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Sample records for extracellular matrix-like gels

  1. Effect of semisynthetic extracellular matrix-like hydrogel containing hepatocyte growth factor on repair of femoral neck defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Guo, Lin; Huang, Lanfeng; Zhao, Dewei; Zhen, Ruixin; Hu, Xiaoning; Yuan, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Using tissue engineering technology research to develop organized artificial bone, then repair bone defect. This work aims to investigate the role of semisynthetic extracellular matrix-like hydrogel (sECMH) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on repair of femoral neck defect in rabbits. 18 New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. According to autologous paired comparison method, the left and right sides of rabbit were used as control and experimental side, respectively. The models of bilateral femoral neck bone defect were established. In experimental side, sECMH containing HGF was implanted in the defect area. In control side, no material was implanted in the defect area. At the 2nd, 4th and 8th week after surgery, the gross observation, histological examination and molybdenum target (Mo-target) X-ray examination were performed on the specimens to study the repair of femoral neck defect. In gross observation, there was no macroscopic difference of femoral neck specimen between the 2nd and 4th postoperative week. At the 8th week, the defect orifice was closed with immature cortical bone, with unblocked marrow cavity. HE staining results showed that, at the 4th week, there were more new vessels in defect area of experimental side, compared with control side. At the 8th week, in experimental side there was immature cortical bone connecting the fracture end in defect area, with visible bone marrow cells. Mo-target X-ray examination found that, at the 8th week, the bone tissue repair in experimental side was better than control side. As a new drug delivery system, sECMH containing HGF has good application prospect in bone tissue repair.

  2. Thermoreversible copolymer gels for extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, B; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    2000-07-01

    To improve the properties of a reversible synthetic extracellular matrix based on a thermally reversible polymer, copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid were prepared in benzene with varying contents of acrylic acid (0 to 3%) and the thermal properties were evaluated. The poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and copolymers made with acrylic acid had molecular weights from 0.8 to 1.7 x10(6) D. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed the high-molecular-weight acrylic acid copolymers had similar onset temperatures to the homopolymers, but the peak width was considerably increased with increasing acrylic acid content. DSC and cloud point measurements showed that polymers with 0 to 3% acrylic acid exhibit a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition between 30 degrees and 37 degrees C. In swelling studies, the homopolymer showed significant syneresis at temperatures above 31 degrees C. Copolymers with 1 and 1.5% showed syneresis beginning at 32 degrees and 37 degrees C, respectively. At 37 degrees C the copolymers with 1.5-3% acrylic acid showed little or no syneresis. Due to the high water content and a transition near physiologic conditions (below 37 degrees C), the polymers with 1.5-2.0% acrylic acid exhibited properties that would be useful in the development of a refillable synthetic extracellular matrix. Such a matrix could be applied to several cell types, including islets of Langerhans, for a biohybrid artificial pancreas.

  3. The endogenous fluorescence of fibroblast in collagen gels as indicator of stiffness of the extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Ortega-Martinez, A.; Franco, W.

    2016-03-01

    The stiffness or rigidity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell response. Established mechanical tests to measure stiffness, such as indentation and tensile tests, are invasive and destructive to the sample. Endogenous or native molecules to cells and ECM components, like tryptophan and cross-links of collagen, display fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light. Most likely, the concentration of these endogenous fluorophores changes as the stiffness of the ECM changes. In this work we investigate the endogenous fluorescence of collagen gels containing fibroblasts as a non-invasive non-destructive method to measure stiffness of the ECM. Human fibroblast cells were cultured in three-dimensional gels of type I collagen (50,000 cells/ml). This construct is a simple model of tissue contraction. During contraction, changes in the excitation-emission matrix (a fluorescence map in the 240-520/290-530 nm range) of constructs were measured with a spectrofluoremeter, and changes in stiffness were measured with a standard indentation test over 16 days. Results show that a progressive increase in fluorescence of the 290/340 nm excitation-emission pair correlates with a progressive increase in stiffness (r=0.9, α=0.5). The fluorescence of this excitation-emission pair is ascribed to tryptophan and variations in the fluorescence of this pair correlate with cellular proliferation. In this tissue model, the endogenous functional fluorescence of proliferating fibroblast cells is a biomechanical marker of stiffness of the ECM.

  4. Light and electron microscopic study of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus subcultured on extracellular matrix gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Valojerdi, Mojtaba Rezazadeh; Ashtiani, Saeed Kazemi; Eftekhari-Yazdi, Poopak

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the structure of epithelial cells from the human oviduct and uterus on extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in the first passage. Human oviducts and endometrial tissues were obtained from patients undergoing total hysterectomy; the epithelial cells, having been isolated by enzyme digestion, were cultured on polystyrene plastic surfaces. The epithelial nature of the cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, and their morphology was examined by microscopy. Cells of an epithelial nature were then trypsinized and cultured on an ECM gel-coated filter insert for 5 days. The cells, in parallel with the tissues, were subsequently prepared for transmission electron microscopy. Plastic-cultured cells had no sign of differentiation and appeared as elongated spindle cells in sections. These cells looked columnar and highly polarized after being cultured on ECM gel surfaces. They were similar to epithelial cells from the corresponding tissue fragment. Cultured on ECM gel, the ciliated epithelial cells of human oviducts appeared ultrastructurally similar to glandular cells from the human uterus. Cilia did not form under culture conditions. It seems that human uterine and oviduct epithelial cells can acquire polarized morphology and differentiated states on ECM gel after having lost it on plastic surfaces and that ECM gel by itself is not enough to induce cilia formation in culture.

  5. Development of an in situ evaluation system for neural cells using extracellular matrix-modeled gel culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Ikegami, Yasuhiro; Mizumachi, Hideyuki; Shirakigawa, Nana; Ijima, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer culture is the most popular cell culture method. However, the cells may not respond as they do in vivo because the culture conditions are different from in vivo conditions. However, hydrogel-embedding culture, which cultures cells in a biocompatible culture substrate, can produce in vivo-like cell responses, but in situ evaluation of cells in a gel is difficult. In this study, we realized an in vivo-like environment in vitro to produce cell responses similar to those in vivo and established an in situ evaluation system for hydrogel-embedded cell responses. The extracellular matrix (ECM)-modeled gel consisted of collagen and heparin (Hep-col) to mimic an in vivo-like environment. The Hep-col gel could immobilize growth factors, which is important for ECM functions. Neural stem/progenitor cells cultured in the Hep-col gel grew and differentiated more actively than in collagen, indicating an in vivo-like environment in the Hep-col gel. Second, a thin-layered gel culture system was developed to realize in situ evaluation of the gel-embedded cells. Cells in a 200-μm-thick gel could be evaluated clearly by a phase-contrast microscope and immunofluorescence staining through reduced optical and diffusional effects. Finally, we found that the neural cells cultured in this system had synaptic connections and neuronal action potentials by immunofluorescence staining and Ca(2+) imaging. In conclusion, this culture method may be a valuable evaluation system for neurotoxicity testing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Stiffness of hyaluronic acid gels containing liver extracellular matrix supports human hepatocyte function and alters cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cynthia; Skardal, Aleksander; Atala, Anthony; Shupe, Thomas D

    2015-03-01

    Tissue engineering and cell based liver therapies have utilized primary hepatocytes with limited success due to the failure of hepatocytes to maintain their phenotype in vitro. In order to overcome this challenge, hyaluronic acid (HA) cell culture substrates were formulated to closely mimic the composition and stiffness of the normal liver cellular microenvironment. The stiffness of the substrate was modulated by adjusting HA hydrogel crosslinking. Additionally, the repertoire of bioactive molecules within the HA substrate was bolstered by supplementation with normal liver extracellular matrix (ECM). Primary human hepatocyte viability and phenotype were determined over a narrow physiologically relevant range of substrate stiffnesses from 600 to 4600Pa in both the presence and absence of liver ECM. Cell attachment, viability, and organization of the actin cytoskeleton improved with increased stiffness up to 4600Pa. These differences were not evident in earlier time points or substrates containing only HA. However, gene expression for the hepatocyte markers hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and albumin significantly decreased on the 4600Pa stiffness at day 7 indicating that cells may not have maintained their phenotype long-term at this stiffness. Function, as measured by albumin secretion, varied with both stiffness and time in culture and peaked at day 7 at the 1200Pa stiffness, slightly below the stiffness of normal liver ECM at 3000Pa. Overall, gel stiffness affected primary human hepatocyte cell adhesion, functional marker expression, and morphological characteristics dependent on both the presence of liver ECM in gel substrates and time in culture.

  7. Analysis of proteins in the extracellular matrix of the plant pathogenic fungus Bipolaris sorokiniana using 2-D gel electrophoresis and MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apoga, D; Ek, B; Tunlid, A

    2001-04-13

    A method was developed for isolating and sequencing proteins present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of germlings and hyphae of filamentous fungi. Surface proteins of the cereal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana were labelled with a membrane impermeable biotinylating agent and extracted using a glycine-HCl buffer. Extracted proteins were purified by affinity binding to streptavidin-conjugated magnetic beads or by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Four of the biotinylated proteins from the ECM of B. sorokiniana were isolated, in gel digested with trypsin and partly sequenced by tandem mass spectrometry. No significant sequence similarities to proteins in databases were obtained.

  8. Extracellular matrix gel is necessary for in vitro cultivation of insulin producing cells from human umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Feng; WU De-quan; HU Yan-hua; JIN Guang-xin

    2008-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet cell transplantation is an effective approach to treat type 1 diabetes. However, this therapy is not widely used because of the severe shortage of transplantable donor islets. This study investigated whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) could be transdifferentiated into insulin producing cells in vitro and the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel in this procedure.Methods Human UCB samples were collected and MSCs were isolated. MSCs specific marker proteins were analyzed by a flow cytometer. The capacities of osteoblast and adipocyte to differentiate were tested. Differentiation into islet like cell was induced by a 15-day protocol with or without ECM gel. Pancreatic characteristics were evaluated with immunofluorescence, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry. Insulin content and release in response to glucose stimulation were detected with chemiluminescent immunoassay system.Results Sixteen MSCs were isolated from 42 term human UCB units (38%). Human UCB-MSCs expressed MSCs specific markers and could be induced in vitro into osteoblast and adipocyte. Islet like cell clusters appeared about 9 days after pancreatic differentiation in the inducing system with ECM gel. The insulin positive cells accounted for (25.2±3.4)% of the induced cells. The induced cells expressed islet related genes and hormones, but were not very responsive to glucose challenge. When MSCs were induced without ECM gel, clusters formation and secretion of functional islet proteins could not be observed.Conclusions Human UCB-MSCs can differentiate into islet like cells in vitro and ECM gel plays an important role in pancreatic endocrine cell maturation and formation of three dimensional structures.

  9. Collaborative interactions between neutrophil elastase and metalloproteinases in extracellular matrix degradation in three-dimensional collagen gels

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    Ertl Ronald F

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extended culture of monocytes and fibroblasts in three-dimensional collagen gels leads to degradation of the gels (see linked study in this issue, "Fibroblasts and monocytes contract and degrade three-dimensional collagen gels in extended co-culture". The current study, therefore, was designed to evaluate production of matrix-degrading metalloproteinases by these cells in co-culture and to determine if neutrophil elastase could collaborate in the activation of these enzymes. Since co-cultures produce prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, the role of PGE2 in this process was also evaluated. Methods Blood monocytes from healthy donors and human fetal lung fibroblasts were cast into type I collagen gels and maintained in floating cultures for three weeks. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were assessed by gelatin zymography (MMPs 2 and 9 and immunoblotting (MMPs 1 and 3. The role of PGE2 was explored by direct quantification, and by the addition of exogenous indomethacin and/or PGE2. Results Gelatin zymography and immunoblots revealed that MMPs 1, 2, 3 and 9 were induced by co-cultures of fibroblasts and monocytes. Neutrophil elastase added to the medium resulted in marked conversion of latent MMPs to lower molecular weight forms consistent with active MMPs, and was associated with augmentation of both contraction and degradation (P 2 appeared to decrease both MMP production and activation. Conclusion The current study demonstrates that interactions between monocytes and fibroblasts can mediate tissue remodeling.

  10. Inhibition of vimentin or B1 integrin reverts morphology of prostate tumor cells grown in laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels and reduces tumor growth in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xueping; Fournier, Marcia V; Ware, Joy L; Bissell, Mina J; Yacoub, Adly; Zehner, Zendra E

    2008-06-12

    Prostate epithelial cells grown embedded in laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) undergo morphologic changes that closely resemble their architecture in vivo. In this study, growth characteristics of three human prostate epithelial sublines derived from the same cellular lineage, but displaying different tumorigenic and metastatic properties in vivo, were assessed in three-dimensional lrECM gels. M12, a highly tumorigenic and metastatic subline, was derived from the immortalized, prostate epithelial P69 cell line by selection in athymic, nude mice and found to contain a deletion of 19p-q13.1. The stable reintroduction of an intact human chromosome 19 into M12 resulted in a poorly tumorigenic subline, designated F6. When embedded in lrECM gels, the parental, nontumorigenic P69 line produced acini with clearly defined lumena. Immunostaining with antibodies to {beta}-catenin, E-cadherin, or {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins showed polarization typical of glandular epithelium. In contrast, the metastatic M12 subline produced highly disorganized cells with no evidence of polarization. The F6 subline reverted to acini-like structures exhibiting basal polarity marked with integrins. Reducing either vimentin levels via small interfering RNA interference or the expression of {alpha}6 and {beta}1 integrins by the addition of blocking antibodies, reorganized the M12 subline into forming polarized acini. The loss of vimentin significantly reduced M12-Vim tumor growth when assessed by s.c. injection in athymic mice. Thus, tumorigenicity in vivo correlated with disorganized growth in three-dimensional lrECM gels. These studies suggest that the levels of vimentin and {beta}1 integrin play a key role in the homeostasis of the normal acinus in prostate and that their dysregulation may lead to tumorigenesis. [Mol Cancer Ther 2009;8(3):499-508].

  11. Gel structure has an impact on pericellular and extracellular matrix deposition, which subsequently alters metabolic activities in chondrocyte-laden PEG hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicodemus, G D; Skaalure, S C; Bryant, S J

    2011-02-01

    While designing poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with high moduli suitable for in situ placement is attractive for cartilage regeneration, the impact of a tighter crosslinked structure on the organization and deposition of the matrix is not fully understood. The objectives of this study were to characterize the composition and spatial organization of new matrix as a function of gel crosslinking and study its impact on chondrocytes in terms of anabolic and catabolic gene expression and catabolic activity. Bovine articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in hydrogels with three crosslinking densities (compressive moduli 60, 320 and 590 kPa) and cultured for 25 days. Glycosaminoglycan production increased with culture time and was greatest in the gels with lowest crosslinking. Collagens II and VI, aggrecan, link protein and decorin were localized to pericellular regions in all gels, but their presence decreased with increasing gel crosslinking. Collagen II and aggrecan expression were initially up-regulated in gels with higher crosslinking, but increased similarly up to day 15. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-13 expression were elevated (∼25-fold) in gels with higher crosslinking throughout the study, while MMP-3 was unaffected by gel crosslinking. The presence of aggrecan and collagen degradation products confirmed MMP activity. These findings indicate that chondrocytes synthesized the major cartilage components within PEG hydrogels, however, gel structure had a significant impact on the composition and spatial organization of the new tissue and on how chondrocytes responded to their environment, particularly with respect to their catabolic expression. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 细胞外基质凝胶支架与嗅鞘细胞体外生物相容性的研究%Evaluation of biological compatibility of extracellular matrix gel scaffold with olfactory ensheathing cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娜; 张誉; 倪厚杰; 杨二方; 唐洲平

    2012-01-01

    Object: To investigate biological compatibility of extracellular matrix gel scaffold ( EMS) with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) of neonatal rat in vitro. Methods: Self-made EMS was established 2-D and 3-D culture system respectively. Morphological characteristics, growth and proliferation of OECs were examined by immunofluores-cence techniques, inverted phase contrast microscopy and MTT assay in 2-D and 3-D culture system. Results: OECs in the two culture systems were growing well, especially in the 3-D culture system, cell density and cell body volume were greater than that of control group. OECs in 3-D culture system compared to the control group showed better morphological characteristics. In 2-D culture system, the absorbance value of the experimental group and the control group by MTT showed no significant difference (P>0.05). Conclusions; EMS with OECs presents good biological compatibility. EMS with OECs is a promising method for nerve tissue bioengineering as the complex of owning 3-D structure and biological activity.%目的:体外研究细胞外基质凝胶支架与新生大鼠嗅鞘细胞的生物相容性.方法:利用自备的细胞外基质凝胶支架分别建立二维与三维的培养体系,通过免疫荧光技术、倒置相差显微镜观察和MTT法研究嗅鞘细胞在ECM凝胶支架中的形态特点、生长与增殖的情况.结果:本实验观察到在2种培养体系中嗅鞘细胞均生长良好,尤其在三维培养体系中细胞密度和胞体体积大于对照组,支架内嗅鞘细胞与对照组相比展现了更好的形态特征.MTT法检测二维培养体系中实验组与对照组的吸光度值,两者无明显差异(P>0.05).结论:体外ECM凝胶支架与嗅鞘细胞有良好的生物相容性,由两者构成的三维结构和生物活性的复合体有可能应用于神经组织工程.

  13. Interaction between hepatocytes and collagen gel in hollow fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Jing; ZHANG Guo-liang; Meng, Qin

    2009-01-01

    Gel entrapment culture of primary mammalian cells within collagen gel is one important configuration for construction of bioartificial organ as well as in vitro model for predicting drug situation in vivo. Gel contraction in entrapment culture, resulting from cell-mediated reorganization of the extracellular matrix, was commonly used to estimate cell viability. However, the exact influence of gel contraction on cell activities has rarely been addressed. This paper investigated the gel contrac...

  14. Extracellular matrix mediates epithelial effects on chondrogenesis in vitro.

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    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Zanetti, N C; Linsenmayer, T F; Reiter, R S

    1984-10-01

    It has been previously observed that single chick embryonic limb mesenchymal cells can differentiate into chondrocytes without cell-cell interactions when cultured in collagen or agarose gels. In the present study, limb ectoderm, but not dermis, inhibits chondrogenesis when placed on such collagen gel cultures. The inhibitory influence can be transmitted extensive distances in the gel, even when the ectoderm is placed on a porous filter. Collagen gels, preconditioned with limb ectoderms, are also inhibitory to chondrogenesis. On the other hand, chondrogenesis is less inhibited by ectoderm when the mesenchymal cells are placed in agarose. These results suggest that the antichondrogenic effect of limb ectoderm is mediated through alterations of the collagenous extracellular matrix and support the idea that the extracellular matrix must be considered as an organized, functional unit capable of regulating cell differentiation.

  15. Thermoresponsive Gels

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    M. Joan Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive gelling materials constructed from natural and synthetic polymers can be used to provide triggered action and therefore customised products such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine types as well as for other industries. Some materials give Arrhenius-type viscosity changes based on coil to globule transitions. Others produce more counterintuitive responses to temperature change because of agglomeration induced by enthalpic or entropic drivers. Extensive covalent crosslinking superimposes complexity of response and the upper and lower critical solution temperatures can translate to critical volume temperatures for these swellable but insoluble gels. Their structure and volume response confer advantages for actuation though they lack robustness. Dynamic covalent bonding has created an intermediate category where shape moulding and self-healing variants are useful for several platforms. Developing synthesis methodology—for example, Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT and Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP—provides an almost infinite range of materials that can be used for many of these gelling systems. For those that self-assemble into micelle systems that can gel, the upper and lower critical solution temperatures (UCST and LCST are analogous to those for simpler dispersible polymers. However, the tuned hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance plus the introduction of additional pH-sensitivity and, for instance, thermochromic response, open the potential for coupled mechanisms to create complex drug targeting effects at the cellular level.

  16. Nonlinear elasticity of alginate gels

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    Hashemnejad, Seyed Meysam; Kundu, Santanu

    Alginate is a naturally occurring anionic polysaccharide extracted from brown algae. Because of biocompatibility, low toxicity, and simple gelation process, alginate gels are used in biomedical and food applications. Here, we report the rheological behavior of ionically crosslinked alginate gels, which are obtained by in situ gelation of alginates with calcium salts, in between two parallel plates of a rheometer. Strain stiffening behavior was captured using large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) experiments. In addition, negative normal stress was observed for these gels, which has not been reported earlier for any polysaccharide networks. The magnitude of negative normal stress increases with applied strain and can exceed that of the shear stress at large strain. Rheological results fitted with a constitutive model that considers both stretching and bending of chains indicate that nonlinearity is likely related to the stretching of the chains between the crosslink junctions. The results provide an improved understanding of the deformation mechanism of ionically crosslinked alginate gel and the results will be important in developing synthetic extracellular matrix (ECM) from these materials.

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

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    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  18. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  19. Testosterone Nasal Gel

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    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the ... does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone ...

  20. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

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    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  1. Characterization of a highly thermostable extracellular lipase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

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    Lopes, Maria de Fátima Silva; Leitão, Ana Lúcia; Regalla, Manuela; Marques, J J Figueiredo; Carrondo, Manuel José Teixeira; Crespo, Maria Teresa Barreto

    2002-06-01

    After screening for the presence of lipase activity in lactobacilli isolated from "chouriço", a traditional Portuguese dry fermented sausage, a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum (DSMZ 12028) was chosen for extracellular lipase characterisation and purification. Proteinase K did not significantly affect lipolytic activity, as opposed to trypsin, which completely eliminated this activity. Among NaCl, Ca2+, EDTA, BSA, glycerol, Mn2+ and Mg2+, only Mn2+ and Mg2+ stimulated the lipase. Purification by gel filtration chromatography and gel electrophoresis revealed four bands, between 98 and 45 kDa, all with lipolytic activity against olive oil.

  2. Transport Phenomena in Gel

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    Masayuki Tokita

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gel becomes an important class of soft materials since it can be seen in a wide variety of the chemical and the biological systems. The unique properties of gel arise from the structure, namely, the three-dimensional polymer network that is swollen by a huge amount of solvent. Despite the small volume fraction of the polymer network, which is usually only a few percent or less, gel shows the typical properties that belong to solids such as the elasticity. Gel is, therefore, regarded as a dilute solid because its elasticity is much smaller than that of typical solids. Because of the diluted structure, small molecules can pass along the open space of the polymer network. In addition to the viscous resistance of gel fluid, however, the substance experiences resistance due to the polymer network of gel during the transport process. It is, therefore, of importance to study the diffusion of the small molecules in gel as well as the flow of gel fluid itself through the polymer network of gel. It may be natural to assume that the effects of the resistance due to the polymer network of gel depends strongly on the network structure. Therefore, detailed study on the transport processes in and through gel may open a new insight into the relationship between the structure and the transport properties of gel. The two typical transport processes in and through gel, that is, the diffusion of small molecules due to the thermal fluctuations and the flow of gel fluid that is caused by the mechanical pressure gradient will be reviewed.

  3. Sol-Gel Glasses

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    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  4. The biophysical properties of Basal lamina gels depend on the biochemical composition of the gel.

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    Arends, Fabienna; Nowald, Constantin; Pflieger, Kerstin; Boettcher, Kathrin; Zahler, Stefan; Lieleg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The migration of cells within a three-dimensional extracellular matrix (ECM) depends sensitively on the biochemical and biophysical properties of the matrix. An example for a biological ECM is given by reconstituted basal lamina gels purified from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma of mice. Here, we compare four different commercial variants of this ECM, which have all been purified according to the same protocol. Nevertheless, in those gels, we detect strong differences in the migration behavior of leukocyte cells as well as in the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. We show that these differences correlate with the mechanical properties and the microarchitecture of the gels which in turn arise from small variations in their biochemical composition.

  5. Sulfur activation-related extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cheng-gui; ZHANG Rui-yong; XIA Jin-lan; ZHANG Qian; NIE Zhen-yuan

    2008-01-01

    The fractions of the extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on two different energy substrates,elemental sulfur and ferrous sulfate,were selectively prepared with hot water treatment and distinctly shown by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.Some protein spots with apparently higher abundance in sulfur energy substrate than in ferrous sulfate energy substrate were identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF.Based on peptide mass fingerprints and bioinformatical analysis,the extracellular proteins were classified according to their functions as conjugal transfer protein,pilin,vacJ lipoprotein,polysaccharide deacetylase family protein,Ser/Thr protein phosphatase family protein and hypothetical proteins.Several extracellular proteins were found abundant in thiol groups and with CXXC functional motif,these proteins may be directly involved in the sulfur activation by use of their thiol group (Pr-SH) to bond the elemental sulfur.

  6. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  7. Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Rude, Thomas H; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) is a powerful genotyping technique used for the separation of large DNA molecules (entire genomic DNA) after digesting it with unique restriction enzymes and applying to a gel matrix under the electric field that periodically changes direction. PFGE is a variation of agarose gel electrophoresis that permits analysis of bacterial DNA fragments over an order of magnitude larger than that with conventional restriction enzyme analysis. It provides a good representation of the entire bacterial chromosome in a single gel with a highly reproducible restriction profile, providing clearly distinct and well-resolved DNA fragments.

  8. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the

  9. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  10. GelTouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miruchna, Viktor; Walter, Robert; Lindlbauer, David

    2015-01-01

    We present GelTouch, a gel-based layer that can selectively transition between soft and stiff to provide tactile multi-touch feedback. It is flexible, transparent when not activated, and contains no mechanical, electromagnetic, or hydraulic components, resulting in a compact form factor (a 2mm thin...... touchscreen layer for our prototype). The activated areas can be morphed freely and continuously, without being limited to fixed, predefined shapes. GelTouch consists of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel layer which alters its viscoelasticity when activated by applying heat (>32 C). We present three different...... a tablet with 6x4 tactile areas, enabling a tactile numpad, slider, and thumbstick. We show that the gel is up to 25 times stiffer when activated and that users detect tactile features reliably (94.8%)....

  11. Mechanics of composite cytoskeletal and extracellular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Living cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their surroundings. This mechanical response is mainly due to the cell cytoskeleton, and its interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cell cytoskeleton is a composite polymeric scaffold made of many different types of protein filaments and crosslinking proteins. Two major filament systems in the cytoskeleton are actin filaments (F-actin) and microtubules (MTs). Actin filaments are semiflexible, while the much stiffer MTs behave as rigid rods. I shall discuss theories that help understand how the direct coupling to the surrounding F-actin matrix allows intracellular MTs to bear large compressive forces and controls the range of force transmission along the MTs, and how the MTs not only enhance the stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton, but can also dramatically endow an initially nearly incompressible F-actin matrix with enhanced compressibility relative to its shear compliance. A second source of compositeness in the cytoskeleton is the presences of different types of crosslinkers that can interact cooperatively leading to enhanced mechanical rigidity and tunable response. Like the cytoskeleton, the ECM is also a polymeric composite. It is primarily composed of a mesh of fibrous proteins, mainly stiff collagen filaments, and a comparatively flexible gel of proteoglycans and hyaluronan. I shall discuss a model that shows how the interplay between the collagen network and the background elastic gel leads to a mechanically robust ECM.

  12. Responsive Gel-Gel Phase Transitions in Artificially Engineered Protein Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, B. D.

    2012-02-01

    Artificially engineered protein hydrogels provide an attractive platform for biomedical materials due to their similarity to components of the native extracellular matrix. Engineering responsive transitions between shear-thinning and tough gel phases in these materials could potentially enable gels that are both shear-thinning and tough to be produced as novel injectable biomaterials. To engineer a gel with such transitions, a triblock copolymer with thermoresponsive polymer endblocks and an artificially engineered protein gel midblock is designed. Temperature is used to trigger a transition from a single network protein hydrogel phase to a double network phase with both protein and block copolymer networks present at different length scales. The thermodynamics of network formation and resulting structural changes are established using small-angle scattering, birefringence, and dynamic scanning calorimetry. The formation of the second network is shown to produce a large, nonlinear increase in the elastic modulus as well as enhancements in creep compliance and toughness. Although the gels show yielding behavior in both the single and double network regimes, a qualitative change in the deformation mechanism is observed due to the structural changes.

  13. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  14. Diffusion from gel in brain: modelisation and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellagoun, A; Meulemans, A; Cherruault, Y

    1992-03-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for describing the mechanism of diffusion from gel (Tissucol) into the extracellular space. After diffusion of the antibiotic in one dimension, the gradient concentration was determined with microvoltametric electrodes. These microelectrodes measure the free diffusible form of electroactive antibiotics in the extracellular brain space. The aim of this study was to find simultaneously the coefficient of diffusion and extraction of some antibiotics (in our case the Fotemustin) using the Alienor Algorithm. These coefficients are useful for predicting the concentration gradient into abscesses, fibrin, etc.

  15. Mechanically induced gel formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpt, Jochem T.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical triggering of gelation of an organic solution by a carbazole-based bisurea organogelator is described. Both the duration of the mechanical stimulation and the gelator concentration control the gelation process and the characteristics of the gel obtained.

  16. Conformance Improvement Using Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, Randall S.; Schrader, Richard; II Hagstrom, John; Wang, Ying; Al-Dahfeeri, Abdullah; Gary, Raven; Marin; Amaury; Lindquist, Brent

    2002-09-26

    This research project had two objectives. The first objective was to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective was to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil.

  17. Crystallization from Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  18. Preparation of chitosan gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagerge S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerogel conditioning of the chitosan makes it possible to prepare porous solids of significant specific surface. The increase in the chitosan concentration or the degree of acetylation decreases the specific surface of the synthesized chitosan gel. Whereas drying with supercritical CO2 more effectively makes it possible to preserve the volume of the spheres of gel and to have a more significant specific surface in comparison with evaporative drying.

  19. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate

  20. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and...

  1. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  2. Gap Dependent Rheology in Type I Collagen Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevalo, Richard; Urbach, Jeffrey; Blair, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    Branched type I collagen fiber networks provide extracellular support in mammalian tissues. The intricate network structure can succumb to partial or complete tearing under sufficient applied strain. Under small shear strains, in vitro collagen gels exhibit strain-stiffening while maintaining overall network integrity. Higher shear strains lead to network failure through discrete yielding events. We perform rheology and confocal-rheology experiments to fully elucidate the strain-stiffening and yielding behavior in these highly nonlinear materials. We apply continuous shear strains to collagen gels confined within the rheometer at fixed gaps. We observe that sheared collagen in the strain-stiffening and yielding regime has an apparent modulus that is strongly dependent on the collagen thickness. Moreover, we demonstrate that network yielding is universally controlled by the ratio of the collagen thickness to the mesh size. These results have broad implications for the interpretation of rheological data of extracellular matrix proteins and for the design of biomimetic scaffolds.

  3. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  4. Organ-specific chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, R F; Nathanson, S D

    1989-05-01

    The preferential colonization of a distant organ by a circulating tumor cell (organ specific metastasis) may be regulated by chemotactic factors present within the extracellular matrix of the host organ. Organ-specific extracellular matrix was prepared from murine kidney and lung by high salt extraction and DNAase/RNAase digestion. A soluble protein fraction (S2) from each of the matricies was obtained by 4 M guanidine extraction and was tested for organ-specific chemotactic activity in a modified Boyden chamber. The lung colonizing B16-F10 and B16-BL6 tumor cell lines demonstrated organ-specific motility only toward the lung extract. The low metastasizing B16 parental line and liver colonizing B16-L4b line showed no preference for either lung or kidney. The lung activity resolves into five fractions by gel filtration chromatography, with the highest activity eluting at Mr approximately 71,000. Chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix may regulate the preferential colonization of an organ by stimulating the migration of tumor cells in a specific manner. These factors may be released during the degradation of the extracellular matrix.

  5. Extracellular Proteins Limit the Dispersal of BiogenicNanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, John W.; Weber, Peter K.; Martin, Michael C.; Gilbert,Benjamin; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-04-27

    High spatial-resolution secondaryion microprobespectrometry, synchrotron radiation Fourier-transform infraredspectroscopy and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrate the intimateassociation of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zincsulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization.Experiments involving synthetic ZnS nanoparticles and representativeamino acids indicate a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticleaggregation. These findings suggest that microbially-derivedextracellular proteins can limit dispersal of nanoparticulatemetal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation,that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurfacefluid flow.

  6. Gel electrolytes and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Sven; Bunte, Christine; Mikhaylik, Yuriy V.; Viner, Veronika G.

    2017-09-05

    Gel electrolytes, especially gel electrolytes for electrochemical cells, are generally described. In some embodiments, the gel electrolyte layers comprise components a) to c). Component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer comprising polymerized units of: a1) at least one monomer containing an ethylenically unsaturated unit and an amido group and a2) at least one crosslinker. Component b) may be at least one conducting salt and component c) may be at least one solvent. Electrodes may comprise the components a), d) and e), wherein component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein. Component d) may be at least one electroactive layer and component e) may be at least one ceramic layer. Furthermore, electrochemical cells comprising component a) which may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein, are also provided.

  7. Active Polymer Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of stimuli-responsive polymer and gels have been developed and applied to biomimetic actuators or artificial muscles. Electroactive polymers that change shape when stimulated electrically seem to be particularly promising. In all cases, however, the mechanical motion is driven by external stimuli, for example, reversing the direction of electric field. On the other hand, many living organisms can generate an autonomous motion without external driving stimuli like self-beating of heart muscles. Here we show a novel biomimetic gel actuator that can walk spontaneously with a wormlike motion without switching of external stimuli. The self-oscillating motion is produced by dissipating chemical energy of oscillating reaction. Although the gel is completely composed of synthetic polymer, it shows autonomous motion as if it were alive.

  8. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  9. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021. The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  10. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  11. gonarthrosis; therapy; Karmolis gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Zavodovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy, tolerance, and safety of Carmolis topical gel in patients with gonarthrosis. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 60 patients with knee osteoarthrosis (OA who were divided into two groups: 1 40 patients received Carmolis topical gel in addition to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 2 20 patients took NSAIDS only (a control group. The treatment duration was 2 weeks. In both groups, therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated from changes in the WOMAC index, pain intensity at rest and during movement by the visual analog scale (VAS. The disease activity was also assessed by a physician and a patient (a Likert scale, local swelling and hyperthermia of the affected joint, the efficiency of treatment, and daily needs for NSAIDs were deter- mined. Results. The performed treatment in both patent groups showed positive clinical changes. Combination therapy involving Carmolis gel displayed greater reductions in WOMAC pain and resting and movement pain than in the con- trol group (as assessed by VAS. On completion of the investigation, considerable improvement was, in the physicians' opinion, noted in 38 (95% patients using Carmolis, which coincided with self-evaluations of the patients. During Carmolis application, the starting dose of NSAIDs could be reduced in 18 (45% patients. Adverse reactions occurred infrequently and required no therapy discontinuation. Conclusion. Carmolis topical gel is effective in relieving clinical symptoms in patients with gonarthrosis, well tolerated, and safe, which can recommend its use in the combination treatment of knee OA.

  12. The Penicillium Chrysogenum Extracellular Proteome. Conversion from a Food-rotting Strain to a Versatile Cell Factory for White Biotechnology*

    OpenAIRE

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; García-Estrada, Carlos; Barreiro, Carlos; Cuadrado, Abel-Alberto; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is well-known by its ability to synthesize β-lactam antibiotics as well as other secondary metabolites. Like other filamentous fungi, this microorganism is an excellent host for secretion of extracellular proteins because of the high capacity of its protein secretion machinery. In this work, we have characterized the extracellular proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54–1255 by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. This method allowe...

  13. Micro- and macrorheology of jellyfish extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Camille; Abou, Bérengère; Ponton, Alain; Cornelissen, Annemiek J M

    2012-01-04

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a key role in tissue organization and morphogenesis. Rheological properties of jellyfish ECM (mesoglea) were measured in vivo at the cellular scale by passive microrheology techniques: microbeads were injected in jellyfish ECM and their Brownian motion was recorded to determine the mechanical properties of the surrounding medium. Microrheology results were compared with macrorheological measurements performed with a shear rheometer on slices of jellyfish mesoglea. We found that the ECM behaved as a viscoelastic gel at the macroscopic scale and as a much softer and heterogeneous viscoelastic structure at the microscopic scale. The fibrous architecture of the mesoglea, as observed by differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, was in accord with these scale-dependent mechanical properties. Furthermore, the evolution of the mechanical properties of the ECM during aging was investigated by measuring microrheological properties at different jellyfish sizes. We measured that the ECM in adult jellyfish was locally stiffer than in juvenile ones. We argue that this stiffening is a consequence of local aggregations of fibers occurring gradually during aging of the jellyfish mesoglea and is enhanced by repetitive muscular contractions of the jellyfish.

  14. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  15. Active Polymer Gel Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji Hashimoto; Ryo Yoshida; Yusuke Hara; Shingo Maeda

    2010-01-01

    Many kinds of stimuli-responsive polymer and gels have been developed and applied to biomimetic actuators or artificial muscles. Electroactive polymers that change shape when stimulated electrically seem to be particularly promising. In all cases, however, the mechanical motion is driven by external stimuli, for example, reversing the direction of electric field. On the other hand, many living organisms can generate an autonomous motion without external driving stimuli like self-beating of he...

  16. The effects of autologous platelet gel on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jenifer L; Cupp, Craig L; Ross, E Victor; Shick, Paul C; Keefe, Michael A; Wester, Derin C; Hannon, Timothy; McConnell, Devin

    2003-08-01

    Laser resurfacing techniques have become a popular means of achieving rejuvenation of damaged skin. Interest is great in attempting to speed re-epithelialization and healing so that patients can return to their normal activities as quickly as possible. Previous studies have demonstrated that wounds heal more quickly when they are covered and kept moist than when they are left open to the air. Until now, no study has been conducted to investigate whether the healing process of a superficial skin burn might be accelerated by the use of an autologous platelet gel as a biologic dressing. Our study of five pigs showed that autologous platelet gel can influence wound healing by stimulating an intense inflammatory process that leads to highly significant increases in the production of extracellular matrices and granulation tissue. The platelet gel accelerated vascular ingrowth, increased fibroblastic proliferation, and accelerated collagen production. However, the gel did not appear to accelerate re-epithelialization. The aggressive production of granulation tissue and the acceleration of collagen production might mean that autologous platelet gel will have a future role in the treatment of burns because the highly vascularized bed it helps create should promote the success of skin grafting in patients with deep partial-thickness and full-thickness burns.

  17. Tailoring material properties of a nanofibrous extracellular matrix derived hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd D.; Lin, Stephen Y.; Christman, Karen L.

    2011-12-01

    In the native tissue, the interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, mechanical stability, and signaling. It has been shown that decellularized ECMs can be processed into injectable formulations, thereby allowing for minimally invasive delivery. Upon injection and increase in temperature, these materials self-assemble into porous gels forming a complex network of fibers with nanoscale structure. In this study we aimed to examine and tailor the material properties of a self-assembling ECM hydrogel derived from porcine myocardial tissue, which was developed as a tissue specific injectable scaffold for cardiac tissue engineering. The impact of gelation parameters on ECM hydrogels has not previously been explored. We examined how modulating pH, temperature, ionic strength, and concentration affected the nanoscale architecture, mechanical properties, and gelation kinetics. These material characteristics were assessed using scanning electron microscopy, rheometry, and spectrophotometry, respectively. Since the main component of the myocardial matrix is collagen, many similarities between the ECM hydrogel and collagen gels were observed in terms of the nanofibrous structure and modulation of properties by altering ionic strength. However, variation from collagen gels was noted for the gelation temperature along with varied times and rates of gelation. These discrepancies when compared to collagen are likely due to the presence of other ECM components in the decellularized ECM based hydrogel. These results demonstrate how the material properties of ECM hydrogels could be tailored for future in vitro and in vivo applications.

  18. Platelets stimulate fibroblast-mediated contraction of collagen gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lundahl Joachim

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelets are thought to play a role in a variety of inflammatory conditions in the lung, some of which may lead to fibrosis. In the current study we tested the hypothesis that whole platelets and platelet lysate can mediate remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro by affecting fibroblast-mediated contraction of a collagen gel. We also sought to determine to what extent platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β contribute to this effect. Methods Washed platelets, isolated from healthy blood donors, and platelet lysate (freezing and thawing, were cast together with human lung fibroblasts in three-dimensional collagen gels. The gels were then released and cultured for four days. PDGF and TGF-β1 concentrations were measured in culture supernatants by ELISA. Results Both platelets and platelet lysate augmented fibroblast-mediated gel contraction in a time and concentration dependent manner (19.9% ± 0.1 (mean ± SEM of initial area vs. 48.0% ± 0.4 at 48 hours; P 1 and PDGF-AA/AB were released in co-culture. PDGF-AA/AB had a maximum release at 24 hours whereas TGF-β1 release increased with longer culture periods. Neutralising antibodies to these mediators partially inhibited platelet-induced gel contraction. Conclusion We conclude that platelets may promote remodelling of extracellular matrix in vitro and that PDGF and TGF-β partially mediate this effect, also indicating a role for other mediators. The findings may be an important mechanism in regulating repair processes after injury.

  19. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  20. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  1. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  4. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  5. Factors influencing alginate gel biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan K; Dusseault, Julie; Bilodeau, Stéphanie; Langlois, Geneviève; Hallé, Jean-Pierre; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2011-07-01

    Alginate remains the most popular polymer used for cell encapsulation, yet its biocompatibility is inconsistent. Two commercially available alginates were compared, one with 71% guluronate (HiG), and the other with 44% (IntG). Both alginates were purified, and their purities were verified. After 2 days in the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6J mice, barium (Ba)-gel and calcium (Ca)-gel beads of IntG alginate were clean, while host cells were adhered to beads of HiG alginate. IntG gel beads, however, showed fragmentation in vivo while HiG gel beads stayed firm. The physicochemical properties of the sodium alginates and their gels were thoroughly characterized. The intrinsic viscosity of IntG alginate was 2.5-fold higher than that of HiG alginate, suggesting a greater molecular mass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that both alginates were similar in elemental composition, including low levels of counterions in all gels. The wettabilities of the alginates and gels were also identical, as measured by contact angles of water on dry films. Ba-gel beads of HiG alginate resisted swelling and degradation when immersed in water, much more than the other gel beads. These results suggest that the main factors contributing to the biocompatibility of gels of purified alginate are the mannuronate/guluronate content and/or intrinsic viscosity.

  6. THE PROPERTIES OF CARRAGEENAN GELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubnik I.M., Gladukh Ye.V., Chernyaev S.V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies on the functional properties of carrageenan, depending on the concentration of sodium chloride and xanthan in gels. It is established that the main factors in the syneresis of carrageenan gels are its concentration, the presence of ions and gums in solution. If using sodium chloride there is a change in the structure of mesh of the resulting gel, which leads to an increase in syneresis.

  7. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  8. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  9. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-01-01

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a ‘soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for β-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of β-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a ‘soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of β-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues' unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis. PMID:18843297

  10. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown th

  11. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown

  12. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  13. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  14. Studies of matrix vesicle-induced mineralization in a gelatin gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boskey, A. L.; Boyan, B. D.; Doty, S. B.; Feliciano, A.; Greer, K.; Weiland, D.; Swain, L. D.; Schwartz, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Matrix vesicles isolated from fourth-passage cultures of chondrocytes were tested for their ability to induce hydroxyapatite formation in a gelatin gel in order to gain insight into the function of matrix vesicles in in situ mineralization. These matrix vesicles did not appear to be hydroxyapatite nucleators per se since the extent of mineral accumulation in the gel diffusion system was not altered by the presence of matrix vesicles alone, and in the vesicle containing gels, mineral crystals were formed whether associated with vesicles or not. In gels with these matrix vesicles and beta-glycerophosphate, despite the presence of alkaline phosphatase activity, there was no increase in mineral deposition. This suggested that in the gel system these culture-derived vesicles did not increase local phosphate concentrations. However, when known inhibitors of mineral crystal formation and growth (proteoglycan aggregates [4 mg/ml], or ATP [1 mM], or both proteoglycan and ATP) were included in the gel, more mineral was deposited in gels with the vesicles than in comparable gels without vesicles, indicating that enzymes within these vesicles were functioning to remove the inhibition. These data support the suggestion that one function of the extracellular matrix vesicles is to transport enzymes for matrix modification.

  15. Condensed cellular seeded collagen gel as an improved biomaterial for tissue engineering of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Rath, Ralf; Gavénis, Karsten; Andereya, Stefan; Mumme, Torsten; Albrand, Monique; Stoffel, Marcus; Weichert, Dieter; Schneider, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation based on collagen gel as matrix scaffold has become a clinically applied treatment for focal defects of articular cartilage. However, the low biomechanical properties of collagen gel makes intraoperative handling difficult and creates the risk of early damages to the vulnerable implant. The aim of the study was to create a stabilized form of collagen gel and to evaluate its biomechanical and biochemical properties.Collagen type-I gel was seeded with human articular chondrocytes. 20 samples were subject to condensation which was achieved mechanically by compression and filtration. Control samples were left uncondensed. From both types of gels 10 samples were used for initial biomechanical evaluation by means of unconfined compression and 10 samples were cultivated under standard conditions in vitro. Following cultivation the samples were evaluated by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. The proliferation rate was calculated and matrix gene expression was quantified by real-time PCR.The biomechanical tests revealed a higher force carrying capacity of the condensed specimens. Strain rate dependency and relaxation was seen in both types of collagen gel representing viscoelastic material properties. Cells embedded within the condensed collagen gel were able to produce extracellular matrix proteins and showed proliferation.Condensed collagen gel represents a mechanically improved type of biomaterial which is suitable for three-dimensional autologous chondrocyte implantation.

  16. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed.

  17. Electrochemical Light-Emitting Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Itoh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light-emitting gel, a gel state electroluminescence material, is reported. It is composed of a ruthenium complex as the emitter, an ionic liquid as the electrolyte, and oxide nanoparticles as the gelation filler. Emitted light was produced via electrogenerated chemiluminescence. The light-emitting gel operated at low voltage when an alternating current was passed through it, regardless of its structure, which is quite thick. The luminescence property of the gel is strongly affected by nanoparticle materials. TiO2 nanoparticles were a better gelation filler than silica or ZnO was, with respect to luminescence stability, thus indicating a catalytic effect. It is demonstrated that the light-emitting gel device, with quite a simple fabrication process, flashes with the application of voltage.

  18. A novel fibrin gel derived from hyaluronic acid-grafted fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chiung L; Chen, Hui W; Wang, Tzu C; Wang, Yng J, E-mail: wang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, No. 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nung St., Shih-Pai, Taipei, Taiwan 112 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Fibrinogen is a major plasma protein that forms a three-dimensional fibrin gel upon being activated by thrombin. In this study, we report the synthesis and potential applications of hybrid molecules composed of fibrinogen coupled to the reducing ends of short-chain hyaluronic acids (sHAs) by reductive amination. The grafting of sHAs to fibrinogen was verified by analyzing particle size, zeta potential and gel-electrophoretic mobility of the hybrid molecules. The sHA-fibrinogen hybrid molecules with graft ratios (sHA/fibrinogen) of up to 6.5 retained the ability to form gels in response to thrombin activation. The sHA-fibrin gels were transparent in appearance and exhibited high water content, which were characteristics distinct from those of gels formed by mixtures of sHAs and fibrinogen. The potential applications of the sHA-fibrin gels were evaluated. The sHA-fibrinogen gel with a graft ratio of 3.6 (S3.6F) was examined for its ability to encapsulate and support the differentiation of ATDC5 chondrocyte-like cells. Compared with the fibrinogen-formed gel, cells cultured in the S3.6F gel exhibited increased lacunae formation; moreover, the abundance of cartilaginous extracellular matrix molecules and the expression of chondrocyte marker genes, such as aggrecan, collagen II and Sox9, were also significantly increased. Our data suggest that the three-dimensional gel formed by the sHA-fibrinogen hybrid is a better support than the fibrin gel for chondrogenesis induction.

  19. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  20. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  1. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  2. sol-gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto A. Monreal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo sintetizamos nanocilindros de dióxido de titanio de 30 a 400 nm por medio de ADN del plásmido pBR322 de 4,362 pares de bases y el uso de isopropóxido de titanio como precursor por medio del proceso sol-gel. Los geles resultantes fueron calcinados y los polvos caracterizados por medio de Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (MEB, Espectroscopía de Energía Dispersiva, Microscopio Electrónico de Transmisión (MET y Difracción de Rayos X. Los resultados muestran que la síntesis in vitro de nanorods en presencia de ADN, puede ser activada. Muchas otras moléculas sintéticas pueden producirse por medio del uso de sistemas orgánicos, es así como reportamos la síntesis de híbridos hechos de ácidos nucleicos en materiales inorgánicos que pueden tener diversas aplicaciones en sistemas catalíticos, biomateriales y materiales nanoestructurados.

  3. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  4. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against......-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels...

  5. Protocol and cell responses in three-dimensional conductive collagen gel scaffolds with conductive polymer nanofibres for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirivisoot, Sirinrath; Pareta, Rajesh; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2014-02-06

    It has been established that nerves and skeletal muscles respond and communicate via electrical signals. In regenerative medicine, there is current emphasis on using conductive nanomaterials to enhance electrical conduction through tissue-engineered scaffolds to increase cell differentiation and tissue regeneration. We investigated the role of chemically synthesized polyaniline (PANI) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) conductive polymer nanofibres for conductive gels. To mimic a naturally derived extracellular matrix for cell growth, type I collagen gels were reconstituted with conductive polymer nanofibres and cells. Cell viability and proliferation of PC-12 cells and human skeletal muscle cells on these three-dimensional conductive collagen gels were evaluated in vitro. PANI and PEDOT nanofibres were found to be cytocompatible with both cell types and the best results (i.e. cell growth and gel electrical conductivity) were obtained with a low concentration (0.5 wt%) of PANI. After 7 days of culture in the conductive gels, the densities of both cell types were similar and comparable to collagen positive controls. Moreover, PC-12 cells were found to differentiate in the conductive hydrogels without the addition of nerve growth factor or electrical stimulation better than collagen control. Importantly, electrical conductivity of the three-dimensional gel scaffolds increased by more than 400% compared with control. The increased conductivity and injectability of the cell-laden collagen gels to injury sites in order to create an electrically conductive extracellular matrix makes these biomaterials very conducive for the regeneration of tissues.

  6. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  7. Colloidal gels: Clay goes patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem K.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  8. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...... a viscoclastic rubber to a plastic fluid and from a plastic fluid to a viscoelastic liquid are shifted to more elevated temperatures when silica is added to the triblock copolymer gel. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  10. Synthesis, properties, and biomedical applications of gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kan; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Tamayol, Ali; Annabi, Nasim; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-12-01

    Gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels have been widely used for various biomedical applications due to their suitable biological properties and tunable physical characteristics. GelMA hydrogels closely resemble some essential properties of native extracellular matrix (ECM) due to the presence of cell-attaching and matrix metalloproteinase responsive peptide motifs, which allow cells to proliferate and spread in GelMA-based scaffolds. GelMA is also versatile from a processing perspective. It crosslinks when exposed to light irradiation to form hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties. It can also be microfabricated using different methodologies including micromolding, photomasking, bioprinting, self-assembly, and microfluidic techniques to generate constructs with controlled architectures. Hybrid hydrogel systems can also be formed by mixing GelMA with nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide, and other polymers to form networks with desired combined properties and characteristics for specific biological applications. Recent research has demonstrated the proficiency of GelMA-based hydrogels in a wide range of tissue engineering applications including engineering of bone, cartilage, cardiac, and vascular tissues, among others. Other applications of GelMA hydrogels, besides tissue engineering, include fundamental cell research, cell signaling, drug and gene delivery, and bio-sensing.

  11. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBRs), are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... with the amount of the humic-like substances retained during filtration as predicted by gel growth theory. A low pressure backwash could re-establish the Water flux only up to 70%....

  12. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Wang; Zheng-wei Li; Min Luo; Ya-jun Li; Ke-qiang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some re-spects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the poly-lactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve ifbers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylac-tic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit+bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells+extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is ben-eifcial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was found with the

  13. Collagen type V enhances matrix contraction by human periodontal ligament fibroblasts seeded in three-dimensional collagen gels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, A.D.; Bronckers, A.L.; Smit, T.H.; Walboomers, X.F.; Everts, V.

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular matrix components play an important role in modulating cellular activity. To study such capacities of the matrix, fibroblasts are frequently cultured in a three-dimensional gel and contraction is assessed as a measure of cellular activity. Since a connective tissue contains several

  14. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M; Tyrode, Eric

    2014-07-29

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels with respect to pH changes was probed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and TIRR. Highly cross-linked gels show a small and fully reversible behavior when the solution pH is switched between pH 2.7 and 5.7. In contrast, low cross-linked gels are more responsive to pH changes, but the response is fully reversible only after the first exposure to the acidic solution, once an internal restructuring of the gel has taken place. Two distinct pKa's for both chitosan and poly(acrylic acid), were determined for the cross-linked structure using TIRR. They are associated with populations of chargeable groups displaying either a bulk like dissociation behavior or forming ionic complexes inside the hydrogel film.

  15. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  16. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riha, Brian D.

    2012-07-03

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  17. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhia, Brian D.

    2011-03-01

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  18. Thixotropic gel for vadose zone remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riha, Brian D.; Looney, Brian B.

    2015-10-27

    A thixotropic gel suitable for use in subsurface bioremediation is provided along with a process of using the gel. The thixotropic gel provides a non-migrating injectable substrate that can provide below ground barrier properties. In addition, the gel components provide for a favorable environment in which certain contaminants are preferentially sequestered in the gel and subsequently remediated by either indigenous or introduced microorganisms.

  19. Sol-gel derived sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Michael E.; Dindal, Amy B.

    2003-11-11

    Described is a method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles for the production of copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent material. The method for producing copolymerized sol-gel derived sorbent particles comprises adding a basic solution to an aqueous metal alkoxide mixture for a pH.ltoreq.8 to hydrolyze the metal alkoxides. Then, allowing the mixture to react at room temperature for a precalculated period of time for the mixture to undergo an increased in viscosity to obtain a desired pore size and surface area. The copolymerized mixture is then added to an immiscible, nonpolar solvent that has been heated to a sufficient temperature wherein the copolymerized mixture forms a solid upon the addition. The solid is recovered from the mixture, and is ready for use in an active sampling trap or activated for use in a passive sampling trap.

  20. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  1. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  2. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  3. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  4. Platelet lysate gel and endothelial progenitors stimulate microvascular network formation in vitro: tissue engineering implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, Tiago M; Beltrami, Cristina; Emanueli, Costanza; De Bank, Paul A; Pula, Giordano

    2016-05-04

    Revascularisation is a key step for tissue regeneration and complete organ engineering. We describe the generation of human platelet lysate gel (hPLG), an extracellular matrix preparation from human platelets able to support the proliferation of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) in 2D cultures and the formation of a complete microvascular network in vitro in 3D cultures. Existing extracellular matrix preparations require addition of high concentrations of recombinant growth factors and allow only limited formation of capillary-like structures. Additional advantages of our approach over existing extracellular matrices are the absence of any animal product in the composition hPLG and the possibility of obtaining hPLG from patients to generate homologous scaffolds for re-implantation. This discovery has the potential to accelerate the development of regenerative medicine applications based on implantation of microvascular networks expanded ex vivo or the generation of fully vascularised organs.

  5. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  6. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  7. Screening effect on nanostructure of charged gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, M; Annaka, M; Hino, M

    2004-01-01

    Charge screening effects on nanostructures of N-isopropylacrylamide-sodium acrylate (NIPA-SA) and -acrylic acid (NIPA-AAc) gels are investigated with small-angle neutron scattering. The NIPA-SA and NIPA-AAc gels with low water content exhibit microphase separations with different dimensions....... The dehydrated NIPA-SA gel also makes the microphase separation but the dehydrated NIPA-AAc gel does not. These results indicate that ionic circumstance around charged bases strongly affects the nanostructures both of the dehydrated gel and the gel with low water content. (C) 2004 Elsevier B. V. All rights...

  8. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Eisenberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jessica L Eisenberg1,2, Asmahan Safi3, Xiaoding Wei3, Horacio D Espinosa3, GR Scott Budinger2, Desire Takawira1, Susan B Hopkinson1, Jonathan CR Jones1,21Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, 2Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USAAim: The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins.Methods: Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy.Results: We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM.Conclusions: An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung.Keywords: alveolar epithelial cells, fibrosis, extracellular matrix, substrate stiffness

  9. Physicochemical behaviour of chitin gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachoud, L; Zydowicz, N; Domard, A

    2000-06-30

    Syneresis of chitin gels formed in the course of N-acetylation of chitosan in hydroalcoholic media has been studied. A critical cross-linking density related to a critical acetylation degree for which the gel undergoes weak syneresis and swells in water was shown (degree of acetylation (DA) 88%). Above this value, the weight loss during syneresis increases with DA. Conversely, syneresis decreases on increasing the polymer concentration, but disappears at a macroscopic level for a polymer concentration close to the critical concentration of entanglement in the initial solution. An increase in temperature favours the formation of hydrophobic interactions and new inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bondings. Due to the weak polyelectrolyte character of chitin, the weight of the gel depends on the pH and ionic strength of the media. Swelling-deswelling experiments show that the swelling of the gel is not fully reversible in relation with the formation of new cross-links during the depletion of the network. Our results reveals that the balance between segment-segment and segment-solvent interactions as well as the molecular mobility play the major role.

  10. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after an el...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  11. Gel formation in protein amyloid aggregation: a physical mechanism for cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Daniel; Bell, Dylan; Tipton, David; Durrance, Samuel; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Cole, Lisa; Li, Bin; Xu, Shaohua

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid fibers are associated with disease but have little chemical reactivity. We investigated the formation and structure of amyloids to identify potential mechanisms for their pathogenic effects. We incubated lysozyme 20 mg/ml at 55C and pH 2.5 in a glycine-HCl buffer and prepared slides on mica substrates for examination by atomic force microscopy. Structures observed early in the aggregation process included monomers, small colloidal aggregates, and amyloid fibers. Amyloid fibers were observed to further self-assemble by two mechanisms. Two or more fibers may merge together laterally to form a single fiber bundle, usually in the form of a helix. Alternatively, fibers may become bound at points where they cross, ultimately forming an apparently irreversible macromolecular network. As the fibers assemble into a continuous network, the colloidal suspension undergoes a transition from a Newtonian fluid into a viscoelastic gel. Addition of salt did not affect fiber formation but inhibits transition of fibers from linear to helical conformation, and accelerates gel formation. Based on our observations, we considered the effects of gel formation on biological transport. Analysis of network geometry indicates that amyloid gels will have negligible effects on diffusion of small molecules, but they prevent movement of colloidal-sized structures. Consequently gel formation within neurons could completely block movement of transport vesicles in neuronal processes. Forced convection of extracellular fluid is essential for the transport of nutrients and metabolic wastes in the brain. Amyloid gel in the extracellular space can essentially halt this convection because of its low permeability. These effects may provide a physical mechanism for the cytotoxicity of chemically inactive amyloid fibers in neurodegenerative disease.

  12. Yield stress determination of a physical gel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Pluronic F127 solutions form gels in water with high elastic moduli. Pluronic gels can, however, only withstand small deformations and stresses. Different steady shear and oscillatory methods traditionally used to determine yield stress values are compared. The results show that the yield stresses...... values of these gels depend on test type and measurement time, and no absolute yield stress value can be determined for these physical gels....

  13. Hybrid Materials of Polymer Gels with Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yan; Kaoru Tsujii

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Polymer gels have been extensively studied[1~17] since the discovery of volume phase-transition of a gel by Tanaka[1~5]. As a unique soft material, gels attract much attention and are tried to be applied for drug-delivery systgems[6], actuators or chemo-mechanical devices[7~9] and so on. In particular, controlled-release of small molecules from a gel is now a subject of special interest[10].

  14. Strain-enhanced stress relaxation impacts nonlinear elasticity in collagen gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungmin; Hu, Kenneth H; Butte, Manish J; Chaudhuri, Ovijit

    2016-05-17

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex assembly of structural proteins that provides physical support and biochemical signaling to cells in tissues. The mechanical properties of the ECM have been found to play a key role in regulating cell behaviors such as differentiation and malignancy. Gels formed from ECM protein biopolymers such as collagen or fibrin are commonly used for 3D cell culture models of tissue. One of the most striking features of these gels is that they exhibit nonlinear elasticity, undergoing strain stiffening. However, these gels are also viscoelastic and exhibit stress relaxation, with the resistance of the gel to a deformation relaxing over time. Recent studies have suggested that cells sense and respond to both nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity of ECM, yet little is known about the connection between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity. Here, we report that, as strain is increased, not only do biopolymer gels stiffen but they also exhibit faster stress relaxation, reducing the timescale over which elastic energy is dissipated. This effect is not universal to all biological gels and is mediated through weak cross-links. Mechanistically, computational modeling and atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicate that strain-enhanced stress relaxation of collagen gels arises from force-dependent unbinding of weak bonds between collagen fibers. The broader effect of strain-enhanced stress relaxation is to rapidly diminish strain stiffening over time. These results reveal the interplay between nonlinear elasticity and viscoelasticity in collagen gels, and highlight the complexity of the ECM mechanics that are likely sensed through cellular mechanotransduction.

  15. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  16. Study of Fricke gel dosimeter response for different gel quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavinato, C. C.; Campos, L. L.

    2010-11-01

    The Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) dosimeter has been studied for application in radiotherapy because it is capable of to measure the spatial distribution of radiation doses. The dosimetry is based on the oxidation of ferrous (Fe2+) to ferric (Fe3+) ions radiation induced, related to the radiation dose. The gel material usually employed is the 300 Bloom gelatin, which is imported and very expensive in Brazil. Aiming to analyze the viability of to use a locally produced and low cost gel material, in this work the spectrophotometric responses of FXG solutions prepared using 270 Bloom gelatin commercially available and 300 Bloom gelatin imported were compared. The absorption spectra of solutions prepared with 5% by weight 270 and 300 Bloom gelatins non-irradiated and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation in the dose range between 0.5 and 100 Gy were analysed, the dose-response curves were evaluated and the useful dose range was established. The obtained results indicate that the FXG solution prepared with 270 Bloom gelatin presents good performance, similar to that presented by the FXG solution prepared with 300 Bloom gelatin and its use can be recommended owing to the low cost and the availability in local market.

  17. 21 CFR 520.1452 - Moxidectin gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Moxidectin gel. 520.1452 Section 520.1452 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1452 Moxidectin gel. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of gel contains 20 milligrams (2 percent) moxidectin. (b) Sponsor. See No....

  18. 21 CFR 866.4900 - Support gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Support gel. 866.4900 Section 866.4900 Food and... IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunology Laboratory Equipment and Reagents § 866.4900 Support gel. (a) Identification. A support gel for clinical use is a device that consists of an agar or agarose preparation...

  19. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  20. Permeability of gels is set by the impulse applied on the gel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbonaite, V.; Jongh, de H.H.J.; Linden, van der E.; Pouvreau, L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    To better understand sensory perception of foods, water exudation studies on protein-based gels are of a high importance. It was aimed to study the interplay of gel coarseness and gel stiffness on water holding (WH) and water flow kinetics from the gel once force is applied onto the material. Ovalbu

  1. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  2. Substrate stiffness regulates extracellular matrix deposition by alveolar epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Jessica L; Safi, Asmahan; Wei, Xiaoding; Espinosa, Horacio D; Budinger, GR Scott; Takawira, Desire; Hopkinson, Susan B; Jones, Jonathan CR

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to address whether a stiff substrate, a model for pulmonary fibrosis, is responsible for inducing changes in the phenotype of alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) in the lung, including their deposition and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Methods Freshly isolated lung AEC from male Sprague Dawley rats were seeded onto polyacrylamide gel substrates of varying stiffness and analyzed for expression and organization of adhesion, cytoskeletal, differentiation, and ECM components by Western immunoblotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Results We observed that substrate stiffness influences cell morphology and the organization of focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, however, we found that substrate stiffness has no influence on the differentiation of type II into type I AEC, nor does increased substrate stiffness lead to an epithelial–mesenchymal transition. In contrast, our data indicate that substrate stiffness regulates the expression of the α3 laminin subunit by AEC and the organization of both fibronectin and laminin in their ECM. Conclusions An increase in substrate stiffness leads to enhanced laminin and fibronectin assembly into fibrils, which likely contributes to the disease phenotype in the fibrotic lung. PMID:23204878

  3. Stratification of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) for aggregated anammox microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Fangxu; Yang, Qing; Liu, Xiuhong; Li, Xiyao; Li, Baikun; Zhang, Liang; Peng, Yongzhen

    2017-02-27

    Sludge aggregation and biofilm formation are the most effective approaches to solve the washout of anammox microorganisms. In this study, the structure and composition of EPS (extracellular polymeric substances) were investigated to elucidate the factors for the anammox aggregation property. Anammox sludge taken from 18 lab-scale and pilot-scale reactors treating different types of wastewater was analyzed using EEM-PARAFAC (excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis), FTIR (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and real-time PCR combined with multivariate statistical analysis. The results showed that slime and TB-EPS (tightly bound EPS) were closely related with water quality and sludge morphology, and could be used as the indicators for anammox microbial survival ability and microbial aggregate morphology. Furthermore, slime secreted from anammox bacterial cells may be exhibited higher viscosity to the sludge surface and easily formed the gel network to aggregate. Large amounts of hydrophobic groups of protein in TB-EPS promoted the microbial aggregation. The mechanisms of anammox aggregation explored in this study enhanced the understanding of anammox stability in wastewater treatment processes.

  4. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  5. [Thermostable extracellular cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I; Orlov, N Ia

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase secreted by Physarum polycephalum plasmodium into extracellular medium has been partially purified by DEAE cellulose chromatography, ultrafiltration, and HPLC. The results obtained by gel filtration, HPLC, electrophoresis, and isoelectric focusing suggest that, the native enzyme in solution is a monomer with a molecular mass of about 90 kDa and pI in the range 3.6 - 4.0. The Km values were estimated to be about 0.9 mM and 7.7 mM, respectively, and Vm for both substrates were similar (up to several thousand micromoles of cAMP hydrolyzed/hour per mg of enzyme). The partially purified enzyme was shown to be extremely stable. It did not lose the activity after heat treatment at 100 degrees C during 30 min. The enzyme was active in the presence of 1% SDS, but it was fully inactivated under the same conditions in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The properties of the phosphodiesterase from Physarum polycephalum are discussed.

  6. Cellular Traction Stresses Mediate Extracellular Matrix Degradation by Invadopodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J.; Parekh, Aron

    2014-01-01

    During tumorigenesis, matrix rigidity can drive oncogenic transformation via altered cellular proliferation and migration. Cells sense extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical properties with intracellular tensile forces generated by actomyosin contractility. These contractile forces are transmitted to the matrix surface as traction stresses which mediate mechanical interactions with the ECM. Matrix rigidity has been shown to increase proteolytic ECM degradation by cytoskeletal structures known as invadopodia that are critical for cancer progression suggesting that cellular contractility promotes invasive behavior. However, both increases and decreases in traction stresses have been associated with metastatic behavior. Therefore, the role of cellular contractility in invasive migration leading to metastasis is unclear. To determine the relationship between cellular traction stresses and invadopodia activity, we characterized the invasive and contractile properties of an aggressive carcinoma cell line utilizing polyacrylamide gels of different rigidities. We found that ECM degradation and traction stresses were linear functions of matrix rigidity. Using calyculin A to augment myosin contractility, we also found that traction stresses were strongly predictive of ECM degradation. Overall, our data suggest that cellular force generation may play an important part in invasion and metastasis by mediating invadopodia activity in response to the mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24412623

  7. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... an electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. RESULTS: A total of 19 papers were included...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse...

  8. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  9. Sol-gel derived ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The synthesis of ceramic raw materials has become an important factor in ceramic technologies. The increasing demands to the performance of ceramic compounds has caused increased activities for the preparation of tailor-made raw materials. Amongst a variety of new syntheses like flame pyrolysis, reactive spray drying, plasma or laser assisted techniques, the sol-gel process plays an important and increasing role. The process describes the building up of an inorganic (in general an oxide) netw...

  10. The Sol-Gel Process

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid Suliman Aboodh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An increasingly important application of liquid jets is the disintegration of the jet to form droplets of liquid containing nuclear fuel. These droplets are then dried and sintered to form ceramic micro spheres for use in fuel elements in nuclear reactors. The total operations required to form the droplets convert them to solids and fire them to ceramic bodies comprise what are known as Sol-Gel processes Reference 13.

  11. The gel electrophoresis markup language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2010-09-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation's Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed the GelML (gel electrophoresis markup language) data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for MS data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications.

  12. The effect of pulsed HIFU on the porosity and permeability of collagen gels: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed HIFU is hypothesized to alter permeability of the extracellular matrix by altering the collagen network. In this study, the ability of HIFU to disrupt the extracellular matrix, particularly Type I collagen, in vitro, was investigated in order to enhance the drug delivery to highly collagenous tumors. This was tested in vitro in two ways, first using dye penetration, and second, by confocal reflection microscopy. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that there was at least a three-fold increase in porosity of the collagen gels after HIFU treatment.

  13. Gel fire suppressants for controlling underground heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Sheng-gen; XUE Sheng

    2011-01-01

    One of the major safety issues in coal mining is heatings and the resultant spontaneous combustion in underground coal mines.CSIRO researchers have developed a number of polymer gels suitable for controlling heatings in coal mines.These gels were developed to meet strict selection criteria including easy preparation,no or low toxicity,controllable gelation time,adaptable to mine water chemistry,adjustable viscosity,relatively long gel life,thermally and chemically stable and low cost.The HPAM-Aluminum Citrate gel system was identified to be the most favourable gel system for fire suppression in underground coal mines.These gels can be applied to the areas undergoing coal heating or gas leakage at a controllable gelation time and impermeable gel barriers can be formed in the areas to block ingress of air.

  14. Consolidation of Inorganic Precipitated Silica Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kind

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal gels are possible intermediates in the generation of highly porous particle systems. In the production process the gels are fragmented after their formation. These gel fragments compact to particles whose application-technological properties are determined by their size and porosity. In the case of precipitated silica gels, this consolidation process depends on temperature and pH, among other parameters. It is shown that these dependencies can be characterized by oedometer measurements. Originally, the oedometer test (one-dimensional compression test stemmed from soil mechanics. It has proven to be an interesting novel examination method for gels. Quantitative data of the time-dependent shrinkage of gel samples can be obtained. The consolidation of the gels shows a characteristic dependence on the above parameters.

  15. Influence of platelet-derived growth factor-AB on tissue development in autologous platelet-rich plasma gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirz, Simone; Dietrich, Maren; Flanagan, Thomas C; Bokermann, Gudrun; Wagner, Wolfgang; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Fibrin-based scaffolds are widely used in tissue engineering. We postulated that the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in contrast to platelet-poor plasma and pure fibrinogen as the basic material leads to an increased release of autologous platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB, which may have a consequent positive effect on tissue development. Therefore, we evaluated the release of PDGF-AB during the production process and the course of PDGF release during cultivation of plasma gels with and w/o platelets. The influence of PDGF-AB on the proliferation rate of human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) was studied using XTT assay. The synthesis of extracellular matrix by HUASMCs in plasma- and fibrin gels was measured using hydroxyproline assay. The use of PRP led to an increase in autologous PDGF-AB release. Further, the platelet-containing plasma gels showed a prolonged release of growth factor during cultivation. Both PRP and platelet-poor plasma gels had a positive effect on the production of collagen. However, PDGF-AB as a supplement in medium and in pure fibrin gel had neither an effect on cell proliferation nor on the collagen synthesis rate. This observation may be due to an absence of PDGF receptors in HUASMCs as determined by flow cytometry. In conclusion, although the prolonged autologous production of PDGF-AB in PRP gels is possible, the enhanced tissue development by HUASMCs within such gels is not PDGF related.

  16. Irreversible fouling of membrane bioreactors due to formation of a non-biofilm gel-like layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Larsen, Poul; Zheng, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS), known to contribute to fouling in membrane bio-reactors (MBR)s, are generally divided into bound and free EPS. The free EPS are able to form a gel-like layer on the membrane active surface. The mechanisms involved in formation of such layer and its effects...... with the amount of the humic-like substances retained during filtration as predicted by gel growth theory. A low pressure backwash could re-establish the water flux only up to 70%....

  17. Purification Crude Extracellular Protease of Saccharomycopsis fibuligera strain R64 Isolated from Tape’ Indonesian Fermented Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B. Roostita

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to purify crude extracellular protease produced by Saccharomycopsis fibuligera strain R64 that isolated from Tape' Indonesian fermented food. Saccharomycopsis fibuligera strain R64 was tested on Malt Extract Agar (MEA that added 3% skim milk powder to discover the proteolytic activity. Extracellular protease purified with ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis and gel filtration chromatography with Sephadex G-100. Bradford method used to measure protein content, protease activity measured with Walter method and SDS-PAGE used to measure the molecule weight of protease. Results shown that isolated yeasts give 2-5 mm of clear zones on MEA that added with skim milk powder. Precipitations with 45% ammonium sulfate give the best protein content of 5.05 mg/mL and protease activity of 0.051 U/mL. After dialysis the protein content the protease activity were increased to 5.57 mg/mL and 0.0631 U/mL. Moreover, the gel filtration chromatography with sephadex G-100 yields 0.023 U/mL proteolytic activities, 2.1 mg/mL protein contents with 97.4 kD protease molecular weight.

  18. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  19. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  20. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  1. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  2. Extracellular matrix-dependent differentiation of rabbit tracheal epithelial cells in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Squiban, A; Boisvieux-Ulrich, E; Guilianelli, C; Houcine, O; Geraud, G; Guennou, C; Marano, F

    1994-01-01

    The differentiation of tracheal epithelial cells in primary culture was investigated according to the nature of the extracellular matrix used. Cultures obtained by the explant technique were realized on a type I collagen substratum either as a thin, dried coating or as a thick, hydrated gel supplemented with culture medium and serum. These two types of substratum induced distinct cell morphology and cytokeratin expression in the explant derived cells. Where cells are less proliferating (from Day 7 to 10 of culture), differentiation was evaluated by morphologic ultrastructural observations, immunocytochemical detection of cytokeratins, and determination of cytokeratin pattern by biochemical analysis. The epithelium obtained on gel was multilayered, with small, round basal cells under large, flattened upper cells. The determination of the keratin pattern expressed by cells grown on gel revealed an expression of keratin 13, already considered as a specific marker of squamous metaplasia, that diminished with retinoic acid treatment. Present results demonstrated by confocal microscopy that K13-positive cells were large upper cells with a dense keratin network, whereas lower cells were positively stained with a specific monoclonal antibody to basal cells (KB37). Moreover, keratin neosynthesis analysis pointed out a higher expression of K6, a marker of hyperproliferation, on gel than on coating. All these data suggest a differentiation of rabbit tracheal epithelial cells grown on gel toward squamous metaplasia. By contrast, the epithelium observed on coating is nearly a monolayer of very large and spread out cells. No K13-positive cells were observed, but an increase in the synthesis of simple epithelium marker (K18) was detected. These two substrata, similar in composition and different in structure, induce separate differentiation and appear as good tools to explore the mechanisms of differentiation of epithelial tracheal cells.

  3. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  4. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH SEKAM PADI MENJADI SILIKA GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Astuti Handayani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sekam padi merupakan salah satu sumber penghasil silika terbesar, berpotensi sebagai bahan pembuatan silika gel. Abu sekam padi mengandung silika sebanyak 87%-97% berat kering. Sintesis silika gel dari abu sekam padi dilakukan dengan mereaksikan abu sekam padi menggunakan larutan NaOH 1N pada suhu 800C selama 1 jam dan dilanjutkan dengan penambahan larutan asam hingga pH=7. Gel yang dihasilkan selanjutnya didiamkan selama 18 jam kemudian dikeringkan pada suhu dikeringkan menggunakan oven pada suhu 800C hingga beratnya konstan. Hasil percobaan diperoleh bahwa silika gel dengan penambahan CH3COOH menghasilkan yield yang lebih besar dibandingkan penambahan HCl. Berdasarkan analisis FT-IR silika gel yang diperoleh memiliki gugus Si-O-Si dan gugus Si-OH. Silika gel dengan penambahan HCl memiliki surface area sebesar 65,558 m2/g, total pore volume 0,1935 cc/g, dan average pore size sebesar 59,0196 Å. Sedangkan silika gel dengan penambahan CH3COOH memiliki surface area sebesar 9,685 m2/g, total pore volume 0,02118 cc/g, dan average pore size sebesar 43,7357Å. Silika gel dengan penambahanCH3COOH memiliki kemampuan menyerap kelembaban udara yang lebih baik dibanding silika gel dengan penambahan HCl. Rice hull ash (RHA is one of the biggest source of silica, potential for sintesis silica gel. RHA contains silica as many as 87 % -97 %. Synthesis of silica gel from rice hull ash was done by reaction using NaOH solution at temperature 800C for 1 hour and followed by the addition of an acid solution until pH=7. The gel were rested with time aging 18 hour, and then dried using oven at temperature 800C until constant weigh. The results obtained that the silica gel with the addition of CH3COOH produce higher yields than the addition of HCl. Based on FT-IR analysis, silica gel has a group of silanol (Si-`OH and siloxan (Si-O-Si group. Silica gel with the addition of HCl has a surface area 65,558 m2/g, a total pore volume 0,1935 cc/g, and average pore size 59

  5. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  6. The Penicillium chrysogenum extracellular proteome. Conversion from a food-rotting strain to a versatile cell factory for white biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jami, Mohammad-Saeid; García-Estrada, Carlos; Barreiro, Carlos; Cuadrado, Abel-Alberto; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2010-12-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is well-known by its ability to synthesize β-lactam antibiotics as well as other secondary metabolites. Like other filamentous fungi, this microorganism is an excellent host for secretion of extracellular proteins because of the high capacity of its protein secretion machinery. In this work, we have characterized the extracellular proteome reference map of P. chrysogenum Wisconsin 54-1255 by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. This method allowed the correct identification of 279 spots by peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem MS. These 279 spots included 328 correctly identified proteins, which corresponded to 131 different proteins and their isoforms. One hundred and two proteins out of 131 were predicted to contain either classical or nonclassical secretion signal peptide sequences, providing evidence of the authentic extracellular location of these proteins. Proteins with higher representation in the extracellular proteome were those involved in plant cell wall degradation (polygalacturonase, pectate lyase, and glucan 1,3-β-glucosidase), utilization of nutrients (extracellular acid phosphatases and 6-hydroxy-d-nicotine oxidase), and stress response (catalase R). This filamentous fungus also secretes enzymes specially relevant for food industry, such as sulfydryl oxidase, dihydroxy-acid dehydratase, or glucoamylase. The identification of several antigens in the extracellular proteome also highlights the importance of this microorganism as one of the main indoor allergens. Comparison of the extracellular proteome among three strains of P. chrysogenum, the wild-type NRRL 1951, the Wis 54-1255 (an improved, moderate penicillin producer), and the AS-P-78 (a penicillin high-producer), provided important insights to consider improved strains of this filamentous fungus as versatile cell-factories of interest, beyond antibiotic production, for other aspects of white biotechnology.

  7. Metal-silica sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegman, Albert E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a single phase metal-silica sol-gel glass formed by the co-condensation of a transition metal with silicon atoms where the metal atoms are uniformly distributed within the sol-gel glass as individual metal centers. Any transition metal may be used in the sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to sensor materials where the sensor material is formed using the single phase metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The sensor materials may be in the form of a thin film or may be attached to an optical fiber. The present invention also relates to a method of sensing chemicals using the chemical sensors by monitoring the chromatic change of the metal-silica sol-gel glass when the chemical binds to the sensor. The present invention also relates to oxidation catalysts where a metal-silica sol-gel glass catalyzes the reaction. The present invention also relates to a method of performing oxidation reactions using the metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to organopolymer metal-silica sol-gel composites where the pores of the metal-silica sol-gel glasses are filled with an organic polymer polymerized by the sol-gel glass.

  8. Partial Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Protease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    Purification of the enzyme by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G75 following ammonium sulphate precipitation gave 2.26 fold increase in purification with specific activity of 46.13 .... minutes in a water bath and were allowed to cool.

  9. Sol-gel electrochromic device

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    All solid state electrochromic devices have potential applications in architectural and automotive fields to regulate the transmission and reflection of radiant energy. We present the optical and electrochemical characteristics of two solid state windows having the configuration glass/ITO/TiO2-CeO2/TiO2/TiO2-CeO2/ITO/glass and glass/ITO/WOa/TiO2/TiO2-CeO2/ITO/glass where the three internal layers have been prepared by sol gel methods. The preparation of the individual sols and some physical p...

  10. Motility initiation in active gels

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires a symmetry breaking mechanism which transforms a symmetric state into a polarized state. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by increased contractility of motor proteins. In this paper we argue that contraction can be responsible not only for the symmetry breaking transition but also for the incipient translocation of the segment of an active gel mimicking the crawling cell. Our model suggests that when the contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold, the cell can stop and re-symmetrizes. The proposed theory reproduces the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and the behavior of keratocytes prior to cell division.

  11. Biopolymer gel matrix as acellular scaffold for enhanced dermal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judith, Rangasamy; Nithya, Mariappan; Rose, Chellan; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-07-01

    Biological grafts have drawbacks such as donor scarcity, disease transmission, tissue infection, while the scaffolds of either collagen or chitosan fabrics fail to become part of the tissue at the wound site, though they favor the formation of connective tissue matrix. This study developed a novel composite consisting of the combination of atelocollagen and chitosan in order to provide a biodegradable molecular matrix in gel form as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment, to promote the wound healing in excision wounds. We found that the topical application of biopolymer composite on the wound promoted cell proliferation, migration and collagen deposition overtime. The enhanced cellular activity in the collagen-chitosan treated wound tissue was also assed by increased levels of Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and Nerve growth factor (NGF) associated with elevated levels of antioxidants and decreased level of lipid peroxidation. The acellular matrix-like topical application material is designed to guide the eventual re-establishment of an anatomically normal skin. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of multi-cell regeneration on a molecular system that mimics tissue engineering in vivo.

  12. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  13. Self-Pumping Active Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun-Ta; Hishamunda, Jean Bernard; Fraden, Seth; Dogic, Zvonimir

    Isotropic active gels are the network which is consist of cross-linked building blocks and the structure of which changes randomly and isotropically with time. Dogic et. al. show that pairs of anti-parallel microtubules form extensile bundles, which merge, extend, and buckle. In an unconfined system, the dynamics of these bundles causes spontaneous turbulent-like flow driven by motion of microscopic molecular motors. We found that confining these active gels in a millimeter sized toroids causes a transition into a new dynamical state characterized by circulation currents persisting for hours until ATP is depleted. We show how toroid dimensions impact the properties of self-organized circular currents, how directions of circulation can be designed by engineering ratchet-shaped boundaries, and how circulations of connected toroids can be either synchronized or antisynchronized. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the flow rate in the circulation is independent of curvature and length of flow path. The flow rate persists for centimeters without decay, disregarding conventional pipe flow resistance. Such findings pave the path to self-pumping pipe transport and performing physical work with biological system.

  14. Gel trapping of dense colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxton, Peter B; Berg, John C

    2005-05-01

    Phase density differences in sols, foams, or emulsions often lead to sedimentation or creaming, causing problems for materials where spatial uniformity over extended periods of time is essential. The problem may be addressed through the use of rheology modifiers in the continuous phase. Weak polymer gels have found use for this purpose in the food industry where they appear to be capable of trapping dispersoid particles in a three-dimensional matrix while displaying water-like viscosities at low shear. Attempts to predict sedimentation stability in terms of particle properties (size, shape, density difference) and gel yield stress have led to qualitative success for suspensions of large particles. The effect of particle size, however, in particular the case in which colloidal dimensions are approached, has not been investigated. The present work seeks to determine useful stability criteria for colloidal dispersions in terms of readily accessible viscoelastic descriptors. Results are reported for systems consisting of 12 microm poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres dispersed in aqueous gellan gum. Monovalent salt concentration is varied to control rheological properties, and sedimentation/centrifugation experiments are performed to determine dispersion stability. Necessary conditions for stability consist of a minimum yield stress together with a value of tan delta less than unity.

  15. Engineering strategies to recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis within synthetic 3 dimensional extracellular matrix with tunable mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnikova, Y.A.; Jorgens, D.M.; Spirio, L.; Auer, M.; Sieminski-Sarang, A.L.; Weaver, V.M.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness) of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell fate and tissue morphogenesis and contribute to disease progression. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mechanisms by which ECM rigidity modulates cell behavior and fate remains rudimentary. To address this issue, a number of two and three dimensional (3D) hydrogel systems have been used to explore the effects of mechanical properties of the ECM on cell behavior. Unfortunately, many of these systems have limited application because fiber architecture, adhesiveness and/or pore size often change in parallel when gel elasticity is varied. Here we describe the use of ECM-adsorbed, synthetic, self-assembling peptide gels (SAPs) that are able to recapitulate normal epithelial acini morphogenesis and gene expression in a 3D context. By exploiting the range of visco-elasticity attainable with these SAP gels, and their ability to recreate native-like ECM fibril topology with minimal variability in ligand density and pore size, we were able to reconstitute normal versus tumor-like phenotype and gene expression patterns in nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells (MECs). Accordingly, this SAP hydrogel system presents the first tunable system capable of independently assessing the interplay between ECM stiffness and multi-cellular epithelial phenotype in a 3D context. PMID:21441648

  16. Virulence determinants and production of extracellular enzymes in Enterococcus spp. from surface water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molale, Lesego Gertrude; Bezuidenhout, Cornelius Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Virulence factors in Enterococcus may be indicative of potential pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of clinically relevant virulence genes, in Enterococcus spp. from environmental water, and their in vitro expression. One hundred and twenty-four Enterococcus isolates (seven species), from five surface water systems in the North West Province, South Africa, were screened for the presence of asa1, cylA, esp, gelE and hyl using polymerase chain reaction. The expression of cylA, hyl and gelE was determined by phenotypic assessments. Sixty-five percent of the isolates were positive for one virulence gene and 13% for two or more. Most frequently detected genes were gelE (32%) and cylA (28%). Enterococcal surface protein was absent in all isolates screened. The presence of virulence genes was correlated with their extracellular enzyme production. The results show that a large percentage of these environmental Enterococcus spp. possess virulence factors that could be expressed in vitro. This is a cause for concern and could have implications for individuals using this water for recreational and cultural purposes. Further investigation is required into the sources of these potential pathogenic Enterococcus isolates and measures to minimize their presence in water sources.

  17. Characteristics of polyacrylamide gel with THPC and Turnbull Blue gel dosimeters evaluated using optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilařová (Vávrů), Kateřina; Kozubíková, Petra; Šolc, Jaroslav; Spěváček, Václav

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare characteristics of radiochromic gel - Turnbull Blue gel (TB gel) with polymer gel - polyacrylamide gel and tetrakis hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (PAGAT) using optical tomography. Both types of gels were examined in terms of dose sensitivity, dose response linearity and background value of spectrophotometric absorbance. The calibration curve was obtained for 60Co irradiation performed on Gammacell 220 at predefined gamma dose levels between 0 and 140 Gy for TBG and 0-15 Gy for PAGAT. To measure relative dose distributions from stereotactic irradiation, dosimeters were irradiated on Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. The cylindrical glass housings filled with gel were attached to the stereotactic frame. They were exposed with single shot and 16 mm collimator by 65 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for TB gel and 4 Gy to a 50% prescription isodose for PAGAT. Evaluations of dosimeters were performed on an UV-vis Spectrophotometer Helios β and an optical cone beam homemade tomography scanner with a 16-bit astronomy CCD camera with a set of color filters. The advantages and potential disadvantages for both types of gel dosimeters were summarized. Dose distribution in central slice and measured profiles of 16 mm shot shows excellent correspondence with treatment planning system Leksell GammaPlan® for both PAGAT and Turnbull Blue gels. Gel dosimeters are suitable for steep dose gradient verification. An optical tomography evaluation method is successful. Dose response characteristics of TB gel and PAGAT gel are presented.

  18. Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPSs in Ocean Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Decho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbial cells (i.e., bacteria, archaea, microeukaryotes in oceans secrete a diverse array of large molecules, collectively called extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs or simply exopolymers. These secretions facilitate attachment to surfaces that lead to the formation of structured ‘biofilm’ communities. In open-water environments, they also lead to formation of organic colloids, and larger aggregations of cells, called ‘marine snow.’ Secretion of EPS is now recognized as a fundamental microbial adaptation, occurring under many environmental conditions, and one that influences many ocean processes. This relatively recent realization has revolutionized our understanding of microbial impacts on ocean systems. EPS occur in a range of molecular sizes, conformations and physical/chemical properties, and polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and even nucleic acids are actively secreted components. Interestingly, however, the physical ultrastructure of how individual EPS interact with each other is poorly understood. Together, the EPS matrix molecules form a three-dimensional architecture from which cells may localize extracellular activities and conduct cooperative/antagonistic interactions that cannot be accomplished efficiently by free-living cells. EPS alter optical signatures of sediments and seawater, and are involved in biogeomineral precipitation and the construction of microbial macrostructures, and horizontal-transfers of genetic information. In the water-column, they contribute to the formation of marine snow, transparent exopolymer particles (TEPs, sea-surface microlayer biofilm, and marine oil snow. Excessive production of EPS occurs during later-stages of phytoplankton blooms as an excess metabolic by product and releases a carbon pool that transitions among dissolved-, colloidal-, and gel-states. Some EPS are highly labile carbon forms, while other forms appear quite refractory to degradation. Emerging studies suggest that EPS

  19. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩同春

    2004-01-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerizationreaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reactionkinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time ofcalcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and anexample is provided to verify the proposed formula.

  20. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩同春

    2004-01-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula.

  1. Stabilized aqueous gels and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, B.L.

    1978-08-29

    New improved aqueous gels, and methods of using same in contacting subterranean formations, are provided. The gels are prepared by gelling an aqueous brine having incorporated therein a water-soluble cellulose ether such as a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), and are rendered more stable to decomposition by incorporating a sulfoalkylated tannin stabilizing agent, such as a sulfomethylated quebracho (SMQ), in the gel during the preparation thereof.

  2. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  3. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  4. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  5. Buckling Instability in Liquid Crystalline Physical Gels

    OpenAIRE

    Verduzco, Rafael; Meng, Guangnan; Kornfield, Julia A; Meyer, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    In a nematic gel we observe a low-energy buckling deformation arising from soft and semisoft elastic modes. We prepare the self-assembled gel by dissolving a coil–side-group liquid-crystalline polymer–coil copolymer in a nematic liquid crystal. The gel has long network strands and a precisely tailored structure, making it ideal for studying nematic rubber elasticity. Under polarized optical microscopy we observe a striped texture that forms when gels uniformly aligned at 35 °C are cooled to r...

  6. Conducting polymer electrodes for gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Katarina; Nilsson, Sara; Robinson, Nathaniel D

    2014-01-01

    In nearly all cases, electrophoresis in gels is driven via the electrolysis of water at the electrodes, where the process consumes water and produces electrochemical by-products. We have previously demonstrated that π-conjugated polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) can be placed between traditional metal electrodes and an electrolyte to mitigate electrolysis in liquid (capillary electroosmosis/electrophoresis) systems. In this report, we extend our previous result to gel electrophoresis, and show that electrodes containing PEDOT can be used with a commercial polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system with minimal impact to the resulting gel image or the ionic transport measured during a separation.

  7. Food gels: gelling process and new applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumya; Bhattacharya, Suvendu

    2012-01-01

    Food gels are viscoelastic substances and several gelled products are manufactured throughout the world. The gelling agents in foods are usually polysaccharides and proteins. In food gels, the polymer molecules are not cross-linked by covalent bonds with the exception of disulphide bonds in some protein gels. Instead, the molecules are held together by a combination of weak inter-molecular forces like hydrogen bonds, electrostatic forces, Van der Waals forces, and hydrophobic interactions. Polysaccharides including hydrocolloids are strongly hydrated in aqueous medium but they tend to have less ordered structures. The mechanism of gelation depends on the nature of the gelling agent(s) and on the conditions of gel formation like the temperature, the presence of ions, the pH, and the concentration of gelling agents, etc. Characterization of gels can be performed in several ways of which rheological measurements are frequently practiced. Multi-component or mixed gel system is an important area of interest in which two or more gelling components are simultaneously used to achieve certain specific structural and functional characteristics. We here discuss about the different gels and gelling agents, the characterization of gels, and the mechanism of gelation with an emphasis on mixed or multi-component gels that would have significant commercial applications.

  8. Conducting polymer electrodes for gel electrophoresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Bengtsson

    Full Text Available In nearly all cases, electrophoresis in gels is driven via the electrolysis of water at the electrodes, where the process consumes water and produces electrochemical by-products. We have previously demonstrated that π-conjugated polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT can be placed between traditional metal electrodes and an electrolyte to mitigate electrolysis in liquid (capillary electroosmosis/electrophoresis systems. In this report, we extend our previous result to gel electrophoresis, and show that electrodes containing PEDOT can be used with a commercial polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis system with minimal impact to the resulting gel image or the ionic transport measured during a separation.

  9. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different phy...

  10. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zoraida Andreu Martínez; María eYáñez-Mó

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physi...

  11. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  12. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  13. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  14. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  15. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  16. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  17. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  18. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  19. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  20. Stacking gels: A method for maximising output for pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng See

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, the gold standard of molecular typing methods, has a major disadvantage of an unusually long electrophoretic time. From the original protocol of 6 days, it was modified to 3 days and subsequently to a single day. We describe the procedure of stacking five to six gels one on top of another in order to increase and maximize the output in a shorter time without compromising the resolution and reproducibility. All the variables that affect pulsed field gels during electrophoresis were taken into consideration. We firstly optimized the parameters to be used and secondly determined whether stacking of five to six gels had any effect on the molecular separation during electrophoresis in comparison with a single gel run. DNA preparation, restriction, electrophoresis, staining and gel documentation was carried out based on previously published methods. Gels were analysed using BioNumerics and dice coefficient and unweighted pair group methods were used to generate dendrograms based on 1.5% tolerance values. Identical band profiles and band resolution-separation were seen in the PFGE patterns with single gel and multiple stacking gels. Cluster analysis further strengthened the fact that results from stacking gels were reproducible and comparable with a single gel run. This method of stacking gels saves time and maximizes the output at the same time. The run time for a single gel was about 28 hours, but with six stacked gels the run time was 54 hours compared with 28 x 6 = 168 hours if they were run separately as single gels thus saving time of 67.86%. Beside the big factor of saving time, stacking gels save resources (electricity, reagents, water, chemicals and working time by increasing the sample throughput in a shorter time without compromising on quality of data. But optimization of working parameters is vital depending on the PFGE system used.

  1. High internal phase emulsion gels (HIPE-gels) created through assembly of natural oil bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikiforidis, C.V.; Scholten, E.

    2015-01-01

    A natural emulsion was used to create a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) gel with elastic properties, indicated by shear elastic moduli between 102 and 105 Pa. The elasticity of the gel network was provided from a 2D-gel network of proteins which were naturally adsorbed at the interface of an oil

  2. Categorization of rheological scaling models for particle gels applied to casein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, M.; Opheusden, van J.H.J.; Vliet, van T.

    2002-01-01

    Rennet-induced casein gels made from skim milk were studied rheologically. A scaling model or framework for describing the rheological behavior of gels is discussed and used for classification of the structure of casein gels. There are two main parameters in the model that describe the number of def

  3. Viscoelastic Properties of Vitreous Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouz Kavehpour, H.; Sharif-Kashani, Pooria

    2010-11-01

    We studied the rheological properties of porcine vitreous humor using a stressed-control shear rheometer. All experiments were performed in a closed environment at body temperature to mimic in-vivo conditions. We modeled the creep deformation using a two-element retardation spectrum model. By associating each element of the model to an individual biopolymeric system in the vitreous gel, a separate response to the applied stress was obtained from each component. The short time scale was associated with the collagen structure, while the longer time scale was related to the microfibrilis and hyaluronan network. We were able to distinguish the role of each main component from the overall rheological properties. Knowledge of this correlation enables us to relate the physical properties of vitreous to its pathology, as well as optimize surgical procedures such as vitrectomy.

  4. Chitosan: Gels and Interfacial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nilsen-Nygaard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a unique biopolymer in the respect that it is abundant, cationic, low-toxic, non-immunogenic and biodegradable. The relative occurrence of the two monomeric building units (N-acetyl-glucosamine and d-glucosamine is crucial to whether chitosan is predominantly an ampholyte or predominantly a polyelectrolyte at acidic pH-values. The chemical composition is not only crucial to its surface activity properties, but also to whether and why chitosan can undergo a sol–gel transition. This review gives an overview of chitosan hydrogels and their biomedical applications, e.g., in tissue engineering and drug delivery, as well as the chitosan’s surface activity and its role in emulsion formation, stabilization and destabilization. Previously unpublished original data where chitosan acts as an emulsifier and flocculant are presented and discussed, showing that highly-acetylated chitosans can act both as an emulsifier and as a flocculant.

  5. Polyacrylamide gels for invadopodia and traction force assays on cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrell, Rachel J; Parekh, Aron

    2015-01-04

    Rigid tumor tissues have been strongly implicated in regulating cancer cell migration and invasion. Invasive migration through cross-linked tissues is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions called invadopodia that proteolytically degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM). Invadopodia activity has been shown to be dependent on ECM rigidity and cancer cell contractile forces suggesting that rigidity signals can regulate these subcellular structures through actomyosin contractility. Invasive and contractile properties of cancer cells can be correlated in vitro using invadopodia and traction force assays based on polyacrylamide gels (PAAs) of different rigidities. Invasive and contractile properties of cancer cells can be correlated in vitro using invadopodia and traction force assays based on polyacrylamide gels (PAAs) of different rigidities. While some variations between the two assays exist, the protocol presented here provides a method for creating PAAs that can be used in both assays and are easily adaptable to the user's specific biological and technical needs.

  6. Symposium: Role of the extracellular matrix in mammary development. Regulation of milk protein and basement membrane gene expression: The influence of the extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggeler, J.; Park, C.S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1988-10-01

    Synthesis and secretion of milk proteins ({alpha}-casein, {beta}-casein, {gamma}-casein, and transferrin) by cultured primary mouse mammary epithelial cells is modulated by the extracellular matrix. In cells grown on released or floating type I collagen gels, mRNA for {beta}-casein and transferrin is increased as much as 30-fold over cells grown on plastic. Induction of {beta}-casein expression depends strongly on the presence of lactogenic hormones, especially prolactin, in the culture. When cells are plated onto partially purified reconstituted basement membrane, dramatic changes in morphology and milk protein gene expression are observed. Cells cultured on the matrix for 6 to 8 d in the presence of prolactin, insulin, and hydrocortisone form hollow spheres and duct-like structures that are completely surrounded by matrix. The cells lining these spheres appear actively secretory and are oriented with their apices facing the lumen. Hybridization experiments indicate that mRNA for {beta}-casein can be increased as much as 70-fold in these cultures. Because > 90% of the cultured cells synthesize immunoreactive {beta}-casein, as compared with only 40% of cells in the late pregnant gland, the matrix appears to be able to induce protein expression in previously silent cells. Synthesis of laminin and assembly of a mammary-specific basal lamina by cells cultured on different extracellular matrices also appears to depend on the presence of lactogenic hormones. These studies provide support for the concept of dynamic reciprocity in which complex interactions between extracellular matrix and the cellular cytoskeleton contribute to the induction and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression in the mammary gland.

  7. Epithelial sheet folding induces lumen formation by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in a collagen gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Sumire; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Yamaguchi, Naoya; Ogata, Genki; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    Lumen formation is important for morphogenesis; however, an unanswered question is whether it involves the collective migration of epithelial cells. Here, using a collagen gel overlay culture method, we show that Madin-Darby canine kidney cells migrated collectively and formed a luminal structure in a collagen gel. Immediately after the collagen gel overlay, an epithelial sheet folded from the periphery, migrated inwardly, and formed a luminal structure. The inhibition of integrin-β1 or Rac1 activity decreased the migration rate of the peripheral cells after the sheets folded. Moreover, lumen formation was perturbed by disruption of apical-basolateral polarity induced by transforming growth factor-β1. These results indicate that cell migration and cell polarity play an important role in folding. To further explore epithelial sheet folding, we developed a computer-simulated mechanical model based on the rigidity of the extracellular matrix. It indicated a soft substrate is required for the folding movement.

  8. Fibroblasts and monocyte macrophages contract and degrade three-dimensional collagen gels in extended co-culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Ronald F

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory cells are believed to play a prominent role during tissue repair and remodeling. Since repair processes develop and mature over extended time frames, the present study was designed to evaluate the effect of monocytes and fibroblasts in prolonged culture in three-dimensional collagen gels. Methods Blood monocytes from healthy donors and human fetal lung fibroblasts were cast into type I collagen gels and maintained in floating cultures for three weeks. Results Fibroblast-mediated gel contraction was initially inhibited by the presence of monocytes (P P P 2 production was significantly increased by co-culture and its presence attenuated collagen degradation. Conclusion The current study, therefore, demonstrates that interaction between monocytes and fibroblasts can contract and degrade extracellular matrix in extended culture.

  9. Epithelial sheet folding induces lumen formation by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in a collagen gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumire Ishida

    Full Text Available Lumen formation is important for morphogenesis; however, an unanswered question is whether it involves the collective migration of epithelial cells. Here, using a collagen gel overlay culture method, we show that Madin-Darby canine kidney cells migrated collectively and formed a luminal structure in a collagen gel. Immediately after the collagen gel overlay, an epithelial sheet folded from the periphery, migrated inwardly, and formed a luminal structure. The inhibition of integrin-β1 or Rac1 activity decreased the migration rate of the peripheral cells after the sheets folded. Moreover, lumen formation was perturbed by disruption of apical-basolateral polarity induced by transforming growth factor-β1. These results indicate that cell migration and cell polarity play an important role in folding. To further explore epithelial sheet folding, we developed a computer-simulated mechanical model based on the rigidity of the extracellular matrix. It indicated a soft substrate is required for the folding movement.

  10. Chondrocyte Morphology in Stiff and Soft Agarose Gels and the Influence of Fetal Calf Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Asima; Hall, Andrew C

    2017-05-01

    Changes to chondrocyte volume/morphology may have deleterious effects on extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism potentially leading to cartilage deterioration and osteoarthritis (OA). The factors controlling chondrocyte properties are poorly understood, however, pericellular matrix (PCM) weakening may be involved. We have studied the density, volume, morphology, and clustering of cultured bovine articular chondrocytes within stiff (2% w/v) and soft (0.2% w/v) three-dimensional agarose gels. Gels with encapsulated chondrocytes were cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM; fetal calf serum (FCS) 1-10%;380 mOsm) for up to 7 days. Chondrocytes were fluorescently labeled after 1, 3, and 7 days with 5-chloromethylfluorescein-diacetate (CMFDA) and propidium iodide (PI) or 1,5-bis{[2-(di-methylamino)ethyl]amino}-4,8-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (DRAQ5) to identify cytoplasmic space or DNA and imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Chondrocyte density, volume, morphology, and clustering were quantified using Volocity™ software. In stiff gels after 7 d with 10% FCS, chondrocyte density remained unaffected and morphology was relatively normal with occasional cytoplasmic processes. However, in soft gels by day 1, chondrocyte volume increased (P = 0.0058) and by day 7, density increased (P = 0.0080), along with the percentage of chondrocytes of abnormal morphology (P stiff gels. FCS exacerbated changes to density (P stiffness and/or increased FCS concentrations promoted chondrocyte proliferation and clustering, increased cell volume, and stimulated abnormal morphology, producing similar changes to those occurring in OA. The increased penetration of factors in FCS into soft gels may be important in the development of these abnormal chondrocyte properties. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1041-1052, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Using Greener Gels to Explore Rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Brendan; Matharu, Avtar S.; Hurst, Glenn A.

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to investigate the rheological properties of a green calcium-cross-linked alginate gel as an alternative to the traditional borax-cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) gel. As borax is suspected of damaging fertility and the unborn child, a safe, green alternative is necessary. The rheological properties of a…

  12. Halogen-bonding-triggered supramolecular gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazza, Lorenzo; Foster, Jonathan A; Fucke, Katharina; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Steed, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Supramolecular gels are topical soft materials involving the reversible formation of fibrous aggregates using non-covalent interactions. There is significant interest in controlling the properties of such materials by the formation of multicomponent systems, which exhibit non-additive properties emerging from interaction of the components. The use of hydrogen bonding to assemble supramolecular gels in organic solvents is well established. In contrast, the use of halogen bonding to trigger supramolecular gel formation in a two-component gel ('co-gel') is essentially unexplored, and forms the basis for this study. Here, we show that halogen bonding between a pyridyl substituent in a bis(pyridyl urea) and 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene brings about gelation, even in polar media such as aqueous methanol and aqueous dimethylsulfoxide. This demonstrates that halogen bonding is sufficiently strong to interfere with competing gel-inhibitory interactions and create a 'tipping point' in gel assembly. Using this concept, we have prepared a halogen bond donor bis(urea) gelator that forms co-gels with halogen bond acceptors.

  13. Recrystallization of amylopectin in concentrated starch gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keetels, CJAM; Oostergetel, GT; vanVliet, T

    1996-01-01

    The relation between the recrystallization of amylopectin and the increase in stiffness of starch gels during storage was studied by various techniques. From transmission electron microscopy it was concluded that the size of the crystalline domains in retrograded 30% w/w potato starch gels was about

  14. Cd(II) Speciation in alginate gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, T.A.; Kalis, E.J.J.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2008-01-01

    Polysaccharides, such as those occurring in cell walls and biofilms, play an important role in metal speciation in natural aqueous systems. This work describes the speciation of Cd(II) in alginate gels chosen as a model system for biogels. The gels are formed by bridging calcium ions at junction zon

  15. Serum release boosts sweetness intensity in gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, G.; Stieger, M.A.; Velde, van de F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of serum release on sweetness intensity in mixed whey protein isolate/gellan gum gels. The impact of gellan gum and sugar concentration on microstructure, permeability, serum release and large deformation properties of the gels was determined. With increasing gellan

  16. Stiffening in gels containing whey protein isolate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purwanti, N.; Veen, van der E.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Gels made only from whey protein isolate (WPI) stiffened over the first few days of storage, after which the textural properties remained nearly constant. However, protein gels containing WPI microparticles, at the same total protein content, stiffened over a longer period than those without micropa

  17. Responsive molecular gels. : Surface Chemistry and Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jaap J. D.; Feringa, Bernard; van Esch, Jan

    2006-01-01

    A review discusses the chemo-responsive gels and physico-responsive gels. Phys. low mol. mass responsive gelators are interesting mols. with many potential applications in areas such as catalysis, sensor and sepn. technol., drug delivery, and biomedicine. In a relatively short period, a wide variety

  18. Flow of colloidal suspensions and gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Roseanna

    Our recent studies of yield of colloidal gels under shear show that yield in such gels occurs in distinct stages. Under fixed stress, yield follows a finite delay period of slow solid-like creep. Post yield, the gel fluidizes and may undergo long-time viscous flow or, in some cases, may re-solidify. Under imposed strain rate, the transition from equilibrium to long-time flow is characterized by one or more stress overshoots, signifying a yield process here as well. These rheological changes are accompanied by evolution in morphology and dynamics of the gel network. Similar regimes have been observed in gels subjected to gravitational forcing; the gel initially supports its own weight, or perhaps undergoes slow, weak compaction. This may be followed by a sudden transition to rapid compaction or sedimentation. Various models have been put forth to explain these behaviors based on structural evolution, but this detail is difficult to observe in experiment. Here we examine the detailed microstructural evolution and rheology of reversible colloidal gels as they deform under gravity, identifying the critical buoyant force at which yield occurs, the role played by ongoing gel coarsening, and similarities and differences compared to yield under shear. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the NSF XSEDE Computational Resource, the NSF Early CAREER Program, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program.

  19. Responsive molecular gels. : Surface Chemistry and Colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jaap J. D.; Feringa, Bernard; van Esch, Jan

    2006-01-01

    A review discusses the chemo-responsive gels and physico-responsive gels. Phys. low mol. mass responsive gelators are interesting mols. with many potential applications in areas such as catalysis, sensor and sepn. technol., drug delivery, and biomedicine. In a relatively short period, a wide variety

  20. Mathematical Modeling of Uniaxial Mechanical Properties of Collagen Gel Scaffolds for Vascular Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro M. Irastorza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.. When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  1. Mathematical modeling of uniaxial mechanical properties of collagen gel scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irastorza, Ramiro M; Drouin, Bernard; Blangino, Eugenia; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Small diameter tissue-engineered arteries improve their mechanical and functional properties when they are mechanically stimulated. Applying a suitable stress and/or strain with or without a cycle to the scaffolds and cells during the culturing process resides in our ability to generate a suitable mechanical model. Collagen gel is one of the most used scaffolds in vascular tissue engineering, mainly because it is the principal constituent of the extracellular matrix for vascular cells in human. The mechanical modeling of such a material is not a trivial task, mainly for its viscoelastic nature. Computational and experimental methods for developing a suitable model for collagen gels are of primary importance for the field. In this research, we focused on mechanical properties of collagen gels under unconfined compression. First, mechanical viscoelastic models are discussed and framed in the control system theory. Second, models are fitted using system identification. Several models are evaluated and two nonlinear models are proposed: Mooney-Rivlin inspired and Hammerstein models. The results suggest that Mooney-Rivlin and Hammerstein models succeed in describing the mechanical behavior of collagen gels for cyclic tests on scaffolds (with best fitting parameters 58.3% and 75.8%, resp.). When Akaike criterion is used, the best is the Mooney-Rivlin inspired model.

  2. Catalytic control over supramolecular gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boekhoven, Job; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; Li, Feng; van der Mee, Lars; Minkenberg, Christophe B; Mendes, Eduardo; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2013-05-01

    Low-molecular-weight gels show great potential for application in fields ranging from the petrochemical industry to healthcare and tissue engineering. These supramolecular gels are often metastable materials, which implies that their properties are, at least partially, kinetically controlled. Here we show how the mechanical properties and structure of these materials can be controlled directly by catalytic action. We show how in situ catalysis of the formation of gelator molecules can be used to accelerate the formation of supramolecular hydrogels, which drastically enhances their resulting mechanical properties. Using acid or nucleophilic aniline catalysis, it is possible to make supramolecular hydrogels with tunable gel-strength in a matter of minutes, under ambient conditions, starting from simple soluble building blocks. By changing the rate of formation of the gelator molecules using a catalyst, the overall rate of gelation and the resulting gel morphology are affected, which provides access to metastable gel states with improved mechanical strength and appearance despite an identical gelator composition.

  3. On shear rheology of gel propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Shai; Peretz, Arie [RAFAEL, MANOR Propulsion and Explosive Systems Division, Haifa (Israel); Natan, Benveniste [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2007-04-15

    Selected fuel, oxidizer and simulant gels were prepared and rheologically characterized using a rotational rheometer. For fuel gelation both organic and inorganic gellants were utilized, whereas oxidizers and simulants were gelled with addition of silica and polysaccharides, respectively. The generalized Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model was found to most adequately represent the gels studied. Hydrazine-based fuels, gelled with polysaccharides, were characterized as shear-thinning pseudoplastic fluids with low shear yield stress, whereas inhibited red-fuming nitric acid (IRFNA) and hydrogen peroxide oxidizers, gelled with silica, were characterized as yield thixotropic fluids with significant shear yield stress. Creep tests were conducted on two rheological types of gels with different gellant content and the results were fitted by Burgers-Kelvin viscoelastic constitutive model. The effect of temperature on the rheological properties of gel propellant simulants was also investigated. A general rheological classification of gel propellants and simulants is proposed. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Controlling the Morphology of Carbon Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Mukai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon gels are unique porous carbons, which aretypically obtained through the carbonization ofresorcinol-formaldehyde gels. This material ispractically an aggregate of nanometer-sized carbonparticles. Nanopores, mostly in the size range ofmesopores, exist between the particles. Smallerpores, micropores being the majority, also exist withinthe particles. Therefore, this material has ahierarchical pore system in which short microporesare directly connected to mesopores.The precursor of carbon gels can be obtained throughsol-gel transition. Therefore there is a high possibilitythat the morphology of the resulting carbon can beeasily controlled using various molding methods.We have actually challenged the controlling of themorphology of carbon gels, and have succeeded inobtaining them in the form of disks, microspheresand microhoneycombs. Details of such carbon gelswill be reported.

  5. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  6. Internal structure analysis of particle-double network gels used in a gel organ replica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Mei; Arai, Masanori; Saito, Azusa; Sakai, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the fabrication of patient organ replicas using 3D printers has been attracting a great deal of attention in medical fields. However, the cost of these organ replicas is very high as it is necessary to employ very expensive 3D printers and printing materials. Here we present a new gel organ replica, of human kidney, fabricated with a conventional molding technique, using a particle-double network hydrogel (P-DN gel). The replica is transparent and has the feel of a real kidney. It is expected that gel organ replicas produced this way will be a useful tool for the education of trainee surgeons and clinical ultrasonography technologists. In addition to developing a gel organ replica, the internal structure of the P-DN gel used is also discussed. Because the P-DN gel has a complex structure comprised of two different types of network, it has not been possible to investigate them internally in detail. Gels have an inhomogeneous network structure. If it is able to get a more uniform structure, it is considered that this would lead to higher strength in the gel. In the present study we investigate the structure of P-DN gel, using the gel organ replica. We investigated the internal structure of P-DN gel using Scanning Microscopic Light Scattering (SMILS), a non-contacting and non-destructive.

  7. Electrophoresis of DNA in agarose gels, polyacrylamide gels and in free solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellwagen, Nancy C.

    2009-01-01

    This review describes the electrophoresis of curved and normal DNA molecules in agarose gels, polyacrylamide gels and in free solution. These studies were undertaken to clarify why curved DNA molecules migrate anomalously slowly in polyacrylamide gels but not in agarose gels. Two milestone papers are cited, in which Ferguson plots were used to estimate the effective pore size of agarose and polyacrylamide gels. Subsequent studies on the effect of the electric field on agarose and polyacrylamide gel matrices, DNA interactions with the two gel matrices, and the effect of curvature on the free solution mobility of DNA are also described. The combined results suggest that the anomalously slow mobilities observed for curved DNA molecules in polyacrylamide gels are due primarily to preferential interactions of curved DNAs with the polyacrylamide gel matrix; the restrictive pore size of the matrix is of lesser importance. In free solution, DNA mobilities increase with increasing molecular mass until leveling off at a plateau value of (3.17 ± 0.01) × 10-4 cm2/Vs in 40 mM Tris-acetate-EDTA buffer at 20°C. Curved DNA molecules migrate anomalously slowly in free solution as well as in polyacrylamide gels, explaining why the Ferguson plots of curved and normal DNAs containing the same number of base pairs extrapolate to different mobilities at zero gel concentration. PMID:19517510

  8. Gelatin increases the coarseness of whey protein gels and impairs water exudation from the mixed gel at low temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, A.H.; Bakhuizen, E.; Ersch, C.; Urbonaite, V.; Jongh, H.H.J. de; Pouvreau, L.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the origin of water holding of mixed protein gels, a study was performed on water exudation from mixed whey protein (WP)-gelatin gels upon applied pressure. Mixed gels were prepared with varying WP and gelatin concentration and gelatin type to obtain gels with a wide range of gel

  9. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  10. Sol-gel composite material characteristics caused by different dielectric constant sol-gel phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Makoto; Kaneko, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Makiko

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic transducers prepared by a sol-gel composite method have been investigated in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). Sol-gel composite materials could be ideal piezoelectric materials for ultrasonic transducer applications in the NDT field, and a new sol-gel composite with desirable characteristics has been developed. Three kinds of sol-gel composite materials composed of different dielectric constant sol-gel phases, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT), Bi4Ti3O12 (BiT), and BaTiO3 (BT), and the same piezoelectric powder phase, PbTiO3 (PT), were fabricated and their properties were compared quantitatively. As a result, the PT/BT, sol-gel composite with the highest dielectric constant sol-gel phase showed the highest d 33 and signal strength. In addition, only PT/BT was successfully poled by room-temperature corona poling with reasonable signal strength.

  11. Resorbable extracellular matrix grafts in urologic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is an increasingly large body of literature concerning tissue-engineering products that may be used in urology. Some of these are quite complex (such as multilayer patient-specific cell-seeded implants yet the most simple and successful products to date are also the most uncomplicated: resorbable acellular extra-cellular matrices (ECMs harvested from animals. ECMs have been used in a variety of difficult urologic reconstruction problems, and this review is intended to summarize this complex literature for the practicing urologist. METHODS: Medline search of related terms such as "SIS, small intestinal submucosa, ECM, extracellular matrix, acellular matrix and urologic reconstruction". Manuscripts missed in the initial search were taken from the bibliographies of the primary references. RESULTS: Full review of potential clinical uses of resorbable extra-cellular matrices in urologic reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the "state of the art" in tissue engineering solutions for urologic reconstruction means resorbable acellular xenograft matrices. They show promise when used as a pubovaginal sling or extra bolstering layers in ureteral or urethral repairs, although recent problems with inflammation following 8-ply pubovaginal sling use and failures after 1- and 4-ply SIS repair of Peyronie's disease underscore the need for research before wide adoption. Preliminary data is mixed concerning the potential for ECM urethral patch graft, and more data is needed before extended uses such as bladder augmentation and ureteral replacement are contemplated. The distant future of ECMs in urology likely will include cell-seeded grafts with the eventual hope of producing "off the shelf" replacement materials. Until that day arrives, ECMs only fulfill some of the requirements for the reconstructive urologist.

  12. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia...... parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K(+) in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better...

  13. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  14. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  15. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  16. Proteomic profiling of fibroblasts reveals a modulating effect of extracellular calumenin on the organization of the actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Hansen, Gry Aune; Vorum, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    cytoskeleton and is involved in cytokinesis. Labeling of S phase fibroblasts with bromo-2'deoxy-uridine indicates that calumenin added to the medium also modulates the cell cycle. Our study thus indicates that calumenin possesses a paracrine role on the cells in its vicinity and therefore may be involved...... in the pathophysiology of thrombosis or in wound healing....... but not in normal vasculature. In order to study the possible effects of calumenin extracellularly we used proteomic profiling of fibroblasts cultured in absence as well as in presence of calumenin. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) we show that normal fibroblasts...

  17. Electrokinetics of nanoparticle gel-electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Reghan J

    2016-09-28

    Gel-electrophoresis has been demonstrated in recent decades to successfully sort a great variety of nanoparticles according to their size, charge, surface chemistry, and corona architecture. However, quantitative theoretical interpetations have been limited by the number and complexity of factors that influence particle migration. Theoretical models have been fragmented and incomplete with respect to their counterparts for free-solution electrophoresis. This paper unifies electrokinetic models that address complex nanoparticle corona architectures, corona and gel charge regulation (e.g., by the local pH), multi-component electrolytes, and non-linear electrostatics and relaxation effects. By comprehensively addressing the electrokinetic aspects of the more general gel-electrophoresis problem, in which short-ranged steric interactions are significant, a stage is set to better focus on the physicochemical and steric factors. In this manner, it is envisioned that noparticle gel-electrophoresis may eventually be advanced from a nanoparticle-characterization tool to one that explicitly probes the short-ranged interactions of nanoparticles with soft networks, such as synthetic gels and biological tissues. In this paper, calculations are undertaken that identify a generalized Hückel limit for nanoparticles in low-conductivity gels, and a new Smoluchowski limit for polyelectrolyte-coated particles in high-conductivity gels that is independent of the gel permeability. Also of fundamental interest is a finite, albeit small, electrophoretic mobility for uncharged particles in charged gels. Electrophoretic mobilities and drag coefficients (with electroviscous effects) for nanoparticles bearing non-uniform coronas show that relaxation effects are typically weak for the small nanoparticles (radius ≈3-10 nm) to which gel-electrophoresis has customarily been applied, but are profound for the larger nanoparticles (radius ≳ 40 nm in low conductivity gels) to which passivated gel

  18. Mechanical properties and in vivo behavior of a biodegradable synthetic polymer microfiber-extracellular matrix hydrogel biohybrid scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yi; Huber, Alexander; Takanari, Keisuke; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Badylak, Stephen F; Wagner, William R

    2011-05-01

    A biohybrid composite consisting of extracellular matrix (ECM) gel from porcine dermal tissue and biodegradable elastomeric fibers was generated and evaluated for soft tissue applications. ECM gel possesses attractive biocompatibility and bioactivity with weak mechanical properties and rapid degradation, while electrospun biodegradable poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU) has good mechanical properties but limited cellular infiltration and tissue integration. A concurrent gel electrospray/polymer electrospinning method was employed to create ECM gel/PEUU fiber composites with attractive mechanical properties, including high flexibility and strength. Electron microscopy revealed a structure of interconnected fibrous layers embedded in ECM gel. Tensile mechanical properties could be tuned by altering the PEUU/ECM weight ratio. Scaffold tensile strengths for PEUU/ECM ratios of 67/33, 72/28 and 80/20 ranged from 80 to 187 kPa in the longitudinal axis (parallel to the collecting mandrel axis) and 41-91 kPa in the circumferential axis with 645-938% breaking strains. The 72/28 biohybrid composite and a control scaffold generated from electrospun PEUU alone were implanted into Lewis rats, replacing a full-thickness abdominal wall defect. At 4 wk, no infection or herniation was found at the implant site. Histological staining showed extensive cellular infiltration into the biohybrid scaffold with the newly developed tissue well integrated with the native periphery, while minimal cellular ingress into the electrospun PEUU scaffold was observed. Mechanical testing of explanted constructs showed evidence of substantial remodeling, with composite scaffolds adopting properties more comparable to the native abdominal wall. The described elastic biohybrid material imparts features of ECM gel bioactivity with PEUU strength and handling to provide a promising composite biomaterial for soft tissue repair and replacement.

  19. Bioprinting 3D cell-laden hydrogel microarray for screening human periodontal ligament stem cell response to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yufei; Ji, Yuan; Huang, Guoyou; Ling, Kai; Zhang, Xiaohui; Xu, Feng

    2015-12-22

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease negatively affecting up to 15% of adults worldwide. Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) hold great promises for periodontal tissue regeneration, where it is necessary to find proper extracellular matrix (ECM) materials (e.g., composition, concentration). In this study, we proposed a bioprinting-based approach to generate nano-liter sized three-dimensional (3D) cell-laden hydrogel array with gradient of ECM components, through controlling the volume ratio of two hydrogels, such as gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) dimethacrylate. The resulting cell-laden array with a gradient of GelMA/PEG composition was used to screen human PDLSC response to ECM. The behavior (e.g., cell viability, spreading) of human PDLSCs in GelMA/PEG array were found to be depended on the volume ratios of GelMA/PEG, with cell viability and spreading area decreased along with increasing the ratio of PEG. The developed approach would be useful for screening cell-biomaterial interaction in 3D and promoting regeneration of functional tissue.

  20. Sol-Gel Manufactured Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Randall L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Tillotson, Thomas M.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Swansiger, Rosalind W.; Fox, Glenn A.

    2005-05-17

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  1. Crystallization of lactose from carbopol gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X M; Martin, G P; Marriott, C; Pritchard, J

    2000-07-01

    To crystallize lactose under static conditions with a view to preparing crystals of well-defined morphology. et-Lactose monohydrate was crystallized from neutralized Carbopol 934 gels. When the majority of crystals had grown to maturity, the gels were acidified using diluted hydrochloric acid and the crystals were harvested by filtration or centrifugation and washed with ethanol-water mixtures. Crystals prepared from the gel had a consistently narrower size distribution than control crystals, prepared from solution under constant stirring. If crystallization was effected in the gel without sedimentation of the crystals, then the resultant crystals had smooth surfaces without visually detectable surface roughness or asperities viewed by optical microscopy. The crystals from Carbopol gels also exhibited the uniform shape of an elongated tomahawk regardless of the crystallization conditions, in contrast to crystallization under constant stirring, where the crystal shape of lactose changed with crystallization conditions especially as a function of the initial concentration of lactose. All batches of lactose crystals prepared from Carbopol gels existed as alpha-lactose monohydrate, which showed better flowability than the controls of a similar particle size. Crystallization from Carbopol gel produces lactose crystals of uniform size, regular shape, smooth surface, and improved flowability.

  2. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  3. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  4. Extracellular superoxide dismutase of boar seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalowka, M; Wysocki, P; Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2008-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzymatic component of the antioxidant defense system that protects spermatozoa by catalysing the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Age and season effects on SOD activity in the seminal plasma were measured in boars at the onset of 8 months through a 35-month period. It was found that age-related changes in SOD activity in the seminal plasma were markedly higher in boars less than 2 years of age. However, it appeared that SOD activity was established at the early sexual maturity age (8-12 months). There were variations in SOD activity throughout the season, being significantly higher in spring and autumn than in summer. A secretory extracellular form of SOD (EC-SOD) was purified to homogeneity (350-fold) from boar seminal plasma, using a three-step purification protocol (affinity chromatography followed by ion exchange and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography). The molecular properties and specificity of SOD (molecular mass, isoelectric point, optimum pH, thermostability and susceptibility to inhibitors) confirmed that the purified enzyme is an extracellular form of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase occurring in boar seminal plasma. The results of this study indicate that EC-SOD is an important antioxidant enzyme of boar seminal plasma, which plays an important physiological role in counteracting oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

  5. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  6. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  7. Extracellular matrix in canine mammary tumors with special focus on versican, a versatile extracellular proteoglycan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) research has become fundamental to understand cancer. This thesis focuses on the exploration of ECM composition and organization in canine mammary tumors, with a special interest in the large chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycan (PG), versican. Chapter 1 gives an overvie

  8. Simulating microbiologically influenced corrosion by depositing extracellular biopolymers on mild steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roe, F.L.; Lewandowski, Z.; Funk, T. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Center for Biofilm Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Electrochemical properties of corroding mild steel (MS) surfaces were measured in real time using three closely spaced microelectrodes. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and ion currents were mapped simultaneously and noninvasively above a MS coupon partially coated with biopolymer gels. Calcium alginate (Ca-Alg [an extracellular biopolymer containing carboxylate functional groups]) and agarose (one without carboxylate functional groups) were tested. Corrosion occurred at approximately the same rate under the two biopolymer spots on the same coupon. Corrosion rates under these biopolymers were {approx} 4 mpy in a weak saline solution. Results suggested corrosion was not influenced by chemical properties of the biopolymer but possibly was controlled by oxygen reduction in noncoated regions of the coupon (i.e., a differential aeration cell).

  9. Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Tuan; Mohd Yasin, Nazlina Haiza; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Maeda, Toshinari

    2014-12-01

    The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 49 ± 5% compared with 27 ± 1% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881 ± 109 CH4 μmol g(-1) dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production.

  10. Some Thoughts on The Definition of a Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi

    To avoid the confusion of the concept of a gel frequently encountered in daily markets of food, cosmetics, and other industrial products, the definition of a gel is revisited. Recent proposals of the definition of a gel are overviewed, and classifications of various gels from different points of view are described. Discussion is mainly focused on the gel-sol transition and the difference between the structured liquid and the gel, and the classification of gels by temperature dependence of elastic modulus. Finally, the definition of a gel is proposed as a working hypothesis from rheological and structural view points.

  11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Birren, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis: A Practical Guide is the first laboratory manual to describe the theory and practice of this technique. Based on the authors' experience developing pulsed field gel instruments and teaching procedures, this book provides everything a researcher or student needs to know in order to understand and carry out pulsed field gel experiments. Clear, well-tested protocols assume only that users have a basic familiarity with molecular biology. Thorough coverage of useful data, theory, and applications ensures that this book is also a lasting resource for more adv

  12. Applications of sol gel ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrow, D. [Datec Coating Corp., Kingston, Ont. (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    The sol gel method is a chemical technique in which polycrystalline ceramic films are fabricated from a solution of organometallic precursors. The technique is attractive for many industrial applications because it is a simple (films are processed in air), flexible (can be used to coat complex geometries) and cost effective (does not require expensive equipment) process. In addition, dense, high quality coatings can be achieved at much lower temperatures than is generally required for sintering bulk ceramics. In this paper the conventional sol gel method and the new datec process are reviewed and potential applications of sol gel coatings in automotive, aerospace, petrochemical, nuclear and electronic industries are discussed. (orig.)

  13. Muscular Contraction Mimiced by Magnetic Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrínyi, Miklós; Szabó, Dénes

    The ability of magnetic-field-sensitive gels to undergo a quick controllable change of shape can be used to create an artificially designed system possessing sensor- and actuator functions internally in the gel itself. The peculiar magneto-elastic properties may be used to create a wide range of motion and to control the shape change and movement, that are smooth and gentle similar to that observed in muscle. Magnetic field sensitive gels provide attractive means of actuation as artificial muscle for biomechanics and biomimetic applications.

  14. Buckling Instability in Liquid Crystalline Physical Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco, Rafael; Meng, Guangnan; Kornfield, Julia A.; Meyer, Robert B.

    2006-04-01

    In a nematic gel we observe a low-energy buckling deformation arising from soft and semisoft elastic modes. We prepare the self-assembled gel by dissolving a coil side-group liquid-crystalline polymer coil copolymer in a nematic liquid crystal. The gel has long network strands and a precisely tailored structure, making it ideal for studying nematic rubber elasticity. Under polarized optical microscopy we observe a striped texture that forms when gels uniformly aligned at 35 °C are cooled to room temperature. We model the instability using the molecular theory of nematic rubber elasticity, and the theory correctly captures the change in pitch length with sample thickness and polymer concentration. This buckling instability is a clear example of a low-energy deformation that arises in materials where polymer network strains are coupled to the director orientation.

  15. K-Basin gel formation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, M.A.

    1998-07-23

    A key part of the proposed waste treatment for K Basin sludge is the elimination of reactive uranium metal by dissolution in nitric acid (Fkirnent, 1998). It has been found (Delegard, 1998a) that upon nitric acid dissolution of the sludge, a gel sometimes forms. Gels are known to sometimes impair solid/liquid separation and/or material transfer. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine the cause(s) of the gel formation and to determine operating parameters for the sludge dissolution that avoid formation of gel. This work and related work were planned in (Fkunent, 1998), (Jewett, 1998) and (Beck, 1998a). This report describes the results of the tests in (Beck, 1998a) with non-radioactive surrogates.

  16. Maize Arabinoxylan Gels as Protein Delivery Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luisa Martínez-López

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The laccase induced gelation of maize bran arabinoxylans at 2.5% (w/v in the presence of insulin or β-lactoglobulin at 0.1% (w/v was investigated. Insulin and β-lacto-globulin did not modify either the gel elasticity (9 Pa or the cross-links content (0.03 and 0.015 mg di- and triferulic acids/mg arabinoxylan, respectively. The protein release capability of the gel was also investigated. The rate of protein release from gels was dependent on the protein molecular weight. The apparent diffusion coefficient was 0.99 × 10-7 and 0.79 × 10-7 cm2/s for insulin (5 kDa and β-lactoglobulin (18 kDa, respectively. The results suggest that maize bran arabinoxylan gels can be potential candidates for the controlled release of proteins.

  17. Evaluation of wheat by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... SDS-PAGE gels cluster analysis was performed to check the ... It is concluded that SDS-PAGE analysis of wheat endosperm protein is useful for evaluation of ..... Comparison of phenotypic and molecular marker-based.

  18. Porosity Governs Normal Stresses in Polymer Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cagny, Henri C G; Vos, Bart E; Vahabi, Mahsa; Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Doi, Masao; Koenderink, Gijsje H; MacKintosh, F C; Bonn, Daniel

    2016-11-18

    When sheared, most elastic solids including metals, rubbers, and polymer gels dilate perpendicularly to the shear plane. This behavior, known as the Poynting effect, is characterized by a positive normal stress. Surprisingly, fibrous biopolymer gels exhibit a negative normal stress under shear. Here we show that this anomalous behavior originates from the open-network structure of biopolymer gels. Using fibrin networks with a controllable pore size as a model system, we show that the normal-stress response to an applied shear is positive at short times, but decreases to negative values with a characteristic time scale set by pore size. Using a two-fluid model, we develop a quantitative theory that unifies the opposite behaviors encountered in synthetic and biopolymer gels.

  19. Sol-gel deposited electrochromic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, N.; Lampert, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochromic devices have increasing application in display devices, switchable mirrors and smart windows. A variety of vacuum deposition technologies have been used to make electrochromic devices. The sol- gel process offers an alternative approach to the synthesis of optical quality and low cost electrochromic device layers. This study summarizes the developments in sol-gel deposited electrochromic films. The sol-gel process involves the formation of oxide networks upon hydrolysis-condensation of alkoxide precursors. In this study we cover the sol-gel deposited oxides of WO[sub 3], V[sub 2]O[sub 5], TiO[sub 2], Nb[sub 2]O[sub 5], and NiO[sub x].

  20. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Carol S.; Reed, Scott T.

    1990-01-01

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  1. Formation of Anisotropic Block Copolymer Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Chya Yan; Shull, Kenneth; Henderson, Kevin; Joester, Derk

    2011-03-01

    Anisotropic, fibrillar gels are important in a variety of processes. Biomineralization is one example, where the mineralization process often occurs within a matrix of collagen or chitin fibers that trap the mineral precursors and direct the mineralization process. We wish to replicate this type of behavior within block copolymer gels. Particularly, we are interested in employing gels composed of cylindrical micelles, which are anisotropic and closely mimic biological fibers. Micelle geometry is controlled in our system by manipulating the ratio of molecular weights of the two blocks and by controlling the detailed thermal processing history of the copolymer solutions. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Dynamic Light Scattering are used to determine the temperature dependence of the gel formation process. Initial experiments are based on a thermally-reversible alcohol-soluble system, that can be subsequently converted to a water soluble system by hydrolysis of a poly(t-butyl methacrylate) block to a poly (methacrylic acid) block. MRSEC.

  2. Elastocapillary Deformations and Fracture of Soft Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Karen; Grzelka, Marion; Bostwick, Joshua

    When a droplet is placed on the surface of a soft gel, the surface deforms by an amount proportional to the elastocapillary length calculated from the ratio of surface tension and elastic modulus. For sufficiently large deformations, the gel can fracture due to the forces generated under the liquid-gel contact line. We observe that a starburst of channel fractures forms at the surface of the gel, driven by fluid propagating away from the central droplet. To understand the initiation of these cracks, we model the substrate as an incompressible, linear-elastic solid and quantify the elastic response. This provides quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of the number of fracture arms as a function of material properties and geometric parameters. In addition, we find that the initiation process is thermally-activated, with delay time that decreases as a function of the elastocapillary length.

  3. Sample collection system for gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.; Dunbar, John M.; Hill, Karen K.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Roybal, Gustavo

    2004-09-21

    An automatic sample collection system for use with an electrophoretic slab gel system is presented. The collection system can be used with a slab gel have one or more lanes. A detector is used to detect particle bands on the slab gel within a detection zone. Such detectors may use a laser to excite fluorescently labeled particles. The fluorescent light emitted from the excited particles is transmitted to low-level light detection electronics. Upon the detection of a particle of interest within the detection zone, a syringe pump is activated, sending a stream of buffer solution across the lane of the slab gel. The buffer solution collects the sample of interest and carries it through a collection port into a sample collection vial.

  4. Physical properties of polymeric gels; Kobunshi gel no kiso denki tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajitsu, Y. [Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Chiba, A. [Waseda University, Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering

    1998-03-31

    This paper explains the following matters on properties of polymeric gels: the percolation theory on sol-gel transfer (incorporating fractal geometry) has become endorsed experimentally; in addition, the large relaxation phenomenon seen in dielectric spectra of carrageenan gel at temperatures lower than the gelation point suggests that a domain of very long needle shape has grown; analysis of dielectric relaxation spectra of sodium acrylate gel (a kind of polymeric electrolyte gel) reveals a result which suggests that its dielectric relaxation mechanism is the same as that of a polymeric electrolyte interlocking system; a polymeric gel membrane (which retains aqueous electrolyte solution) made by dissolving LiBF4 into a mixed solution of propylene carbonate and dimethoxyethane is known to show ion electric conductivity value close to that of aqueous electrolyte solution (in the order of 10 {sup -3} S/cm). 27 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  6. Neutrophils cast extracellular traps in response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Denkers, Eric Y

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular traps by neutrophils is a now well-established phenomenon that contributes to the innate response to extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. The importance of NETs during protozoan infection has been less explored, but recent findings suggest an emerging role for release of neutrophil-derived extracellular DNA in response to this class of microbial pathogens. The present review summarizes findings to date regarding elicitation of NETs by Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Eimeria bovis, and Leishmania spp.

  7. Rheological Characterization of Ethanolamine Gel Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    V. S Jyoti, Botchu; Baek, Seung Wook

    2016-07-01

    Ethanolamine is considered to be an environmentally friendly propellant system because it has low toxicity and is noncarcinogenic in nature. In this article, efforts are made to formulate and prepare ethanolamine gel systems, using pure agarose and hybrids of paired gelling agents (agarose + polyvinylpyrrolidine (PVP), agarose + SiO2, and PVP + SiO2), that exhibit a measurable yield stress, thixotropic behavior under shear rate ranges of 1-1,000 s-1 and a viscoelastic nature. To achieve these goals, multiple rheological experiments (including flow and dynamic studies) are performed. In this article, results are presented from experiments measuring the apparent viscosity, yield stress, thixotropy, dynamic strain, frequency sweep, and tan δ behaviors, as well as the effects of the test temperature, in the gel systems. The results show that the formulated ethanolamine gels are thixotropic in nature with yield stress between 30 and 60 Pa. The apparent viscosity of the gel decreases as the test temperature increases, and the apparent activation energy is the lowest for the ethanolamine-(PVP + SiO2) gel system. The dynamic rheology study shows that the type of gellant, choice of hybrid gelling materials and their concentration, applied frequencies, and strain all vitally affect the viscoelastic properties of the ethanolamine gel systems. In the frequency sweep experiment, the ethanolamine gels to which agarose, agarose + PVP, and agarose + SiO2 were added behave like linear frequency-dependent viscoelastic liquids, whereas the ethanolamine gel to which PVP + SiO2 was added behaves like a nearly frequency-independent viscoelastic solid. The variation in the tan δ of these gelled propellants as a function of frequency is also discussed.

  8. Using Greener Gels To Explore Rheology

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu, Avtar Singh; Hurst, Glenn; Garrett, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was developed to investigate the rheological properties of a green calcium-cross-linked alginate gel as an alternative to the traditional borax-cross-linked poly(vinyl alcohol) gel. As borax is suspected of damaging fertility and the unborn child, a safe, green alternative is necessary. The rheological properties of a sodium alginate solution were examined as a function of temperature using capillary viscometry. Gelation and degelation processes were followed using rot...

  9. Gel and gel-free approaches for the quantitative characterisation of complex protein mixtures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Buthelezi, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available -dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE gels), solution phase isoelectric focusing (IEF), offline strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography and offline high pH reverse phase (RP) chromatography. All fractions collected from the solution-based methods were... which fractionation method between 2DE gels, solution phase IEF, SCX-RP and RP-RP results in the highest number of protein identities RESULTS When the number of protein identities in the different fractionation techniques was compared (Figure 2...

  10. Tridimensional dosimetry using MAGIC gel with formaldehyde; Dosimetria tridimensional usando gel MAGIC com formaldeido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavoni, Juliana F.; Baffa, Oswaldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica], e-mail: baffa@ffclrp.usp.br; Pike, Tina L.; Snow, Jessica; DeWerd, Larry A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics. Medical Radiation Research Center

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents the application of MAGIC gel with formaldehyde (MAGIC-f) in the tri dimensional dose distribution measurement of an IMRT planning. A high similarity was found between the dose distributions measured by the gel dosimeter and the dose distributions expected by the treatment planning system (TPS) in all of the irradiated volume, this was proved by the direct overlapping of these isodoses. These results show that MAGIC-f gel is feasible for tridimensional dose distribution measurements. (author)

  11. Pengaruh Natrium Hialuronat terhadap Penetrasi Kofein Sebagai Antiselulit dalam Sediaan Hidrogel, Hidroalkoholik Gel, dan Emulsi Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshita Djajadisastra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anticellulite topical gel preparation with caffeine as an active ingredient needs a penetration enhancer to reach subcutaneous layer. Sodium hyaluronate (NaHA, the sodium salt of hyaluronic acid, is a hydrophilic polysaccharide derivative polymer. It has an ability to enhance percutaneous penetration by loosening the dense of the compact substance of stratum corneum. The aim of this research was to observe the effects of NaHA on caffeine penetration as an anticellulite active agent in three types of gel preparation: hydrogel, hydroalcoholic gel, and gel emulsion. Each gel type contained caffeine 1,5% and was varied into three formulas. Formula 1 contained HPMC 2% as gel basis; formula 2 contained HPMC 2% and NaHA 0,5% as gel basis; formula 3 contained NaHA 2% as gel basis. Caffeine penetration properties were analyzed by Franz diffusion cell in vitro test using rat skin as membrane. Percent caffeine penetration of hydrogel formula 1, 2, 3 were 9,41 ± 0,01%; 11,74 ± 0,13%; 16,32 ± 0,03%, respectively. Percent caffeine penetration of hydroalcoholic gel formula 1, 2, 3 were 19,54 ± 0,02%; 22,99 ± 0,23%; 7,42 ± 0,08%, respectively. Percent caffeine penetration of gel emulsion formula 1, 2, 3 were 10,47 ± 0,19%; 13,41 ± 0,12%; 18,42 ± 0,06%, respectively. The result showed that NaHA enhanced the caffeine percutaneous penetration properties in various gel preparations, except hidroalkoholic gel formula 3.

  12. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  13. Physiology and pathology of extracellular vesicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first publication about blood plasma microparticles. Initially considered as cell fragments or “platelet dust”, extracellular vesicles currently attracted the attention of biochemists, biophysicists, physicians, pharmacists around the world. They are heterogeneous in structure and derived from many cell types, express different antigen and contain variety of biomolecules that determines wide range of biological activity, including procoagulant, regenerative, immunomodulating, and others. They play an important role in the pathophysiology of different diseases and conditions – from infarction, injuries and pregnancies to the “graft versus host” disease. The vesicles as medicaments and their carriers, as well as the drugs that affect them, are a rapidly developing field of research.

  14. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps in tissue pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Kumar, Santosh; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are innate immune systems against invading pathogens. NETs are characterized as released DNA mixed with cytoplasmic antimicrobial proteins such as myeloperoxidase, proteinase3 and neutrophil elastase. While NETs are thought to have an important role in host defense, recent work has suggested that NETs contribute to tissue injury in non-infectious disease states. Uncontrolled NET formation in autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, cancers and thrombotic diseases can exacerbate a disease or even be a major initiator of tissue injury. But spotting NETs in tissues is not easy. Here we review the available histopathological evidence on the presence of NETs in a variety of diseases. We discuss technical difficulties and potential sources of misinterpretation while trying to detect NETs in tissue samples.

  16. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre‐B cell colony‐enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro‐environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro‐environment. PMID:27128025

  17. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Kadota

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  19. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids.

  20. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  1. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results.

  2. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results. PMID:28358895

  3. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  4. Role of extracellular superoxide dismutase in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Qin, Zhenyu; Laude, Karine; Kim, Ha Won; McCann, Louise; Folz, J Rodney; Dikalov, Sergey; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2006-09-01

    We previously found that angiotensin II-induced hypertension increases vascular extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD), and proposed that this is a compensatory mechanism that blunts the hypertensive response and preserves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. To test this hypothesis, we studied ecSOD-deficient mice. ecSOD(-/-) and C57Blk/6 mice had similar blood pressure at baseline; however, the hypertension caused by angiotensin II was greater in ecSOD(-/-) compared with wild-type mice (168 versus 147 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.01). In keeping with this, angiotensin II increased superoxide and reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in small mesenteric arterioles to a greater extent in ecSOD(-/-) than in wild-type mice. In contrast to these findings in resistance vessels, angiotensin II paradoxically improved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, reduced intracellular and extracellular superoxide, and increased NO production in aortas of ecSOD(-/-) mice. Whereas aortic expression of endothelial NO synthase, Cu/ZnSOD, and MnSOD were not altered in ecSOD(-/-) mice, the activity of Cu/ZnSOD was increased by 80% after angiotensin II infusion. This was associated with a concomitant increase in expression of the copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD in the aorta but not in the mesenteric arteries. Moreover, the angiotensin II-induced increase in aortic reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity was diminished in ecSOD(-/-) mice as compared with controls. Thus, during angiotensin II infusion, ecSOD reduces hypertension, minimizes vascular superoxide production, and preserves endothelial function in resistance arterioles. We also identified novel compensatory mechanisms involving upregulation of copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD, increased Cu/ZnSOD activity, and decreased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity in larger vessels. These compensatory mechanisms preserve large vessel function when ecSOD is absent in

  5. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  6. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  7. Actuation and ion transportation of polyelectrolyte gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Xiao

    2010-04-01

    Consisting of charged network swollen with ionic solution, polyelectrolyte gels are known for their salient characters including ion exchange and stimuli responsiveness. The active properties of polyelectrolyte gels are mostly due to the migration of solvent molecules and solute ions, and their interactions with the fixed charges on the network. In this paper, we extend the recently developed nonlinear field theory of polyelectrolyte gels by assuming that the kinetic process is limited by the rate of the transportation of mobile species. To study the coupled mechanical deformation, ion migration, and electric field, we further specialize the model to the case of a laterally constrained gel sheet. By solving the field equations in two limiting cases: the equilibrium state and the steady state, we calculate the mechanical responses of the gel to the applied electric field, and study the dependency on various parameters. The results recover the behavior observed in experiments in which polyelectrolyte gels are used as actuators, such as the ionic polymer metal composite. In addition, the model reveals the mechanism of the selectivity in ion transportation. Although by assuming specific material laws, the reduced system resembles those in most existing models in the literature, the theory can be easily generalized by using more realistic free-energy functions and kinetic laws. The adaptability of the theory makes it suitable for studying many similar material systems and phenomena.

  8. Cavitation of a Physically Associating Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Satish; Kundu, Santanu

    Self-assembly of block copolymers in selective solvents form ordered structures such as micelles, vesicles, and physically crosslinked gels due to difference in their interaction with solvents. These gels have wide range of applications in tissue engineering, food science and biomedical field due to their tunable properties and responsiveness with changing environmental conditions. Pressurization of a defect inside a physically associating gel can lead to elastic instability (cavitation) leading to failure of the gel. The failure behavior involves dissociation of physical networks. A thermoreversible, physically associating gel with different volume fractions of a triblock copolymer, poly (methyl methacrylate)-poly (n-butyl acrylate)-poly (methyl methacrylate) [PMMA-PnBA-PMMA] in 2-ethyl 1-hexanol, a midblock selective solvent, is considered here. Mechanical properties were investigated using shear rheology and cavitation experiments. The experimental data is fitted with a constitutive model that captures the stiffening behavior followed by softening behavior of a physical gel. Finite element analysis has been performed on cavitation rheology geometry to capture the failure behavior and to calculate energy release rate during cavitation experiments.

  9. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels; Etude du gel d`alteration des verres nucleaires et synthese de gels modeles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-10-05

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs.

  10. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Danieli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries.

  11. Actuator device utilizing a conductive polymer gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Douglas A.; Irvin, David J.

    2004-02-03

    A valve actuator based on a conductive polymer gel is disclosed. A nonconductive housing is provided having two separate chambers separated by a porous frit. The conductive polymer is held in one chamber and an electrolyte solution, used as a source of charged ions, is held in the second chamber. The ends of the housing a sealed with a flexible elastomer. The polymer gel is further provide with electrodes with which to apply an electrical potential across the gel in order to initiate an oxidation reaction which in turn drives anions across the porous frit and into the polymer gel, swelling the volume of the gel and simultaneously contracting the volume of the electrolyte solution. Because the two end chambers are sealed the flexible elastomer expands or contracts with the chamber volume change. By manipulating the potential across the gel the motion of the elastomer can be controlled to act as a "gate" to open or close a fluid channel and thereby control flow through that channel.

  12. Characterization of Early-Phase Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanbao; Kwon, Keehwan; Tsitrin, Tamara; Bekele, Shiferaw; Sikorski, Patricia; Nelson, Karen E; Pieper, Rembert

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have an important role in the antimicrobial defense and resolution of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our research suggests that a mechanism known as neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a defense strategy to combat pathogens that have invaded the urinary tract. A set of human urine specimens with very high neutrophil counts had microscopic evidence of cellular aggregation and lysis. Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase) treatment resulted in disaggregation of such structures, release of DNA fragments and a proteome enriched in histones and azurophilic granule effectors whose quantitative composition was similar to that of previously described in vitro-formed NETs. The effector proteins were further enriched in DNA-protein complexes isolated in native PAGE gels. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a flattened morphology of neutrophils associated with decondensed chromatin, remnants of granules in the cell periphery, and myeloperoxidase co-localized with extracellular DNA, features consistent with early-phase NETs. Nuclear staining revealed that a considerable fraction of bacterial cells in these structures were dead. The proteomes of two pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were indicative of adaptive responses to early-phase NETs, specifically the release of virulence factors and arrest of ribosomal protein synthesis. Finally, we discovered patterns of proteolysis consistent with widespread cleavage of proteins by neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3 and cathepsin G and evidence of citrullination in many nuclear proteins.

  13. Characterization of Early-Phase Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanbao; Kwon, Keehwan; Tsitrin, Tamara; Sikorski, Patricia; Nelson, Karen E.; Pieper, Rembert

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have an important role in the antimicrobial defense and resolution of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Our research suggests that a mechanism known as neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is a defense strategy to combat pathogens that have invaded the urinary tract. A set of human urine specimens with very high neutrophil counts had microscopic evidence of cellular aggregation and lysis. Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase) treatment resulted in disaggregation of such structures, release of DNA fragments and a proteome enriched in histones and azurophilic granule effectors whose quantitative composition was similar to that of previously described in vitro-formed NETs. The effector proteins were further enriched in DNA-protein complexes isolated in native PAGE gels. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a flattened morphology of neutrophils associated with decondensed chromatin, remnants of granules in the cell periphery, and myeloperoxidase co-localized with extracellular DNA, features consistent with early-phase NETs. Nuclear staining revealed that a considerable fraction of bacterial cells in these structures were dead. The proteomes of two pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, were indicative of adaptive responses to early-phase NETs, specifically the release of virulence factors and arrest of ribosomal protein synthesis. Finally, we discovered patterns of proteolysis consistent with widespread cleavage of proteins by neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3 and cathepsin G and evidence of citrullination in many nuclear proteins. PMID:28129394

  14. Purification and biochemical characterization of a halotolerant Staphylococcus sp. extracellular lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Lobna; Kamoun, Jannet; Ali, Madiha Bou; Jallouli, Raida; Bradai, Rim; Mechichi, Tahar; Gargouri, Youssef; Ali, Yassine Ben; Aloulou, Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    We have isolated a lipolytic halotolerant bacterium, designated as CJ3, that was identified as a Staphylococcus sp. Culture conditions were optimized and the highest extracellular lipase production amounting to 5 U/ml was achieved after 24 h of cultivation. The extracellular lipase was purified 24-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation and a Sephacryl S-200 chromatography, and its molecular mass was found to be around 38 kDa, as revealed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The lipase substrate specificity was investigated using short (tributyrin) and long (olive oil) chain triglyceride substrates. The lipase was inhibited by submicellar concentrations of Triton X-100, and maximum specific activities were found to be 802 U/mg on tributyrin and 260 U/mg on olive oil at pH 8.0 and 45 °C. The lipase was fairly stable in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0, and about 69% of its activity was retained after incubation at 45 °C for 60 min. The enzyme showed a high tolerance to a wide range of salt concentration and a good stability in organic solvents, especially in long-chain alcohols.

  15. Mechanistic antimicrobial approach of extracellularly synthesized silver nanoparticles against gram positive and gram negative bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamboli, Dhawal P.; Lee, Dae Sung, E-mail: daesung@knu.ac.kr

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Bacterial extracelluar enzymes stabilized the silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). • AgNPs formation was characterized by analytical techniques such as UV–vis, TEM, and FTIR. • AgNPs showed obvious antimicrobial activity against both gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. • A mechanism of AgNPs’ antimicrobial activity was proposed. -- Abstract: The development of eco-friendly and reliable processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles has attracted considerable interest in nanotechnology. In this study, an extracellular enzyme system of a newly isolated microorganism, Exiguobacterium sp. KNU1, was used for the reduction of AgNO{sub 3} solutions to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The extracellularly biosynthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNPs were approximately 30 nm (range 5–50 nm) in size, well-dispersed and spherical. The AgNPs were evaluated for their antimicrobial effects on different gram negative and gram positive bacteria using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. Reasonable antimicrobial activity against Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was observed. The morphological changes occurred in all the microorganisms tested. In particular, E. coli exhibited DNA fragmentation after being treated with the AgNPs. Finally, the mechanism for their bactericidal activity was proposed according to the results of scanning electron microscopy and single cell gel electrophoresis.

  16. Preparation of continuous alumina gel fibres by aqueous sol–gel process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hongbin Tan; Xiaoling Ma; Mingxing Fu

    2013-02-01

    Continuous alumina gel fibres were prepared by sol–gel method. The spinning sol was prepared by mixing aluminum nitrate, lactic acid and polyvinylpyrrolidone with a mass ratio of 10:3:1.5. Thermogravimetry–differential scanning calorimetry (TG–DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the properties of the gel and ceramic fibres. The Al2O3 fibres with a uniform diameter can be obtained by sintering gel fibres at 1200 °C.

  17. The Gel Electrophoresis Markup Language (GelML) from the Proteomics Standards Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank; Hoogland, Christine; Martinez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Medina-Aunon, J. Alberto; Albar, Juan Pablo; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Wipat, Anil; Hermjakob, Henning; Almeida, Jonas S; Stanislaus, Romesh; Paton, Norman W; Jones, Andrew R

    2011-01-01

    The Human Proteome Organisation’s Proteomics Standards Initiative (HUPO-PSI) has developed the GelML data exchange format for representing gel electrophoresis experiments performed in proteomics investigations. The format closely follows the reporting guidelines for gel electrophoresis, which are part of the Minimum Information About a Proteomics Experiment (MIAPE) set of modules. GelML supports the capture of metadata (such as experimental protocols) and data (such as gel images) resulting from gel electrophoresis so that laboratories can be compliant with the MIAPE Gel Electrophoresis guidelines, while allowing such data sets to be exchanged or downloaded from public repositories. The format is sufficiently flexible to capture data from a broad range of experimental processes, and complements other PSI formats for mass spectrometry data and the results of protein and peptide identifications to capture entire gel-based proteome workflows. GelML has resulted from the open standardisation process of PSI consisting of both public consultation and anonymous review of the specifications. PMID:20677327

  18. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Controls VEGF Signaling and Processing in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Kelsey D; Teran, Madelane; Nugent, Matthew A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF) drives endothelial cell maintenance and angiogenesis. Endothelial cell behavior is altered by the stiffness of the substrate the cells are attached to suggesting that VEGF activity might be influenced by the mechanical cellular environment. We hypothesized that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness modifies VEGF-cell-matrix tethering leading to altered VEGF processing and signaling. We analyzed VEGF binding, internalization, and signaling as a function of substrate stiffness in endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (Fn) linked polyacrylamide gels. Cell produced extracellular matrices on the softest substrates were least capable of binding VEGF, but the cells exhibited enhanced VEGF internalization and signaling compared to cells on all other substrates. Inhibiting VEGF-matrix binding with sucrose octasulfate decreased cell-internalization of VEGF and, inversely, heparin pre-treatment to enhance Fn-matrix binding of VEGF increased cell-internalization of VEGF regardless of matrix stiffness. β1 integrins, which connect cells to Fn, modulated VEGF uptake in a stiffness dependent fashion. Cells on hard surfaces showed decreased levels of activated β1 and inhibition of β1 integrin resulted in a greater proportional decrease in VEGF internalization than in cells on softer matrices. Extracellular matrix binding is necessary for VEGF internalization. Stiffness modifies the coordinated actions of VEGF-matrix binding and β1 integrin binding/activation, which together are critical for VEGF internalization. This study provides insight into how the microenvironment may influence tissue regeneration and response to injury and disease. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2026-2039, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Extracellular matrix and cell surface as determinants of connective tissue differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M

    1989-09-01

    This paper reviews in vitro studies, largely from the author's laboratory, concerning the conditions that are permissive for the differentiation of limb bud mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes. In high-density cell culture, even in a defined medium, the same normal sequence of events that is found in vivo in developing cartilage is also observed. This system can be used to study heritable disorders in model systems such as in mutant mouse embryos. In addition, single mesenchymal cells can differentiate into hypertrophic chondrocytes in hydrated collagen gel or agarose cultures. A rounded cell shape promotes chondrogenesis, while a flattened cell shape promotes fibroblast differentiation. The actin cytoskeleton is shown to play a central role in regulating connective tissue cell differentiation. By use of such cell culture manipulations, it is now possible to grow large numbers of fibroblastic cells from human biopsy material for storage and to carry out experimental studies after re-expression of chondrogenesis in gel cultures. It is suggested that cytoskeletal-extracellular matrix interactions play a fundamental role in connective tissue differentiation. Matrix receptors might be developmentally regulated and modify epithelial effects on mesenchymal cells. In this way mesenchymal cells differentiate in a highly organized manner in spatial and temporal terms.

  20. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  1. Purification and characterization of an extracellular lipase from Mucor hiemalis f. corticola isolated from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulker, Serdar; Karaoğlu, Sengül Alpay

    2012-10-01

    We have screened 39 microfungi isolates originated from soil in terms of lipolytic activity. Out of all screened, a novel strain of Mucor hiemalis f. corticola was determined to have the highest lipase activity. The extracellular lipase was produced in response to 2% glucose and 2.1% peptone. The lipase was purified 12.63-folds with a final yield of 27.7% through following purification steps; ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, gel filtration column chromatography and ion exchange chromatography, respectively. MALDI-TOF MS analysis revealed 31% amino-acid identity to a known lipase from Rhizomucor miehei species. The molecular weight of the lipase was determined as 46 kDa using SDS-PAGE and analytical gel filtration. Optimal pH and temperature of the lipase were determined as 7.0 and 40°C, respectively. The enzyme activity was observed to be stable at the pH range of 7.0-9.0. Thermostability assays demonstrated that the lipase was stable up to 50°C for 60 min. The lipase was more stable in ethanol and methanol than other organic solvents tested. Furthermore, the activity of the lipase was slightly enhanced by SDS and PMSF. In the presence of p-NPP as substrate, K(m) and V(max) values of the lipase were calculated by Hanes-Woolf plot as 1.327 mM and 91.11 μmol/min, respectively.

  2. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EXTRACELLULAR ALKALINE PROTEASE PRODUCED FROM AN ISOLATED BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Bundela

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the studies on the purification and partial characterization of serine alkaline protease produced through submerged fermentation process from a locally isolated Bacillus subtilis. This strain, grown in a highly alkaline medium (pH 10, produces an extracellular proteolytic enzyme. The alkaline protease was purified in a simple two-step procedure involving ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified alkaline protease indicated an estimated molecular mass of 30KDa. It was more active in the range of 20-60ºC and had an optimum activity at 55ºC with optimum pH of 10.5. Characterization of the protease showed that it required certain cations such as Mg++, Mn++ and Ca++ for maximal activity. The serine nature of the alkaline protease was confirmed by PMSF inhibition. The temperature and pH stability of this Alkaline Protease from Bacillus Subtilismakes it potentially useful forindustrial applications.

  3. Abdominal wall reconstruction by a regionally distinct biocomposite of extracellular matrix digest and a biodegradable elastomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Hashizume, Ryotaro; Huber, Alexander; Amoroso, Nicholas J; D'Amore, Antonio; Badylak, Stephen F; Wagner, William R

    2016-09-01

    Current extracellular matrix (ECM) derived scaffolds offer promising regenerative responses in many settings, however in some applications there may be a desire for more robust and long lasting mechanical properties. A biohybrid composite material that offers both strength and bioactivity for optimal healing towards native tissue behavior may offer a solution to this problem. A regionally distinct biocomposite scaffold composed of a biodegradable elastomer (poly(ester urethane)urea) and porcine dermal ECM gel was generated to meet this need by a concurrent polymer electrospinning/ECM gel electrospraying technique where the electrosprayed component was varied temporally during the processing. A sandwich structure was achieved with polymer fiber rich upper and lower layers for structural support and an ECM-rich inner layer to encourage cell ingrowth. Increasing the upper and lower layer fiber content predictably increased tensile strength. In a rat full thickness abdominal wall defect model, the sandwich scaffold design maintained its thickness whereas control biohybrid scaffolds lacking the upper and lower fiber-rich regions failed at 8 weeks. Sandwich scaffold implants also showed higher collagen content 4 and 8 weeks after implantation, exhibited an increased M2 macrophage phenotype response at later times and developed biaxial mechanical properties better approximating native tissue. By employing a processing approach that creates a sheet-form scaffold with regionally distinct zones, it was possible to improve biological outcomes in body wall repair and provide the means for further tuning scaffold mechanical parameters when targeting other applications. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Purification and characterization of a thermostable extracellular phytase from Bacillus licheniformis PFBL-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasimoye, Feyisola O; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; Sanni, Morakinyo D

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular phytase from Bacillus licheniformis PFBL-03 was purified in three steps by using ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on a DEAE Sephadex A-50 column, and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The single protein band on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) suggested that the enzyme was homogeneous. The molecular mass determined from SDS-PAGE was 36 kD. The enzyme yield was 10% while the purification fold was 39. The purified phytase exhibited optimum activity at 55°C and was able to retain 55% of its original activity after 60 min of incubation at 80°C. The purified enzyme had optimum pH of 6.0 and was stable over a pH range of 4.0 to 7.5. The kinetic parameters K(m) and V(max) of the purified phytase for sodium phytate were 4.7 mM and 49.01 µmol/min. The activity of the enzyme was enhanced in the presence of Ca²⁺ but completely inhibited by Fe²⁺, Mn²⁺, and Cu²⁺. The exhibited characteristics of the purified phytase from Bacillus licheniformis PFBL-03 show that the enzyme has potential for applications in the animal feed industry.

  5. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  6. Uncertainty in 3D gel dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Deene, Yves; Jirasek, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) gel dosimetry has a unique role to play in safeguarding conformal radiotherapy treatments as the technique can cover the full treatment chain and provides the radiation oncologist with the integrated dose distribution in 3D. It can also be applied to benchmark new treatment strategies such as image guided and tracking radiotherapy techniques. A major obstacle that has hindered the wider dissemination of gel dosimetry in radiotherapy centres is a lack of confidence in the reliability of the measured dose distribution. Uncertainties in 3D dosimeters are attributed to both dosimeter properties and scanning performance. In polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout, discrepancies in dose response of large polymer gel dosimeters versus small calibration phantoms have been reported which can lead to significant inaccuracies in the dose maps. The sources of error in polymer gel dosimetry with MRI readout are well understood and it has been demonstrated that with a carefully designed scanning protocol, the overall uncertainty in absolute dose that can currently be obtained falls within 5% on an individual voxel basis, for a minimum voxel size of 5 mm3. However, several research groups have chosen to use polymer gel dosimetry in a relative manner by normalizing the dose distribution towards an internal reference dose within the gel dosimeter phantom. 3D dosimetry with optical scanning has also been mostly applied in a relative way, although in principle absolute calibration is possible. As the optical absorption in 3D dosimeters is less dependent on temperature it can be expected that the achievable accuracy is higher with optical CT. The precision in optical scanning of 3D dosimeters depends to a large extend on the performance of the detector. 3D dosimetry with X-ray CT readout is a low contrast imaging modality for polymer gel dosimetry. Sources of error in x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry (XCT) are currently under investigation and include inherent

  7. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  8. 21 CFR 524.660b - Dimethyl sulfoxide gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dimethyl sulfoxide gel. 524.660b Section 524.660b... Dimethyl sulfoxide gel. (a) Specifications. Dimethyl sulfoxide gel, veterinary contains 90 percent dimethyl sulfoxide in an aqueous gel. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000856 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions...

  9. Separation of Pneumcoccal Capsular Polysaccharide BY Gel Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Xiaoping; Huang Xinghua; Li Zhongqin; Chen Jiebo

    2004-01-01

    Separation of pneumcoccal capsular polysaccharide by gel was investigated in this paper. The gels used here were poly(acrylamide-co-sodium methacrylate)gels and prepared by free radical polymerization in aqueous solution. The experimental results indicated that gel extraction is a potential method to separate pneumcoccal capsular polysaccharide from its dilute solution.

  10. Preparation and characterization of lidocaine rice gel for oral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonogi, Siriporn; Kaewpinta, Adchareeya; Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Khongkhunthian, Sakornrat

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to prepare buccal anesthetic gels using rice as gelling agent. Rice grains of four rice varieties, Jasmine (JM), Saohai (SH), Homnil (HN), and Doisket (DS) were chemically modified. Buccal rice gels, containing lidocaine hydrochloride as local anesthetic drug were formulated using the respective modified rice varieties. The gels were evaluated for outer appearance, pH, color, gel strength, foaming property, adhesion, in vitro drug release and in vivo efficacy. It was found that the developed rice gels possessed good texture. Rice varieties showed influence on gel strength, color, turbidity, adhesive property, release property, and anesthetic efficacy. JM gel showed the lowest turbidity with light transmission of 86.76 ± 1.18% whereas SH gel showed the highest gel strength of 208.78 ± 10.42 g/cm(2). Lidocaine hydrochloride can cause a decrease in pH and adhesive property but an increase in turbidity of the gels. In vitro drug release profile within 60 min of lidocaine SH gel and lidocaine HN gel showed that lidocaine could be better released from SH gel. Evaluation of in vivo anesthetic efficacy in 100 normal volunteers indicates that both lidocaine rice gels have high efficacy but different levels. Lidocaine SH gel possesses faster onset of duration and longer duration of action than lidocaine HN gel.

  11. Cell wall peroxidases in the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta are responsible for extracellular superoxide production, and can display tyrosinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jackson L Y; Sulaiman, Mariam; Beckett, Richard P; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-04-01

    In our earlier work, we showed that the liverwort Dumortiera hirsuta produces an extracellular oxidative burst of superoxide radicals during rehydration following desiccation stress. The oxidative burst is a common early response of organisms to biotic and abiotic stresses, with suggested roles in signal transduction, formation of protective substances such as suberin, melanin and lignin and defense against pathogens. To discover which enzymes are responsible for the extracellular superoxide production, we isolated apoplastic fractions from D. hirsuta, surveyed for the presence of potential redox enzymes, and performed non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis activity stains. Various isoforms of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and tyrosinase (o-diphenolase) (EC 1.10.3.1) were present at significant levels in the apoplast. In-gel activity staining revealed that some peroxidases isoforms could produce superoxide, while tryosinases could readily metabolize 3,4-dihydroxy phenyl l-alanine (l-dopa) into melanins. Interestingly, some peroxidase isoforms could oxidize the native tyrosinase substrate l-dopa at significant levels, even in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, while others could do so only in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In D. hirsuta, peroxidases may play an important role in melanin formation. Possible functions for these diverse oxidases in liverwort biology are discussed.

  12. Degradation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and laminin) by serine-proteinases isolated from Lonomia achelous caterpillar hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Sara; Guerrero, Belsy; Salazar, Ana M; Gil, Amparo; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L

    2006-09-01

    Lonomia achelous is a caterpillar distributed in southern Venezuela and in northern Brazil that causes an acute hemorrhagic syndrome in people who have contact with its bristles. The effect of the crude hemolymph and its chromatographic fractions (FDII, Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2) on extracellular matrix proteins was studied. The chromatographic fractions show activities similar to plasmin and urokinase. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both lonomins appear as a protein band of 25 kDa under reduced conditions. By exclusion chromatography, the molecular weights of Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2 were 26.5 and 24.5 kDa, respectively. Fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin were degraded by all venom components. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under reduced conditions, shows that lonomins degrade fibronectin in four main fragments of 116, 60, 50 and 30 kDa. Molecular exclusion chromatography in native conditions shows that the molecular masses of these fragments are > or = 300, 62 and 27 kDa. The proteolytic effect of lonomins was abolished by benzamidine/HCl, iodoacetic acid and aprotinin. The extracellular matrix protein degradation together with the fibrino(geno)lytic activity of hemolymph and its fractions could explain, in part, the hemorrhagic syndrome, and the wound dehiscence in persons who have had contact with the L. achelous caterpillar.

  13. Insulin release from islets of Langerhans entrapped in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) polymer gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, B; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    1999-01-01

    A copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (98 mol% in feed) and acrylic acid, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) (P(NIPAAm-co-AAc)), was prepared by free radical polymerization for development of a thermally reversible polymer to entrap islets of Langerhans for a refillable biohybrid artificial pancreas. A 5 wt% solution of the polymer in Hanks' balanced salt solution forms a gel at 37 degrees C that exhibits no syneresis. Diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dextrans having molecular weights of 4400 and 70000 were used to evaluate mass transport in the gel at 37 degrees C. Insulin secretion from islets in the polymer gel was also investigated in both static and dynamic systems. The polymer gel exhibited excellent diffusion of FITC dextran 4400 and FITC dextran 70000 with diffusion ratios, D/D0 (ratio of diffusion in the gel to diffusion in water), of 0.20+/-0.04 and 0.35+/-0.17, respectively. Human islets entrapped in the polymer gel showed prolonged insulin secretion in response to basal (5.5 mM) glucose concentration compared to free human islets. Rat islets showed prolonged insulin secretion in response to high (16.5 mM) glucose concentrations compared to free rat islets. Rat islets in the polymer gel maintained insulin secretion in response to the higher glucose concentration for over 26 days. Rat islets entrapped by the polymer also released higher quantities of insulin more rapidly in response to changes in concentrations of glucose and other stimulants than rat islets entrapped in an alginate control. These results suggest that this material would provide adequate diffusion for rapid insulin release in an application as a synthetic extracellular matrix for a biohybrid artificial pancreas.

  14. Increasing extracellular matrix collagen level and MMP activity induces cyst development in polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD kidneys exhibit increased extracellular matrix (ECM collagen expression and metalloproteinases (MMPs activity. We investigated the role of these increases on cystic disease progression in PKD kidneys. Methods We examined the role of type I collagen (collagen I and membrane bound type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP on cyst development using both in vitro 3 dimensional (3D collagen gel culture and in vivo PCK rat model of PKD. Results We found that collagen concentration is critical in controlling the morphogenesis of MDCK cells cultured in 3D gels. MDCK cells did not form 3D structures at collagen I concentrations lower than 1 mg/ml but began forming tubules when the concentration reaches 1 mg/ml. Significantly, these cells began to form cyst when collagen I concentration reached to 1.2 mg/ml, and the ratios of cyst to tubule structures increased as the collagen I concentration increased. These cells exclusively formed cyst structures at a collagen I concentration of 1.8 mg/ml or higher. Overexpression of MT1-MMP in MDCK cells significantly induced cyst growth in 3D collagen gel culture. Conversely, inhibition of MMPs activity with doxycycline, a FDA approved pan-MMPs inhibitor, dramatically slowed cyst growth. More importantly, the treatment of PCK rats with doxycycline significantly decreased renal tubule cell proliferation and markedly inhibited the cystic disease progression. Conclusions Our data suggest that increased collagen expression and MMP activity in PKD kidneys may induce cyst formation and expansion. Our findings also suggest that MMPs may serve as a therapeutic target for the treatment of human PKD.

  15. The role of extracellular matrix in glioma invasion: a cellular Potts model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Brenda M; Kaufman, Laura J

    2008-12-15

    In this work, a cellular Potts model based on the differential adhesion hypothesis is employed to analyze the relative importance of select cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts in glioma invasion. To perform these simulations, three types of cells and two ECM components are included. The inclusion of explicit ECM with an inhomogeneous fibrous component and a homogeneously dispersed afibrous component allows exploration of the importance of relative energies of cell-cell and cell-ECM contacts in a variety of environments relevant to in vitro and in vivo experimental investigations of glioma invasion. Simulations performed here focus chiefly on reproducing findings of in vitro experiments on glioma spheroids embedded in collagen I gels. For a given range and set ordering of energies associated with key cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions, our model qualitatively reproduces the dispersed glioma invasion patterns found for most glioma cell lines embedded as spheroids in collagen I gels of moderate concentration. In our model, we find that invasion is maximized at intermediate collagen concentrations, as occurs experimentally. This effect is seen more strongly in model gels composed of short collagen fibers than in those composed of long fibers, which retain significant connectivity even at low density. Additional simulations in aligned model matrices further elucidate how matrix structure dictates invasive patterns. Finally, simulations that allow invading cells to both dissolve and deposit ECM components demonstrate how Q-Potts models may be elaborated to allow active cell alteration of their surroundings. The model employed here provides a quantitative framework with which to bound the relative values of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions and investigate how varying the magnitude and type of these interactions, as well as ECM structure, could potentially curtail glioma invasion.

  16. Hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion): formation and rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Aramaki, Kenji

    2008-11-04

    The formation, stability, and rheological behavior of a hexagonal phase based gel-emulsion (O/H1 gel-emulsion) have been studied in water/C12EO8/hydrocarbon oil systems. A partial phase behavior study indicates that the oil nature has no effect on the phase sequences in the ternary phase diagram of water/C12EO8/oil systems but the domain size of the phases or the oil solubilization capacity considerably changes with oil nature. Excess oil is in equilibrium with the hexagonal phase (H1) in the ternary phase diagram in the H1+O region. The O/H1 gel-emulsion was prepared (formation) and kept at 25 degrees C to check stability. It has been found that the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion depends on the oil nature. After 2 min observation (formation), the results show that short chain linear hydrocarbon oils (heptane, octane) are more apt to form a O/H1 gel-emulsion compared to long chain linear hydrocarbon oils (tetradecane, hexadecane), though the stability is not good enough in either system, that is, oil separates within 24 h. Nevertheless, the formation and stability of the O/H1 gel-emulsion is appreciably increased in squalane and liquid paraffin. It is surmised that the high transition temperature of the H1+O phase and the presence of a bicontinuous cubic phase (V1) might hamper the formation of a gel-emulsion. It has been pointed out that the solubilization of oil in the H1 phase could be related to emulsion stability. On the other hand, the oil nature has little or no effect on the formation and stability of a cubic phase based gel-emulsion (O/I1 gel-emulsion). From rheological measurements, it has found that the rheogram of the O/H1 gel-emulsion indicates gel-type structure and shows shear thinning behavior similar to the case of the O/I1 gel-emulsion. Rheological data infer that the O/I1 gel-emulsion is more viscous than the O/H1 gel-emulsion at room temperature but the O/H1 gel-emulsion shows consistency at elevated temperature.

  17. Fabricating porous materials using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Volosin, Alex

    2016-06-14

    Porous materials are fabricated using interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gels. A mixture or precursor solution including an inorganic gel precursor, an organic polymer gel precursor, and a solvent is treated to form an inorganic wet gel including the organic polymer gel precursor and the solvent. The inorganic wet gel is then treated to form a composite wet gel including an organic polymer network in the body of the inorganic wet gel, producing an interpenetrating inorganic-organic composite gel. The composite wet gel is dried to form a composite material including the organic polymer network and an inorganic network component. The composite material can be treated further to form a porous composite material, a porous polymer or polymer composite, a porous metal oxide, and other porous materials.

  18. Recovery of Peripheral Nerve with Massive Loss Defect by Tissue Engineered Guiding Regenerative Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimon Rochkind

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Guiding Regeneration Gel (GRG was developed in response to the clinical need of improving treatment for peripheral nerve injuries and helping patients regenerate massive regional losses in peripheral nerves. The efficacy of GRG based on tissue engineering technology for the treatment of complete peripheral nerve injury with significant loss defect was investigated. Background. Many severe peripheral nerve injuries can only be treated through surgical reconstructive procedures. Such procedures are challenging, since functional recovery is slow and can be unsatisfactory. One of the most promising solutions already in clinical practice is synthetic nerve conduits connecting the ends of damaged nerve supporting nerve regeneration. However, this solution still does not enable recovery of massive nerve loss defect. The proposed technology is a biocompatible and biodegradable gel enhancing axonal growth and nerve regeneration. It is composed of a complex of substances comprising transparent, highly viscous gel resembling the extracellular matrix that is almost impermeable to liquids and gasses, flexible, elastic, malleable, and adaptable to various shapes and formats. Preclinical study on rat model of peripheral nerve injury showed that GRG enhanced nerve regeneration when placed in nerve conduits, enabling recovery of massive nerve loss, previously unbridgeable, and enabled nerve regeneration at least as good as with autologous nerve graft “gold standard” treatment.

  19. Metabolic regulation of collagen gel contraction by porcine aortic valvular interstitial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Peter I; Qu, Xin; Geiszler, Andrew M; Nagrath, Deepak; Harmancey, Romain; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Grande-Allen, K Jane

    2014-12-06

    Despite a high incidence of calcific aortic valve disease in metabolic syndrome, there is little information about the fundamental metabolism of heart valves. Cell metabolism is a first responder to chemical and mechanical stimuli, but it is unknown how such signals employed in valve tissue engineering impact valvular interstitial cell (VIC) biology and valvular disease pathogenesis. In this study porcine aortic VICs were seeded into three-dimensional collagen gels and analysed for gel contraction, lactate production and glucose consumption in response to manipulation of metabolic substrates, including glucose, galactose, pyruvate and glutamine. Cell viability was also assessed in two-dimensional culture. We found that gel contraction was sensitive to metabolic manipulation, particularly in nutrient-depleted medium. Contraction was optimal at an intermediate glucose concentration (2 g l(-1)) with less contraction with excess (4.5 g l(-1)) or reduced glucose (1 g l(-1)). Substitution with galactose delayed contraction and decreased lactate production. In low sugar concentrations, pyruvate depletion reduced contraction. Glutamine depletion reduced cell metabolism and viability. Our results suggest that nutrient depletion and manipulation of metabolic substrates impacts the viability, metabolism and contractile behaviour of VICs. Particularly, hyperglycaemic conditions can reduce VIC interaction with and remodelling of the extracellular matrix. These results begin to link VIC metabolism and macroscopic behaviour such as cell-matrix interaction.

  20. Immobilization of Beauveria bassiana Lipase on Silica Gel by Physical Adsorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Hitomi Sugahara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular lipase from Beauveria bassianastrain CG481 was immobilized by using thirteen different immobilization protocols. Silica gel was chosen as the most suitable adsorbent with 94.8% of activity yield. The adsorption on silica gel did not change the optimum pH (8.5 and temperature (45ºC values of the free lipase (FL for lipolytic activity, and it showed higher activities in extreme conditions (pH 9.0 to 10.5, 60ºC. The lipase immobilized on silica gel (ILS showed enhanced stability at pH 7.0 after 120 h incubation (69.0% when compared to FL (33.3%. The thermal stability was also enhanced by immobilization at 60ºC in aqueous (64.6% and organic medium (95.1%, while FL showed only 40.6% of residual activity in aqueous medium and exhibited no activity for esterification reaction in n-heptane. The treatment of ILS with 0.8 M NaCl prevented lipase desorption while Triton X-100 (0.1% resulted the enzyme leakage. The ILS was reused for four times for esterification reaction with 80.8% of initial activity.

  1. Supramolecular Gel-Templated In Situ Synthesis and Assembly of CdS Quantum Dots Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; He, Jie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dawei; He, Haibing; Ren, Lianbing; Jiang, Biwang; Wang, Yong; Teng, Chao; Xue, Gi; Tao, Huchun

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have attempted to develop strategies for spontaneously organizing nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) geometries, it remains a fascinating challenge. In this study, a method for in situ synthesis and self-assembly of a CdS quantum dots (QDs) gel using a Cd supramolecular gel as a scaffold was demonstrated. During the QDs formation process, the Cd ions that constituted the Cd gels served as the precursors of the CdS QDs, and the oleic acid (OA) that ligated with the Cd in the supramolecular gels was capped on the surface of the CdS QDs in the form of carboxylate. The OA-stabilized CdS QDs were in situ synthesized in the entangled self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFIN) of the Cd gels through reactions between the gelator and H2S. As a result, the QDs exactly replicated the framework of the SAFIN in the CdS QD gels instead of simply assembling along the SAFIN of the supramolecular gels. Moreover, the CdS QDs showed extraordinary sensitivity in the fluorescence detection of IO4 - anions. The facile one-step method developed here is a new approach to assembling nanostructured materials into 3D architectures and has general implications for the design of low molecular mass gelators to bring desired functionality to the developed supramolecular gels.

  2. Optimal processing for gel electrophoresis images: Applying Monte Carlo Tree Search in GelApp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phi-Vu; Ghezal, Ali; Hsueh, Ya-Chih; Boudier, Thomas; Gan, Samuel Ken-En; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2016-08-01

    In biomedical research, gel band size estimation in electrophoresis analysis is a routine process. To facilitate and automate this process, numerous software have been released, notably the GelApp mobile app. However, the band detection accuracy is limited due to a band detection algorithm that cannot adapt to the variations in input images. To address this, we used the Monte Carlo Tree Search with Upper Confidence Bound (MCTS-UCB) method to efficiently search for optimal image processing pipelines for the band detection task, thereby improving the segmentation algorithm. Incorporating this into GelApp, we report a significant enhancement of gel band detection accuracy by 55.9 ± 2.0% for protein polyacrylamide gels, and 35.9 ± 2.5% for DNA SYBR green agarose gels. This implementation is a proof-of-concept in demonstrating MCTS-UCB as a strategy to optimize general image segmentation. The improved version of GelApp-GelApp 2.0-is freely available on both Google Play Store (for Android platform), and Apple App Store (for iOS platform). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Alkali cold gelation of whey proteins. Part I: sol-gel-sol(-gel) transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadé-Prieto, Ruben; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2009-05-19

    The cold gelation of preheated whey protein isolate (WPI) solutions at alkaline conditions (pH>10) has been studied to better understand the effect of NaOH in the formation and destruction of whey protein aggregates and gels. Oscillatory rheology has been used to follow the gelation process, resulting in novel and different gelation profiles with the gelation pH. At low alkaline pH, typical sol-gel transitions are observed, as in many other biopolymers. At pH>11.5, the system gels quickly, after approximately 300 s, followed by a slow degelation step that transforms the gel to a viscous solution. Finally, there is a second gelation step. This results in a surprising sol-gel-sol-gel transition in time at constant gelation conditions. At very high pH (>12.5), the degelation step is very severe, and the second gelation step is not observed, resulting in a sol-gel-sol transition. The first quick gelation step is related to the quick swelling of the WPI aggregates in alkali, as observed from light scattering, which enables the formation of new noncovalent interactions to form a gel network. These interactions are argued to be destroyed in the subsequent degelation step. Disulfide cross-linking is observed only in the second gelation step, not in the first step.

  4. Evolution of gel structure during thermal processing of Na-geopolymer gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxson, Peter; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2006-10-10

    The present work examines how the gel structure and phase composition of Na-geopolymers derived from metakaolin with varied Si/Al ratio evolve with exposure to temperatures up to 1000 degrees C. Gels were thermally treated and characterized using quantitative XRD, DTA, and FTIR to elucidate the changes in gel structure, phase composition, and porosity at each stage of heating. It is found that the phase stability, defined by the amount and onset temperature of crystallization, is improved at higher Si/Al ratios. Two different mechanisms of densification have been isolated by FTIR, related to viscous flow and collapse of the highly distributed pore network in the gel. Gels with low Si/Al ratio only experience viscous flow that correlates with low thermal shrinkage. Gels at a higher Si/Al ratio, which have a homogeneous microstructure composed of a highly distributed porosity, undergo both densification processes corresponding to a large extent of thermal shrinkage during densification. This work elucidates the intimate relationship between gel microstructure, chemistry, and thermal evolution of Na-geopolymer gels.

  5. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    to be formed. In addition the low amount of micellar calcium caused a more compact gel structure with many protein aggregates. The results of this study highlighted the importance of calcium for the formation of acid, calcium and rennet gels. The content and the interactions of calcium with proteins during...... salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... of temperature and pH may result in different final structure properties in dairy products such as cheese. A significant amount of calcium remained in the micelles between pH 4.8 and 4.6, this can contribute to the final strength of acid milk gels, such as in yogurt or in cream cheeses. After the gelation point...

  6. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  7. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  8. Unusual reversible elastomeric gels from Nostoc commune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sol; Gonzales, Karen N; Romero, Eduardo G; Troncoso, Omar P; Torres, Fernando G

    2017-04-01

    Nostoc commune cyanobacteria grow in extreme conditions of desiccation and nutrient-poor soils. Their colonies form spherical gelatinous bodies are composed of a variety of polysaccharides that allow them to store water and nutrients. In this paper, we study this type of biological gel that shows characteristics of both chemical and physical gels. The structure of this gel was assessed by means of scanning electron microscopy, plate-plate rheometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and absorption/desorption tests. The storage modulus of this gel was found to be frequency independent, as is usual for chemical gels. The stress sweeps showed a reversible stress softening behaviour that was explained in terms of the physical nature of the interactions of this network. The high density of physical crosslinks probably allows this physical network to behave as a highly elastomeric chemical network, limiting the relaxation of individual chains. On the other hand, reversibility is associated with the physical nature of its bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Polymethacrylate microparticles gel for topical drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouta, Hagar Ibrahim; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2010-10-01

    Evaluating the potentials of particulate delivery systems in topical drug delivery. Polymethacrylate microparticles (MPs) incorporating verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) as a model hydrophilic drug with potential topical clinical uses, using Eudragit RS100 and Eudragit L100 were prepared for the formulation of a composite topical gel. The effect of initial drug loading, polymer composition, particularly the proportion of Eudragit L100 as an interacting polymer component and the HLB of the dispersing agent on MPs characteristics was investigated. A test MPs formulation was incorporated in gel and evaluated for drug release and human skin permeation. MPs showed high % incorporation efficiency and % yield. Composition of the hybrid polymer matrix was a main determinant of MPs characteristics, particularly drug release. Factors known to influence drug release such as MPs size and high drug solubility were outweighed by strong VRP-Eudragit L100 interaction. The developed MPs gel showed controlled VRP release and reduced skin retention compared to a free drug gel. Topical drug delivery and skin retention could be modulated using particulate delivery systems. From a practical standpoint, the VRP gel developed may offer advantage in a range of dermatological conditions, in response to the growing off-label topical use of VRP.

  10. New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic monomers with radiation-crosslinked gel matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroki, A.; Yamashita, S.; Sato, Y.; Nagasawa, N.; Taguchi, M.

    2013-06-01

    New polymer gel dosimeters consisting of less toxic methacrylate-type monomers such as 2-hydroxymethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and polyethylene glycol 400 dimethacrylate (9G) with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) gel were prepared. The HPC gels were obtained by using a radiation-induced crosslinking technique to be applied in a matrix instead of a gelatin, which is conventionally used in earlier dosimeters, for the polymer gel dosimeters. The prepared polymer gel dosimeters showed cloudiness by exposing to 60Co γ-ray, in which the cloudiness increased with the dose up to 10 Gy. At the same dose, the increase in the cloudiness appeared with increasing concentration of 9G. As a result of the absorbance measurement, it was found that the dose response depended on the composition ratio between HEMA and 9G.

  11. Simultaneous immunoblotting analysis with activity gel electrophoresis and 2-D gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Der-Yen; Chang, Geen-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion blotting method can couple immunoblotting analysis with another biochemical technique in a single polyacrylamide gel, however, with lower transfer efficiency as compared to the conventional electroblotting method. Thus, with diffusion blotting, protein blots can be obtained from an SDS polyacrylamide gel for zymography assay, from a native polyacrylamide gel for electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) or from a 2-D polyacrylamide gel for large-scale screening and identification of a protein marker. Thereafter, a particular signal in zymography, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and 2-dimensional gel can be confirmed or identified by simultaneous immunoblotting analysis with a corresponding antiserum. These advantages make diffusion blotting desirable when partial loss of transfer efficiency can be tolerated or be compensated by a more sensitive immunodetection reaction using enhanced chemiluminescence detection.

  12. The extracellular matrix in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua-Rodríguez, Jacob; Oskarsson, Thordur

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is increasingly recognized as an important regulator in breast cancer. ECM in breast cancer development features numerous changes in composition and organization when compared to the mammary gland under homeostasis. Matrix proteins that are induced in breast cancer include fibrillar collagens, fibronectin, specific laminins and proteoglycans as well as matricellular proteins. Growing evidence suggests that many of these induced ECM proteins play a major functional role in breast cancer progression and metastasis. A number of the induced ECM proteins have moreover been shown to be essential components of metastatic niches, promoting stem/progenitor signaling pathways and metastatic growth. ECM remodeling enzymes are also markedly increased, leading to major changes in the matrix structure and biomechanical properties. Importantly, several ECM components and ECM remodeling enzymes are specifically induced in breast cancer or during tissue regeneration while healthy tissues under homeostasis express exceedingly low levels. This may indicate that ECM and ECM-associated functions may represent promising drug targets against breast cancer, providing important specificity that could be utilized when developing therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension, formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows: pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  14. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  15. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF EXTRACELLULAR BIOPOLYMER FLOCCULANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; LIU Binbin; XIONG Jinshui; YAN Jingchun

    2007-01-01

    The biopolymer flocculant (named PS-2) producing by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The PS-2 had high efficiency with small dosage, when dealing with kaolin suspension,formed larger floc, with big sedimentation rate, over a wide range of temperatures. Distributing of flocculating activity test showed that the biopolymer flocculant was an extracellular product. The composition analysis of purified biopolymer flocculant showed that it composed mainly of polysaccharide and nucleic acid. The content of polysaccharide was 86.7%, which determined by using phenol-vitriol method, and the content of nucleic acid was 7.8%, which determined by UV absorption method. The biopolymer flocculant as a powder form showed much better stability than that as a supernatant. The character of biopolymer flocculant was stable even it was heated to 100 ℃ when it in acidic condition. The optimal conditions to flocculate kaolin suspension were as follows:pH 8~12, flocculant dosage 1mL/L, and Ca2+ as the optimal cation.

  16. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  17. Extracellular Vesicles: potential roles in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier G de Jong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV consist of exosomes, which are released upon fusion of the multivesicular body with the cell membrane, and microvesicles, which are released directly from the cell membrane. EV can mediate cell-cell communication and are involved in many processes, including immune signaling, angiogenesis, stress response, senescence, proliferation, and cell differentiation. The vast amount of processes that EV are involved in and the versatility of manner in which they can influence the behavior of recipient cells make EV an interesting source for both therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Successes in the fields of tumor biology and immunology sparked the exploration of the potential of EV in the field of regenerative medicine. Indeed, EV are involved in restoring tissue and organ damage, and may partially explain the paracrine effects observed in stem cell based therapeutic approaches. The function and content of EV may also harbor information that can be used in tissue engineering, in which paracrine signaling is employed to modulate cell recruitment, differentiation, and proliferation. In this review, we discuss the function and role of EV in regenerative medicine and elaborate on potential applications in tissue engineering.

  18. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  19. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  20. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  1. Towards traceable size determination of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Varga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extracellular vesicles (EVs have clinical importance due to their roles in a wide range of biological processes. The detection and characterization of EVs are challenging because of their small size, low refractive index, and heterogeneity. Methods: In this manuscript, the size distribution of an erythrocyte-derived EV sample is determined using state-of-the-art techniques such as nanoparticle tracking analysis, resistive pulse sensing, and electron microscopy, and novel techniques in the field, such as small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and size exclusion chromatography coupled with dynamic light scattering detection. Results: The mode values of the size distributions of the studied erythrocyte EVs reported by the different methods show only small deviations around 130 nm, but there are differences in the widths of the size distributions. Conclusion: SAXS is a promising technique with respect to traceability, as this technique was already applied for traceable size determination of solid nanoparticles in suspension. To reach the traceable measurement of EVs, monodisperse and highly concentrated samples are required.

  2. Extracellular Vesicles and Autophagy in Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianyang Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a type of chronic joint disease that is characterized by the degeneration and loss of articular cartilage and hyperplasia of the synovium and subchondral bone. There is reasonable knowledge about articular cartilage physiology, biochemistry, and chondrocyte metabolism. However, the etiology and pathogenesis of OA remain unclear and need urgent clarification to guide the early diagnosis and treatment of OA. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small membrane-linking particles that are released from cells. In recent decades, several special biological properties have been found in EV, especially in terms of cartilage. Autophagy plays a critical role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Likewise, more and more research has gradually focused on the effect of autophagy on chondrocyte proliferation and function in OA. The synthesis and release of EV are closely associated with autophagy. At the same time, both EV and autophagy play a role in OA development. Based on the mechanism of EV and autophagy in OA development, EV may be beneficial in the early diagnosis of OA; on the other hand, the combination of EV and autophagy-related regulatory drugs may provide insight into possible OA therapeutic strategies.

  3. Relevance of extracellular DNA in rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietramellara, Giacomo; Ascher, Judith; Baraniya, Divyashri; Arfaioli, Paola; Ceccherini, Maria Teresa; Hawes, Martha

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising areas for future development is the manipulation of the rhizosphere to produce sustainable and efficient agriculture production systems. Using Omics approaches, to define the distinctive features of eDNA systems and structures, will facilitate progress in rhizo-enforcement and biocontrol studies. The relevance of these studies results clear when we consider the plethora of ecological functions in which eDNA is involved. This fraction can be actively extruded by living cells or discharged during cellular lysis and may exert a key role in the stability and variability of the soil bacterial genome, resulting also a source of nitrogen and phosphorus for plants due to the root's capacity to directly uptake short DNA fragments. The adhesive properties of the DNA molecule confer to eDNA the capacity to inhibit or kill pathogenic bacteria by cation limitation induction, and to facilitate formation of biofilm and extracellular traps (ETs), that may protect microorganisms inhabiting biofilm and plant roots against pathogens and allelopathic substances. The ETs are actively extruded by root border cells when they are dispersed in the rhizosphere, conferring to plants the capacity to extend an endogenous pathogen defence system outside the organism. Moreover, eDNA could be involved in rhizoremediation in heavy metal polluted soil acting as a bioflotation reagent.

  4. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell-cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable. Recent studies have shown the potential of hydrogels to mimic native ECM. Such an engineered native-like ECM is more likely to provide cells with rational cues for diagnostic and therapeutic studies. The research for novel biomaterials has led to an extension of the scope and techniques used to fabricate biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. In this article, we detail the progress of the current state-of-the-art engineering methods to create cell-encapsulating hydrogel tissue constructs as well as their applications in in vitro models in biomedicine.

  5. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  6. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  7. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  8. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  9. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  10. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  11. Extracellular matrix components in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Francisco; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Injured axons of the peripheral nerve are able to regenerate and, eventually, reinnervate target organs. However, functional recovery is usually poor after severe nerve injuries. The switch of Schwann cells to a proliferative state, secretion of trophic factors, and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (such as collagen, laminin, or fibronectin) in the distal stump are key elements to create a permissive environment for axons to grow. In this review, we focus attention on the ECM components and their tropic role in axonal regeneration. These components can also be used as molecular cues to guide the axons through artificial nerve guides in attempts to better mimic the natural environment found in a degenerating nerve. Most used scaffolds tested are based on natural molecules that form the ECM, but use of synthetic polymers and functionalization of hydrogels are bringing new options. Progress in tissue engineering will eventually lead to the design of composite artificial nerve grafts that may replace the use of autologous nerve grafts to sustain regeneration over long gaps.

  12. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  13. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  14. Involvement of extracellular and intracellular enzymes of Ceriporia sp. ZLY-2010 for biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang-Young; Kim, Ho-Yong; Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Seon-Hong; Lee, Soo-Min; Choi, In-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the interrelation between the biodegradation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by Ceriporia sp. ZLY-2010 and its fungal enzyme systems. The degradation rates of Aroclor 1254 and 1260 were 29.01% on day 5 and 36.80% on day 10, respectively. MnP (Manganese dependent peroxidase) and laccase activities showed the greatest increases in the samples containing Aroclors, indicating that extracellular enzymes of Ceriporia sp. ZLY-2010 were affected by the addition of Aroclors. However, the relationship between the biodegradation rate and extracellular enzymes might be obscured by the complexity of the biodegradation process. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase was inhibited and the biodegradation rate of the Aroclor decreased by adding the inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that intracellular enzymes play a significant role in the biodegradation of Aroclor. Complex extracellular and intracellular enzyme systems in Ceriporia sp. ZLY-2010 play an important role in degrading PCBs. Physiological changes of Ceriporia sp. ZLY-2010 caused by PCBs appeared to affect biodegradation of PCBs. However, it is necessary to further study the unidentified enzymes related to the biodegradation of Aroclor.

  15. Antibacterial Activity of Extracellular Protease Isolated From an Algicolous Fungus Xylaria psidii KT30 Against Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik Indarmawan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases became more serious problem for public health in recent years. Although existing antibacterial drugs have been relatively effective, they do not rule out the emergence of resistance to the drug. Therefore, the intensive exploration of new bioactive compounds from natural, especially peptide compounds began in recent decades in order-handling infection. This study aimed to isolate, purify and test the potential application of Xylaria psidii KT30 extracellular protease as antibacterial agent against Gram-positive bacteria. X. psidii KT30, a marine fungus isolated from red seaweed Kappaphycus alvarezii showed antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial compounds of this fungus were predicted as a group of proteases. Extracellular protease exhibited an optimum activity when potato dextrose broth was used as cultivation medium. Furthermore, the highest activity of these proteases was found on fungal extract after day 15 of cultivation with value of 2.33 ± 0.19 U/mL. The partial purification of proteases using G-75 column chromatography resulted in 2 groups of fractions and showed protease activity based on zymogram assay. The extracellular proteases obtained from those fractions have 3 patterns of molecular mass based on sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis which are 56.62, 89.12, 162.18 kDa.

  16. SURFACE DYNAMIC FRICTION OF POLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.P.Gong; G.Kagata; Y.Iwasaki; Y.Osada

    2000-01-01

    The sliding friction of various kinds of hydrogels has been studied and it was found that the frictional behaviors of the hydrogels do not conform to Amonton's law F =μW which well describes the friction of solids. The frictional force and its dependence on the load are quite different depending on the chemical structures of the gels, surface properties of the opposing substrates, and the measurement condition. The gel friction is explained in terms of interfacial interaction, either attractive or repulsive, between the polymer chain and the solid surface. According to this model, the friction is ascribed to the viscous flow of solvent at the interface in the repulsive case. In the attractive case, the force to detach the adsorbing chain from the substrate appears as friction. The surface adhesion between glass particles and gels measured by AFM showed a good correlation with the friction, which supported the repulsion-adsorption model proposed by the authors.

  17. Carbon gels derived from natural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Celzard

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Most carbon gels investigated so far and reportedin the literature were prepared from resorcinolcrosslinked with formaldehyde in water, and weregenerally dried with supercritical CO2 before beingpyrolysed. In the present paper, through someselected examples, we show how valuable carbongels can be derived from other phenolic resourceshaving a natural origin. Special emphasis is givento tannin and lignin, both derived from wood, aspotential precursors of carbon aero- and cryogels.However, natural compounds not obeying the usualconcepts of sol-gel chemistry may also be used forpreparing carbon gels, such as cellulose, and evenglucose. In the latter case, hydrothermal treatmentforces the phase separation to occur, and leads tomonoliths which can be advantageously convertedinto carbon aerogels by supercritical drying andsubsequent pyrolysis.

  18. On the scattering properties of polyelectrolyte gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, Jean-Louis; Joanny, Jean-François; Pincus, Phil

    1992-08-01

    We present a simple model for scattering properties of polyelectrolyte gels at swelling equilibrium. In the weak screening limit where the Debye-Hückel screening length is larger than the mesh size of the gel, the direct electrostatic interactions are negligible and the swelling is driven by the osmotic pressure of the counterions. The tension created by this pressure is transmitted through the crosslinks to the elastic chains which behave as isolated chains with an applied force at their end points. The structure factor of the gel can be split into a frozen component due to the average concentration heterogeneities and a thermodynamic component due to concentration fluctuations. The frozen component has a peak at a wavevector of the order of the mesh size of the gel, the thermodynamic component has a peak at a higher wavevector of the order of the inverse transverse radius of the chains. At infinite times the dynamic structure factor relaxes towards the frozen component of the static structure factor. In the limit of small wavevectors the relaxation is diffusive with a diffusion constant equal to the Stokes diffusion constant of the Pincus blobs of the stretched chains. The diffusion constant shows a minimum at a wavevector of the order of the inverse transverse radius of the chains. Nous présentons un modèle simple pour étudier la diffusion de rayonnement par des gels polylectrolytes à l'équilibre de gonflement. Dans la limite d'écrantage faible où la longueur d'écran de Debye-Hückel est plus grande que la maille du gel, les interactions électrostatiques directes sont négligeables et le gonflement est dû à la pression osmotique des contreions. La tension créée par cette pression est transmise par les noeuds du gel aux chaines élastiques qui se comportent comme des chaines isolées avec une force extérieure appliquée aux extrémités. Le facteur de structure du gel est la somme d'une composante gelée due aux hétérogénéités de concentration

  19. Synthesis and Characteristics of Organic Bentonite Gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The bentonite was modified using Ca-bentonite as a matrix and octadecyl/ hexadecyl ammoniumsized by dispersing it into the dimethyl benzene-methyl alcohol system fully.The optimum process conditions for organic modification were that the coating agent dosage is 22g/L, reaction time is 90 minutes and the pH value of pulp is 10.X-ray diffraction ( XRD ) analysis indicates that the d (001) value of the modified bentonite is 20.532A.The influence of gel temperature on its viscosity characteristic was studied.By analyzing the transmssion electron microscopy (TEM) images and observing the dispersed gel, the nanometer effect of the organic gel was discussed.

  20. A New Standard-Based Polynomial Interpolation (SBPIn) method to address gel-to-gel variability for the comparison of multiple denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2013-02-15

    The Standard-Based Polynomial Interpolation (SBPIn) method is a new simple three-step protocol proposed to address common gel-to-gel variations for the comparison of sample profiles across multiple DGGE gels. The advantages of this method include no requirement for additional software or modification of the standard DGGE protocol.

  1. A New Standard-Based Polynomial Interpolation (SBPIn) Method to Address Gel-to-Gel Variability for the Comparison of Multiple Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Profile Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Standard-Based Polynomial Interpolation (SBPIn) method is a new simple three-step protocol proposed to address common gel-to-gel variations for the comparison of sample profiles across multiple DGGE gels. The advantages of this method include no requirement for additional software or modification of the standard DGGE protocol. PMID:23234884

  2. Extracellular proteome of Trichoderma harzianum to identify proteins with biotechnological value

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ambrosino P; Lorito M; Scala V; Marra R; Vinale F; Soriente I; Ferraioli S; Carbone V; Ruocco M; Woo S L

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichoderma harzianum strain T22 parasitizes and controls many phytopatogenic fungi and is applied commercially as biological control agent. The production of hydrolitic enzymes appears to be a key factor in the parasitic process. We tested the endo-esochitinolitic and glucanolitic activities of culture filtrates of T22 grown under carbon and nitrogen starvation or in presence of biomass or cell walls of the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea , Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium ultimum. The highest level of enzimatic activities was found in culture where the mycoparasite interacted with a phytopathogenic fungus. Therefore we used a proteomic approach to investigate changes in the complex mixture of extracellular proteins secreted by T. harzianum strain T22 in order to identify proteins of potential biotechnology value for commercial and industrial use. Proteome technology has greatly enhanced our ability to conduct functional genomics studies. Nevertheless only a few studies have been published so far on the fungal extracellular proteome. Sample preparation remains the most critical step in analyses based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and it requires to be optimized for each specific application. In this study, our first aim was to set up the extraction protocol of the extracellular proteins secreted by T . harzianum strain T22 when it was grown in vitro . The secreted proteins were analysed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and substantial changes in the extracellular proteome of the mycoparasite have been observed. Comparing the 2D maps of the fungus grown in minimal medium with glycerol as carbon source (used as control condition) with those obtained in inducing conditions, a lot of novel proteins appeared. The higher number of novel and upregulated spots was obtained in the presence of Rhizoctonia solani biomass. Other spots were specifically up-regulated by the interaction with different plant pathogens. Differentially expressed

  3. Engineering strategies to recapitulate epithelial morphogenesis within synthetic three-dimensional extracellular matrix with tunable mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnikova, Y. A.; Jorgens, D. M.; Spirio, L.; Auer, M.; Sarang-Sieminski, A. L.; Weaver, V. M.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties (e.g. stiffness) of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell fate and tissue morphogenesis and contribute to disease progression. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mechanisms by which ECM rigidity modulates cell behavior and fate remains rudimentary. To address this issue, a number of two and three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel systems have been used to explore the effects of the mechanical properties of the ECM on cell behavior. Unfortunately, many of these systems have limited application because fiber architecture, adhesiveness and/or pore size often change in parallel when gel elasticity is varied. Here we describe the use of ECM-adsorbed, synthetic, self-assembling peptide (SAP) gels that are able to recapitulate normal epithelial acini morphogenesis and gene expression in a 3D context. By exploiting the range of viscoelasticity attainable with these SAP gels, and their ability to recreate native-like ECM fibril topology with minimal variability in ligand density and pore size, we were able to reconstitute normal and tumor-like phenotypes and gene expression patterns in nonmalignant mammary epithelial cells. Accordingly, this SAP hydrogel system presents the first tunable system capable of independently assessing the interplay between ECM stiffness and multi-cellular epithelial phenotype in a 3D context. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  4. Matching Two-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis' Spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Anjos, António; AL-Tam, Faroq; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches. This ar......This paper describes an approach for matching Two-Dimensional Electrophoresis (2-DE) gels' spots, involving the use of image registration. The number of false positive matches produced by the proposed approach is small, when compared to academic and commercial state-of-the-art approaches...

  5. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, John M.

    1992-01-01

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  6. Sol-gel synthesis of lithium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, M.A. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Mexico City (Mexico); Jimenez-Becerril, J. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica]|[Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica; Bulbulian, S. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica; Lara, V.H. [Univ. Autonoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    1996-02-01

    LiAlO{sub 2} was prepared by two sol-gel methods using simultaneous hydrolysis of the reagents: aluminum sec-butoxide/lithium methoxide and aluminum sec-butoxide/LiOH. The resulting ceramic powders were compared with those prepared by two conventional methods (i.e., solid-state fusion and peroxide). The sol-gel method provided powders with a very high {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} content after calcining at temperatures as low as 700 C when LiOH was used. The solids were characterized by AAS, DTA, TGA, XRD, and SEM.

  7. Ordering phenomena in ABA triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynders, K.; Mischenko, N.; Kleppinger, R.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature and concentration dependencies of the degree of order in ABA triblock copolymer gels are discussed. Two factors can influence the ordering phenomena: the conformation of the midblocks (links of the network) and the polydispersity of the endblock domains (nodes of the network). The lat......Temperature and concentration dependencies of the degree of order in ABA triblock copolymer gels are discussed. Two factors can influence the ordering phenomena: the conformation of the midblocks (links of the network) and the polydispersity of the endblock domains (nodes of the network...

  8. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  9. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shin-Ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P C; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-02-06

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a "message in a bottle" to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  10. Insertion of tetracysteine motifs into dopamine transporter extracellular domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Navaroli

    Full Text Available The neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT is a major determinant of extracellular dopamine (DA levels and is the primary target for a variety of addictive and therapeutic psychoactive drugs. DAT is acutely regulated by protein kinase C (PKC activation and amphetamine exposure, both of which modulate DAT surface expression by endocytic trafficking. In order to use live imaging approaches to study DAT endocytosis, methods are needed to exclusively label the DAT surface pool. The use of membrane impermeant, sulfonated biarsenic dyes holds potential as one such approach, and requires introduction of an extracellular tetracysteine motif (tetraCys; CCPGCC to facilitate dye binding. In the current study, we took advantage of intrinsic proline-glycine (Pro-Gly dipeptides encoded in predicted DAT extracellular domains to introduce tetraCys motifs into DAT extracellular loops 2, 3, and 4. [(3H]DA uptake studies, surface biotinylation and fluorescence microscopy in PC12 cells indicate that tetraCys insertion into the DAT second extracellular loop results in a functional transporter that maintains PKC-mediated downregulation. Introduction of tetraCys into extracellular loops 3 and 4 yielded DATs with severely compromised function that failed to mature and traffic to the cell surface. This is the first demonstration of successful introduction of a tetracysteine motif into a DAT extracellular domain, and may hold promise for use of biarsenic dyes in live DAT imaging studies.

  11. Gel de plaquetas: arcabouço 3D para cultura celular Platelet gel: 3D scaffold for cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O reparo tissular é o objetivo final da cirurgia. A cultura celular requer arcabouço mecânico que dê suporte ao crescimento celular e difusão dos nutrientes. O uso do plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP como um arcabouço 3D possui diversas vantagens: é material biológico, de fácil absorção pós-transplante, rico em fatores de crescimento, em especial PDGF- ββ e TGF-β que estimula síntese de matriz extracelular na cartilagem. OBJETIVO: Desenvolver arcabouço 3D à base de PRP. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Duas formas foram idealizadas: Sphere e Carpet. Condições estéreis foram utilizadas. O gel de plaquetas permaneceu em cultura celular, observado diariamente em microscópio invertido. RESULTADOS: Ambos arcabouços obtiveram sucesso, com aspectos positivos e negativos. DISCUSSÃO: A forma Sphere não aderiu ao plástico. Observou-se retração do gel e investigação ao microscópio dificultada devido às áreas opacas no campo visual. A forma Carpet não aderiu ao plástico e apresentou-se translúcida. O tempo de estudo foi de 20 dias. CONCLUSÕES: A produção de um arcabouço 3D PRP foi um sucesso, e trata-se de uma alternativa que necessita ser mais utilizado e investigado para que se consolide em uma rota eficiente e confiável na tecnologia de engenharia tissular, particularmente em cultura de tecido cartilaginoso.INTRODUCTION: Tissue repair has been the ultimate goal of surgery. Cell culture requires a mechanical scaffold that supports cell growth and nutrient diffusion. Using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a 3D scaffold presents various advantages: it is a biological material, easily absorbed after transplantation, rich in growth factors, in particular, PDGF-ββ and TGF-β that stimulate extracellular matrix synthesis in cartilage culture. OBJECTIVE: To develop a PRP 3D scaffold. Material and METHODS: Two forms were idealized: Sphere and Carpet. Sterile conditions were used. The platelet gel remained in culture

  12. Effects of pH and thermally sensitive hybrid gels on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhuojun; Shu, Yinglan; Wan, Chao; Wu, Chi

    2015-04-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow is an essential step for bone formation. The osteogenesis is normally induced by chemical mediators. Recent laboratory studies have revealed that mechanical properties of an extracellular matrix, typically hydrogels with different modules, also affect the fate of stem cells. The question is how to adjust their mechanical properties inside the body in biomedical applications. In this study, we designed/used a novel extracellular matrix, namely, a hybrid gel made of billions of injectable small thermally and pH-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) microgels whose swelling at the body pH and temperature physically jammed them and mesenchymal stem cells together, which enabled us to in situ apply an adjustable mechanical stress on those embedded stem cells. By treating the cell layer with the microgels, we found that an earlier incorporation of the microgels significantly increases the alkaline phosphatase activity, while a later addition of the microgels after the primary calcium deposition enhances the extracellular matrix mineralization in the mesenchymal stem cells cultures accompanied by up-regulation of osteogenic marker genes expression, presumably due to the calcium fixation by the carboxyl groups inside the microgels and the physical contact between the microgels and mesenchymal stem cells layers. These microgels provide an extracellular matrix microenvironment to affect the fate and biological behavior of mesenchymal stem cells, facilitating their potential applications in regenerative therapies.

  13. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A.; Lind, Jan; Wetherbee, Richard; Gretz, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Achnanthes longipes is a marine, biofouling diatom that adheres to surfaces via adhesive polymers extruded during motility or organized into structures called stalks that contain three distinct regions: the pad, shaft, and collar. Four monoclonal antibodies (AL.C1–AL.C4) and antibodies from two uncloned hybridomas (AL.E1 and AL.E2) were raised against the extracellular adhesives of A. longipes. Antibodies were screened against a hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble-fraction. The hot-water-insoluble/hot-bicarbonate-soluble fraction was fractionated to yield polymers in three size ranges: F1, ≥ 20,000,000 Mr; F2, ≅100,000 Mr; and F3, <10,000 Mr relative to dextran standards. The ≅100,000-Mr fraction consisted of highly sulfated (approximately 11%) fucoglucuronogalactans (FGGs) and low-sulfate (approximately 2%) FGGs, whereas F1 was composed of O-linked FGG (F2)-polypeptide (F3) complexes. AL.C1, AL.C2, AL.C4, AL.E1, and AL.E2 recognized carbohydrate complementary regions on FGGs, with antigenicity dependent on fucosyl-containing side chains. AL.C3 was unique in that it had a lower affinity for FGGs and did not label any portion of the shaft. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunocytochemistry indicated that low-sulfate FGGs are expelled from pores surrounding the raphe terminus, creating the cylindrical outer layers of the shaft, and that highly sulfated FGGs are extruded from the raphe, forming the central core. Antibody-labeling patterns and other evidence indicated that the shaft central-core region is related to material exuded from the raphe during cell motility. PMID:9536061

  14. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Walter H; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an 'end-stage' process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This review is not meant to

  15. Metabolic requirements for neutrophil extracellular traps formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Espinosa, Oscar; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina Bertha; López-Villegas, Edgar Oliver; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    As part of the innate immune response, neutrophils are at the forefront of defence against infection, resolution of inflammation and wound healing. They are the most abundant leucocytes in the peripheral blood, have a short lifespan and an estimated turnover of 1010 to 1011 cells per day. Neutrophils efficiently clear microbial infections by phagocytosis and by oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms. In 2004, a new neutrophil anti-microbial mechanism was described, the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) composed of DNA, histones and anti-microbial peptides. Several microorganisms, bacterial products, as well as pharmacological stimuli such as PMA, were shown to induce NETs. Neutrophils contain relatively few mitochondria, and derive most of their energy from glycolysis. In this scenario we aimed to analyse some of the metabolic requirements for NET formation. Here it is shown that NETs formation is strictly dependent on glucose and to a lesser extent on glutamine, that Glut-1, glucose uptake, and glycolysis rate increase upon PMA stimulation, and that NET formation is inhibited by the glycolysis inhibitor, 2-deoxy-glucose, and to a lesser extent by the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin. Moreover, when neutrophils were exposed to PMA in glucose-free medium for 3 hr, they lost their characteristic polymorphic nuclei but did not release NETs. However, if glucose (but not pyruvate) was added at this time, NET release took place within minutes, suggesting that NET formation could be metabolically divided into two phases; the first, independent from exogenous glucose (chromatin decondensation) and, the second (NET release), strictly dependent on exogenous glucose and glycolysis. PMID:25545227

  16. Lung extracellular matrix and redox regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Watson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis affects millions worldwide and, even though there has been a significant investment in understanding the processes involved in wound healing and maladaptive repair, a complete understanding of the mechanisms responsible for lung fibrogenesis eludes us, and interventions capable of reversing or halting disease progression are not available. Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the excessive expression and uncontrolled deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins resulting in erosion of the tissue structure. Initially considered an ‘end-stage’ process elicited after injury, these events are now considered pathogenic and are believed to contribute to the course of the disease. By interacting with integrins capable of signal transduction and by influencing tissue mechanics, ECM proteins modulate processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to differentiation and growth factor expression. In doing so, ECM proteins help orchestrate complex developmental processes and maintain tissue homeostasis. However, poorly controlled deposition of ECM proteins promotes inflammation, fibroproliferation, and aberrant differentiation of cells, and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, atherosclerosis and cancer. Considering their vital functions, ECM proteins are the target of investigation, and oxidation–reduction (redox reactions have emerged as important regulators of the ECM. Oxidative stress invariably accompanies lung disease and promotes ECM expression directly or through the overproduction of pro-fibrotic growth factors, while affecting integrin binding and activation. In vitro and in vivo investigations point to redox reactions as targets for intervention in pulmonary fibrosis and related disorders, but studies in humans have been disappointing probably due to the narrow impact of the interventions tested, and our poor understanding of the factors that regulate these complex reactions. This

  17. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  18. The Fsr Quorum-Sensing System of Enterococcus faecalisModulates Surface Display of the Collagen-Binding MSCRAMM Ace through Regulation of gelE▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Kenneth L.; Gao, Peng; Diaz-Garcia, Daniel; Sillanpää, Jouko; Nallapareddy, Sreedhar R.; Murray, Barbara E.; Harvey, Barrett R.

    2011-01-01

    Ace, a known virulence factor and the first identified microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) of Enterococcus faecalisis associated with host cell adherence and endocarditis. The Fsr quorum-sensing system of E. faecalis, a two-component signal transduction system, has also been repeatedly linked to virulence in E. faecalis, due in part to the transcriptional induction of an extracellular metalloprotease, gelatinase (GelE). In this study, we discovered that disruption of the Fsr pathway significantly increased the levels of Ace on the cell surface in the latter phases of growth. Furthermore, we observed that, in addition to fsrBmutants, other strains identified as deficient in GelE activity also demonstrated a similar phenotype. Additional experiments demonstrated the GelE-dependent cleavage of Ace from the surface of E. faecalis, confirming that GelE specifically reduces Ace cell surface display. In addition, disruption of the Fsr system or GelE expression significantly improved the ability of E. faecalisto adhere to collagen, which is consistent with higher levels of Ace on the E. faecalissurface. These results demonstrate that the display of Ace is mediated by quorum sensing through the action of GelE, providing insight into the complicated world of Gram-positive pathogen adhesion and colonization. PMID:21705589

  19. Surface acoustic waves induced micropatterning of cells in gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Shahid M; Manbachi, Amir; Samandari, Mohamadmahdi; Walch, Philipp; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Davoudi, Farideh; Wang, Wesley; Abrinia, Karen; Cooper, Jonathan M; Khademhosseini, Ali; Shin, Su Ryon

    2017-02-14

    Acoustic force patterning is an emerging technology that provides a platform to control the spatial location of cells in a rapid, accurate, yet contactless manner. However, very few studies have been reported on the usage of acoustic force patterning for the rapid arrangement of biological objects, such as cells, in a three-dimensional (3D) environment. In this study, we report on a bio-acoustic force patterning technique, which uses surface acoustic waves (SAWs) for the rapid arrangement of cells within an extracellular matrix-based hydrogel such as gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). A proof-of-principle was achieved through both simulations and experiments based on the in-house fabricated piezoelectric SAW transducers, which enabled us to explore the effects of various parameters on the performance of the built construct. The SAWs were applied in a fashion that generated standing SAWs (SSAWs) on the substrate, the energy of which subsequently was transferred into the gel, creating a rapid, and contactless alignment of the cells (<10 s, based on the experimental conditions). Following ultraviolet radiation induced photo-crosslinking of the cell encapsulated GelMA pre-polymer solution, the patterned cardiac cells readily spread after alignment in the GelMA hydrogel and demonstrated beating activity in 5-7 days. The described acoustic force assembly method can be utilized not only to control the spatial distribution of the cells inside a 3D construct, but can also preserve the viability and functionality of the patterned cells (e.g. beating rates of cardiac cells). This platform can be potentially employed in a diverse range of applications, whether it is for tissue engineering, in vitro cell studies, or creating 3D biomimetic tissue structures.

  20. A phenomenological model for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, damage, and plasticity of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Rachev, Alexander I; Gleason, Rudolph L

    2009-10-01

    Mechanical stimulation has been shown to dramatically improve mechanical and functional properties of gel-derived tissue engineered blood vessels (TEBVs). Adjusting factors such as cell source, type of extracellular matrix, cross-linking, magnitude, frequency, and time course of mechanical stimuli (among many other factors) make interpretation of experimental results challenging. Interpretation of data from such multifactor experiments requires modeling. We present a modeling framework and simulations for mechanically mediated growth, remodeling, plasticity, and damage of gel-derived TEBVs that merge ideas from classical plasticity, volumetric growth, and continuum damage mechanics. Our results are compared with published data and suggest that this model framework can predict the evolution of geometry and material behavior under common experimental loading scenarios.

  1. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K.

    2016-08-30

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials.

  2. Aplicações sinteticas de enzimas imobiliadas em organo-gel e gel de agar

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Neide

    1997-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciencias Fisicas e Matematicas As microemulsões água-em-óleo (água + óleo + surfactante) podem ser utilizadas para formar géis elásticos e termoreversíveis pela adição de gelatina. Este sistema é chamado de organo-gel ou MBG (do inglês, "microemulsion-based gels"). As mudanças que ocorrem no organo-gel, quanto a sua estabilidade, foram observadas fixando a concentração do surfactante AOT (di-2-etilhexil sulfosuccina...

  3. Multiple-phase behavior and memory effect of polymer gel

    CERN Document Server

    Annaka, M; Nakahira, T; Sugiyama, M; Hara, K; Matsuura, T

    2002-01-01

    A poly(4-acrylamidosalicylic acid) gel (PASA gel) exhibits multiple phases as characterized by distinct degrees of swelling; the gel can take one of four different swelling values, but none of the intermediate values. The gel has remarkable memory: the phase behavior of the gel depends on whether the gel has experienced the most swollen phase or the most collapsed phase in the immediate past. The information is stored and reversibly erased in the form of a macroscopic phase transition behavior. The structure factors corresponding to these four phases were obtained by SANS, which indicated the presence of characteristic structures depending on pH and temperature, particularly in the shrunken state. (orig.)

  4. Rheological properties of polymer micro-gel dispersions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zhaoxia; Li Yahua; Lin Meiqin; Li Mingyuan

    2009-01-01

    The influence of swelling time, temperature, NaCI concentration and polymer micro-gel concentration on rheological properties of polymer micro-gel dispersions was studied by using a HAAKE rheometer. The results showed that with increasing swelling time and NaCI concentration, the polymer micro-gel dispersions changed from a shear-thickening fluid to a Newtonian fluid. The polymer micro- gel dispersion show shear-thinning in non-saline water. At higher swelling temperature, the time of the polymer micro-gel dispersion showing shear-thickening was shorter. With increasing polymer micro-gel concentration, the dispersion changed from shear-thickening to shear-thinning.

  5. The mechanism and properties of acid-coagulated milk gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanokphat Phadungath

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Acid-coagulated milk products such as fresh acid-coagulated cheese varieties and yogurt areimportant dairy food products. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms involved in gel formation, physical properties of acid gels, and the effects of processing variables such as heat treatment and gelation temperature on the important physical properties of acid milk gels. This paper reviews the modern concepts of possible mechanisms involved in the formation of particle milk gel aggregation, along with recent developments including the use of techniques such as dynamic low amplitude oscillatory rheology to observe the gel formation process, and confocal laser scanning microscopy to monitor gel microstructure.

  6. Protein electrophoretic migration data from custom and commercial gradient gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Miller

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data related to the article “A method for easily customizable gradient gel electrophoresis” (A.J. Miller, B. Roman, E.M. Norstrom, 2016 [1]. Data is presented on the rate of electrophoretic migration of proteins in both hand-poured and commercially acquired acrylamide gradient gels. For each gel, migration of 9 polypeptides of various masses was measured upon completion of gel electrophoresis. Data are presented on the migration of proteins within separate lanes of the same gel as well as migration rates from multiple gels.

  7. Formation of macroporous gel morphology by phase separation in the silica sol-gel system containing nonionic surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junsheng Wu; Xiaogang Li; Wei Du; Hua Chen

    2005-01-01

    The phase separation and gel formation behavior in an alkoxy-derived silica sol-gel system containing Ci6EOi5 has been investigated. Various gel morphologies similar to other sol-gel systems containing organic additives were obtained by changing the preparation conditions. Micrometer-range interconnected porous gels were obtained by freezing transitional structures of phase separation in the sol-gel process. The dependence of the resulting gel morphology on several important reaction parameters such as the starting composition, reaction temperature and acid catalyst concentration was studied in detail. The experimental results indicate that the gel morphology is mainly determined by the time relation between the onset of phase separation and gel formation.

  8. Influence of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid on structure, mechanical properties, and glioma invasion of collagen I gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-li; Sun, Charles; Wilhelm, Matthew E; Fox, Laura J; Zhu, Jieling; Kaufman, Laura J

    2011-11-01

    To mimic the extracellular matrix surrounding high grade gliomas, composite matrices composed of either acid-solubilized (AS) or pepsin-treated (PT) collagen and the glycosaminoglycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) are prepared and characterized. The structure and mechanical properties of collagen/CS and collagen/HA gels are studied via confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM) and rheology. CRM reveals that CS induces fibril bundling and increased mesh size in AS collagen but not PT collagen networks. The presence of CS also induces more substantial changes in the storage and loss moduli of AS gels than of PT gels, in accordance with expectation based on network structural parameters. The presence of HA significantly reduces mesh size in AS collagen but has a smaller effect on PT collagen networks. However, both AS and PT collagen network viscoelasticity is strongly affected by the presence of HA. The effects of CS and HA on glioma invasion is then studied in collagen/GAG matrices with network structure both similar to (PT collagen-based gels) and disparate from (AS collagen-based gels) those of the corresponding pure collagen matrices. It is shown that CS inhibits and HA has no significant effect on glioma invasion in 1.0 mg/ml collagen matrices over 3 days. The inhibitory effect of CS on glioma invasion is more apparent in AS than in PT collagen gels, suggesting invasive behavior in these environments is affected by both biochemical and network morphological changes induced by GAGs. This study is among the few efforts to differentiate structural, mechanical and biochemical effects of changes to matrix composition on cell motility in 3D.

  9. Incorporation of tenascin-C into the extracellular matrix by periostin underlies an extracellular meshwork architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2010-01-15

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C null mice exhibited a similar phenotype, confined tibial periostitis, which possibly corresponds to medial tibial stress syndrome in human sports injuries. Periostin possessed adjacent domains that bind to tenascin-C and the other ECM protein: fibronectin and type I collagen, respectively. These adjacent domains functioned as a bridge between tenascin-C and the ECM, which increased deposition of tenascin-C on the ECM. The deposition of hexabrachions of tenascin-C may stabilize bifurcations of the ECM fibrils, which is integrated into the extracellular meshwork architecture. This study suggests a role for periostin in adaptation of the ECM architecture in the mechanical environment.

  10. Effectiveness of Gel Repellents on Feral Pigeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birte Stock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Millions of feral pigeons (Columba livia live in close association with the human population in our cities. They pose serious health risks to humans and lead to high economic loss due to damage caused to buildings. Consequently, house owners and city authorities are not willing to allow pigeons on their buildings. While various avian repellents are regularly introduced onto the market, scientific proof of efficacy is lacking. This study aimed at testing the effectiveness of two avian gel repellents and additionally examined their application from animal welfare standpoint. The gels used an alleged tactile or visual aversion of the birds, reinforced by additional sensory cues. We mounted experimental shelves with the installed repellents in a pigeon loft and observed the behavior of free-living feral pigeons towards the systems. Both gels showed a restricted, transient repellent effect, but failed to prove the claimed complete effectiveness. Additionally, the gels’ adhesive effect remains doubtful in view of animal welfare because gluing of plumage presents a risk to feral pigeons and also to other non-target birds. This study infers that both gels lack the promised complete efficacy, conflict with animal welfare concerns and are therefore not suitable for feral pigeon management in urban areas.

  11. Gels for the conservation of cultural heritage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglioni, Piero; Dei, Luigi; Carretti, Emiliano; Giorgi, Rodorico

    2009-08-04

    Gels are becoming one of the most important tools for the conservation of cultural heritage. They are very versatile systems and can be easily adapted to the cleaning and consolidation of works of art. This perspective reviews the major achievements in the field and suggests possible future developments.

  12. Sol-Gel Derived Hafnia Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Jay D.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Blum, Yigal; Sacks, Michael; Ellerby, Don; Johnson, Sylvia M.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Sol-gel derived hafnia coatings are being developed to provide an oxidation protection layer on ultra-high temperature ceramics for potential use in turbine engines (ultra-efficient engine technology being developed by NASA). Coatings using hafnia sol hafnia filler particles will be discussed along with sol synthesis and characterization.

  13. Sol-Gel Synthesis Of Aluminoborosilicate Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Jeffrey; Leiser, Daniel; Selvaduray, Guna

    1992-01-01

    Application of sol-gel process to synthesis of aluminoborosilicate powders shows potential for control of microstructures of materials. Development of materials having enhanced processing characteristics prove advantageous in extending high-temperature endurance of fibrous refractory composite insulation made from ceramic fibers.

  14. Drying and Rehydration of Calcium Alginate Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, R.; Li, L.; Fang, Y.; Appelqvist, I.; Mendes, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the rehydration properties of air-dried calcium alginate gel beads. Rehydration is shown to depend on alginate source (i.e. mannuronic to guluronic acid ratio) and the salt concentration in the rehydration medium. Rehydration curves are described adequately by the empirical W

  15. Non-diffusing radiochromic micelle gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin; Sekimoto, Masaya

    2010-11-01

    The addition of Laponite, a synthetic clay nanoparticle material to radiochromic leuco Malachite Green micelle hydrogel eliminates diffusion of the cationic dye by electrostatic binding. The clay nanoparticles also increased dose sensitivity ten-fold relative to the parent gel formulation. This material is a suitable 3D water equivalent dosimeter with optical CT readout.

  16. Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berglund, LJ; An, KN; O'Driscoll, SW

    2000-01-01

    In biomedical research, agarose gel is widely used in tissue culture systems because it permits growing cells and tissues in a three-dimensional suspension. This is especially important in the application of tissue engineering concepts to cartilage repair because it supports the cartilage phenotype.

  17. Dynamic pressure transmission through agarose gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berglund, LJ; An, KN; O'Driscoll, SW

    2000-01-01

    In biomedical research, agarose gel is widely used in tissue culture systems because it permits growing cells and tissues in a three-dimensional suspension. This is especially important in the application of tissue engineering concepts to cartilage repair because it supports the cartilage phenotype.

  18. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  19. Drying and Rehydration of Calcium Alginate Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, R.; Li, L.; Fang, Y.; Appelqvist, I.; Mendes, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the rehydration properties of air-dried calcium alginate gel beads. Rehydration is shown to depend on alginate source (i.e. mannuronic to guluronic acid ratio) and the salt concentration in the rehydration medium. Rehydration curves are described adequately by the empirical

  20. The charge transport in polymeric gel electrolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present thesis consisted in the study of the charge transport in gel electrolytes, which were obtained by photopolymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) sub n -dimethacrylates with n=3, 9, and 23, and the survey of structure and property relations for the optimization of the electrolyte composition. The pressure dependence of the electric conductivity was measured. (HSI)

  1. Screening of mucoadhesive vaginal gel formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ochoa Andrade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rational design of vaginal drug delivery formulations requires special attention to vehicle properties that optimize vaginal coating and retention. The aim of the present work was to perform a screening of mucoadhesive vaginal gels formulated with carbomer or carrageenan in binary combination with a second polymer (carbomer, guar or xanthan gum. The gels were characterised using in vitroadhesion, spreadability and leakage potential studies, as well as rheological measurements (stress and frequency sweep tests and the effect of dilution with simulated vaginal fluid (SVF on spreadability. Results were analysed using analysis of variance and multiple factor analysis. The combination of polymers enhanced adhesion of both primary gelling agents, carbomer and carrageenan. From the rheological point of view all formulations presented a similar behaviour, prevalently elastic and characterised by loss tangent values well below 1. No correlation between rheological and adhesion behaviour was found. Carbomer and carrageenan gels containing the highest percentage of xanthan gum displayed good in vitro mucoadhesion and spreadability, minimal leakage potential and high resistance to dilution. The positive results obtained with carrageenan-xanthan gum-based gels can encourage the use of natural biocompatible adjuvants in the composition of vaginal products, a formulation field that is currently under the synthetic domain.

  2. Production of lignocellulolytic enzymes by Trametes gallica and detection of polysaccharide hydrolase and laccase activities in polyacrylamide gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xun; Zhang, Renhuai; Zhang, Yizheng

    2004-01-01

    White rot fungus Trametes gallica was studied for the production of lignocellulolytic enzymes: cellulase, xylanase, laccase, manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP), and lignin peroxidase (LiP). The results demonstrated that low-nitrogen (2.2 mM N) and surface stationary cultivation favored production of extracellular MnP. MnP activity reached 118.1 UL(-1) while T. gallica was grown in a low-nitrogen culture containing phenylalanine. However, laccase levels observed in high-nitrogen (22 mM N) agitated cultures were much greater than those seen in low-nitrogen. The N source experiments seemed to reveal that NH4+ plays an important role in inducing MnP and laccase of the fungus. Results showed that T. gallica produces a series of the lignocellulolytic enzymes, and needs high N to produce all the enzymes during solid-state fermentation of wheat straw. This paper also presents a modified zymogram procedure to detect xylanase and laccase of T. gallica in polyacrylamide gel. Xylanase in crude enzyme of T. gallica was displayed by contacting protein gel strips with xylan substrate gels and by staining with iodine. By immersing the protein gel strips in o-tolidine solution, the blue-green zones representing laccase activity were visualized against a colorless background. Copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  3. 3D gel printing for soft-matter systems innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Kawakami, Masaru; Gong, Jin; Makino, Masato; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Saito, Azusa

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, several high-strength gels have been developed, especially from Japan. These gels are expected to use as a kind of new engineering materials in the fields of industry and medical as substitutes to polyester fibers, which are materials of artificial blood vessels. We consider if various gel materials including such high-strength gels are 3D-printable, many new soft and wet systems will be developed since the most intricate shape gels can be printed regardless of the quite softness and brittleness of gels. Recently we have tried to develop an optical 3D gel printer to realize the free-form formation of gel materials. We named this apparatus Easy Realizer of Soft and Wet Industrial Materials (SWIM-ER). The SWIM-ER will be applied to print bespoke artificial organs, including artificial blood vessels, which will be possibly used for both surgery trainings and actual surgery. The SWIM-ER can print one of the world strongest gels, called Double-Network (DN) gels, by using UV irradiation through an optical fiber. Now we also are developing another type of 3D gel printer for foods, named E-Chef. We believe these new 3D gel printers will broaden the applications of soft-matter gels.

  4. Synthetic and Biopolymer Gels - Similarities and Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horkay, Ferenc

    2006-03-01

    Ion exchange plays a central role in a variety of physiological processes, such as nerve excitation, muscle contraction and cell locomotion. Hydrogels can be used as model systems for identifying fundamental chemical and physical interactions that govern structure formation, phase transition, etc. in biopolymer systems. Polyelectrolyte gels are particularly well-suited to study ion-polymer interactions because their structure and physical-chemical properties (charge density, crosslink density, etc) can be carefully controlled. They are sensitive to different external stimuli such as temperature, ionic composition and pH. Surprisingly few investigations have been made on polyelectrolyte gels in salt solutions containing both monovalent and multivalent cations. We have developed an experimental approach that combines small angle neutron scattering and osmotic swelling pressure measurements. The osmotic pressure exerted on a macroscopic scale is a consequence of changes occurring at a molecular level. The intensity of the neutron scattering signal, which provides structural information as a function of spatial resolution, is directly related to the osmotic pressure. We have found a striking similarity in the scattering and osmotic behavior of polyacrylic acid gels and DNA gels swollen in nearly physiological salt solutions. Addition of calcium ions to both systems causes a sudden volume change. This volume transition, which occurs when the majority of the sodium counterions are replaced by calcium ions, is reversible. Such reversibility implies that the calcium ions are not strongly bound by the polyanion, but are free to move along the polymer chain, which allows these ions to form temporary bridges between negative charges on adjacent chains. Mechanical measurements reveal that the elastic modulus is practically unchanged in the calcium-containing gels, i.e., ion bridging is qualitatively different from covalent crosslinks.

  5. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  6. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  7. Ascorbic acid: a nonradioactive extracellular space marker in canine heart

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reil, G H; Frombach, R; Kownatzki, R; Quante, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1987-01-01

    The distribution pattern of ascorbic acid and L-[14C]ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue was compared with those of the classical radioactive extracellular space markers [3H]-inulin, [3H]sucrose, and Na82Br...

  8. Production of extracellular amylase from agricultural residues by a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... The production of extracellular amylases by solid state fermentation (SSF) was ... production of amylase have been studied and accordingly, optimum conditions have .... lactose and sucrose were tested along with control to.

  9. Extracellular Neurotransmitter Receptor Clustering: Think Outside the Box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthias Kneussel

    2010-01-01

    @@ Postsynaptic submembrane scaffolds cluster neurotransmitter receptors through intracellular protein-protein interactions. Growing evidence supports the view that extracellular factors can be almost as important to trigger synaptic receptor aggregation.

  10. Extracellular Matrix and Dermal Fibroblast Function in the Healing Wound

    OpenAIRE

    Tracy, Lauren E.; Minasian, Raquel A.; Caterson, E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Fibroblasts play a critical role in normal wound healing. Various extracellular matrix (ECM) components, including collagens, fibrin, fibronectin, proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and matricellular proteins, can be considered potent protagonists of fibroblast survival, migration, and metabolism.

  11. Placental extracellular vesicles and feto-maternal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M; Chamley, L W

    2015-01-29

    The human placenta is an anatomically unique structure that extrudes a variety of extracellular vesicles into the maternal blood (including syncytial nuclear aggregates, microvesicles, and nanovesicles). Large quantities of extracellular vesicles are produced by the placenta in both healthy and diseased pregnancies. Since their first description more than 120 years ago, placental extracellular vesicles are only now being recognized as important carriers for proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, which may play a crucial role in feto-maternal communication. Here, we summarize the current literature on the cargos of placental extracellular vesicles and the known effects of such vesicles on maternal cells/systems, especially those of the maternal immune and vascular systems. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  12. A secreted tyrosine kinase acts in the extracellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoli, Mattia R; Yum, Jina; Breitkopf, Susanne B; Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E; Xiao, Junyu; Worby, Carolyn; Wong, Swee-Kee; Lin, Grace; Edenius, Maja; Keller, Tracy L; Asara, John M; Dixon, Jack E; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Whitman, Malcolm

    2014-08-28

    Although tyrosine phosphorylation of extracellular proteins has been reported to occur extensively in vivo, no secreted protein tyrosine kinase has been identified. As a result, investigation of the potential role of extracellular tyrosine phosphorylation in physiological and pathological tissue regulation has not been possible. Here, we show that VLK, a putative protein kinase previously shown to be essential in embryonic development, is a secreted protein kinase, with preference for tyrosine, that phosphorylates a broad range of secreted and ER-resident substrate proteins. We find that VLK is rapidly and quantitatively secreted from platelets in response to stimuli and can tyrosine phosphorylate coreleased proteins utilizing endogenous as well as exogenous ATP sources. We propose that discovery of VLK activity provides an explanation for the extensive and conserved pattern of extracellular tyrosine phosphophorylation seen in vivo, and extends the importance of regulated tyrosine phosphorylation into the extracellular environment.

  13. EVpedia : a community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong-Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyong-Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Desiderio, Dominic M; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W; Gross, Julia Christina; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F; Hill, Michelle M; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young-Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming-Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, François; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I; Rodrigues, Marcio L; Roh, Tae-Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stępień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yáñez-Mó, María; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song; Nolte - t Hoen, Esther

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. RESULTS: We prese

  14. EVpedia : A community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Kyong Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Christina Gross, Julia; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'T Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; Van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, Francois; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stepień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yánez-Mó, Maria; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. Results: We prese

  15. Production of Extracellular Anti-leukaemic Enzyme Lasparaginase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of Extracellular Anti-leukaemic Enzyme Lasparaginase from Marine Actinomycetes by ... actinomycetes, screen them for Lasparaginase activity and characterise the enzyme. ... The apparent Km value for the substrate was 25 μM.

  16. Extracellular siderophores of rapidly growing Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Charlang, G; Horowitz, R M; Lowy, P H; Ng, B.; Poling, S M; Horowitz, N. H.

    1982-01-01

    The highly active extracellular siderophores previously detected in young cultures of Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum have been identified as the cyclic ester fusigen (fusarinine C), and its open-chain form, fusigen B (fusarinine B).

  17. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R-M; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit I; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Cordeiro-da Silva, Anabela; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H H; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Nyman, Tuula A; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Wauben, Marca H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/112675735; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological

  18. Enhanced sensitivity RNA gel loading buffer that enables efficient RNA separation on native gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Keqin; Zhou, Wenli; Ji, Wan; Davis, Sara

    2004-02-01

    RNA gel analysis is essential for quality assessment of RNA preparations for subsequent analysis such as microarrays and real-time PCRs. The routinely used standard electrophoresis of RNA through formaldehyde-containing agarose gels is not only labor-intensive and time-consuming, but also involves sizeable quantities of hazardous materials. Above all, it is not sensitive, requiring more than 1 microgram of RNA for the assay. Current gene expression profiling with microarrays and real-time PCR often involves limiting amounts of RNA. It is therefore important to have a more sensitive way to analyze RNA. Here we report an improved ethidium bromide-based RNA gel analysis system with our Superload buffer that increases sensitivity to 12.5 ng of total RNA and allows RNA analysis on a regular native Tris-acetate EDTA (TAE) agarose gel.

  19. Combined rheological and ultrasonic study of alginate and pectin gels near the sol-gel transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebrand, Michel; Kolb, Max; Axelos, Monique A V

    2006-10-01

    The sol-gel transition of biopolymer mixtures has been investigated by rheological and ultrasonic measurements. A scaling analysis of the data was performed for both types of measurements. A gel time was determined from rheology for the pure pectin samples, and the data could be fitted to a universal scaling form near the transition point. Its critical exponents are in good agreement with the predictions of scalar percolation theory. In addition, the ultrasonic signal of the pectin samples close to the transition was analyzed in terms of a high-frequency scaling approach for the attenuation and the velocity. For the alginate samples and the mixtures, for which the gel point cannot be determined reliably from rheology, the ultrasonic measurements were analyzed using the same scaling form as for the pectin sample, thus providing a method for estimating the gel point, even in the absence of rheological data.

  20. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-de...

  1. The extracellular matrix of plants: Molecular, cellular and developmental biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    A symposium entitled ``The Extracellular Matrix of Plants: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology was held in Tamarron, Colorado, March 15--21, 1996. The following topics were explored in addresses by 43 speakers: structure and biochemistry of cell walls; biochemistry, molecular biology and biosynthesis of lignin; secretory pathway and synthesis of glycoproteins; biosynthesis of matrix polysaccharides, callose and cellulose; role of the extracellular matrix in plant growth and development; plant cell walls in symbiosis and pathogenesis.

  2. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Featherstone, David E.; Scott A. Shippy

    2007-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μ...

  3. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness and Architecture Govern Intracellular Rheology in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Erin L.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating E...

  4. Influence of select extracellular matrix proteins on mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic commitment in three-dimensional contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Bayona, Silvia; Guiza-Arguello, Viviana; Qu, Xin; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S

    2012-12-01

    Growth factors have been shown to be powerful mediators of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) osteogenic differentiation. However, their use in tissue engineered scaffolds not only can be costly but also can induce undesired responses in surrounding tissues. Thus, the ability to specifically promote MSC osteogenic differentiation in the absence of exogenous growth factors via the manipulation of scaffold material properties would be beneficial. The current work examines the influence of select extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on MSC osteogenesis toward the goal of developing scaffolds with intrinsically osteoinductive properties. Fibrinogen (FG), fibronectin (FN) and laminin-1 (LN) were chosen for evaluation due to their known roles in bone morphogenesis or bone fracture healing. These proteins were conjugated into poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogels and their effects on encapsulated 10T½ MSCs were evaluated. Specifically, following 1week of culture, mid-term markers of various MSC lineages were examined in order to assess the strength and specificity of the observed osteogenic responses. PEG-LN gels demonstrated increased levels of the osteogenic transcription factor osterix relative to day 0 levels. In addition, PEG-FG and PEG-LN gels were associated with increased deposition of bone ECM protein osteocalcin relative to PEG-FN gels and day 0. Importantly, the osteogenic response associated with FG and LN appeared to be specific in that markers for chondrocytic, smooth muscle cell and adipocytic lineages were not similarly elevated relative to day 0 in these gels. To gain insight into the integrin dynamics underlying the observed differentiation results, initial integrin adhesion and temporal alterations in cell integrin profiles were evaluated. The associated results suggest that α(2), α(v) and α(6) integrin subunits may play key roles in integrin-mediated osteogenesis.

  5. Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants: Updated Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants: Updated Safety Information Share Tweet ... When the Food and Drug Administration allowed silicone gel-filled breast implants back on the market in ...

  6. Preparation and swelling behavior of polyvinyl alcohol physiological saline gel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol(PVA) physiological saline gel was prepared using physiological saline solution of the polymer by freezing and thawing method. The influences of the concentration of PVA, freezing and thawing cycle times and solvent swelling media on the swelling properties of PVA saline gel were investigated. The result show that the electrolytical ions have great effect on the swelling behavior of PVA saline gel. The equilibrium swelling ratio of PVA saline gel in aqueous swelling media is larger than that in saline swelling media. Also, the equilibrium swelling ratios of PVA saline gel in aqueous and in saline media decrease with the increase of gel concentration and the increase of freezing and thawing cycle times. The decreasing speed of equilibrium swelling ratio with the increase of freezing and thawing cycle times of PVA gel in distilled water is faster than that in physiological saline. The swelling kinetic equation can sufficiently describe the swelling behavior of PVA physiological saline gel.

  7. Optical Anisotropy and Molecular Orientation of Neutralized Curdlan Gels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasuyuki Maki; Hideki Okamura; Toshiaki Dobashi

    2017-01-01

    Curdlan gels were prepared by dialyzing its alkaline solutions in HCl solutions, and its optical anisotropy and molecular orientation in the gel were investigated by birefringence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS...

  8. ZONE ELECTROPHORESIS OF HUMAN PAROTID SALIVA IN ACRYLAMIDE GEL,

    Science.gov (United States)

    anodically with generally better resolution than is evident for the cathodically-migrating components. Salivary amylase , a troublesome factor in the starch -gel electrophoresis of saliva proteins, does not attack acrylamide gel.

  9. Intrathecal Delivery of Ketorolac Loaded In Situ Gels for Prolonged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in situ gel near the fractured vertebra in a rat model). ... The formulated in situ gels can potentially be used as implants for the treatment of .... xanthan gum orally in an appropriate volume. ..... polyelectrolyte alginate-chitosan complex based.

  10. Establishment of gel materials with different mechanical properties by 3D gel printer SWIM-ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takafumi; Tase, Taishi; Okada, Koji; Saito, Azusa; Takamatsu, Kyuuichiro; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    A 3D printer is a device which can directly produce objects whose shape is the same as the original 3D digital data. Hydrogels have unique properties such as high water content, low frictional properties, biocompatibility, material permeability and high transparency, which are rare in hard and dry materials. These superior characteristics of gels promise useful medical applications. We have been working on the development of a 3D gel printer, SWIM-ER (Soft and Wet Industrial - Easy Realizer), which can make models of organs and artificial blood vessels with gel material. However, 3D printing has a problem: the mechanical properties of the printed object vary depending on printing conditions, and this matter was investigated with SWIM-ER. In the past, we found that mechanical properties of 3D gel objects depend on the deposition orientation in SWIM-ER. In this study, gels were printed with different laser scanning speeds. The mechanical properties of these gels were investigated by compression tests, water content measurements and SMILS (Scanning Microscopic Light Scattering).

  11. Economical evolution: microbes reduce the synthetic cost of extracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2010-08-24

    Protein evolution is not simply a race toward improved function. Because organisms compete for limited resources, fitness is also affected by the relative economy of an organism's proteome. Indeed, many abundant proteins contain relatively high percentages of amino acids that are metabolically less taxing for the cell to make, thus reducing cellular cost. However, not all abundant proteins are economical, and many economical proteins are not particularly abundant. Here we examined protein composition and found that the relative synthetic cost of amino acids constrains the composition of microbial extracellular proteins. In Escherichia coli, extracellular proteins contain, on average, fewer energetically expensive amino acids independent of their abundance, length, function, or structure. Economic pressures have strategically shaped the amino acid composition of multicomponent surface appendages, such as flagella, curli, and type I pili, and extracellular enzymes, including type III effector proteins and secreted serine proteases. Furthermore, in silico analysis of Pseudomonas syringae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and over 25 other microbes spanning a wide range of GC content revealed a broad bias toward more economical amino acids in extracellular proteins. The synthesis of any protein, especially those rich in expensive aromatic amino acids, represents a significant investment. Because extracellular proteins are lost to the environment and not recycled like other cellular proteins, they present a greater burden on the cell, as their amino acids cannot be reutilized during translation. We hypothesize that evolution has optimized extracellular proteins to reduce their synthetic burden on the cell.

  12. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Extracellular potassium homeostasis: insights from hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-05-01

    Extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body's potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase and release by inward-rectifier K(+) channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons, and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis, focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward-rectifier K(+) channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A multistimuli-responsive photochromic metal-organic gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-Chao; Pan, Mei; Li, Kang; Wang, Sujuan; Zhang, Jianyong; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2014-04-02

    A photochromic metal-organic gel with thermo-, photo-, and anion-responsive behavior is obtained. Unusually, heating of the Al-ligand solution leads to gel formation and cooling to room temperature reverses the process to reform the solution. The gel is sensitive to weakly coordinating anions. Additionally, reversible photochromic transformations take place both in the solution and gel states, accompanied by reversibly switched luminescence.

  15. Gel-forming reagents and uses thereof for preparing microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golova, Julia; Chernov, Boris; Perov, Alexander

    2010-11-09

    New gel-forming reagents including monomers and cross-linkers, which can be applied to gel-drop microarray manufacturing by using co-polymerization approaches are disclosed. Compositions for the preparation of co-polymerization mixtures with new gel-forming monomers and cross-linker reagents are described herein. New co-polymerization compositions and cross-linkers with variable length linker groups between unsaturated C.dbd.C bonds that participate in the formation of gel networks are disclosed.

  16. CURRENT COLLOIDAL DISPERSION GELS ARE NOT SUPERIOR TO POLYMER FLOODING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seright Randy; Han Peihui; Wang Dongmei

    2006-01-01

    The suggestion that the colloidal-dispersion-gel (CDG) process is superior to normal polymer flooding is misleading and generally incorrect. Colloidal dispersion gels, in their present state of technological development, should not be advocated as an improvement to, or substitute for, polymer flooding. Gels made from aluminum-citrate crosslinked polyacrylamides can act as conventional gels and provide effective conformance improvement in treating some types of excess water production problems if sound scientific and engineering principles are respected.

  17. Highly Elastic and Self-Healing Composite Colloidal Gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diba, Mani; Wang, Huanan; Kodger, Thomas E; Parsa, Shima; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G

    2017-03-01

    Composite colloidal gels are formed by the pH-induced electrostatic assembly of silica and gelatin nanoparticles. These injectable and moldable colloidal gels are able to withstand substantial compressive and tensile loads, and exhibit a remarkable self-healing efficiency. This study provides new, critical insight into the structural and mechanical properties of composite colloidal gels and opens up new avenues for practical application of colloidal gels.

  18. Photochromic properties of spirooxazine dyes in ormocer gels and coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Lisong; Mennig, Martin; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1992-01-01

    The wet- and "cold"-chemical characteristic of sol-gel process makes the sol-gel derived materials offer exciting potentials as hosts for photochromic dyes. In the present work, using mixed organically modified silicon alkoxides as starting compounds a novel ORMOCER material has been prepared via the sol-gel process as a host for spirooxazines. The photochromic properties of the dyes in the ORMOCER gel and coating are compared with those in ethanol. The experimental results show that both the...

  19. Isolation of extracellular polymeric substances from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke eJachlewski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78 °C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER extraction and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundredshundred of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25 kDa to 116 kDa and pI values of 5 to 8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse groups of enzymes such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms.

  20. Human Dupuytren's Ex Vivo Culture for the Study of Myofibroblasts and Extracellular Matrix Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkampouna, Sofia; Kloen, Peter; Obdeijn, Miryam C; Riester, Scott M; van Wijnen, Andre J; Kruithof-de Julio, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Organ fibrosis or "scarring" is known to account for a high death toll due to the extensive amount of disorders and organs affected (from cirrhosis to cardiovascular diseases). There is no effective treatment and the in vitro tools available do not mimic the in vivo situation rendering the progress of the out of control wound healing process still enigmatic. To date, 2D and 3D cultures of fibroblasts derived from DD patients are the main experimental models available. Primary cell cultures have many limitations; the fibroblasts derived from DD are altered by the culture conditions, lack cellular context and interactions, which are crucial for the development of fibrosis and weakly represent the derived tissue. Real-time PCR analysis of fibroblasts derived from control and DD samples show that little difference is detectable. 3D cultures of fibroblasts include addition of extracellular matrix that alters the native conditions of these cells. As a way to characterize the fibrotic, proliferative properties of these resection specimens we have developed a 3D culture system, using intact human resections of the nodule part of the cord. The system is based on transwell plates with an attached nitrocellulose membrane that allows contact of the tissue with the medium but not with the plastic, thus, preventing the alteration of the tissue. No collagen gel or other extracellular matrix protein substrate is required. The tissue resection specimens maintain their viability and proliferative properties for 7 days. This is the first "organ" culture system that allows human resection specimens from DD patients to be grown ex vivo and functionally tested, recapitulating the in vivo situation.

  1. Isolation of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Biofilms of the Thermoacidophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachlewski, Silke; Jachlewski, Witold D; Linne, Uwe; Bräsen, Christopher; Wingender, Jost; Siebers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are the major structural and functional components of microbial biofilms. The aim of this study was to establish a method for EPS isolation from biofilms of the thermoacidophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, as a basis for EPS analysis. Biofilms of S. acidocaldarius were cultivated on the surface of gellan gum-solidified Brock medium at 78°C for 4 days. Five EPS extraction methods were compared, including shaking of biofilm suspensions in phosphate buffer, cation-exchange resin (CER) extraction, and stirring with addition of EDTA, crown ether, or NaOH. With respect to EPS yield, impact on cell viability, and compatibility with subsequent biochemical analysis, the CER extraction method was found to be the best suited isolation procedure resulting in the detection of carbohydrates and proteins as the major constituents and DNA as a minor component of the EPS. Culturability of CER-treated cells was not impaired. Analysis of the extracellular proteome using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis resulted in the detection of several hundreds of protein spots, mainly with molecular masses of 25-116 kDa and pI values of 5-8. Identification of proteins suggested a cytoplasmic origin for many of these proteins, possibly released via membrane vesicles or biofilm-inherent cell lysis during biofilm maturation. Functional analysis of EPS proteins, using fluorogenic substrates as well as zymography, demonstrated the activity of diverse enzyme classes, such as proteases, lipases, esterases, phosphatases, and glucosidases. In conclusion, the CER extraction method, as previously applied to bacterial biofilms, also represents a suitable method for isolation of water soluble EPS from the archaeal biofilms of S. acidocaldarius, allowing the investigation of composition and function of EPS components in these types of biofilms.

  2. Age and SPARC Change the Extracellular Matrix Composition of the Left Ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra E. de Castro Brás

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, a collagen-binding matricellular protein, has been implicated in procollagen processing and deposition. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and SPARC-dependent changes in protein composition of the cardiac extracellular matrix (ECM. We studied 6 groups of mice (n=4/group: young (4-5 months old, middle-aged (11-12 m.o., and old (18–29 m.o. C57BL/6J wild type (WT and SPARC null. The left ventricle (LV was decellularized to enrich for ECM proteins. Protein extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE, digested in-gel, and analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Relative quantification was performed by spectral counting, and changes in specific proteins were validated by immunoblotting. We identified 321 proteins, of which 44 proteins were extracellular proteins. Of these proteins, collagen III levels were lower in the old null mice compared to WT, suggestive of a role for SPARC in collagen deposition. Additionally, fibrillin showed a significant increase in the null middle-aged group, suggestive of increased microfibril deposition in the absence of SPARC. Collagen VI increased with age in both genotypes (>3-fold, while collagen IV showed increased age-associated levels only in the WT animals (4-fold, P<0.05. These changes may explain the previously reported age-associated increases in LV stiffness. In summary, our data suggest SPARC is a possible therapeutic target for aging induced LV dysfunction.

  3. 21 CFR 520.1720d - Phenylbutazone gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phenylbutazone gel. 520.1720d Section 520.1720d... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.1720d Phenylbutazone gel. (a) Specifications. Each 30 grams of gel contains 4 grams of phenylbutazone. (b) Sponsor. See No. 061623 in §...

  4. 21 CFR 520.1453 - Moxidectin and praziquantel gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Moxidectin and praziquantel gel. 520.1453 Section 520.1453 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and praziquantel gel. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of gel contains 20 milligrams (mg)...

  5. 21 CFR 520.1242f - Levamisole hydrochloride gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Levamisole hydrochloride gel. 520.1242f Section 520.1242f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Levamisole hydrochloride gel. (a) Specifications. The drug is a gel containing 11.5 percent...

  6. Power Law Behavior of Structural Properties of Protein Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Marleen; Roefs, Sebastianus P.F.M.; Mellema, Jorrit; Kruif, Kees G.

    1998-01-01

    Whey proteins are globular, heat-sensitive proteins. The gel structure, the formation of this structure, and the rheological properties of particulate whey protein isolate (WPI) gels have been investigated. On increasing the NaCl concentration, the permeability of the WPI gels increased, indicating

  7. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L; Hunt, Rodney D; Montgomery, Frederick C

    2013-08-06

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous hafnium oxide gels contain a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous hafnium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including hafnium, an acid, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  8. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  9. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous cerium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L; Chi, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous cerium oxide gels contain a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous cerium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  10. Antimicrobial efficacy of alcohol-based hand gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhermetti, M; Marques Wiirzler, L A; Castanheira Facio, B; da Silva Furlan, M; Campo Meschial, W; Bronharo Tognim, M C; Botelho Garcia, L; Luiz Cardoso, C

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, several commercial alcohol-based hand gels have appeared on the market to improve the hand-cleansing compliance of healthcare workers. Although the antimicrobial efficacy of these products has been reported in different countries, few studies have investigated this subject in Brazil. In this study, we assessed the antimicrobial efficacy of 12 alcohol-based hand gels produced in Brazil, containing 70% w/w or v/v ethyl alcohol as the active ingredient, according to the European Standard EN 1500 (EN 1500). The following alcohol gels were tested: Hand Gel, Voga Gel, Solumax Solugel, Doctor Clean, Rio Gel, Clear Gel, Sevengel, Hand CHC, Gel Bac, WBL-50 Gel, Sanigel and Soft Care Gel. In addition, 70% w/w ethyl alcohol and three alcohol-based hand rubs (Sterillium, Sterillium Gel, and Spitaderm), commonly used in Europe and effective according to EN 1500, were also tested. All the products tested, except for two, were approved by the EN 1500 test protocol with a 60s application. The results confirmed the antimicrobial efficacy of the majority of the alcohol gels produced in Brazil for hand hygiene of healthcare workers.

  11. Hydroxyapatite incorporated into collagen gels for mesenchymal stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laydi, F; Rahouadj, R; Cauchois, G; Stoltz, J-F; de Isla, N

    2013-01-01

    Collagen gels could be used as carriers in tissue engineering to improve cell retention and distribution in the defect. In other respect hydroxyapatite could be added to gels to improve mechanical properties and regulate gel contraction. The aim of this work was to analyze the feasibility to incorporate hydroxyapatite into collagen gels and culture mesenchymal stem cells inside it. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-BM) were used in this study. Gels were prepared by mixing rat tail type I collagen, hydroxyapatite microparticles and MSCs. After polymerization gels were kept in culture while gel contraction and mechanical properties were studied. In parallel, cell viability and morphology were analyzed. Gels became free-floating gels contracted from day 3, only in the presence of cells. A linear rapid contraction phase was observed until day 7, then a very slow contraction phase took place. The incorporation of hydroxyapatite improved gel stability and mechanical properties. Cells were randomly distributed on the gel and a few dead cells were observed all over the experiment. This study shows the feasibility and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite supplemented collagen gels for the culture of mesenchymal stem cells that could be used as scaffolds for cell delivery in osteoarticular regenerative medicine.

  12. Internal calibration of gel dosimeters: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trapp, J V; Kairn, T; Crowe, S; Fielding, A [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences Queensland University of Technology GPO Box 2434, Brisbane 4001 (Australia)], E-mail: j.trapp@qut.edu.au

    2009-05-01

    In this work we test the feasibility of a new calibration method for gel dosimetry. We examine, through Monte Carlo modelling, whether the inclusion of an organic plastic scintillator system at key points within the gel phantom would perturb the dose map. Such a system would remove the requirement for a separate calibration gel, removing many sources of uncertainty.

  13. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  14. Differential sensitivity of epithelial cells to extracellular matrix in polarity establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of apical-basal polarity is crucial for epithelial sheets that form a compartment in the body, which function to maintain the environment in the compartment. Effects of impaired polarization are easily observed in three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems rather than in two-dimensional (2-D) culture systems. Although the mechanisms for establishing the polarity are not completely understood, signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM) are considered to be essential for determining the basal side and eventually generating polarity in the epithelial cells. To elucidate the common features and differences in polarity establishment among various epithelial cells, we analyzed the formation of epithelial apical-basal polarity using three cell lines of different origin: MDCK II cells (dog renal tubules), EpH4 cells (mouse mammary gland), and R2/7 cells (human colon) expressing wild-type α-catenin (R2/7 α-Cate cells). These cells showed clear apical-basal polarity in 2-D cultures. In 3-D cultures, however, each cell line displayed different responses to the same ECM. In MDCK II cells, spheroids with a single lumen formed in both Matrigel and collagen gel. In R2/7 α-Cate cells, spheroids showed similar apical-basal polarity as that seen in MDCK II cells, but had multiple lumens. In EpH4 cells, the spheroids displayed an apical-basal polarity that was opposite to that seen in the other two cell types in both ECM gels, at least during the culture period. On the other hand, the three cell lines showed the same apical-basal polarity both in 2-D cultures and in 3-D cultures using the hanging drop method. The three lines also had similar cellular responses to ECM secreted by the cells themselves. Therefore, appropriate culture conditions should be carefully determined in advance when using various epithelial cells to analyze cell polarity or 3-D morphogenesis.

  15. Differential sensitivity of epithelial cells to extracellular matrix in polarity establishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenobu Yonemura

    Full Text Available Establishment of apical-basal polarity is crucial for epithelial sheets that form a compartment in the body, which function to maintain the environment in the compartment. Effects of impaired polarization are easily observed in three-dimensional (3-D culture systems rather than in two-dimensional (2-D culture systems. Although the mechanisms for establishing the polarity are not completely understood, signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM are considered to be essential for determining the basal side and eventually generating polarity in the epithelial cells. To elucidate the common features and differences in polarity establishment among various epithelial cells, we analyzed the formation of epithelial apical-basal polarity using three cell lines of different origin: MDCK II cells (dog renal tubules, EpH4 cells (mouse mammary gland, and R2/7 cells (human colon expressing wild-type α-catenin (R2/7 α-Cate cells. These cells showed clear apical-basal polarity in 2-D cultures. In 3-D cultures, however, each cell line displayed different responses to the same ECM. In MDCK II cells, spheroids with a single lumen formed in both Matrigel and collagen gel. In R2/7 α-Cate cells, spheroids showed similar apical-basal polarity as that seen in MDCK II cells, but had multiple lumens. In EpH4 cells, the spheroids displayed an apical-basal polarity that was opposite to that seen in the other two cell types in both ECM gels, at least during the culture period. On the other hand, the three cell lines showed the same apical-basal polarity both in 2-D cultures and in 3-D cultures using the hanging drop method. The three lines also had similar cellular responses to ECM secreted by the cells themselves. Therefore, appropriate culture conditions should be carefully determined in advance when using various epithelial cells to analyze cell polarity or 3-D morphogenesis.

  16. Transaxillary endoscopic silicone gel breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Louis L

    2010-09-01

    Following the return of silicone gel breast implants to the US market in 2006, augmentation with these implants has become increasingly popular. Surgeons have an array of refined techniques from which to choose when performing these procedures, many of which offer the advantage of reduced or less-obvious postoperative scarring. For obvious reasons, many patients are requesting placement of the implants through incisions that are removed from the breast area (and thereby hidden). The challenge of these approaches is to provide a level of technical control that matches what is afforded with the traditional inframammary approach. The addition of endoscopic assistance has provided a level of tissue visualization and technical control not previously possible with the transaxillary approach, with results that rival those of an inframammary procedure. In this article, the author presents his current operative technique, which has allowed for the routine placement of silicone gel breast implants through a transaxillary incision using endoscopic assistance.

  17. Gel cast foam diesel particulate filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binner, J.G.P.; Hughes, S. [IPTME, Loughborough Univ., Loughborough (United Kingdom); Sambrook, R.M. [Dytech Corp. Ltd., Dronfield (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    A new manufacturing route for foam ceramics based on gel casting has been developed and is being commercialised. Gel casting employs an organic monomer that is polymerised to cause the in-situ gelation of a foamed aqueous ceramic slurry. The primary advantage is the inherent flexibility of the process; the foams can be near net shape manufactured in a variety of shapes and sizes and after production are simply dried and fired. In addition, the porosity and pore size distribution can be varied to suit the application and a wide range of ceramics can be foamed with densities ranging from 5-40% of theoretical. Applications are diverse and include the potential to be used as diesel particulate filters (DPF). The present work examines this and concludes that filtration efficiencies of {>=}90% are achievable without generating a significant backpressure for the engine. (orig.)

  18. Structural hierarchy governs fibrin gel mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechocka, Izabela K; Bacabac, Rommel G; Potters, Max; Mackintosh, Fred C; Koenderink, Gijsje H

    2010-05-19

    Fibrin gels are responsible for the mechanical strength of blood clots, which are among the most resilient protein materials in nature. Here we investigate the physical origin of this mechanical behavior by performing rheology measurements on reconstituted fibrin gels. We find that increasing levels of shear strain induce a succession of distinct elastic responses that reflect stretching processes on different length scales. We present a theoretical model that explains these observations in terms of the unique hierarchical architecture of the fibers. The fibers are bundles of semiflexible protofibrils that are loosely connected by flexible linker chains. This architecture makes the fibers 100-fold more flexible to bending than anticipated based on their large diameter. Moreover, in contrast with other biopolymers, fibrin fibers intrinsically stiffen when stretched. The resulting hierarchy of elastic regimes explains the incredible resilience of fibrin clots against large deformations.

  19. Soft Gels with Ordered Iron Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuxian; Liu, Bo; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    For a number of years we and others have investigated electrorheological (ER) gel systems comprising low-modulus elastomers mixed with various particles. Unlike ER fluids, the particles in gels do not change relative positions, thus creating model systems that can be used to check equilibrium theories of ER response. To make such materials, a magnetic field was used to align iron particles during the cure of a liquid silicone prepolymer in a sheet mold. Particle chains were made with as little as 0.5% particles, and aligned at angles from 0 to 45° to the normal. The gap between the particles was controlled by swelling the crosslinked material with additional prepolymer. The dependence of the ER effect on particle structuring in these materials was investigated experimentally using rheometry and dielectrometry. Also investigated were the properties of these materials as transducers and actuators.

  20. Ballistic penetration of Perma-Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckman, Raymond Albert; Powell, David Arthur; Lew, Adrian

    2012-03-01

    In this study a number of experiments were performed by taking high-speed footage of the firing spherical steel bullets at different speeds into Perma-Gel, a new synthetic thermoplastic material touted to exhibit similar properties to ordnance ballistic gelatin. We found that the gel undergoes very large and recoverable elastic deformations, which could strongly affect the dynamics of the temporary cavity formed behind the projectile. As with ordnance ballistic gelatin, the diameter of the temporary cavity can be many times the diameter of the projectile, in contrast with that of the permanent cavity which is several times smaller.We also observed that the closure of the cavity chokes the air inside, which could affect its dynamics in noticeable ways. Finally, one of the experiments suggest that the precise model of material failure may not be important to determine the dynamics of the temporary cavity.

  1. Gel Fabrication of Molybdenum “Beads”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-11-01

    Spherical molybdenum particles or “beads” of various diameters are of interest as feedstock materials for the additive manufacture of targets and assemblies used in the production of 99Mo medical isotopes using accelerator technology. Small metallic beads or ball bearings are typically fabricated from wire; however, small molybdenum spheres cannot readily be produced in this manner. Sol-gel processes are often employed to produce small dense microspheres of metal oxides across a broad diameter range that in the case of molybdenum could be reduced and sintered to produce metallic spheres. These Sol-gel type processes were examined for forming molybdenum oxide beads; however, the molybdenum trioxide was chemically incompatible with commonly used gelation materials. As an alternative, an aqueous alginate process being assessed for the fabrication of oxide spheres for catalyst applications was employed to form molybdenum trioxide beads that were successfully reduced and sintered to produce small molybdenum spheres.

  2. Ring-Resonator/Sol-Gel Interferometric Immunosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Gregory; Cohen, David

    2007-01-01

    A proposed biosensing system would be based on a combination of (1) a sensing volume containing antibodies immobilized in a sol-gel matrix and (2) an optical interferometer having a ring resonator configuration. The antibodies would be specific to an antigen species that one seeks to detect. In the ring resonator of the proposed system, light would make multiple passes through the sensing volume, affording greater interaction length and, hence, greater antibody- detection sensitivity.

  3. Rheology of Biopolymer Solutions and Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Picout

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheological techniques and methods have been employed for many decades in the characterization of polymers. Originally developed and used on synthetic polymers, rheology has then found much interest in the field of natural (bio polymers. This review concentrates on introducing the fundamentals of rheology and on discussing the rheological aspects and properties of the two major classes of biopolymers: polysaccharides and proteins. An overview of both their solution properties (dilute to semi-dilute and gel properties is described.

  4. Active nematic gels as active relaxing solids

    OpenAIRE

    Turzi, Stefano S

    2017-01-01

    I put forward a continuum theory for active nematic gels, defined as fluids or suspensions of orientable rodlike objects endowed with active dynamics, that is based on symmetry arguments and compatibility with thermodynamics. The starting point is our recent theory that models (passive) nematic liquid crystals as relaxing nematic elastomers. The interplay between viscoelastic response and active dynamics of the microscopic constituents is naturally taken into account. By contrast with standar...

  5. Proteome-level display by 2-dimensional chromatography of extracellular matrix-dependent modulation of the phenotype of bladder cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular matrix can have a profound effect upon the phenotype of cancer cells. Previous work has shown that growth of bladder cancer cells on a matrix derived from normal basement membrane suppresses many malignant features that are displayed when the cells are grown on a matrix that has been modified by malignant tumors. This work was undertaken to investigate proteome-level changes as determined by a new commercially available proteome display involving 2-dimensional chromatography for bladder cancer cells grown on different extracellular matrix preparations that modulate the expression of the malignant phenotype. Results Depending on the matrix, between 1300 and 2000 distinct peaks were detected by two-dimensional chromatographic fractionation of 2.1 – 4.4 mg of total cellular protein. The fractions eluting from the reversed-phase fractionation were suitable for mass spectrometric identification following only lyophilization and trypsin digestion and achieved approximately 10-fold higher sensitivity than was obtained with gel-based separations. Abundant proteins that were unique to cells grown on one of the matrices were identified by mass spectrometry. Following concentration, peaks of 0.03 AU provided unambiguous identification of protein components when 10% of the sample was analyzed, whereas peaks of 0.05 AU was approximately the lower limit of detection when the entire sample was separated on a gel and in-gel digestion was used. Although some fractions were homogeneous, others were not, and up to 3 proteins per fraction were identified. Strong evidence for post-translational modification of the unique proteins was noted. All 13 of the unique proteins from cells grown on Matrigel were related to MYC pathway. Conclusion The system provides a viable alternative to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis for proteomic display of biological systems. The findings suggest the importance of MYC to the malignant phenotype

  6. Epoxy Sol-Gel Hybrid Thermosets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angels Serra

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel methodologies are advantageous in the preparation of hybrid materials in front of the conventional addition of nanoparticles, because of the fine dispersion of the inorganic phase that can be reached in epoxy matrices. In addition, the use of organoalkoxysilanes as coupling agents allows covalent linkage between organic and inorganic phases, which is the key point in the improvement of mechanical properties. The sol-gel process involves hydrolysis and condensation reactions under mild conditions, starting from hydrolysable metal alkoxides, generally alkoxy silanes. Using the sol-gel procedure, the viscosity of the formulation is maintained, which is an important issue in coating applications, whereas the transparency of the polymer matrix is also maintained. However, only the proper combination of the chemistries and functionalities of both organic and inorganic structures leads to thermosets with the desired characteristics. The adequate preparation of hybrid epoxy thermosets enables their improvement in characteristics such as mechanical properties (modulus, hardness, scratch resistance, thermal and flame resistance, corrosion and antimicrobial protection, and even optical performance among others.

  7. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  8. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Manocha; E Yasuda; Y Tanabe; S Manocha; D Vashistha

    2000-02-01

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing has been used to prepare silicon based glasses, especially oxycarbides through organic–inorganic hybrid gels by hydrolysis–condensation reactions in silicon alkoxides, 1,4-butanediol and furfuryl alcohol with an aim to introduce Si–C linkages in the precursors at sol level. The incorporation of these linkages has been studied using IR and NMR spectroscopy. These bonds, so introduced, are maintained throughout the processing, especially during pyrolysis to high temperatures. In FFA–TEOS system, copolymerization with optimized mol ratio of the two results in resinous mass. This precursor on pyrolysis to 1000°C results in Si–O–C type amorphous solid black mass. XRD studies on the materials heated to 1400°C exhibit presence of crystalline Si–C and cristobalites in amorphous Si–O–C mass. In organic–inorganic gel system, the pyrolysed mass exhibits phase stability up to much higher temperatures. The carbidic materials so produced have been found to exhibit good resistance against oxidation at 1000°C.

  9. Crack buckling in soft gels under compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Long; Chung-Yuen Hui

    2012-01-01

    Recent interest in designing soft gels with high fracture toughness has called for simple and robust methods to test fracture behavior.The conventional method of applying tension to a gel sample suffers from a difficulty of sample gripping.In this paper,we study a possible fracture mechanism of soft gels under uni-axial compression.We show that the surfaces of a pre-existing crack,oriented parallel to the loading axis,can buckle at a critical compressive stress.This buckling instability can open the crack surfaces and create highly concentrated stress fields near the crack tip,which can lead to crack growth.We show that the onset of crack buckling can be deduced by a dimensional argument combined with an analysis to determine the critical compression needed to induce surface instabilities of an elastic half space.The critical compression for buckling was verified for a neoHookean material model using finite element simulations.

  10. An MRI phantom using carrageenan gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Yamamoto, Naotake; Tanaka, Akio; Hiraki, Yoshio [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Uchida, Nobue; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2000-12-01

    We have developed a new solid type carrageenan gel phantom. The ingredients of the new gel are carrageenan, manganese chloride, sodium chloride, sodium azide, and water. The gel phantom has sufficient strength to form a torso without the use of a reinforcing agent. A phantom of a desired shape can be created by pouring a hot solution of carrageenan into a mold. The phantom can then be cut easily with a knife and trimmed into the desired shape. The recommended concentrations of the ingredients are; 5 wt% carrageenan, 0.2 mM MnCl{sub 2}, 0.19 wt% NaCl, 0.1 wt% NaN{sub 3}, with the remainder being water. T{sub 2} and T{sub 1} of this phantom at 1.5 T are 84.9 ms and 429 ms respectively. The conductivity and relative dielectric constant at 63.8 MHz are 0.769 S/m and 81.4 respectively. (author)

  11. Gel Electrophoresis of Gold-DNA Nanoconjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pellegrino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold-DNA conjugates were investigated in detail by a comprehensive gel electrophoresis study based on 1200 gels. A controlled number of single-stranded DNA of different length was attached specifically via thiol-Au bonds to phosphine-stabilized colloidal gold nanoparticles. Alternatively, the surface of the gold particles was saturated with single stranded DNA of different length either specifically via thiol-Au bonds or by nonspecific adsorption. From the experimentally determined electrophoretic mobilities, estimates for the effective diameters of the gold-DNA conjugates were derived by applying two different data treatment approaches. The first method is based on making a calibration curve for the relation between effective diameters and mobilities with gold nanoparticles of known diameter. The second method is based on Ferguson analysis which uses gold nanoparticles of known diameter as reference database. Our study shows that effective diameters derived from gel electrophoresis measurements are affected with a high error bar as the determined values strongly depend on the method of evaluation, though relative changes in size upon binding of molecules can be detected with high precision. Furthermore, in this study, the specific attachment of DNA via gold-thiol bonds to Au nanoparticles is compared to nonspecific adsorption of DNA. Also, the maximum number of DNA molecules that can be bound per particle was determined.

  12. STUDY ON ACRYLAMIDE-SODIUM ACRYLATE COPOLYMER GELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Maotang; LI Qian; XU Jiping

    1990-01-01

    Acrylamide-sodium acrylate copolymer hydrogels have been obtained by radiation techniques.Two different methods have been used to introduce -COONa groups into polymer chains of the gels: (1) by partial hydrolysis of acrylamide homopolymer gel; (2) by direct copolymerization and crosslinking of acrylamide and sodium acrylate in aqueous solutions. It was found that the gels obtained in different ways had different properties, the swelling character of the gels obtained by partial hydrolysis were more sensitive to pH of swelling aqueous media. In order to explain these differences,13 C-NMR techniques were used to investigate the sequence distribution of monomer units of both gels.

  13. Sol-gel layers for ceramic microsystems application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czok, Mateusz; Golonka, Leszek

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes research on sol-gel solutions preparation process. Utilize of a sol-gel layers in the LTCC technology for reduction of surface roughness and influence on the ceramics properties is examined and described. The influence of sol-gel layer on possible sedimentation of dyes or biological substances in channels, mixers or chambers of ceramic microfluidic structures was investigated. Moreover, properties of sol-gel coated surfaces have been precisely examined and described. Finally, positive results of conducted experiments made it possible to design and manufacture a simple microfluidic ceramic structure, with embedded protective layer of sol-gel, for fluorescence measurements.

  14. Comparative fluorescence two-dimensional gel electrophoresis using a gel strip sandwich assembly for the simultaneous on-gel generation of a reference protein spot grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; Wang, Weiqun; Streipert, Benjamin; Geib, Birgit; Grün, Lothar; König, Simone

    2012-05-01

    The comparison of proteins separated on 2DE is difficult due to gel-to-gel variability. Here, a method named comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) is presented, which allows the generation of an artificial protein grid in parallel to the separation of an analytical sample on the same gel. Different fluorescent stains are used to distinguish sample and marker on the gel. The technology combines elements of 1DE and 2DE. Special gel combs with V-shaped wells are placed in a stacking gel above the pI strip. Proteins separated on the pI strip are electrophoresed at the same time as marker proteins (commercially available purified protein of different molecular weight) placed in V-wells. In that way, grids providing approximately 100 nodes as landmarks for the determination of protein spot coordinates are generated. Data analysis is possible with commercial 2DE software capable of warping. The method improves comparability of 2DE protein gels, because they are generated in combination with regular in-gel anchor points formed by protein standards. This was shown here for two comparative experiments with three gels each using Escherichia coli lysate. For a set of 47 well-defined samples spots, the deviation of the coordinates was improved from 7% to less than 1% applying warping using the marker grid. Conclusively, as long as the same protein markers, the same size of pI-strips and the same technology are used, gel matching is reproducibly possible. This is an important advancement for projects involving comparison of 2DE-gels produced over several years and in different laboratories. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Ionogel Electrolytes through Sol-Gel Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Ariel I.

    Electrical energy needs have intensified due to the ubiquity of personal electronics, the decarbonization of energy services through electrification, and the use of intermittent renewable energy sources. Despite developments in mechanical and thermal methods, electrochemical technologies are the most convenient and effective means of storing electrical energy. These technologies include both electrochemical cells, commonly called batteries, and electrochemical double-layer capacitors, or "supercapacitors", which store energy electrostatically. Both device types require an ion-conducting electrolyte. Current devices use solutions of complex salts in organic solvents, leading to both toxicity and flammability concerns. These drawbacks can be avoided by replacing conventional electrolytes with room-temperature molten salts, known as ionic liquids (ILs). ILs are non-volatile, non-flammable, and offer high conductivity and good electrochemical stability. Device mass can be reduced by combining ILs with a solid scaffold material to form an "ionogel," further improving performance metrics. In this work, sol-gel chemistry is explored as a means of forming ionogel electrolytes. Sol-gel chemistry is a solution-based, industrially-relevant, well-studied technique by which solids such as silica can be formed in situ. Previous works used a simple acid-catalyzed sol-gel reaction to create brittle, glassy ionogels. Here, both the range of products that can be accomplished through sol-gel processing and the understanding of interactions between ILs and the sol-gel reaction network are greatly expanded. This work introduces novel ionogel materials, including soft and compliant silica-supported ionogels and PDMS-supported ionogels. The impacts of the reactive formulation, IL identity, and casting time are detailed. It is demonstrated that variations in formulation can lead to rapid gelation and open pore structures in the silica scaffold or slow gelation and more dense silica

  16. Concentric Gel System to Study the Biophysical Role of Matrix Microenvironment on 3D Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Nicholas Agung; Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to migrate is crucial in a wide variety of cell functions throughout life from embryonic development and wound healing to tumor and cancer metastasis. Despite intense research efforts, the basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cell migration are still not fully understood, especially in the physiologically relevant three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. Here, we describe an in vitro assay designed to allow quantitative examination of 3D cell migration behaviors. The method exploits the cell’s mechanosensing ability and propensity to migrate into previously unoccupied extracellular matrix (ECM). We use the invasion of highly invasive breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231, in collagen gels as a model system. The spread of cell population and the migration dynamics of individual cells over weeks of culture can be monitored using live-cell imaging and analyzed to extract spatiotemporally-resolved data. Furthermore, the method is easily adaptable for diverse extracellular matrices, thus offering a simple yet powerful way to investigate the role of biophysical factors in the microenvironment on cell migration. PMID:25867104

  17. Modelling of the inhomogeneous interior of polymer gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shew, Chwen-Yang; Iwaki, Takafumi

    2006-04-01

    A simple model has been investigated to elucidate the mean squared displacement (MSD) of probe molecules in cross-linked polymer gels. In the model, we assume that numerous cavities distribute in the inhomogeneous interior of a gel, and probe molecules are confined within these cavities. The individual probe molecules trapped in a gel are treated as Brownian particles confined to a spherical harmonic potential. The harmonic potential is chosen to model the effective potential experienced by the probe particle in the cavity of a gel. Each field strength is corresponding to the characteristic of one type of effective cavity. Since the statistical distribution of different effective cavity sizes is unknown, several distribution functions are examined. Meanwhile, the calculated averaged MSDs are compared to the experimental data by Nisato et al (2000 Phys. Rev. E 61 2879). We find that the theoretical results of the MSD are sensitive to the shape of the distribution function. For low cross-linked gels, the best fit is obtained when the interior cavities of a gel follow a bimodal distribution. Such a result may be attributed to the presence of at least two distinct classes of cavity in gels. For high cross-linked gels, the cavities in the gel can be depicted by a single-modal uniform distribution function, suggesting that the range of cavity sizes becomes smaller. These results manifest the voids inside a gel, and the shape of distribution functions may provide the insight into the inhomogeneous interior of a gel.

  18. Dynamic viscoelastic properties of collagen gels with high mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideki; Shimizu, Kousuke; Hara, Masayuki

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new method for the preparation of mechanically strong collagen gels by combining successively basic gel formation, followed by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linking and lyophilization. Gels cross-linked three times with this method showed stronger mechanical properties (G': 3730±2060 Pa, G″: 288±35 Pa) than a conventional gel that was sequentially cross-linked with EDC once (G': 226±70 Pa, G″: 21±4.4 Pa), but not as strong as the same gel with heating for 30 min at 80°C (G': 7010±830 Pa, G″: 288±35 Pa) reported in our previous paper. The conventional collagen gel was cross-linked with EDC once, heated once, and then subjected twice to a lyophilization-gel formation-cross-linking cycle to give three-cycled gel 2. This gel had the strongest mechanical properties (G': 40,200±18,000 Pa, G″: 3090±1400 Pa, Young's modulus: 0.197±0.069 MPa) of the gels tested. These promising results suggest possible applications of the gels as scaffolds in tissue engineering research.

  19. Agarose gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for visualization of simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James; Wright, Drew; Meksem, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    In the modern age of genetic research there is a constant search for ways to improve the efficiency of plant selection. The most recent technology that can result in a highly efficient means of selection and still be done at a low cost is through plant selection directed by simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites). The molecular markers are used to select for certain desirable plant traits without relying on ambiguous phenotypic data. The best way to detect these is the use of gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis is a common technique in laboratory settings which is used to separate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) by size. Loading DNA and RNA onto gels allows for visualization of the size of fragments through the separation of DNA and RNA fragments. This is achieved through the use of the charge in the particles. As the fragments separate, they form into distinct bands at set sizes. We describe the ability to visualize SSRs on slab gels of agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  20. Solvent-induced lysozyme gels: rheology, fractal analysis, and sol-gel kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcelo A; Arêas, Elizabeth P G

    2005-09-15

    In this work, the gelation kinetics and fractal character of lysozyme gel matrices developed in tetramethylurea (TMU)-water media were investigated. Gelation times were determined from the temporal crossover point between the storage, G', and loss, G'', moduli, as a function of the binary solvent composition and of protein concentration. The inverse dependence of the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region (gamma0) on protein concentration indicate that the lysozyme gels belong to the "strong link" kind, a gel category where interparticle links are stronger than intraparticle ones. Lysozyme gel fractal dimensions (Df) were determined from the analysis of rheological data according to a scaling theory by Shih et al. [Phys. Rev. A 42 (1990) 4772-4779] and were found to be compatible with a diffusion-limited cluster-aggregation kinetics (DLCA) for lysozyme gels formed at the TMU mass fraction in the binary organic-aqueous solvent, wTMU=0.9, and with a reaction-limited cluster aggregation kinetics (RLCA) for wTMU in the 0.6< or =wTMU< or =0.8 range.

  1. Electrochemical performance of nonflammable polymeric gel electrolyte containing triethylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalia, Boor Singh; Fujita, Takayoshi; Yoshimoto, Nobuko; Egashira, Minato; Morita, Masayuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 2-16-1 Tokiwadai, Ube 755-8611 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Nonflammable polymeric gel electrolyte has been prepared by immobilizing 1 M LiBF{sub 4}/EC + DEC + TEP (55:25:20, v/v/v, EC: ethylene carbonate, DEC: diethyl carbonate and TEP: triethylphosphate) solution in poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) (PVdF-HFP) where TEP acts as a fire-retardant solvent in the gel electrolyte. The polymeric gel electrolyte has a high value of ionic conductivity of 1.76 mS cm{sup -1} at 28 C. Thermal safety calorimetry (TSC) experiments show good thermal stability of the gel electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry and charge/discharge cycling tests were performed on LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}/gel electrolyte and graphite/gel electrolyte half cells. The gel electrolyte works well for graphite/LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cell although some improvement in the cycleability of the graphite electrode is still needed. (author)

  2. Anion-switchable supramolecular gels for controlling pharmaceutical crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jonathan A.; Piepenbrock, Marc-Oliver M.; Lloyd, Gareth O.; Clarke, Nigel; Howard, Judith A. K.; Steed, Jonathan W.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the use of low-molecular-weight supramolecular gels as media for the growth of molecular crystals. Growth of a range of crystals of organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, was achieved in bis(urea) gels. Low-molecular-weight supramolecular gelators allow access to an unlimited range of solvent systems, in contrast to conventional aqueous gels such as gelatin and agarose. A detailed study of carbamazepine crystal growth in four different bis(urea) gelators, including a metallogelator, is reported. The crystallization of a range of other drug substances, namely sparfloxacin, piroxicam, theophylline, caffeine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen (paracetamol), sulindac and indomethacin, was also achieved in supramolecular gel media without co-crystal formation. In many cases, crystals can be conveniently recovered from the gels by using supramolecular anion-triggered gel dissolution; however, crystals of substances that themselves bind to anions are dissolved by them. Overall, supramolecular gel-phase crystallization offers an extremely versatile new tool in pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

  3. Antioxidant effect of green tea on polymer gel dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, E. J. J.; Sathiyaraj, P.; Deena, T.; Kumar, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Extract from Green Tea (GTE) acts as an antioxidant in acrylamide based polymer gel dosimeter. In this work, PAGAT gel was used for investigation of antioxidant effect of GTE.PAGAT was called PAGTEG (Polyacrylamide green tea extract gel dosimeter) after adding GTE. Free radicals in water cause pre polymerization of polymer gel before irradiation. Polyphenols from GTE are highly effective to absorb the free radicals in water. THPC is used as an antioxidant in polymer gel dosimeter but here we were replaced it by GTE and investigated its effect by spectrophotometer. GTE added PAGAT samples response was lower compared to THPC added sample. To increase the sensitivity of the PAGTEG, sugar was added. This study confirmed that THPC was a good antioxidant for polymer gel dosimeter. However, GTE also can be used as an antioxidant in polymer gel if use less quantity (GTE) and add sugar as sensitivity enhancer.

  4. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Pohnert, Georg; Wei, Dong

    2016-10-20

    Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology.

  5. From mechanotransduction to extracellular matrix gene expression in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, Matthias; Gelman, Laurent; Lutz, Roman; Maier, Silke

    2009-05-01

    Tissue mechanics provide an important context for tissue growth, maintenance and function. On the level of organs, external mechanical forces largely influence the control of tissue homeostasis by endo- and paracrine factors. On the cellular level, it is well known that most normal cell types depend on physical interactions with their extracellular matrix in order to respond efficiently to growth factors. Fibroblasts and other adherent cells sense changes in physical parameters in their extracellular matrix environment, transduce mechanical into chemical information, and integrate these signals with growth factor derived stimuli to achieve specific changes in gene expression. For connective tissue cells, production of the extracellular matrix is a prominent response to changes in mechanical load. We will review the evidence that integrin-containing cell-matrix adhesion contacts are essential for force transmission from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton, and describe novel experiments indicating that mechanotransduction in fibroblasts depends on focal adhesion adaptor proteins that might function as molecular springs. We will stress the importance of the contractile actin cytoskeleton in balancing external with internal forces, and describe new results linking force-controlled actin dynamics directly to the expression of specific genes, among them the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C. As assembly lines for diverse signaling pathways, matrix adhesion contacts are now recognized as the major sites of crosstalk between mechanical and chemical stimuli, with important consequences for cell growth and differentiation.

  6. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Pohnert, Georg; Wei, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology. PMID:27775594

  7. Extracellular Metabolites from Industrial Microalgae and Their Biotechnological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Industrial microalgae, as a big family of promising producers of renewable biomass feedstock, have been commercially exploited for functional food, living feed and feed additives, high-value chemicals in nutraceuticals, cosmeceuticals, and chemical reagents. Recently, microalgae have also been considered as a group that might play an important role in biofuel development and environmental protection. Almost all current products of industrial microalgae are derived from their biomass; however, large amounts of spent cell-free media are available from mass cultivation that is mostly unexploited. In this contribution we discuss that these media, which may contain a remarkable diversity of bioactive substances are worthy to be recovered for further use. Obviously, the extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae have long been neglected in the development of production methods for valuable metabolites. With the advances in the last ten years, more and more structures and properties from extracellular metabolites have been identified, and the potential utilization over wide fields is attracting attention. Some of these extracellular metabolites can be potentially used as drugs, antioxidants, growth regulators or metal chelators. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the known extracellular metabolites from industrial microalgae which might be of commercial interest. The attention mainly focuses on the reports of extracellular bioactive metabolites and their potential application in biotechnology.

  8. In vitro Determination of Extracellular Proteins from Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Juliano S.; Santiago, André S.; Toledo, Marcelo A. S.; Horta, Maria A. C.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Tasic, Ljubica; de Souza, Anete P.

    2016-01-01

    The phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa causes economic losses in important agricultural crops. Xylem vessel occlusion caused by biofilm formation is the major mechanism underlying the pathogenicity of distinct strains of X. fastidiosa. Here, we provide a detailed in vitro characterization of the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa. Based on the results, we performed a comparison with a strain J1a12, which cannot induce citrus variegated chlorosis symptoms when inoculated into citrus plants. We then extend this approach to analyze the extracellular proteins of X. fastidiosa in media supplemented with calcium. We verified increases in extracellular proteins concomitant with the days of growth and, consequently, biofilm development (3–30 days). Outer membrane vesicles carrying toxins were identified beginning at 10 days of growth in the 9a5c strain. In addition, a decrease in extracellular proteins in media supplemented with calcium was observed in both strains. Using mass spectrometry, 71 different proteins were identified during 30 days of X. fastidiosa biofilm development, including proteases, quorum-sensing proteins, biofilm formation proteins, hypothetical proteins, phage-related proteins, chaperones, toxins, antitoxins, and extracellular vesicle membrane components. PMID:28082960

  9. Vitamin A Deficiency and Alterations in the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Barber

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin A or retinol which is the natural precursor of several biologically active metabolites can be considered the most multifunctional vitamin in mammals. Its deficiency is currently, along with protein malnutrition, the most serious and common nutritional disorder worldwide. It is necessary for normal embryonic development and postnatal tissue homeostasis, and exerts important effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. These actions are produced mainly by regulating the expression of a variety of proteins through transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms. Extracellular matrix proteins are among those whose synthesis is known to be modulated by vitamin A. Retinoic acid, the main biologically active form of vitamin A, influences the expression of collagens, laminins, entactin, fibronectin, elastin and proteoglycans, which are the major components of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, the structure and macromolecular composition of this extracellular compartment is profoundly altered as a result of vitamin A deficiency. As cell behavior, differentiation and apoptosis, and tissue mechanics are influenced by the extracellular matrix, its modifications potentially compromise organ function and may lead to disease. This review focuses on the effects of lack of vitamin A in the extracellular matrix of several organs and discusses possible molecular mechanisms and pathologic implications.

  10. Structural changes in mixed Col I/Col V collagen gels probed by SHG microscopy: implications for probing stromal alterations in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajeti, Visar; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Ponik, Suzanne M; Keely, Patricia J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Campagnola, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy has been previously used to describe the morphology of collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) in different stages of invasion in breast cancer. Here this concept is extended by using SHG to provide quantitative discrimination of self-assembled collagen gels, consisting of mixtures of type I (Col I) and type V (Col V) isoforms which serve as models of changes in the ECM during invasion in vivo. To investigate if SHG is sensitive to changes due to Col V incorporation into Col I fibrils, gels were prepared with 0-20% Col V with the balance consisting of Col I. Using the metrics of SHG intensity, fiber length, emission directionality, and depth-dependent intensities, we found similar responses for gels comprised of 100% Col I, and 95% Col I/5% Col V, where these metrics were all significantly different from those of the 80% Col I/20% Col V gels. Specifically, the gels of lower Col V content produce brighter SHG, are characterized by longer fibers, and have a higher forward/backward emission ratio. These attributes are all consistent with more highly organized collagen fibrils/fibers and are in agreement with previous TEM characterization as well as predictions based on phase matching considerations. These results suggest that SHG can be developed to discriminate Col I/Col V composition in tissues to characterize and follow breast cancer invasion.

  11. Stability of capillary gels for automated sequencing of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, H; Dew-Jager, K E; Brady, K; Grey, R; Dovichi, N J; Gesteland, R

    1992-08-01

    Recent interest in capillary gel electrophoresis has been fueled by the Human Genome Project and other large-scale sequencing projects. Advances in gel polymerization techniques and detector design have enabled sequencing of DNA directly in capillaries. Efforts to exploit this technology have been hampered by problems with the reproducibility and stability of gels. Gel instability manifests itself during electrophoresis as a decrease in the current passing through the capillary under a constant voltage. Upon subsequent microscopic examination, bubbles are often visible at or near the injection (cathodic) end of the capillary gel. Gels have been prepared with the polyacrylamide matrix covalently attached to the silica walls of the capillary. These gels, although more stable, still suffer from problems with bubbles. The use of actual DNA sequencing samples also adversely affects gel stability. We examined the mechanisms underlying these disruptive processes by employing polyacrylamide gel-filled capillaries in which the gel was not attached to the capillary wall. Three sources of gel instability were identified. Bubbles occurring in the absence of sample introduction were attributed to electroosmotic force; replacing the denaturant urea with formamide was shown to reduce the frequency of these bubbles. The slow, steady decline in current through capillary sequencing gels interferes with the ability to detect other gel problems. This phenomenon was shown to be a result of ionic depletion at the gel-liquid interface. The decline was ameliorated by adding denaturant and acrylamide monomers to the buffer reservoirs. Sample-induced problems were shown to be due to the presence of template DNA; elimination of the template allowed sample loading to occur without complications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Sol-gel synthesis of hydroxyapatite; Sintese de hidroxiapatita via sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zupanski, M.D.; Lucena, M.P.P.; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: michelledunin@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) has been established as the calcium phosphate based compound with most applications in the biological field. Among the numerous techniques for synthesis of HAp, the sol-gel processing route affords great control over purity and formed phases using low processing temperatures. In addition, the sol-gel approach offers an option for homogeneous HAp coating on metal substrates, as well as the ability to generate nanocrystalline powders. In this work, the sol-gel synthesis of HAp was investigated employing triethyl phosphate and calcium nitrate tetrahydrate as phosphorous and calcium precursors, respectively. The aging effect on phase composition and powder morphology of the final product was studied in terms of temperature and aging time. The powders were studied by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, particle size distribution by laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. (author)

  13. Dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy with Fricke-gel layers and Fricke-gel catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G; Carrara, M; Negri, A; Invernizzi, M; Tenconi, C; Scotti, A; Pirola, L; Borroni, M; Tomatis, S; Fallai, C, E-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.i

    2010-11-01

    Fricke-gel layer dosimeters (FGLD) and Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) have been designed and tested with the aim of enquiring their suitability for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source control and for in-vivo dose verification during treatment. Anisotropy function measurements have been carried out with FGLDs in which a thin plastic tube has been placed in for the {sup 192}Ir source insertion. FGDCs are constituted by plastic tubes (3 mm of external diameter and 13 cm of length) filled with the dosimeter-gel. Absorbed dose images and profiles were attained by means of optical analysis. Dedicated software has been developed both for achieving anisotropy function values and for obtaining reliable results in visible light absorbance measurements across the thin cylindrical dosimeters. Preparation and analysis procedures have been optimised. The results confirm that the proposed methods are very promising for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry.

  14. Investigation of the Peroxovanadate Sol-Gel Process and Characterization of the Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenot, Craig Joseph [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In general, the peroxovanadate solution sol-gel process can be thought of as consisting of two parts: (1) the decomposition of the peroxo species and (2) cation hydrolysis leading to gelation. By controlling the synthesis conditions, both layered and amorphous compounds can be created. However, the type of water coordination observed in these gels was found to be identical no matter what the long-range order. The current work clarified many of the discrepancies found in the literature and offered much new valuable information. Highlights include the types of vanadium environments present at various stages of hydration, the role of adsorbed water, oxygen exchange from adsorbed water into the gel sites, and the ability to create metastable VMoO solid solution phases. These results could have a variety of impacts on future catalysis research.

  15. Experimental data of inorganic gel based smart window using silica sol–gel process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayeon Jung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article experimental data are presented for inorganic gel based smart window fabricated using silica sol–gel process. Parallel beam transmittances were measured as functions of voltages for samples fabricated with different concentrations of nitric acid. Spectroscopic transmittance data at different driving voltages for samples fabricated with different LC concentrations are shown. Transmittance spectra of the Si–Ti based gel-based-liquid-crystal (GDLC device measured as different driving voltages were compared with those of PDLC. GDLC showed much lower operating voltages, 10–15 V, for on-state. Formation of the LC droplet in gelation process is illustrated. The methyl organic group surrounds LC droplets. Demonstration of GDLC based smart window showed the successful operation with low driving voltages. GDLC window shows clear color, even at off-state, compared with PDLC.

  16. Functional advantages conferred by extracellular prokaryotic membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew J; Kuehn, Meta J

    2013-01-01

    The absence of subcellular organelles is a characteristic typically used to distinguish prokaryotic from eukaryotic cells. But recent discoveries do not support this dogma. Over the past 50 years, researchers have begun to appreciate and characterize Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane-derived vesicles and Gram-positive and archaeal membrane vesicles. These extracellular, membrane-bound organelles can perform a variety of functions, including binding and delivery of DNA, transport of virulence factors, protection of the cell from outer membrane targeting antimicrobials and ridding the cell of toxic envelope proteins. Here, we review the contributions of these extracellular organelles to prokaryotic physiology and compare these with the contributions of the bacterial interior membrane-bound organelles responsible for harvesting light energy and for generating magnetic crystals of heavy metals. Understanding the roles of these multifunctional extracellular vesicle organelles as microbial tools will help us to better realize the diverse interactions that occur in our polymicrobial world.

  17. The impact of extracellular acidosis on dendritic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mónica Elba; Gamberale, Romina; Trevani, Analía Silvina; Martínez, Diego; Ceballos, Ana; Sabatte, Juan; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge Raúl

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells. They are activated in the periphery by conserved pathogen molecules and by inflammatory mediators produced by a variety of cell types in response to danger signals. It is widely appreciated that inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues are usually associated with the development of acidic microenvironments. Surprisingly, there are relatively few studies directed to analyze the effect of extracellular acidosis on the immune response. We focus on the influence of extracellular acidosis on the function of immature DCs. The results presented here show that acidosis activates DCs. It increases the acquisition of extracellular antigens for MHC class I-restricted presentation and the ability of antigen-pulsed DCs to induce both specific CD8+ CTL and B-cell responses. These findings may have important implications to our understanding of the mechanisms through which DCs sense the presence of infection or inflammation in nonlymphoid tissues.

  18. A Look inside the Listeria monocytogenes Biofilms Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Colagiorgi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen able to persist in food industry and is responsible for a severe illness called listeriosis. The ability of L. monocytogenes to persist in environments is due to its capacity to form biofilms that are a sessile community of microorganisms embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS’s. In this review, we summarized recent efforts performed in order to better characterize the polymeric substances that compose the extracellular matrix (ECM of L. monocytogenes biofilms. EPS extraction and analysis led to the identification of polysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other molecules within the listerial ECM. All this knowledge will be useful for increasing food protection, suggesting effective strategies for the minimization of persistence of L. monocytogenes in food industry environments.

  19. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release......-deficient P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing mutant are more susceptible to aminoglycoside treatment than wild-type biofilms but become rescued from the detrimental action of aminoglycosides upon supplementation with exogenous DNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exposure to lysed polymorphonuclear leukocytes......, which are thought to be a source of extracellular DNA at sites of infections, increases the tolerance of P. aeruginosa biofilms toward aminoglycosides. Although biofilm-associated aminoglycoside tolerance recently has been linked to extracellular DNA-mediated activation of the pmr genes, we demonstrate...

  20. Unidirectional cell crawling model guided by extracellular cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanjiang; Geng, Yuxu

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is a highly regulated and complex cellular process to maintain proper homeostasis for various biological processes. Extracellular environment was identified as the main affecting factors determining the direction of cell crawling. It was observed experimentally that the cell prefers migrating to the area with denser or stiffer array of microposts. In this article, an integrated unidirectional cell crawling model was developed to investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of unidirectional cell migration, which incorporates the dominating intracellular biochemical processes, biomechanical processes and the properties of extracellular micropost arrays. The interpost spacing and the stiffness of microposts are taken into account, respectively, to study the mechanism of unidirectional cell locomotion and the guidance of extracellular influence cues on the direction of unidirectional cell crawling. The model can explain adequately the unidirectional crawling phenomena observed in experiments such as "spatiotaxis" and "durotaxis," which allows us to obtain further insights into cell migration.

  1. Extracellular Protease Activity of Enteropathogenic Escherechia coli on Mucin Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI BUDIARTI

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC causes gastrointestinal infections in human. EPEC invasion was initiated by attachment and aggressive colonization on intestinal surface. Attachment of EPEC alter the intestine mucosal cells. Despite this, the pathogenic mechanism of EPEC infectior has not been fully understood. This research hypothesizes that extracellular proteolytic enzymes is necessary for EPEC colonization. The enzyme is secreted into gastrointestinal milieu and presumably destroy mucus layer cover the gastrointestinal tract. The objective of this study was to assay EPEC extracellular protease enzyme by using mucin substrate. The activity of EPEC extracellular proteolytic enzyme on 1% mucin substrate was investigated. Non-pathogenic E. coli was used as a negative control. Positive and tentative controls were Yersinia enterocolitica and Salmonella. Ten EPEC strains were assayed, seven of them were able to degrade mucin, and the highest activity was produced by K1.1 strain. Both positive and tentative controls also showed the ability to digest 0.20% mucin.

  2. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  3. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  4. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  5. Extracellular matrix as a driver for lung regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Jenna L; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-03-01

    Extracellular matrix has manifold roles in tissue mechanics, guidance of cellular behavior, developmental biology, and regenerative medicine. Over the past several decades, various pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown that many connective tissues may be replaced and/or regenerated using suitable extracellular matrix scaffolds. More recently, decellularization of lung tissue has shown that gentle removal of cells can leave behind a "footprint" within the matrix that may guide cellular adhesion, differentiation and homing following cellular repopulation. Fundamental issues like understanding matrix composition and micro-mechanics remain difficult to tackle, largely because of a lack of available assays and tools for systematically characterizing intact matrix from tissues and organs. This review will critically examine the role of engineered and native extracellular matrix in tissue and lung regeneration, and provide insights into directions for future research and translation.

  6. Synthesis of Hydrophobically Modified Poly(acrylic acid) gels and Interaction of the gels with Cationic/Anionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田琴; 唐小真; 庄东青; 章云祥

    2002-01-01

    Poly(acrylic acid)(PAA) gel network with only chemical crosslinking and hydorophobically modified PAA(HM-PAA)gels with both chemical and physical crosslinking were synthesized by radical polymerization in tert-butanol,using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crossliker,and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctanesulfoamido)ethyl methacrylate (FMA),stearyl acrylate (SA) or lauryl acrylate (LA) as Hydrophobic comonomer respectively.The effcet of the fractions and the species of the hydrophobes on swelling properties of HM-PAA gels and the interaction of gels and surfactants were studied.The results showed that the swelling ratio of HM-PAA gels exhibited a sharp decrease with increasing hydrophobic comomomer comcentration,Which Could be sacribed to the formation of strong hydrophobic association among hydrophobic groups.It was proved that two kinds of binding mechanisms of surfactan/gel and different kinds of hydrophobic clusters existed in gels containing both physical and chemical networks.

  7. Synthesis of Hydrophobically Modified Poly(acrylic acid) Gels and Interaction of the Gels with Cationic/Anionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN,Qin(田琴); TANG,Xiao-Zhen(唐小真); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2002-01-01

    Poly( acrylic acid) (PAA) gel network with only chemical crosslinking and hydrophobically modified PAA (HM-PAA)gels with both chemical and physical crosslinking were synthesized by radical polymerization in tert-butanol, using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker, and 2-(Nethylperfiuorooctanesulfoamido) ethyl methacrylate ( FMA ),stearyl acrylate (SA) or lauryl acrylate (LA) as hydrophobic comonomer respectively. The effect of the fractions and the species of the hydrophobes on swelling properties of HM-PAA gels and the interaction of gels and surfactants were studied.The results showed that the swelling ratio of HM-PAA gels exhibited a sharp decrease with increasing hydrophobic comonomer concentration, which could be ascribed to the formation of strong hydrophobic association among hydrophobic groups. It was proved that two kinds of binding mechanisms of surfactant/gel and different kinds of hydrophobic dusters existed in gels containing both physical and chemical networks.

  8. Analysis of variations in band positions for normalization in across-gel denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Yuko; Yamamura, Kohji; Morimoto, Sho; Bao, Zhihua; Kurose, Daisuke; Sato, Ikuo; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Tsushima, Seiya

    2015-05-01

    Variation in band position between gels is a well-known problem in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). However, few reports have evaluated the degree of variation in detail. In this study, we investigated the variation in band positions of DNA samples extracted from soil, normalized using reference positions within marker lanes for DGGE in three organismal (bacterial, fungal, and nematode) conditions. For sample lanes, marker DNA (as a control) and sample DNA were used. The test for normality of distribution showed that the position data of a large percentage of bands were normally distributed but not for certain bands. For the normally-distributed data, their variations [standard deviation of marker bands (SDM) and standard deviation of sample bands (SDS), respectively] were assessed. For all organismal conditions, the degree of within-gel variation were similar between SDMs and SDSs, while between-gel variations in SDSs were larger than those in SDMs. Due to the large effect of between-gel variations, the total variations in SDSs were more varied between sample bands, and the mean variations of all sample bands were higher than those in the markers. We found that the total variation in the fungal and nematode SDSs decreased when the intervals between marker bands were narrowed, suggesting that band interval is important for reducing total variation in normalized band positions. For the non-normally distributed data, the distribution was examined in detail. This study provided detailed information on the variation of band positions, which could help to optimize markers for reducing band position variation, and could aid in the accurate identification of bands in across-gel DGGE analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. EXTRACELLULAR PROTEINS PRODUCED BY DIFFERENT SPECIES OF THE FUNGUS TRICHODERMA ON SECONDARY PAPER MILL SLUDGE SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Vaskova,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kraft pulping is the most commonly used pulping process in the pulp and paper industry. In this process wood chips are chemically delignified using sodium sulfide and sodium hydroxide. Delignification is usually followed by mechanical fiberization and a bleaching process of the resulting wood pulp. In addition to lignin-free wood pulp, this process also produces waste that contains residues of used chemicals, lignin, cellulose, hemicelluloses, and small amounts of other wood components. Because of the worldwide large-scale production of paper, the sludge from paper mills contributes significantly to environmental pollution. Although there have been great efforts being made to utilize this lignin-rich material, sludge is mostly disposed in landfills or incinerated in a boiler. This research project used secondary sludge as a substrate for 7 wood-decay fungi taxonomically belonging to the genus Trichoderma. The examined fungi expressed the capability of consuming sludge components as a carbon source to produce extracellular proteins. The proteins were separated by gel electrophoresis. Before and after fungi cultivation, the sludge was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR.

  10. Lipolytic potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01: production, partial purification, and characterisation of an extracellular lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Lívia Tereza Andrade; Oliveira, Jamil S; dos Santos, Vera L; Regis, Wiliam C B; Santoro, Marcelo M; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01 was investigated by describing the catalytic properties and stability of a secreted extracellular lipase. Enzyme production was considered high under room temperature after 4 days using sunflower oil and a combination of casein with sodium nitrate. Lipase was partially purified by 3.9-fold, resulting in a 44.2% yield using ammonium sulphate precipitation (60%) quantified with Superose 12 HR gel filtration chromatography. The activity of the enzyme was maximised at pH 8.5, and the enzyme demonstrated stability under alkaline conditions. The optimum temperature was found to be 45°C, and the enzyme was stable for up to 100 minutes, with more than 80% of initial activity remaining after incubation at this temperature. Partially purified enzyme showed reasonable stability with triton X-100 and was activated in the presence of organic solvents (toluene, hexane, and methanol). Among the tested ions, only Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Al(3+) showed inhibitory effects. Substrate specificity of the lipase was higher for C14 among various p-nitrophenyl esters assayed. The KM and V max values of the purified enzyme for p-nitrophenyl palmitate were 0.13 mM and 12.58 umol/(L·min), respectively. These features render a novel biocatalyst for industrial applications.

  11. Lipolytic Potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01: Production, Partial Purification, and Characterisation of an Extracellular Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Tereza Andrade Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipolytic potential of Aspergillus japonicus LAB01 was investigated by describing the catalytic properties and stability of a secreted extracellular lipase. Enzyme production was considered high under room temperature after 4 days using sunflower oil and a combination of casein with sodium nitrate. Lipase was partially purified by 3.9-fold, resulting in a 44.2% yield using ammonium sulphate precipitation (60% quantified with Superose 12 HR gel filtration chromatography. The activity of the enzyme was maximised at pH 8.5, and the enzyme demonstrated stability under alkaline conditions. The optimum temperature was found to be 45°C, and the enzyme was stable for up to 100 minutes, with more than 80% of initial activity remaining after incubation at this temperature. Partially purified enzyme showed reasonable stability with triton X-100 and was activated in the presence of organic solvents (toluene, hexane, and methanol. Among the tested ions, only Cu2+, Ni2+, and Al3+ showed inhibitory effects. Substrate specificity of the lipase was higher for C14 among various p-nitrophenyl esters assayed. The KM and Vmax values of the purified enzyme for p-nitrophenyl palmitate were 0.13 mM and 12.58 umol/(L·min, respectively. These features render a novel biocatalyst for industrial applications.

  12. In Vivo Analysis of Extracellular Proteins in Rat Brains with a Newly Developed Intracerebral Microdialysis Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura,Mitsuo

    1990-02-01

    Full Text Available Peptides and proteins in the extracellular space in the central nervous system were investigated in vivo using an intracerebral microdialysis probe. The molecular cut-off of the hollow fiber which was used for the probe was approximately 100 kDa. We examined recovery rates of several compounds in vitro. The recovery rates of proteins and peptides were between 7-28%, with the exceptions of substance P and insulin-like growth factor I. The recovery rates of monoamines and their metabolites were 22-40%. In in vivo studies, two major proteins with apparent molecular weights of 62 kDa and 12 kDa, and several minor proteins (28 kDa, 43 kDa, 52 kDa and 70 kDa were detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the dialysate from a probe implanted in the striatum of anesthetized rats. These results suggest that the newly developed, intracerebral microdialysis probe might be useful for investigating the dynamic changes of peptides and proteins in the central nervous system.

  13. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  14. Purification and Properties of an Extracellular Polyhydroxybutyrate Depolymerase from Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; LI Fan; WANG Zhan-yong; LIU Dong-bo; XIA Hong-mei; LIU Ling-fei; CHEN Shan

    2012-01-01

    An extracellular polyhydroxybutyrate(PHB) depolymerase was purified to homogeneity from the culture supematant of a PHB-degrading bacterium,Pseudomonas mendocina DSWY0601,which was isolated from brewery sewage for the ability to form clear zones on the PHB mineral agar plates.The molecular weight of the purified PHB depolymerase as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis(SDS-PAGE) was approximately 59800 at the optimal temperature and pH value being 50℃ and 8.5,respectively.PHB depolymerase was stable in a temperature rangc of 20--50℃ and sensitive to pH value within a pH range of 8.0--9.5.PHB depolymerase degraded poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate(P3/4HB) and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate(PHBV) but did not degrade poly(lactic acid)(PLA),poly(butylene succinate)(PBS) or poly(caprolactone)(PCL).PHB depolymerase was sensitive to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride(PMSF),H2O2 and SDS.The main product after enzymatic degradation of PHB was indentified as 3-hydroxbutyrate monomer(3HB) by mass spectrometric analysis,suggesting that PHB depolymerase acted as an exo-type hydrolase.Analysis ofphaZpm gene reveals that PHB depolymerase is a typical denatured short-chain-length PHA(dPHAscL,PHA=polyhydroxyalkanoate)depolymerase containing catalytic domain,linker and substrate-binding domain.

  15. Cell-associated and extracellular proteolytic activity of an oral flagellate, Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bózner, P; Demes, P

    1991-01-01

    Proteolytic activities in crude extracts and culture filtrates from Trichomonas tenax were determined using hide powder azure as substrate and the proteinase profiles in both samples were analysed in SDS-polyacrylamide gels containing copolymerized gelatin. The enzyme activity in the crude extract was detected over a broad pH range and was strongly activated by dithiothreitol, mainly in the pH range 5-8, and inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Extracellular enzyme activity in culture filtrates was SH-dependent and increased continuously during incubation of the cell suspension, suggesting proteinase release. A total of seven distinct proteolytic bands could be detected in crude preparations. Three of these, with apparent Mr values 35,000, 45,000 and 56,000 and a pH optimum of 4-7, were SH-dependent and their inhibitory sensitivities were characteristic for cysteine proteinases. The 45,000 and 56,000 proteinases probably corresponded to those found in the culture filtrates. Proteolytic bands with apparent Mr 76,000, 87,000, 102,000 and 270,000 and pH optima in the alkaline region, pH 8-9, were independent of SH groups and were inhibited by a chelating agent EDTA, suggesting that they belong to the metalloproteinase family.

  16. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular matrix proteins secreted by hypertrophic scar with normal skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hypertrophic scars (HSs is a fibroproliferative disorder of abnormal wound healing. HSs usually characterize excessive proliferation of fibroblasts, abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM during wound healing, associated with cosmetic, functional, and psychological problems. Owing to the role of ECM proteins in scar formation, we comparatively analyzed matrix proteins secreted by normal skin fibroblasts (NSFs and HS fibroblasts (HSFs. The acetone-extracted secreted proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, and identified by mass spectrometry (MS. Based on Go annotation of MS data, the profiling of ECM proteins was established and scar-related proteins have been screened out. The functions of several ECM proteins identified by MS have been discussed, such as collagens I, VI, XII, fibronectin, decorin, lumican, and protein procollagen C endopeptidase enhancer 1 (PCPE-1. Among them, the MS result of PCPE-1 was supported by Western blotting that PCPE-1 from HSFs were significantly upregulated than that from NSFs. It is suggested that PCPE-1 could be a potential target for scar treatment. The exploration of scar related proteins may provide new perspectives on understanding the mechanism of scar formation and open a new way to scar treatment and prevention.

  17. Purification and Characterization of Extracellular Laccase Secreted by Pleurotus sajor-caju MTCC 141

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Sahay; R. S. S. Yadav; K. D. S. Yadav

    2008-01-01

    The effect of lignin containing natural substrates corn-cob, coir-dust, saw-dust, wheat straw and bagasse particles on the extracellular secretion of laccase in the liquid culture growth medium of Pleurotus sajor-caju MTCC 141 has been studied. The culture conditions for maximum secretion of laccase by Pleurotus sajor-caju MTCC 141 have been optimized. Homogeneous preparation of laccase from the culture filtrate of the fungus has been achieved using ammonium sulphate precipitation, anion exchange chromatography on DEAE and gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-100. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band in SDS-PAGE analysis indicating a molecular weight of 90 kD. The enzymatic characteristics Km, kcat, pH and temperature optima of the purified laccase have been determined using 2, 6-dimethoxyphenol as the substrate and have been found to be 35μmol/L, 0.30 min-1, 4.5 and 37℃ respectively. The Km values for the other substrate like catechol, m-cresol, pyrogallol and syringaldazine have also been determined which were found to be 216 μmol/L, 380 μmol/L, 370 μmol/L and 260 μmol/L respectively.

  18. Purification and characterisation of an extracellular phytase from Aspergillus niger 11T53A9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Greiner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular phytase from Aspergillus niger 11T53A9 was purified about 51-fold to apparent homogeneity with a recovery of 20.3% referred to the phytase activity in the crude extract. Purification was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation, ion chromataography and gel filtration. The purified enzyme behaved as a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of about 85 kDa and exhibited maximal phytate-degrading activity at pH 5.0. Optimum temperature for the degradation of phytate was 55°C. The kinetic parameters for the hydrolysis of sodium phytate were determined to be K M = 54 µmol l-1 and k cat = 190 sec-1 at pH 5.0 and 37°C. The purified enzyme was rather specific for phytate dephosphorylation. It was shown that the phytase preferably dephosphorylates myo-inositol hexakisphosphate in a stereospecific way by sequential removal of phosphate groups via D-Ins(1,2,4,5,6P5, D-Ins(1,2,5,6P4, D-Ins(1,2,6P3, D-Ins(1,2P2 to finally Ins(2P.

  19. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  20. Monocytes increase human cardiac myofibroblast-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling through TGF-β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Lipon, Brodie D; Svystonyuk, Daniyil A; Teng, Guoqi; Guzzardi, David G; Silva, Claudia; Yong, V Wee; Fedak, Paul W M

    2016-03-15

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac myofibroblasts remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM), preventing mechanical complications. However, prolonged myofibroblast activity leads to dysregulation of the ECM, maladaptive remodeling, fibrosis, and heart failure (HF). Chronic inflammation is believed to drive persistent myofibroblast activity; however, the mechanisms are unclear. We assessed the influence of peripheral blood monocytes on human cardiac myofibroblast activity in a three-dimensional (3D) ECM microenvironment. Human cardiac myofibroblasts isolated from surgical biopsies of the right atrium and left ventricle were seeded into 3D collagen matrices. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human donors and cocultured with myofibroblasts. Monocytes increased myofibroblast activity measured by collagen gel contraction (baseline: 57.6 ± 5.9% vs. coculture: 65.2 ± 7.1% contraction; P matrix metalloproteinase 9 compared with baseline (122.9 ± 10.1 pg/ml and 3,496.0 ± 190.4 pg/ml, respectively, vs. 21.5 ± 16.3 pg/ml and 183.3 ± 43.9 pg/ml; P matrix. Peripheral blood monocyte interaction with human cardiac myofibroblasts stimulates myofibroblast activity through release of TGF-β1. These data implicate inflammation as a potential driver of cardiac fibrosis.