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Sample records for extracellular gaba concentration

  1. The effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular concentrations of GABA in dorsal hippocampus of male rats.

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    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-11-01

    Repeated, intermittent exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine results in response enhancements to subsequent drug treatments, a phenomenon referred to as behavioral sensitization. As persistent neuronal sensitization may contribute to the long-lasting consequences of drug abuse, characterizing the neurochemical mechanisms of sensitization is providing insights into addiction. Although it has been shown that GABAergic systems in the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus are involved in morphine sensitization, the alteration of extracellular level of GABA in this area in morphine sensitization has not been investigated. In the present study, using the in vivo microdialysis technique, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus of freely moving rats. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular GABA concentration in CA1 was decreased following acute administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular GABA concentration in this area. The enhancement of GABA in morphine sensitized rats was inhibited by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the GABAergic neuronal transmission in dorsal hippocampus induced by morphine sensitization and it is implied that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  2. Basic mechanism leading to stimulation of glycogenolysis by isoproterenol, EGF, elevated extracellular K+ concentrations, or GABA.

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    Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Bai, Qiufang; Cai, Liping; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Glycogenolysis, in brain parenchyma an astrocyte-specific process, has changed from being envisaged as an emergency procedure to playing central roles during brain response to whisker stimulation, memory formation, astrocytic K(+) uptake and stimulated release of ATP. It is activated by several transmitters and by even very small increases in extracellular K(+) concentration, and to be critically dependent upon an increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), whereas cAMP plays only a facilitatory role together with increased [Ca(2+)]i. Detailed knowledge about the signaling pathways eliciting glycogenolysis is therefore of interest and was investigated in the present study in well differentiated cultures of mouse astrocytes. The β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol stimulated glycogenolysis by a β1-adrenergic effect, which initiated a pathway in which cAMP/protein kinase A activated a Gi/Gs shift, leading to Ca(2+)-activated glycogenolysis. Inhibition of this pathway downstream of cAMP but upstream of the Gi/Gs shift abolished the glycogenolysis. However, inhibitors operating downstream of the Ca(2+)-sensitive step, but preventing transactivation-mediated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor stimulation, a later step in the activated pathway, also caused inhibition of glycogenolysis. For this reason the effect of EGF was investigated and it was found to be glycogenolytic. Large increases in extracellular K(+) activated glycogenolysis by a nifedipine-inhibited L-channel opening allowing influx of Ca(2+), known to be glycogenolysis-dependent. Small increases (addition of 5 mM KCl) caused a smaller effect by a similarly glycogenolysis-reliant opening of an IP3 receptor-dependent ouabain signaling pathway. The same pathway could be activated by GABA (also in brain slices) due to its depolarizing effect in astrocytes.

  3. The effects of thioperamide on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the rat prefrontal cortex.

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    Welty, Natalie; Shoblock, James R

    2009-12-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3R) are presynaptic heteroreceptors that negatively modulate the release of histamine and other neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine. Blocking H3 receptors with antagonists/inverse agonists has been shown to be procognitive and this effect has often been associated with increases in acetylcholine transmission. H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the prefrontal cortex, an area associated with cognitive performance. While the procognitive effects of H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists may depend on alterations to acetylcholine or histamine release, other transmitters involved in cognitive processing such as glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may also be involved. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of thioperamide, an H3 receptor antagonist, on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the prefrontal cortex. By means of in vivo microdialysis on freely moving Sprague Dawley rats, samples were collected and assayed via high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. Replacement of calcium with magnesium revealed that the release of GABA, but not glutamate, was calcium-dependent. Thioperamide (10-20 mg/kg) did not affect basal glutamate or GABA release. Perfusion with a high concentration of potassium (100 mM) increased GABA, but not glutamate, release and thioperamide (20 mg/kg) attenuated the effects of high potassium on GABA release. These data indicate that H3 receptors in the prefrontal cortex can enhance stimulated GABA release, but do not regulate basal levels of glutamate or GABA.

  4. Exposure to novelty and forced swimming evoke stressor-dependent changes in extracellular GABA in the rat hippocampus.

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    de Groote, L; Linthorst, A C E

    2007-09-07

    In the hippocampus, a brain structure critically important in the stress response, GABA controls neuronal activity not only via synaptic inhibition, but also via tonic inhibition through stimulation of extrasynaptic GABA receptors. The extracellular level of GABA may represent a major determinant for tonic inhibition and, therefore, it is surprising that its responsiveness to stress has hardly been investigated. To clarify whether hippocampal extracellular GABA levels change in response to acute stress, we conducted an in vivo microdialysis study in rats. We found that dialysate GABA levels respond to various neuropharmacological manipulations such as reuptake inhibition, elevated concentrations of K(+), tetrodotoxin and baclofen, indicating that a large proportion of hippocampal extracellular GABA depends on neuronal release and that GABA re-uptake plays a role in determining the extracellular levels of this neurotransmitter. Next, rats were exposed to a novel cage or to forced swimming in 25 degrees C water. Interestingly, these two stressors resulted in opposite effects. Novelty caused a fast increase in GABA (120% of baseline), whereas forced swimming resulted in a profound decrease (70% of baseline). To discriminate between the psychological and physical aspects (i.e. the effects on body temperature) of forced swimming, another group of animals was forced to swim at 35 degrees C. This stressor, like novelty, caused an increase in hippocampal GABA, suggesting a stimulatory effect of psychological stress. The effects of novelty could not be blocked by the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results are the first to demonstrate stressor-dependent changes in hippocampal extracellular GABA; an observation which may be of particular significance for GABAergic tonic inhibition of hippocampal neurons.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTRACELLULAR GABA IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA-RETICULATA BY MEANS OF BRAIN MICRODIALYSIS

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    TIMMERMAN, W; ZWAVELING, J; WESTERINK, BHC

    1992-01-01

    Brain microdialysis was used to characterize extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) of freely moving rats. The extracellular GABA in the SNR was characterized using acutely implanted probes (4-8 h after surgery; day 1) and chronically implanted probes (

  6. EFECTO DE LA ADMINISTRACIÓN INTRACEREBRAL DE MK-801 Y (- NICOTINA EN LAS CONCENTRACIONES EXTRACELULARES DE GLU Y GABA EN EL NÚCLEO PEDUNCULOPONTINO DE RATAS Effect of the Mk801 and (- Nicotine Intracerebral Administration on Glu and Gaba Extracellular Concentration in the Pedunculopontine Nucleus from Rats

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    LISETTE BLANCO LEZCANO

    Full Text Available Aunque la manipulación farmacológica de los sistemas glutamatérgico y colinérgico se ha tratado en modelos experimentales de enfermedad de Parkinson (EP, pocos autores han realizado estudios de esta temática a nivel del núcleo pedunculopontino (NPP. El presente trabajo aborda los cambios en las concentraciones extracelulares (CE de glutamato (Glu y ácido δ-amino butírico (GABA en el NPP de ratas hemiparkinsonizadas por inyección de 6-hidroxidopamina (6-OHDA y sometidas a infusión local de MK-801 (10 µmol/L o (- nicotina (10 mM. La infusión se realizó mediante microdiálisis cerebral y la determinación de CE de neurotransmisores se realizó a través de cromatografía líquida de alta resolución acoplada a detección de fluorescencia. La infusión de MK-801 en el NPP produjo disminución significativa de CE de Glu (pAlthough the pharmacological manipulation of the glutamatergic and cholinergic systems have been studied in animal models of Parkinson´s disease (PD, only some authors have done work on this topic at the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN. The present work studied the changes in glutamate (Glu and δ-aminobutyric acid (GABA extracellular concentrations (EC in the PPN from hemiparkinsonian rats by 6hydroxydopamine injection. The rats were locally perfused by MK-801 (10 µmol/L or (- nicotine (10 mM solutions by cerebral microdyalisis. The biochemical studies were carried out through high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detection. MK-801 infusion induced a significant decrease of Glu (p< 0.01 and GABA (p< 0.01 EC in PPN. On the other hand (- nicotine infusion induced a significant increase of Glu (p< 0.001 and GABA (p< 0.001 EC in PPN from hemiparkinsonian rats. The local blockade of NMDA receptors by MK-801 infusion facilitates the interaction between Glu and their metabotropic receptors that take part in presynaptic inhibition mechanisms and interfere with neurotransmitters release. Meanwhile, the

  7. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF EXTRACELLULAR GABA IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA OF THE RAT DURING SEIZURES AND ANTICONVULSANT TREATMENTS

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    SAYIN, U; TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the anti-epileptic drugs valproic acid and gamma-vinyl-GABA (vigabatrin) on the extracellular content of GABA was determined by microdialysis. Probes were implanted in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) of rats. It was found that gamma-vinyl-GABA (1000 mg/kg) induced a 4-6-fold

  8. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF EXTRACELLULAR GABA IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA OF THE RAT DURING SEIZURES AND ANTICONVULSANT TREATMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SAYIN, U; TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The effects of the anti-epileptic drugs valproic acid and gamma-vinyl-GABA (vigabatrin) on the extracellular content of GABA was determined by microdialysis. Probes were implanted in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) of rats. It was found that gamma-vinyl-GABA (1000 mg/kg) induced a 4-6-fold inc

  9. Does extracellular calcium determine what pool of GABA is the target for alpha-latrotoxin?

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    Storchak, L G; Linetska, M V; Himmelreich, N H

    2002-04-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxin alpha-latrotoxin, from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, causes massive [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes, irrespective of calcium presence in the extracellular medium. Whether the binding of alpha-latrotoxin to Ca(2+)-dependent (neurexin 1 alpha) or to Ca(2+)-independent (latrophilin) receptor triggers [(3)H]GABA release by the same mechanisms or different ones, inducing either exocytotic process or outflow by mobile membrane GABA transporter, is unknown. We examined alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release from synaptosomes which cytosolic [(3)H]GABA pool was depleted either by applying competitive inhibitors of the GABA transporter, nipecotic acid and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, or by permeation with digitonin. We also compared the effect of the GABA transporter inhibitors on depolarisation-evoked and alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release using as depolarising agents 4-aminopyridine and high KCl in the Ca(2+)-containing and in Ca(2+)-free medium, respectively. Incubation of synaptosomes with nipecotic acid induced the essential acceleration of unstimulated [(3)H]GABA release and deep inhibition of high KCl-evoked Ca(2+)-independent [(3)H]GABA release. In contrast, at the similar conditions the effect of alpha-latrotoxin was greatly augmented with respect to the control response. Another way to assay what GABA pool was involved in alpha-latrotoxin-induced release lays in an analysis of the effects of depolarisation and alpha-latrotoxin in consecutive order. The preliminary 4-aminopyridine-stimulated [(3)H]GABA release attenuated the toxin effect. But when depolarisation occurred in Ca(2+)-free medium, no influence on alpha-latrotoxin effect was revealed. Employing digitonin-permeated synaptosomes, we have shown that alpha-latrotoxin could stimulate [3H]GABA release in the medium with 1mM EGTA, this effect of the toxin was blocked by concanavalin A and was ATP-dependent. The latter suggests that alpha

  10. GABA, a natural immunomodulator of T lymphocytes

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    Bjurstöm, Helen; Wang, Junyang; Ericsson, Ida

    2008-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain. Here we show that GABA in the extracellular space may affect the fate of pathogenic T lymphocytes entering the brain. We examined in encephalitogenic T cells if they expressed functional GABA channels that could......M and higher GABA concentrations decreased T cell proliferation. The results are consistent with GABA being immunomodulatory....

  11. Photolysis of Caged-GABA Rapidly Terminates Seizures In Vivo: Concentration and Light Intensity Dependence.

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    Wang, Dan; Yu, Zhixin; Yan, Jiaqing; Xue, Fenqin; Ren, Guoping; Jiang, Chenxi; Wang, Weimin; Piao, Yueshan; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    The therapy of focal epilepsy remains unsatisfactory for as many as 25% of patients. The photolysis of caged-γ-aminobutyric acid (caged-GABA) represents a novel and alternative option for the treatment of intractable epilepsy. Our previous experimental results have demonstrated that the use of blue light produced by light-emitting diode to uncage ruthenium-bipyridine-triphenylphosphine-c-GABA (RuBi-GABA) can rapidly terminate paroxysmal seizure activity both in vitro and in vivo. However, the optimal concentration of RuBi-GABA, and the intensity of illumination to abort seizures, remains unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the optimal anti-seizure effects of RuBi-GABA by using implantable fibers to introduce blue light into the neocortex of a 4-aminopyridine-induced acute seizure model in rats. We then investigated the effects of different combinations of RuBi-GABA concentrations and light intensity upon seizure. Our results show that the anti-seizure effect of RuBi-GABA has obvious concentration and light intensity dependence. This is the first example of using an implantable device for the photolysis of RuBi-GABA in the therapy of neocortical seizure, and an optimal combination of RuBi-GABA concentration and light intensity was explored. These results provide important experimental data for future clinical translational studies.

  12. Relating MEG measured motor cortical oscillations to resting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration.

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    Gaetz, W; Edgar, J C; Wang, D J; Roberts, T P L

    2011-03-15

    The human motor cortex exhibits characteristic beta (15-30 Hz) and gamma oscillations (60-90 Hz), typically observed in the context of transient finger movement tasks. The functional significance of these oscillations, such as post-movement beta rebound (PMBR) and movement-related gamma synchrony (MRGS) remains unclear. Considerable animal and human non-invasive studies, however, suggest that the networks supporting these motor cortex oscillations depend critically on the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Despite such speculation, a direct relation between MEG measured motor cortex oscillatory power and frequency with resting GABA concentrations has not been demonstrated. In the present study, motor cortical responses were measured from 9 healthy adults while they performed a cued button-press task using their right index finger. In each participant, PMBR and MRGS measures were obtained from time-frequency plots obtained from primary motor (MI) sources, localized using beamformer differential source localization. For each participant, complimentary magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) GABA measures aligned to the motor hand knob of the left central sulcus were also obtained. GABA concentration was estimated as the ratio of the motor cortex GABA integral to a cortical reference NAA resonance at 2 ppm. A significant linear relation was observed between MI GABA concentration and MRGS frequency (R(2)=0.46, pGABA concentration and MRGS power. Conversely, a significant linear relation was observed between MI GABA concentration and PMBR power (R(2)=0.34, pGABA concentration and PMBR frequency. Finally, a significant negative linear relation between the participant's age and MI gamma frequency was observed, such that older participants had a lower gamma frequency (R(2)=0.40, pGABA in the generation and modulation of endogenous motor cortex rhythmic beta and gamma activity.

  13. Electrical stimulation of the substantia nigra reticulata : Detection of neuronal extracellular GABA in the ventromedial thalamus and its regulatory mechanism using microdialysis in awake rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    A combination of electrical stimulation and microdialysis was used to study the nigrothalamic gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system and its regulatory mechanisms in awake rats. Extracellular GABA levels in the ventromedial nucleus of the thalamus were detected in S-min fractions collected befor

  14. Timing of the developmental switch in GABA(A) mediated signaling from excitation to inhibition in CA3 rat hippocampus using gramicidin perforated patch and extracellular recordings.

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    Tyzio, Roman; Holmes, Gregory L; Ben-Ari, Yehezkiel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2007-01-01

    The timing of the developmental switch in the GABA(A) mediated responses from excitatory to inhibitory was studied in Wistar rat CA3 hippocampal pyramidal cells using gramicidin perforated patch-clamp and extracellular recordings. Gramicidin perforated patch recordings revealed a gradual developmental shift in the reversal potential of synaptic and isoguvacine-induced GABA(A) mediated responses from -55 +/- 4 mV at postnatal days P0-2 to -74 +/- 3 mV at P13-15 with a midpoint of disappearance of the excitatory effects of GABA at around P8. Extracellular recordings in CA3 pyramidal cell layer revealed that the effect of isoguvacine on multiple unit activity (MUA) switched from an increase to a decrease at around P10. The effect of synaptic GABA(A) mediated responses on MUA switched from an increase to a decrease at around P8. It is concluded that the developmental switch in the action of GABA via GABA(A) receptors from excitatory to inhibitory occurs in Wistar rat CA3 pyramidal cells at around P8-10, an age that coincides with the transition from immature to mature hippocampal rhythms. We propose that excitatory GABA contributes to enhanced excitability and ictogenesis in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

  15. Decreased auditory GABA+ concentrations in presbycusis demonstrated by edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

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    Gao, Fei; Wang, Guangbin; Ma, Wen; Ren, Fuxin; Li, Muwei; Dong, Yuling; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Bai, Xue; Zhao, Bin; Edden, Richard A E

    2015-02-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central auditory system. Altered GABAergic neurotransmission has been found in both the inferior colliculus and the auditory cortex in animal models of presbycusis. Edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), using the MEGA-PRESS sequence, is the most widely used technique for detecting GABA in the human brain. However, to date there has been a paucity of studies exploring changes to the GABA concentrations in the auditory region of patients with presbycusis. In this study, sixteen patients with presbycusis (5 males/11 females, mean age 63.1 ± 2.6 years) and twenty healthy controls (6 males/14 females, mean age 62.5 ± 2.3 years) underwent audiological and MRS examinations. Pure tone audiometry from 0.125 to 8 kHz and tympanometry were used to assess the hearing abilities of all subjects. The pure tone average (PTA; the average of hearing thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz) was calculated. The MEGA-PRESS sequence was used to measure GABA+ concentrations in 4 × 3 × 3 cm(3) volumes centered on the left and right Heschl's gyri. GABA+ concentrations were significantly lower in the presbycusis group compared to the control group (left auditory regions: p = 0.002, right auditory regions: p = 0.008). Significant negative correlations were observed between PTA and GABA+ concentrations in the presbycusis group (r = -0.57, p = 0.02), while a similar trend was found in the control group (r = -0.40, p = 0.08). These results are consistent with a hypothesis of dysfunctional GABAergic neurotransmission in the central auditory system in presbycusis and suggest a potential treatment target for presbycusis.

  16. Action of bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues on GABA transporters and its relation to anticonvulsant activity

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    Bolvig, T; Larsson, O M; Pickering, D S;

    1999-01-01

    The inhibitory action of bicyclic isoxazole gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogues and their 4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl (DPB) substituted derivatives has been investigated in cortical neurones and astrocytes as well as in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) cells transiently expressing either mouse GABA...... anticonvulsant activity, lack of proconvulsant activity and the ability of THPO to increase extracellular GABA concentration, indicate that these bicyclic isoxazole GABA analogues and their DPB derivatives may be useful lead structures in future search for new antiepileptic drugs....

  17. Regional GABA concentration and (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding in rat brain following repeated electroconvulsive shock

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    Bowdler, J.M.; Green, A.R.; Minchin, M.C.W.; Nutt, D.J. (Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford (UK))

    1983-01-01

    It has been confirmed that 24 hours following a series of electroconvulsive shocks (ECS) given once daily for 10 days (ECS x 10) to rats there is an increase in GABA concentration in the corpus striatum. A similar change was seen after the ECS had been given to rats anaesthetised with halothane, or when 5 ECS were given spread out over 10 days, the rats being anaesthetised during the ECS. A daily convulsion for 10 days elicited by flurothyl exposure resulted in an increased striatal GABA concentration, but also increased the GABA concentration in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and cortex. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was present 24 hours after ECS daily for 5 days or 3 days after ECS daily for 10 days. No change in (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding was seen in hippocampus, cortex or corpus striatum 24 hours after the last of 10 once daily ECS. The increase in striatal GABA concentration was therefore seen at all times when enhanced monoaminemediated behaviours have been demonstrated following seizures.

  18. Revised Ion/Substrate Coupling Stoichiometry of GABA Transporters.

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    Eskandari, Sepehr; Willford, Samantha L; Anderson, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent evidence in support of a 3 Na(+): 1 Cl(-): 1 GABA coupling stoichiometry for plasma membrane GABA transporters (SLC6A1 , SLC6A11 , SLC6A12 , SLC6A13 ) and how the revised stoichiometry impacts our understanding of the contribution of GABA transporters to GABA homeostasis in synaptic and extrasynaptic regions in the brain under physiological and pathophysiological states. Recently, our laboratory probed the GABA transporter stoichiometry by analyzing the results of six independent measurements, which included the shifts in the thermodynamic transporter reversal potential caused by changes in the extracellular Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA concentrations, as well as the ratio of charge flux to substrate flux for Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA under voltage-clamp conditions. The shifts in the transporter reversal potential for a tenfold change in the external concentration of Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA were 84 ± 4, 30 ± 1, and 29 ± 1 mV, respectively. Charge flux to substrate flux ratios were 0.7 ± 0.1 charges/Na(+), 2.0 ± 0.2 charges/Cl(-), and 2.1 ± 0.1 charges/GABA. We then compared these experimental results with the predictions of 150 different transporter stoichiometry models, which included 1-5 Na(+), 0-5 Cl(-), and 1-5 GABA per transport cycle. Only the 3 Na(+): 1 Cl(-): 1 GABA stoichiometry model correctly predicts the results of all six experimental measurements. Using the revised 3 Na(+): 1 Cl(-): 1 GABA stoichiometry, we propose that the GABA transporters mediate GABA uptake under most physiological conditions. Transporter-mediated GABA release likely takes place under pathophysiological or extreme physiological conditions.

  19. Striatal and thalamic GABA level concentrations play differential roles for the modulation of response selection processes by proprioceptive information.

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    Dharmadhikari, Shalmali; Ma, Ruoyun; Yeh, Chien-Lin; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Snyder, Sandy; Zauber, S Elizabeth; Dydak, Ulrike; Beste, Christian

    2015-10-15

    The selection of appropriate responses is a complex endeavor requiring the integration of many different sources of information in fronto-striatal-thalamic circuits. An often neglected but relevant piece of information is provided by proprioceptive inputs about the current position of our limbs. This study examines the importance of striatal and thalamic GABA levels in these processes using GABA-edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (GABA-MRS) and a Simon task featuring proprioception-induced interference in healthy subjects. As a possible model of deficits in the processing of proprioceptive information, we also included Parkinson's disease (PD) patients in this study. The results show that proprioceptive information about unusual postures complicates response selection processes in controls, but not in PD patients. The well-known deficits of PD patients in processing proprioceptive information can turn into a benefit when altered proprioceptive information would normally complicate response selection processes. Striatal and thalamic GABA levels play dissociable roles in the modulation of response selection processes by proprioceptive information: Striatal GABA levels seem to be important for the general speed of responding, most likely because striatal GABA promotes response selection. In contrast, the modulation of response conflict by proprioceptive information is closely related to thalamic GABA concentrations with higher concentration being related to a smaller response conflict effect. The most likely explanation for this finding is that the thalamus is involved in the integration of sensorimotor, attentional, and cognitive information for the purpose of response formation. Yet, this effect in the thalamus vanishes when controls and PD patients were analyzed separately.

  20. Conformationally sensitive proximity of extracellular loops 2 and 4 of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-1 inferred from paired cysteine mutagenesis.

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    Hilwi, Maram; Dayan, Oshrat; Kanner, Baruch I

    2014-12-05

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled GABA transporter GAT-1 is a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters, which are crucial for synaptic transmission. Structural work on the bacterial homologue LeuT suggests that extracellular loop 4 closes the extracellular solvent pathway when the transporter becomes inward-facing. To test whether this model can be extrapolated to GAT-1, cysteine residues were introduced at positions 359 and 448 of extracellular loop 4 and transmembrane helix 10, respectively. Treatment of HeLa cells, expressing the double cysteine mutant S359C/K448C with the oxidizing reagent copper(II)(1,10-phenantroline)3, resulted in a significant inhibition of [(3)H]GABA transport. However, transport by the single cysteine mutant S359C was also inhibited by the oxidant, whereas its activity was almost 4-fold stimulated by dithiothreitol. Both effects were attenuated when the conserved cysteine residues, Cys-164 and/or Cys-173, were replaced by serine. These cysteines are located in extracellular loop 2, the role of which in the structure and function of the eukaryotic neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters remains unknown. The inhibition of transport of S359C by the oxidant was markedly reduced under conditions expected to increase the proportion of inward-facing transporters, whereas the reactivity of the mutants to a membrane-impermeant sulfhydryl reagent was not conformationally sensitive. Our data suggest that extracellular loops 2 and 4 come into close proximity to each other in the outward-facing conformation of GAT-1.

  1. Structure and functional interaction of the extracellular domain of human GABA[subscript B] receptor GBR2

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    Geng, Yong; Xiong, Dazhi; Mosyak, Lidia; Malito, David L.; Kniazeff, Julie; Chen, Yan; Burmakina, Svetlana; Quick, Matthias; Bush, Martin; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Fan, Qing R. (CNRS-UMR); (Columbia)

    2012-10-24

    Inhibitory neurotransmission is mediated primarily by GABA. The metabotropic GABA{sub B} receptor is a G protein-coupled receptor central to mammalian brain function. Malfunction of GABA{sub B} receptor has been implicated in several neurological disorders. GABA{sub B} receptor functions as a heterodimeric assembly of GBR1 and GBR2 subunits, where GBR1 is responsible for ligand-binding and GBR2 is responsible for G protein coupling. Here we demonstrate that the GBR2 ectodomain directly interacts with the GBR1 ectodomain to increase agonist affinity by selectively stabilizing the agonist-bound conformation of GBR1. We present the crystal structure of the GBR2 ectodomain, which reveals a polar heterodimeric interface. We also identify specific heterodimer contacts from both subunits, and GBR1 residues involved in ligand recognition. Lastly, our structural and functional data indicate that the GBR2 ectodomain adopts a constitutively open conformation, suggesting a structural asymmetry in the active state of GABA{sub B} receptor that is unique to the GABAergic system.

  2. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

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    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  3. Impulsivity and Aggression in Female BPD and ADHD Patients: Association with ACC Glutamate and GABA Concentrations.

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    Ende, Gabriele; Cackowski, Sylvia; Van Eijk, Julia; Sack, Markus; Demirakca, Traute; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin; Sobanski, Esther; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) and attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are both characterized by high impulsivity and difficulties in controlling anger and aggression. In BPD, comorbid ADHD may further increase impulsivity. For both disorders, altered MR spectroscopy levels of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA as well as some correlations with impulsivity were previously reported. The objective of this study was to investigate the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA in relation to impulsivity and aggression as expressed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in groups of female patients with BPD and ADHD, respectively. Associations of glutamate and GABA levels with further BPD (symptom severity) and ADHD aspects (hyperactivity and inattention) were exploratively evaluated. 1H MR spectra were acquired at 3T to determine glutamate to total creatine ratios (Glu/tCr) and GABA levels from the ACC in a BPD group (n=26), an ADHD group (n=22), and a healthy control (HC) group (n=30); all participants were females. Both patient groups showed higher scores on self-reported impulsivity, anger, and aggression compared with HCs. ACC GABA levels were significantly lower in ADHD than HC. Although measures of impulsivity were positively related to glutamate and negatively to GABA, for aggression only a negative correlation with GABA could be demonstrated. These data provide human in vivo evidence for the role of ACC Glu/tCr and GABA in impulsivity and aggression. If distinct associations of Glu/tCr and GABA for BPD and ADHD can be confirmed in future studies, this might yield implications for more specific pharmacological treatments.

  4. Multi-regional investigation of the relationship between functional MRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation and GABA concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Harris

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported an inter-individual correlation between regional GABA concentration, as measured by MRS, and the amplitude of the functional blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD response in the same region. In this study, we set out to investigate whether this coupling generalizes across cortex. In 18 healthy participants, we performed edited MRS measurements of GABA and BOLD-fMRI experiments using regionally related activation paradigms. Regions and tasks were the: occipital cortex with a visual grating stimulus; auditory cortex with a white noise stimulus; sensorimotor cortex with a finger-tapping task; frontal eye field with a saccade task; and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with a working memory task. In contrast to the prior literature, no correlation between GABA concentration and BOLD activation was detected in any region. The origin of this discrepancy is not clear. Subtle differences in study design or insufficient power may cause differing results; these and other potential reasons for the discrepant results are discussed. This negative result, although it should be interpreted with caution, has a larger sample size than prior positive results, and suggests that the relationship between GABA and the BOLD response may be more complex than previously thought.

  5. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B.; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M.; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups, where orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying DA action on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using whole cell patch clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration dependent, bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high concentrations (100 μM) of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors, whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours. PMID:26036709

  6. Concentration-dependent activation of dopamine receptors differentially modulates GABA release onto orexin neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Victoria; Trask, Robert B; Briggs, Chantalle; Rowe, Todd M; Hirasawa, Michiru

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) and orexin neurons play important roles in reward and food intake. There are anatomical and functional connections between these two cell groups: orexin peptides stimulate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area and DA inhibits orexin neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the action of DA on orexin neurons remain incompletely understood. Therefore, the effect of DA on inhibitory transmission to orexin neurons was investigated in rat brain slices using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that DA modulated the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in a concentration-dependent bidirectional manner. Low (1 μM) and high (100 μM) concentrations of DA decreased and increased IPSC frequency, respectively. These effects did not accompany a change in mIPSC amplitude and persisted in the presence of G-protein signaling inhibitor GDPβS in the pipette, suggesting that DA acts presynaptically. The decrease in mIPSC frequency was mediated by D2 receptors whereas the increase required co-activation of D1 and D2 receptors and subsequent activation of phospholipase C. In summary, our results suggest that DA has complex effects on GABAergic transmission to orexin neurons, involving cooperation of multiple receptor subtypes. The direction of dopaminergic influence on orexin neurons is dependent on the level of DA in the hypothalamus. At low levels DA disinhibits orexin neurons whereas at high levels it facilitates GABA release, which may act as negative feedback to curb the excitatory orexinergic output to DA neurons. These mechanisms may have implications for consummatory and motivated behaviours.

  7. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration inversely correlates with basal perfusion in human occipital lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Manus J; Rane, Swati; Hussey, Erin; Mason, Emily; Pradhan, Subechhya; Waddell, Kevin W; Ally, Brandon A

    2014-03-01

    Commonly used neuroimaging approaches in humans exploit hemodynamic or metabolic indicators of brain function. However, fundamental gaps remain in our ability to relate such hemo-metabolic reactivity to neurotransmission, with recent reports providing paradoxical information regarding the relationship among basal perfusion, functional imaging contrast, and neurotransmission in awake humans. Here, sequential magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements of the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA+macromolecules normalized by the complex N-acetyl aspartate-N-acetyl aspartyl glutamic acid: [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG]), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements of perfusion, fractional gray-matter volume, and arterial arrival time (AAT) are recorded in human visual cortex from a controlled cohort of young adult male volunteers with neurocognitive battery-confirmed comparable cognitive capacity (3 T; n=16; age=23±3 years). Regression analyses reveal an inverse correlation between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.46; P=0.037), yet no relationship between AAT and [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] (R=-0.12; P=0.33). Perfusion measurements that do not control for AAT variations reveal reduced correlations between [GABA(+)]/[NAA-NAAG] and perfusion (R=-0.13; P=0.32). These findings largely reconcile contradictory reports between perfusion and inhibitory tone, and underscore the physiologic origins of the growing literature relating functional imaging signals, hemodynamics, and neurotransmission.

  8. Lowering extracellular chloride concentration alters outer hair cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecola, R P; Bobbin, R P

    1992-08-01

    In general, increasing external K+ concentration, as well as exposure to hypotonic medium, induces a shortening of outer hair cells (OHCs) accompanied by an increase in width and volume. One possible mechanism suggested for these changes is a movement of Cl- and/or water across the cell membrane. We therefore examined the role of Cl- in OHC volume maintenance by testing the effect of decreasing extracellular Cl- concentration on OHC length and shape. In addition, the effect of hypotonic medium was examined. OHCs were isolated from guinea pig cochleae, mechanically dissociated and dispersed, and placed in a modified Hanks balanced salt solution (HBS). Exposing the cells to a Cl(-)-free HBS produced an initial shortening, which was rapidly followed by an increase in length. After about 9 min of exposure to Cl(-)-free HBS, the cells appeared to lose all water and collapsed. Upon return to normal HBS, the OHCs returned to their normal shape. We speculate that the collapse of the OHCs may be due to the loss of intracellular Cl-, which, in turn, resulted in the loss of intracellular K+ and water. The results indicate that Cl- contributes greatly to the maintenance of OHC volume. In addition, we confirmed that isolated OHCs swell in hypotonic medium and maintain their swollen state until returned to normal medium. The mechanism for maintenance of the swollen state is unknown.

  9. Exploring the relationship between cortical GABA concentrations, auditory gamma-band responses and development in ASD: Evidence for an altered maturational trajectory in ASD.

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    Port, Russell G; Gaetz, William; Bloy, Luke; Wang, Dah-Jyuu; Blaskey, Lisa; Kuschner, Emily S; Levy, Susan E; Brodkin, Edward S; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is hypothesized to arise from imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission (E/I imbalance). Studies have demonstrated E/I imbalance in individuals with ASD and also corresponding rodent models. One neural process thought to be reliant on E/I balance is gamma-band activity (Gamma), with support arising from observed correlations between motor, as well as visual, Gamma and underlying GABA concentrations in healthy adults. Additionally, decreased Gamma has been observed in ASD individuals and relevant animal models, though the direct relationship between Gamma and GABA concentrations in ASD remains unexplored. This study combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and edited magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in 27 typically developing individuals (TD) and 30 individuals with ASD. Auditory cortex localized phase-locked Gamma was compared to resting Superior Temporal Gyrus relative cortical GABA concentrations for both children/adolescents and adults. Children/adolescents with ASD exhibited significantly decreased GABA+/Creatine (Cr) levels, though typical Gamma. Additionally, these children/adolescents lacked the typical maturation of GABA+/Cr concentrations and gamma-band coherence. Furthermore, children/adolescents with ASD additionally failed to exhibit the typical GABA+/Cr to gamma-band coherence association. This altered coupling during childhood/adolescence may result in Gamma decreases observed in the adults with ASD. Therefore, individuals with ASD exhibit improper local neuronal circuitry maturation during a childhood/adolescence critical period, when GABA is involved in configuring of such circuit functioning. Provocatively a novel line of treatment is suggested (with a critical time window); by increasing neural GABA levels in children/adolescents with ASD, proper local circuitry maturation may be restored resulting in typical Gamma in adulthood. Autism Res 2017, 10: 593-607. © 2016 International Society for

  10. Changes in GABA and glutamate concentrations during memory tasks in patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing DBS surgery.

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    Buchanan, Robert J; Darrow, David P; Meier, Kevin T; Robinson, Jennifer; Schiehser, Dawn M; Glahn, David C; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Until now direct neurochemical measurements during memory tasks have not been accomplished in the human basal ganglia. It has been proposed, based on both functional imaging studies and psychometric testing in normal subjects and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), that the basal ganglia is responsible for the performance of feedback-contingent implicit memory tasks. To measure neurotransmitters, we used in vivo microdialysis during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. We show in the right subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients with PD a task-dependent change in the concentrations of glutamate and GABA during an implicit memory task relative to baseline, while no difference was found between declarative memory tasks. The five patients studied had a significant decrease in the percent concentration of GABA and glutamate during the performance of the weather prediction task (WPT). We hypothesize, based on current models of basal ganglia function, that this decrease in the concentration is consistent with expected dysfunction in basal ganglia networks in patients with PD.

  11. Changes in GABA and Glutamate concentrations during Memory Tasks in Patients with Parkinson’s disease undergoing DBS Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Buchanan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Until now direct neurochemical measurements during memory tasks have not been accomplished in the human basal ganglia. It has been proposed, based on both functional imaging studies and psychometric testing in normal subjects and in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD, that the basal ganglia is responsible for the performance of feedback-contingent implicit memory tasks. To measure neurotransmitters, we used in-vivo microdialysis during deep brain stimulator (DBS surgery. We show in the right subthalamic nucleus (STN of patients with PD a task-dependent change in the concentrations of glutamate and GABA during an implicit memory task relative to baseline, while no difference was found between declarative memory tasks. The five patients studied had a significant decrease in the percent concentration of GABA and glutamate during the performance of the Weather Prediction Task (WPT. We hypothesize, based on current models of basal ganglia function, that this decrease in the concentration is consistent with expected dysfunction in basal ganglia networks in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  12. Effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist NAS-181 on extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA in the frontal cortex and ventral hippocampus of awake rats: a microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Jing; Wang, Fu-Hua; Stenfors, Carina; Ogren, Sven Ove; Kehr, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist NAS-181 ((R)-(+)-2-(3-morpholinomethyl-2H-chromen-8-yl) oxymethyl-morpholine methanesulfonate) on cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in the rat brain in vivo. Extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA were monitored by microdialysis in the frontal cortex (FC) and ventral hippocampus (VHipp) in separate groups of freely moving rats. NAS-181 (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.) caused a dose-dependent increase in ACh levels, reaching the maximal values of 500% (FC) and 230% (VHipp) of controls at 80 min post-injection. On the contrary, NAS-181 injected at doses of 10 or 20 mg/kg s.c. had no effect on basal extracellular levels of Glu and GABA in these areas. The present data suggest that ACh neurotransmission in the FC and VHipp, the brain structures strongly implicated in cognitive function, is under tonic inhibitory control of 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptors localized at the cholinergic terminals in these areas.

  13. GLUCOSE-CONCENTRATION IN SUBCUTANEOUS EXTRACELLULAR-SPACE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHMIDT, FJ; SLUITER, WJ; SCHOONEN, AJM

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- To compare the subcutaneous glucose sensor measurements with two reference methods. Previous studies provide conflicting findings about the real glucose concentrations in subcutaneous tissue. Some suggest substantially lower concentration, whereas others measure proportionally higher gluc

  14. Gestational changes of GABA levels and GABA binding in the human uterus

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    Erdoe, S.L.; Villanyi, P.; Laszlo, A.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the activities of L-glutamate decarboxylase and GABA-transaminase, and the nature of the sodium-independent binding of GABA were examined in uterine tissue pieces obtained surgically from pregnant and non-pregnant women. GABA concentrations were reduced, while the activity of GABA-transaminase and the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA significantly increased in specimens from pregnant subjects. These findings suggest some gestation-related functional role for the GABA system in the human uterus.

  15. At immature mossy fibers-CA3 connections, activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors by endogenously released GABA contributes to synapses silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF) which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABA(B) autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABA(B) receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF-induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of E(GABA) from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABA(B) receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures.

  16. Glutamate and GABA concentration changes in the globus pallidus internus of Parkinson's patients during performance of implicit and declarative memory tasks: a report of two subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert J; Gjini, Klevest; Darrow, David; Varga, Georgeta; Robinson, Jennifer L; Nadasdy, Zoltan

    2015-03-01

    The basal ganglia, typically associated with motor function, are involved in human cognitive processes, as demonstrated in behavioral, lesion, and noninvasive functional neuroimaging studies. Here we report task-contingent changes in concentrations of the neurotransmitters glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the globus pallidus internus (GPi) of two patients with Parkinson's disease undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery by utilizing in-vivo microdialysis measurements during performance of implicit and declarative memory tasks. Performance of an implicit memory task (weather prediction task-WPT) was associated with increased levels of glutamate and GABA in the GPi compared to their concentrations at baseline. On the other hand, performance of a declarative memory task (verbal learning task-VLT) was associated with decreased levels of glutamate and GABA in GPi compared to baseline during the encoding and immediate recall phase with less conclusive results during the delayed recall phase. These results are in line with hypothesized changes in these neurotransmitter levels: an increase of excitatory (Glu) input from subthalamic nucleus (STN) to GPi during implicit memory task performance and a decrease of inhibitory inputs (GABA) from globus pallidus externus (GPe) and striatum to GPi during declarative memory performance. Consistent with our previous report on in-vivo neurotransmitter changes during tasks in STN, these data provide corroborative evidence for the direct involvement of basal ganglia in cognitive functions and complements our model of the functional circuitry of basal ganglia in the healthy and Parkinson's disease affected brain.

  17. An acidic amino acid transmembrane helix 10 residue conserved in the neurotransmitter:sodium:symporters is essential for the formation of the extracellular gate of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter GAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yona, Assaf; Kanner, Baruch I

    2012-03-01

    GAT-1 mediates transport of GABA together with sodium and chloride in an electrogenic process enabling efficient GABAergic transmission. Biochemical and modeling studies based on the structure of the bacterial homologue LeuT are consistent with a mechanism whereby the binding pocket is alternately accessible to either side of the membrane and which predicts that the extracellular part of transmembrane domain 10 (TM10) exhibits aqueous accessibility in the outward-facing conformation only. In this study we have engineered cysteine residues in the extracellular half of TM10 of GAT-1 and probed their state-dependent accessibility to sulfhydryl reagents. In three out of four of the accessible cysteine mutants, the inhibition of transport by a membrane impermeant sulfhydryl reagent was diminished under conditions expected to increase the proportion of inward-facing transporters, such as the presence of GABA together with the cotransported ions. A conserved TM10 aspartate residue, whose LeuT counterpart participates in a "thin" extracellular gate, was found to be essential for transport and only the D451E mutant exhibited residual transport activity. D451E exhibited robust sodium-dependent transient currents with a voltage-dependence indicative of an increased apparent affinity for sodium. Moreover the accessibility of an endogenous cysteine to a membrane impermeant sulfhydryl reagent was enhanced by the D451E mutation, suggesting that sodium binding promotes an outward-facing conformation of the transporter. Our results support the idea that TM10 of GAT-1 lines an accessibility pathway from the extracellular space into the binding pocket and plays a role in the opening and closing of the extracellular transporter gate.

  18. Proton MRS of the unilateral substantia nigra in the human brain at 4 tesla: detection of high GABA concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Gülin; Terpstra, Melissa; Tkác, Ivan; Aia, Pratibha; Lowary, Jodi; Tuite, Paul J; Gruetter, Rolf

    2006-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), the cause of which is unknown. Characterization of early SN pathology could prove beneficial in the treatment and diagnosis of PD. The present study shows that with the use of short-echo (5 ms) Stimulated-Echo Acquisition Mode (STEAM) spectroscopy and LCModel, a neurochemical profile consisting of 10 metabolites, including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutathione (GSH), can be measured from the unilateral SN at 4 tesla. The neurochemical profile of the SN is unique and characterized by a fourfold higher GABA/Glu ratio compared to the cortex, in excellent agreement with established neurochemistry. The presence of elevated GABA levels in SN was validated with the use of editing, suggesting that partial volume effects were greatly reduced. These findings establish the feasibility of obtaining a neurochemical profile of the unilateral human SN by single-voxel spectroscopy in small volumes.

  19. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  20. GABA concentration and GABAergic neuron populations in limbic areas are differentially altered by brain serotonin deficiency in Tph2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waider, Jonas; Proft, Florian; Langlhofer, Georg; Asan, Esther; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Gutknecht, Lise

    2013-02-01

    While tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2) null mutant (Tph2(-/-)) mice are completely deficient in brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, the formation of serotonergic neurons and pathfinding of their projections are not impaired. However, 5-HT deficiency, during development and in the adult, might affect morphological and functional parameters of other neural systems. To assess the influence of 5-HT deficiency on γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) systems, we carried out measurements of GABA concentrations in limbic brain regions of adult male wildtype (wt), heterozygous (Tph2(+/-)) and Tph2(-/-) mice. In addition, unbiased stereological estimation of GABAergic interneuron numbers and density was performed in subregions of amygdala and hippocampus. Amygdala and prefrontal cortex displayed significantly increased and decreased GABA concentrations, respectively, exclusively in Tph2(+/-) mice while no changes were detected between Tph2(-/-) and wt mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus, increased GABA concentrations were found in Tph2(-/-) mice. While total cell density in the anterior basolateral amygdala did not differ between genotypes, the number and density of the GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased in Tph2(-/-) mice, with the group of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (ir) interneurons contributing somewhat less to the decrease than that of non-PV-ir GABAergic interneurons. Major morphological changes were also absent in the dorsal hippocampus, and only a trend toward reduced density of PV-ir cells was observed in the CA3 region of Tph2(-/-) mice. Our findings are the first to document that life-long reduction or complete lack of brain 5-HT transmission causes differential changes of GABA systems in limbic regions which are key players in emotional learning and memory processes. The changes likely reflect a combination of developmental alterations and functional adaptations of emotion circuits to balance the lack of 5-HT, and may underlie altered emotional

  1. Brain intra- and extracellular sodium concentration in multiple sclerosis: a 7 T MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracca, Maria; Vancea, Roxana O; Fleysher, Lazar; Jonkman, Laura E; Oesingmann, Niels; Inglese, Matilde

    2016-03-01

    Intra-axonal accumulation of sodium ions is one of the key mechanisms of delayed neuro-axonal degeneration that contributes to disability accrual in multiple sclerosis. In vivo sodium magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated an increase of brain total sodium concentration in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially in patients with greater disability. However, total sodium concentration is a weighted average of intra- and extra-cellular sodium concentration whose changes reflect different tissue pathophysiological processes. The in vivo, non-invasive measurement of intracellular sodium concentration is quite challenging and the few applications in patients with neurological diseases are limited to case reports and qualitative assessments. In the present study we provide first evidence of the feasibility of triple quantum filtered (23)Na magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T, and provide in vivo quantification of global and regional brain intra- and extra-cellular sodium concentration in 19 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and 17 heathy controls. Global grey matter and white matter total sodium concentration (respectively P brain regional level, clusters of increased total sodium concentration and intracellular sodium concentration and decreased intracellular sodium volume fraction were found in several cortical, subcortical and white matter regions when patients were compared with healthy controls (P < 0.05 family-wise error corrected for total sodium concentration, P < 0.05 uncorrected for multiple comparisons for intracellular sodium concentration and intracellular sodium volume fraction). Measures of total sodium concentration and intracellular sodium volume fraction, but not measures of intracellular sodium concentration were correlated with T2-weighted and T1-weighted lesion volumes (0.05 < P < 0.01) and with Expanded Disability Status Scale (P < 0.05). Thus, suggesting that while intracellular sodium volume fraction decrease could

  2. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  3. Extracellular ATP inhibits root gravitropism at concentrations that inhibit polar auxin transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqiang; Brady, Shari R.; Sun, Yu; Muday, Gloria K.; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Raising the level of extracellular ATP to mM concentrations similar to those found inside cells can block gravitropism of Arabidopsis roots. When plants are grown in Murashige and Skoog medium supplied with 1 mM ATP, their roots grow horizontally instead of growing straight down. Medium with 2 mM ATP induces root curling, and 3 mM ATP stimulates lateral root growth. When plants are transferred to medium containing exogenous ATP, the gravity response is reduced or in some cases completely blocked by ATP. Equivalent concentrations of ADP or inorganic phosphate have slight but usually statistically insignificant effects, suggesting the specificity of ATP in these responses. The ATP effects may be attributable to the disturbance of auxin distribution in roots by exogenously applied ATP, because extracellular ATP can alter the pattern of auxin-induced gene expression in DR5-beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants and increase the response sensitivity of plant roots to exogenously added auxin. The presence of extracellular ATP also decreases basipetal auxin transport in a dose-dependent fashion in both maize (Zea mays) and Arabidopsis roots and increases the retention of [(3)H]indole-3-acetic acid in root tips of maize. Taken together, these results suggest that the inhibitory effects of extracellular ATP on auxin distribution may happen at the level of auxin export. The potential role of the trans-plasma membrane ATP gradient in auxin export and plant root gravitropism is discussed.

  4. Evidence for Tonic Control by the GABAA Receptor of Extracellular D-Serine Concentrations in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Umino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous D-serine is a putative dominant co-agonist for the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR in the mammalian forebrain. Although the NMDAR regulates the higher order brain functions by interacting with various neurotransmitter systems, the possible interactions between D-serine and an extra-glutamatergic system largely remain elusive. For the first time, we show in the rat and mouse using an in vivo microdialysis technique that the extracellular D-serine concentrations are under tonic increasing control by a major inhibitory transmitter, GABA, via the GABAA (GABAAR in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Thus, an intra-mPFC infusion of a selective GABAAR antagonist, bicuculline (BIC, caused a concentration-dependent and reversible decrease in the extracellular levels of D-serine in the rat mPFC without affecting those of another intrinsic NMDAR coagonist, glycine and an NMDAR agonist, L-glutamate. The decreasing effects of BIC were eliminated by co-infusion of a selective GABAA agonist, muscimol (MUS and were mimicked by a GABAA antagonist, gabazine (GBZ. In contrast, selective blockade of the GABAB or homomeric ρGABAA (formerly GABAC receptor by saclofen or (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA, respectively, failed to downregulate the prefrontal extracellular D-serine levels. Moreover, the local BIC application attenuated the ability of NMDA given to the mPFC to increase the cortical extracellular concentrations of taurine, indicating the hypofunction of the NMDAR. Finally, in the mouse mPFC, the reduction of the extracellular D-serine levels by a local injection of BIC into the prefrontal portion was replicated, and was precluded by inhibition of the neuronal or glial activity by co-local injection with tetrodotoxin (TTX or fluorocitrate (Fluo, respectively. These findings suggest that the GABAAR-mediated regulation of the D-serine signaling may exert fine-tuning of the NMDAR function and require both

  5. The Uptake of GABA in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez Rojas, Robert L; Ahn, Il-Young; Suárez Mantilla, Brian; Sant'Anna, Celso; Pral, Elizabeth Mieko Furusho; Silber, Ariel Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is widely known as a neurotransmitter and signal transduction molecule found in vertebrates, plants, and some protozoan organisms. However, the presence of GABA and its role in trypanosomatids is unknown. Here, we report the presence of intracellular GABA and the biochemical characterization of its uptake in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Kinetic parameters indicated that GABA is taken up by a single transport system in pathogenic and nonpathogenic forms. Temperature dependence assays showed a profile similar to glutamate transport, but the effect of extracellular cations Na(+) , K(+) , and H(+) on GABA uptake differed, suggesting a different uptake mechanism. In contrast to reports for other amino acid transporters in T. cruzi, GABA uptake was Na(+) dependent and increased with pH, with a maximum activity at pH 8.5. The sensitivity to oligomycin showed that GABA uptake is dependent on ATP synthesis. These data point to a secondary active Na(+) /GABA symporter energized by Na(+) -exporting ATPase. Finally, we show that GABA occurs in the parasite's cytoplasm under normal culture conditions, indicating that it is regularly taken up from the culture medium or synthesized through an still undescribed metabolic pathway.

  6. Nitric oxide inhibited the melanophore aggregation induced by extracellular calcium concentration in snakehead fish, Channa punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saikat P; Palande, Nikhil V; Jadhao, Arun G

    2011-12-01

    We studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) and extra-cellular Ca(2+) on the melanophores in Indian snakehead teleost, Channa punctatus. Increase of Ca(2+) level in the external medium causes pigment aggregation in melanophores. This pigment-aggregating effect was found to be inhibited when the external medium contained spontaneous NO donor, sodium nitro prusside (SNP) at all the levels of concentration tested. Furthermore, it has been observed that SNP keeps the pigment in dispersed state even after increasing the amount of Ca(2+). In order to test whether NO donor SNP causes dispersion of pigments or not is checked by adding the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, N-omega-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) in the medium. It has been noted that the inhibitor L-NNA blocked the effect of NO donor SNP causing aggregation of pigments. In that way NO is inhibiting the effect of extracellular Ca(2+), keeping the pigment dispersed.

  7. Non-GABA(A)-mediated effects of lindane on neurite development and intracellular free calcium ion concentration in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C A; Audesirk, G

    1995-04-01

    Changes in transmembrane Ca(2+) fluxes and intracellular free Ca(2+) ion concentrations ([Ca(2+)](in)) regulate many aspects of neurite development in cultured neurons. Lindane has been shown to increase [Ca(2+)](in) in several cell types. It was therefore hypothesized that lindane exposure would increase [Ca(2+)](in) and thereby alter neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The study reported here showed that lindane (50-100 muM) increased [Ca(2+)](in) during short-term exposure (up to 4 hr); in contrast, with long-term exposure (24-48 hr) lindane (1-50 mum) decreased [Ca(2+)](in) significantly below control levels. Lindane decreased neurite initiation at high concentrations (25 mum or above). Lindane increased dendrite number at low concentrations (0.5-1 muM), but decreased dendrite number at high concentrations (50 mum or above). Lindane decreased axon and dendrite elongation and branching at 50 mum. Loading neurons with 1 mum 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), a calcium chelator that partially 'clamps' [Ca(2+)](in), eliminated the effects of 50 mum lindane on [Ca(2+)](in) in short-term exposures. BAPTA did not significantly reverse the inhibition of neurite initiation or axonal elongation caused by 50 mum lindane. However, BAPTA partially reversed the inhibition of dendrite elongation and completely reversed the inhibition of axon and dendrite branching caused by 50 mum lindane. Therefore, some, but not all, of lindane's effects on neurite development may be due to changes in [Ca(2+)](in). Picrotoxin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A))-associated chloride channel antagonist, had no effect on [Ca(2+)](in) or any parameters of neurite growth, suggesting that the effects of lindane on neurite development and [Ca(2+)](in) were not mediated through actions on GABA(A)-associated chloride channels.

  8. Acute desensitization of presynaptic GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and induction of epileptiform discharges in the neonatal rat hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosetti, P; Bakels, R; Colin-Le Brun, [No Value; Ferrand, N; Gaiarsa, JL; Caillard, O

    2004-01-01

    The consequences of sustained activation of GABA(B) receptors on GABA(B)-mediated inhibition and network activity were investigated in the neonatal rat hippocampus using whole-cell and extracellular field recordings. GABA(B)-mediated presynaptic control of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release prog

  9. Systematic analysis of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism and function in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuantai; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-05-24

    While GABA has been suggested to regulate spore encapsulation in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, the metabolic profile and other potential functions of GABA during development remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the homeostasis of GABA metabolism by disrupting genes related to GABA metabolism and signaling. Extracellular levels of GABA are tightly regulated during early development, and GABA is generated by the glutamate decarboxylase, GadB, during growth and in early development. However, overexpression of the prespore-specific homologue, GadA, in the presence of GadB reduces production of extracellular GABA. Perturbation of extracellular GABA levels delays the process of aggregation. Cytosolic GABA is degraded by the GABA transaminase, GabT, in the mitochondria. Disruption of a putative vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT) homologue DdvGAT reduces secreted GABA. We identified the GABAB receptor-like family member GrlB as the major GABA receptor during early development, and either disruption or overexpression of GrlB delays aggregation. This delay is likely the result of an abolished pre-starvation response and late expression of several "early" developmental genes. Distinct genes are employed for GABA generation during sporulation. During sporulation, GadA alone is required for generating GABA and DdvGAT is likely responsible for GABA secretion. GrlE but not GrlB is the GABA receptor during late development.

  10. A standardized method to determine the concentration of extracellular vesicles using tunable resistive pulse sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vogel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the pathogenic role of extracellular vesicles (EVs in disease and their potential diagnostic and therapeutic utility is extremely reliant on in-depth quantification, measurement and identification of EV sub-populations. Quantification of EVs has presented several challenges, predominantly due to the small size of vesicles such as exosomes and the availability of various technologies to measure nanosized particles, each technology having its own limitations. Materials and Methods: A standardized methodology to measure the concentration of extracellular vesicles (EVs has been developed and tested. The method is based on measuring the EV concentration as a function of a defined size range. Blood plasma EVs are isolated and purified using size exclusion columns (qEV and consecutively measured with tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS. Six independent research groups measured liposome and EV samples with the aim to evaluate the developed methodology. Each group measured identical samples using up to 5 nanopores with 3 repeat measurements per pore. Descriptive statistics and unsupervised multivariate data analysis with principal component analysis (PCA were used to evaluate reproducibility across the groups and to explore and visualise possible patterns and outliers in EV and liposome data sets. Results: PCA revealed good reproducibility within and between laboratories, with few minor outlying samples. Measured mean liposome (not filtered with qEV and EV (filtered with qEV concentrations had coefficients of variance of 23.9% and 52.5%, respectively. The increased variance of the EV concentration measurements could be attributed to the use of qEVs and the polydisperse nature of EVs. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of this standardized methodology to facilitate comparable and reproducible EV concentration measurements.

  11. CSF glutamate/GABA concentrations in pyridoxine-dependent seizures: etiology of pyridoxine-dependent seizures and the mechanisms of pyridoxine action in seizure control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T; Matsuo, N; Takahashi, T

    2001-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the binding affinity of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) to the active form of pyridoxine is low in cases of pyridoxine-dependent seizures (PDS) and that a quantitative imbalance between excitatory (i.e. glutamate) and inhibitory (i.e. gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABA) neurotransmitters could cause refractory seizures. However, inconsistent findings with GAD insufficiency have been reported in PDS. We report a case of PDS that is not accompanied by an elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glutamate concentration. Intravenous pyridoxine phosphate terminated generalized seizures which were otherwise refractory to conventional anti-epileptic medicines. No seizure occurred once oral pyridoxine (13.5 mg/kg per day) was started in combination with phenobarbital sodium (PB, 3.7 mg/kg per day). The electroencephalogram (EEG) normalized approximately 8 months after pyridoxine was started. The patient is gradually acquiring developmental milestones during the 15 months follow-up period. The CSF glutamate and GABA concentrations were determined on three separate occasions: (1) during status epilepticus; (2) during a seizure-free period with administration of pyridoxine and PB; and (3) 6 days after suspension of pyridoxine and PB and immediately before a convulsion. The CSF glutamate level was below the sensitivity of detection (pyridoxine supplementation, were within the normal range. We suggest that (1) PDS is not a discrete disease of single etiology in that insufficient activation of GAD may not account for seizure susceptibility in all cases and (2) mechanism(s) of anti-convulsive effect of pyridoxine, at least in some cases, may be independent of GAD activation.

  12. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana eCesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  13. Brain microdialysis of GABA and glutamate : What does it signify?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, BHC

    1997-01-01

    Microdialysis has become a frequently used method to study extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the central nervous system. However, the fact that the major part of GABA and glutamate as measured by microdialysis does not fulfill the classical criteria for exocytotic release questions the v

  14. Mechanisms of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling under high extracellular K(+) concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shingo; Kurachi, Yoshihisa

    2016-03-01

    In response to the elevation of extracellular K(+) concentration ([K(+)]out), astrocytes clear excessive K(+) to maintain conditions necessary for neural activity. K(+) clearance in astrocytes occurs via two processes: K(+) uptake and K(+) spatial buffering. High [K(+)]out also induces swelling in astrocytes, leading to edema and cell death in the brain. Despite the importance of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report results from a simulation analysis of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling. Astrocyte models were constructed by incorporating various mechanisms such as intra/extracellular ion concentrations of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), cell volume, and models of Na,K-ATPase, Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC), K-Cl cotransporter, inwardly-rectifying K(+) (KIR) channel, passive Cl(-) current, and aquaporin channel. The simulated response of astrocyte models under the uniform distribution of high [K(+)]out revealed significant contributions of NKCC and Na,K-ATPase to increases of intracellular K(+) and Cl(-) concentrations, and swelling. Moreover, we found that, under the non-uniform distribution of high [K(+)]out, KIR channels localized at synaptic clefts absorbed excess K(+) by depolarizing the equivalent potential of K(+) (E K) above membrane potential, while K(+) released through perivascular KIR channels was enhanced by hyperpolarizing E K and depolarizing membrane potential. Further analysis of simulated drug effects revealed that astrocyte swelling was modulated by blocking each of the ion channels and transporters. Our simulation analysis revealed controversial mechanisms of astrocytic K(+) clearance and swelling resulting from complex interactions among ion channels and transporters.

  15. GABA regulates the multidirectional tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons in living neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Inada

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0 through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr, the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABA(A receptors and of the Na⁺-K⁺-Cl⁻ cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca²⁺, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABA(AR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo.

  16. Induction of the GABA cell phenotype: an in vitro model for studying neurodevelopmental disorders.

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    Sivan Subburaju

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the hippocampus have suggested that a network of genes is associated with the regulation of the GAD₆₇ (GAD1 expression and may play a role in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA dysfunction in schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BD. To obtain a more detailed understanding of how GAD₆₇ regulation may result in GABAergic dysfunction, we have developed an in vitro model in which GABA cells are differentiated from the hippocampal precursor cell line, HiB5. Growth factors, such as PDGF, and BDNF, regulate the GABA phenotype by inducing the expression of GAD₆₇ and stimulating the growth of cellular processes, many with growth cones that form appositions with the cell bodies and processes of other GAD₆₇-positive cells. These changes are associated with increased expression of acetylated tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 and the post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95. The addition of BDNF, together with PDGF, increases the levels of mRNA and protein for GAD₆₇, as well as the high affinity GABA uptake protein, GAT1. These changes are associated with increased concentrations of GABA in the cytoplasm of "differentiated" HiB5 neurons. In the presence of Ca²⁺ and K⁺, newly synthesized GABA is released extracellularly. When the HiB5 cells appear to be fully differentiated, they also express GAD₆₅, parvalbumin and calbindin, and GluR subtypes as well as HDAC1, DAXX, PAX5, Runx2, associated with GAD₆₇ regulation. Overall, these results suggest that the HiB5 cells can differentiate into functionally mature GABA neurons in the presence of gene products that are associated with GAD₆₇ regulation in the adult hippocampus.

  17. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  18. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  19. Reproducible extracellular vesicle size and concentration determination with tunable resistive pulse sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A. W. Coumans

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The size of extracellular vesicles (EVs can be determined with a tunable resistive pulse sensor (TRPS. Because the sensing pore diameter varies from pore to pore, the minimum detectable diameter also varies. The aim of this study is to determine and improve the reproducibility of TRPS measurements. Methods: Experiments were performed with the qNano system (Izon using beads and a standard urine vesicle sample. With a combination of voltage and stretch that yields a high blockade height, we investigate whether the minimum detected diameter is more reproducible when we configure the instrument targeting (a fixed stretch and voltage, or (b fixed blockade height. Results: Daily measurements with a fixed stretch and voltage (n=102 on a standard urine sample show a minimum detected vesicle diameter of 128±19 nm [mean±standard deviation; coefficient of variation (CV 14.8%]. The vesicle concentration was 2.4·109±3.8·109 vesicles/mL (range 1.4·108–1.8·1010. When we compared setting a fixed stretch and voltage to setting a fixed blockade height on 3 different pores, we found a minimum detected vesicle diameter of 118 nm (CV 15.5%, stretch, and 123 nm (CV 4.5%, blockade height. The detected vesicle concentration was 3.2–8.2·108 vesicles/mL with fixed stretch and 6.4–7.8·108 vesicles/mL with fixed blockade height. Summary/conclusion: Pore-to-pore variability is the cause of the variation in minimum detected size when setting a fixed stretch and voltage. The reproducibility of the minimum detectable diameter is much improved by setting a fixed blockade height.

  20. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of GABA-T by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Saba A J; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Barghouthi, Samira

    2003-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T, EC 2.6.1.19) is a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of gamma-aminobutyric acid. The kinetics of this reaction are studied in vitro, both in the absence, and in the presence of two inhibitors: gamma-vinyl GABA (4-aminohex-5-enoic acid), and a natural product, taurine (ethylamine-2-sulfonic acid). A kinetic model that describes the transamination process is proposed. GABA-T from Pseudomonas fluorescens is inhibited by gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine at concentrations of 51.0 and 78.5 mM. Both inhibitors show competitive inhibition behavior when GABA is the substrate and the inhibition constant (Ki) values for gamma-vinyl GABA and taurine were found to be 26 +/- 3 mM and 68 +/- 7 mM respectively. The transamination process of alpha-ketoglutarate was not affected by the presence of gamma-vinyl GABA, whereas, taurine was a noncompetitive inhibitor of GABA-T when alpha-ketoglutarate was the substrate. The inhibition dissociation constant (Kii) for this system was found to be 96 +/- 10 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) in the absence of inhibition, was found to be 0.79 +/- 0.11 mM, and 0.47 +/- 0.10 mM for GABA and alpha-ketoglutarate respectively.

  1. Differential effects of phosphonic analogues of GABA on GABA(B) autoreceptors in rat neocortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, J; Marino, V; Parker, D A; Kerr, D I

    1998-04-01

    The effects of five phosphonic derivatives of GABA on the release of [3H]-GABA from rat neocortical slices, preloaded with [3H]-GABA, were investigated. Phaclofen and 4-aminobutylphosphonic acid (4-ABPA) increased the overflow of [3H] evoked by electrical stimulation (2 Hz) in a concentration-dependent manner, with similar potencies (phaclofen EC50=0.3 mmol/l, 4-ABPA EC50=0.4 mmol/l). At 3 mmol/l, phaclofen increased the release of [3H]-GABA by 82.6+/-8.6%, and 4-ABPA increased the release by 81.3+/-9.0%. 2-Amino-ethylphosphonic acid (2-AEPA) increased the overflow of [3H] by 46.8+/-10.9% at the highest concentration tested (3 mmol/l). In contrast, the lower phosphonic homologue 3-aminopropylphosphonic acid (3-APPA), and 2-amino-2-(p-chlorophenyl)-ethylphosphonic acid (2-CPEPA), a baclofen analogue, did not modify the stimulated overflow. These results suggest that phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-AEPA are antagonists at GABA(B) autoreceptors, the latter being the weakest antagonist, whilst neither 3-APPA nor 2-CPEPA are active at these receptors. Since phaclofen, 4-ABPA and 2-CPEPA are antagonists and 3-APPA a partial agonist/antagonist on GABA(B) heteroreceptors, the lack of effect of 3-APPA and 2-CPEPA on [3H]-GABA release in this study suggests that GABA(B) autoreceptors may be pharmacologically distinct from the heteroreceptors.

  2. Oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid directs the metabolism of GABA into the Krebs cycle in rat pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Fisac, Inés; Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Ortsäter, Henrik; Pizarro-Delgado, Javier; Martín del Río, Rafael; Bergsten, Peter; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge

    2006-11-15

    OMP (oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid) stimulates by itself a biphasic secretion of insulin whereas L-leucine requires the presence of L-glutamine. L-Glutamine is predominantly converted into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in rat islets and L-leucine seems to promote its metabolism in the 'GABA shunt' [Fernández-Pascual, Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, Martín del Río and Tamarit-Rodríguez (2004) Biochem. J. 379, 721-729]. In the present study, we have investigated how 10 mM OMP affects L-glutamine metabolism to uncover possible differences with L-leucine that might help to elucidate whether they share a common mechanism of stimulation of insulin secretion. In contrast with L-leucine, OMP alone stimulated a biphasic insulin secretion in rat perifused islets and decreased the islet content of GABA without modifying its extracellular release irrespective of the concentration of L-glutamine in the medium. GABA was transaminated to L-leucine whose intracellular concentration did not change because it was efficiently transported out of the islet cells. The L-[U-14C]-Glutamine (at 0.5 and 10.0 mM) conversion to 14CO2 was enhanced by 10 mM OMP within 30% and 70% respectively. Gabaculine (250 microM), a GABA transaminase inhibitor, suppressed OMP-induced oxygen consumption but not L-leucine- or glucose-stimulated respiration. It also suppressed the OMP-induced decrease in islet GABA content and the OMP-induced increase in insulin release. These results support the view that OMP promotes islet metabolism in the 'GABA shunt' generating 2-oxo-glutarate, in the branched-chain alpha-amino acid transaminase reaction, which would in turn trigger GABA deamination by GABA transaminase. OMP, but not L-leucine, suppressed islet semialdehyde succinic acid reductase activity and this might shift the metabolic flux of the 'GABA shunt' from gamma-hydroxybutyrate to succinic acid production.

  3. The concentration of extracellular superoxide dismutase in plasma is maintained by LRP-mediated endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen V; Thøgersen, Ida B; Valnickova, Zuzana;

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we show that human extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) binds to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). This interaction is most likely responsible for the removal of EC-SOD from the blood circulation via LRP expressed in liver tissue. The receptor recogniti...

  4. GABA and GABA receptors alterations in the primary visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen; Bi, Ai-Ling; Xu, Chao-Li; Ye, Xiang; Chen, Mei-Qing; Wang, Xin-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Guo, Jun-Guo; Jiang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Bi, Hong-Sheng

    2017-02-02

    Until recently most researches on myopia mechanisms have mainly been focused on the eye ball and few investigations were explored on the upper visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. The roles of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the retinal and in the upper visual pathway are inter-correlated. As the retinal glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), GABA, and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors increased during the concave lens induced myopia formation, however, whether GABA alterations also occurred in the visual cortex during the concave lens induction is still unknown. In the present study, using HPLC, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) and Real-Time Quantitative-PCR (RT-PCR) methods, we observed the changing trends of GABA, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), and GABA receptors in the visual cortex of concave lens-induced myopic guinea pigs. Similar to the changing patterns of retinal GABA, the concentrations of GAD, GABA and the mRNA levels of GABA receptors in the visual cortex also increased. These results indicate that the exploration on myopia mechanisms should possibly be investigated on the whole visual pathway and the detailed significance of cortical GABA alterations needs further investigation.

  5. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui CHEN; Cui-cui WANG; Xia XIAO; Li WEI; Guoxiong XU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats.Methods:Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy.The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot.MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining.The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg),and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC.Probenecid,a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L,50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs.Results:The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group.Furthermore,the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats.Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats.Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels.Conclusion:Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats.

  6. Concentration determination of extracellular and intracellular red pigments produced by Monascus sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Sanae Hamano

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work red pigments production was evaluated (by spectrophotometry in semi-synthetic medium by rotary shaker cultures, utilizing seven strains of Monascus sp. The strains isolated at LEB/DEQ/EPUSP had a absorbance average of extracellular red pigments higher than the others strains (13.0 and 9.6 U, respectively and the specific production of extracellular red pigments was from 1.7 until 3.5 times higher than the specific production of intracellular ones.Monascus sp. é um fungo filamentoso cuja principal aplicação industrial está relacionada à sua capacidade de produzir pigmentos vermelhos, utilizados como corantes naturais em alimentos, em substituição aos sintéticos. Neste trabalho a produção de pigmentos vermelhos foi avaliada (por meio de espectrofotometria de varredura em meio semi-sintético, empregando sete cepas de Monascus sp., através de cultivos conduzidos em incubador rotativo. As cepas isoladas no LEB/DEQ/EPUSP apresentaram média dos valores de absorbância dos pigmentos vermelhos extracelulares maior em relação às demais cepas (13,0 e 9,6 U, respectivamente, sendo que para as primeiras, a produção específica dos referidos pigmentos foi de 1,7 a 3,5 vezes maior que a produção específica dos pigmentos intracelulares.

  7. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity (albumin

  8. Concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with affinity for extracellular matrix in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus A sign of vascular damage in patients with diabetic nephropathy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Myrup, B.; Rossing, P.; Jensen, T.; Gram, J.; Kluft, C.; Jespersen, J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate protein concentration changes during venous occlusion of proteins with reported affinity for extracellular matrix (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, antithrombin III, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) in comparison with proteins with no reported affinity

  9. Investigating GABA and its function in platelets as compared to neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneez, Fatima Shad; Saeed, Sheikh Arshad

    2009-08-01

    We have recently suggested that platelets could be used as a model for neuronal receptors. In this paper we have investigated gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism and GABA receptors in platelets and in cultured neurons to see whether platelets' GABA mimics neuronal GABA receptor activities. We used the ELISA technique for detecting the GABA concentration in platelet rich plasma and cultured neurons. The functional effects of GABA and its receptor ligands on platelets were determined using an aggregometer. We found that the GABA concentration is 30% lower in platelets than in neurons and in both preparations GABA was metabolized by GABA transaminase (GABA-T). GABA potentiated calcium dependent platelet aggregation with a higher value in washed platelets suspension (WPS) then in platelet rich plasma (PRP). This effect was inhibited by benzodiazepines, calcium channel blockers and the selective phosphoinositide 3-kinase antagonist Wortmannin. GABA neurotransmission is involved in most aspects of normal brain function and can be perturbed in many neuropathologic conditions. We concluded that platelets could be further developed to be used as a peripheral model to study neuronal GABAergic function and its abnormality in diseases such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. Furthermore our results indicated that PI3-kinase is involved in calcium dependent GABA induced platelet aggregation as this synergistic effect is inhibited by Wortmannin in dose dependent manner.

  10. Fast detection of extrasynaptic GABA with a whole-cell sniffer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rasmus K; Petersen, Anders V; Schmitt, Nicole;

    2014-01-01

    . Ambient GABA is essential for adjusting the excitability of neurons. However, due to the lack of suitable methods, little is known about its dynamics. Here we describe a new technique that allows detection of GABA transients and measurement of the steady state GABA concentration with high spatial...

  11. Tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, María; Martín, M Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2009-11-01

    The microbial decarboxylation of some amino acids leads to the undesirable presence of biogenic amines in foods. One of the most abundant and frequent biogenic amines found in fermented foods is tyramine, which is produced by the decarboxylation of tyrosine. In the present work, transcriptional analysis of tyramine biosynthesis in Enterococcus durans IPLA655, a strain isolated from cheese, was studied. The gene coding for the tyrosine decarboxylase (tdcA) and that coding for the tyrosine-tyramine antiporter (tyrP) form an operon transcribed from the promoter P(tdcA), the expression of which is regulated by the extracellular pH and tyrosine concentration. Quantification of gene expression during the log phase of growth showed high concentrations of tyrosine and acidic pH conditions to induce tdcA-tyrP polycistronic messenger transcription.

  12. Impairment of GABA transporter GAT-1 terminates cortical recurrent network activity via enhanced phasic inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Simon Razik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system, GABA transporters (GATs very efficiently clear synaptically released GABA from the extracellular space, and thus exert a tight control on GABAergic inhibition. In neocortex, GABAergic inhibition is heavily recruited during recurrent phases of spontaneous action potential activity which alternate with neuronally quiet periods. Therefore, such activity should be quite sensitive to minute alterations of GAT function. Here, we explored the effects of a gradual impairment of GAT-1 and GAT-2/3 on spontaneous recurrent network activity – termed network bursts and silent periods – in organotypic slice cultures of rat neocortex. The GAT-1 specific antagonist NO-711 depressed activity already at nanomolar concentrations (IC50 for depression of spontaneous multiunit firing rate of 42 nM, reaching a level of 80% at 500-1000 nM. By contrast, the GAT-2/3 preferring antagonist SNAP-5114 had weaker and less consistent effects. Several lines of evidence pointed towards an enhancement of phasic GABAergic inhibition as the dominant activity-depressing mechanism: network bursts were drastically shortened, phasic GABAergic currents decayed slower, and neuronal excitability during ongoing activity was diminished. In silent periods, NO-711 had little effect on neuronal excitability or membrane resistance, quite in contrast to the effects of muscimol, a GABA mimetic which activates GABAA receptors tonically. Our results suggest that an enhancement of phasic GABAergic inhibition efficiently curtails cortical recurrent activity and may mediate antiepileptic effects of therapeutically relevant concentrations of GAT-1 antagonists.

  13. GABA transporter subtype 1 and GABA transporter subtype 3 modulate glutamatergic transmission via activation of presynaptic GABA(B) receptors in the rat globus pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-Tao; Paré, Jean-Francois; Smith, Yoland

    2012-08-01

    The intra-pallidal application of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter subtype 1 (GAT-1) or GABA transporter subtype 3 (GAT-3) transporter blockers [1-(4,4-diphenyl-3-butenyl)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride (SKF 89976A) or 1-[2-[tris(4-methoxyphenyl)methoxy]ethyl]-(S)-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid (SNAP 5114)] reduces the activity of pallidal neurons in monkey. This effect could be mediated through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in glutamatergic terminals by GABA spillover following GABA transporter (GAT) blockade. To test this hypothesis, we applied the whole-cell recording technique to study the effects of SKF 89976A and SNAP 5114 on evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) in the presence of gabazine, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist, in rat globus pallidus slice preparations. Under the condition of postsynaptic GABA(B) receptor blockade by the intra-cellular application of N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl)-triethylammonium bromide (OX314), bath application of SKF 89976A (10 μM) or SNAP 5114 (10 μM) decreased the amplitude of eEPSCs, without a significant effect on its holding current and whole cell input resistance. The inhibitory effect of GAT blockade on eEPSCs was blocked by (2S)-3-[[(1S)-1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]amino-2-hydroxypropyl](phenylmethyl)phosphinic acid, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. The paired-pulse ratio of eEPSCs was increased, whereas the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents was reduced in the presence of either GAT blocker, demonstrating a presynaptic effect. These results suggest that synaptically released GABA can inhibit glutamatergic transmission through the activation of presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors following GAT-1 or GAT-3 blockade. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that presynaptic GABA(B) heteroreceptors in putative glutamatergic subthalamic afferents to the globus pallidus are sensitive to increases in extracellular GABA induced

  14. High extracellular potassium ion concentration attenuates the blockade action of ketanserin on Kvl.3 channels expressed in xenopus oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Ketanserin (KT), a selective serotonin (5-HT) 2-receptor antagonist, reduces peripheral blood pressure by blocking the activation of peripheral 5-HT receptors. In this study electrophysiological method was used to investigate the effect of KT and potassium ion on Kv1.3 potassium channels and explore the role of blocker KT in the alteration of channel kinetics contributing to the potassium ion imbalances. Methods Kvl.3 channels were expressed in xenopus oocytes, and currents were measured using the two-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. Results KCI made a left shift of activation and an inactivation curve of Kv1.3 current and accelerated the activation and inactivation time constant. High extracellular [K+] attenuated the blockade effect of KT on Kv1.3 channels. In the presence of KT and KCI the activation and inactivation time constants were not influenced significantly no matter what was administered first. KT did not significantly inhibit Kv1.3 current induced by tetraethylammonium (TEA). Conclusions KT is a weak blocker of Kv1.3 channels at different concentrations of extracellular potassium and binds to the intracellular side of the channel pore. The inhibitor KT of ion channels is not fully effective in clinical use because of high [K+]o and other electrolyte disorders.

  15. An excitatory GABA loop operating in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe eAstorga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While it has been proposed that the conventional inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA can be excitatory in the mammalian brain, much remains to be learned concerning the circumstances and the cellular mechanisms governing potential excitatory GABA action. Using a combination of optogenetics and two-photon calcium imaging in vivo, we find that activation of chloride-permeable GABAA receptors in parallel fibers of the cerebellar molecular layer of adult mice causes parallel fiber excitation. Stimulation of parallel fibers at submaximal stimulus intensities leads to GABA release from molecular layer interneurons, thus creating a positive feedback loop that enhances excitation near the center of an activated parallel fiber bundle. Our results imply that elevated chloride concentration can occur in specific intracellular compartments of mature mammalian neurons and suggest an excitatory role for GABAA receptors in the cerebellar cortex of adult mice.

  16. At immature mossy fibers-CA3 connections, activation of presynaptic GABAB receptors by endogenously released GABA contributes to synapses silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Early in postnatal life correlated GABAergic activity in the hippocampus is thought to play a crucial role in synaptogenesis and in the development of adult neuronal networks. Unlike adulthood, at this developmental stage, mossy fibers (MF which are the axons of granule cells, release GABA into CA3 principal cells and interneurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that at MF-CA3 connections, tonic activation of GABAB autoreceptors by GABA is responsible for the low probability of release and synapse silencing. Blocking GABAB receptors with CGP55845 enhanced the probability of GABA release and switched on silent synapses while the opposite was observed with baclofen. Both these effects were presynaptic and were associated with changes in paired-pulse ratio and coefficient of variation. In addition, enhancing the extracellular GABA concentration by repetitive stimulation of MF or by blocking the GABA transporter GAT-1, switched off active synapses, an effect that was prevented by CGP55845. In the presence of CGP55845, stimulation of MF induced synaptic potentiation. The shift of EGABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide, a blocker of the cation-chloride co-transporter NKCC1, prevented synaptic potentiation and caused synaptic depression, suggesting that the depolarizing action of GABA observed in the presence of CGP55845 is responsible for the potentiating effect. It is proposed that, activation of GABAB receptors by spillover of GABA from MF terminals reduces the probability of release and contributes to synapses silencing. This would act as a filter to prevent excessive activation of the auto-associative CA3 network and the emergence of seizures.

  17. The dynamics of GABA signaling: Revelations from the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, H Elliott; Walton, James C; Gamble, Karen L; McNeill, John K; Hummer, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Virtually every neuron within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) communicates via GABAergic signaling. The extracellular levels of GABA within the SCN are determined by a complex interaction of synthesis and transport, as well as synaptic and non-synaptic release. The response to GABA is mediated by GABAA receptors that respond to both phasic and tonic GABA release and that can produce excitatory as well as inhibitory cellular responses. GABA also influences circadian control through the exclusively inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors. Both GABA and neuropeptide signaling occur within the SCN, although the functional consequences of the interactions of these signals are not well understood. This review considers the role of GABA in the circadian pacemaker, in the mechanisms responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms, in the ability of non-photic stimuli to reset the phase of the pacemaker, and in the ability of the day-night cycle to entrain the pacemaker.

  18. Probing Intracellular Element Concentration Changes during Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation Using Synchrotron Radiation Based X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Maria J.; Laforce, Brecht; Garrevoet, Jan; Vergucht, Eva; De Rycke, Riet; Cloetens, Peter; Urban, Constantin F.; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    High pressure frozen (HPF), cryo-substituted microtome sections of 2 μm thickness containing human neutrophils (white blood cells) were analyzed using synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence (SR nano-XRF) at a spatial resolution of 50 nm. Besides neutrophils from a control culture, we also analyzed neutrophils stimulated for 1–2 h with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a substance inducing the formation of so-called Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (or NETs), a defense system again pathogens possibly involving proteins with metal chelating properties. In order to gain insight in metal transport during this process, precise local evaluation of elemental content was performed reaching limits of detection (LODs) of 1 ppb. Mean weight fractions within entire neutrophils, their nuclei and cytoplasms were determined for the three main elements P, S and Cl, but also for the 12 following trace elements: K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Br, Sr and Pb. Statistical analysis, including linear regression provided objective analysis and a measure for concentration changes. The nearly linear Ca and Cl concentration changes in neutrophils could be explained by already known phenomena such as the induction of Ca channels and the uptake of Cl under activation of NET forming neutrophils. Linear concentration changes were also found for P, S, K, Mn, Fe, Co and Se. The observed linear concentration increase for Mn could be related to scavenging of this metal from the pathogen by means of the neutrophil protein calprotectin, whereas the concentration increase of Se may be related to its antioxidant function protecting neutrophils from the reactive oxygen species they produce against pathogens. We emphasize synchrotron radiation based nanoscopic X-ray fluorescence as an enabling analytical technique to study changing (trace) element concentrations throughout cellular processes, provided accurate sample preparation and data-analysis. PMID:27812122

  19. Mechanism by which an elevation of extracellular glucide concentration induces pigment aggregation in medaka melanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Ryozo; Goda, Makoto; Oshima, Noriko

    2002-09-15

    An increase in glucide concentration induces pigment aggregation in melanophores in the skin on scales isolated from the medaka, Oryzias latipes. In this study, hexoses (including the common D-isomers of glucose, galactose, fructose, and mannitol) were examined. Denervated melanophores were refractory to such stimuli. An alpha-adrenolytic agent, phentolamine, effectively blocked the responses of normally innervated melanophores. The pigment-aggregating action of glucide was inhibited by withdrawal of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions from the medium. A specific blocker of voltage-dependent N-type Ca(2+) channels, the omega-conotoxin GVIA, also inhibited the glucide action. The conclusion derived is that an elevation of glucide levels acts to open Ca(2+) channels of presynaptic membranes of sympathetic postganglionic fibers, and the consequently released adrenergic transmitter acts on the effector cells to induce the aggregation of their pigmentary organelles. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Glutamate and GABA in Appetite Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Teresa C

    2013-01-01

    Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue, and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms. Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using (13)C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-(13)C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-(13)C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the glutamate-glutamine-GABA

  1. Activity of the TonEBP/OREBP transactivation domain varies directly with extracellular NaCl concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Joan D; Williams, Chester K; Persaud, Prita; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Ye; Burg, Maurice B

    2002-01-22

    Hypertonicity-induced binding of the transcription factor TonEBP/OREBP to its cognate DNA element, ORE/TonE, is associated with increased transcription of several osmotically regulated genes. Previously, it was found that hypertonicity rapidly causes nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of TonEBP/OREBP and, more slowly, increases TonEBP/OREBP abundance. Also, the C terminus of TonEBP/OREBP was found to contain a transactivation domain (TAD). We have now tested for tonicity dependence of the TAD activity of the 983 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP. HepG2 cells were cotransfected with a reporter construct and one of several TAD expression vector constructs. The reporter construct contained GAL4 DNA binding elements, a minimal promoter, and the Photinus luciferase gene. TAD expression vectors generate chimeras comprised of the GAL4 DNA binding domain fused to (i) the 983 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP, (ii) 17 glutamine residues, (iii) the TAD of c-Jun, or (iv) no TAD. All TAD-containing chimeras were functional at normal extracellular osmolality (300 mosmol/kg), but the activity only of the chimera containing the 983 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP varied with extracellular NaCl concentration, decreasing by >80% at 200 mosmol/kg and increasing 8-fold at 500 mosmol/kg. The chimera containing the 983 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP was constitutively localized to the nucleus and showed tonicity-dependent posttranslational modification consistent with phosphorylation. The activity at 500 mosmol/kg was reduced by herbimycin, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a protein kinase CK2 inhibitor. Thus, the 983 C-terminal amino acids of TonEBP/OREBP contain a TAD that is regulated osmotically, apparently by tonicity-dependent phosphorylation.

  2. Evidence for a Revised Ion/Substrate Coupling Stoichiometry of GABA Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willford, Samantha L; Anderson, Cynthia M; Spencer, Shelly R; Eskandari, Sepehr

    2015-08-01

    Plasma membrane γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) are electrogenic transport proteins that couple the cotranslocation of Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA across the plasma membrane of neurons and glia. A fundamental property of the transporter that determines its ability to concentrate GABA in cells and, hence, regulate synaptic and extra-synaptic GABA concentrations, is the ion/substrate coupling stoichiometry. Here, we scrutinized the currently accepted 2 Na(+):1 Cl(-):1 GABA stoichiometry because it is inconsistent with the measured net charge translocated per co-substrate (Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA). We expressed GAT1 and GAT3 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and utilized thermodynamic and uptake under voltage-clamp measurements to determine the stoichiometry of the GABA transporters. Voltage-clamped GAT1-expressing oocytes were internally loaded with GABA, and the reversal potential (V rev) of the transporter-mediated current was recorded at different external concentrations of Na(+), Cl(-), or GABA. The shifts in V rev for a tenfold change in the external Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA concentration were 84 ± 4, 30 ± 1, and 29 ± 1 mV, respectively. To determine the net charge translocated per Na(+), Cl(-), and GABA, we measured substrate fluxes under voltage clamp in cells expressing GAT1 or GAT3. Charge flux to substrate flux ratios were 0.7 ± 0.1 charge/Na(+), 2.0 ± 0.2 charges/Cl(-), and 2.1 ± 0.1 charges/GABA. Altogether, our results strongly suggest a 3 Na(+):1 Cl(-):1 GABA coupling stoichiometry for the GABA transporters. The revised stoichiometry has important implications for understanding the contribution of GATs to GABAergic signaling in health and disease.

  3. GABA selectively increases mucin-1 expression in isolated pig jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hannah-Sophie; Sponder, Gerhard; Pieper, Robert; Aschenbach, Jörg R; Deiner, Carolin

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) is synthesized by glutamic acid decarboxylase, which is expressed in the central nervous system and in various other tissues including the intestine. Moreover, GABA can be ingested in vegetarian diets or produced by bacterial commensals in the gastrointestinal tract. As previous studies in lung have suggested a link between locally increased GABA availability and mucin 5AC production, the present study sought to test whether the presence or lack of GABA (and its precursor glutamine) has an effect on intestinal mucin expression. Porcine jejunum epithelial preparations were incubated with two different amounts of GABA or glutamine on the mucosal side for 4 h, and changes in the relative gene expression of seven different mucins, enzymes involved in mucin shedding, GABA B receptor, enzymes involved in glutamine/GABA metabolism, glutathione peroxidase 2, and interleukin 10 were examined by quantitative PCR (TaqMan(®) assays). Protein expression of mucin-1 (MUC1) was analyzed by Western blot. On the RNA level, only MUC1 was significantly up-regulated by both GABA concentrations compared with the control. Glutamine-treated groups showed the same trend. On the protein level, all treatment groups showed a significantly higher MUC1 expression than the control group. We conclude that GABA selectively increases the expression of MUC1, a cell surface mucin that prevents the adhesion of microorganisms, because of its size and negative charge, and therefore propose that the well-described positive effects of glutamine on enterocytes and intestinal integrity are partly attributable to effects of its metabolite GABA.

  4. Neurotransmitter GABA activates muscle but not α7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Leonardo; Bergé, Ignacio; Bravo, Matías; Esandi, María Del Carmen; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cys-loop receptors are neurotransmitter-activated ion channels involved in synaptic and extrasynaptic transmission in the brain and are also present in non-neuronal cells. As GABAA and nicotinic receptors (nAChR) belong to this family, we explored by macroscopic and single-channel recordings whether the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA has the ability to activate excitatory nAChRs. GABA differentially activates nAChR subtypes. It activates muscle nAChRs, with maximal peak currents of about 10% of those elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) and 15-fold higher EC50 with respect to ACh. At the single-channel level, the weak agonism is revealed by the requirement of 20-fold higher concentration of GABA for detectable channel openings, a major population of brief openings, and absence of clusters of openings when compared with ACh. Mutations at key residues of the principal binding-site face of muscle nAChRs (αY190 and αG153) affect GABA activation similarly as ACh activation, whereas a mutation at the complementary face (εG57) shows a selective effect for GABA. Studies with subunit-lacking receptors show that GABA can activate muscle nAChRs through the α/δ interface. Interestingly, single-channel activity elicited by GABA is similar to that elicited by ACh in gain-of-function nAChR mutants associated to congenital myasthenic syndromes, which could be important in the progression of the disorders due to steady exposure to serum GABA. In contrast, GABA cannot elicit single-channel or macroscopic currents of α7 or the chimeric α7-serotonin-type 3 receptor, a feature important for preserving an adequate excitatory/inhibitory balance in the brain as well as for avoiding activation of non-neuronal receptors by serum GABA. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Selective GABA transporter inhibitors tiagabine and EF1502 exhibit mechanistic differences in their ability to modulate the ataxia and anticonvulsant action of the extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor agonist gaboxadol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten Kirkegaard; Ebert, Bjarke; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2011-01-01

    Modulation of the extracellular levels of GABA via inhibition of the synaptic GABA transporter GAT1 by the clinically effective and selective GAT1 inhibitor tiagabine [(R)-N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]nipecotic acid; Gabitril] has proven to be an effective treatment strategy for focal...

  6. Sub-inhibitory tigecycline concentrations induce extracellular matrix binding protein Embp dependent Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Julian; Henke, Hanae A; Hector, Nina; Both, Anna; Christner, Martin; Büttner, Henning; Kaplan, Jeffery B; Rohde, Holger

    2016-09-01

    Biofilm-associated Staphylococcus epidermidis implant infections are notoriously reluctant to antibiotic treatment. Here we studied the effect of sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, oxacillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, linezolid and tigecycline on S. epidermidis 1585 biofilm formation, expression of extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp) and potential implications for S. epidermidis - macrophage interactions. Penicillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid had no biofilm augmenting effect at any of the concentrations tested. In contrast, at sub-inhibitory concentrations tigecycline and oxacillin exhibited significant biofilm inducing activity. In S. epidermidis 1585, SarA is a negative regulator of giant 1 MDa Embp, and down regulation of sarA induces Embp-dependent assembly of a multi-layered biofilm architecture. Dot blot immune assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and qPCR showed that under biofilm inducing conditions, tigecycline augmented embp expression compared to the control grown without antibiotics. Conversely, expression of regulator sarA was suppressed, suggesting that tigecycline exerts its effects on embp expression through SarA. Tigecycline failed to induce biofilm formation in embp transposon mutant 1585-M135, proving that under these conditions Embp up-regulation is necessary for biofilm accumulation. As a functional consequence, tigecycline induced biofilm formation significantly impaired the up-take of S. epidermidis by mouse macrophage-like cell line J774A.1. Our data provide novel evidence for the molecular basis of antibiotic induced biofilm formation, a phenotype associated with inherently increased antimicrobial tolerance. While this could explain failure of antimicrobial therapies, persistence of S. epidermidis infections in the presence of sub-inhibitory antimicrobials is additionally propelled by biofilm-related impairment of macrophage-mediated pathogen eradication.

  7. Effects of extracellular iron concentration on calcium absorption and relationship between Ca2+ and cell apoptosis in Caco-2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Qing Li; Xiang-Lin Duan; Yan-Zhong Chang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the method of growing small intestinal epithelial cells in short-term primary culture and to investigate the effect of extracellular iron concentration ([Fe3+]) on calcium absorption and the relationship between the rising intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and cell apoptosis in human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. METHODS: Primary culture was used for growing small intestinal epithelial cells. [Ca2+]i was detected by a confocal laser scanning microscope. The changes in [Ca2+]i were represented by fluorescence intensity (FI). The apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry.RESULTS: Isolation of epithelial cells and preservation of its three-dimensional integrity were achieved using the digestion technique of a mixture of collagenase Ⅺ and dispase Ⅰ. Purification of the epithelial cells was facilitated by using a simple differential sedimentation method. The results showed that proliferation of normal gut epithelium in vitro was initially dependent upon the maintenance of structural integrity of the tissue. If 0.25% trypsin was used for digestion, the cells were severely damaged and very difficult to stick to the Petri dish for growing. The Fe3+ chelating agent desferrioxamine (100, 200 and 300 μmol/L) increased the FI of Caco-2 cells from 27.50±13.18 (control,n = 150) to 35.71±13.99 (n = 150, P<0.01), 72.19±35.40 (n = 150, P<0.01) and 211.34±29.03 (n = 150, P<0.01) in a concentration-dependent manner. There was a significant decrease in the FI of Caco-2 cells treated by ferric ammonium citrate (FAC, a Fe3+ donor; 10, 50 and 100 μmol/L). The FIvalue of Caco-2 cells treated by FAC was 185.85±33.77 (n = 150, P<0.01), 122.73±58.47 (n = 150, P<0.01), and 53.29±19.82 (n = 150, P<0.01), respectively, suggesting that calcium absorption was influenced by [Fe3+]. Calcium ionophore A23187 (0.1, 1.0 and 10 μmol/L) increased the FI of Caco-2 cells from 40.45±13.95 (control, n = 150) to 45.19±21.95 (n = 150, P<0

  8. Frontal GABA levels change during working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Lars; Martin, Ernst; Klaver, Peter; Edden, Richard; Zelaya, Fernando; Lythgoe, David J; Lüchinger, Rafael; Brandeis, Daniel; O'Gorman, Ruth L

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging metrics are thought to reflect changes in neurotransmitter flux, but changes in neurotransmitter levels have not been demonstrated in humans during a cognitive task, and the relationship between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during cognition has not yet been established. We evaluate the concentration of the major inhibitory (GABA) and excitatory (glutamate + glutamine: Glx) neurotransmitters and the cerebral perfusion at rest and during a prolonged delayed match-to-sample working memory task. Resting GABA levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with the resting perfusion and inversely with the change in perfusion during the task. Further, only GABA increased significantly during the first working memory run and then decreased continuously across subsequent task runs. The decrease of GABA over time was paralleled by a trend towards decreased reaction times and higher task accuracy. These results demonstrate a link between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during working memory, indicating that functional neuroimaging metrics depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition required for cognitive processing.

  9. Frontal GABA levels change during working memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Michels

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging metrics are thought to reflect changes in neurotransmitter flux, but changes in neurotransmitter levels have not been demonstrated in humans during a cognitive task, and the relationship between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during cognition has not yet been established. We evaluate the concentration of the major inhibitory (GABA and excitatory (glutamate + glutamine: Glx neurotransmitters and the cerebral perfusion at rest and during a prolonged delayed match-to-sample working memory task. Resting GABA levels in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with the resting perfusion and inversely with the change in perfusion during the task. Further, only GABA increased significantly during the first working memory run and then decreased continuously across subsequent task runs. The decrease of GABA over time was paralleled by a trend towards decreased reaction times and higher task accuracy. These results demonstrate a link between neurotransmitter dynamics and hemodynamic activity during working memory, indicating that functional neuroimaging metrics depend on the balance of excitation and inhibition required for cognitive processing.

  10. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  11. Release of ATP from marginal cells in the cochlea of neonatal rats can be induced by changes in extracellular and intracellular ion concentrations.

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    Yating Peng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP plays an important role in the cochlea. However, the source of ATP and the mechanism by which it is released remain unclear. This study investigates the presence and release mechanism of ATP in vitro cultured marginal cells isolated from the stria vascularis of the cochlea in neonatal rats. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats aged 1-3 days old were used for isolation, in vitro culture, and purification of marginal cells. Cultured marginal cells were verified by flow cytometry. Vesicles containing ATP in these cells were identified by fluorescence staining. The bioluminescence assay was used for determination of ATP concentration in the extracellular fluid released by marginal cells. Assays for ATP concentration were performed when the ATP metabolism of cells was influenced, and ionic concentrations in intracellular and extracellular fluid were found to change. RESULTS: Evaluation of cultured marginal cells with flow cytometry revealed the percentage of fluorescently-labeled cells as 92.9% and 81.9%, for cytokeratin and vimentin, respectively. Quinacrine staining under fluorescence microscopy revealed numerous green, star-like spots in the cytoplasm of these cells. The release of ATP from marginal cells was influenced by changes in the concentration of intracellular and extracellular ions, namely extracellular K(+ and intra- and extracellular Ca(2+. Furthermore, changes in the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+ induced by the inhibition of the phospholipase signaling pathway also influence the release of ATP from marginal cells. CONCLUSION: We confirmed the presence and release of ATP from marginal cells of the stria vascularis. This is the first study to demonstrate that the release of ATP from such cells is associated with the state of the calcium pump, K(+ channel, and activity of enzymes related to the phosphoinositide signaling pathway, such as adenylate cyclase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A(2.

  12. Glutamate and GABA in appetite regulation

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    Teresa Cardoso Delgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms.Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the

  13. Effect of phosphatidylserine on the basal and GABA-activated Cl- permeation across single nerve membranes from rabbit Deiters' neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapallino, M.V.; Cupello, A.; Mainardi, P.; Besio, G.; Loeb, C.W. (Centro di Studio per la Neurofisiologia Cerebrale, C.N.R., Genova (Italy))

    1990-06-01

    The permeation of labeled Cl- ions across single plasma membranes from Deiters' neurons has been studied in the presence of various concentrations of phosphatidylserine (PS) on their extracellular side. PS reduces significantly basal Cl- permeation only at 10(-5) M on the membrane exterior. No effect was found at other concentrations. GABA activable 36Cl- permeation is heavily reduced and almost abolished at 10(-11) - 10(-5) M phosphatidylserine. This exogenous phosphatidylserine effect is difficult to interpret in relation to the function of the endogenous phospholipid. However, it may be involved in the epileptogenic effect in vivo of exogenous phosphatidylserine administration to rats.

  14. Plasma concentrations of extracellular matrix protein fibulin-1 are related to cardiovascular risk markers in chronic kidney disease and diabetes

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    Scholze Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibulin-1 is one of a few extracellular matrix proteins present in blood in high concentrations. We aimed to define the relationship between plasma fibulin-1 levels and risk markers of cardiovascular disease. Methods Plasma fibulin-1 was determined in subjects with chronic kidney disease (n = 32; median age 62.5, inter-quartile range 51 – 73 years and 60 age-matched control subjects. Among kidney disease patients serological biomarkers related to cardiovascular disease (fibrinogen, interleukin 6, C-reactive protein were measured. Arterial applanation tonometry was used to determine central hemodynamic and arterial stiffness indices. Results We observed a positive correlation of fibulin-1 levels with age (r = 0.38; p = 0.033, glycated hemoglobin (r = 0.80; p = 0.003, creatinine (r = 0.35; p = 0.045, and fibrinogen (r = 0.39; p = 0.027. Glomerular filtration rate and fibulin-1 were inversely correlated (r = −0.57; p = 0.022. There was a positive correlation between fibulin-1 and central pulse pressure (r = 0.44; p = 0.011 and central augmentation pressure (r = 0.55; p = 0.001. In a multivariable regression model, diabetes, creatinine, fibrinogen and central augmentation pressure were independent predictors of plasma fibulin-1. Conclusion Increased plasma fibulin-1 levels were associated with diabetes and impaired kidney function. Furthermore, fibulin-1 levels were associated with hemodynamic cardiovascular risk markers. Fibulin-1 is a candidate in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease observed in chronic kidney disease and diabetes.

  15. Synaptically released neurotransmitter fails to desensitize postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, J R; Randall, A D

    2001-05-01

    GABA concentration jump experiments performed on membrane patches predict that postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors will become desensitized following the release of the contents of a single GABA-containing synaptic vesicle. To examine this we used a single synaptic bouton stimulation technique to directly examine whether postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors in cultured cerebellar granule cells exhibit transmitter-induced desensitization. In a large number of recordings, no evidence was found for desensitization of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors by vesicularly released transmitter. This was the case even when as many as 40 vesicles were released from a single bouton within 1.5 s. In addition, postsynaptic depolarization and application of the benzodiazepine flunitrazepam, manipulations previously shown to enhance desensitization of GABA(A) receptors, failed to unmask transmitter-induced desensitization. In contrast, a single 2- to 3-s application of a high concentration of exogenous GABA was able to depress synaptic responsiveness for up to 70 s. Furthermore, pharmacological depletion of GABA eliminated inhibitory synaptic communication, suggesting that GABA is the transmitter and the desensitization-resistant inhibitory postsynaptic currents are not mediated by a "nondesensitizing" ligand such as beta-alanine. Overall our data indicate that a specific desensitization-resistant population of GABA(A) receptors are present at postsynaptic sites on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

  16. GABA increases electrical excitability in a subset of human unmyelinated peripheral axons.

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    Richard W Carr

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A proportion of small diameter primary sensory neurones innervating human skin are chemosensitive. They respond in a receptor dependent manner to chemical mediators of inflammation as well as naturally occurring algogens, thermogens and pruritogens. The neurotransmitter GABA is interesting in this respect because in animal models of neuropathic pain GABA pre-synaptically regulates nociceptive input to the spinal cord. However, the effect of GABA on human peripheral unmyelinated axons has not been established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Electrical stimulation was used to assess the effect of GABA on the electrical excitability of unmyelinated axons in isolated fascicles of human sural nerve. GABA (0.1-100 microM increased electrical excitability in a subset (ca. 40% of C-fibres in human sural nerve fascicles suggesting that axonal GABA sensitivity is selectively restricted to a sub-population of human unmyelinated axons. The effects of GABA were mediated by GABA(A receptors, being mimicked by bath application of the GABA(A agonist muscimol (0.1-30 microM while the GABA(B agonist baclofen (10-30 microM was without effect. Increases in excitability produced by GABA (10-30 microM were blocked by the GABA(A antagonists gabazine (10-20 microM, bicuculline (10-20 microM and picrotoxin (10-20 microM. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Functional GABA(A receptors are present on a subset of unmyelinated primary afferents in humans and their activation depolarizes these axons, an effect likely due to an elevated intra-axonal chloride concentration. GABA(A receptor modulation may therefore regulate segmental and peripheral components of nociception.

  17. Local impermeant anions establish the neuronal chloride concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glykys, J; Dzhala, V; Egawa, K

    2014-01-01

    , but accumulating evidence suggests factors other than the bulk concentrations of transported ions determine [Cl(-)](i). Measurement of [Cl(-)](i) in murine brain slice preparations expressing the transgenic fluorophore Clomeleon demonstrated that cytoplasmic impermeant anions ([A](i)) and polyanionic extracellular...... anions determine the homeostatic set point for [Cl(-)], and hence, neuronal volume and the polarity of local GABA(A)R signaling....

  18. Interaction of GABA-mimetics with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6) in hyperosmotic treated Caco-2, LLC-PK1 and rat renal SKPT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Rune Nørgaard; Lagunas, Candela; Plum, Jakob; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2016-01-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if basic GABA-mimetics interact with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6), and to find a suitable cell based model that is robust towards extracellular changes in osmolality during uptake studies. Taurine uptake was measured in human Caco-2 cells, porcine LLC-PK1 cells, and rat SKPT cells using radiolabelled taurine. Hyperosmotic conditions were obtained by incubation with raffinose (final osmolality of 500mOsm) for 24h prior to the uptake experiments. Expression of the taurine transporter, TauT, was investigated at the mRNA level by real-time PCR. Uptake of the GABA-mimetics gaboxadol and vigabatrin was investigated in SKPT cells, and quantified by liquid scintillation or HPLC-MS/MS analysis, respectively. The uptake rate of [(3)H]-taurine was Na(+) and Cl(-) and concentration dependent with taurine with an apparent Vmax of 6.3±1.6pmolcm(-2)min(-1) and a Km of 24.9±15.0μM. β-alanine, nipecotic acid, gaboxadol, GABA, vigabatrin, δ-ALA and guvacine inhibited the taurine uptake rate in a concentration dependent manner. The order of affinity for TauT was β-alanine>GABA>nipecotic acid>guvacine>δ-ALA>vigabatrin>gaboxadol with IC50-values of 0.04, 1.07, 2.02, 4.19, 4.94, 31.4 and 39.9mM, respectively. In conclusion, GABA mimetics inhibited taurine uptake in hyperosmotic rat renal SKPT cells. SKPT cells, which seem to be a useful model for investigating taurine transport in the short-term presence of high concentrations of osmolytes. Furthermore, analogues of β-alanine appear to have higher affinities for TauT than GABA-analogues.

  19. Effect of nitric oxide donor SNAP on GABA release from rat brain nerve terminals

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    A. S. Tarasenko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work we investigated the effect of nanomolar concentrations of nitric oxide on the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA from rat brain nerve terminals using a radioisotope method with [3H]GABA and a spectrofluorimetric method with Ca2+-sensitive probe Fluo-4 AM. It was shown that in the presen­ce of dithiothreitol (DTT, nitric oxide donor SNAP at concentration, in which it produces NO in the nanomolar range, caused Ca2+-independent [3H]GABA release from nerve terminals. The applications of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP and nipecotic acid (NA, as the inducers of GABA release from vesicular and cytoplasmic pools, showed that the maximum of SNAP/+DTT-induced [3H]GABA release was registered at 10th min of incubation and coincided in time with significant increase (almost double in NA-induced [3H]GABA release. At this time point, 4-AP-induced release of [3H]GABA was drastically reduced. At the 15th min of incubation of nerve terminals with SNAP/+DTT, the opposite picture was observed: the decrease in NA- and increase in 4-AP-induced [3H]GABA release. Thus, nitric oxide in the form of S-nitrosothiols at nanomolar concentrations causes Ca2+-independent GABA leakage from synaptic vesicles into cytosol with subsequent release from nerve terminals. The reuptake of the neurotransmitter and its re-accumulation in synaptic vesicles occur later.

  20. The language of GABA in pollen tube growth and guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui YU; Yan CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The achievement of double fertilization in higher plants requires the successful transport of sperm cells to the female gametes, the ovules. Pollen tubes, the tubular structure protruding from pollens, carrying the sperms play an important role in this process. How a pollen tube precisely guides its direction to gain its goal is of mystery. Previous investigation indicated that mul-tiple signal clues from the pistils function as the route signs to regulate the pathway of pollen tube growth. Among the signal clues, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) seems to be universal. Its gradient concentration has been found both in tobacco and Arabidopsis pollen tube guid-ance. In the communication of pollens and pistils, what on earth GABA tells pollen tubes is of great interest. The GABA receptors on the pollen membrane are thought to be the hinge in the language conversation. In this review, the mechanism of GABA gradient formation is investigated. The possible GABA receptor on the pollen membrane is examined and its function is discussed. To decipher the possible language of GABA in pollen tube growth and guidance, multiple methods are needed. The combination of transcriptome and proteomics assay is expected to unveil the secret.

  1. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca(2+)-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca(2+) increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca(2+)-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca(2+)-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes.

  2. THIP and isoguvacine are partial agonists of GABA-stimulated benzodiazepine receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karobath, M; Lippitsch, M

    1979-10-15

    The effects of THIP and isoguvacine on 3H-flunitrazepam binding to washed membranes prepared from the cerebral cortex of adult rats have been examined. THIP, which has only minimal stimulatory effects on benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor binding, has been found to inhibit the stimulation induced by small concentrations (2 microM) of exogenous GABA. While isoguvacine stimulates BZ receptor binding, although to a smaller extent than GABA, it also antagonizes the stimulation of BZ receptor binding induced by GABA. Thus THIP and isoguvacine exhibit the properties of a partial agonist of GABA-stimulated BZ receptor binding.

  3. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

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    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  4. Noninvasive evaluation of the regional variations of GABA using magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Christopher R; Michael, Navin; Tustison, Nicholas J; Patrie, James T; Raghavan, Prashant; Wintermark, Max; Sendhil Velan, S

    2015-06-01

    Rapid regional fluctuations in GABA may result in inhomogeneous concentrations throughout the brain parenchyma. The goal of this study is to provide further insight into the natural distribution of GABA throughout the brain and thus determine if a surrogate site may be used for spectroscopy when evaluating motor diseases, neurological disorders, or psychiatric dysfunction. In this prospective study, eight healthy volunteers underwent spectroscopic evaluation of the frontal lobe, occipital lobe, lateral temporal lobe, basal ganglia, and both hippocampi using a spin echo variant of a J-difference editing method. Knowledge of the relative peak intensities of the macromolecule peaks at 3ppm and 0.9ppm was used to correct the contribution of co-edited macromolecules to the GABA peak at 3ppm. The GABA values were internally referenced to NAA. Linear regression was used to normalize the effect of regional tissue-fraction variation on the GABA/NAA values. A one-way ANOVA was performed with Tukey's multiple comparison test to compare the normalized GABA/NAA values in each pair of locations. After accounting for the macromolecule contribution to the GABA signal and correction for tissue fraction variation, the normalized GABA/NAA ratios differ significantly between the six brain locations (p<0.001). Pairwise comparisons of the corrected normalized GABA/NAA ratios show statistically significant variation between the frontal lobe and the basal ganglia, frontal and lateral temporal lobes, and frontal lobe and right hippocampus. Variations in the normalized GABA/NAA ratios trend toward significance between the frontal lobe and left hippocampus, occipital lobe and the frontal lobe, occipital lobe and basal ganglia, and occipital lobe and right hippocampus. Our study suggests that GABA concentration is inhomogeneous throughout the parenchyma. Studies evaluating the role of GABA must carefully consider voxel placement when incorporating spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc

  5. Antioxidant effect of hyaluronan on polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived reactive oxygen species is dependent on its molecular weight and concentration and mainly involves the extracellular space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Krasiński

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyaluronan (HA, a component of the extracellular matrix, may regulate immune cell functions through its interactions with cellular receptors. Besides its effect on cytokine and chemokine production, its antioxidant properties have been described. However, the mechanisms of this are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HA concentration and molecular weight and its antioxidant properties towards human neutrophils. Also assessed was whether the antioxidant effect of HA is connected with a reduction in intracellular oxygen potential, which could indicate its direct effect on neutrophil respiratory burst.Materials/Methods: The relationship between HA’s antioxidant properties and its concentration and molecular weight was assessed by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence method (CL. To evaluate the effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential selectively, the dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR123 flow cytometric method was used.Results: Reduction of both HA molecular weight and its concentration decreased its antioxidant properties in the CL method. A selective effect of HA on intracellular oxygen potential measured by the DHR123 method was not shown.Conclusions: The antioxidant properties of HA are related to both its molecular weight and its concentration. The lack of an antioxidant effect of HA in the DHR123 test compared with a significant reduction in CL values at the same HA concentration suggests that HA acts mainly as a chemical ROI scavenger in the extracellular space.

  6. Immediate response of Ca2+ concentration in myocardial cells against oxidation stress by extracellular photosensitization reaction using Talaporfin sodium for the arrhythmia treatment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Takahashi, Mei; Ito, Arisa; Arai, Tsunenori

    2014-02-01

    We studied the immediate response of myocardial cells by continuous observation using confocal microscope against oxidation stress by extracellular photosensitization reaction using Talaporfin sodium for tachyarrhythmia treatment application. Immediate response in order from several seconds to several minutes is required for the arrhythmia treatment since operators should judge the therapeutic effect during the tachyarrhythmia ablation procedure. To understand the immediate response of myocardial cells, we measured the intracellular Ca2+ concentration using fluo-4 AM during and after the extracellular photosensitization reaction. Talaporfin sodium concentration was varied 10-30 μg/ml. A red diode laser of 663 nm in wavelength was irradiated under the microscope with the radiant exposure of 40 J/cm2 and irradiance of 0.29 W/cm2. We observed the fluorescence image of fluo-4 AM each 400 ms during until 10 min after the photosensitization reaction. The myocardial cell beatings were stopped about 2 s after the beginning of the laser irradiation. The blebs were formed with the Ca2+ inflow. The intracellular Ca2+ was re-decreased after the bleb formation and then the cell necrosis was induced. The cell lethality 10 min after the laser irradiation was less than bleb formation ratio. The time response of the cell necrosis was shortened with the photosensitizer concentration increasing and the minimum average value was 209 s in the case of the 30 μg/ml in photosensitizer concentration and 40 J/cm2 in the radiant exposure. We think this extracellular photosensitization reaction may be applicable to tachyarrhythmia treatment in terms of its immediate response.

  7. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R

    2010-01-01

    . The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT...... neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 m...... no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also GAT2 or GAT3 (HUGO nomenclature) could play a role....

  8. GABA(A) receptors on calbindin-immunoreactive myenteric neurons of guinea pig intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Galligan, J J

    2000-01-14

    These studies were carried out to characterize the properties of gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABA(A)) receptors on guinea pig intestinal myenteric neurons maintained in primary culture. In addition, the type of neuron expressing GABA(A) receptors was identified using immunohistochemical methods. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of currents elicited by GABA and acetylcholine (ACh) were obtained using pipettes containing Neurobiotin. After electrophysiological studies, neurons were processed for localization of calbindin-D28K-immunoreactivity (calbindin-ir). GABA (1 mM) and ACh (3 mM) caused inward currents in most cells tested. GABA currents were mimicked by muscimol (1-300 microM) and were blocked by bicuculline (10 microM) indicating that GABA was acting at GABA(A) receptors. GABA currents were associated with a conductance increase and a linear current/voltage relationship with a reversal potential of 1 +/- 1 mV (n = 5). Pentobarbital (PB, 3-1000 microM) and diazepam (DZP, 0.01-10 microM) potentiated GABA-induced currents. A maximum concentration of DZP (1 microM) increased GABA-induced currents 3.1 +/- 0.3 times while PB (1000 microM) increased GABA currents by 11 +/- 2 times. In outside-out patches, the amplitude of GABA-activated single-channel currents was linearly related to membrane potential with a single-channel conductance of 28.5 + 0.5 pS (n = 10). PB and DZP increased the open probability of GABA-induced single-channel currents. Neurons containing calbindin-ir were large, were isolated from other neurons and had GABA current amplitudes of -3.4 +/- 0.3 nA (n = 48). Neurons with weak or absent calbindin-ir were smaller, were localized in clusters of cells and had GABA-induced current amplitudes of -0.6 +/- 0.1 nA (n = 20). ACh-induced currents were smaller in calbindin-ir neurons (-0.7 +/- 0.1 nA) compared to weakly calbindin-ir neurons (-1.4 +/- 0.1 nA). These results indicate that myenteric calbindin-ir neurons express a high density of GABA

  9. Functional properties of GABA synaptic inputs onto GABA neurons in monkey prefrontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Rotaru (Diana C.); C. Olezene (Cameron); T. Miyamae (Takeaki); N.V. Povysheva (Nadezhda V.); A.V. Zaitsev (Aleksey V.); D.A. Lewis (David A.); G. Gonzalez-Burgos (Guillermo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn rodent cortex GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synapses are a significant source of input onto GABA neurons, and the properties of these inputs vary among GABA neuron subtypes that differ in molecular markers and firing patterns. Some features of cortical interne

  10. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.; Beadle, D.J. (School of Biological and Molecular Sciences, Oxford Polytechnic, Headington, Oxford (England))

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. These results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.

  11. GABA and Glutamate Uptake and Metabolism in Retinal Glial (Müller) Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bringmann, Andreas; Grosche, Antje; Pannicke, Thomas; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the s...

  12. Inhibition of Brain Swelling after Ischemia-Reperfusion by β-Adrenergic Antagonists: Correlation with Increased K+ and Decreased Ca2+ Concentrations in Extracellular Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infarct size and brain edema following ischemia/reperfusion are reduced by inhibitors of the Na+, K+, 2Cl−, and water cotransporter NKCC1 and by β1-adrenoceptor antagonists. NKCC1 is a secondary active transporter, mainly localized in astrocytes, driven by transmembrane Na+/K+ gradients generated by the Na+,K+-ATPase. The astrocytic Na+,K+-ATPase is stimulated by small increases in extracellular K+ concentration and by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Larger K+ increases, as occurring during ischemia, also stimulate NKCC1, creating cell swelling. This study showed no edema after 3 hr medial cerebral artery occlusion but pronounced edema after 8 hr reperfusion. The edema was abolished by inhibitors of specifically β1-adrenergic pathways, indicating failure of K+-mediated, but not β1-adrenoceptor-mediated, stimulation of Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 transport during reoxygenation. Ninety percent reduction of extracellular Ca2+ concentration occurs in ischemia. Ca2+ omission abolished K+ uptake in normoxic cultures of astrocytes after addition of 5 mM KCl. A large decrease in ouabain potency on K+ uptake in cultured astrocytes was also demonstrated in Ca2+-depleted media, and endogenous ouabains are needed for astrocytic K+ uptake. Thus, among the ionic changes induced by ischemia, the decrease in extracellular Ca2+ causes failure of the high-K+-stimulated Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 ion/water uptake, making β1-adrenergic activation the only stimulus and its inhibition effective against edema.

  13. [GABA, a key transmitter for fetal brain maturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2007-01-01

    GABA, the principal inhibitory transmitter excites immature neurons in all animal species studied. This is due to the higher intracellular concentration of chloride at early developmental stages. Excitatory actions of GABA play an important action in brain maturation. Recent observations also suggest an abrupt shift during delivery that exerts a neuro-protective action contributing to reduce the sequels of trauma and anoxic episodes. These observations have important clinical implications in relation to delivery associated insults but also preterm delivery and more generally consumption of agents during gestation.

  14. The effects of stiripentol on GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet L

    2011-04-01

    The anticonvulsant stiripentol (Diacomittm) has been shown to have a positive impact on control of seizures for many patients with Dravet syndrome. As with most antiepileptic drugs, stiripentol has multiple mechanisms of action. Its direct anticonvulsant activity is likely due to enhancement of inhibitory, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission. Stiripentol was shown to increase the activity of both neuronal and recombinant GABA(A) receptors at clinically relevant concentrations. At recombinant receptors, stiripentol was found to act through a unique site in a subunit-dependent manner. Positive modulation by stiripentol was most effective at GABA(A) receptors containing an α3 subunit. The expression of the α3 subunit is developmentally regulated, with highest levels in the immature brain. This subunit selectivity may explain the greater clinical efficacy of stiripentol in childhood-onset epilepsies, including Dravet syndrome.

  15. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  16. GABA B receptor subunit expression in glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Deuchars, J; Davies, C H; Pangalos, M N

    2003-09-01

    GABA(B) receptor subunits are widely expressed on neurons throughout the CNS, at both pre- and postsynaptic sites, where they mediate the late, slow component of the inhibitory response to the major inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. The existence of functional GABA(B) receptors on nonneuronal cells has been reported previously, although the molecular composition of these receptors has not yet been described. Here we demonstrate for the first time, using immunohistochemistry the expression of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) on nonneuronal cells of the rat CNS. All three principle GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on these cells irrespective of whether they had been cultured or found within brain tissue sections. At the ultrastructural level GABA(B) receptor subunits were expressed on astrocytic processes surrounding both symmetrical and assymetrical synapses in the CA1 subregion of the hippocampus. In addition, GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b), and GABA(B2) receptor subunits were expressed on activated microglia in culture but were not found on myelin forming oligodendrocytes in the white matter of rat spinal cord. Together these data demonstrate that the obligate subunits of functional GABA(B) receptors are expressed in astrocytes and microglia in the rat CNS.

  17. Depolarizing actions of GABA in immature neurons depend neither on ketone bodies nor on pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Allene, Camille; Nardou, Romain; Picardo, Michel A; Yamamoto, Sumii; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Caiati, Maddalena D; Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Milh, Mathieu; Ferré, Pascal; Khazipov, Rustem; Romette, Jean-Louis; Lorquin, Jean; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Nehlig, Astrid; Cherubini, Enrico; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2011-01-05

    GABA depolarizes immature neurons because of a high [Cl(-)](i) and orchestrates giant depolarizing potential (GDP) generation. Zilberter and coworkers (Rheims et al., 2009; Holmgren et al., 2010) showed recently that the ketone body metabolite DL-3-hydroxybutyrate (DL-BHB) (4 mM), lactate (4 mM), or pyruvate (5 mM) shifted GABA actions to hyperpolarizing, suggesting that the depolarizing effects of GABA are attributable to inadequate energy supply when glucose is the sole energy source. We now report that, in rat pups (postnatal days 4-7), plasma D-BHB, lactate, and pyruvate levels are 0.9, 1.5, and 0.12 mM, respectively. Then, we show that DL-BHB (4 mM) and pyruvate (200 μM) do not affect (i) the driving force for GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents (DF(GABA)) in cell-attached single-channel recordings, (2) the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of synaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated responses in perforated patch recordings, (3) the action potentials triggered by focal GABA applications, or (4) the GDPs determined with electrophysiological recordings and dynamic two-photon calcium imaging. Only very high nonphysiological concentrations of pyruvate (5 mM) reduced DF(GABA) and blocked GDPs. Therefore, DL-BHB does not alter GABA signals even at the high concentrations used by Zilberter and colleagues, whereas pyruvate requires exceedingly high nonphysiological concentrations to exert an effect. There is no need to alter conventional glucose enriched artificial CSF to investigate GABA signals in the developing brain.

  18. Effects of GABA agonists on body temperature regulation in GABA(B(1))-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéva, Christophe; Bremner-Danielsen, Marianne; Edlund, Anders; Ekstrand, A Jonas; Elg, Susanne; Erickson, Sven; Johansson, Thore; Lehmann, Anders; Mattsson, Jan P

    2003-09-01

    1. Activation of GABA(B) receptors evokes hypothermia in wildtype (GABA(B(1))+/+) but not in GABA(B) receptor knockout (GABA(B(1))-/-) mice. The aim of the present study was to determine the hypothermic and behavioural effects of the putative GABA(B) receptor agonist gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), and of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol. In addition, basal body temperature was determined in GABA(B(1))+/+, GABA(B(1))+/- and GABA(B(1))-/- mice. 2. GABA(B(1))-/- mice were generated by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Correct gene targeting was assessed by Southern blotting, PCR and Western blotting. GABA(B) receptor-binding sites were quantified with radioligand binding. Measurement of body temperature was done using subcutaneous temperature-sensitive chips, and behavioural changes after drug administration were scored according to a semiquantitative scale. 3. GABA(B(1))-/- mice had a short lifespan, probably caused by generalised seizure activity. No histopathological or blood chemistry changes were seen, but the expression of GABA(B(2)) receptor protein was below the detection limit in brains from GABA(B(1))-/- mice, in the absence of changes in mRNA levels. 4. GABA(B) receptor-binding sites were absent in brain membranes from GABA(B(1))-/- mice. 5. GABA(B(1))-/- mice were hypothermic by approximately 1 degrees C compared to GABA(B(1))+/+ and GABA(B(1))+/- mice. 6. Injection of baclofen (9.6 mg kg-1) produced a large reduction in body temperature and behavioural effects in GABA(B(1))+/+ and in GABA(B(1))+/- mice, but GABA(B(1))-/- mice were unaffected. The same pattern was seen after administration of GHB (400 mg kg-1). The GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (2 mg kg-1), on the other hand, produced a more pronounced hypothermia in GABA(B(1))-/-mice. In GABA(B(1))+/+ and GABA(B(1))+/- mice, muscimol induced sedation and reduced locomotor activity. However, when given to GABA(B(1))-/- mice, muscimol triggered periods of intense jumping and wild

  19. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  20. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  1. In Vivo Measurement of GABA Transmission in Healthy Subjects and Schizophrenia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankle, W. Gordon; Cho, Raymond Y.; Prasad, Konasale M.; Mason, N. Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L.; Walker, Christopher; Lewis, David A.; Narendran, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Postmortem studies in schizophrenia reveal alterations in gene products that regulate the release and extracellular persistence of GABA. However, results of in vivo studies of schizophrenia measuring total tissue GABA with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have been inconsistent. Neither the postmortem nor the MRS studies directly address the physiological properties of GABA neurotransmission. The present study addresses this question through an innovative positron emission tomography (PET) paradigm. Method The binding of [11C]flumazenil, a benzodiazepine-specific PET radiotracer, was measured before and after administration of tiagabine (0.2 mg/kg of body weight), a GABA membrane transporter (GAT1) blocker, in 17 off-medication patients with schizophrenia and 22 healthy comparison subjects. Increased extracellular GABA, through GAT1 blockade, enhances the affinity of GABAA receptors for benzodiazepine ligands, detected as an increase in [11C]flumazenil tissue distribution volume (VT). Results [11C]Flumazenil VT was significantly increased across all cortical brain regions in the healthy comparison group but not in the schizophrenia group. This lack of effect was most prominent in the antipsychotic-naive schizophrenia group. In this subgroup, [11C]flumazenil ΔVT in the medial temporal lobe was correlated with positive symptoms, and baseline [11C] flumazenil VT in the medial temporal lobe was negatively correlated with visual learning. In the healthy comparison group but not the schizophrenia group, [11C]flumazenil ΔVT was positively associated with gamma-band oscillation power. Conclusions This study demonstrates, for the first time, an in vivo impairment in GABA transmission in schizophrenia, most prominent in antipsychotic-naive individuals. The impairment in GABA transmission appears to be linked to clinical symptoms, disturbances in cortical oscillations, and cognition. PMID:26133962

  2. Interaction between cyclodextrin and neuronal membrane results in modulation of GABA(A) receptor conformational transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-06-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are nanostructures widely applied in biotechnology and chemistry. Owing to partially hydrophobic character, CDs interact with biological membranes. While the mechanisms of CDs interactions with lipids were widely studied, their effects on proteins are less understood. In the present study we investigated the effects of beta cyclodextrin (betaCD) on GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) gating. To reliably resolve the kinetics of conformational transitions, currents were elicited by ultrafast gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) applications to outside-out patches from rat cultured hippocampal neurons. betaCD increased the amplitude of responses to saturating GABA concentration ([GABA]) in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by profound alterations in the current kinetics. Current deactivation was slowed down by betaCD but this effect was biphasic with a maximum at around 0.5 mM betaCD. While the fast deactivation time constant was monotonically slowed down within considered betaCD concentration range, the slow component first increased and then, at millimolar betaCD concentration, decreased. The rate and extent of desensitization was decreased by betaCD in a dose-dependent manner. The analysis of current responses to nonsaturating [GABA] indicated that betaCD affected the GABA(A)R agonist binding site by slowing down the unbinding rate. Modulation of GABA(A)R desensitization and binding showed different concentration-dependence suggesting different modualtory sites with higher affinity of the latter one. All the betaCD effects were fully reversible indicating that cholesterol uptake into betaCD was not the primary mechanism. We conclude that betaCD is a strong modulator of GABA(A)R conformational transitions.

  3. Genetic manipulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt in rice: overexpression of truncated glutamate decarboxylase (GAD2) and knockdown of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) lead to sustained and high levels of GABA accumulation in rice kernels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Yasuka; Oonishi, Takayuki; Ozaki, Kae; Kainou, Kumiko; Akama, Kazuhito

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid commonly present in all organisms. Because cellular levels of GABA in plants are mainly regulated by synthesis (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD) and catabolism (GABA-transaminase, GABA-T), we attempted seed-specific manipulation of the GABA shunt to achieve stable GABA accumulation in rice. A truncated GAD2 sequence, one of five GAD genes, controlled by the glutelin (GluB-1) or rice embryo globulin promoters (REG) and GABA-T-based trigger sequences in RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes controlled by one of these promoters as well, was introduced into rice (cv. Koshihikari) to establish stable transgenic lines under herbicide selection using pyriminobac. T₁ and T₂ generations of rice lines displayed high GABA concentrations (2-100 mg/100 g grain). In analyses of two selected lines from the T₃ generation, there was a strong correlation between GABA level and the expression of truncated GAD2, whereas the inhibitory effect of GABA-T expression was relatively weak. In these two lines both with two T-DNA copies, their starch, amylose, and protein levels were slightly lower than non-transformed cv. Koshihikari. Free amino acid analysis of mature kernels of these lines demonstrated elevated levels of GABA (75-350 mg/100 g polished rice) and also high levels of several amino acids, such as Ala, Ser, and Val. Because these lines of seeds could sustain their GABA content after harvest (up to 6 months), the strategy in this study could lead to the accumulation GABA and for these to be sustained in the edible parts.

  4. Excitatory action of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on crustacean neurosecretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, U; Onetti, C; Valdiosera, R; Aréchiga, H

    1994-02-01

    1. Intracellular and voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from a selected population of neurosecretory (ns) cells in the X organ of the crayfish isolated eyestalk. Pulses of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) elicited depolarizing responses and bursts of action potentials in a dose-dependent manner. These effects were blocked by picrotoxin (50 microM) but not by bicuculline. Picrotoxin also suppressed spontaneous synaptic activity. 2. The responses to GABA were abolished by severing the neurite of X organ cells, at about 150 microns from the cell body. Responses were larger when the application was made at the neuropil level. 3. Topical application of Cd2+ (2 mM), while suppressing synaptic activity, was incapable of affecting the responses to GABA. 4. Under whole-cell voltage-clamp, GABA elicited an inward current with a reversal potential dependent on the chloride equilibrium potential. The GABA effect was accompanied by an input resistance reduction up to 33% at a -50 mV holding potential. No effect of GABA was detected on potassium, calcium, and sodium currents present in X organ cells. 5. The effect of GABA on steady-state currents was dependent on the intracellular calcium concentration. At 10(-6) M [Ca2+]i, GABA (50 microM) increased the membrane conductance more than threefold and shifted the zero-current potential from -25 to -10 mV. At 10(-9) M [Ca2+]i, GABA induced only a 1.3-fold increase in membrane conductance, without shifting the zero-current potential. 6. These results support the notion that in the population of X organ cells sampled in this study, GABA acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter, opening chloride channels.

  5. Hypoxia treatment on germinating faba bean (Vicia faba L. seeds enhances GABA-related protection against salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runqiang Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a non-protein amino acid with some functional properties for human health. Its content is usually lower in plant seeds. Hypoxia or salt (NaCl stress is an effective way for accumulating GABA during seed germination. However, NaCl stress on GABA accumulation under hypoxia is currently infrequent. The effect of NaCl on GABA accumulation in germinating faba bean (Vicia faba L. under hypoxia was therefore investigated in this study. Faba bean seeds were steeped in citric acid buffer (pH 3.5 containing NaCl with a final O2 concentration of 5.5 mg L-1 and germinated for 5 d. Results showed that 60 mmol L-1 NaCl was the optimum concentration for GABA accumulation in germinating faba beans under hypoxia. Germination for 5 d under hypoxia-NaCl stress was less beneficial for GABA accumulation than only hypoxia (control. Polyamine degradation pathway played a more important role for accumulating GABA in germinating faba bean as an adaptive response to NaCl stress. Removing NaCl significantly increased GABA content, while it decreased glutamate decarboxylase (GAD activity. Simultaneously, polyamine was accumulated, which might be related to the enhancement of physiological activity after recovery. When treated with aminoguanidine (AG for 3 d, GABA content decreased by 29.82%. These results indicated that the tolerance ability of GABA shunt to NaCl stress was weaker than that of polyamine degradation pathway. The NaCl treatment for 3 d under hypoxia could raise the contribution ratio of polyamine degradation pathway for GABA accumulation. The contribution ratio of polyamine degradation pathway for GABA formation was 29.82% when treated for at least 3 d

  6. Anion transport and GABA signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Huebner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas activation of GABAA receptors by GABA usually results in a hyperpolarizing influx of chloride into the neuron, the reversed chloride driving force in the immature nervous system results in a depolarizing efflux of chloride. This GABAergic depolarization is deemed to be important for the maturation of the neuronal network. The concept of a developmental GABA switch has mainly been derived from in vitro experiments and reliable in vivo evidence is still missing. As GABAA receptors are permeable for both chloride and bicarbonate, the net effect of GABA also critically depends on the distribution of bicarbonate. Whereas chloride can either mediate depolarizing or hyperpolarizing currents, bicarbonate invariably mediates a depolarizing current under physiological conditions. Intracellular bicarbonate is quickly replenished by cytosolic carbonic anhydrases. Intracellular bicarbonate levels also depend on different bicarbonate transporters expressed by neurons. The expression of these proteins is not only developmentally regulated but also differs between cell types and even subcellular regions. In this review we will summarize current knowledge about the role of some of these transporters for brain development and brain function.

  7. Maternal oxytocin triggers a transient inhibitory switch in GABA signaling in the fetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyzio, Roman; Cossart, Rosa; Khalilov, Ilgam; Minlebaev, Marat; Hübner, Christian A; Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khazipov, Rustem

    2006-12-15

    We report a signaling mechanism in rats between mother and fetus aimed at preparing fetal neurons for delivery. In immature neurons, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter. We found that, shortly before delivery, there is a transient reduction in the intracellular chloride concentration and an excitatory-to-inhibitory switch of GABA actions. These events were triggered by oxytocin, an essential maternal hormone for labor. In vivo administration of an oxytocin receptor antagonist before delivery prevented the switch of GABA actions in fetal neurons and aggravated the severity of anoxic episodes. Thus, maternal oxytocin inhibits fetal neurons and increases their resistance to insults during delivery.

  8. Action of tremorgenic mycotoxins on GABA/sub A/ receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, D.B.; Cole, R.J.; Valdes, J.J.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1987-11-09

    The effects of four tremorgenic and one nontremorgenic mycotoxins were studied on ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA/sub A/) receptor binding and function in rat brain and on binding of a voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel in Torpedo electric organ. None of the mycotoxins had significant effect on (/sup 3/H)muscimol or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding to the GAMA/sup A/ receptor. However, only the four tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibited GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx and (/sup 35/S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate ((/sup 35/S)TBPS) binding in rate brain membranes, while the nontremorgenic verruculotoxin had no effect. Inhibition of (/sup 35/S)TBPS binding by paspalinine was non-competitive. This suggests that tremorgenic mycotoxins inhibit GABA/sub A/ receptor function by binding close to the receptor's Cl/sup -/ channel. On the voltage-operated Cl/sup -/ channel, only high concentrations of verruculogen and verruculotoxin caused significant inhibition of the channel's binding of (/sup 35/S)TBPS. The data suggest that the tremorgenic action of these mycotoxins may be due in part to their inhibition of GABA/sub A/ receptor function. 21 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Common Distribution of gad Operon in Lactobacillus brevis and its GadA Contributes to Efficient GABA Synthesis toward Cytosolic Near-Neutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinglong; Tun, Hein Min; Law, Yee-Song; Khafipour, Ehsan; Shah, Nagendra P.

    2017-01-01

    Many strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria have exhibited strain-specific capacity to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) via their glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) system, which is one of amino acid-dependent acid resistance (AR) systems in bacteria. However, the linkage between bacterial AR and GABA production capacity has not been well established. Meanwhile, limited evidence has been provided to the global diversity of GABA-producing LAB and bifidobacteria, and their mechanisms of efficient GABA synthesis. In this study, genomic survey identified common distribution of gad operon-encoded GAD system in Lactobacillus brevis for its GABA production among varying species of LAB and bifidobacteria. Importantly, among four commonly distributed amino acid-dependent AR systems in Lb. brevis, its GAD system was a major contributor to maintain cytosolic pH homeostasis by consuming protons via GABA synthesis. This highlights that Lb. brevis applies GAD system as the main strategy against extracellular and intracellular acidification demonstrating its high capacity of GABA production. In addition, the abundant GadA retained its activity toward near-neutral pH (pH 5.5–6.5) of cytosolic acidity thus contributing to efficient GABA synthesis in Lb. brevis. This is the first global report illustrating species-specific characteristic and mechanism of efficient GABA synthesis in Lb. brevis. PMID:28261168

  10. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...

  11. A tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that affects tomato fruit amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Christopher J; Thomas, Benjamin; Baxter, Charles J; Smith, J Andrew C; Sweetlove, Lee J

    2015-03-01

    Vacuolar accumulation of acidic metabolites is an important aspect of tomato fruit flavour and nutritional quality. The amino acids Asp and Glu accumulate to high concentrations during ripening, while γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) shows an approximately stoichiometric decline. Given that GABA can be catabolised to form Glu and subsequently Asp, and the requirement for the fruit to maintain osmotic homeostasis during ripening, we hypothesised the existence of a tonoplast transporter that exports GABA from the vacuole in exchange for import of either Asp or Glu. We show here that the tomato vacuolar membrane possesses such a transport property: transport of Glu across isolated tonoplast vesicle membranes was trans-stimulated in counterexchange mode by GABA, Glu and Asp. We identified SlCAT9 as a candidate protein for this exchanger using quantitative proteomics of a tonoplast-enriched membrane fraction. Transient expression of a SlCAT9-YFP fusion in tobacco confirmed a tonoplast localisation. The function of the protein was examined by overexpression of SlCAT9 in transgenic tomato plants. Tonoplast vesicles isolated from transgenic plants showed higher rates of Glu and GABA transport than wild-type (WT) only when assayed in counterexchange mode with Glu, Asp, or GABA. Moreover, there were substantial increases in the content of all three cognate amino acids in ripe fruit from the transgenic plants. We conclude that SlCAT9 is a tonoplast Glu/Asp/GABA exchanger that strongly influences the accumulation of these amino acids during fruit development.

  12. Purification of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) from fermentation of defatted rice bran extract by using ion exchange resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan Nha, Vi; Phung, Le Thi Kim; Dat, Lai Quoc

    2017-09-01

    Rice bran is one of the significant byproducts of rice processing with 10 %w/w of constitution of whole rice grain. It is rich in nutrient compounds, including glutamic acid. Thus, it could be utilized for the fermentation with Lactobateria for synthesis of GABA, a valuable bioactive for antihypertensive effects. However, the concentration and purity of GABA in fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract is low for production of GABA drug. This research focused on the purification of GABA from the fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract by using cation exchange resin. The results indicate that, the adsorption isotherm of GABA by Purelite C100 showed the good agreement with Freundlich model, with high adsorption capacity. The effects of pH and concentration of NaCl in eluent on the elution were also investigated. The obtained results show that, at the operating conditions of elution as follows: pH 6.5, 0.8 M of NaCl in eluent, 0.43 of bed volume; concentration of GABA in accumulative eluent, the purity and recovery yield of GABA were 743.8 ppm, 44.0% and 84.2%, respectively. Results imply that, it is feasible to apply cation exchange resin for purification of GABA from fermentation broth of defatted rice bran extract.

  13. GABA and glutamate uptake and metabolism in retinal glial (Müller cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eBringmann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Müller cells, the principal glial cells of the retina, support the synaptic activity by the uptake and metabolization of extracellular neurotransmitters. Müller cells express uptake and exchange systems for various neurotransmitters including glutamate and -aminobutyric acid (GABA. Müller cells remove the bulk of extracellular glutamate in the inner retina and contribute to the glutamate clearance around photoreceptor terminals. By the uptake of glutamate, Müller cells are involved in the shaping and termination of the synaptic activity, particularly in the inner retina. Reactive Müller cells are neuroprotective, e.g., by the clearance of excess extracellular glutamate, but may also contribute to neuronal degeneration by a malfunctioning or even reversal of glial glutamate transporters, or by a downregulation of the key enzyme, glutamine synthetase. This review summarizes the present knowledge about the role of Müller cells in the clearance and metabolization of extracellular glutamate and GABA. Some major pathways of GABA and glutamate metabolism in Müller cells are described; these pathways are involved in the glutamate-glutamine cycle of the retina, in the defense against oxidative stress via the production of glutathione, and in the production of substrates for the neuronal energy metabolism.

  14. Impact of Precooling and Controlled-Atmosphere Storage on γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Accumulation in Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Molin; Ndeurumio, Kessy H; Zhao, Lei; Hu, Zhuoyan

    2016-08-24

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) fruit cultivars 'Chuliang' and 'Shixia' were analyzed for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation after precooling and in controlled-atmosphere storage. Fruit were exposed to 5% O2 plus 3%, 5%, or 10% CO2 at 4 °C, and GABA and associated enzymes, aril firmness, and pericarp color were measured. Aril softening and pericarp browning were delayed by 5% CO2 + 5% O2. GABA concentrations and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15) activities declined during storage at the higher-CO2 treatments. However, GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T; EC 2.6.1.19) activities in elevated CO2-treated fruit fluctuated during storage. GABA concentrations increased after precooling treatments. GAD activity and GABA-T activity were different between cultivars after precooling. GABA concentrations in fruit increased after 3 days of 10% CO2 + 5% O2 treatment and then declined as storage time increased. GABA accumulation was associated with stimulation of GAD activity rather than inhibition of GABA-T activity.

  15. 5-(N, N-Hexamethylene) amiloride is a GABA-A ρ1 receptor positive allosteric modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Heather D; Gonzales, Eric B

    2016-11-01

    Guanidine compounds act as ion channel modulators. In the case of Cys-loop receptors, the guanidine compound amiloride antagonized the heteromeric GABA-A, glycine, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. However, amiloride exhibits characteristics consistent with a positive allosteric modulator for the human GABA-A (hGABA-A) ρ1 receptor. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the positive allosteric modulation was influenced by the GABA-A ρ1 second transmembrane domain 15' position, a site implicated in ligand allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. There are a variety of amiloride derivatives that provide opportunities to assess the significance of amiloride functional groups (e.g., the guanidine group, the pyrazine ring, etc.) in the modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor activity. We utilized 3 amiloride derivatives (benzamil, phenamil, and 5-(N, N-Hexamethylene) amiloride) to assess the contribution of these groups toward the potentiation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Benzamil and phenamil failed to potentiate on the wild type GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current while HMA demonstrated efficacy only at the highest concentration studied. The hGABA-A ρ1 (I15'N) mutant receptor activity was potentiated by lower HMA concentrations compared to the wild type receptor. Our findings suggest that an exposed guanidine group on amiloride and amiloride derivatives is critical for modulating the GABA-A ρ1 receptor. The present study provides a conceptual framework for predicting which amiloride derivatives will demonstrate positive allosteric modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 receptor.

  16. Synthesis of nylon 4 from gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) produced by recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si Jae; Kim, Eun Young; Noh, Won; Oh, Young Hoon; Kim, Hye Young; Song, Bong Keun; Cho, Kwang Myung; Hong, Soon Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Jegal, Jonggeon

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we developed recombinant Escherichia coli strains expressing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Il1403 glutamate decarboxylase (GadB) for the production of GABA from glutamate monosodium salt (MSG). Syntheses of GABA from MSG were examined by employing recombinant E. coli XL1-Blue as a whole cell biocatalyst in buffer solution. By increasing the concentration of E. coli XL1-Blue expressing GadB from the OD₆₀₀ of 2-10, the concentration and conversion yield of GABA produced from 10 g/L of MSG could be increased from 4.3 to 4.8 g/L and from 70 to 78 %, respectively. Furthermore, E. coli XL1-Blue expressing GadB highly concentrated to the OD₆₀₀ of 100 produced 76.2 g/L of GABA from 200 g/L of MSG with 62.4 % of GABA yield. Finally, nylon 4 could be synthesized by the bulk polymerization using 2-pyrrolidone that was prepared from microbially synthesized GABA by the reaction with Al₂O₃ as catalyst in toluene with the yield of 96 %.

  17. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-10-01

    Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concentration at an early stage leading to an efflux of chloride and excitatory actions of GABA in immature neurons. This triggers sodium spikes, activates voltage-gated calcium channels, and acts in synergy with NMDA channels by removing the voltage-dependent magnesium block. GABA signaling is also established before glutamatergic transmission, suggesting that GABA is the principal excitatory transmitter during early development. In fact, even before synapse formation, GABA signaling can modulate the cell cycle and migration. The consequence of these rules is that developing networks generate primitive patterns of network activity, notably the giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs), largely through the excitatory actions of GABA and its synergistic interactions with glutamate signaling. These early types of network activity are likely required for neurons to fire together and thus to "wire together" so that functional units within cortical networks are formed. In addition, depolarizing GABA has a strong impact on synaptic plasticity and pathological insults, notably seizures of the immature brain. In conclusion, it is suggested that an evolutionary preserved role for excitatory GABA in immature cells provides an important mechanism in the formation of synapses and activity in neuronal networks.

  18. Auto-modulation of neuroactive steroids on GABA A receptors: a novel pharmacological effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Florian; Rassler, Cornelia; Allgaier, Clemens; Strecker, Karl; Wohlfarth, Kai

    2007-02-01

    GABA(A) receptor function is modulated by various important drugs including neuroactive steroids that act on allosteric modulatory sites and can directly activate GABA(A) receptor channels at high concentrations. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings and rapid applications of the neuroactive steroid alphaxalone to investigate repetitive steroid effects. Alphaxalone potentiation of submaximal GABA-evoked currents was enhanced significantly by repetitive coapplications at all investigated recombinant isoforms (alpha1beta3delta, alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3delta, alpha6beta3gamma2L) and at GABA(A) receptors of differentiated human NT2 neurons. A similar increase of current amplitudes was induced by repetitive applications of a high steroid concentration without GABA. We refer to these reversible effects as auto-modulation because repeated interactions of steroids enhanced their own pharmacological impact at the receptor sites in a time and concentration dependent manner without affecting GABA controls. Pronounced auto-modulatory actions were also measured using the neurosteroid 5alpha-THDOC in contrast to indiplon, THIP, and pentobarbital indicating a steroid specificity. Protein kinase A inhibition significantly reduced alphaxalone auto-modulation at alpha1beta3gamma2L, alpha6beta3gamma2L, and alpha6beta3delta subtypes while it enhanced potentiation at alpha1beta3delta isoforms suggesting a crucial influence of receptor subunit composition and phosphorylation for steroid actions. Especially at extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor sites containing the delta subunit steroid auto-modulation may have a critical role in enhancing potentiation of GABA-induced currents.

  19. GABA localization in the nematode Ascaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastella, J.

    1988-01-01

    A histochemical approach was used to examine the distribution of GABA-associated neurons in the nematode Ascaris, an organism whose small number of morphologically simple neurons make it an excellent preparation for analyzing neuronal phenotypes. Two GABAergic markers were examined: GABA-like immunoreactivity (GLIR), a marker for endogenous stores of GABA; and ({sup 3}H)-GABA uptake, a marker for GABA uptake sites. Strong GLIR was present in the cell bodies, neurites and commissures of dorsal and ventral inhibitory motorneurons present in this region. Strong GLIR was also present in the cell bodies and processes of the four RME neurons in the nerve ring and in several other ganglionic neurons. Staining was absent in excitatory motorneurons, in ventral cord interneurons and in muscle cells and hypodermis. GABA uptake sites were found in single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords. ({sup 3}H)-GABA labeling was also observed in the other two RME cells and several other cephalic neurons. Four putative cholinergic excitatory motorneurons in the retrovesicular ganglion (RVG) were heavily labeled. Ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motorneurons did not take up ({sup 3}H)-GABA. Labeling of the ventral cord excitatory motorneuron somata and cell bodies was at or slightly above background. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed.

  20. [A new role of GABA on synapses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Tatsuya; Kasai, Haruo

    2014-08-01

    Neurons connect and transmit information via synapses. The major excitatory and inhibitory (E-I) neurotransmitters are glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively. The E-I balance plays an important role in various brain functions. In this review, we summarize the role of GABA on synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity by introducing our own recent findings. In synaptic integration, GABA is considered to inhibit depolarization induced by glutamate and suppress action potentials. We found that GABA also has a more direct role on the synaptic plasticity of excitatory inputs. GABA effectively promotes the shrinkage and elimination of synapses by suppressing local dendritic Ca(2+) signaling, while keeping the Ca(2+) domain of the NMDA receptors intact. In this manner, GABA promoted the activation of calcineurin, which in turn activated cofilin. Interestingly, shrinkage tended to spread, likely due to the spread of cofilin, and induced competitive selection of synapses via its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The selection of synapses is key to the reorganization of the central nervous system during development and in adulthood, and GABA plays key roles in various mental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. Our results account well for the in vivo GABA functions on synaptic selection, and may help to develop new therapeutic compounds.

  1. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  2. Comparison of taurine, GABA, Glu, and Asp as scavengers of malondialdehyde in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Wang, Wei; Yu, Pingfeng; Xi, Zhijiang; Xu, Lijian; Li, Xiaolong; He, Nongyue

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine if amino acid neurotransmitters such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine, glutamate (Glu), and aspartate (Asp) can scavenge activated carbonyl toxicants. In vitro, direct reaction between malondialdehyde (MDA) and amino acids was researched using different analytical methods. The results indicated that scavenging activated carbonyl function of taurine and GABA is very strong and that of Glu and Asp is very weak in pathophysiological situations. The results provided perspective into the reaction mechanism of taurine and GABA as targets of activated carbonyl such as MDA in protecting nerve terminals. In vivo, we studied the effect of taurine and GABA as antioxidants by detecting MDA concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities. It was shown that MDA concentration was decreased significantly, and the activities of SOD and GSH-Px were increased significantly in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of acute epileptic state rats, after the administration of taurine and GABA. The results indicated that the peripherally administered taurine and GABA can scavenge free radicals and protect the tissue against activated carbonyl in vivo and in vitro.

  3. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  4. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  5. Dynamics of epileptic activity in a peculiar case of childhood absence epilepsy and correlation with thalamic levels of GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Leal

    2016-01-01

    Significance: In a clinical case of CAE with EEG and fMRI-BOLD manifestations restricted to one hemisphere, we found an associated increase in thalamic GABA concentration consistent with a role for this abnormality in human CAE.

  6. GABA systems, benzodiazepines, and substance dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Alterations in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex and GABA neurotransmission influence the reinforcing and intoxicating effects of alcohol and benzodiazepines. Chronic modulation of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex plays a major role in central nervous system dysregulation during alcohol abstinence. Withdrawal symptoms stem in part from a decreased GABAergic inhibitory function and an increase in glutamatergic excitatory function. GABA(A) receptors play a role in both reward and withdrawal phenomena from alcohol and sedative-hypnotics. Although less well understood, GABA(B) receptor complexes appear to play a role in inhibition of motivation and diminish relapse potential to reinforcing drugs. Evidence suggests that long-term alcohol use and concomitant serial withdrawals permanently alter GABAergic function, down-regulate benzodiazepine binding sites, and in preclinical models lead to cell death. Benzodiazepines have substantial drawbacks in the treatment of substance use-related disorders that include interactions with alcohol, rebound effects, alcohol priming, and the risk of supplanting alcohol dependency with addiction to both alcohol and benzodiazepines. Polysubstance-dependent individuals frequently self-medicate with benzodiazepines. Selective GABA agents with novel mechanisms of action have anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and reward inhibition profiles that have potential in treating substance use and withdrawal and enhancing relapse prevention with less liability than benzodiazepines. The GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen has promise in relapse prevention in a number of substance dependence disorders. The GABA(A) and GABA(B) pump reuptake inhibitor tiagabine has potential for managing alcohol and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal and also possibly a role in relapse prevention.

  7. Muscimol as an ionotropic GABA receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2014-10-01

    Muscimol, a psychoactive isoxazole from Amanita muscaria and related mushrooms, has proved to be a remarkably selective agonist at ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historic overview highlights the discovery and development of muscimol and related compounds as a GABA agonist by Danish and Australian neurochemists. Muscimol is widely used as a ligand to probe GABA receptors and was the lead compound in the development of a range of GABAergic agents including nipecotic acid, tiagabine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol, (Gaboxadol(®)) and 4-PIOL.

  8. EXTRACELLULAR GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID IN THE SUBSTANTIA-NIGRA RETICULATA MEASURED BY MICRODIALYSIS IN AWAKE RATS - EFFECTS OF VARIOUS STIMULANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIMMERMAN, W; WESTERINK, BHC

    1995-01-01

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR) was challenged by local infusion of various receptor-specific agents to obtain additional information on the physiological significance of extracellular GABA levels as measured by microdialysis in awake rats. No

  9. Effect of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate on cryopreserved epididymal cat sperm intracellular ATP concentration, sperm quality, and in vitro fertilizing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuwanut, Paweena; Arya, Nlin; Comizzoli, Pierre; Chatdarong, Kaywalee

    2015-09-15

    Intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is essential for supporting sperm function in the fertilization process. During cryopreservation, damage of sperm mitochondrial membrane usually leads to compromised production of intracellular ATP. Recently, extracellular ATP (ATPe) was introduced as a potent activator of sperm motility and fertilizing ability. This study aimed to evaluate (1) levels of intracellular ATP in frozen-thawed epididymal cat sperm after incubation with ATPe and (2) effects of ATPe on epididymal cat sperm parameters after freezing and thawing. Eighteen male cats were included. For each replicate, epididymal sperm from two cats were pooled to one sample (N = 9). Each pooled sample was cryopreserved with the Tris-egg yolk extender into three straws. After thawing, the first and second straws were incubated with 0-, 1.0-, or 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes and evaluated for sperm quality at 10 minutes, 1, 3, and 6 hours after thawing and fertilizing ability. The third straw was evaluated for intracellular ATP concentration in control and with 2.5-mM ATPe treatment. Higher concentration of intracellular sperm ATP was observed in the samples treated with 2.5-mM ATPe compared to the controls (0.339 ± 0.06 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm vs. 0.002 ± 0.003 μg/2 × 10(6) sperm, P ≤ 0.05). In addition, incubation with 2.5-mM ATPe for 10 minutes promoted sperm motility (56.7 ± 5.0 vs. 53.3 ± 4.4%, P ≤ 0.05) and progressive motility (3.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.8 ± 0.4, P ≤ 0.05), mitochondrial membrane potential (36.4 ± 5.5 vs. 28.7 ± 4.8%, P ≤ 0.05), and blastocyst rate (36.1 ± 7.0 and 28.8 ± 7.4%, P ≤ 0.05) compared with the controls. In contrast, ATPe remarkably interfered acrosome integrity after 6 hours of postthawed incubation. In sum, the present finding that optimal incubation time of postthaw epididymal cat sperm under proper ATPe condition might constitute a rationale for the studies on other endangered wild felids regarding sperm quality and embryo

  10. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis regulates pollen germination and polarized growth in Picea wilsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yu; Chen, Tong; Jing, Yanping; Fan, Lusheng; Wan, Yinglang; Lin, Jinxing

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a four-carbon non-protein amino acid found in a wide range of organisms. Recently, GABA accumulation has been shown to play a role in the stress response and cell growth in angiosperms. However, the effect of GABA deficiency on pollen tube development remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that specific concentrations of exogenous GABA stimulated pollen tube growth in Picea wilsonii, while an overdose suppressed pollen tube elongation. The germination percentage of pollen grains and morphological variations in pollen tubes responded in a dose-dependent manner to treatment with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (3-MP), a glutamate decarboxylase inhibitor, while the inhibitory effects could be recovered in calcium-containing medium supplemented with GABA. Using immunofluorescence labeling, we found that the actin cables were disorganized in 3-MP treated cells, followed by the transition of endo/exocytosis activating sites from the apex to the whole tube shank. In addition, variations in the deposition of cell wall components were detected upon labeling with JIM5, JIM7, and aniline blue. Our results demonstrated that calcium-dependent GABA signaling regulates pollen germination and polarized tube growth in P. wilsonii by affecting actin filament patterns, vesicle trafficking, and the configuration and distribution of cell wall components.

  11. Utilization of barley or wheat bran to bioconvert glutamate to γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wen-Jie; Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Keun-Sung

    2013-09-01

    This study deals with the utilization of agro-industrial wastes created by barley and wheat bran in the production of a value-added product, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The simple and eco-friendly reaction requires no pretreatment or microbial fermentation steps but uses barley or wheat bran as an enzyme source, glutamate as a substrate, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. The optimal reaction conditions were determined on the basis of the temperatures and times used for the decarboxylation reactions and the initial concentrations of barley or wheat bran, glutamate, and PLP. The optimal reactions produced 9.2 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 92% GABA conversion rate, when barley bran was used and 6.0 mM of GABA from 10 mM glutamate, yielding a 60% GABA conversion rate, when wheat bran was used. The results imply that barley bran is more efficient than wheat bran in the production of GABA.

  12. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA(A receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eThiel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN project widely throughout the central nervous system (CNS. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs and, in high concentrations (10 mM, as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABA(ARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABA(ARs. We expressed GABA(ARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues ß2(N265 and ß2(M286, which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues alpha1(R120, ß2(Y157, ß3(D163, ß3(V175 and ß3(Q185. We showed that the amino acid residues ß2(Y157 and ß3(Q185 mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas alpha1(R120 and ß2(D163 form a potential histamine interaction site in GABA(ARs.

  13. Modulatory effect of substance P on GABA-activated currents from rat dorsal root ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-qiang SI; Zhi-qin ZHANG; Chun-xia LI; Li-feng WANG; Yun-lei YANG; Zhi-wang LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the modulatory effect of substance P (SP) on GABA-activated current of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in rat. METHODS: The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record SP- and GABAactivated currents in neurons freshly dissociated from rat DRG neurons. Drugs were applied by rapid solution exchange. RESULTS: Application of SP (28/41, 68.5 %) and GABA (36/41, 88.2 %) could induce concentrationdependent inward current in some cells. SP-(10 μmol/L) and GABA (100 μmol/L)-activated inward currents were (244±83) pA (n=9) and (1.8±0.5) nA (n=13), respectively. The majority of GABA-activated current had obvious three processes, the peak value (Ip), the steady state (Iss) and the desensitization (Ia). The desensitization of GABAactivated current was a biphasic process, including fast and slow desensitization. However, pre-application of SP (0.001-1 μmol/L) could inhibit the GABA-activated inward current which was identified to be GABAA receptormediated current. The inhibitory effects were concentration-dependent. The inhibitory effect of SP on the peak value of GABA-activated current was more than the steady state of GABA-activated current. The inhibition of GABA-activated current by SP (0.1 μmol/L) was related to the time after application of SP, the inhibition of GABAactivated currents by SP reached the peak at about 4 min (49.8 %±7.2 %, n=7, P<0.01) and took about 12 min to get a full recovery. The inhibition of GABA-activated currents by SP was almost completely removed after blockade of PKC by H-7 with the re-patch clamp. CONCLUSION: Pre-application of SP exerts a more strong inhibitory effect on the peak value of GABA-activated current than the steady state of GABA-activated current.

  14. A possible role of the non-GAT1 GABA transporters in transfer of GABA from GABAergic to glutamatergic neurons in mouse cerebellar neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, C; Babot, Z; Cristòfol, R; Sonnewald, U; Waagepetersen, H S; Schousboe, A

    2010-09-01

    Cultures of dissociated cerebellum from 7-day-old mice were used to investigate the mechanism involved in synthesis and cellular redistribution of GABA in these cultures consisting primarily of glutamatergic granule neurons and a smaller population of GABAergic Golgi and stellate neurons. The distribution of GAD, GABA and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut-1 was assessed using specific antibodies combined with immunofluorescence microscopy. Additionally, tiagabine, SKF 89976-A, betaine, beta-alanine, nipecotic acid and guvacine were used to inhibit the GAT1, betaine/GABA (BGT1), GAT2 and GAT3 transporters. Only a small population of cells were immuno-stained for GAD while many cells exhibited VGlut-1 like immuno-reactivity which, however, never co-localized with GAD positive neurons. This likely reflects the small number of GABAergic neurons compared to the glutamatergic granule neurons constituting the majority of the cells. GABA uptake exhibited the kinetics of high affinity transport and could be partly (20%) inhibited by betaine (IC(50) 142 microM), beta-alanine (30%) and almost fully (90%) inhibited by SKF 89976-A (IC(50) 0.8 microM) or nipecotic acid and guvacine at 1 mM concentrations (95%). Essentially all neurons showed GABA like immunostaining albeit with differences in intensity. The results indicate that GABA which is synthesized in a small population of GAD-positive neurons is redistributed to essentially all neurons including the glutamatergic granule cells. GAT1 is not likely involved in this redistribution since addition of 15 microM tiagabine (GAT1 inhibitor) to the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content of the cells. Likewise the BGT1 transporter cannot alone account for the redistribution since inclusion of 3 mM betaine in the culture medium had no effect on the overall GABA content. The inhibitory action of beta-alanine and high concentrations of nipecotic acid and guvacine on GABA transport strongly suggests that also

  15. GABA Australis, some reflections on the history of GABA receptor research in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2017-02-01

    Research on GABA receptors has a long history in Australia dating from 1958 with David Curtis and his colleagues in Canberra. This review traces many of the advances made in Australia guided by highly cited publications and some obscure ones. It covers the discovery of key chemicals with which to investigate GABA receptor function including bicuculline, muscimol, phaclofen, THIP and (+)-CAMP. Also described are findings relevant to the involvement of mutant GABA receptors in inherited epilepsy. The modulation of GABA receptors by a bewildering range of chemicals, especially by flavonoids and terpenoids, is discussed.

  16. Inhibition of GABA release by presynaptic ionotropic GABA receptors in hippocampal CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmacher, Nikolai; Draguhn, Andreas

    2004-02-09

    Vesicular transmitter release can be regulated by transmitter-gated ion channels at presynaptic axon terminals. The central inhibitory transmitter GABA acts on such presynaptic ionotropic receptors in various cells, including inhibitory interneurons. Here we report that GABA-mediated postsynaptic inhibitory currents in CA3 pyramidal cells of rat hippocampal slices are suppressed by agonists of GABAA receptors. The effect is present for both stimulus-induced and miniature IPSCs, indicating a reduction in the probability of vesicular release by presynaptic, action-potential-independent mechanisms. We conclude that the release of GABA from hippocampal CA3 interneurons is regulated by a negative feedback via presynaptic ionotropic GABA autoreceptors.

  17. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Furutani, Shogo; Ihara, Makoto; Ling, Yun; Yang, Xinling; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR) RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs.

  18. Meroterpenoid Chrodrimanins Are Selective and Potent Blockers of Insect GABA-Gated Chloride Channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    Full Text Available Meroterpenoid chrodrimanins, produced from Talaromyces sp. YO-2, are known to paralyze silkworm (Bombyx mori larvae, but their target is unknown. We have investigated the actions of chrodrimanin B on ligand-gated ion channels of silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B had no effect on membrane currents when tested alone at 1 μM. However, it completely blocked the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA-induced current and showed less pronounced actions on acetylcholine- and L-glutamate-induced currents, when delivered at 1 μM for 1 min prior to co-application with transmitter GABA. Thus, chrodrimanins were also tested on a wild-type isoform of the B. mori GABA receptor (GABAR RDL using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Chrodrimanin B attenuated the peak current amplitude of the GABA response of RDL with an IC50 of 1.66 nM. The order of the GABAR-blocking potency of chrodrimanins B > D > A was in accordance with their reported insecticidal potency. Chrodrimanin B had no open channel blocking action when tested at 3 nM on the GABA response of RDL. Co-application with 3 nM chrodrimanin B shifted the GABA concentration response curve to a higher concentration and further increase of chrodrimanin B concentration to 10 nM; it reduced maximum current amplitude of the GABA response, pointing to a high-affinity competitive action and a lower affinity non-competitive action. The A282S;T286V double mutation of RDL, which impairs the actions of fipronil, hardly affected the blocking action of chrodrimanin B, indicating a binding site of chrodrimanin B distinct from that of fipronil. Chrodrimanin B showed approximately 1,000-fold lower blocking action on human α1β2γ2 GABAR compared to RDL and thus is a selective blocker of insect GABARs.

  19. Control of GABA Release at Mossy Fiber-CA3 Connections in the Developing Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safiulina, Victoria F; Caiati, Maddalena D; Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Bisson, Giacomo; Migliore, Michele; Cherubini, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF)-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs) exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABA(B) and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons), generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  20. GABA maintains the proliferation of progenitors in the developing chick ciliary marginal zone and non-pigmented ciliary epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Ring

    Full Text Available GABA is more than the main inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the adult CNS. Several studies have shown that GABA regulates the proliferation of progenitor and stem cells. This work examined the effects of the GABA(A receptor system on the proliferation of retinal progenitors and non-pigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE cells. qRT-PCR and whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology were used to characterize the GABA(A receptor system. To quantify the effects on proliferation by GABA(A receptor agonists and antagonists, incorporation of thymidine analogues was used. The results showed that the NPE cells express functional extrasynaptic GABA(A receptors with tonic properties and that low concentration of GABA is required for a baseline level of proliferation. Antagonists of the GABA(A receptors decreased the proliferation of dissociated E12 NPE cells. Bicuculline also had effects on progenitor cell proliferation in intact E8 and E12 developing retina. The NPE cells had low levels of the Cl-transporter KCC2 compared to the mature retina, suggesting a depolarising role for the GABA(A receptors. Treatment with KCl, which is known to depolarise membranes, prevented some of the decreased proliferation caused by inhibition of the GABA(A receptors. This supported the depolarising role for the GABA(A receptors. Inhibition of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCCs reduced the proliferation in the same way as inhibition of the GABA(A receptors. Inhibition of the channels increased the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(KIP1, along with the reduced proliferation. These results are consistent with that when the membrane potential indirectly regulates cell proliferation with hyperpolarisation of the membrane potential resulting in decreased cell division. The increased expression of p27(KIP1 after inhibition of either the GABA(A receptors or the L-type VGCCs suggests a link between the GABA(A receptors, membrane potential, and

  1. New GABA amides activating GABAA-receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raster, Peter; Späth, Andreas; Bultakova, Svetlana; Gorostiza, Pau; König, Burkhard; Bregestovski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We have prepared a series of new and some literature-reported GABA-amides and determined their effect on the activation of GABAA-receptors expressed in CHO cells. Special attention was paid to the purification of the target compounds to remove even traces of GABA contaminations, which may arise from deprotection steps in the synthesis. GABA-amides were previously reported to be partial, full or superagonists. In our hands these compounds were not able to activate GABAA-receptor channels in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. New GABA-amides, however, gave moderate activation responses with a clear structure-activity relationship suggesting some of these compounds as promising molecular tools for the functional analysis of GABAA-receptors.

  2. New GABA amides activating GABAA-receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Raster

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared a series of new and some literature-reported GABA-amides and determined their effect on the activation of GABAA-receptors expressed in CHO cells. Special attention was paid to the purification of the target compounds to remove even traces of GABA contaminations, which may arise from deprotection steps in the synthesis. GABA-amides were previously reported to be partial, full or superagonists. In our hands these compounds were not able to activate GABAA-receptor channels in whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. New GABA-amides, however, gave moderate activation responses with a clear structure–activity relationship suggesting some of these compounds as promising molecular tools for the functional analysis of GABAA-receptors.

  3. Quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in (1) H MRS volumes composed heterogeneously of grey and white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Mark; Singh, Krish D; Brealy, Jennifer A; Linden, David E J; Evans, C John

    2016-11-01

    The quantification of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration using localised MRS suffers from partial volume effects related to differences in the intrinsic concentration of GABA in grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. These differences can be represented as a ratio between intrinsic GABA in GM and WM: rM . Individual differences in GM tissue volume can therefore potentially drive apparent concentration differences. Here, a quantification method that corrects for these effects is formulated and empirically validated. Quantification using tissue water as an internal concentration reference has been described previously. Partial volume effects attributed to rM can be accounted for by incorporating into this established method an additional multiplicative correction factor based on measured or literature values of rM weighted by the proportion of GM and WM within tissue-segmented MRS volumes. Simulations were performed to test the sensitivity of this correction using different assumptions of rM taken from previous studies. The tissue correction method was then validated by applying it to an independent dataset of in vivo GABA measurements using an empirically measured value of rM . It was shown that incorrect assumptions of rM can lead to overcorrection and inflation of GABA concentration measurements quantified in volumes composed predominantly of WM. For the independent dataset, GABA concentration was linearly related to GM tissue volume when only the water signal was corrected for partial volume effects. Performing a full correction that additionally accounts for partial volume effects ascribed to rM successfully removed this dependence. With an appropriate assumption of the ratio of intrinsic GABA concentration in GM and WM, GABA measurements can be corrected for partial volume effects, potentially leading to a reduction in between-participant variance, increased power in statistical tests and better discriminability of true effects.

  4. Role of gamma-aminobutyricacidB(GABA(B)) receptors in the regulation of kainic acid-induced cell death in mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Kyu; Seo, Young Jun; Choi, Seong Soo; Kwon, Min Soo; Shim, Eon Jeong; Lee, Jin Young; Suh, Hong Won

    2005-12-31

    Kainic acid (KA) is well-known as an excitatory, neurotoxic substance. In mice, KA administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) lead to morphological damage of hippocampus expecially concentrated on the CA3 pyramidal neurons. In the present study, the possible role of gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA(B)) receptors in hippocampal cell death induced by KA (0.1 microg) administered i.c.v. was examined. 5-Aminovaleric acid (5-AV; GABA(B) receptors antagonist, 20 mug) reduced KA-induced CA3 pyramidal cell death. KA increased the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (p-CaMK II) immunoreactivities (IRs) 30 min after KA treatment, and c-Fos, c-Jun IR 2 h, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), complement receptor type 3 (OX-42) IR 1 day in hippocampal area in KA-injected mice. 5-AV attenuated KA-induced p-CaMK II, GFAP and OX-42 IR in the hippocampal CA3 region. These results suggest that p-CaMK II may play as an important regulator on hippocampal cell death induced by KA administered i.c.v. in mice. Activated astrocytes, which was presented by GFAP IR, and activated microglia, which was presented by the OX-42 IR, may be a good indicator for measuring the cell death in hippocampal regions by KA excitotoxicity. Furthermore, it showed that GABA(B) receptors appear to be involved in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell death induced by KA administered i.c.v. in mice.

  5. GABA-agonists induce the formation of low-affinity GABA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells via preexisting high affinity GABA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Meier, E; Schousboe, A

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of specific GABA-binding to membranes isolated from cerebellar granule cells, cultured for 12 days from dissociated cerebella of 7-day-old rats was studied using [3H]GABA as the ligand. The granule cells were cultured in the presence of the specific GABA receptor agonist 4, 5, 6, 7-t...

  6. GABA(A) receptor- and GABA transporter polymorphisms and risk for essential tremor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thier, S; Kuhlenbäumer, G; Lorenz, D

    2011-01-01

    Background:  Clinical features and animal models of essential tremor (ET) suggest gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABA(A) R) subunits and GABA transporters as putative candidate genes. Methods:  A total of 503 ET cases and 818 controls were investigated for an association between polymorphisms...

  7. CSF GABA is reduced in first-episode psychosis and associates to symptom severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, F; Fatouros-Bergman, H; Goiny, M; Malmqvist, A; Piehl, F; Cervenka, S; Collste, K; Victorsson, P; Sellgren, C M; Flyckt, L; Erhardt, S; Engberg, G

    2017-03-14

    Schizophrenia is characterized by a multiplicity of symptoms arising from almost all domains of mental function. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain and is increasingly recognized to have a significant role in the pathophysiology of the disorder. In the present study, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of GABA were analyzed in 41 first-episode psychosis (FEP) patients and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers by high-performance liquid chromatography. We found lower CSF GABA concentration in FEP patients compared with that in the healthy volunteers, a condition that was unrelated to antipsychotic and/or anxiolytic medication. Moreover, lower CSF GABA levels were associated with total and general score of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, illness severity and probably with a poor performance in a test of attention. This study offers clinical in vivo evidence for a potential role of GABA in early-stage schizophrenia.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 14 March 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.25.

  8. Sleep duration varies as a function of glutamate and GABA in rat pontine reticular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2011-08-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) is a component of the ascending reticular activating system and plays a role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The PnO receives glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from many brain regions that regulate behavioral state. Indirect, pharmacological evidence has suggested that glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling within the PnO alters traits that characterize wakefulness and sleep. No previous studies have simultaneously measured endogenous glutamate and GABA from rat PnO in relation to sleep and wakefulness. The present study utilized in vivo microdialysis coupled on-line to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence to test the hypothesis that concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PnO vary across the sleep/wake cycle. Concentrations of glutamate and GABA were significantly higher during wakefulness than during non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Regression analysis revealed that decreases in glutamate and GABA accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep episodes. These data provide novel support for the hypothesis that endogenous glutamate and GABA in the PnO contribute to the regulation of sleep duration.

  9. GABA(B2) is essential for g-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Filippov, A K; Hirst, W D; Russell, R B; Wood, M D; Nasir, S; Couve, A; Brown, D A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in their requirement for heterodimerization between two homologous subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), for functional expression. Whereas GABA(B1) is capable of binding receptor agonists and antagonists, the role of each GABA(B) subunit in receptor signaling is unknown. Here we identified amino acid residues within the second intracellular domain of GABA(B2) that are critical for the coupling of GABA(B) receptor heterodimers to their downstream effector systems. Our results provide strong evidence for a functional role of the GABA(B2) subunit in G-protein coupling of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer. In addition, they provide evidence for a novel "sequential" GPCR signaling mechanism in which ligand binding to one heterodimer subunit can induce signal transduction through the second partner of a heteromeric complex.

  10. Excitatory action of GABA on immature neurons is not due to absence of ketone bodies metabolites or other energy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Tyzio, Roman; Nehlig, Astrid

    2011-09-01

    Brain slices incubated with glucose have provided most of our knowledge on cellular, synaptic, and network driven mechanisms. It has been recently suggested that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) excites neonatal neurons in conventional glucose-perfused slices but not when ketone bodies metabolites, pyruvate, and/or lactate are added, suggesting that the excitatory actions of GABA are due to energy deprivation when glucose is the sole energy source. In this article, we review the vast number of studies that show that slices are not energy deprived in glucose-containing medium, and that addition of other energy substrates at physiologic concentrations does not alter the excitatory actions of GABA on neonatal neurons. In contrast, lactate, like other weak acids, can produce an intracellular acidification that will cause a reduction of intracellular chloride and a shift of GABA actions. The effects of high concentrations of lactate, and particularly of pyruvate (4-5 mm), as used are relevant primarily to pathologic conditions; these concentrations not being found in the brain in normal "control" conditions. Slices in glucose-containing medium may not be ideal, but additional energy substrates neither correspond to physiologic conditions nor alter GABA actions. In keeping with extensive observations in a wide range of animal species and brain structures, GABA depolarizes immature neurons and the reduction of the intracellular concentration of chloride ([Cl(-)](i)) is a basic property of brain maturation that has been preserved throughout evolution. In addition, this developmental sequence has important clinical implications, notably concerning the higher incidence of seizures early in life and their long-lasting deleterious sequels. Immature neurons have difficulties exporting chloride that accumulates during seizures, leading to permanent increase of [Cl(-)](i) that converts the inhibitory actions of GABA to excitatory and hampers the efficacy of GABA-acting antiepileptic

  11. Differences in GABA-induced chloride ion influx in brain of inbred mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, O.; Chiu, T.H.; Rosenberg, H.C.

    1986-03-01

    Audiogenic seizure-susceptible (AS) mice (DBA2J) are a widely used model of epilepsy. The precise pathophysiology of this mouse strain is not fully understood. One of the proposed mechanisms was a difference in GABA/BZ receptor affinity and population from that of audiogenic seizure resistant (ASR) mice. This study attempted to determine the difference in function of GABA/BZ receptor between DBA2J (AS) and C57BL6J (ASR) mice by directly measuring the GABA-induced chloride ion (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) influx in twice washed crude brain homogenates. /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx was terminated by ice-cold buffer and collected by filtration. A concentration range of 2-1000 ..mu..M GABA and two age-matched groups (20-22 days and 40-42 days) were used. GABA-induced /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ influx was dose-dependent, and brain homogenates from DBA2J mice (20-22 days) were less sensitive to GABA-induced Cl/sup -/ ion influx than C57BL6J mice at both age groups. However, in older DBA2J mice (40-42 days), the sensitivity to GABA was intermediate between that of the younger AS mice and the control ASR mice. No significant difference in basal influx of Cl/sup -/ was observed between age groups and mouse strains, nor was there any significant difference between 20-22 days old and 40-42 days old C57BL6J mice. In conclusion, this study had demonstrated a malfunction may recover with age.

  12. Production of gaba (γ - aminobutyric acid by microorganisms: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid is a four carbon non-protein amino acid that is widely distributed in plants, animals and microorganisms. As a metabolic product of plants and microorganisms produced by the decarboxylation of glutamic acid, GABA functions as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain that directly affects the personality and the stress management. A wide range of traditional foods produced by microbial fermentation contain GABA, in which GABA is safe and eco-friendly, and also has the possibility of providing new health-benefited products enriched with GABA. Synthesis of GABA is catalyzed by glutamate decarboxylase, therefore, the optimal fermentation condition is mainly based on the biochemical properties of the enzyme. Major GABA producing microorganisms are lactic acid bacteria (LAB, which make food spoilage pathogens unable to grow and act as probiotics in the gastrointestinal tract. The major factors affecting the production of GABA by microbial fermentation are temperature, pH, fermentation time and different media additives, therefore, these factors are summarized to provide the most up-dated information for effective GABA synthesis. There has been a huge accumulation of knowledge on GABA application for human health accompanying with a demand on natural GABA supply. Only the GABA production by microorganisms can fulfill the demand with GABA-enriched health beneficial foods.

  13. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro Tochitani

    Full Text Available Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67, both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  14. Immunoreactivity for GABA, GAD65, GAD67 and Bestrophin-1 in the meninges and the choroid plexus: implications for non-neuronal sources for GABA in the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochitani, Shiro; Kondo, Shigeaki

    2013-01-01

    Neural progenitors in the developing neocortex, neuroepithelial cells and radial glial cells, have a bipolar shape with a basal process contacting the basal membrane of the meninge and an apical plasma membrane facing the lateral ventricle, which the cerebrospinal fluid is filled with. Recent studies revealed that the meninges and the cerebrospinal fluid have certain roles to regulate brain development. γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a neurotransmitter which appears first during development and works as a diffusible factor to regulate the properties of neural progenitors. In this study, we examined whether GABA can be released from the meninges and the choroid plexus in the developing mouse brain. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67), both of which are GABA-synthesizing enzymes, are expressed in the meninges. The epithelial cells in the choroid plexus express GAD65. GABA immunoreactivity could be observed beneath the basal membrane of the meninge and in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. Expression analyses on Bestrophin-1, which is known as a GABA-permeable channel in differentiated glial cells, suggested that the cells in the meninges and the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus have the channels able to permeate non-synaptic GABA into the extracellular space. Further studies showed that GAD65/67-expressing meningeal cells appear in a manner with rostral to caudal and lateral to dorsal gradient to cover the entire neocortex by E14.5 during development, while the cells in the choroid plexus in the lateral ventricle start to express GAD65 on E11-E12, the time when the choroid plexus starts to develop in the developing brain. These results totally suggest that the meninges and the choroid plexus can work as non-neuronal sources for ambient GABA which can modulate the properties of neural progenitors during neocortical development.

  15. Characterization of GABA/sub A/ receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride uptake in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, M.D.; Morrow, A.L.; Paul, S.M.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1987-09-07

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor-mediated /sup 36/chloride (/sup 36/Cl/sup -/) uptake was measured in synaptoneurosomes from rat brain. GABA and GABA agonists stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner with the following order of potency: Muscimol>GABA>piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (P4S)>4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c)pyridin-3-ol (THIP)=3-aminopropanesulfonic acid (3APS)>>taurine. Both P4S and 3APS behaved as partial agonists, while the GABA/sub B/ agonist, baclofen, was ineffective. The response to muscimol was inhibited by bicuculline and picrotoxin in a mixed competitive/non-competitive manner. Other inhibitors of GABA receptor-opened channels or non-neuronal anion channels such as penicillin, picrate, furosemide and disulfonic acid stilbenes also inhibited the response to muscimol. A regional variation in muscimol-stimulated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was observed; the largest responses were observed in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus, moderate responses were obtained in the striatum and hypothalamus and the smallest response was observed in the pons-medulla. GABA receptor-mediated /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ uptake was also dependent on the anion present in the media. The muscinol response varied in media containing the following anions: Br/sup -/>Cl/sup -/greater than or equal toNO/sub 3//sup -/>I/sup -/greater than or equal toSCN/sup -/>>C/sub 3/H/sub 5/OO/sup -/greater than or equal toClO/sub 4//sup -/>F/sup -/, consistent with the relative anion permeability through GABA receptor-gated anion channels and the enhancement of convulsant binding to the GABA receptor-gated Cl/sup -/ channel. 43 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  16. In vivo neurochemical evidence that newly synthesised GABA activates GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors on dopaminergic nerve endings in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA released from accumbal GABAergic interneurons plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of dopamine efflux through GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors located on accumbal dopaminergic nerve endings. The cytosolic newly synthesised GABA alters vesicular GABA levels and, accordingly, the amount of GAB

  17. MK-801诱导的精神分裂症发育模型大鼠脑组织DA,DOPAC,Glu和GABA浓度的变化%Concentration change of DA, DOPAC, Glu and GABA in brain tissues in schizophrenia developmental model rats induced by MK-801

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 唐亚梅; 蒲唯丹; 张向晖; 赵靖平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the related neurobiochemical mechanism by comparing the concentration change of dopamine (DA),dihydroxy-phenyl acetic acid (DOPAC),glutamate (Glu),and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain tissues in schizophrenia (SZ) developmental model rats and chronic medication model rats.Methods A total of 60 neonatal male Spragur-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups at the postnatal day 6:an SZ developmental rat model group (subcutaneous injection with MK-801 at the postnatal day 7-10,0.1 mg/kg,Bid),a chronic medication model group (intraperitoneal injection at the postnatal day 47-60,0.2 mg/kg,Qd),and a normal control group (injection with O.9% normal saline during the corresponding periods).DA,DOPAC,Glu,and GABA of the tissue homogenate from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus were examined with Coularray electrochemic detection by high performance liquid chromatogram technique.The utilization rate of DA and Glu was calculated.Results Compared with the normal control group,the concentration of DA and DOPAC in the mPFC and the hippocampus in the SZ developmental model group significantly decreased ( P < 0.05 ),and the GABA concentration and Glu utilization rate in the mPFC also decreased (P < 0.05 ).Compared with the chronic medication model group,the DA concentration of the mPFC in the SZ developmental group decreased ( P < 0.05 ),and the DOPAC concentration and the utility rate of DA in the hippocampus also decreased (P <0.01,P <0.05,respectively).Conclusion The activities of DA,Glu and GABA system decrease in the mPFC and the DA system function reduces in the hippocampus of SZ developmental rats.%目的:通过对MK-801诱导的精神分裂症(schizophrenia,SZ)发育模型大鼠和慢性给药模型大鼠脑组织多巴胺(dopamine,DA)、二羟苯乙酸(dihydroxy-phenyl acetic acid,DOPAC)、谷氨酸盐(glutamate,Glu)和γ-氨基丁酸(γ-aminobutyric acid,GABA)浓度的比较研究,探讨

  18. Trophic actions of GABA on neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-06-01

    During brain development, transmitter-gated receptors are operative before synapse formation, suggesting that their action is not restricted to synaptic transmission. GABA, which is the principal excitatory transmitter in the developing brain, acts as an epigenetic factor to control processes including cell proliferation, neuroblast migration and dendritic maturation. These effects appear to be mediated through a paracrine, diffuse, non-synaptic mode of action that precedes the more focused, rapid mode of operation characteristic of synaptic connections. This sequential operation implies that GABA is used as an informative agent but in a unique context at an early developmental stage. This sequence also implies that by altering these effects, drugs acting on the GABA system could be pathogenic during pregnancy.

  19. GABA(A) receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition on glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sokatsu; Yoshimura, Megumu; Shin, Min-Chul; Wakita, Masahito; Nonaka, Kiku; Akaike, Norio

    2011-01-15

    We investigated the functional roles of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors on excitatory nerve terminals in contributing to spontaneous and action potential-evoked glutamatergic transmission to rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons. Single CA3 neurons were mechanically isolated with adherent nerve terminals, namely the 'synaptic bouton preparation', and spontaneous glutamatergic excitatory synaptic potentials (sEPSCs) and EPSCs evoked by focal electrical stimuli of a single presynaptic glutamatergic boutons (eEPSCs) were recorded using conventional whole-cell patch recordings. Selective activation of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors on these excitatory nerve terminals by muscimol, markedly facilitated sEPSCs frequency but inhibited eEPSC amplitude. The facilitation of sEPSC frequency was completely occluded by GABA(A) receptor-Cl⁻ channel blockers bicuculline or penicillin (PN). PN itself concentration-dependently inhibited the GABA(A) receptor response induced by bath application of muscimol, but had no effect on the glutamate receptor response. In addition, pretreatment with a blocker of the Na(+), K(+), 2Cl⁻ co-transporter type 1 (NKCC-1), bumetanide, prevented the muscimol-induced inhibition of eEPSCs. The results indicate that activation of presynaptic GABA(A) receptors directly depolarizes glutamatergic excitatory nerve terminals and thereby differentially modulates sEPSCs and eEPSCs.

  20. The inhibitory role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on immunomodulation of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meijia; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Li, Yiqun; Liu, Zhaoqun; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an inhibitory neurotransmitter to suppress the immune-mediated pro-inflammatory reactions, and it has been used in the treatment of many inflammation-related diseases in vertebrates, while its immunomodulatory role in invertebrates has never been reported. In the present study, GABA was found to exist in the hemolymph of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and its concentration decreased slightly from 8.00 ± 0.37 μmol L(-1) at normal condition to 7.73 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1) at 6 h after LPS stimulation, and then increased to 9.34 ± 0.15 μmol L(-1), 8.86 ± 0.68 μmol L(-1) at 12 h and 48 h, respectively. After LPS stimulation, the mRNA expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines (CgIL-17 and CgTNF) and immune effectors (CgSOD and CgBPI), and the protein expression of NOS increased significantly, and these increased trends were remarkably inhibited by GABA stimulation. At the same time, the phagocytosis rate and apoptosis rate of immunocytes also increased obviously after LPS stimulation, whereas the increase was repressed with the addition of GABA. The results collectively demonstrated that GABA was an indispensable inhibitory agent for both humoral and cellular immune response, which mainly functioned at the late phase of immune response to avoid the excess immune reactions and maintain the immune homeostasis.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances GABA transport by modulating the trafficking of GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1) from the plasma membrane of rat cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sandra H; Jørgensen, Trine N; Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia; Duflot, Sylvie; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Gether, Ulrik; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-11-25

    The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters (GATs) are located in the plasma membrane of neurons and astrocytes and are responsible for termination of GABAergic transmission. It has previously been shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates GAT-1-mediated GABA transport in nerve terminals and neuronal cultures. We now report that BDNF enhances GAT-1-mediated GABA transport in cultured astrocytes, an effect mostly due to an increase in the V(max) kinetic constant. This action involves the truncated form of the TrkB receptor (TrkB-t) coupled to a non-classic PLC-γ/PKC-δ and ERK/MAPK pathway and requires active adenosine A(2A) receptors. Transport through GAT-3 is not affected by BDNF. To elucidate if BDNF affects trafficking of GAT-1 in astrocytes, we generated and infected astrocytes with a functional mutant of the rat GAT-1 (rGAT-1) in which the hemagglutinin (HA) epitope was incorporated into the second extracellular loop. An increase in plasma membrane of HA-rGAT-1 as well as of rGAT-1 was observed when both HA-GAT-1-transduced astrocytes and rGAT-1-overexpressing astrocytes were treated with BDNF. The effect of BDNF results from inhibition of dynamin/clathrin-dependent constitutive internalization of GAT-1 rather than from facilitation of the monensin-sensitive recycling of GAT-1 molecules back to the plasma membrane. We therefore conclude that BDNF enhances the time span of GAT-1 molecules at the plasma membrane of astrocytes. BDNF may thus play an active role in the clearance of GABA from synaptic and extrasynaptic sites and in this way influence neuronal excitability.

  2. Sleep and GABA levels in the oral part of rat pontine reticular formation are decreased by local and systemic administration of morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C J; Lydic, R; Baghdoyan, H A

    2007-01-05

    Morphine, a mu-opioid receptor agonist, is a commonly prescribed treatment for pain. Although highly efficacious, morphine has many unwanted side effects including disruption of sleep and obtundation of wakefulness. One mechanism by which morphine alters sleep and wakefulness may be by modulating GABAergic signaling in brain regions regulating arousal, including the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO). This study used in vivo microdialysis in unanesthetized Sprague-Dawley rat to test the hypothesis that mu-opioid receptors modulate PnO GABA levels. Validation of the high performance liquid chromatographic technique used to quantify GABA was obtained by dialyzing the PnO (n=4 rats) with the GABA reuptake inhibitor nipecotic acid (500 microM). Nipecotic acid caused a 185+/-20% increase in PnO GABA levels, confirming chromatographic detection of GABA and demonstrating the existence of functional GABA transporters in rat PnO. Morphine caused a concentration-dependent decrease in PnO GABA levels (n=25 rats). Coadministration of morphine (100 microM) with naloxone (1 microM), a mu-opioid receptor antagonist, blocked the morphine-induced decrease in PnO GABA levels (n=5 rats). These results show for the first time that mu-opioid receptors in rat PnO modulate GABA levels. A second group of rats (n=6) was used to test the hypothesis that systemically administered morphine also decreases PnO GABA levels. I.v. morphine caused a significant (PPnO GABA levels relative to control i.v. infusions of saline. Finally, microinjections followed by 2 h recordings of electroencephalogram and electromyogram tested the hypothesis that PnO morphine administration disrupts sleep (n=8 rats). Morphine significantly (PPnO.

  3. Distribution and ultrastructure of neurons in opossum piriform cortex displaying immunoreactivity to GABA and GAD and high-affinity tritiated GABA uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberly, L.B.; Hansen, D.J.; Feig, S.L.; Presto, S.

    1987-12-08

    GABAergic neurons have been identified in the piriform cortex of the opossum at light and electron microscopic levels by immunocytochemical localization of GABA and the GABA-synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and by autoradiographic visualization of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake. Four major neuron populations have been distinguished on the basis of soma size, shape, and segregation at specific depths and locations: large horizontal cells in layer Ia of the anterior piriform cortex, small globular cells with thin dendrites concentrated in layers Ib and II of the posterior piriform cortex, and multipolar and fusiform cells concentrated in the deep part of layer III in anterior and posterior parts of the piriform cortex and the subjacent endopiriform nucleus. All four populations were well visualized with both antisera, but the large layer Ia horizontal cells displayed only very light /sup 3/H-GABA uptake, thus suggesting a lack of local axon collaterals or lack of high-affinity GABA uptake sites. The large, ultrastructurally distinctive somata of layer Ia horizontal cells receive a very small number of symmetrical synapses; the thin, axonlike dendrites of small globular cells are exclusively postsynaptic and receive large numbers of both symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses, in contrast to somata which receive a small number of both types; and the deep multipolar and fusiform cells receive a highly variable number of symmetrical and asymmetrical synapses on somata and proximal dendrites. Labeled puncta of axon terminal dimensions were found in large numbers in the neuropil surrounding pyramidal cell somata in layer II and in the endopiriform nucleus. Moderately large numbers of labeled puncta were found in layer I at the depth of pyramidal cell apical dendrites with greater numbers in layer Ia at the depth of distal apical segments than in layer Ib.

  4. Changes in extracellular levels of amygdala amino acids in genetically fast and slow kindling rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Rick S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul; McIntyre, Dan C

    2002-08-01

    A neurochemical basis for many of the epilepsies has long been suspected to result from an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter mechanisms. Data supporting changes in extrasynaptic amino acid levels during epileptogenesis, however, remain controversial. In the present study, we used in vivo microdialysis to measure the levels of extracellular GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) and glutamate during seizure development in rats with a genetic predisposition for (Fast), or against (Slow), amygdala kindling. Dialysates were collected from both amygdalae before, during, and up to 12 min after a threshold-triggered amygdala afterdischarge (AD). One hour later, samples were again collected from both amygdalae in response to a hippocampal threshold AD. Daily amygdala kindling commenced the next day but without dialysis. After the rats were fully kindled, the same protocol was again employed. Amino acid levels were not consistently increased above baseline with triggered seizures in either strain. Instead, before kindling, a focal seizure in the Slow rats was associated with a large decrease in GABA in the non-stimulated amygdala, while amino acid levels in the Fast rats remained near baseline in both amygdalae. Similar results were seen after kindling. By contrast, before and after kindling, hippocampal stimulation caused large decreases in all amino acid levels in both amygdalae in both strains. These data suggest that, in response to direct stimulation, extracellular amino acid concentrations remain stable in tissues associated with either greater natural (Fast) or induced (kindled Fast/Slow) excitability, but are lowered with indirect stimulation (hippocampus) and/or low excitability.

  5. Enhanced Extracellular Glutamate and Dopamine in the Ventral Pallidum of Alcohol-Preferring AA and Alcohol-Avoiding ANA Rats after Morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Heidi; Nurmi, Harri; Raivio, Noora; Kiianmaa, Kalervo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of ventral pallidal opioidergic mechanisms in the control of ethanol intake by studying the effects of acute administration of morphine on the levels of GABA, glutamate, and dopamine in the ventral pallidum. The study was conducted using the alcohol-preferring Alko Alcohol (AA) and alcohol-avoiding Alko Non-Alcohol (ANA) rat lines that have well-documented differences in their voluntary ethanol intake and brain opioidergic systems. Therefore, examination of neurobiological differences between the lines is supposed to help to identify the neuronal mechanisms underlying ethanol intake, since selection pressure is assumed gradually to lead to enrichment of alleles promoting high or low ethanol intake, respectively. The effects of an acute dose of morphine (1 or 10 mg/kg s.c.) on the extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the ventral pallidum were monitored with in vivo microdialysis. The concentrations of GABA and glutamate in the dialyzates were determined with a high performance liquid chromatography system using fluorescent detection, while electrochemical detection was used for dopamine. The levels of glutamate in the rats injected with morphine 1 mg/kg were significantly above the levels found in the controls and in the rats receiving morphine 10 mg/kg. Morphine 10 mg/kg also increased the levels of dopamine. Morphine could not, however, modify the levels of GABA. The rat lines did not differ in any of the effects of morphine. The data suggest that the glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems in the ventral pallidum may mediate some effects of morphine. Since there were no differences between the AA and ANA lines, the basic hypothesis underlying the use of the genetic animal model suggests that the effects of morphine detected probably do not underlie the different intake of ethanol by the lines and contribute to the control of ethanol intake in these animals.

  6. Enhanced extracellular glutamate and dopamine in the ventral pallidum of alcohol-preferring AA and alcohol-avoiding ANA rats after morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi eKemppainen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of ventral pallidal opioidergic mechanisms in the control of ethanol intake by studying the effects of acute administration of morphine on the levels of GABA, glutamate, and dopamine in the ventral pallidum. The study was conducted using the alcohol-preferring AA (Alko Alcohol and alcohol-avoiding (Alko Non-Alcohol rat lines that have well-documented differences in their voluntary ethanol intake and brain opioidergic systems. Therefore, examination of neurobiological differences between the lines is supposed to help to identify the neuronal mechanisms underlying ethanol intake, since selection pressure is assumed gradually to lead to enrichment of alleles promoting high or low ethanol intake, respectively. The effects of an acute dose of morphine (1 or 10 mg/kg s.c. on the extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the ventral pallidum were monitored with in vivo microdialysis. The concentrations of GABA and glutamate in the dialysates were determined with a HPLC system using fluorescent detection, while electrochemical detection was used for dopamine. The levels of glutamate in the rats injected with morphine 1 mg/kg were significantly above the levels found in the controls and in the rats receiving morphine 10 mg/kg. Morphine 10 mg/kg also increased the levels of dopamine. Morphine could not, however, modify the levels of GABA. The rat lines did not differ in any of the effects of morphine. The data suggest that the glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems in the ventral pallidum may mediate some effects of morphine. Since there were no differences between the AA and ANA lines, the basic hypothesis underlying the use of the genetic animal model suggests that the effects of morphine detected probably do not underlie the different intake of ethanol by the lines and contribute to the control of ethanol intake in these animals.

  7. GABA and glycine channels in isolated ganglion cells from the goldfish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B N; Fain, G L; Fain, M J

    1989-11-01

    1. Adult goldfish retinas were enzymatically dissociated and ganglion cells were maintained in culture for periods of 1-5 days. Ganglion cells could be identified by their morphology, and this identification was confirmed by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye Fast Blue injected into the optic nerve stub. 2. All the ganglion cells tested responded to 30 microM-GABA or 100 microM-glycine between 2 and 30 h after enzymatic dissociation of the retina. 3. Whole-cell responses to 30 microM-GABA or glycine declined over a period of seconds during sustained applications of the agonists, probably as a result of desensitization. There was an irreversible decline in the peak whole-cell response to repeated applications of 30 microM-GABA unless the pipette-filling solution contained 2 mM-ATP, 4 mM-Mg2+, 10 mM-EGTA and no added Ca2+. Both GABA and glycine responses also showed an irreversible decline in outside-out patches but, in this case, Mg2+, ATP, and very low Ca2+ failed to stabilize the response. 4. Whole-cell currents activated by both GABA and glycine were demonstrated to be chloride-selective by investigating the dependence of reversal potential (Vr) on internal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i). For GABA responses, the dependence of Vr on [Cl-]i could not be distinguished from that predicted by the Nernst relation. For glycine, deviations from Nernstian dependence were observed, but the permeability to Cl- was at least 20 times greater than to isethionate, SO4(2-), or monovalent cations (Na+ and Cs+). 5. Bicuculline methochloride (10 microM) selectively blocked responses to 3-30 microM-GABA without affecting responses to 30 microM-glycine. Bicuculline itself was not as selective. At agonist concentrations of 30 microM, 3 microM-bicuculline partially blocked the response to GABA but not that to glycine, but bicuculline at 10 microM blocked responses to both GABA and glycine. Strychnine (0.3-1 microM) blocked responses to 30 microM-glycine but also competitively

  8. Comparative immunohistochemical localisation of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunits in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Robbins, M J; Calver, A R; Leslie, R A; Pangalos, M N

    2001-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors mediating the slow onset and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS. The recent cloning of two genes, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2), has revealed a novel requirement for GABA(B) receptor signalling. Studies have demonstrated that the two receptor subunits associate as a GABA(B1)/GABA(B2) heterodimer to form a functional GABA(B) receptor. In this study we have developed polyclonal antisera specific to two splice variants of the GABA(B1) subunit, GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b), as well as an antiserum to the GABA(B2) subunit. Using affinity-purified antibodies derived from these antisera we have mapped out the distribution profile of each subunit in rat brain, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion. In brain the highest areas of GABA(B1a), GABA(B1b) and GABA(B2) subunit expression were found in neocortex, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum and habenula. In spinal cord, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits were expressed in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, as well as in motor neurones in the deeper layers of the ventral horn. GABA(B) receptor subunit immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglion suggested that expression of GABA(B1b) was restricted to the large diameter neurones, in contrast to GABA(B1a) and GABA(B2) subunits which were expressed in both large and small diameter neurones. Although expression levels of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits varied we found no areas in which GABA(B1) was expressed in the absence of GABA(B2). This suggests that most, if not all, GABA(B1) immunoreactivity may represent functional GABA(B) receptors. Although our data are in general agreement with functional studies, some discrepancies in GABA(B1) subunit expression occurred with respect to other immunohistochemical studies. Overall our data suggest that GABA(B) receptors are widely expressed throughout the brain and spinal cord, and that GABA(B1a) and GABA(B1b) subunits can associate with GABA(B2) to form both pre- and post-synaptic receptors.

  9. Excitatory GABA in rodent developing neocortex in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheims, Sylvain; Minlebaev, Marat; Ivanov, Anton; Represa, Alfonso; Khazipov, Rustem; Holmes, Gregory L; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Zilberter, Yuri

    2008-08-01

    GABA depolarizes immature cortical neurons. However, whether GABA excites immature neocortical neurons and drives network oscillations as in other brain structures remains controversial. Excitatory actions of GABA depend on three fundamental parameters: the resting membrane potential (Em), reversal potential of GABA (E(GABA)), and threshold of action potential generation (Vthr). We have shown recently that conventional invasive recording techniques provide an erroneous estimation of these parameters in immature neurons. In this study, we used noninvasive single N-methyl-d-aspartate and GABA channel recordings in rodent brain slices to measure both Em and E(GABA) in the same neuron. We show that GABA strongly depolarizes pyramidal neurons and interneurons in both deep and superficial layers of the immature neocortex (P2-P10). However, GABA generates action potentials in layer 5/6 (L5/6) but not L2/3 pyramidal cells, since L5/6 pyramidal cells have more depolarized resting potentials and more hyperpolarized Vthr. The excitatory GABA transiently drives oscillations generated by L5/6 pyramidal cells and interneurons during development (P5-P12). The NKCC1 co-transporter antagonist bumetanide strongly reduces [Cl(-)]i, GABA-induced depolarization, and network oscillations, confirming the importance of GABA signaling. Thus a strong GABA excitatory drive coupled with high intrinsic excitability of L5/6 pyramidal neurons and interneurons provide a powerful mechanism of synapse-driven oscillatory activity in the rodent neocortex in vitro. In the companion paper, we show that the excitatory GABA drives layer-specific seizures in the immature neocortex.

  10. L-glutamate released from activated microglia downregulates astrocytic L-glutamate transporter expression in neuroinflammation: the ‘collusion’ hypothesis for increased extracellular L-glutamate concentration in neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki Junpei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the central nervous system, astrocytic L-glutamate (L-Glu transporters maintain extracellular L-Glu below neurotoxic levels, but their function is impaired with neuroinflammation. Microglia become activated with inflammation; however, the correlation between activated microglia and the impairment of L-Glu transporters is unknown. Methods We used a mixed culture composed of astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. To quantify L-Glu transporter function, we measured the extracellular L-Glu that remained 30 min after an application of L-Glu to the medium (the starting concentration was 100 μM. We determined the optimal conditions of lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment to establish an inflammation model without cell death. We examined the predominant subtypes of L-Glu transporters and the changes in the expression levels of these transporters in this inflammation model. We then investigated the role of activated microglia in the changes in L-Glu transporter expression and the underlying mechanisms in this inflammation model. Results Because LPS (10 ng/mL, 72 h caused a significant increase in the levels of L-Glu remaining but did not affect cell viability, we adopted this condition for our inflammation model without cell death. GLAST was the predominant L-Glu transporter subtype, and its expression decreased in this inflammation model. As a result of their release of L-Glu, activated microglia were shown to be essential for the significant decrease in L-Glu uptake. The serial application of L-Glu caused a significant decrease in L-Glu uptake and GLAST expression in the astrocyte culture. The hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX inhibited L-Glu release from activated microglia and ameliorated the decrease in GLAST expression in the inflammation model. In addition, the elevation of the astrocytic intracellular L-Glu itself caused the downregulation of GLAST. Conclusions Our findings suggest that activated microglia trigger the

  11. GABA(A) receptors in visual and auditory cortex and neural activity changes during basic visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Pengmin; Duncan, Niall W; Wiebking, Christine; Gravel, Paul; Lyttelton, Oliver; Hayes, Dave J; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Kostikov, Alexey; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Reader, Andrew J; Northoff, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have demonstrated that levels of resting γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the visual cortex predict the degree of stimulus-induced activity in the same region. These studies have used the presentation of discrete visual stimulus; the change from closed eyes to open also represents a simple visual stimulus, however, and has been shown to induce changes in local brain activity and in functional connectivity between regions. We thus aimed to investigate the role of the GABA system, specifically GABA(A) receptors, in the changes in brain activity between the eyes closed (EC) and eyes open (EO) state in order to provide detail at the receptor level to complement previous studies of GABA concentrations. We conducted an fMRI study involving two different modes of the change from EC to EO: an EO and EC block design, allowing the modeling of the haemodynamic response, followed by longer periods of EC and EO to allow the measuring of functional connectivity. The same subjects also underwent [(18)F]Flumazenil PET to measure GABA(A) receptor binding potentials. It was demonstrated that the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex predicted the degree of changes in neural activity from EC to EO. This same relationship was also shown in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, the local-to-global ratio of GABA(A) receptor binding potential in the visual cortex also predicted the change in functional connectivity between the visual and auditory cortex from EC to EO. These findings contribute to our understanding of the role of GABA(A) receptors in stimulus-induced neural activity in local regions and in inter-regional functional connectivity.

  12. Block of GABA(A) receptor ion channel by penicillin: electrophysiological and modeling insights toward the mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossokhin, Alexey V; Sharonova, Irina N; Bukanova, Julia V; Kolbaev, Sergey N; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2014-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)R) mainly mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Different classes of modulators target GABA(A)R properties. Penicillin G (PNG) belongs to the class of noncompetitive antagonists blocking the open GABA(A)R and is a prototype of β-lactam antibiotics. In this study, we combined electrophysiological and modeling approaches to investigate the peculiarities of PNG blockade of GABA-activated currents recorded from isolated rat Purkinje cells and to predict the PNG binding site. Whole-cell patch-сlamp recording and fast application system was used in the electrophysiological experiments. PNG block developed after channel activation and increased with membrane depolarization suggesting that the ligand binds within the open channel pore. PNG blocked stationary component of GABA-activated currents in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 value of 1.12mM at -70mV. The termination of GABA and PNG co-application was followed by a transient tail current. Protection of the tail current from bicuculline block and dependence of its kinetic parameters on agonist affinity suggest that PNG acts as a sequential open channel blocker that prevents agonist dissociation while the channel remains blocked. We built the GABA(A)R models based on nAChR and GLIC structures and performed an unbiased systematic search of the PNG binding site. Monte-Carlo energy minimization was used to find the lowest energy binding modes. We have shown that PNG binds close to the intracellular vestibule. In both models the maximum contribution to the energy of ligand-receptor interactions revealed residues located on the level of 2', 6' and 9' rings formed by a bundle of M2 transmembrane segments, indicating that these residues most likely participate in PNG binding. The predicted structural models support the described mechanism of PNG block.

  13. Acupuncture reduces relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior via activation of GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wyju; Kim, Min Sun; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Yeon; Lee, Jin Gyeom; Kim, Hong Yu; Yoon, Seong Shoon; Lee, Bong Hyo; Chang, Suchan; Kim, Jae Hyo; Choi, Kwang H; Koo, Ho; Gwak, Young Seob; Steffensen, Scott C; Ryu, Yeon-Hee; Kim, Hee Young; Yang, Chae Ha

    2017-03-07

    There is growing public interest in alternative approaches to addiction treatment and scientific interest in elucidating the neurobiological underpinnings of acupuncture. Our previous studies showed that acupuncture at a specific Shenmen (HT7) points reduced dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) induced by drugs of abuse. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of HT7 acupuncture on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neuronal activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior. Using microdialysis and in vivo single-unit electrophysiology, we evaluated the effects of HT7 acupuncture on VTA GABA and NAc DA release and VTA GABA neuronal activity in rats. Using a within-session reinstatement paradigm in rats self-administering cocaine, we evaluated the effects of HT7 stimulation on cocaine-primed reinstatement. Acupuncture at HT7 significantly reduced cocaine suppression of GABA release and GABA neuron firing rates in the VTA. HT7 acupuncture attenuated cocaine-primed reinstatement, which was blocked by VTA infusions of the selective GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen. HT7 stimulation significantly decreased acute cocaine-induced DA release in the NAc, which was also blocked by 2-hydroxysaclofen. HT7 acupuncture also attenuated cocaine-induced sensitization of extracellular DA levels in the NAc. Moreover, HT7 acupuncture reduced both locomotor activity and neuronal activation in the NAc induced by acute cocaine in a needle-penetration depth-dependent fashion. These results suggest that acupuncture may suppress cocaine-induced DA release in the NAc and cocaine-seeking behavior through activation of VTA GABA neurons. Acupuncture may be an effective therapy to reduce cocaine relapse by enhancing GABAergic inhibition in the VTA.

  14. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V.; Hawker, Dustin D.; Wu, Rui; Doud, Emma; Widom, Julia; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Liu, Dali; Kelleher, Neil L.; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-04-08

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  15. Yellow fluorescent protein-based assay to measure GABA(A channel activation and allosteric modulation in CHO-K1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teres Johansson

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA(A ion channels are important drug targets for treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Finding GABA(A channel subtype selective allosteric modulators could lead to new improved treatments. However, the progress in this area has been obstructed by the challenging task of developing functional assays to support screening efforts and the generation of cells expressing functional GABA(A ion channels with the desired subtype composition. To address these challenges, we developed a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP-based assay to be able to study allosteric modulation of the GABA(A ion channel using cryopreserved, transiently transfected, assay-ready cells. We show for the first time how the MaxCyte STX electroporation instrument can be used to generate CHO-K1 cells expressing functional GABA(A α2β3γ2 along with a halide sensing YFP-H148Q/I152L (YFP-GABA(A2 cells. As a basis for a cell-based assay capable of detecting allosteric modulators, experiments with antagonist, ion channel blocker and modulators were used to verify GABA(A subunit composition and functionality. We found that the I(- concentration used in the YFP assay affected both basal quench of YFP and potency of GABA. For the first time the assay was used to study modulation of GABA with 7 known modulators where statistical analysis showed that the assay can distinguish modulatory pEC50 differences of 0.15. In conclusion, the YFP assay proved to be a robust, reproducible and inexpensive assay. These data provide evidence that the assay is suitable for high throughput screening (HTS and could be used to discover novel modulators acting on GABA(A ion channels.

  16. Elevated tonic extracellular dopamine concentration and altered dopamine modulation of synaptic activity precede dopamine loss in the striatum of mice overexpressing human α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Hoa A; Wu, Nanping; Cely, Ingrid; Kelly, Rachel L; Hean, Sindalana; Richter, Franziska; Magen, Iddo; Cepeda, Carlos; Ackerson, Larry C; Walwyn, Wendy; Masliah, Eliezer; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Levine, Michael S; Maidment, Nigel T

    2011-07-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-synuclein (α-Syn), a protein associated with presynaptic vesicles, causes familial forms of Parkinson's disease in humans and is also associated with sporadic forms of the disease. We used in vivo microdialysis, tissue content analysis, behavioral assessment, and whole-cell patch clamp recordings from striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSSNs) in slices to examine dopamine transmission and dopaminergic modulation of corticostriatal synaptic function in mice overexpressing human wild-type α-Syn under the Thy1 promoter (α-Syn mice). Tonic striatal extracellular dopamine and 3-methoxytyramine levels were elevated in α-Syn mice at 6 months of age, prior to any reduction in total striatal tissue content, and were accompanied by an increase in open-field activity. Dopamine clearance and amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux were unchanged. The frequency of MSSN spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) was lower in α-Syn mice. Amphetamine reduced sEPSC frequency in wild types (WTs) but produced no effect in α-Syn mice. Furthermore, whereas quinpirole reduced and sulpiride increased sEPSC frequency in WT mice, they produced the opposite effects in α-Syn mice. These observations indicate that overexpression of α-Syn alters dopamine efflux and D2 receptor modulation of corticostriatal glutamate release at a young age. At 14 months of age, the α-Syn mice presented with significantly lower striatal tissue dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase content relative to WT littermates, accompanied by an L-DOPA-reversible sensory motor deficit. Together, these data further validate this transgenic mouse line as a slowly progressing model of Parkinson's disease and provide evidence for early dopamine synaptic dysfunction prior to loss of striatal dopamine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. The Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    inhibitor methionine sulfoximine and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase) inhibitors fluoro-acetate and -citrate. Acetate is metabolized exclusively by glial cells, and [(13)C]acetate is thus capable when used in combination with magnetic resonance spectroscopy or mass spectrometry, to provide......The operation of a glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle in the brain consisting of the transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons and neurotransmitter glutamate or GABA from neurons to astrocytes is a well-known concept. In neurons, glutamine is not only used for energy production and protein...... synthesis, as in other cells, but is also an essential precursor for biosynthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters. An excellent tool for the study of glutamine transfer from astrocytes to neurons is [(14)C]acetate or [(13)C]acetate and the glial specific enzyme inhibitors, i.e. the glutamine synthetase...

  18. Control of GABA release at single mossy fiber-CA3 connections in the developing hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria F Safiulina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review some of the recent work carried out in our laboratory concerning the functional role of GABAergic signalling at immature mossy fibres (MF-CA3 principal cell synapses has been highlighted. While in adulthood MF, the axons of dentate gyrus granule cells release onto CA3 principal cells and interneurons glutamate, early in postnatal life they release GABA, which exerts into targeted cells a depolarizing and excitatory action. We found that GABAA-mediated postsynaptic currents (MF-GPSCs exhibited a very low probability of release, were sensitive to L-AP4, a group III metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, and revealed short-term frequency-dependent facilitation. Moreover, MF-GPSCs were down regulated by presynaptic GABAB and kainate receptors, activated by spillover of GABA from MF terminals and by glutamate present in the extracellular medium, respectively. Activation of these receptors contributed to the low release probability and in some cases to synapses silencing. By pairing calcium transients, associated with network-driven giant depolarizing potentials or GDPs (a hallmark of developmental networks thought to represent a primordial form of synchrony between neurons, generated by the synergistic action of glutamate and GABA with MF activation increased the probability of GABA release and caused the conversion of silent synapses into conductive ones suggesting that GDPs act as coincident detector signals for enhancing synaptic efficacy. Finally, to compare the relative strength of CA3 pyramidal cell output in relation to their MF glutamatergic or GABAergic inputs in adulthood or in postnatal development, respectively, a realistic model was constructed taking into account different biophysical properties of these synapses.

  19. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Priya, G.G.; Kannapiran, E.

    of cell-cell physical contact will be high. In this study, the physical proximity was artificially enhanced between cells and the effect on luminescence in the concentrated cells in the normal culture medium and in the presence of other non-bacterial cell...

  20. Suppression of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminases induces prominent GABA accumulation, dwarfism and infertility in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Matsukura, Chiaki; Takayama, Mariko; Asamizu, Erika; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    Tomatoes accumulate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at high levels in the immature fruits. GABA is rapidly converted to succinate during fruit ripening through the activities of GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). Although three genes encoding GABA-T and both pyruvate- and α-ketoglutarate-dependent GABA-T activities have been detected in tomato fruits, the mechanism underlying the GABA-T-mediated conversion of GABA has not been fully understood. In this work, we conducted loss-of-function analyses utilizing RNA interference (RNAi) transgenic plants with suppressed pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T gene expression to clarify which GABA-T isoforms are essential for its function. The RNAi plants with suppressed SlGABA-T gene expression, particularly SlGABA-T1, showed severe dwarfism and infertility. SlGABA-T1 expression was inversely associated with GABA levels in the fruit at the red ripe stage. The GABA contents in 35S::SlGABA-T1(RNAi) lines were 1.3-2.0 times and 6.8-9.2 times higher in mature green and red ripe fruits, respectively, than the contents in wild-type fruits. In addition, SlGABA-T1 expression was strongly suppressed in the GABA-accumulating lines. These results indicate that pyruvate- and glyoxylate-dependent GABA-T is the essential isoform for GABA metabolism in tomato plants and that GABA-T1 primarily contributes to GABA reduction in the ripening fruits.

  1. Treatment of germinated wheat to increase levels of GABA and IP6 catalyzed by endogenous enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    We found that the levels of bioactive products from wheat can be increased dramatically by manipulating germination conditions and taking advantage of the activity of endogenous enzymes. The yield of phytic acid (IP(6)) from wheat germinated in the presence of high, controlled levels of dissolved oxygen (188 +/- 28 mg/100 g wheat) was almost three times greater than that from wheat germinated with no supplemental oxygen (74 +/- 10 mg/100 g wheat). The yield of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from wheat germinated in the presence of uncontrolled levels of dissolved oxygen was 18 +/- 3 times greater than that from nonsupplemented wheat (1 mg/100 g wheat). The concentration of GABA was much greater in wheat germ than in whole wheat, and the yield of GABA from wheat germ processed with supplemental water (163 +/- 7 mg/100 g wheat germ) was notably greater than that from wheat germ processed with no supplemental water (100 +/- 2 mg/100 g wheat germ). In contrast, IP(6) was more concentrated in wheat bran, and the yield of IP(6) from wheat bran processed with supplemental water (3100 +/- 12 mg/100 g wheat bran) was notably higher than that from wheat bran processed with no supplemental water (2420 +/- 13 mg/100 g wheat bran). We conclude that the large amount of GABA extracted from wheat germ is likely due to high glutamate decarboxylase activity and low aminotransferase activity and that the large amount of IP(6) extracted from wheat bran is likely due to high levels of tyrosinase activity. Our findings indicate that bioactive molecules such as GABA and IP(6) can be successfully mass-produced by taking advantage of endogenous enzymatic activities.

  2. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2000-01-01

    GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been...... demonstrated that neuronal and glial GABA transport mechanisms have dissimilar substrate specificities. With GABA transport mechanisms as pharmacological targets, strategies for pharmacological interventions with the purpose of stimulating GABA neurotransmission seem to be (1) effective blockade of neuronal...... recently been reported as the most selective glial GABA uptake inhibitor so far known and may be a useful tool for further elucidation of the pharmacology of GABA transporters. In recent years, a variety of lipophilic analogues of the amino acids 23 and 24 have been developed, and one of these compounds...

  3. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, J; Geetha Priya, G; Kannapiran, E

    2011-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a biochemical process occurring in many organisms. Bacterial bioluminescence has been investigated extensively that lead to many applications of such knowledge. Quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacteria is a chemical signal process to recognize the strength of its own population to start luminescence in harmony. There is a mechanism in these bacteria to also recognize inter-species strength. When there is a higher number of these bacteria, the possibility and frequency of cell-cell physical contact will be high. In this study, the physical proximity was artificially enhanced between cells and the effect on luminescence in the concentrated cells in the normal culture medium and in the presence of other non-bacterial cell-free supernatants was investigated. The role of such physical contact in the quorum sensing in the bioluminescence is not known. Increase in the luminescence of V. fischeri when concentrated shows that the presence of physical proximity facilitates the quorum sensing for their bioluminescence.

  4. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed.

  5. Evaluation of commercial soy sauce koji strains of Aspergillus oryzae for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab Kadir, Safuan; Wan-Mohtar, Wan Abd Al Qadr Imad; Mohammad, Rosfarizan; Abdul Halim Lim, Sarina; Sabo Mohammed, Abdulkarim; Saari, Nazamid

    2016-10-01

    In this study, four selected commercial strains of Aspergillus oryzae were collected from soy sauce koji. These A. oryzae strains designated as NSK, NSZ, NSJ and NST shared similar morphological characteristics with the reference strain (A. oryzae FRR 1675) which confirmed them as A. oryzae species. They were further evaluated for their ability to produce γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by cultivating the spore suspension in a broth medium containing 0.4 % (w/v) of glutamic acid as a substrate for GABA production. The results showed that these strains were capable of producing GABA; however, the concentrations differed significantly (P GABA concentration was obtained from NSK (194 mg/L) followed by NSZ (63 mg/L), NSJ (51.53 mg/L) and NST (31.66 mg/L). Therefore, A. oryzae NSK was characterized and the sequence was found to be similar to A. oryzae and A. flavus with 99 % similarity. The evolutionary distance (K nuc) between sequences of identical fungal species was calculated and a phylogenetic tree prepared from the K nuc data showed that the isolate belonged to the A. oryzae species. This finding may allow the development of GABA-rich ingredients using A. oryzae NSK as a starter culture for soy sauce production.

  6. GABA modulates baroreflex in the ventral tegmental area in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Masoumeh; Rasoulpanah, Minoo; Nasimi, Ali

    2015-12-01

    There are some reports demonstrating the cardiovascular functions of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). About 20-30% of the VTA neurons are GABAergic, which might play a role in baroreflex modulation. This study was performed to find the effects of GABA(A), GABA(B) receptors and reversible synaptic blockade of the VTA on baroreflex. Drugs were microinjected into the VTA of urethane anesthetized rats, and the maximum change of blood pressure and the gain of the reflex bradycardia in response to intravenous phenylephrine (Phe) injection were compared with the preinjection and the control values. Microinjection of bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 100 pmol/100 nl), a GABA(A) antagonist, into the VTA strongly decreased the Phe-induced hypertension, indicating that GABA itself attenuated the baroreflex. Muscimol, a GABA(A) agonist (30 mM, 100 nl), produced no significant changes. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), moderately attenuated the baroreflex, however phaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist (1000 pmole/100 nl), had no significant effect. In conclusion, for the first time, we demonstrated that GABA(A) receptors of the VTA strongly attenuate and GABA(B) receptors of the VTA moderately attenuate baroreflex in rat. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. The tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase like gene located in the tyramine biosynthesis cluster of Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracellular pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linares Daniel M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tyramine producer Enterococcus durans IPLA655 contains all the necessary genes for tyramine biosynthesis, grouped in the TDC cluster. This cluster includes tyrS, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase like gene. Results This work shows that tyrS was maximally transcribed in absence of tyrosine at acidic pH, showing a greater than 10-fold induction in mRNA levels over levels occurring in presence of tyrosine. Mapping of the tyrS transcriptional start site revealed an unusually long untranslated leader region of 322 bp, which displays the typical features of the T box transcriptional attenuation mechanism. The tyrosine concentration regulation of tyrS was found to be mediated by a transcription antitermination system, whereas the specific induction at acidic pH was regulated at transcription initiation level. Conclusions The expression of the tyrS gene present in the TDC cluster of E. durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracelular pH. The regulation is mediated by both an antitermination system and the promoter itself.

  8. Spectroscopic Characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens: Suppression using Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Bismuth Thiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Korpol, Bhoom Reddy; Chellam, Shankararaman; Gassman, Paul L.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-10-21

    Free and capsular EPS produced by Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens were characterized in detail using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Total EPS production decreased upon treatment with sub-inhibitory concentrations of lipophilic bismuth thiols (bismuth dimercaptopropanol, BisBAL; bismuth ethanedithiol, BisEDT; and bismuth pyrithione, BisPYR), BisBAL being most effective. Bismuth thiols also influenced acetylation and carboxylation of polysaccharides in EPS from S. marcescens. Extensive homology between EPS samples in the presence and absence of bismuth was observed with proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids varying predominantly only in the total amount expressed. Second derivative analysis of the amide I region of FTIR spectra revealed decreases in protein secondary structures in the presence of bismuth thiols. Hence, anti-fouling properties of bismuth thiols appear to originate in their ability to suppress O-acetylation and protein secondary structures in addition to total EPS secretion.

  9. The expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) receptor subunits in the cNS differs from that in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Medhurst, A D; Robbins, M J; Charles, K J; Evans, M L; Harrison, D C; Stammers, M; Hughes, S A; Hervieu, G; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Middlemiss, D N; Pangalos, M N

    2000-01-01

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the slow and prolonged synaptic actions of GABA in the CNS via the modulation of ion channels. Unusually, GABA(B) receptors form functional heterodimers composed of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits. The GABA(B1) subunit is essential for ligand binding, whereas the GABA(B2) subunit is essential for functional expression of the receptor dimer at the cell surface. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to analyse expression levels of these subunits, and their associated splice variants, in the CNS and peripheral tissues of human and rat. GABA(B1) subunit splice variants were expressed throughout the CNS and peripheral tissues, whereas surprisingly GABA(B2) subunit splice variants were neural specific. Using novel antisera specific to individual GABA(B) receptor subunits, we have confirmed these findings at the protein level. Analysis by immunoblotting demonstrated the presence of the GABA(B1) subunit, but not the GABA(B2) subunit, in uterus and spleen. Furthermore, we have shown the first immunocytochemical analysis of the GABA(B2) subunit in the brain and spinal cord using a GABA(B2)-specific antibody. We have, therefore, identified areas of non-overlap between GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunit expression in tissues known to contain functional GABA(B) receptors. Such areas are of interest as they may well contain novel GABA(B) receptor subunit isoforms, expression of which would enable the GABA(B1) subunit to reach the cell surface and form functional GABA(B) receptors.

  10. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep-promoting effects of a GABA/5-HTP mixture: Behavioral changes and neuromodulation in an invertebrate model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki-Bae; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-04-01

    This study was to investigate the sleep promoting effects of combined γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), by examining neuronal processes governing mRNA level alterations, as well as assessing neuromodulator concentrations, in a fruit fly model. Behavioral assays were applied to investigate subjective nighttime activity, sleep episodes, and total duration of subjective nighttime sleep of two amino acids and GABA/5-HTP mixture with caffeine treated flies. Also, real-time PCR and HPLC analysis were applied to analyze the signaling pathway. Subjective nighttime activity and sleep patterns of individual flies significantly decreased with 1% GABA treatment in conjunction with 0.1% 5-HTP treatment (pHTP mixture resulted in significant differences between groups related to sleep patterns (40%, pHTP mixture significantly increased GABA levels 1h and 12h following treatment (2.1 fold and 1.2 fold higher than the control, respectively) and also increased 5-HTP levels (0 h: 1.01 μg/protein, 12h: 3.45 μg/protein). In this regard, we successfully demonstrated that using a GABA/5-HTP mixture modulates subjective nighttime activity, sleep episodes, and total duration of subjective nighttime sleep to a greater extent than single administration of each amino acid, and that this modulation occurs via GABAergic and serotonergic signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. GABA shunt enzymes and the relationship with morphine abstinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th. de Boer (Thijs)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractSelective inhibition of tbe rate-limiting step in tbe degradation of tbe inhibitory neurotransmitter Y·aminobutyric acid (GABA) might be of potential use in the treatment of many neurological or psychiatric disorders since it might correct a central GABA deficiency. Alternatively, as suc

  13. Interaction of GABA-mimetics with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6) in hyperosmotic treated caco-2, LLC-PK1 and rat renal SKPT cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune Nørgaard; Lagunas, Candela; Plum, Jakob Munk;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if basic GABA-mimetics interact with the taurine transporter (TauT, Slc6a6), and to find a suitable cell based model that is robust towards extracellular changes in osmolality during uptake studies. Taurine uptake was measured in human Caco-2 cells...

  14. A noncanonical release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manent, Jean-Bernard; Demarque, Michaël; Jorquera, Isabel; Pellegrino, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent; Represa, Alfonso

    2005-05-11

    Immature neurons express GABA and glutamate receptors before synapse formation, and both transmitters are released at an early developmental stage. We have now tested the hypothesis that the ongoing release of GABA and glutamate modulates neuronal migration. Using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling and cocultures of hippocampal slices obtained from naive and green fluorescent protein-transgenic mice, we report that migration is severely affected by GABA(A) or NMDA receptor antagonist treatments. These effects were also present in munc18-1 knock-out slices in which soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent vesicular secretion of transmitters has been deleted. GABA(A) antagonists were more efficient than NMDA antagonists to reduce cell migration, in keeping with the earlier maturation of GABAergic mechanisms. We conclude that GABA and, to a lesser degree, glutamate released in a SNARE-independent mechanism exert a paracrine action on neuronal migration.

  15. Triton X-100 inhibits agonist-induced currents and suppresses benzodiazepine modulation of GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Ebert, Bjarke; Klaerke, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Changes in lipid bilayer elastic properties have been proposed to underlie the modulation of voltage-gated Na(+) and L-type Ca(2+) channels and GABA(A) receptors by amphiphiles. The amphiphile Triton X-100 increases the elasticity of lipid bilayers at micromolar concentrations, assessed from its ...

  16. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays. It was f...... is extremely fast....

  17. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  18. Design and Synthesis of Photoaffinity Probe Candidates for the GABA-gated Chloride Channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shang-Zhong; LI Qing-X.

    2006-01-01

    In order to characterize binding sites of insecticidal compounds on GABA gated chloride channel, new photoaffinity probe candidates based on 5e-t-butyl-2e-[4-(substituted-propynyl)phenyl]-1,3-dithiane for the noncompetitive blocker (NCB) site of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel were designed and synthesized, and their potency as an inhibitor on NCB was measured by 4'-ethynyl-4-n-[2,3-3H2]-propylbicycloorthobenzoate (3H EBOB) assay. The synthesized compounds showed high inhibition activities with half maximum inhibition concentrations (IC50) of lower than 35 nmol/L and were very stable in binding conditions as well photoreacted quickly at 300 nm light. These new compounds are expected to be good photoaffinity labeling probes if radioisotope iodine is incorporated.

  19. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  20. [Pharmacological influences on the brain level and transport of GABA. II) Effect of various psychoactive drugs on brain level and uptake of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabana, M A; Varotto, M; Saladini, M; Zanchin, G; Battistin, L

    1981-04-30

    The effects of some psychoactive drugs on the level and uptake of GABA in the mouse brain was studied using well standardized procedures, mainely the silica-gel cromatography for determining the GABA content and the brain slices for measuring GABA uptake. It was found that levomepromazine, sulpiride, haloperidol and amytryptiline were without effects on the cerebral level of GABA; it was also found that these drugs do not influence the rates of uptake of GABA by mouse brain slices. Such results do indicate that the psychoactive drugs studied are without effects on the level and uptake of GABA in the brain.

  1. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko eTakayama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle via reactions catalysed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, GABA transaminase (GABA-T and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development.

  2. GABA[subscript A] Receptor Downregulation in Brains of Subjects with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Reutiman, Teri J.; Folsom, Timothy D.; Thuras, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABA[subscript A]) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for mediation of fast inhibitory action of GABA in the brain. Preliminary reports have demonstrated altered expression of GABA receptors in the brains of subjects with autism suggesting GABA/glutamate system dysregulation. We investigated the…

  3. Hippocampal GABA transporter distribution in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, O.; Karaca, U.; Andrade, P.; Nijs, L. de; Kusters, B.; Peeters, A.; Dings, J.; Pannek, H.; Ebner, A.; Rijkers, K.; Hoogland, G.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine hippocampal expression of neuronal GABA-transporter (GAT-1) and glial GABA-transporter (GAT-3) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and hippocampal sclerosis (HS). METHODS: Hippocampal sections were immunohistochemically stained for GABA-transporter 1 and GABA-transpor

  4. The effects of neuroleptics on the GABA-induced Cl- current in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons: differences between some neuroleptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kenjiro; Tatebayashi, Hideharu; Matsuo, Tadashi; Shoge, Takashi; Motomura, Haruhiko; Matsuno, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Akira; Tashiro, Nobutada

    2002-03-01

    1. Several neuroleptics inhibited the 3 microM gamma-aminobutyric acid induced-chloride current (GABA-current) on dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in whole-cell patch-clamp investigations. 2. The IC(50) for clozapine, zotepine, olanzapine, risperidone and chlorpromazine were 6.95, 18.26, 20.30, 106.01 and 114.56 microM, respectively. The values for the inhibitory effects of neuroleptics on the GABA (3 microM)-current, which were calculated by the fitting Hill's equations where the concentrations represent the mean therapeutic blood concentrations, were ranked clozapine>zotepine>chlorpromazine>olanzapine>risperidone. These inhibitory effects, weighted with the therapeutic concentrations of neuroleptics, were correlated with the clinical incidences of seizure during treatment with neuroleptics. 3. Clozapine reduced the picrotoxin-inhibiton, and may compete with a ligand of the t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding site. 4. Haloperidol and quetiapine did not affect the peak amplitude of the GABA (3 microM)-current. However, haloperidol reduced the clozapine-inhibition, and may antagonize ligand binding to TBPS binding site. 5. Neuroleptics including haloperidol and quetiapine enhanced the desensitization of the GABA (3 microM)-current. However, haloperidol and quetiapine at 100 microM inhibited the desensitization at the beginning of application. 6. Blonanserin (AD-5423) at 30 and 50 microM potentiated the GABA (3 microM)-current to 170.1+/-6.9 and 192.0+/-10.6% of the control current, respectively. Blonanserin shifted GABA concentration-response curve leftward. Blonanserin only partly negatively interacted with diazepam. The blonanserin-potentiation was not reversed by flumazenil. Blonanserin is not a benzodiazepine receptor agonist. 7. The various effects of neuroleptics on the GABA-current may be related to the clinical effects including modifying the seizure threshold.

  5. The effects of neuroleptics on the GABA-induced Cl− current in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons: differences between some neuroleptics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kenjiro; Tatebayashi, Hideharu; Matsuo, Tadashi; Shoge, Takashi; Motomura, Haruhiko; Matsuno, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Akira; Tashiro, Nobutada

    2002-01-01

    Several neuroleptics inhibited the 3 μM γ-aminobutyric acid induced-chloride current (GABA-current) on dissociated rat dorsal root ganglion neurons in whole-cell patch-clamp investigations. The IC50 for clozapine, zotepine, olanzapine, risperidone and chlorpromazine were 6.95, 18.26, 20.30, 106.01 and 114.56 μM, respectively. The values for the inhibitory effects of neuroleptics on the GABA (3 μM)-current, which were calculated by the fitting Hill's equations where the concentrations represent the mean therapeutic blood concentrations, were ranked clozapine>zotepine>chlorpromazine>olanzapine>risperidone. These inhibitory effects, weighted with the therapeutic concentrations of neuroleptics, were correlated with the clinical incidences of seizure during treatment with neuroleptics. Clozapine reduced the picrotoxin-inhibiton, and may compete with a ligand of the t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding site. Haloperidol and quetiapine did not affect the peak amplitude of the GABA (3 μM)-current. However, haloperidol reduced the clozapine-inhibition, and may antagonize ligand binding to TBPS binding site. Neuroleptics including haloperidol and quetiapine enhanced the desensitization of the GABA (3 μM)-current. However, haloperidol and quetiapine at 100 μM inhibited the desensitization at the beginning of application. Blonanserin (AD-5423) at 30 and 50 μM potentiated the GABA (3 μM)-current to 170.1±6.9 and 192.0±10.6% of the control current, respectively. Blonanserin shifted GABA concentration-response curve leftward. Blonanserin only partly negatively interacted with diazepam. The blonanserin-potentiation was not reversed by flumazenil. Blonanserin is not a benzodiazepine receptor agonist. The various effects of neuroleptics on the GABA-current may be related to the clinical effects including modifying the seizure threshold. PMID:11906969

  6. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S Carpenter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site.

  7. Pentobarbital enhances GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, which is prevented by expression of GABA(A) epsilon subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnaten, Mustapha; Walwyn, Wendy M; Wang, Jijiang; Venkatesan, Priya; Evans, Cory; Chang, Kyoung S K; Andresen, Michael C; Hales, Tim G; Mendelowitz, David

    2002-09-01

    Pentobarbital decreases the gain of the baroreceptor reflex on the order of 50%, and this blunting is caused nearly entirely by decreasing cardioinhibitory parasympathetic activity. The most likely site of action of pentobarbital is the gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor. The authors tested whether pentobarbital augments the inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission to cardiac parasympathetic neurons, and whether expression of the GABA(A) epsilon subunit prevents this facilitation. The authors used a novel approach to study the effect of pentobarbital on identified cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in rat brainstem slices. The cardiac parasympathetic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus were retrogradely prelabeled with a fluorescent tracer and were visually identified for patch clamp recording. The effects of pentobarbital on spontaneous GABAergic synaptic events were tested. An adenovirus was used to express the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor in cardiac parasympathetic neurons to examine whether this transfection alters pentobarbital-mediated changes in GABAergic neurotransmission. Pentobarbital increased the duration but not the frequency or amplitude of spontaneous GABAergic currents in cardiac parasympathetic neurons. Transfection of cardiac parasympathetic neurons with the epsilon subunit of the GABA(A) receptor prevented the pentobarbital-evoked facilitation of GABAergic currents. Pentobarbital, at clinically relevant concentrations, prolongs the duration of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents that impinge on cardiac parasympathetic neurons. This action would augment the inhibition of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, reduce parasympathetic cardioinhibitory activity, and increase heart rate. Expression of the GABA(A) receptor epsilon subunit in cardiac parasympathetic neurons renders the GABA receptors insensitive to pentobarbital.

  8. Cloning and sequencing of mouse GABA transporter complementary DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAMANTHONYC.W.; LIHEGUO; 等

    1994-01-01

    A cDNA encoding the mouse GABA transporter has been isolated and sequenced.The results show that the mouse GABA transporter cDNA differs from that of the rat by 60 base pairs at the open reading frame region but the deduced amino acid sequences of the two cDNAs are identical and both composed of 599 amino acids.However,the amino acid sequence is different from the sequence deduced from a recently published mouse GABA transporter cDNA.

  9. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  10. Extracellular matrix molecules and synaptic plasticity: immunomapping of intracellular and secreted Reelin in the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Moreno, Tania; Galazo, Maria J; Porrero, Cesar; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Clascá, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    Reelin, a large extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is secreted by several neuron populations in the developing and adult rodent brain. Secreted Reelin triggers a complex signaling pathway by binding lipoprotein and integrin membrane receptors in target cells. Reelin signaling regulates migration and dendritic growth in developing neurons, while it can modulate synaptic plasticity in adult neurons. To identify which adult neural circuits can be modulated by Reelin-mediated signaling, we systematically mapped the distribution of Reelin in adult rat brain using sensitive immunolabeling techniques. Results show that the distribution of intracellular and secreted Reelin is both very widespread and specific. Some interneuron and projection neuron populations in the cerebral cortex contain Reelin. Numerous striatal neurons are weakly immunoreactive for Reelin and these cells are preferentially located in striosomes. Some thalamic nuclei contain Reelin-immunoreactive cells. Double-immunolabeling for GABA and Reelin reveals that the Reelin-immunoreactive cells in the visual thalamus are the intrinsic thalamic interneurons. High local concentrations of extracellular Reelin selectively outline several dendrite spine-rich neuropils. Together with previous mRNA data, our observations suggest abundant axoplasmic transport and secretion in pathways such as the retino-collicular tract, the entorhino-hippocampal ('perforant') path, the lateral olfactory tract or the parallel fiber system of the cerebellum. A preferential secretion of Reelin in these neuropils is consistent with reports of rapid, activity-induced structural changes in adult brain circuits.

  11. Low nanomolar GABA effects at extrasynaptic a4ß1/ß3delta GABAA receptor subtypes indicate a different binding mode for GABA at these receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karim, Nasiara; Wellendorph, Petrine; Absalom, Nathan;

    2012-01-01

    Ionotropic GABA(A) receptors are a highly heterogenous population of receptors assembled from a combination of multiple subunits. The aims of this study were to characterize the potency of GABA at human recombinant d-containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using th...

  12. Chemical integrity of ( sup 3 H)GABA used in binding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcar, V.J. (Univ. of Sydney, N.S.W. (Australia))

    1989-07-01

    A method which is claimed to be able to determine the proportion of true GABA within radiolabeled GABA used in binding studies was tested using (3H)GABA. The method was found to be unsuitable for {sup 3}H-labeled GABA and, furthermore, both theoretical considerations and the present experimental data indicated that it could also produce misleading results with ({sup 14}C)GABA.

  13. The GABA excitatory/inhibitory shift in brain maturation and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Khalilov, Ilgam; Kahle, Kristopher T; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-10-01

    Ionic currents and the network-driven patterns they generate differ in immature and adult neurons: The developing brain is not a "small adult brain." One of the most investigated examples is the developmentally regulated shift of actions of the transmitter GABA that inhibit adult neurons but excite immature ones because of an initially higher intracellular chloride concentration [Cl(-)](i), leading to depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA instead of hyperpolarizing and inhibitory actions. The levels of [Cl(-)](i) are also highly labile, being readily altered transiently or persistently by enhanced episodes of activity in relation to synaptic plasticity or a variety of pathological conditions, including seizures and brain insults. Among the plethora of channels, transporters, and other devices involved in controlling [Cl(-)](i), two have emerged as playing a particularly important role: the chloride importer NKCC1 and the chloride exporter KCC2. Here, the authors stress the importance of determining how [Cl(-)](i) is dynamically regulated and how this affects brain operation in health and disease. In a clinical perspective, agents that control [Cl(-)](i) and reinstate inhibitory actions of GABA open novel therapeutic perspectives in many neurological disorders, including infantile epilepsies, autism spectrum disorders, and other developmental disorders.

  14. Improved estimates for the role of grey matter volume and GABA in bistable perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Kristian; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Del Pin, Simon Hviid; Andersen, Lau Møller; Rees, Geraint; Kanai, Ryota

    2016-10-01

    Across a century or more, ambiguous stimuli have been studied scientifically because they provide a method for studying the internal mechanisms of the brain while ensuring an unchanging external stimulus. In recent years, several studies have reported correlations between perceptual dynamics during bistable perception and particular brain characteristics such as the grey matter volume of areas in the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and the relative GABA concentration in the occipital lobe. Here, we attempt to replicate previous results using similar paradigms to those used in the studies first reporting the correlations. Using the original findings as priors for Bayesian analyses, we found strong support for the correlation between structure-from-motion percept duration and anterior SPL grey matter volume. Correlations between percept duration and other parietal areas as well as occipital GABA, however, were not directly replicated or appeared less strong than previous studies suggested. Inspection of the posterior distributions (current "best guess" based on new data given old data as prior) revealed that several original findings may reflect true relationships although no direct evidence was found in support of them in the current sample. Additionally, we found that multiple regression models based on grey matter volume at 2-3 parietal locations (but not including GABA) were the best predictors of percept duration, explaining approximately 35% of the inter-individual variance. Taken together, our results provide new estimates of correlation strengths, generally increasing confidence in the role of the aSPL while decreasing confidence in some of the other relationships.

  15. Retrospective correction of frequency drift in spectral editing: The GABA editing example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Jan Willem; Marenco, Stefano; Berman, Karen F; Shen, Jun

    2017-08-01

    GABA levels can be measured using proton MRS with a two-step editing sequence. However due to the low concentration of GABA, long acquisition time is usually needed to achieve sufficient SNR to detect small differences in many psychiatric disorders. During this long scan time the frequency offset of the measured voxel can change because of magnetic field drift and patient movement. This drift will change the frequency of the editing pulse relative to that of metabolites, leading to errors in quantification. In this article we describe a retrospective method to correct for frequency drift in spectral editing. A series of reference signals for each metabolite was generated for a range of frequency offsets and then averaged together based on the history of frequency changes over the scan. These customized basis sets were used to fit the in vivo data. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the correction method and the remarkable robustness of a GABA editing technique with a top hat editing profile in the presence of frequency drift. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Retrograde release of endocannabinoids inhibits presynaptic GABA release to second-order baroreceptive neurons in NTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Yin; Bonham, Ann C; Dean, Caron; Hopp, Francis A; Hillard, Cecilia J; Seagard, Jeanne L

    2010-12-01

    In prior studies, we found that activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) prolonged baroreflex-induced sympathoinhibition in rats. In many regions of the central nervous system, activation of cannabinoid-1 receptors presynaptically inhibits γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, disinhibiting postsynaptic neurons. To determine if cannabinoid-1 receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition of GABA release occurs in the NTS, we recorded miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in anatomically identified second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin. The cannabinoid-1 receptor agonists, WIN 55212-2 (0.3-30 μM) and methanandamide (3 μM) decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 251, 5 μM). Importantly, depolarization of second-order baroreceptive neurons decreased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; an effect which was blocked by the cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist. The data indicate that depolarization of second-order baroreceptive NTS neurons induces endocannabinoid release from the neurons, leading to activation of presynaptic cannabinoid-1 receptors, inhibition of GABA release and subsequent enhanced baroreflex signaling in the NTS. The data suggest that endocannabinoid signaling in the NTS regulates short-term synaptic plasticity and provide a mechanism for endocannabinoid modulation of central baroreflex control.

  17. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors.

  18. GABA Metabolism and Transport: Effects on Synaptic Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Roth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition is an important regulator of excitability in neuronal networks. In addition, inhibitory synaptic signals contribute crucially to the organization of spatiotemporal patterns of network activity, especially during coherent oscillations. In order to maintain stable network states, the release of GABA by interneurons must be plastic in timing and amount. This homeostatic regulation is achieved by several pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms and is triggered by various activity-dependent local signals such as excitatory input or ambient levels of neurotransmitters. Here, we review findings on the availability of GABA for release at presynaptic terminals of interneurons. Presynaptic GABA content seems to be an important determinant of inhibitory efficacy and can be differentially regulated by changing synthesis, transport, and degradation of GABA or related molecules. We will discuss the functional impact of such regulations on neuronal network patterns and, finally, point towards pharmacological approaches targeting these processes.

  19. Dual role of GABA in the neonatal rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, I; Dzhala, V; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    1999-11-01

    The effects of modulators of GABA-A receptors on neuronal network activity were studied in the neonatal (postnatal days 0-5) rat hippocampus in vitro. Under control conditions, the physiological pattern of activity of the neonatal hippocampal network was characterized by spontaneous network-driven giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). The GABA-A receptor agonist isoguvacine (1-2 microM) and the allosteric modulator diazepam (2 microM) induced biphasic responses: initially the frequency of GDPs increased 3 to 4 fold followed by blockade of GDPs and desynchronization of the network activity. The GABA-A receptor antagonists bicuculline (10 microM) and picrotoxin (100 microM) blocked GDPs and induced glutamate (AMPA and NMDA)-receptor-mediated interictal- and ictal-like activities in the hippocampal slices and the intact hippocampus. These data suggest that at early postnatal ages GABA can exert a dual - both excitatory and inhibitory - action on the network activity.

  20. Interactions between modulators of the GABA(A) receptor: Stiripentol and benzodiazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet L

    2011-03-05

    Many patients with refractory epilepsy are treated with polytherapy, and nearly 15% of epilepsy patients receive two or more anti-convulsant agents. The anti-convulsant stiripentol is used as an add-on treatment for the childhood epilepsy syndrome known as severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy (Dravet syndrome). Stiripentol has multiple mechanisms of action, both enhancing GABA(A) receptors and reducing activity of metabolic enzymes that break down other drugs. Stiripentol is typically co-administered with other anti-convulsants such as benzodiazepines which also act through GABA(A) receptor modulation. Stiripentol slows the metabolism of some of these drugs through inhibition of a variety of cytochrome P450 enzymes, but could also influence their effects on GABAergic neurotransmission. Is it rational to co-administer drugs which can act through the same target? To examine the potential interaction between these modulators, we transiently transfected HEK-293T cells to produce α3β3γ2L or α3β3δ recombinant GABA(A) receptors. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we measured the response to each benzodiazepine alone and in combination with a maximally effective concentration of stiripentol. We compared the responses to four different benzodiazepines: diazepam, clonazepam, clobazam and norclobazam. In all cases we found that these modulators were equally effective in the presence and absence of stiripentol. The δ-containing receptors were insensitive to modulation by the benzodiazepines, which did not affect potentiation by stiripentol. These data suggest that stiripentol and the benzodiazepines act independently at GABA(A) receptors and that polytherapy could be expected to increase the maximum effect beyond either drug alone, even without consideration of changes in metabolism.

  1. Accuracy and stability of measuring GABA, glutamate, and glutamine by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: A phantom study at 4 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michael E.; Lauriat, Tara L.; Shanahan, Meghan; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jensen, J. Eric

    2011-02-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the potential to provide valuable information about alterations in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), and glutamine (Gln) in psychiatric and neurological disorders. In order to use this technique effectively, it is important to establish the accuracy and reproducibility of the methodology. In this study, phantoms with known metabolite concentrations were used to compare the accuracy of 2D J-resolved MRS, single-echo 30 ms PRESS, and GABA-edited MEGA-PRESS for measuring all three aforementioned neurochemicals simultaneously. The phantoms included metabolite concentrations above and below the physiological range and scans were performed at baseline, 1 week, and 1 month time-points. For GABA measurement, MEGA-PRESS proved optimal with a measured-to-target correlation of R2 = 0.999, with J-resolved providing R2 = 0.973 for GABA. All three methods proved effective in measuring Glu with R2 = 0.987 (30 ms PRESS), R2 = 0.996 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.910 (MEGA-PRESS). J-resolved and MEGA-PRESS yielded good results for Gln measures with respective R2 = 0.855 (J-resolved) and R2 = 0.815 (MEGA-PRESS). The 30 ms PRESS method proved ineffective in measuring GABA and Gln. When measurement stability at in vivo concentration was assessed as a function of varying spectral quality, J-resolved proved the most stable and immune to signal-to-noise and linewidth fluctuation compared to MEGA-PRESS and 30 ms PRESS.

  2. Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna A Walter

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms.

  3. Benzodiazepines do not potentiate GABA responses in neonatal hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, C; Ben-Ari, Y

    1991-09-16

    Benzodiazepines (midazolam; flunitrazepam) and pentobarbital increase the response to exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in adult hippocampal cells. We report in this paper that in contrast pentobarbital but not benzodiazepine potentiate the effects of exogenous (GABA) in neurons recorded from slices of less than two weeks old. This finding suggests that the functional association of benzodiazepine and GABAA receptors is changed during early postnatal life.

  4. GABA level, gamma oscillation, and working memory performance in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming A. Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between working memory impairment, disordered neuronal oscillations, and abnormal prefrontal GABA function has been hypothesized in schizophrenia; however, in vivo GABA measurements and gamma band neural synchrony have not yet been compared in schizophrenia. This case–control pilot study (N = 24 compared baseline and working memory task-induced neuronal oscillations acquired with high-density electroencephalograms (EEGs to GABA levels measured in vivo with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Working memory performance, baseline GABA level in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, and measures of gamma oscillations from EEGs at baseline and during a working memory task were obtained. A major limitation of this study is a relatively small sample size for several analyses due to the integration of diverse methodologies and participant compliance. Working memory performance was significantly lower for patients than for controls. During the working memory task, patients (n = 7 had significantly lower amplitudes in gamma oscillations than controls (n = 9. However, both at rest and across working memory stages, there were significant correlations between gamma oscillation amplitude and left DLPFC GABA level. Peak gamma frequency during the encoding stage of the working memory task (n = 16 significantly correlated with GABA level and working memory performance. Despite gamma band amplitude deficits in patients across working memory stages, both baseline and working memory-induced gamma oscillations showed strong dependence on baseline GABA levels in patients and controls. These findings suggest a critical role for GABA function in gamma band oscillations, even under conditions of system and cognitive impairments as seen in schizophrenia.

  5. RDX binds to the GABA(A) receptor-convulsant site and blocks GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in the amygdala: a mechanism for RDX-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Larry R; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Qashu, Felicia; Finne, Huckelberry; Pidoplichko, Volodymyr; Bannon, Desmond I; Braga, Maria F M

    2011-03-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a high-energy, trinitrated cyclic compound that has been used worldwide since World War II as an explosive in both military and civilian applications. RDX can be released in the environment by way of waste streams generated during the manufacture, use, and disposal of RDX-containing munitions and can leach into groundwater from unexploded munitions found on training ranges. For > 60 years, it has been known that exposure to high doses of RDX causes generalized seizures, but the mechanism has remained unknown. We investigated the mechanism by which RDX induces seizures. By screening the affinity of RDX for a number of neurotransmitter receptors, we found that RDX binds exclusively to the picrotoxin convulsant site of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) ionophore. Whole-cell in vitro recordings in the rat basolateral amygdala (BLA) showed that RDX reduces the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents and the amplitude of GABA-evoked postsynaptic currents. In extracellular field recordings from the BLA, RDX induced prolonged, seizure-like neuronal discharges. These results suggest that binding to the GABA(A) receptor convulsant site is the primary mechanism of seizure induction by RDX and that reduction of GABAergic inhibitory transmission in the amygdala is involved in the generation of RDX-induced seizures. Knowledge of the molecular site and the mechanism of RDX action with respect to seizure induction can guide therapeutic strategies, allow more accurate development of safe thresholds for exposures, and help prevent the development of new explosives or other munitions that could pose similar health risks.

  6. Presumed case of "stiff-horse syndrome" caused by decreased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in an American Paint mare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Tawna Backman; Sellers, Ann Davidson; Goehring, Lutz S

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamic acid into the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Increased serum GAD (auto) antibody concentrations were found in a mare with increased postural musculature tone resulting in stiffness and recumbence. The mare was treated with dexamethasone which resulted in resolution of clinical signs and decreased GAD antibody concentrations.

  7. Presumed case of “stiff–horse syndrome” caused by decreased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in an American Paint mare

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, Tawna Backman; Sellers, Ann Davidson; Goehring, Lutz S

    2012-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamic acid into the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Increased serum GAD (auto) antibody concentrations were found in a mare with increased postural musculature tone resulting in stiffness and recumbence. The mare was treated with dexamethasone which resulted in resolution of clinical signs and decreased GAD antibody concentrations.

  8. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko J Luhmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP, respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e. neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g. anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of homobaclofen on wild type and mutant GABA(B)1b receptors coexpressed with the GABA(B)2 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Madsen, Bo E.; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2001-01-01

    Homobaclofen (5-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl) pentanoic acid) is a homologue of the classical GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen. In a recent study, the two enantiomers of this compound were tested in a GABA(B) receptor selective [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) binding assay using rat brain...

  10. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway.

  11. Transition to seizure: ictal discharge is preceded by exhausted presynaptic GABA release in the hippocampal CA3 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang J; Koifman, Julius; Shin, Damian S; Ye, Hui; Florez, Carlos M; Zhang, Liang; Valiante, Taufik A; Carlen, Peter L

    2012-02-15

    How the brain transitions into a seizure is poorly understood. Recurrent seizure-like events (SLEs) in low-Mg2+/ high-K+ perfusate were measured in the CA3 region of the intact mouse hippocampus. The SLE was divided into a "preictal phase," which abruptly turns into a higher frequency "ictal" phase. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors shortened the preictal phase, abolished interictal bursts, and attenuated the slow preictal depolarization, with no effect on the ictal duration, whereas SLEs were blocked by glutamate receptor blockade. In CA3 pyramidal cells and stratum oriens non-fast-spiking and fast-spiking interneurons, recurrent GABAergic IPSCs predominated interictally and during the early preictal phase, synchronous with extracellularly measured recurrent field potentials (FPs). These IPSCs then decreased to zero or reversed polarity by the onset of the higher-frequency ictus. However, postsynaptic muscimol-evoked GABA(A) responses remained intact. Simultaneously, EPSCs synchronous with the FPs markedly increased to a maximum at the ictal onset. The reversal potential of the compound postsynaptic currents (combined simultaneous EPSCs and IPSCs) became markedly depolarized during the preictal phase, whereas the muscimol-evoked GABA(A) reversal potential remained unchanged. During the late preictal phase, interneuronal excitability was high, but IPSCs, evoked by local stimulation, or osmotically by hypertonic sucrose application, were diminished, disappearing at the ictal onset. We conclude that the interictal and early preictal states are dominated by GABAergic activity, with the onset of the ictus heralded by exhaustion of presynaptic release of GABA, and unopposed increased glutamatergic responses.

  12. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  13. Distribution of 3H-GABA uptake sites in the nematode Ascaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guastella, J.; Stretton, A.O. (University of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1991-05-22

    The distribution of uptake sites for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nematode Ascaris suum was examined by autoradiography of 3H-GABA uptake. Single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords were labeled with 3H-GABA. Serial section analysis identified the cells of origin of these processes as the RMEV-like and RMED-like neurons. These cells belong to a set of four neurons in the nerve ring, all of which are labeled by 3H-GABA. 3H-GABA labeling of at least two other sets of cephalic neurons was seen. One of these pairs consists of medium-sized lateral ganglia neurons, located at the level of the amphid commissure bundle. A second pair is located in the lateral ganglia at the level of the deirid commissure bundle. The position and size of these lateral ganglia cells suggest that they are the GABA-immunoreactive lateral ganglia cells frequently seen in whole-mount immunocytochemical preparations. Four neuronal cell bodies located in the retrovesicular ganglion were also labeled with 3H-GABA. These cells, which are probably cholinergic excitatory motor neurons, do not contain detectable GABA-like immunoreactivity. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed. The ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motor neurons, which are known to contain GABA-like immunoreactivity, were not labeled above background with 3H-GABA. Together with the experiments reported previously, these results define three classes of GABA-associated neurons in Ascaris: (1) neurons that contain endogenous GABA and possess a GABA uptake system; (2) neurons that contain endogenous GABA, but that either lack a GABA uptake system or possess a GABA uptake system of low activity; (3) neurons that possess a GABA uptake system, but that lack endogenous GABA.

  14. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/-S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and trazolate, and a diaryl-triazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin

  15. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  16. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  17. Effect of novel atypical antipsychotic, blonanserin, on extracellular neurotransmitter level in rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohoyama, Keiko; Yamamura, Satoshi; Hamaguchi, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Masanori; Motomura, Eishi; Shiroyama, Takashi; Tanii, Hisashi; Okada, Motohiro

    2011-02-25

    To clarify the mechanisms of action of blonanserin, an atypical antipsychotic drug, we studied the effects of systemic administration of blonanserin and risperidone on extracellular levels of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, GABA and glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex using microdialysis, and neuronal firing in the ventral tegmental area, locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe nucleus and mediodorsal thalamic nucleus using radiotelemetry. The binding affinities of blonanserin to D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors in the rat brain were confirmed and found to be similar. Blonanserin transiently increased neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and ventral tegmental area but not in dorsal raphe nucleus or mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, whereas risperidone increased the firing in locus coeruleus, ventral tegmental area and dorsal raphe nucleus but not in mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Blonanserin persistently increased frontal extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine but not serotonin, GABA or glutamate, whereas risperidone persistently increased those of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin but not GABA or glutamate. These results suggest a pharmacological correlation between the stimulatory effects of these antipsychotics on frontal monoamine release and neuronal activity in monoaminergic nuclei. Inhibition of the α(2) adrenoceptor increased extracellular monoamine levels and enhanced blonanserin-induced increase in extracellular serotonin level. These results indicated that the combination of antagonism of D(2) and 5-HT(2A) receptors contribute to the rise in extracellular levels of norepinephrine and dopamine, and that α(2) adrenoceptors play important roles in frontal serotonin release. They also suggest that blonanserin-induced activation of monoaminergic transmission could be, at least partially, involved in atypical antipsychotic properties of blonanserin. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-type specific deletion of GABA(A)α1 in corticotropin-releasing factor-containing neurons enhances anxiety and disrupts fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafford, Georgette M; Guo, Ji-Dong; Flandreau, Elizabeth I; Hazra, Rimi; Rainnie, Donald G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-10-02

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is critical for the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stressors, and it has been shown to modulate fear and anxiety. The CRF receptor is widely expressed across a variety of cell types, impeding progress toward understanding the contribution of specific CRF-containing neurons to fear dysregulation. We used a unique CRF-Cre driver transgenic mouse line to remove floxed GABA(A)α1 subunits specifically from CRF neurons [CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO]. This process resulted in mice with decreased GABA(A)α1 expression only in CRF neurons and increased CRF mRNA within the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These mice show normal locomotor and pain responses and no difference in depressive-like behavior or Pavlovian fear conditioning. However, CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO increased anxiety-like behavior and impaired extinction of conditioned fear, coincident with an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. These behavioral impairments were rescued with systemic or BNST infusion of the CRF antagonist R121919. Infusion of Zolpidem, a GABA(A)α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, into the BNST of the CRF-GABA(A)α1 KO was ineffective at decreasing anxiety. Electrophysiological findings suggest a disruption in inhibitory current may play a role in these changes. These data indicate that disturbance of CRF containing GABA(A)α1 neurons causes increased anxiety and impaired fear extinction, both of which are symptoms diagnostic for anxiety disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  19. Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptors in the rat central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda,Hiroo

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA were investigated in the rat central nervous system by radioreceptor assay (RRA. Scatchard analysis revealed that the rat brain had two distinct GABA binding sites with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd of 11.7 nM and 34.7 nM. The highest level of specific [3H]-GABA binding was found in the rat cerebellum. Imidazole acetic acid, a potent GABA agonist, was effective in displacing [3H]-GABA binding but beta-alanine was slightly effective in inhibiting [3H]-GABA binding. Muscimol, the most potent GABA agonist, has been used as a ligand to characterize the postsynaptic GABA receptors. However, the maximal binding capacity (Bmax of muscimol-RRA was about 3 times larger than that of GABA-RRA, suggesting that muscimol might label not only GABA receptors but other unknown receptors as well. An endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was purified from the P2 fraction of rat brain with 0.05% Triton X-100. The endogenous inhibitor was competitive with GABA on GABA binding sites. The inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor of GABA receptor binding was blocked by the allosteric effect of diazepam. In the presence of diazepam, [3H]-GABA binding with the endogenous inhibitor was larger than that with GABA, whereas there was no difference in the absence of diazepam. This indicated that the endogenous inhibitor was not GABA itself. The molecular weight of the endogenous inhibitor was estimate by gel filtration to be less than 3,000 daltons.

  20. Marlin-1, a novel RNA-binding protein associates with GABA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, Andrés; Restituito, Sophie; Brandon, Julia M; Charles, Kelly J; Bawagan, Hinayana; Freeman, Katie B; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Moss, Stephen J

    2004-04-02

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Whereas heterodimerization between GABA(B) receptor GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits is essential for functional expression, how neurons coordinate the assembly of these critical receptors remains to be established. Here we have identified Marlin-1, a novel GABA(B) receptor-binding protein that associates specifically with the GABA(B)R1 subunit in yeast, tissue culture cells, and neurons. Marlin-1 is expressed in the brain and exhibits a granular distribution in cultured hippocampal neurons. Marlin-1 binds different RNA species including the 3'-untranslated regions of both the GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 mRNAs in vitro and also associates with RNA in cultured neurons. Inhibition of Marlin-1 expression via small RNA interference technology results in enhanced intracellular levels of the GABA(B)R2 receptor subunit without affecting the level of GABA(B)R1. Together our results suggest that Marlin-1 functions to regulate the cellular levels of GABA(B) R2 subunits, which may have significant effects on the production of functional GABA(B) receptor heterodimers. Therefore, our observations provide an added level of regulation for the control of GABA(B) receptor expression and for the efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  1. Putrescine catabolism via DAO contributes to proline and GABA accumulation in roots of lupine seedlings growing under salt stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Legocka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The levels of polyamines (PAs, proline (Pro, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA as well as the activity of diamine oxidase (DAO; EC 1.4.3.6 were studied in the roots of 2-day-old lupine (Lupinus luteus L. ‘Juno’ seedlings treated with 200 mM NaCl for 24 h. The effect of adding 1 mM aminoguanidine (AG, an inhibitor of DAO activity, was also analyzed. It was found that in roots of lupine seedlings growing under salt stress, a negative correlation between Pro accumulation and putrescine (Put content takes place. Pro level increased in roots by about 160% and, at the same time, Put content decreased by about 60%, as a result of ca. twofold increase of DAO activity. The AG added to the seedlings almost totally inhibited the activity of DAO, increased Put accumulation to control level, decreased Pro content by about 25%, and reduced GABA level by about 22%. Addition of 50 mM GABA to the lupine seedlings growing in the presence of AG and NaCl restored Pro content in roots to its level in NaCl-treated plants. In this research, the clear correlation between Put degradation and GABA and Pro accumulation was shown for the first time in the roots of seedlings growing under salt stress. This could be considered as a short-term response of a plant to high salt concentration. Our findings indicate that during intensive Pro accumulation in roots induced by salt stress, the pool of this amino acid is indirectly supported by GABA production as a result of Put degradation.

  2. GABA(A) receptor M2-M3 loop secondary structure and changes in accessibility during channel gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Amal K; Chatav, Maya; Akabas, Myles H

    2002-11-08

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor M2-M3 loop structure and its role in gating were investigated using the substituted cysteine accessibility method. Residues from alpha(1)Arg-273 to alpha(1)Ile-289 were mutated to cysteine, one at a time. MTSET(+) or MTSES(-) reacted with all mutants from alpha(1)R273C to alpha(1)Y281C, except alpha(1)P277C, in the absence and presence of GABA. The MTSET(+) closed-state reaction rate was >1000 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)N274C, alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)K278C, and alpha(1)Y281C and was <300 liters/mol-s at alpha(1)R273C, alpha(1)L276C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C. These two groups of residues lie on opposite sides of an alpha-helix. The fast reacting group lies on a continuation of the M2 segment channel-lining helix face. This suggests that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends about two helical turns beyond alpha(1)N274 (20'), aligned with the extracellular ring of charge. At alpha(1)S275C, alpha(1)V279C, alpha(1)A280C, and alpha(1)A284C the reaction rate was faster in the presence of GABA. The reagents had no functional effect on the mutants from alpha(1)A282C to alpha(1)I289C, except alpha(1)A284C. Access may be sterically hindered possibly by close interaction with the extracellular domain. We suggest that the M2 segment alpha-helix extends beyond the predicted extracellular end of the M2 segment and that gating induces a conformational change in and/or around the N-terminal half of the M2-M3 loop. Implications for coupling ligand-evoked conformational changes in the extracellular domain to channel gating in the membrane-spanning domain are discussed.

  3. Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Woodin, Melanie A; Sernagor, Evelyne; Cancedda, Laura; Vinay, Laurent; Rivera, Claudio; Legendre, Pascal; Luhmann, Heiko J; Bordey, Angelique; Wenner, Peter; Fukuda, Atsuo; van den Pol, Anthony N; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Cherubini, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    DURING BRAIN DEVELOPMENT, THERE IS A PROGRESSIVE REDUCTION OF INTRACELLULAR CHLORIDE ASSOCIATED WITH A SHIFT IN GABA POLARITY: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent "Hypothesis and Theory Article," the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be "an experimental artefact" (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology.

  4. Relative neurotoxicity of ivermectin and moxidectin in Mdr1ab (-/-) mice and effects on mammalian GABA(A) channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménez, Cécile; Sutra, Jean-François; Prichard, Roger; Lespine, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The anthelmintics ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) display differences in toxicity in several host species. Entrance into the brain is restricted by the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter, while toxicity is mediated through the brain GABA(A) receptors. This study compared the toxicity of IVM and MOX in vivo and their interaction with GABA(A) receptors in vitro. Drug toxicity was assessed in Mdr1ab(-/-) mice P-gp-deficient after subcutaneous administration of increasing doses (0.11-2.0 and 0.23-12.9 µmol/kg for IVM and MOX in P-gp-deficient mice and half lethal doses (LD(50)) in wild-type mice). Survival was evaluated over 14-days. In Mdr1ab(-/-) mice, LD(50) was 0.46 and 2.3 µmol/kg for IVM and MOX, respectively, demonstrating that MOX was less toxic than IVM. In P-gp-deficient mice, MOX had a lower brain-to-plasma concentration ratio and entered into the brain more slowly than IVM. The brain sublethal drug concentrations determined after administration of doses close to LD(50) were, in Mdr1ab(-/-) and wild-type mice, respectively, 270 and 210 pmol/g for IVM and 830 and 740-1380 pmol/g for MOX, indicating that higher brain concentrations are required for MOX toxicity than IVM. In rat α1β2γ2 GABA channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IVM and MOX were both allosteric activators of the GABA-induced response. The Hill coefficient was 1.52±0.45 for IVM and 0.34±0.56 for MOX (pMOX relative to GABA alone was 413.7±66.1 and 257.4±40.6%, respectively (pMOX in the brain and in the interaction of IVM and MOX with GABA(A) receptors account for differences in neurotoxicity seen in intact and Mdr1-deficient animals. These differences in neurotoxicity of IVM and MOX are important in considering their use in humans.

  5. GABA-B receptor activation and conflict behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelaars, C.E.J.; Bollen, E.L.; Rigter, H.; Bruinvels, J.

    1988-01-01

    Baclofen and oxazepam enhance extinction of conflict behavior in the Geller-Seifter test while baclofen and diazepam release punished behavior in Vogel's conflict test. In order to investigate the possibility that the effect of the selective GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen is mediated indirectly via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex, the effect of pretreatment of rats with baclofen on (/sup 3/H)-diazepam binding to washed and unwashed cortical and cerebellar membranes of rats has been studied. Baclofen pretreatment increase Bmax in washed cerebellar membranes when bicuculline was present in the incubation mixture. No effect was seen in cortical membranes. The present results render it unlikely that the effect of baclofen on extinction of conflict behavior and punished drinking is mediated via the GABA-A/benzodiazepine receptor complex. 50 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  6. Neurochemical correlates of. gamma. -aminobutyrate (GABA) inhibition in cat visual cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcar, V.J.; Dreher, B. (Univ. of Sydney (Australia))

    1990-01-01

    High affinity binding of ({sup 3}H){gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to neuronal membranes from different parts of cat visual cortex was tested for sensitivity to GABA{sub A} agonists isoguvacine and THIP, GABA{sub A} antagonist SR95531 and GABA{sub B} agonist baclofen. Some of the GABA{sub A}-binding sites were found to have a very low affinity for THIP, suggesting the presence and, possibly, uneven distribution of non-synaptic GABA{sub A} receptors in cat visual cortex. There were no differences in K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of high affinity uptake of GABA and in the potency of K{sup +}-stimulated release of GABA, between primary and association cortices. Consequently, the present results indicate that despite the anatomical and physiological differences between the primary and association feline visual cortices the neurochemical characteristics of GABAergic inhibition are very similar in the two regions.

  7. GABA depolarizes immature neurons and inhibits network activity in the neonatal neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmse, Knut; Kummer, Michael; Kovalchuk, Yury; Witte, Otto W; Garaschuk, Olga; Holthoff, Knut

    2015-07-16

    A large body of evidence from in vitro studies suggests that GABA is depolarizing during early postnatal development. However, the mode of GABA action in the intact developing brain is unknown. Here we examine the in vivo effects of GABA in cells of the upper cortical plate using a combination of electrophysiological and Ca(2+)-imaging techniques. We report that at postnatal days (P) 3-4, GABA depolarizes the majority of immature neurons in the occipital cortex of anaesthetized mice. At the same time, GABA does not efficiently activate voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and fails to induce action potential firing. Blocking GABA(A) receptors disinhibits spontaneous network activity, whereas allosteric activation of GABA(A) receptors has the opposite effect. In summary, our data provide evidence that in vivo GABA acts as a depolarizing neurotransmitter imposing an inhibitory control on network activity in the neonatal (P3-4) neocortex.

  8. Antagonism of GABAB-receptor-mediated responses in the guinea-pig isolated ileum and vas deferens by phosphono-analogues of GABA.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, D. I.; Ong, J; Prager, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    1. The phosphono-analogues of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 4-amino-butylphosphonic acid (4-ABPA), 3-amino-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-propylphosphonic acid (phaclofen) and 3-amino-2-cyclohexylpropyl-phosphonic acid, each antagonized the GABA- and baclofen-induced GABAB-receptor-mediated depression of twitch responses to transmural stimulation in the guinea-pig isolated ileum, in a concentration-dependent, reversible and surmountable manner (apparent pA2 = 4.0 +/- 0.1, 4 +/- 0.2 and 3.7 +/- 0.2 resp...

  9. The four human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Christiansen, Bolette; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    , we perform the first elaborate pharmacological characterization of all four human GAT subtypes. We conduct the experiments in parallel in a [3H]GABA uptake assay using 14 standard GAT substrates and inhibitors. This setup enables direct comparison of the absolute values of inhibitory activities......, no subtype selective ligands have been reported for the three remaining GATs. Given the potential therapeutic relevance of the individual GAT subtypes, a search for novel structures displaying selectivities for specific GAT subtypes is important. In this study, we validate our [3H]GABA uptake assay for use...... at the four human GATs....

  10. Selective mGAT2 (BGT-1) GABA Uptake Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten Kirkegaard

    2013-01-01

    β-Amino acids sharing a lipophilic diaromatic side chain were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse GABA transporter subtypes mGAT1−4. The parent amino acids were also characterized. Compounds 13a, 13b, and 17b displayed more than 6-fold selectivity for mGAT2 over mGAT1. Compou...... 17b displayed anticonvulsive properties inferring a role of mGAT2 in epileptic disorders. These results provide new neuropharmacological tools and a strategy for designing subtype selective GABA transport inhibitors....

  11. Attenuation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transaminase activity contributes to GABA increase in the cerebral cortex of mice exposed to β-cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Cao, D; Li, X; Zhang, R; Yu, F; Ren, Y; An, L

    2014-03-01

    The current study investigated the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels and GABA metabolic enzymes (GABA transaminase (GABA(T)) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)) activities at 2 and 4 h after treatment, using a high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detectors and colorimetric assay, in the cerebral cortex of mice treated with 20, 40 or 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin by a single oral gavage, with corn oil as vehicle control. In addition, GABA protein (4 h after treatment), GABA(T) protein (2 h after treatment) and GABA receptors messenger RNA (mRNA) expression were detected by immunohistochemistry, Western blot and real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, respectively. β-Cypermethrin (80 mg/kg) significantly increased GABA levels in the cerebral cortex of mice, at both 2 and 4 h after treatment, compared with the control. Also, GABA immunohistochemistry results suggested that the number of positive granules was increased in the cerebral cortex of mice 4 h after exposure to 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin when compared with the control. Furthermore, the results also showed that GABA(T) activity detected was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex of mice 2 h after β-cypermethrin administration (40 or 80 mg/kg). No significant changes were found in GAD activity, or the expression of GABA(T) protein and GABAB receptors mRNA, in the cerebral cortex of mice, except that 80 mg/kg β-cypermethrin caused a significant decrease, compared with the vehicle control, in GABAA receptors mRNA expression 4 h after administration. These results suggested that attenuated GABA(T) activity induced by β-cypermethrin contributed to increased GABA levels in the mouse brain. The downregulated GABAA receptors mRNA expression is most likely a downstream event.

  12. d Subunit-Containing GABA[subscript A] Receptor Prevents Overgeneralization of Fear in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Han-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Wei-Zhu; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Yin, Xiao-Ping; Pan, Bing-Xing

    2017-01-01

    The role of d subunit-containing GABA[subscript A] receptor (GABA[subscript A](d)R) in fear generalization is uncertain. Here, by using mice with or without genetic deletion of GABA[subscript A](d)R and using protocols in which the conditioned tone stimuli were cross presented with different nonconditioned stimuli, we observed that when the two…

  13. GABA and Endocannabinoids Mediate Depotentiation of Schaffer Collateral Synapses Induced by Stimulation of Temperoammonic Inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2016-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of Schaffer collateral (SC) synapses in the hippocampus is thought to play a key role in episodic memory formation. Because the hippocampus is a shorter-term, limited capacity storage system, repeated bouts of learning and synaptic plasticity require that SC synapses reset to baseline at some point following LTP. We previously showed that repeated low frequency activation of temperoammonic (TA) inputs to the CA1 region depotentiates SC LTP without persistently altering basal transmission. This heterosynaptic depotentiation involves adenosine A1 receptors but not N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, metabotropic glutamate receptors or L-type calcium channels. In the present study, we used rat hippocampal slices to explore other messengers contributing to TA-induced SC depotentiation, and provide evidence for the involvement of cannabinoid-1 and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type-A receptors as more proximal signaling events leading to synaptic resetting, with A1 receptor activation serving as a downstream event. Surprisingly, we found that TA-induced SC depotentiation is independent of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate glutamate receptors. We also examined the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and found a role for extracellular-signal related kinase 1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not c-Jun-N-terminal kinase. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of TA inputs to CA1 activates a complex signaling network that instructs SC synaptic resetting. The involvement of GABA and endocannabinoids suggest mechanisms that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction associated with substance abuse and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. GABA and Endocannabinoids Mediate Depotentiation of Schaffer Collateral Synapses Induced by Stimulation of Temperoammonic Inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Izumi

    Full Text Available Long-term potentiation (LTP of Schaffer collateral (SC synapses in the hippocampus is thought to play a key role in episodic memory formation. Because the hippocampus is a shorter-term, limited capacity storage system, repeated bouts of learning and synaptic plasticity require that SC synapses reset to baseline at some point following LTP. We previously showed that repeated low frequency activation of temperoammonic (TA inputs to the CA1 region depotentiates SC LTP without persistently altering basal transmission. This heterosynaptic depotentiation involves adenosine A1 receptors but not N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, metabotropic glutamate receptors or L-type calcium channels. In the present study, we used rat hippocampal slices to explore other messengers contributing to TA-induced SC depotentiation, and provide evidence for the involvement of cannabinoid-1 and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA type-A receptors as more proximal signaling events leading to synaptic resetting, with A1 receptor activation serving as a downstream event. Surprisingly, we found that TA-induced SC depotentiation is independent of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors. We also examined the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs, and found a role for extracellular-signal related kinase 1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not c-Jun-N-terminal kinase. These results indicate that low frequency stimulation of TA inputs to CA1 activates a complex signaling network that instructs SC synaptic resetting. The involvement of GABA and endocannabinoids suggest mechanisms that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction associated with substance abuse and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  15. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  16. Saturable binding of /sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate to the sites linked to the GABA receptor and the interaction with gabaergic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Bymaster, F.P.; Squires, R.F.

    1984-02-27

    /sup 35/S-t-Butylbicyclophosphorothionate (/sup 35/S-TBPS) binds in a concentration-saturable manner to specific sites on membranes from rat cerebral cortex. Using a filtration assay at 25/sup 0/C, in 250 mM NaCl, specific binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS constitutes about 84 to 94 percent of total binding, depending on radioligand concentrations. /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is optimal in the presence of NaCl or NaBr and substantially less in the presence of NaI or NaF. It is sensitive to the treatment with 0.05 percent Triton X-100 but not to repeated freezing and thawing, procedures which increase /sup 3/H-GABA binding. Pharmacological studies show that /sup 35/S-TBPS binding is strongly inhibited by GABA-A receptor agonists (e.g., GABA and muscimol) and by the noncompetitive antagonist, picrotoxin, but not the competitive antagonist, bicuculline. Compounds which enhance binding of radioactive GABA and benzodiazepines, such as the pyrazolopyridines, cartazolate and tracazolate, and a diaryltriazine, LY81067, are also potent inhibitors of /sup 35/S-TBPS binding, with LY81067 being the most effective. The effects of GABA, picrotoxin and LY81067 on the saturable binding of /sup 35/S-TBPS in cortical membranes are compared. The present findings are consistent with the interpretation that /sup 35/S-TBPS bind at or near the picrotoxin-sensitive anion recognition sites of the GABA/benzodiazepine/picrotoxin receptor complex.

  17. Seizures beget seizures: the quest for GABA as a key player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2006-01-01

    Synapses mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptors are notoriously altered during periods of enhanced activity. Since a loss of inhibitory tone is a basic cause of seizures and epilepsies, it is important to determine the underlying mechanisms and the way this could be alleviated or at least reduced. Alterations of the intracellular content of chloride are thought to be a major player in the sequence of events that follow episodes of hyperactivity. In this review, I discuss these mechanisms both in the adult and developing brain, relying on studies in which chloride and GABAergic currents were measured by electrophysiological and imaging techniques. The main conclusion is that in adult systems, status epilepticus induces a complete re-organization of the networks, with cell death, axonal growth, and glutamatergic neosynapse formation leading to an increased glutamatergic drive. This, in turn, will decrease the threshold of seizure generation and thus contribute to seizure generation. In contrast, GABAergic synapses are not readily "plastic" as the lost interneurones and synapses are not replaced. Somatostatin-positive 0-LM Interneurons that innervate the dendrites of the principal cells in the hippocampus degenerate selectively, leading to a loss of the inhibitory drive in the dendrites, whereas somatic projecting basket cells and somatic inhibitory drives are relatively spared. This imbalance leads to a reduction of the inhibitory strength that is necessary but not sufficient to generate ongoing seizures. An additional important factor is the persistent increase of the intracellular chloride concentration that leads to a long-lasting shift in the depolarizing direction of the actions of GABA that will also contribute to seizure generation. In the developing brain, a major source of seizure generation is the depolarizing and often excitatory actions of GABA due to a higher intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl-]I) in immature neurons, a property

  18. An autonomous circadian clock in the inner mouse retina regulated by dopamine and GABA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Xiang Ruan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the mammalian retinal circadian clock on retinal physiology and function is widely recognized, yet the cellular elements and neural regulation of retinal circadian pacemaking remain unclear due to the challenge of long-term culture of adult mammalian retina and the lack of an ideal experimental measure of the retinal circadian clock. In the current study, we developed a protocol for long-term culture of intact mouse retinas, which allows retinal circadian rhythms to be monitored in real time as luminescence rhythms from a PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC clock gene reporter. With this in vitro assay, we studied the characteristics and location within the retina of circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, the influence of major retinal neurotransmitters, and the resetting of the retinal circadian clock by light. Retinal PER2::LUC rhythms were routinely measured from whole-mount retinal explants for 10 d and for up to 30 d. Imaging of vertical retinal slices demonstrated that the rhythmic luminescence signals were concentrated in the inner nuclear layer. Interruption of cell communication via the major neurotransmitter systems of photoreceptors and ganglion cells (melatonin and glutamate and the inner nuclear layer (dopamine, acetylcholine, GABA, glycine, and glutamate did not disrupt generation of retinal circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, nor did interruption of intercellular communication through sodium-dependent action potentials or connexin 36 (cx36-containing gap junctions, indicating that PER2::LUC rhythms generation in the inner nuclear layer is likely cell autonomous. However, dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, and GABA, acting through membrane hyperpolarization and casein kinase, set the phase and amplitude of retinal PER2::LUC rhythms, respectively. Light pulses reset the phase of the in vitro retinal oscillator and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists attenuated these phase shifts. Thus, dopamine and GABA act at the molecular level of PER

  19. Single rodent mesohabenular axons release glutamate and GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Mejias-Aponte, Carlos; Zhang, Shiliang; Wang, Huiling; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward, aversion, addiction, and depression, through descending interactions with several brain structures, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). VTA provides reciprocal inputs to LHb, but their actions are unclear. Here we show that the majority of rat and mouse VTA neurons innervating LHb co-express markers for both glutamate-signaling (vesicular glutamate transporter 2, VGluT2) and GABA-signaling (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD; and vesicular GABA transporter, VGaT). A single axon from these mesohabenular neurons co-expresses VGluT2-protein and VGaT-protein, and surprisingly establishes symmetric and asymmetric synapses on LHb neurons. In LHb slices, light activation of mesohabenular fibers expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) driven by VGluT2 or VGaT promoters elicits release of both glutamate and GABA onto single LHb neurons. In vivo light-activation of mesohabenular terminals inhibits or excites LHb neurons. Our findings reveal an unanticipated type of VTA neuron that co-transmits glutamate and GABA, and provides the majority of mesohabenular inputs. PMID:25242304

  20. GABA in Paraventricular Nucleus Regulates Adipose Afferent Reflex in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ding

    Full Text Available Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT induces adipose afferent reflex (AAR, and thereby causes a general sympathetic activation. Paraventricular nucleus (PVN is important in control of sympathetic outflow. This study was designed to investigate the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA in PVN in regulating the AAR.Experiments were carried out in anesthetized rats. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and mean arterial pressure (MAP were continuously recorded. AAR was evaluated by the RSNA and MAP responses to electrical stimulation of the right epididymal WAT (eWAT afferent nerve. Electrical stimulation of eWAT afferent nerve increase RSNA. Bilateral microinjection of the GABAA receptor agonist isoguvacine or the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen attenuated the AAR. The effect of isoguvacine on the AAR was greater than that of baclofen. The GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine enhanced the AAR, while the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP-35348 had no significant effect on the AAR. Bilateral PVN microinjection of vigabatrin, a selective GABA-transaminase inhibitor, to increase endogenous GABA levels in the PVN abolished the AAR. The inhibitory effect of vigabatrin on the AAR was attenuated by the pretreatment with gabazine or CGP-35348. Pretreatment with combined gabazine and CGP-35348 abolished the effects of vigabatrin.Activation of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the PVN inhibits the AAR. Blockade of GABAA receptors in the PVN enhances the AAR. Endogenous GABA in the PVN plays an important role in regulating the AAR.

  1. Study on Flavour Volatiles of GABA Green Tea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2012-06-26

    Jun 26, 2012 ... inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system and is known to ... units (Yao et al., 2005; Shimoda et al., 1995; Baptista et al., 1998; Kenji and ... This study took GABA tea through vacuum processing and water ...

  2. Neurofibromin Regulation of ERK Signaling Modulates GABA Release and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Cui (Yijun); R.M. Costa (Rui); G.G. Murphy (Geoffrey); Y. Elgersma (Ype); Y. Zhu (Yuan); D.H. Gutmann (David); L.F. Parada (Luis); I. Mody (Istvan); A.J. Silva (Alcino)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe uncovered a role for ERK signaling in GABA release, long-term potentiation (LTP), and learning, and show that disruption of this mechanism accounts for the learning deficits in a mouse model for learning disabilities in neurofibromatosis type I (NF1). Our results demonstrate that neur

  3. Ionotropic GABA Receptors and Distal Retinal ON and OFF Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Popova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the vertebrate retina, visual signals are segregated into parallel ON and OFF pathways, which provide information for light increments and decrements. The segregation is first evident at the level of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in distal retina. The activity of large populations of ON and OFF bipolar cells is reflected in the b- and d-waves of the diffuse electroretinogram (ERG. The role of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, acting through ionotropic GABA receptors in shaping the ON and OFF responses in distal retina, is a matter of debate. This review summarized current knowledge about the types of the GABAergic neurons and ionotropic GABA receptors in the retina as well as the effects of GABA and specific GABAA and GABAC receptor antagonists on the activity of the ON and OFF bipolar cells in both nonmammalian and mammalian retina. Special emphasis is put on the effects on b- and d-waves of the ERG as a useful tool for assessment of the overall function of distal retinal ON and OFF channels. The role of GABAergic system in establishing the ON-OFF asymmetry concerning the time course and absolute and relative sensitivity of the ERG responses under different conditions of light adaptation in amphibian retina is also discussed.

  4. GABA inhibition of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Krönström, Jenny; Holmgren, Susanne; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2011-03-01

    Photogenic organs (photophores) of the velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) are under hormonal control, since melatonin (MT) and prolactin (PRL) trigger luminescence while α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) prevents this light to be emitted. A recent study supported, however, the presence of numerous nerve fibres in the photogenic tissue of this shark. Immunohistochemical and pharmacological results collected in this work support these nerve fibres to be inhibitory GABAergic nerves since (i) GABA immunoreactivity was detected inside the photogenic tissue, where previous labelling detected the nerve fibre structures and (ii) GABA was able to inhibit MT and PRL-induced luminescence, which was on the other hand increased by the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (BICU). In addition, we also demonstrated that BICU can induce light per se by provoking pigment retraction in the pigmented cells composing the iris-like structure of the photophore, attaining, however, only about 10% of hormonally induced luminescence intensity at 10(-3)mol L(-1). This strongly supports that a GABA inhibitory tonus controls photophore "aperture" in the photogenic tissue of E. spinax but also that MT and PRL have more than one target cell type in the photophores.

  5. Structure activity relationship of selective GABA uptake inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Jørgensen, Lars; Madsen, Karsten K;

    2015-01-01

    A series of β-amino acids with lipophilic diaromatic side chain was synthesized and characterized pharmacologically on mouse γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) transporter subtypes mGAT1-4 in order to investigate structure activity relationships (SAR) for mGAT2 (corresponding to hBGT-1). Variation...

  6. STUDY OF PHENIBUT ANTIEDEMIC ACTION AND NEW GABA DERIVATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Scherbakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied phenibut, gammalone, and new GABA derivatives action on the development of experimental cerebral edema. We have detected gammoxyn - the most prospective substance for further study as cere-broprotector. We have established that gammoxyn has a signified protective action in cerebral edema.

  7. Synthesis and proton NMR spectroscopy of intra-vesicular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luke Y-J; Tong, Rong; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-01-01

    We report the synthesis of vesicles containing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and their proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. These vesicles were constructed to more closely mimic the intracellular environment wherein GABA exists. For this study, these GABA-containing vesicles were examined under (1)H NMR as a potential platform for future studies on the differences between aqueous phantoms, ex vivo brain extracts, and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy results. We found that intra-vesicular GABA faithfully yielded the chemical shifts and J-coupling constants of free aqueous GABA, alongside the chemical shift signals of the vesicle wall.

  8. GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid production, antioxidant activity in some germinated dietary seeds and the effect of cooking on their GABA content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasarin TIANSAWANG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germinated grains have been known as sources of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA that provide beneficial effects for human health. This study was aimed to investigate GABA production, dietary fiber, antioxidant activity, and the effect of cooking on GABA loss in germinated legumes and sesame. The highest GABA content was found in germinated mung bean, (0.8068 g kg-1, 24 h incubation followed by germinated soybean, germinated black bean and soaked sesame. Beside GABA, dietary fiber content also increased in all grains during germination where the insoluble dietary fiber fractions were always found in higher proportions to soluble dietary fiber fractions. Our results also confirmed that germinated mung bean is a rich source of GABA and dietary fibers. Microwave cooking resulted in the smallest loss of GABA in mung bean and sesame, while steaming led to the least GABA content loss in soybean and black bean. Therefore microwave cooking and steaming are the most recommended cooking processes to preserve GABA in germinated legumes and sesame.

  9. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Ippolito

    Full Text Available Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1, was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  10. Spatial distributions of GABA receptors and local inhibition of Ca2+ transients studied with GABA uncaging in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kanemoto

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-amino-butylic acid-mediated inhibition in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons was characterized by two-photon uncaging of a caged-GABA compound, BCMACM-GABA, and one-photon uncaging of RuBi-GABA in rat hippocampal slice preparations. Although we found that GABA(A-mediated currents were diffusely distributed along the dendrites, currents elicited at the branch points of the apical dendritic trunk were approximately two times larger than those elsewhere in the dendrite. We examined the inhibitory action of the GABA-induced currents on Ca(2+ transients evoked with a single back-propagating action potential (bAP in oblique dendrites. We found that GABA uncaging selectively inhibited the Ca(2+ transients in the region adjacent (20 µm. Our data indicate that GABA inhibition results in spatially confined inhibition of Ca(2+ transients shortly after bAP, and suggest that this effect is particularly potent at the dendritic branch points where GABA receptors cluster.

  11. A fluorescence-coupled assay for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) reveals metabolic stress-induced modulation of GABA content in neuroendocrine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Joseph E; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2014-01-01

    Pathways involved in the synthesis of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of high grade neuroendocrine (NE) neoplasms as well as neoplasms from a non-NE lineage. Using The Cancer Genome Atlas, overexpression of the GABA synthetic enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), was found to be associated with decreased disease free-survival in prostate adenocarcinoma and decreased overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Furthermore, GAD1 was found to be expressed in castrate-resistant prostate cancer cell lines, but not androgen-responsive cell lines. Using a novel fluorescence-coupled enzymatic microplate assay for GABA mediated through reduction of resazurin in a prostate neuroendocrine carcinoma (PNEC) cell line, acid microenvironment-induced stress increased GABA levels while alkaline microenvironment-induced stress decreased GABA through modulation of GAD1 and glutamine synthetase (GLUL) activities. Moreover, glutamine but not glucose deprivation decreased GABA through modulation of GLUL. Consistent with evidence in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms that GABA synthesis mediated through GAD1 may play a crucial role in surviving stress, GABA may be an important mediator of stress survival in neoplasms. These findings identify GABA synthesis and metabolism as a potentially important pathway for regulating cancer cell stress response as well as a potential target for therapeutic strategies.

  12. GABA(A) receptor physiology and its relationship to the mechanism of action of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Raman

    2012-03-01

    Clobazam was initially developed in the early 1970s as a nonsedative anxiolytic agent, and is currently available as adjunctive therapy for epilepsy and anxiety disorders in more than 100 countries. In October 2011, clobazam (Onfi™; Lundbeck Inc., Deerfield, IL, USA) was approved by the US FDA for use as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients aged 2 years and older. It is a long-acting 1,5-benzodiazepine whose structure distinguishes it from the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines, such as diazepam, lorazepam and clonazepam. Clobazam is well absorbed, with peak concentrations occurring linearly 1-4 hours after administration. Both clobazam and its active metabolite, N-desmethylclobazam, are metabolized in the liver via the cytochrome P450 pathway. The mean half-life of N-desmethylclobazam (67.5 hours) is nearly double the mean half-life of clobazam (37.5 hours). Clobazam was synthesized with the anticipation that its distinct chemical structure would provide greater efficacy with fewer benzodiazepine-associated adverse effects. Frequently reported adverse effects of clobazam therapy include dizziness, sedation, drowsiness and ataxia. Evidence gathered from approximately 50 epilepsy clinical trials in adults and children indicated that the sedative effects observed with clobazam treatment were less severe than those reported with 1,4-benzodiazepines. In several studies of healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety, clobazam appeared to enhance participants' performance in cognitive tests, further distinguishing it from the 1,4-benzodiazepines. The anxiolytic and anticonvulsant effects of clobazam are associated with allosteric activation of the ligand-gated GABA(A) receptor. GABA(A) receptors are found extensively throughout the CNS, occurring synaptically and extrasynaptically. GABA(A) receptors are composed of five protein subunits, two copies of a single type of α subunit, two copies of one type of

  13. GABA mediated excitation in immature rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, E; Rovira, C; Gaiarsa, J L; Corradetti, R; Ben Ari, Y

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal neurons in vitro during the first postnatal week revealed the presence of spontaneous giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs). These were generated by the synchronous discharge of a population of neurons. GDPs reversed polarity at -27 and -51 mV when recorded with KCl or K-methylsulphate filled electrodes, respectively. GDPs were blocked by the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). Iontophoretic or bath applications of GABA (10-300 microM) in the presence of tetrodotoxin (1 microM), induced a membrane depolarization or in voltage clamp experiments an inward current which reversed polarity at the same potential as GDPs. The response to GABA was blocked in a non-competitive manner by bicuculline (10 microM) and did not desensitize. GABA mediated GDPs were presynaptically modulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Their frequency was reduced or blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and by the rather specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). The frequency of GDPs was enhanced by glycine and D-serine (10-30 microM) in a strychnine insensitive manner. This effect was blocked by AP-5, suggesting that it was mediated by the allosteric modulatory site of the NMDA receptor. These observations suggest that most of the 'excitatory' drive in immature neurons is mediated by GABA acting on GABAA receptors; furthermore excitatory amino acids modulate the release of GABA by a presynaptic action on GABAergic interneurons.

  14. GABA(A) receptor subtype selective cognition enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubach, Karen

    2003-08-01

    Currently the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is largely unrealised, with no preventive or curative therapies. The marketed acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (eg. donepezil, Aricept) are directed toward temporary symptomatic relief from impaired cognition, but have prominent adverse effects with minimal efficacy. In pursuit of novel cognition enhancers, the observation that classical benzodiazepines (BZ, eg. diazepam) are amnesic, coupled with the preservation of GABA(A) receptors in brain areas most affected by AD, highlighted the GABA(A) receptor as a potential therapeutic target. In contrast to the amnesic BZ agonists, the BZ inverse agonists (eg. DMCM) which attenuate GABA(A) receptor function, have been shown to improve performance in animal models of learning and memory. Unfortunately, such non-selective ligands also induce anxiety and convulsions. More recently, novel ligands have been developed (eg. 6,6-dimethyl-3-(2-hydroxyethyl)thio-1-(thiazol-2-yl)-6,7-dihydro-2-benzothiophen-4(5H)-one) that demonstrate binding selectivity and high inverse agonism for the alpha5 GABA(A) receptor subtype, which is preferentially located in the hippocampus, a region of the brain associated with learning and memory. Pre-clinical results are encouraging, since these alpha5 selective inverse agonists enhance memory in animal models, such as spatial learning in the Morris water-maze, but are devoid of the adverse effects associated with activity at other GABA(A) receptor subtypes in other brain regions. If the efficacy and safety profiles of alpha5 inverse agonists in humans prove to be similar to those seen in pre-clinical studies, these compounds would offer significant benefit to AD and MCI patients.

  15. The role of GABA in the regulation of GnRH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miho eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons form the final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA has long been implicated as one of the major players in the regulation of GnRH neurons. Although GABA is typically an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature adult central nervous system, most mature GnRH neurons show the unusual characteristic of being excited by GABA. While many reports have provided much insight into the contribution of GABA to the activity of GnRH neurons, the precise physiological role of the excitatory action of GABA on GnRH neurons remains elusive. This brief review presents the current knowledge of the role of GABA signaling in GnRH neuronal activity. We also discuss the modulation of GABA signaling by neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and the functional consequence of GABAergic inputs to GnRH neurons in both the physiology and pathology of reproduction.

  16. Photorelease of GABA with visible light using an inorganic caging group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Rial Verde

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe the selective photorelease of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA with a novel caged-GABA compound that uses a ruthenium complex as photosensor. This compound (“RuBi-GABA” can be excited with visible wavelengths, providing greater tissue penetration, less photo-toxicity, and faster photorelease kinetics than currently used UV light-sensitive caged compounds. Using pyramidal neurons from neocortical brain slices, we show that RuBi-GABA uncaging induces GABA-A receptor-mediated responses, has no detectable side effects on endogenous GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors and generates responses with kinetics and spatial resolution comparable to the best caged GABA compounds presently available. Finally, we illustrate two potential applications of RuBi-GABA uncaging: GABA receptor mapping, and optical silencing of neuronal firing.

  17. Are presynaptic GABA-Cρ2 receptors involved in anti-nociception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadavarty, R; Hwang, J; Rajput, P S; Soja, P J; Kumar, U; Sastry, B R

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the anti-nociceptive effects of GABA-C receptors in the central nervous system. Intracisternal injection of CACA, a GABA-C receptor agonist or isoguvacine, a GABA-A receptor agonist, significantly increased the tail-withdrawal latency. TPMPA, a GABA-C receptor antagonist blocked the effects of CACA but not isoguvacine indicating that GABA-C receptors are involved in regulating pain. Further, double-labelled immunofluorescence studies revealed that GABA-Cρ2 receptors are expressed presynaptically in the spinal dorsal horn, especially, substantia gelatinosa, a region that has been previously implicated in analgesia by regulating nociceptive inflow. These data provide a provenance for future work looking at presynaptic spinal GABA-C receptors in the control of nociception.

  18. Spontaneous thermal motion of the GABA(A) receptor M2 channel-lining segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Amal K; Akabas, Myles H

    2005-10-21

    The gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor channel opening involves translational and rotational motions of the five channel-lining, M2 transmembrane segments. The M2 segment's extracellular half is loosely packed and undergoes significant thermal motion. To characterize the extent of the M2 segment's motion, we used disulfide trapping experiments between pairs of engineered cysteines. In alpha1beta1 gamma2S receptors the single gamma subunit is flanked by an alpha and beta subunit. The gamma2 M2-14' position is located in the alpha-gamma subunit interface. Gamma2 13' faces the channel lumen. We expressed either the gamma2 14' or the gamma2 13' cysteine substitution mutants with alpha1 cysteine substitution mutants between 12' and 16' and wild-type beta1. Disulfide bonds formed spontaneously between gamma2 14'C and both alpha1 15'C and alpha1 16'C and also between gamma2 13'C and alpha1 13'C. Oxidation by copper phenanthroline induced disulfide bond formation between gamma2 14'C and alpha1 13'C. Disulfide bond formation rates with gamma2 14'C were similar in the presence and absence of GABA, although the rate with alpha1 13'C was slower than with the other two positions. In a homology model based on the acetylcholine receptor structure, alphaM2 would need to rotate in opposite directions by approximately 80 degrees to bring alpha1 13' and alpha1 15' into close proximity with gamma2 14'. Alternatively, translational motion of alphaM2 would reduce the extent of rotational motion necessary to bring these two alpha subunit residues into close proximity with the gamma2 14' position. These experiments demonstrate that in the closed state the M2 segments undergo continuous spontaneous motion in the region near the extracellular end of the channel gate. Opening the gate may involve similar but concerted motions of the M2 segments.

  19. Cell-attached recordings of responses evoked by photorelease of GABA in the immature cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat eMinlebaev

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel non-invasive technique to measure the polarity of GABAergic responses based on cell-attached recordings of currents activated by laser-uncaging of GABA. For these recordings, a patch pipette was filled with a solution containing RuBi-GABA, and GABA was released from this complex by a laser beam conducted to the tip of the patch pipette via an optic fiber. In cell-attached recordings from neocortical and hippocampal neurons in postnatal days P2-5 rat brain slices in vitro, we found that laser-uncaging of GABA activates integral cell-attached currents mediated by tens of GABA(A channels. The initial response was inwardly directed, indicating a depolarizing response to GABA. The direction of the initial response was dependent on the pipette potential and analysis of its slope-voltage relationships revealed a depolarizing driving force of +11 mV for the currents through GABA channels. Initial depolarizing responses to GABA uncaging were inverted to hyperpolarizing in the presence of the NKCC1 blocker bumetanide. Current-voltage relationships of the currents evoked by Rubi-GABA uncaging using voltage-ramps at the peak of responses not only revealed a bumetanide-sensitive depolarizing reversal potential of the GABA(A receptor mediated responses, but also showed a strong voltage-dependent hysteresis. Upon desensitization of the uncaged-GABA response, current-voltage relationships of the currents through single GABA(A channels revealed depolarizing responses with the driving force values similar to those obtained for the initial response. Thus, cell-attached recordings of the responses evoked by local intrapipette GABA uncaging are suitable to assess the polarity of the GABA(A-Rs mediated signals in small cell compartments.

  20. Different subtypes of GABA-A receptors are expressed in human, mouse and rat T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K Mendu

    Full Text Available γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is the most prominent neuroinhibitory transmitter in the brain, where it activates neuronal GABA-A receptors (GABA-A channels located at synapses and outside of synapses. The GABA-A receptors are primary targets of many clinically useful drugs. In recent years, GABA has been shown to act as an immunomodulatory molecule. We have examined in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells which subunit isoforms of the GABA-A channels are expressed. The channel physiology and drug specificity is dictated by the GABA-A receptor subtype, which in turn is determined by the subunit isoforms that make the channel. There were 5, 8 and 13 different GABA-A subunit isoforms identified in human, mouse and rat CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Importantly, the γ2 subunit that imposes benzodiazepine sensitivity on the GABA-A receptors, was only detected in the mouse T cells. Immunoblots and immunocytochemistry showed abundant GABA-A channel proteins in the T cells from all three species. GABA-activated whole-cell transient and tonic currents were recorded. The currents were inhibited by picrotoxin, SR95531 and bicuculline, antagonists of GABA-A channels. Clearly, in both humans and rodents T cells, functional GABA-A channels are expressed but the subtypes vary. It is important to bear in mind the interspecies difference when selecting the appropriate animal models to study the physiological role and pharmacological properties of GABA-A channels in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells and when selecting drugs aimed at modulating the human T cells function.

  1. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes.

  2. Effects of oxytocin on GABA signalling in the foetal brain during delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazipov, Rustem; Tyzio, Roman; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) exerts multiple effects in the adult central nervous system. However, little is known about the effects of OXT on foetal neurons during delivery, at the time when a surge of OXT occurs. In a recent study, the effects of OXT on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling have been reported in foetal and newborn rats. In the immature rat hippocampal and neocortical neurons at birth, endogenous OXT induced a switch in the action of GABA from excitatory to inhibitory. This excitatory-to-inhibitory switch was caused by a switch in the polarity of the GABAergic responses from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing, reflecting a decrease in the intracellular chloride concentration. The effects of OXT were mimicked and occluded by bumetanide, a selective blocker of the chloride co-transporter NKCC1, suggesting that the effects of OXT involve inhibition of NKCC1. Neuronal death caused by anoxic-aglycaemic episodes was substantially delayed in the foetal hippocampus by endogenous OXT. These findings suggest that OXT plays important role in the preparation of the foetal brain to delivery.

  3. Role of GABA(B) receptors in learning and memory and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Chelcie F; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2016-04-01

    Although it is evident from the literature that altered GABAB receptor function does affect behavior, these results often do not correspond well. These differences could be due to the task protocol, animal strain, ligand concentration, or timing of administration utilized. Because several clinical populations exhibit learning and memory deficits in addition to altered markers of GABA and the GABAB receptor, it is important to determine whether altered GABAB receptor function is capable of contributing to the deficits. The aim of this review is to examine the effect of altered GABAB receptor function on synaptic plasticity as demonstrated by in vitro data, as well as the effects on performance in learning and memory tasks. Finally, data regarding altered GABA and GABAB receptor markers within clinical populations will be reviewed. Together, the data agree that proper functioning of GABAB receptors is crucial for numerous learning and memory tasks and that targeting this system via pharmaceuticals may benefit several clinical populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-05-23

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes.

  5. Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Ambient Extracellular Glutamate

    OpenAIRE

    Featherstone, David E.; Scott A. Shippy

    2007-01-01

    Many neuroscientists assume that ambient extracellular glutamate concentrations in the nervous system are biologically negligible under nonpathological conditions. This assumption is false. Hundreds of studies over several decades suggest that ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the intact mammalian brain are ~0.5 to ~5 μM. This has important implications. Glutamate receptors are desensitized by glutamate concentrations significantly lower than needed for receptor activation; 0.5 to 5 μ...

  6. Anticonvulsant effects of the wasp Polybia ignobilis venom on chemically induced seizures and action on GABA and glutamate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Mortari, Márcia Renata; Oliveira, Luciana; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira

    2005-05-01

    Venoms of spiders and wasps are well recognized to present high affinity to the central nervous tissue of many mammalian species. Here we describe the effects of direct exposure of rat (Rattus norvegicus) brains to the crude and denatured venom of the Brazilian social wasp Polybia ignobilis. Lower doses of crude venom injected via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) inhibited the exploratory activity of animals, while higher doses provoked severe generalized tonic-clonic seizures, with hind limb extension. The status epilepticus lasted for few minutes leading the animals to respiratory depression and death. In contrast, the denatured venom was anticonvulsant against acute seizures induced by the i.c.v. injection of bicuculline, picrotoxin and kainic acid, but it was ineffective against seizures caused by systemic pentylenetetrazole. Moreover, the [3H]-glutamate binding in membranes from rat brain cortex was inhibited by the denatured venom in lower concentrations than the [3H]-GABA binding. The denatured venom contains free GABA and glutamate (34 and 802 pg/microg of venom, respectively), but they are not the major binding inhibitors. These interactions of venom components with GABA and glutamate receptors could be responsible for the anticonvulsant effects introducing the venom from P. ignobilis as a potential pharmacological source of anticonvulsant drugs.

  7. Synchronization by Food Access Modifies the Daily Variations in Expression and Activity of Liver GABA Transaminase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia De Ita-Pérez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Daytime restricted feeding (DRF is an experimental protocol that influences the circadian timing system and underlies the expression of a biological clock known as the food entrained oscillator (FEO. Liver is the organ that reacts most rapidly to food restriction by adjusting the functional relationship between the molecular circadian clock and the metabolic networks. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA is a signaling molecule in the liver, and able to modulate the cell cycle and apoptosis. This study was aimed at characterizing the expression and activity of the mostly mitochondrial enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T during DRF/FEO expression. We found that DRF promotes a sustained increase of GABA-T in the liver homogenate and mitochondrial fraction throughout the entire day-night cycle. The higher amount of GABA-T promoted by DRF was not associated to changes in GABA-T mRNA or GABA-T activity. The GABA-T activity in the mitochondrial fraction even tended to decrease during the light period. We concluded that DRF influences the daily variations of GABA-T mRNA levels, stability, and catalytic activity of GABA-T. These data suggest that the liver GABAergic system responds to a metabolic challenge such as DRF and the concomitant appearance of the FEO.

  8. Effect of antioxidant treatment on spinal GABA neurons in a neuropathic pain model in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yowtak, June; Wang, Jigong; Kim, Hee Young; Lu, Ying; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2013-11-01

    One feature of neuropathic pain is a reduced spinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory function. However, the mechanisms behind this attenuation remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the spinal GABA neuron loss and reduced GABA neuron excitability in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain in mice. The importance of spinal GABAergic inhibition in neuropathic pain was tested by examining the effects of intrathecally administered GABA receptor agonists and antagonists in SNL and naïve mice, respectively. The effects of SNL and antioxidant treatment on GABA neuron loss and functional changes were examined in transgenic GAD67-enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) mice. GABA receptor agonists transiently reversed mechanical hypersensitivity of the hind paw in SNL mice. On the other hand, GABA receptor antagonists made naïve mice mechanically hypersensitive. Stereological analysis showed that the numbers of enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) GABA neurons were significantly decreased in the lateral superficial laminae (I-II) on the ipsilateral L5 spinal cord after SNL. Repeated antioxidant treatments significantly reduced the pain behaviors and prevented the reduction in EGFP+ GABA neurons. The response rate of the tonic firing GABA neurons recorded from SNL mice increased with antioxidant treatment, whereas no change was seen in those recorded from naïve mice, which suggested that oxidative stress impaired some spinal GABA neuron activity in the neuropathic pain condition. Together the data suggest that neuropathic pain, at least partially, is attributed to oxidative stress, which induces both a GABA neuron loss and dysfunction of surviving GABA neurons. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. GABA transporter 1 transcriptional starting site exhibiting tissue specific difference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    GABA transporter 1(GAT1)takes important roles in multiple physiological processes through the uptake and release of GABA,but the regulation of GAT1 gene expression in different tissues is rarely known.To address the question,first,5' Rapid amplification of cDNA end(RACE)was used to determine GAT1 transcriptional starting sites in neonatal mouse cerebral cortex and intestine,adult mouse brain and adult rat testis.The products of 5'RACE were confirmed by DNA sequencing.We found that the transcript of GAT1 in neonatal mouse cerebral cortex and adult mouse brain starts at the same site(inside of exon 1),while in mouse intestine,GAT1 starts transcription in intron 1,and in rat testis,the transcript of GAT1 has an additional untranslation exon to the 5' direction.

  10. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons.

  11. Pharmacological analysis of the activation and receptor properties of the tonic GABA(CR current in retinal bipolar cell terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie M Jones

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition in the central nervous system (CNS can occur via rapid, transient postsynaptic currents and via a tonic increase in membrane conductance, mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs respectively. Retinal bipolar cells (BCs exhibit a tonic current mediated by GABA(CRs in their axon terminal, in addition to synaptic GABA(AR and GABA(CR currents, which strongly regulate BC output. The tonic GABA(CR current in BC terminals (BCTs is not dependent on vesicular GABA release, but properties such as the alternative source of GABA and the identity of the GABA(CRs remain unknown. Following a recent report that tonic GABA release from cerebellar glial cells is mediated by Bestrophin 1 anion channels, we have investigated their role in non-vesicular GABA release in the retina. Using patch-clamp recordings from BCTs in goldfish retinal slices, we find that the tonic GABA(CR current is not reduced by the anion channel inhibitors NPPB or flufenamic acid but is reduced by DIDS, which decreases the tonic current without directly affecting GABA(CRs. All three drugs also exhibit non-specific effects including inhibition of GABA transporters. GABA(CR ρ subunits can form homomeric and heteromeric receptors that differ in their properties, but BC GABA(CRs are thought to be ρ1-ρ2 heteromers. To investigate whether GABA(CRs mediating tonic and synaptic currents may differ in their subunit composition, as is the case for GABA(ARs, we have examined the effects of two antagonists that show partial ρ subunit selectivity: picrotoxin and cyclothiazide. Tonic and synaptic GABA(CR currents were differentially affected by both drugs, suggesting that a population of homomeric ρ1 receptors contributes to the tonic current. These results extend our understanding of the multiple forms of GABAergic inhibition that exist in the CNS and contribute to visual signal processing in the retina.

  12. Stoichiometry of δ subunit containing GABA(A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Mortensen, M; Smart, T G

    2014-02-01

    Although the stoichiometry of the major synaptic αβγ subunit-containing GABAA receptors has consensus support for 2α:2β:1γ, a clear view of the stoichiometry of extrasynaptic receptors containing δ subunits has remained elusive. Here we examine the subunit stoichiometry of recombinant α4β3δ receptors using a reporter mutation and a functional electrophysiological approach. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we inserted a highly characterized 9' serine to leucine mutation into the second transmembrane (M2) region of α4, β3 and δ subunits that increases receptor sensitivity to GABA. Whole-cell, GABA-activated currents were recorded from HEK-293 cells co-expressing different combinations of wild-type (WT) and/or mutant α4(L297S), β3(L284S) and δ(L288S) subunits. Recombinant receptors containing one or more mutant subunits showed increased GABA sensitivity relative to WT receptors by approximately fourfold, independent of the subunit class (α, β or δ) carrying the mutation. GABA dose-response curves of cells co-expressing WT subunits with their respective L9'S mutants exhibited multiple components, with the number of discernible components enabling a subunit stoichiometry of 2α, 2β and 1δ to be deduced for α4β3δ receptors. Varying the cDNA transfection ratio by 10-fold had no significant effect on the number of incorporated δ subunits. Subunit stoichiometry is an important determinant of GABAA receptor function and pharmacology, and δ subunit-containing receptors are important mediators of tonic inhibition in several brain regions. Here we demonstrate a preferred subunit stoichiometry for α4β3δ receptors of 2α, 2β and 1δ. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Ionotropic GABA and Glutamate Receptor Mutations and Human Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hongjie; Low, Chian-Ming; Moody, Olivia A; Jenkins, Andrew; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-07-01

    The advent of whole exome/genome sequencing and the technology-driven reduction in the cost of next-generation sequencing as well as the introduction of diagnostic-targeted sequencing chips have resulted in an unprecedented volume of data directly linking patient genomic variability to disorders of the brain. This information has the potential to transform our understanding of neurologic disorders by improving diagnoses, illuminating the molecular heterogeneity underlying diseases, and identifying new targets for therapeutic treatment. There is a strong history of mutations in GABA receptor genes being involved in neurologic diseases, particularly the epilepsies. In addition, a substantial number of variants and mutations have been found in GABA receptor genes in patients with autism, schizophrenia, and addiction, suggesting potential links between the GABA receptors and these conditions. A new and unexpected outcome from sequencing efforts has been the surprising number of mutations found in glutamate receptor subunits, with the GRIN2A gene encoding the GluN2A N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit being most often affected. These mutations are associated with multiple neurologic conditions, for which seizure disorders comprise the largest group. The GluN2A subunit appears to be a locus for epilepsy, which holds important therapeutic implications. Virtually all α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor mutations, most of which occur within GRIA3, are from patients with intellectual disabilities, suggesting a link to this condition. Similarly, the most common phenotype for kainate receptor variants is intellectual disability. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of disease-associated mutations in ionotropic GABA and glutamate receptor families, and discuss implications regarding the identification of human mutations and treatment of neurologic diseases.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  15. Local inhibition of GABA affects precedence effect in the inferior colliculus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjun Wang; Ningyu Wang; Dan Wang; Jun Jia; Jinfeng Liu; Yan Xie; Xiaohui Wen; Xiaoting Li

    2014-01-01

    The precedence effect is a prerequisite for faithful sound localization in a complex auditory envi-ronment, and is a physiological phenomenon in which the auditory system selectively suppresses the directional information from echoes. Here we investigated how neurons in the inferior col-liculus respond to the paired sounds that produce precedence-effect illusions, and whether their ifring behavior can be modulated through inhibition with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We recorded extracellularly from 36 neurons in rat inferior colliculus under three conditions:no injection, injection with saline, and injection with gamma-aminobutyric acid. The paired sounds that produced precedence effects were two identical 4-ms noise bursts, which were deliv-ered contralaterally or ipsilaterally to the recording site. The normalized neural responses were measured as a function of different inter-stimulus delays and half-maximal interstimulus delays were acquired. Neuronal responses to the lagging sounds were weak when the inter-stimulus delay was short, but increased gradually as the delay was lengthened. Saline injection produced no changes in neural responses, but after local gamma-aminobutyric acid application, responses to the lagging stimulus were suppressed. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid affected the normalized response to lagging sounds, independently of whether they or the paired sounds were contralateral or ipsilateral to the recording site. These observations suggest that local inhibition by gamma-aminobutyric acid in the rat inferior colliculus shapes the neural responses to lagging sounds, and modulates the precedence effect.

  16. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  17. [Influence of exogenous gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid contents in roots of melon seedling under hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Li, Jing-Rui; Xia, Qing-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Gao, Hong-Bo

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigated the influence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on GABA metabolism and amino acid content under hypoxia stress by accurately controlling the level of dissolved oxygen in hydroponics, using the roots of melon 'Xiyu 1' seedlings as the test material. The results showed that compared with the control, the growth of roots was inhibited seriously under hypoxia stress. Meanwhile, the hypoxia-treated roots had significantly higher activities of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamine synthetase (GS), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) as well as the contents of GABA, pyruvic acid, alanine (Ala) and aspartic acid (Asp). But the contents of glutamic acid (Glu) and alpha-keto glutaric acid in roots under hypoxia stress was obviously lower than those of the control. Exogenous treatment with GABA alleviated the inhibition effect of hypoxia stress on root growth, which was accompanied by an increase in the contents of endogenous GABA, Glu, alpha-keto glutaric acid and Asp. Furthermore, under hypoxia stress, the activities of GAD, GDH, GOGAT, GS, ALT, AST as well as the contents of pyruvic acid and Ala significantly decreased in roots treated with GABA. However, adding GABA and viny-gamma-aminobutyric acid (VGB) reduced the alleviation effect of GABA on melon seedlings under hypoxia stress. The results suggested that absorption of GABA by roots could alleviate the injury of hypoxia stress to melon seedlings. This meant that GABA treatment allows the normal physiological metabolism under hypoxia by inhibiting the GAD activity through feedback and maintaining higher Glu content as well as the bal- ance of carbon and nitrogen.

  18. The C-terminal domains of the GABA(b) receptor subunits mediate intracellular trafficking but are not required for receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, A R; Robbins, M J; Cosio, C; Rice, S Q; Babbs, A J; Hirst, W D; Boyfield, I; Wood, M D; Russell, R B; Price, G W; Couve, A; Moss, S J; Pangalos, M N

    2001-02-15

    GABA(B) receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain and spinal cord. These receptors are heterodimers assembled from GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits, neither of which is capable of producing functional GABA(B) receptors on homomeric expression. GABA(B1,) although able to bind GABA, is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) when expressed alone. In contrast, GABA(B2) is able to access the cell surface when expressed alone but does not couple efficiently to the appropriate effector systems or produce any detectable GABA-binding sites. In the present study, we have constructed chimeric and truncated GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits to explore further GABA(B) receptor signaling and assembly. Removal of the entire C-terminal intracellular domain of GABA(B1) results in plasma membrane expression without the production of a functional GABA(B) receptor. However, coexpression of this truncated GABA(B1) subunit with either GABA(B2) or a truncated GABA(B2) subunit in which the C terminal has also been removed is capable of functional signaling via G-proteins. In contrast, transferring the entire C-terminal tail of GABA(B1) to GABA(B2) leads to the ER retention of the GABA(B2) subunit when expressed alone. These results indicate that the C terminal of GABA(B1) mediates the ER retention of this protein and that neither of the C-terminal tails of GABA(B1) or GABA(B2) is an absolute requirement for functional coupling of heteromeric receptors. Furthermore although GABA(B1) is capable of producing GABA-binding sites, GABA(B2) is of central importance in the functional coupling of heteromeric GABA(B) receptors to G-proteins and the subsequent activation of effector systems.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a functional human ¿-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter, human GAT-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Bolette; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Jensen, Anders A.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma membrane gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters act to terminate GABA neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. Intriguingly four distinct GABA transporters have been cloned from rat and mouse, whereas only three functional homologs of these transporters have been cloned from human....... The aim of this study therefore was to search for this fourth missing human transporter. Using a bioinformatics approach, we successfully identified and cloned the full-length cDNA of a so far uncharacterized human GABA transporter (GAT). The predicted protein displays high sequence similarity to rat GAT......-2 and mouse GAT3, and in accordance with the nomenclature for rat GABA transporters, we therefore refer to the transporter as human GAT-2. We used electrophysiological and cell-based methods to demonstrate that this protein is a functional transporter of GABA. The transport was saturable...

  20. Molecular basis of the alternative recruitment of GABA(A) versus glycine receptors through gephyrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans-Michael; Kasaragod, Vikram Babu; Hausrat, Torben Johann;

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors (GABA(A)Rs, GlyRs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and contribute to many synaptic functions, dysfunctions and human diseases. GABA(A)Rs are important drug targets regulated by direct interactions with the scaffolding protein ge...... of GABA(A)Rs offers a framework for future investigations into the regulation of inhibitory synaptic strength and for the development of mechanistically and therapeutically relevant compounds targeting the gephyrin-GABA(A)R interaction.......γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors (GABA(A)Rs, GlyRs) are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors and contribute to many synaptic functions, dysfunctions and human diseases. GABA(A)Rs are important drug targets regulated by direct interactions with the scaffolding protein...

  1. Distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitecka, L; Ben-Ari, Y

    1987-12-01

    The distribution of GABA-like (GABA-Li) immunoreactivity in the rat amygdaloid complex was studied by using an anti-GABA antibody. GABA-Li positive neurons and processes were present in every nucleus of the complex. Three patterns of immunoreactivity were revealed: (1) the intercalated masses and the lateral olfactory tract nucleus exhibited the most intense staining of the neuropil, and virtually every neuron was labeled, (2) the central and medial nuclei contained intensely labeled neuropil and moderately labeled neurons, and (3) in the remaining nuclei, the neuropil was weakly labeled, and relatively numerous GABA-Li neurons were present. Our results suggest that: (1) the intercalated masses and lateral olfactory tract nucleus consist of large aggregates of GABA-Li immunoreactive neurons, and (2) the lateral, basal dorsal, and the posterior cortical nuclei may constitute a significant source of GABAergic connections to other amygdaloid nuclei, in particular to the medial and central nuclei.

  2. Effect of GABA on sperm acrosome reation in antisperm antibody positive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BianSL; ZhanW

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid(GABA) on the rate of sperm acrosome reaction both in normal and antisperm antibody (AsAb) porsitive men.Methods:the sperm acrosome reaction was tested with triplestain technique in two groups of 18 men each.Results:(1)GABA increased the rate of sperm acrosome reaction both in normal and AsAb positive subjects(P<0.01);(2) GABA increased the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of sperm(P<0.01);(3)GABA increased the Ca2+-ATPase activity of sperm (P<0.05);(4)GABA decreased the production of MDA and oxygen free radicals of sperm.conclusion:GABA could regulate the rate of sperm acrosome reaction.

  3. Association of GABA(B) receptors and members of the 14-3-3 family of signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Kittler, J T; Uren, J M; Calver, A R; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Moss, S J

    2001-02-01

    Two GABA(B) receptors, GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2, have been cloned recently. Unlike other G protein-coupled receptors, the formation of a heterodimer between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 is required for functional expression. We have used the yeast two hybrid system to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1. We report a direct association between GABA(B) receptors and two members of the 14-3-3 protein family, 14-3-3eta and 14-3-3zeta. We demonstrate that the C-terminus of GABA(B)R1 associates with 14-3-3zeta in rat brain preparations and tissue cultured cells, that they codistribute after rat brain fractionation, colocalize in neurons, and that the binding site overlaps partially with the coiled-coil domain of GABA(B)R1. Furthermore we show a reduced interaction between the C-terminal domains of GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 in the presence of 14-3-3. The results strongly suggest that GABA(B)R1 and 14-3-3 associate in the nervous system and begin to reveal the signaling complexities of the GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptor heterodimer.

  4. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Harriet; Ebert, Bjarke; Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Jensen, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) subtypes α1β2γ(2S), α2β2γ(2S), α3β2γ(2S), α5β2γ(2S) and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) GABA(A)Rs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold) as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(A)R than at the α(1,2,3,5)β2γ(2S) receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non-selective modulation

  5. Functional characterization of the 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam at human GABA(A receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet Hammer

    Full Text Available The 1,5-benzodiazepine clobazam is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in patients 2 years of age or older in the United States, and for treatment of anxiety and various forms of epilepsy elsewhere. Clobazam has been reported to exhibit different in vivo adverse effects and addiction liability profile than the classic 1,4-benzodiazepines. In this study, it was investigated whether the in vitro pharmacological properties of clobazam and its major active metabolite N-desmethylclobazam could explain some of these clinical differences. The functional properties of the two 1,5-benzodiazepines were characterized at the human γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(AR subtypes α1β2γ(2S, α2β2γ(2S, α3β2γ(2S, α5β2γ(2S and α6β2δ expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by use of two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology and compared to those exhibited by the 1,4-benzodiazepine clonazepam. All three compounds potentiated GABA EC20-evoked responses through the α(1,2,3,5β2γ(2S GABA(ARs in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with each displaying similar EC50 values at the four subtypes. Furthermore, the degrees of potentiation of the GABA EC20 currents through the four receptors mediated by saturating modulator concentrations did not differ substantially for any of the three benzodiazepines. The three compounds were substantially less potent (200-3900 fold as positive allosteric modulators at the α6β2δ GABA(AR than at the α(1,2,3,5β2γ(2S receptors. Interestingly, however, clobazam and especially N-desmethylclobazam were highly efficacious potentiators of α6β2δ receptor signaling. Although this activity component is unlikely to contribute to the in vivo effects of clobazam/N-desmethylclobazam, the 1,5-benzodiazepine could constitute an interesting lead for novel modulators targeting this low-affinity binding site in GABAARs. In conclusion, the non

  6. GABA-mediated inhibition of the anaphylactic response in the guinea-pig trachea.

    OpenAIRE

    Gentilini, G.; FRANCHI-MICHELI, S.; Mugnai, S.; Bindi, D.; Zilletti, L.

    1995-01-01

    1. In sensitized guinea-pigs, the effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABAmimetic drugs have been investigated on tracheal segments contracted by cumulative application of an allergen (ovoalbumin, OA) and on serosal mast cells. The same drugs have also been tested on activation of alveolar macrophages isolated from unsensitized guinea-pigs. 2. Superfusion with GABA (1-1000 microM) reduced the contraction intensity of tracheal strips. The effect of GABA (100 microM) was not affected ...

  7. Selected Gamma Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Esters may Provide Analgesia for Some Central Pain Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Central pain is an enigmatic, intractable condition, related to destruction of thalamic areas, resulting in likely loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission mediated by GABA. It is proposed that treatment of central pain, a localized process, may be treated by GABA supplementation, like Parkinson’s disease and depression. At physiologic pH, GABA exists as a zwitterion that is poorly permeable to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Because the pH of the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) is acidic relative...

  8. Allosteric modulation of GABA(B) receptor function in human frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, Maria C; Ambu, Rossano; Garau, Luciana; Onali, Pierluigi

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of different allosteric modulators on the functional activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors in membranes of post-mortem human frontal cortex were examined. Western blot analysis indicated that the tissue preparations expressed both GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B) receptor heterodimer. In [35S]-GTPgammaS binding assays, Ca2+ ion (1 mM) enhanced the potency of the agonists GABA and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APA) and that of the antagonist CGP55845, but not that of the GABA(B) receptor agonist (-)-baclofen. CGP7930 (2,6-di-t-Bu-4-(3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-propyl)-phenol), a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(B) receptors, potentiated both GABA(B) receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]-GTPgammaS binding and inhibition of forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Chelation of Ca2+ ion by EGTA reduced the CGP7930 enhancement of GABA potency in stimulating [35S]-GTPgammaS binding by two-fold. Fendiline, also reported to act as a positive allosteric modulator of GABA(B) receptors, failed to enhance GABA stimulation of [35S]-GTPgammaS binding but inhibited the potentiating effect of CGP7930. The inhibitory effect was mimicked by the phenothiazine antipsychotic trifluoperazine (TFP), but not by other compounds, such as verapamil or diphenydramine (DPN). These data demonstrate that the function of GABA(B) receptors of human frontal cortex is positively modulated by Ca2+ ion and CGP7930, which interact synergistically. Conversely, fendiline and trifluoperazine negatively affect the allosteric regulation by CGP7930.

  9. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  10. Effect of flumazenil on sevoflurane requirements for minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake and recovery status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liang, Peng; Zhou, Cheng; Li, Kai-Yu; Guo, Li-Juan; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    .... This study was to detect the effect of GABA receptors on the hypnotic action of volatile anesthetics by evaluation of the effect of intravenous flumazenil on sevoflurane minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration-awake (MAC-Awake...

  11. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Evert; de Kleijn, Roy; Colzato, Lorenza S; Alkemade, Anneke; Forstmann, Birte U; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  12. Pu-Erh tea and GABA attenuates oxidative stress in kainic acid-induced status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pu-Erh tea is one of the most-consumed beverages due to its taste and the anti-anxiety-producing effect of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) if contains. However the protective effects of Pu-Erh tea and its constituent, GABA to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizure have not been fully investigated. Methods We analyzed the effect of Pu-Erh tea leaf (PETL) and GABA on KA-induced neuronal injury in vivo and in vitro. Results PETL and GABA reduced the maximal seizure classes, pred...

  13. Unique insecticide specificity of human homomeric rho 1 GABA(C) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratra, Gurpreet S; Erkkila, Brian E; Weiss, David S; Casida, John E

    2002-03-24

    Several convulsants and major insecticides block the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated chloride channel in brain on binding to the GABA(A) receptor. The GABA(C) receptor, important in retina and present in brain, is also coupled to a chloride channel and is therefore a potential target for toxicant action examined here in radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments. Human homomeric rho 1 GABA(C) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) undergoes specific and saturable high-affinity binding of 4-n-[3H]propyl-4' -ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([3H]EBOB) using a cyano analog (CNBOB) to determine non-specific binding. This GABA(C) rho 1 receptor is very sensitive to CNBOB and lindane relative to alpha-endosulfan, tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate, picrotoxinin and fipronil (IC(50) values of 23, 91, 800, 1080, 4000 and >10000 nM, respectively, in displacing [3H]EBOB). A similar potency sequence (except for picrotoxinin) is observed for inhibition of GABA-induced currents of rho 1 receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The present study does not consider rho 2 homomeric and rho 1 rho 2 heteromeric GABA(C) receptors which are known to be more sensitive than rho 1 to picrotoxinin. The inhibitor sensitivity and specificity of this rho 1 GABA(C) receptor differ greatly from those of human homomeric beta 3 and native GABA(A) receptors.

  14. [GABA--the basic mediator of excitation in the early stages of hippocampal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazipov, R N; Zefirov, A L; Ben-Ari, E

    1998-01-01

    GABA is the principal neurotransmitter of inhibition in the adult mammalian brain. However, at early stages of development, including embryonic period and first week of postnatal life, GABA plays the role of main neurotransmitter of excitation. The paradoxical excitatory effect of GABA is due to an inversed chloride gradient and therefore a depolarizing direction of GABA-A receptor mediated responses. In addition, another type of GABAergic inhibition mediated by postsynaptic GABA-B receptors is not functional at early stage of life. In the neonatal rat hippocampus, GABA, acting via GABA-A receptors, activates voltage gated sodium and calcium channels and potentiates the activity of NMDA receptors by reducing their voltage dependent Mg2+ block. The temporal window when GABA exerts excitatory actions coincides with a particular pattern of activity of hippocampal neuronal network that is characterized by periodical giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) reminiscent of interictal-like epileptiform discharges. Recent studies have shown that GDPs result from the synchronous discharge of GABAergic interneurons and principal glutamatergic pyramidal cells and are mediated by the synergistic excitatory actions of GABA-A and glutamate receptors. GDPs provide synchronous intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and may therefore be implicated in hebbian modulation of developing synapses and activity-dependent formation of the hippocampal network.

  15. Sodium-independent, bicuculline-sensitive (/sup 3/H)GABA binding to isolated rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minuk, G.Y.; Bear, C.E.; Sarjeant, E.J.

    1987-05-01

    To determine whether hepatocytes possess specific receptor sites for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potent amino acid neurotransmitter, (/sup 3/H)GABA, was added to sodium-free suspensions of Percoll-purified hepatocytes derived from collagenase-perfused rat livers under various experimental conditions and in the presence or absence of specific GABA receptor agonists (muscimol) and antagonists (bicuculline). The effects of GABA, muscimol, and bicuculline on hepatocyte resting membrane potentials were also determined. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GABA to hepatocytes was a consistent finding. GABA-hepatocyte interactions were reversible and temperature dependent. Muscimol and bicuculline inhibited binding in a dose-dependent manner (IC50, 30 nM and 50 microM, respectively), whereas strychnine (1.0-100 microM), a nonspecific central nervous system stimulant, had no appreciable effect. Both GABA and muscimol (100 microM) caused significant hyperpolarization of hepatocyte resting membrane potential (delta PD 5.4 +/- 3.1 and 22.2 +/- 16.2 mV, respectively, means +/- SD, P less than 0.0005). Bicuculline (100 microM) inhibited the effect of muscimol (P less than 0.05). The results of this study suggest that specific GABA receptor sites exist on the surface of isolated rat hepatocytes. The presence of such sites raises the possibility that, in addition to adrenergic and cholinergic innervation, hepatic function may be influenced by GABA-ergic neurotransmitter mechanisms.

  16. A study on quality components and sleep-promoting effects of GABA black tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenfang; Li, Yun; Ma, William; Ge, Yazhong; Huang, Yahui

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the changes in quality components of gamma (γ)-aminobutyric acid (GABA) black tea during processing, and to investigate the effect of three dosages of GABA black tea on sleep improvement. The results showed that the GABA content was increased significantly up to 2.70 mg g(-1) after vacuum anaerobic and aerobic treatment. In addition, the content of GABA after drying reached 2.34 mg g(-1), which achieved the standard of GABA tea. During the entire processing of GABA black tea, the contents of tea polyphenols, caffeine and total catechins displayed a gradually descending trend, while the contents of free amino acids and GABA were firstly increased, and then reduced. The GABA black tea had significant effects on prolonging the sleeping time with sodium pentobarbital (P sleeping rate induced by sodium pentobarbital at a sub-threshold dose (P sleeping latency period induced by sodium barbital was not significant (P > 0.05). It had no effect on directly inducing sleep and the mouse body weight. The extract of GABA black tea improved the sleeping quality of mice to extend with an optimal effect being found in the high dose-treated mice.

  17. Verruculogen: a new substance for decreasing of GABA levels in CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotujac, L; Muftić, R H; Filipović, N

    1976-01-01

    In our previous work we examined the mechanism of action of the new tremorogenic substance verruculogen isolated by Cole and coworkers. Examining the effect of various substances with known mechanisms of action on verruculogen-induced tremor, we concluded that this tremor was probably related to decrease of GABA levels in CNS. In order to further define the mechanisms of action of verruculogen, we determined brain GABA levels in animals in which tremor was produced by verruculogen administration. Verruculogen administration produced a decrease in GABA levels in mouse CNS. This finding substantiates our earlier suggestion that verruculogen-induced tremor is mediated by a loss of inhibitory GABA function.

  18. The GABAB1a isoform mediates heterosynaptic depression at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guetg, Nicole; Seddik, Riad; Vigot, Réjan

    2009-01-01

    that GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors are more abundant than GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors at glutamatergic terminals. Accordingly, it was found that GABA(B(1a,2)) receptors are more efficient than GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors in inhibiting glutamate release when maximally activated by exogenous application of the agonist...... baclofen. Here, we used a combination of genetic, ultrastructural and electrophysiological approaches to analyze to what extent GABA(B(1a,2)) and GABA(B(1b,2)) receptors inhibit glutamate release in response to physiological activation. We first show that at hippocampal mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 pyramidal...

  19. MODULATORY EFFECT OF CAFFEINE ON GABA-ACTIVATED CURRENT FROM ACUTELY ISOLATED RAT DORSAL ROOT GANGLION NEURONS%咖啡因对急性分离大鼠DRG神经元GABA-激活电流的调制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李韶; 孙长凯; 张健; 李爱萍; 朴花; 李之望

    2007-01-01

    应用全细胞膜片钳记录大鼠新鲜分离背根神经节(DRG)神经元GABA-激活电流,观察咖啡因对GABA-激活电流(IGABA)的调制作用.结果显示:大部分受检细胞(97.4%,113/116) 对外加GABA敏感.1-1000 μmol/L GABA引起一剂量依赖性、有明显去敏感作用的内向电流.预加咖啡因(0.01-100 μmol/L)30 s后再加GABA能明显抑制GABA(100 μmol/L )激活电流的幅值.预加咖啡因后GABA量效曲线明显下移;GABA-激活电流的最大值较之对照下降约57%;而Kd值(30 μmol/L)几乎不变.该结果提示此种抑制为非竞争性的.预加氨茶碱(theophylline)亦可明显抑制GABA激活电流,同一浓度(10 μmol/L)下氨茶碱的抑制作用较咖啡因的抑制作用强.预加安定(diazepam, 1 μmol/L)对GABA(10 μmol/L )激活电流有增强作用,而预加咖啡因(10 μmol/L )有拮抗安定增强IGABA的作用.胞内透析H-8后,几乎可以完全消除咖啡因对IGABA的抑制作用.本结果表明咖啡因在初级传入末稍可能产生对抗突触前抑制的效应.%Whole-cell patch clamp technique was performed on acutely isolated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to investigate the modulatory effect of caffeine on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated currents (IGABA). The results showed that the majority of the neurons examined (97.4%, 113/116) were sensitive to GABA. 1-1000 μmol/L GABA activated a concentration-dependent inward current which manifested obvious desensitization. After the neurons were treated with caffeine (0.01-100 μmol/L) prior to the application of GABA (100 μmol/L) for 30 s, GABA-activated membrane currents were obviously inhibited. Caffeine shifted the GABA dose-response curve downward and decreased the maximum response to 57% without changing Kd value. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect is non-competitive. Theophylline showed a similar and stronger inhibitory effect on IGABA. The pretreatment with caffeine (10 μmol/L) inhibited IGABA, which was

  20. Central and Peripheral GABA(A) Receptor Regulation of the Heart Rate Depends on the Conscious State of the Animal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Intuitively one might expect that activation of GABAergic inhibitory neurons results in bradycardia. In conscious animals the opposite effect is however observed. GABAergic neurons in nucleus ambiguus hold the ability to control the activity of the parasympathetic vagus nerve that innervates...... the heart. Upon GABA activation the vagus nerve will be inhibited leaving less parasympathetic impact on the heart. The picture is however blurred in the presence of anaesthesia where both the concentration and type of anaesthetics can result in different effects on the cardiovascular system. This paper...

  1. Neuropharmacological and Neurobiological Relevance of In vivo 1H-MRS of GABA and Glutamate for Preclinical Drug Discovery in Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waschkies, Conny F; Bruns, Andreas; Müller, Stephan; Kapps, Martin; Borroni, Edilio; von Kienlin, Markus; Rudin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)) is a translational modality with great appeal for neuroscience since the two major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate, and GABA, can be noninvasively quantified in vivo and have served to explore disease state and effects of drug treatment. Yet, if 1H-MRS shall serve for decision making in preclinical pharmaceutical drug discovery, it has to meet stringent requirements. In particular, 1H-MRS needs to reliably report neurobiologically relevant but rather small changes in neurometabolite levels upon pharmacological interventions and to faithfully appraise target engagement in the associated molecular pathways at pharmacologically relevant doses. Here, we thoroughly addressed these matters with a three-pronged approach. Firstly, we determined the sensitivity and reproducibility of 1H-MRS in rat at 9.4 Tesla for detecting changes in GABA and glutamate levels in the striatum and the prefrontal cortex, respectively. Secondly, we evaluated the neuropharmacological and neurobiological relevance of the MRS readouts by pharmacological interventions with five well-characterized drugs (vigabatrin, 3-mercaptopropionate, tiagabine, methionine sulfoximine, and riluzole), which target key nodes in GABAergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission. Finally, we corroborated the MRS findings with ex vivo biochemical analyses of drug exposure and neurometabolite concentrations. For all five interventions tested, 1H-MRS provided distinct drug dose-effect relationships in GABA and glutamate over preclinically relevant dose ranges and changes as low as 6% in glutamate and 12% in GABA were reliably detected from 16 mm3 volumes-of-interest. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the value and limitation of quantitative 1H-MRS of glutamate and GABA for preclinical pharmaceutical research in mental disorders. PMID:24694923

  2. GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse modulate neurochemical, electrographic, and behavioral phenotypes of wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, RaShonda R; Chang, Theresa; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-09-15

    Drugs that potentiate transmission at GABA(A) receptors are widely used to enhance sleep and to cause general anesthesia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that GABA(A) receptors in the pontine reticular nucleus, oral part (PnO) of mouse modulate five phenotypes of arousal: sleep and wakefulness, cortical electroencephalogram (EEG) activity, acetylcholine (ACh) release in the PnO, breathing, and recovery time from general anesthesia. Microinjections into the PnO of saline (vehicle control), the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, muscimol with the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline, and bicuculline alone were performed in male C57BL/6J mice (n = 33) implanted with EEG recording electrodes. Muscimol caused a significant increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. These effects were reversed by coadministration of bicuculline. Bicuculline administered alone caused a significant decrease in wakefulness and increase in NREM sleep and REM sleep. Muscimol significantly increased EEG power in the delta range (0.5-4 Hz) during wakefulness and in the theta range (4-9 Hz) during REM sleep. Dialysis delivery of bicuculline to the PnO of male mice (n = 18) anesthetized with isoflurane significantly increased ACh release in the PnO, decreased breathing rate, and increased anesthesia recovery time. All drug effects were concentration dependent. The effects on phenotypes of arousal support the conclusion that GABA(A) receptors in the PnO promote wakefulness and suggest that increasing GABAergic transmission in the PnO may be one mechanism underlying the phenomenon of paradoxical behavioral activation by some benzodiazepines.

  3. Effects of hippocampal injections of a novel ligand selective for the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 subunits of the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor on Pavlovian conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, David J; Tetzlaff, Julie E; Cook, James M; He, Xiaohui; Helmstetter, Fred J

    2002-07-01

    Benzodiazepine pharmacology has led to greater insight into the neural mechanisms underlying learning and anxiety. The synthesis of new compounds capable of modulating responses produced by these receptors has been made possible by the development of an isoform model of the GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complex. In the current experiment, rats were pretreated with several concentrations of the novel ligand RY024 (an alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 -selective benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist) in the hippocampus and were trained in a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm. RY024 independently produced fear-related behavior prior to training and, at the highest concentration, decreased the strength of conditioning observed 24 h after training. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of hippocampal GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptors in learning and anxiety.

  4. Glutamate and GABA in Vestibulo-Sympathetic Pathway Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R; Friedrich, Victor L; Martinelli, Giorgio P

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex (VSR) actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The VSR pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively). The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the VSR pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the VSR were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified VSR pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. VSR pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the GABAergic VSR pathway neurons showed a target preference, projecting predominantly to CVLM. These data provide the first

  5. Glutamate and GABA in vestibulo-sympathetic pathway neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gay R Holstein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex actively modulates blood pressure during changes in posture. This reflex allows humans to stand up and quadrupeds to rear or climb without a precipitous decline in cerebral perfusion. The vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway conveys signals from the vestibular end organs to the caudal vestibular nuclei. These cells, in turn, project to pre-sympathetic neurons in the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla (RVLM and CVLM, respectively. The present study assessed glutamate- and GABA-related immunofluorescence associated with central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway in rats. Retrograde FluoroGold tract tracing was used to label vestibular neurons with projections to RVLM or CVLM, and sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation was employed to activate these pathways. Central vestibular neurons of the vestibulo-sympathetic reflex were identified by co-localization of FluoroGold and cFos protein, which accumulates in some vestibular neurons following galvanic stimulation. Triple-label immunofluorescence was used to co-localize glutamate- or GABA- labeling in the identified vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons. Most activated projection neurons displayed intense glutamate immunofluorescence, suggestive of glutamatergic neurotransmission. To support this, anterograde tracer was injected into the caudal vestibular nuclei. Vestibular axons and terminals in RVLM and CVLM co-localized the anterograde tracer and vesicular glutamate transporter-2 signals. Other retrogradely-labeled cFos-positive neurons displayed intense GABA immunofluorescence. Vestibulo-sympathetic reflex pathway neurons of both phenotypes were present in the caudal medial and spinal vestibular nuclei, and projected to both RVLM and CVLM. As a group, however, triple-labeled vestibular cells with intense glutamate immunofluorescence were located more rostrally in the vestibular nuclei than the GABAergic neurons. Only the

  6. Depolarization by K*O+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in gabaergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of gaba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, Bo; Hansen, G.H.; Schousboe, Arne

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures......Neurotransmitter release, gaba release, membrane transporter, vesicles, intracellular CA*OH, neuron cultures...

  7. LIMPIABOTAS PASCUAL GABAS DEL ROSARIO [Material gráfico

    OpenAIRE

    Fundación para la Etnografía y el Desarrollo de la Artesanía Canaria

    1990-01-01

    Antiguedad: SIGLO XX Calificación del suelo: URBANO CONSOLIDADO Clasificación del suelo: URBANO DON PASCUAL GABAS DEL ROSARIO SUELE TRABAJA EN LA CHURRERIA MONTESOL, CALLE PEROJO ESQUINA CON COLMENARES. SE LLAMA PASCUAL, PERO LE CONOCEN COMO "JUANITO". Declaración BIC:No EN SU JUVENTUD SE DESAYUNABA AGUA DE NOGAL CON GOFIO. HOY COBRA 2.50 EUROS POR SERVICIO. EL MATERIAL DE TRABAJO LO DEJA EN ESA MISMA CHURRERÍA, DONDE TAMBIEN SE CAMBIA DE ROPA. LUEGO SE LAVA BIEN LAS MANOS, Y P...

  8. The anti-convulsant stiripentol acts directly on the GABA(A) receptor as a positive allosteric modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Janet L

    2009-01-01

    Stiripentol (STP) has been used as co-therapy for treatment of epilepsy for many years. Its mechanism of action has long been considered to be indirect, as it inhibits the enzymes responsible for metabolism of other anti-convulsant agents. However, a recent report suggested that STP might also act at the neuronal level, increasing inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. We examined the effect of STP on the functional properties of recombinant GABA(A) receptors (GABARs) and found that it was a positive allosteric modulator of these ion channels. Its activity showed some dependence on subunit composition, with greater potentiation of alpha3-containing receptors and reduced potentiation when the beta1 or epsilon subunits were present. STP caused a leftward shift in the GABA concentration-response relationship, but did not increase the peak response of the receptors to a maximal GABA concentration. Although STP shares some functional characteristics with the neurosteroids, its activity was not inhibited by a neurosteroid site antagonist and was unaffected by a mutation in the alpha3 subunit that reduced positive modulation by neurosteroids. The differential effect of STP on beta1- and beta2/beta3-containing receptors was not altered by mutations within the second transmembrane domain that affect modulation by loreclezole. These findings suggest that STP acts as a direct allosteric modulator of the GABAR at a site distinct from many commonly used anti-convulsant, sedative and anxiolytic drugs. Its higher activity at alpha3-containing receptors as well as its activity at delta-containing receptors may provide a unique opportunity to target selected populations of GABARs.

  9. Receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulation of GABA(A) receptor function by niflumic acid, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Saku T; Mansikkamäki, Salla; Möykkynen, Tommi; Lüddens, Hartmut; Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Korpi, Esa R

    2003-09-01

    In addition to blocking cyclooxygenases, members of the fenamate group of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been proposed to affect brain GABAA receptors. Using quantitative autoradiography with GABAA receptor-associated ionophore ligand [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) on rat brain sections, one of the fenamates, niflumate, at micromolar concentration was found to potentiate GABA actions in most brain areas, whereas being in the cerebellar granule cell layer an efficient antagonist similar to furosemide. With recombinant GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we found that niflumate potentiated 3 microM GABA responses up to 160% and shifted the GABA concentration-response curve to the left in alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, the predominant GABAA receptor subtype in the brain. This effect needed the gamma2 subunit, because on alpha1beta2 receptors, niflumate exhibited solely an antagonistic effect at high concentrations. The potentiation was not abolished by the specific benzodiazepine site antagonist flumazenil. Niflumate acted as a potent antagonist of alpha6beta2 receptors (with or without gamma2 subunit) and of alphaXbeta2gamma2 receptors containing a chimeric alpha1 to alpha6 subunit, which suggests that niflumate antagonism is dependent on the same transmembrane domain 1- and 2-including fragment of the alpha6 subunit as furosemide antagonism. This antagonism was noncompetitive because the maximal GABA response, but not the potency, was reduced by niflumate. These data show receptor subtype-dependent positive and negative modulatory actions of niflumate on GABAA receptors at clinically relevant concentrations, and they suggest the existence of a novel positive modulatory site on alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors that is dependent on the gamma2 subunit but not associated with the benzodiazepine binding site.

  10. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, E.; Kleijn, R.; Colzato, L.S.; Alkemade, A.; Forstmann, B.U.; Nieuwenhuis, S.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human cortex. The food supplement version of GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benef

  11. [Effect of retroauricular galvanic stimulation on the central vestibular system--immunohistochemical evaluation of GABA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okami, K; Sekitani, T

    1990-03-01

    The changes of the neurotransmitter (GABA) distribution in the brain stem of the rats by retroauricular galvanic stimulation were investigated using immunohistochemical method. Twenty-one rats were divided into two groups: the control group which received no galvanic stimulation, and the galvanically stimulated group which received anodal galvanic stimulation (unipolar monoauricular, 5 mA in intensity, 500 msec of duration, 1 Hz in frequency) for 30 minutes. The specimens obtained as usual strict procedure for histological investigation were stained immunohistochemically using antisera against GABA. The results were as follows: 1. In the control group, GABA-like immunoreactivity was observed in all four main vestibular nuclei. In the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei GABA-like immunoreactivity was found in the small cells and the terminals. Giant cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus were surrounded by GABA immunoreactive terminals. 2. In the galvanically stimulated group GABA-like immunoreactivity showed recognizable laterality in the lateral vestibular nucleus where GABA-like immunoreactivity surrounding giant cells showed more intensive on the side ipsilateral to the stimulation compared with the opposite side. On the other hand GABA-like immunoreactivity showed no laterality in the superior, medial, and descending vestibular nuclei. 3. It can be concluded that the retroauricular galvanic stimulation cause some changes in the inhibitory activity of the lateral vestibulo-spinal tract and of the spinal motor neuron.

  12. The role of GABA(A) receptors in the development of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Mary-Anne

    2008-07-01

    Alcoholism is a common, heritable, chronic relapsing disorder. GABA(A) receptors undergo allosteric modulation by ethanol, anesthetics, benzodiazepines and neurosteroids and have been implicated in the acute as well as the chronic effects of ethanol including tolerance, dependence and withdrawal. Medications targeting GABA(A) receptors ameliorate the symptoms of acute withdrawal. Ethanol induces plasticity in GABA(A) receptors: tolerance is associated with generally decreased GABA(A) receptor activation and differentially altered subunit expression. The dopamine (DA) mesolimbic reward pathway originating in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and interacting stress circuitry play an important role in the development of addiction. VTA GABAergic interneurons are the primary inhibitory regulators of DA neurons and a subset of VTA GABA(A) receptors may be implicated in the switch from heavy drinking to dependence. GABA(A) receptors modulate anxiety and response to stress; important elements of sustained drinking and relapse. The GABA(A) receptor subunit genes clustered on chromosome 4 are highly expressed in the reward pathway. Several recent studies have provided strong evidence that one of these genes, GABRA2, is implicated in alcoholism in humans. The influence of the interaction between ethanol and GABA(A) receptors in the reward pathway on the development of alcoholism together with genetic and epigenetic vulnerabilities will be explored in this review.

  13. Segregation of acetylcholine and GABA in the rat superior cervical ganglia: functional correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eElinos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons have the capability to segregate their neurotransmitters (NTs and co-transmitters to separate varicosities of single axons; furthermore, in culture, these neurons can even segregate classical transmitters. In vivo sympathetic neurons employ acetylcholine (ACh and other classical NTs such as gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA. Herein, we explore whether these neurons in vivo segregate these classical NTs in the superior cervical ganglia of the rat. We determined the topographical distribution of GABAergic varicosities, somatic GABAA receptor, as well as the regional distribution of the segregation of ACh and GABA. We evaluated possible regional differences in efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission, in the sensitivity of GABAA receptor to GABA and to the competitive antagonist picrotoxin (PTX. We found that sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vivo do segregate ACh and GABA. GABAergic varicosities and GABAA receptor expression showed a rostro-caudal gradient along ganglia; in contrast, segregation exhibited a caudo-rostral gradient. These uneven regional distributions in expression of GABA, GABAA receptors, and level segregation correlate with stronger synaptic transmission found in the caudal region. Accordingly, GABAA receptors of rostral region show larger sensitivity to GABA and PTX. These results suggest the presence of different types of GABAA receptors in each region that result in a different regional levels of endogenous GABA inhibition. Finally, we discuss a possible correlation of these different levels of GABA modulation and the function of the target organs innervated by rostral and caudal ganglionic neurons.

  14. Prospective frequency correction for macromolecule-suppressed GABA editing at 3T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edden, Richard A E; Oeltzschner, Georg; Harris, Ashley D

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of B0 field offsets and drift on macromolecule (MM)-suppressed GABA-editing experiments, and to implement and test a prospective correction scheme. "Symmetric" editing schemes are proposed to suppress unwanted coedited MM signals in GABA editing. MATERIALS...

  15. Effect of GABA, a Bacterial Metabolite, on Pseudomonas fluorescens Surface Properties and Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G. J. Feuilloley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different bacterial species and, particularly Pseudomonas fluorescens, can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and express GABA-binding proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of GABA on the virulence and biofilm formation activity of different strains of P. fluorescens. Exposure of a psychotropic strain of P. fluorescens (MF37 to GABA (10−5 M increased its necrotic-like activity on eukaryotic (glial cells, but reduced its apoptotic effect. Conversely, muscimol and bicuculline, the selective agonist and antagonist of eukaryote GABAA receptors, respectively, were ineffective. P. fluorescens MF37 did not produce biosurfactants, and its caseinase, esterase, amylase, hemolytic activity or pyoverdine productions were unchanged. In contrast, the effect of GABA was associated to rearrangements of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure, particularly in the lipid A region. The surface hydrophobicity of MF37 was marginally modified, and GABA reduced its biofilm formation activity on PVC, but not on glass, although the initial adhesion was increased. Five other P. fluorescens strains were studied, and only one, MFP05, a strain isolated from human skin, showed structural differences of biofilm maturation after exposure to GABA. These results reveal that GABA can regulate the LPS structure and cytotoxicity of P. fluorescens, but that this property is specific to some strains.

  16. Positive modulation of delta-subunit containing GABAA receptors in mouse neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis;

    2012-01-01

    δ-subunit containing extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptors are potential targets for modifying neuronal activity in a range of brain disorders. With the aim of gaining more insight in synaptic and extrasynaptic inhibition, we used a new positive modulator, AA29504, of δ-subunit containing GABA(A) recep...

  17. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on synaptogenesis and synaptic function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Elster, L;

    1998-01-01

    , but the intracellular link between GABA receptor activation and DNA transcription is largely unknown. GABA also controls the induction and development of functionally and pharmacologically different GABAA receptor subtypes. The induced receptors are likely to be inserted only into the synaptic membrane domain. However...

  18. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    of such transporters pointing in particular to an interesting role of the transporters located extrasynaptically. It is suggested that the betaine-GABA transporter BGT1 should receive particular interest in this context as the GABA analogue EF 1502 (N-[4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]-4-(methylamino)-4...

  19. Neurotransmitters as food supplements: the effects of GABA on brain and behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evert eBoonstra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The food supplement version of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is widely available online. Although many consumers claim that they experience benefits from the use of these products, it is unclear whether these supplements confer benefits beyond a placebo effect. Currently, the mechanism of action behind these products is unknown. It has long been thought that GABA is unable to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB, but the studies that have assessed this issue are often contradictory and range widely in their employed methods. Accordingly, future research needs to establish the effects of oral GABA administration on GABA levels in the human brain, for example using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There is some evidence in favor of a calming effect of GABA food supplements, but most of this evidence was reported by researchers with a potential conflict of interest. We suggest that any veridical effects of GABA food supplements on brain and cognition might be exerted through BBB passage or, more indirectly, via an effect on the enteric nervous system. We conclude that the mechanism of action of GABA food supplements is far from clear, and that further work is needed to establish the behavioral effects of GABA.

  20. GABA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites modulate hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; de Boer, P; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the regulation of acetylcholine release from the ventral hippocampus by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was investigated in vivo. GABA receptor agonists and antagonists were administered locally in the medial septum and the adjacent vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca, o

  1. Modulation of cell surface GABA B receptors by desensitization,trafficking and regulated degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dietmar; Benke; Khaled; Zemoura; Patrick; J; Maier

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory neurotransmission ensures normal brain function by counteracting and integrating excitatory activity.-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system,and mediates its effects via two classes of receptors:the GABA A and GABA B receptors.GABA A receptors are heteropentameric GABA-gated chloride channels and responsible for fast inhibitory neurotransmission.GABA B receptors are heterodimeric G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) that mediate slow and prolonged inhibitory transmission.The extent of inhibitory neurotransmission is determined by a variety of factors,such as the degree of transmitter release and changes in receptor activity by posttranslational modifications (e.g.,phosphorylation),as well as by the number of receptors present in the plasma membrane available for signal transduction.The level of GABA B receptors at the cell surface critically depends on the residence time at the cell surface and finally the rates of endocytosis and degradation.In this review we focus primarily on recent advances in the understanding of trafficking mechanisms that determine the expression level of GABA B receptors in the plasma membrane,and thereby signaling strength.

  2. GABA accumulation in response to different nitrogenous compounds in unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwal, Simab; Khetkorn, Wanthanee; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2015-01-01

    GABA accumulation and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity, the principal enzyme involved in GABA formation, was investigated in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 wild-type (WT) and gad knockout mutant strains grown in medium containing different nitrogenous compounds. Nitrate was the best nitrogen source for GAD activity and GABA accumulation followed by nitrite, ammonium, and urea. An increase in the accumulation of GABA was observed in WT and mutant cells grown for 24 h in medium supplemented with 0.5 mM putrescine or spermidine with a parallel increase in GAD activity. The mutant could not accumulate GABA at all the conditions tested except when supplemented with putrescine or spermidine, where high GABA levels were observed in both WT and mutant strains. Glutamate supplementation up to 10 mM for 24 h resulted in a significant increase in both GAD activity and GABA content. Overall results suggested that optimization of nitrogen source and nitrogenous compounds supplementation was effective for the enhancement of GABA accumulation in Synechocystis.

  3. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of (TH)triazolam binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of (TH)TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37C). Saturation studies of (TH)TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100 M) showed a GABA-shift. At 0C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables.

  4. A Steered Molecular Dynamics Study of Binding and Translocation Processes in the GABA Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovstrup, Soren; David, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The entire substrate translocation pathway in the human GABA transporter (GAT-1) was explored for the endogenous substrate GABA and the anti-convulsive drug tiagabine. Following a steered molecular dynamics (SMD) approach, in which a harmonic restraining potential is applied to the ligand...

  5. A Unified Model of the GABA(A) Receptor Comprising Agonist and Benzodiazepine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Bergmann, Rikke; Sørensen, Pernille Louise

    2013-01-01

    We present a full-length a1b2c2 GABA receptor model optimized for agonists and benzodiazepine (BZD) allosteric modulators. We propose binding hypotheses for the agonists GABA, muscimol and THIP and for the allosteric modulator diazepam (DZP). The receptor model is primarily based on the glutamate...

  6. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) synthesis of Lactobacillus in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dat, Lai Quoc; Ngan, Tran Thi Kim; Nu, Nguyen Thi Xuan

    2017-09-01

    This research focused on the synthesis of GABA by Lactobacillus bacteria in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract without adding glutamate. Two strains of Lactobacillus were investigated into capacity of GABA synthesis. Result indicates that, Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 exhibited the higher capacity of GABA synthesis in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract than that of Lactobacillus plantarum VTCC - B - 890. Total dissolved solid (TDS), free amino acids (AA) and reducing sugar (RS) contents in fermentation of defatted rice bran extract with two strains also significantly decreased. At pH 5 and 9 %w/w of TDS content in defatted rice bran extract, Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 accumulated 2,952 ppm of GABA in 24 hours of fermentation. The result implies that fermentation with Lactobacillus brevis VTCC - B - 454 can be applied for GABA production from defatted rice bran extract.

  7. GABA/glutamate co-release controls habenula output and is modified by antidepressant treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabel, Steven J.; Proulx, Christophe D.; Piriz, Joaquin; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb), a key regulator of monoaminergic brain regions, is activated by negatively-valenced events. Its hyperactivity is associated with depression. While enhanced excitatory input to the LHb has been linked to depression, little is known about inhibitory transmission. We discovered that GABA is co-released with its functional opponent, glutamate, from long-range basal ganglia inputs (which signal negative events) to limit LHb activity in rodents. At this synapse, the balance of GABA/glutamate signaling is shifted towards reduced GABA in a model of depression and increased GABA by antidepressant treatment. GABA and glutamate co-release therefore controls LHb activity, and regulation of this remarkable form of transmission may be important for determining the impact of negative life events on mood and behavior. PMID:25237099

  8. GAD65 is essential for synthesis of GABA destined for tonic inhibition regulating epileptiform activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walls, Anne B; Nilsen, Linn Hege; Eyjolfsson, Elvar M;

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: GABA is synthesized from glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), which exists in two isoforms, that is, GAD65 and GAD67. In line with GAD65 being located in the GABAergic synapse, several studies have demonstrated that this isoform is important during sustained synaptic transmission....... In contrast, the functional significance of GAD65 in the maintenance of GABA destined for extrasynaptic tonic inhibition is less well studied. Using GAD65-/- and wild type GAD65+/+ mice, this was examined employing the cortical wedge preparation, a model suitable for investigating extrasynaptic GABA......(A) receptor activity. An impaired tonic inhibition in GAD65-/- mice was revealed demonstrating a significant role of GAD65 in the synthesis of GABA acting extrasynaptically. The correlation between an altered tonic inhibition and metabolic events as well as the functional and metabolic role of GABA...

  9. Identification of the first highly selective inhibitor of human GABA transporter GAT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Maria; Al-Khawaja, Anas; Vogensen, Stine B.;

    2015-01-01

    Screening a library of small-molecule compounds using a cell line expressing human GABA transporter 3 (hGAT3) in a [(3)H]GABA uptake assay identified isatin derivatives as a new class of hGAT3 inhibitors. A subsequent structure-activity relationship (SAR) study led to the identification of hGAT3......-yl)indoline-2,3-dione) revealed a noncompetitive mode of inhibition at hGAT3. This suggests that this compound class, which has no structural resemblance to GABA, has a binding site different from the substrate, GABA. This was supported by a molecular modeling study that suggested a unique binding...... site that matched the observed selectivity, inhibition kinetics, and SAR of the compound series. These compounds are the most potent GAT3 inhibitors reported to date that provide selectivity for GAT3 over other GABA transporter subtypes....

  10. Acute Immobilization Stress Modulate GABA Release from Rat Olfactory Bulb: Involvement of Endocannabinoids—Cannabinoids and Acute Stress Modulate GABA Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Delgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effects of cannabinoids and acute immobilization stress on the regulation of GABA release in the olfactory bulb. Glutamate-stimulated 3H-GABA release was measured in superfused slices. We report that cannabinoids as WIN55, 212-2, methanandamide, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol were able to inhibit glutamate- and KCl-stimulated 3H-GABA release. This effect was blocked by the CB1 antagonist AM281. On the other hand, acute stress was able per se to increase endocannabinoid activity. This effect was evident since the inhibition of stimulated GABA release by acute stress was reversed with AM281 and tetrahydrolipstatin. Inhibition of the endocannabinoid transport or its catabolism showed reduction of GABA release, antagonized by AM281 in control and stressed animals. These results point to endocannabinoids as inhibitory modulators of GABA release in the olfactory bulb acting through an autocrine mechanism. Apparently, stress increases the endocannabinoid system, modulating GABAergic synaptic function in a primary sensory organ.

  11. Regulation of /sup 3/H-dopamine release by presynaptic GABA and glutamate heteroreceptors in rat brain nucleus accumbens synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, G.I.; Hetey, L.

    1987-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was a neurochemical study of the effect of agonists of different types of GABA receptors - muscimol (type A receptor), baclofen (type B receptor), delta-aminolevulinic acid (DALA; GABA autoreceptor), and also of GABA itself - on tritium-labelled dopamine release, stimulated by potassium cations, from synaptosomes of the nuclei accumbenes of the rat brain.

  12. Cold-induced thermogenesis mediated by GABA in the preoptic area of anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Toshimasa

    2004-08-01

    Bilateral microinjections of GABA (300 mM, 100 nl) or the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (100 microM, 100 nl) into the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus increased the rate of whole body O(2) consumption (VO(2)) and the body core (colonic) temperature of urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, artificially ventilated rats. The most sensitive site was the dorsomedial POA at the level of the anterior commissure. The GABA-induced thermogenesis was accompanied by a tachycardic response and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded from the femoral or neck muscles. Pretreatment with muscle relaxants (1 mg/kg pancuronium bromide + 4 mg/kg vecuronium bromide i.v.) prevented GABA-induced EMG activity but had no significant effect on GABA-induced thermogenesis. However, pretreatment with the beta-adrenoceptor propranolol (5 mg/kg i.v.) greatly attenuated the GABA-induced increase in VO(2) and tachycardic responses. Accordingly, the GABA-induced increase in VO(2) reflected mainly nonshivering thermogenesis. On the other hand, cooling of the shaved back of the rat by contact with a plastic bag containing 28 degrees C water also elicited thermogenic, tachycardic, and EMG responses. Bilateral microinjections of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (500 microM, 100 nl), but not the vehicle saline, into the POA blocked these skin cooling-induced responses. These results suggest that GABA and GABA(A) receptors in the POA mediate cold information arising from the skin for eliciting cold-induced thermogenesis.

  13. Comparative density of CCK- and PV-GABA cells within the cortex and hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul David Whissell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK- and parvalbumin (PV-expressing neurons constitute the two major populations of perisomatic GABAergic neurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. As CCK- and PV-GABA neurons differ in an array of morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological features, it has been proposed that they form distinct inhibitory ensembles which differentially contribute to network oscillations and behaviour. However, the relationship and balance between CCK- and PV-GABA neurons in the inhibitory networks of the brain is currently unclear as the distribution of these cells has never been compared on a large scale. Here, we systemically investigated the distribution of CCK- and PV-GABA cells across a wide number of discrete forebrain regions using an intersectional genetic approach. Our analysis revealed several novel trends in the distribution of these cells. While PV-GABA cells were more abundant overall, CCK-GABA cells outnumbered PV-GABA cells in several subregions of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral temporal cortex. Interestingly, CCK-GABA cells were relatively more abundant in secondary/association areas of the cortex (V2, S2, M2, and AudD/AudV than they were in corresponding primary areas (V1, S1, M1 and Aud1. The reverse trend was observed for PV-GABA cells. Our findings suggest that the balance between CCK- and PV-GABA cells in a given cortical region is related to the type of processing that area performs; inhibitory networks in the secondary cortex tend to favour the inclusion of CCK-GABA cells more than networks in the primary cortex. The intersectional genetic labelling approach employed in the current study expands upon the ability to study molecularly defined subsets of GABAergic neurons. This technique can be applied to the investigation of neuropathologies which involve disruptions to the GABAergic system, including schizophrenia, stress, maternal immune activation and autism.

  14. Differential actions of fipronil and dieldrin insecticides on GABA-gated chloride channels in cockroach neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xilong; Salgado, Vincent L; Yeh, Jay Z; Narahashi, Toshio

    2003-09-01

    Fipronil and dieldrin are known to inhibit GABA receptors in both mammals and insects. However, the mechanism of selective toxicity of these insecticides between mammals and insects remains to be seen. One possible mechanism is that insect GABA receptors are more sensitive than mammalian GABAA receptors to fipronil and dieldrin. We examined differential actions of fipronil and dieldrin on GABA-gated chloride channels in insects and compared them with the data on mammalian GABAA receptors. Neurons were acutely dissociated from the American cockroach thoracic ganglia, and currents evoked by GABA were recorded by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. GABA-evoked currents were carried by chloride ions, blocked by picrotoxinin, but not by bicuculline. Fipronil inhibited GABA currents with an IC50 value of 28 nM, whereas dieldrin exhibited a dual action potentiation with an EC50 value of 4 nM followed by inhibition with an IC50 value of 16 nM. Fipronil and dieldrin acted on the resting receptor at comparable rates, whereas fipronil blocked the activated receptor 10 times faster than dieldrin. Fipronil inhibition was partially reversible, whereas dieldrin inhibition was irreversible. Fipronil was 59 times more potent on cockroach GABA receptors than on rat GABAA receptors. However, the potentiating and inhibitory potencies of dieldrin in cockroach GABA receptors were comparable with those in rat GABAA receptors. It was concluded that the higher toxicity of fipronil in insects than in mammals is due partially to the higher sensitivity of GABA receptors. The mechanism of dieldrin's selective toxicity must lie in factors other than the sensitivity of GABA receptors.

  15. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Wheeler

    Full Text Available GABA(A receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients.We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin.Our results show that functional GABA(A receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  16. Dual effect of beta-amyloid on α7 and α4β2 nicotinic receptors controlling the release of glutamate, aspartate and GABA in rat hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Mura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously showed that beta-amyloid (Aβ, a peptide considered as relevant to Alzheimer's Disease, is able to act as a neuromodulator affecting neurotransmitter release in absence of evident sign of neurotoxicity in two different rat brain areas. In this paper we focused on the hippocampus, a brain area which is sensitive to Alzheimer's Disease pathology, evaluating the effect of Aβ (at different concentrations on the neurotransmitter release stimulated by the activation of pre-synaptic cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs, α4β2 and α7 subtypes. Particularly, we focused on some neurotransmitters that are usually involved in learning and memory: glutamate, aspartate and GABA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: WE USED A DUAL APPROACH: in vivo experiments (microdialysis technique on freely moving rats in parallel to in vitro experiments (isolated nerve endings derived from rat hippocampus. Both in vivo and in vitro the administration of nicotine stimulated an overflow of aspartate, glutamate and GABA. This effect was greatly inhibited by the highest concentrations of Aβ considered (10 µM in vivo and 100 nM in vitro. In vivo administration of 100 nM Aβ (the lowest concentration considered potentiated the GABA overflow evoked by nicotine. All these effects were specific for Aβ and for nicotinic secretory stimuli. The in vitro administration of either choline or 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (α7 and α4β2 nAChRs selective agonists, respectively elicited the hippocampal release of aspartate, glutamate, and GABA. High Aβ concentrations (100 nM inhibited the overflow of all three neurotransmitters evoked by both choline and 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride. On the contrary, low Aβ concentrations (1 nM and 100 pM selectively acted on α7 subtypes potentiating the choline-induced release of both aspartate and glutamate, but not the one of GABA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results reinforce the concept that Aβ has relevant

  17. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona

    2013-01-01

    their phenotype and determine their concentration in biological fluids. To identify circulating as well as cell culture-derived vesicles, the current standard is immunoblotting or a flow cytometrical analysis for specific proteins, both of which requires large amounts of purified vesicles....

  18. The membrane effects, and sensitivity to strychnine, of neural inhibition of the Mauthner cell, and its inhibition by glycine and GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, J.; Roper, S.; Yasargil, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    1. Anionic conductance changes in Mauthner neurones of goldfish were measured during synaptically evoked inhibition and inhibition caused by iontophoretic application of the putative inhibitory transmitters glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). 2. The effects of either amino acid were indistinguishable from those of the neural inhibitory transmitter(s). The membrane permeability during the neural or drug response was increased to Br-, Cl-, I-, SCN-, NO3-, ClO3-, and formate (HCOO-), but not to HCO3-, BrO3-, IO3-, SO4-, HPO4-, H2PO4-, acetate and citrate. 3. Strychnine was injected intramuscularly, iontophoretically, or applied topically to the exposed brain in order to compare quantitatively its ability to prevent inhibition evoked by synaptic activation and by pharmacological means. Inhibitions were measured by the increase in membrane conductance. 4. Strychnine, at concentrations just adequate to block completely the late collateral inhibition (LCI) and crossed VIII nerve inhibition, had little effect on the pharmacological inhibition caused by glycine, and sometimes there was no detectable effect at all. In one experiment even a local iontophoretic application of strychnine in a sufficient dose to diffuse over the cell and block the LCI almost completely, merely halved the effect of a small dose of glycine applied to the same localized region of the membrane. 5. Higher concentrations of strychnine than those necessary to block synaptically evoked inhibition would reduce the effect of glycine but not that of GABA. The evidence indicated that any apparent effect of strychnine upon GABA could be explained by displacement of the GABA-containing iontophoretic pipette. 6. The glycine-blocking action of iontophoretic pulses of strychnine was of relatively very slow onset and long duration compared to the effects of pulses of glycine and GABA. 7. These findings can be interpreted as either (1) strychnine has a presynaptic action, preventing the release of inhibitory

  19. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  20. Effect of extracellular pH on recombinant alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercik, Katarzyna; Pytel, Maria; Cherubini, Enrico; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-08-01

    Recently, we have reported that extracellular protons allosterically modulated neuronal GABA(A) receptors [Mozrzymas, J.W., Zarnowska, E.D., Pytel, M., Mercik, K., 2003a. Modulation of GABA(A) receptors by hydrogen ions reveals synaptic GABA transient and a crucial role of desensitiztion process. Journal of Neuroscience 23, 7981-7992]. However, GABAARs in neurons are heterogeneous and the effect of hydrogen ions depends on the receptor subtype. In particular, gamma2 subunit sets the receptor sensibility to several modulators including protons. However, the mechanisms whereby protons modulate gamma2-containing and gamma2-free GABAARs have not been fully elucidated. To this end, current responses to ultrafast GABA applications were recorded for alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha1beta2 receptors at different pH values. For both receptor types, increase in pH induced a decrease in amplitudes of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] but this effect was stronger for alpha1beta2 receptors. In the case of alpha1beta2gamma2 receptors, protons strongly affected the current time course due to a down regulation of binding and desensitization rates. This effect was qualitatively similar to that described in neurons. Protons strongly influenced the amplitude of alpha1beta2 receptor-mediated currents but the effect on their kinetics was weak suggesting a predominant direct non-competitive inhibition with a minor allosteric modulation. In conclusion, we provide evidence that extracellular protons strongly affect GABAA receptors and that, depending on the presence of the gamma2 subunit, the modulatory mechanisms show profound quantitative and qualitative differences.

  1. Pharmacology of morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide at opioid, excitatory amino acid, GABA and glycine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, S.E.; Smith, M.T. (Department of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland (Australia)); Dood, P.R. (Clinical Research Centre, Royal Brisbane Hospital Foundation, Brisbane (Australia))

    1994-07-01

    Morphine in high doses and its major metabolite, morphine-3-glucuronide, cause CNS excitation following intrathecal and intracerebroventricular administration by an unknown mechanism. This study investigated whether morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide interact at major excitatory (glutamate), major inhibitory (GABA or glycine), or opioid binding sites. Homogenate binding assays were performed using specific radioligands. At opioid receptors, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine caused an equipotent sodium shift, consistent with morphine-3-glucuronide behaving as an agonist. This suggests that morphine-3-glucuronide-mediated excitation is not caused by an interaction at opioid receptors. Morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine caused a weak inhibition of the binding of [sup 3]H-MK801 (non-competitive antagonist) and [sup 125]I-ifenprodil (polyamine site antagonist), but at unphysiologically high concentrations. This suggests that CNS excitation would not result from an interaction of morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine with these sites on the NMDA receptor. Morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine inhibited the binding of [sup 3]H-muscimol (GABA receptor agonist), [sup 3]H-diazepam and [sup 3]H-flunitraxepam (benzodiazepine agonists) binding very weakly, suggesting the excitatory effects of morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine are not elicited through GABA[sub A] receptors. Morphine-3-glucuronide and high-dose morphine did not prevent re-uptake of glutamate into presynaptic nerve terminals. In addition, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine did not inhibit the binding of [sup 3]H-strychnine (glycine receptor antagonist) to synaptic membranes prepared from bovine spinal cord. It is concluded that excitation caused by high-dose morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide is not mediated by an interaction with postsynaptic amino acid receptors. (au) (30 refs.).

  2. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    Regulation, 1998, 25: 23-28.[34]Cui. S. J.. Wang, H. H., Ma, L. G. et al., The effects of extracellular calmodulin of style and pollen on pollen germination and pollen tube growth, Acta Phytophysiologica Sinica (in Chinese), 1998, 42: 320-326.[35]Ma, L. G.. Xu, X. D., Cui, S. J. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin on pollen germination and tube growth, Chin. Sci.Bull. (in Chinese), 1998, 43(2): 143-146.[36]Wanner. L. A., Gruissem, W., Expression dynamics of the tomato rbcS gene family during development, Plant Cell, 1991,3: 1289-1303.[37]Sawbridge, T. I., Knight, M. R., Jenkins, G. I., Ontogenetic regulation and photoregulation of members of the Phaseolus vulgaris L. rbcS gene family, Planta, 1996, 198: 31-38.[38]Zhang, S. Q., Ma, L. G., Sun, D. Y., The effect of extracellular calmodulin on rbcS-3A expression in suspension-cultured tomato cells, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese), 2000, 42(6): 653-655.[39]Shang, Z. L., Ma, L. G., Wang, X. C. et al., Effect of extracellular calmodulin on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in lily pollen grains, Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese), 2001, 43(1): 12-17.[40]Ma, L. G., Xu, X. D., Cui, S. J. et al., The presence of a heterotrimeric G protein and its role in signal transduction of extracellular calmodulin in pollen germination and tube growth, Plant Cell, 1999, 11: 1351-1363.[41]Guo, Y., Ma, L. G., Zhang, L. et al., The involvement of hetrotrimeric G protein in signal transduction of extracellular calmodulin in regulating rbcS expression, Chin. Sci. Bull., 2000, 45(20): 2195-2200.[42]Ma, L. G., Xu, X. D., Cui, S. J. et al., The involvement of phosphoinositide signaling pathway in the initiatory effects of extracellular calmodulin on pollen germination and tube growth, Acta Phytophysiologica Sinica (in Chinese), 1998, 24:196-200.[43]Wang, X., Cui, S. J., Ma, L. G. et al., The involvement of PLC-IP3 pathway in pollen tube growth by microinjection study,Acta Botanica Sinica (in Chinese), 2000

  3. Galanin-Expressing GABA Neurons in the Lateral Hypothalamus Modulate Food Reward and Noncompulsive Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls-Creekmore, Emily; Yu, Sangho; Francois, Marie; Hoang, John; Huesing, Clara; Bruce-Keller, Annadora; Burk, David; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Morrison, Christopher D; Münzberg, Heike

    2017-06-21

    The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) integrates reward and appetitive behavior and is composed of many overlapping neuronal populations. Recent studies associated LHA GABAergic neurons (LHA (GABA) ), which densely innervate the ventral tegmental area (VTA), with modulation of food reward and consumption; yet, LHA (GABA) projections to the VTA exclusively modulated food consumption, not reward. We identified a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons that coexpress the neuropeptide galanin (LHA (Gal) ). These LHA (Gal) neurons also modulate food reward, but lack direct VTA innervation. We hypothesized that LHA (Gal) neurons may represent a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons that mediates food reward independent of direct VTA innervation. We used chemogenetic activation of LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neurons in mice to compare their role in feeding behavior. We further analyzed locomotor behavior to understand how differential VTA connectivity and transmitter release in these LHA neurons influences this behavior. LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neuronal activation both increased operant food-seeking behavior, but only activation of LHA (GABA) neurons increased overall chow consumption. Additionally, LHA (Gal) or LHA (GABA) neuronal activation similarly induced locomotor activity, but with striking differences in modality. Activation of LHA (GABA) neurons induced compulsive-like locomotor behavior; while LHA (Gal) neurons induced locomotor activity without compulsivity. Thus, LHA (Gal) neurons define a subpopulation of LHA (GABA) neurons without direct VTA innervation that mediate noncompulsive food-seeking behavior. We speculate that the striking difference in compulsive-like locomotor behavior is also based on differential VTA innervation. The downstream neural network responsible for this behavior and a potential role for galanin as neuromodulator remains to be identified.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The lateral hypothalamus (LHA) regulates motivated feeding behavior via GABAergic LHA neurons

  4. Stable isotope dilution HILIC-MS/MS method for accurate quantification of glutamic acid, glutamine, pyroglutamic acid, GABA and theanine in mouse brain tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koichi; Miyazaki, Yasuto; Unno, Keiko; Min, Jun Zhe; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed the stable isotope dilution hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) technique for the accurate, reasonable and simultaneous quantification of glutamic acid (Glu), glutamine (Gln), pyroglutamic acid (pGlu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and theanine in mouse brain tissues. The quantification of these analytes was accomplished using stable isotope internal standards and the HILIC separating mode to fully correct the intramolecular cyclization during the electrospray ionization. It was shown that linear calibrations were available with high coefficients of correlation (r(2)  > 0.999, range from 10 pmol/mL to 50 mol/mL). For application of the theanine intake, the determination of Glu, Gln, pGlu, GABA and theanine in the hippocampus and central cortex tissues was performed based on our developed method. In the region of the hippocampus, the concentration levels of Glu and pGlu were significantly reduced during reality-based theanine intake. Conversely, the concentration level of GABA increased. This result showed that transited theanine has an effect on the metabolic balance of Glu analogs in the hippocampus.

  5. Use of sourdough fermentation and pseudo-cereals and leguminous flours for the making of a functional bread enriched of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coda, Rossana; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco

    2010-02-28

    Lactobacillus plantarum C48 and Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis PU1, previously selected for the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), were used for sourdough fermentation of cereal, pseudo-cereal and leguminous flours. Chickpea, amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat were the flours most suitable to be enriched of GABA. The parameters of sourdough fermentation were optimized. Addition of 0.1mM pyridoxal phosphate, dough yield of 160, inoculum of 5 x 10(7)CFU/g of starter bacteria and fermentation for 24h at 30 degrees C were found to be the optimal conditions. A blend of buckwheat, amaranth, chickpea and quinoa flours (ratio 1:1:5.3:1) was selected and fermented with baker's yeast (non-conventional flour bread, NCB) or with Lb. plantarum C48 sourdough (non-conventional flour sourdough bread, NCSB) and compared to baker's yeast started wheat flour bread (WFB). NCSB had the highest concentration of free amino acids and GABA (ca. 4467 and 504 mg/kg, respectively). The concentration of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of NCSB bread was the highest, as well as the rate of in vitro starch hydrolysis was the lowest. Texture analysis showed that sourdough fermentation enhances several characteristics of NCSB with respect to NCB, thus approaching the features of WFB. Sensory analysis showed that sourdough fermentation allowed to get good palatability and overall taste appreciation.

  6. Early life stress is a risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking and impulsivity in adults and is mediated via a CRF/GABA(A) mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Wang, Hong; June, Harry L; Bell, Kimberly A; Rabe, Holger; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata Naga Phani Babu; Cook, James; Lüddens, Hartmut; Aurelian, Laure; June, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Childhood stress and trauma are associated with substance use disorders in adulthood, but the neurological changes that confer increased vulnerability are largely unknown. In this study, maternal separation (MS) stress, restricted to the pre-weaning period, was used as a model to study mechanisms of protracted effects of childhood stress/traumatic experiences on binge drinking and impulsivity. Using an operant self-administration model of binge drinking and a delay discounting assay to measure impulsive-like behavior, we report that early life stress due to MS facilitated acquisition of binge drinking and impulsivity during adulthood in rats. Previous studies have shown heightened levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) after MS, and here, we add that MS increased expression levels of GABA(A) α2 subunit in central stress circuits. To investigate the precise role of these circuits in regulating impulsivity and binge drinking, the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin and the novel GABA(A) α2 subunit ligand 3-PBC were infused into the central amygdala (CeA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Antalarmin and 3-PBC at each site markedly reduced impulsivity and produced profound reductions on binge-motivated alcohol drinking, without altering responding for sucrose. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that low concentrations of 3-PBC directly reversed the effect of relatively high concentrations of ethanol on α2β3γ2 GABA(A) receptors, by a benzodiazepine site-independent mechanism. Together, our data provide strong evidence that maternal separation, i.e. early life stress, is a risk factor for binge drinking, and is linked to impulsivity, another key risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking. We further show that pharmacological manipulation of CRF and GABA receptor signaling is effective to reverse binge drinking and impulsive-like behavior in MS rats. These results provide novel insights into the role of the brain stress systems in the

  7. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Shimeng; Yang, Liukun; Shi, Qixin; Li, Yujiao; Zhang, Kun; Yang, Le; Zhao, Minggao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT) cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T) expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB), a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment. PMID:27517961

  8. GABA is the principal fast-acting excitatory transmitter in the neonatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinekugel, X; Khalilov, I; McLean, H; Caillard, O; Gaiarsa, J L; Ben-Ari, Y; Khazipov, R

    1999-01-01

    gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal neurotransmitter of inhibition in the adult mammalian brain. However, at early stages of development, including the embryonic period and first week of postnatal life, GABA plays the role of main neurotransmitter of excitation. The paradoxical excitatory effect of GABA is caused by an inverted chloride gradient and, therefore, a depolarizing direction of GABA type A (GABAA) receptor mediated responses. In addition, another type of GABAergic inhibition mediated by postsynaptic GABA type B (GABAB) receptors is not functional at early stage of life. In the neonatal rat hippocampus, GABA, acting via GABAA receptors, activates voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels and potentiates the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by reducing their voltage-dependent Mg2+ block. The temporal window when GABA exerts excitatory actions coincides with a particular pattern of activity of hippocampal neuronal network that is characterized by periodical giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) reminiscent of interictal-like epileptiform discharges. Recent studies have shown that GDPs result from the synchronous discharge of GABAergic interneurons and principal glutamatergic pyramidal cells, and they are mediated by the synergistic excitatory actions of GABAA and glutamate receptors. GDPs provide synchronous intracellular Ca2+ oscillations and may, therefore, be implicated in hebbian modulation of developing synapses and activity-dependent formation of the hippocampal network.

  9. Regulation of (/sup 3/H)GABA release from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakawa, J.; Taniyama, K.; Iwai, S.; Tanaka, C.

    1988-12-01

    The presence of receptors that regulate the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was studied in strips of the guinea pig urinary bladder. GABA (10(-8)-10(-5) M) and muscimol (10(-8)-10(-5) M), but not baclofen (10(-5) M), reduced the Ca2+-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant release of (/sup 3/H)GABA evoked by high K+ from the urinary bladder strips preloaded with (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of muscimol was antagonized by bicuculline and potentiated by diazepam, clonazepam, and pentobarbital sodium. The potentiating effect of clonazepam was antagonized by Ro 15-1788. Acetylcholine (ACh) inhibited the high K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of ACh was antagonized by atropine sulfate and pirenzepine but not by hexamethonium. Norepinephrine (NE) inhibited the evoked release of (/sup 3/H)GABA. The inhibitory effect of NE was mimicked by clonidine, but not by phenylephrine, and was antagonized by yohimbine but not by prazosin. These results provide evidence that the release of GABA from strips of guinea pig urinary bladder is regulated via the bicuculline-sensitive GABAA receptor, M1-muscarinic, and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors.

  10. Hypothesis/review: contribution of putrescine to 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) production in response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelp, Barry J; Bozzo, Gale G; Trobacher, Christopher P; Zarei, Adel; Deyman, Kristen L; Brikis, Carolyne J

    2012-09-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in various plant parts, including bulky fruits such as apples, in response to abiotic stress. It is generally believed that the GABA is derived from glutamate, although a contribution from polyamines is possible. Putrescine, but not spermidine and spermine, generally accumulates in response to the genetic manipulation of polyamine biosynthetic enzymes and abiotic stress. However, the GABA levels in stressed plants are influenced by processes other than putrescine availability. It is hypothesized that the catabolism of putrescine to GABA is regulated by a combination of gene-dependent and -independent processes. The expression of several putative diamine oxidase genes is weak, but highly stress-inducible in certain tissues of Arabidopsis. In contrast, candidate genes that encode 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase are highly constitutive, but not stress inducible. Changes in O(2) availability and cellular redox balance due to stress may directly influence the activities of diamine oxidase and 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase, thereby restricting GABA formation. Apple fruit is known to accumulate GABA under controlled atmosphere storage and therefore could serve as a model system for investigating the relative contribution of putrescine and glutamate to GABA production.

  11. Contents of Neo-flavored Tea (GABA Kintaro) Containing γ-Aminobutyric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Yoshiya

    The contents of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), catechins, theaflavins, caffeine and pheophorbide-a in neo-flavored tea (GABA Kintaro tea) were analyzed. 1)The amounts of GABA were increased over 1.5mg/g by means of infrared ray irradiation with agitation treatment. 2)There was a tendency for the amount of catechins to be decreased by this treatment, whereas the amount of theaflavins tended to increase with the same treatment. The composition of these contents in this GABA Kintaro tea was almost the same as that of black tea. 3)There was a tendency for the amount of caffeine to be decreased by this treatment. 4)There was a tendency for the amount of pheophorbide-a to be increased by this treatment. 5)The result of this study showed that the amounts of GABA and theaflavins in this GABA Kintaro tea were higher than ordinary green tea but contained few catechins.It became clear that the amount of pheophorbide-a in this GABA Kintaro tea was less than the standard value established in processed chlorella.

  12. Imbalance between Glutamate and GABA in Fmr1 Knockout Astrocytes Influences Neuronal Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a form of inherited mental retardation that results from the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP, the product of the Fmr1 gene. Numerous studies have shown that FMRP expression in astrocytes is important in the development of FXS. Although astrocytes affect neuronal dendrite development in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice, the factors released by astrocytes are still unclear. We cultured wild type (WT cortical neurons in astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM from WT or Fmr1 KO mice. Immunocytochemistry and Western blotting were performed to detect the dendritic growth of both WT and KO neurons. We determined glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA levels using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The total neuronal dendritic length was reduced when cultured in the Fmr1 KO ACM. This neurotoxicity was triggered by an imbalanced release of glutamate and GABA from Fmr1 KO astrocytes. We found increased glutaminase and GABA transaminase (GABA-T expression and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression in Fmr1 KO astrocytes. The elevated levels of glutamate contributed to oxidative stress in the cultured neurons. Vigabatrin (VGB, a GABA-T inhibitor, reversed the changes caused by glutamate and GABA release in Fmr1 KO astrocytes and the abnormal behaviors in Fmr1 KO mice. Our results indicate that the imbalance in the astrocytic glutamate and GABA release may be involved in the neuropathology and the underlying symptoms of FXS, and provides a therapeutic target for treatment.

  13. Prevention of GABA reduction during dough fermentation using a baker's yeast dal81 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide

    2016-10-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is consumed by yeasts during fermentation. To prevent GABA reduction in bread dough, a baker's yeast mutant AY77 deficient in GABA assimilation was characterized and utilized for wheat dough fermentation. An amber mutation in the DAL81 gene, which codes for a positive regulator of multiple nitrogen degradation pathways, was found in the AY77 strain. The qPCR analyses of genes involved in nitrogen utilization showed that transcriptional levels of the UGA1 and DUR3 genes encoding GABA transaminase and urea transporter, respectively, are severely decreased in the AY77 cells. The AY77 strain cultivated by fed-batch culture using cane molasses exhibited inferior gas production during dough fermentation compared to that of wild-type strain AY13. However, when fed with molasses containing 0.5% ammonium sulfate, the mutant strain exhibited gas production comparable to that of the AY13 strain. In contrast to the AY13 strain, which completely consumed GABA in dough within 5 h, the AY77 strain consumed no GABA under either culture condition. Dough fermentation with the dal81 mutant strain should be useful for suppression of GABA reduction in breads.

  14. Amiloride and GMQ Allosteric Modulation of the GABA-A ρ1 Receptor: Influences of the Intersubunit Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Amiloride, a diuretic used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure, and 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) are guanidine compounds that modulate acid-sensing ion channels. Both compounds have demonstrated affinity for a variety of membrane proteins, including members of the Cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels, such as the heteromeric GABA-A αβγ receptors. The actions of these guanidine compounds on the homomeric GABA-A ρ1 receptor remains unclear, especially in light of how many GABA-A αβγ receptor modulators have different effects in the GABA-A ρ1 receptors. We sought to characterize the influence of amiloride and GMQ on the human GABA-A ρ1 receptors using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. The diuretic amiloride potentiated the human GABA-A ρ1 GABA-mediated current, whereas GMQ antagonized the receptor. Furthermore, a GABA-A second transmembrane domain site, the intersubunit site, responsible for allosteric modulation in the heteromeric GABA-A receptors mediated amiloride’s positive allosteric actions. In contrast, the mutation did not remove GMQ antagonism but only changed the guanidine compound’s potency within the human GABA-A ρ1 receptor. Through modeling and introduction of point mutations, we propose that the GABA-A ρ1 intersubunit site plays a role in mediating the allosteric effects of amiloride and GMQ. PMID:25829529

  15. Ultrastructure of GABA- and tachykinin-immunoreactive neurons in the lower division of the central body of the desert locust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Homberg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The central complex, a group of neuropils spanning the midline of the insect brain, plays a key role in spatial orientation and navigation. In the desert locust and other species, many neurons of the central complex are sensitive to the oscillation plane of polarized light above the animal and are likely involved in the coding of compass directions derived from the polarization pattern of the sky. Polarized light signals enter the locust central complex primarily through two types of -aminobutyric acid (GABA-immunoreactive tangential neurons, termed TL2 and TL3 that innervate specific layers of the lower division of the central body (CBL. Candidate postsynaptic partners are columnar neurons (CL1 connecting the CBL to the protocerebral bridge. Subsets of CL1 neurons are immunoreactive to antisera against locustatachykinin (LomTK. To better understand the synaptic connectivities of tangential and columnar neurons in the CBL, we studied its ultrastructural organization in the desert locust, both with conventional electron microscopy and in preparations immunolabeled for GABA or LomTK. Neuronal profiles in the CBL were rich in mitochondria and vesicles. Three types of vesicles were distinguished: small clear vesicles with diameters of 20-40 nm, dark dense-core vesicles (diameter 70-120 nm, and granular dense-core vesicles (diameter 70-80 nm. Neurons were connected via divergent dyads and, less frequently, through convergent dyads. GABA-immunoreactive neurons contained small clear vesicles and small numbers of dark dense core vesicles. They had both pre- and postsynaptic contacts but output synapses were observed more frequently than input synapses. LomTK immunostaining was concentrated on large granular vesicles; neurons had pre- and postsynaptic connections often with neurons assumed to be GABAergic. The data suggest that GABA-immunoreactive tangential neurons provide signals to postsynaptic neurons in the CBL, including LomTK-immunolabeled CL1

  16. The alpha2C-adrenoceptor modulates GABA release in mouse striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilie; Ordway, Gregory A

    2003-04-10

    The alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor occurs in high density in the striatum relative to other brain regions, but its biological role in striatal physiology is perplexing because of the paucity of noradrenergic terminals in this region. In this study, mice with a targeted inactivation of the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor gene (alpha(2C)-KO mice), and genetically related mice (WT mice), were used to study the potential role of the striatal alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor in modulating GABA release. Perfused brain slices were pre-loaded with [(3)H]GABA and were stimulated electrically. In WT mice, the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, UK14304 (brimonidine), significantly enhanced [(3)H]GABA release from striatal slices, while the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, RX821002, alone evoked a significant decrease in [(3)H]GABA release. In alpha(2C)-KO mice, the effect of RX821002 was absent, while UK14304 retained its ability to enhance [(3)H]GABA release. Pharmacological depletion of monoamines in WT mice also abolished the effect of RX821002 on [(3)H]GABA release. In hippocampal slices, RX821002-induced reduction in [(3)H]GABA release was present in WT and alpha(2C)-KO mice. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, RX821002 increased [(3)H]GABA release in striatal slices from both WT and alpha(2C)-KO mice. Together, these data imply that alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors are located on different neurons in the striatum, that alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor-mediated effects on striatal GABA release are mediated by an endogenous catecholamine that could be dopamine, and that the alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor effect of RX821002 does not occur at the GABAergic terminal.

  17. Membrane voltage modulates the GABA(A) receptor gating in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Maria; Mercik, Katarzyna; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W

    2006-02-01

    The kinetics of GABAergic currents in neurons is known to be modulated by the membrane voltage but the underlying mechanisms have not been fully explored. In particular, the impact of membrane potential on the GABA(A) receptor gating has not been elucidated. In the present study, the effect of membrane voltage on current responses elicited by ultrafast GABA applications was studied in cultured hippocampal neurons. The current to voltage relationship (I-V) for responses to saturating [GABA] (10 mM) showed an inward rectification (slope conductance at positive voltages was 0.62 +/- 0.05 of that at negative potentials). On the contrary, I-V for currents evoked by low [GABA] (1 microM) showed an outward rectification. The onset of currents elicited by saturating [GABA] was significantly accelerated at positive potentials. Analysis of currents evoked by prolonged applications of saturating [GABA] revealed that positive voltages significantly increased the rate and extent of desensitization. The onsets of current responses to non-saturating [GABA] were significantly accelerated at positive voltages indicating an enhancement of the binding rate. However, at low [GABA] at which the onset rate is expected to approach an asymptote set by opening/closing and unbinding rates, no significant modification of current onset by voltage was observed. Quantitative analysis based on model simulations indicated that the major effect of membrane depolarization was to increase the rates of binding, desensitization and of opening as well as to slightly reduce the rate of exit from desensitization. In conclusion, we provide evidence that membrane voltage affects the GABA(A) receptor microscopic gating.

  18. Suppression of sustained and transient ON signals of amacrine cells by GABA is mediated by different receptor subtypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张道启; 杨如; 杨雄里

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular recordings were made from amacrine cells in the isolated, superfused carp retina, and the effects of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on sustained and transient ON signals of these cells were studied. Exogenous GABA application partially suppressed the sustained response of ON amacrine cells, which could be completely reversed by picrotoxin (PTX), a chloride channel blocker, and by bicuculline (BCC), a specific GABA_A receptor antagonist. On the other hand, suppression by GABA of the ON response which was predominantly driven by rod signals in a certain portion of transient ON-OFF amacrine cells was completely blocked by PTX, but not by BCC, indicating that GABA_C receptors may be involved in the effect. These results suggest that GABA_A and GABA_C receptors may be respectively involved in mediating the transmission of sustained and transient signals in the carp inner retina.

  19. Dorsomedial hypothalamic GABA regulates anxiety in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, A; Katner, J S

    1995-02-01

    Blockade of GABAA function in the region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of rats is known to elicit a constellation of physiologic responses including increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate, and plasma catecholamine levels, as well as behavioral responses such as increases in locomotor activity and anxiogenic-like effects as measured in a conflict test and the elevated plus-maze test. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of microinjecting GABAA antagonists bicuculline methiodide (BMI) and picrotoxin, as well as the GABAA agonist muscimol, into the DMH of rats placed in the social interaction (SI) test. Muscimol decreased HR and BP but increased SI, whereas the GABA antagonists increased HR and BP but decreased SI time. Blocking the HR changes elicited by GABAergic drugs injected into the DMH with systemic injections of atenolol and atropine methylbromide did not block their effects on SI.

  20. Astrocytic control of biosynthesis and turnover of the neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis....... Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA...

  1. Increased binding of [3H]GABA to striatal membranes following ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, A; Pulsinelli, W

    1983-05-01

    Sodium-independent binding of [3H]gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) to membranes prepared from ischemic-damaged rat striatum was studied by kinetic and time-course analysis. Three days after 40 min of ischemia, [3H]GABA binding increased fourfold over control values. Scatchard analysis of the binding showed that ischemia significantly increased the affinity (KD) and the total number of binding sites (Bmax) for the high-affinity GABA receptor. These results support the conclusion that transient forebrain ischemia damages striatal GABAergic neurons.

  2. Presynaptic kainate receptors that enhance the release of GABA on CA1 hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, R; Tyzio, R; Dinocourt, C; Esclapez, M; Hirsch, J C; Ben-Ari, Y; Bernard, C

    2001-02-01

    We report that kainate receptors are present on presynaptic GABAergic terminals contacting interneurons and that their activation increases GABA release. Application of kainate increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in CA1 interneurons. Local applications of glutamate but not of AMPA or NMDA also increased GABA quantal release. Application of kainate as well as synaptically released glutamate reduced the number of failures of GABAergic neurotransmission between interneurons. Thus, activation of presynaptic kainate receptors increases the probability of GABA release at interneuron-interneuron synapses. Glutamate may selectively control the communication between interneurons by increasing their mutual inhibition.

  3. Antidepressants and seizure-interactions at the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malatynska, E.; Knapp, R.J.; Ikeda, M.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    Convulsive seizures are a potential side effect of antidepressant drug treatment and can be produced by all classes of antidepressants. It is also know that some convulsant and anticonvulsant drug actions are mediated by the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex. Drugs acting at this complex appear to induce convulsions by inhibiting chloride conductance through the associated chloride channel. Using the method of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl-uptake by rat cerebral cortical vesicles, we show that some antidepressant drugs can inhibit the GABA-receptor chloride uptake, and that the degree of chloride channel inhibition by these drugs correlates with the frequency of convulsive seizures induced by them.

  4. Painful tonic heat stimulation induces GABA accumulation in the prefrontal cortex in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Danielsen, Else R; Kehlet, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    in pain processing. Using a 3T MR scanner, we acquired spectra from the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) in 13 healthy right-handed subjects at rest and during painful heat stimulation. The painful stimulus consisted of a suprathreshold painful tonic heat pulse, which was delivered to the right...... that GABA is released in the human cerebral cortex during painful stimulation. The results are in line with animal findings on the role of GABA in pain processing and with studies in humans showing analgesic efficacy of GABA-related drugs in clinical pain conditions....

  5. GABA metabolism pathway genes, UGA1 and GAD1, regulate replicative lifespan in Saccharomycescerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tamura, Takayuki [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Yoshida, Ryo [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohta, Shinji [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan); Fukusaki, Eiichiro [Department of Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, 1266 Tamura, Nagahama, Shiga 526-0829 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields}We demonstrate that two genes in the yeast GABA metabolism pathway affect aging. {yields} Deletion of the UGA1 or GAD1 genes extends replicative lifespan. {yields} Addition of GABA to wild-type cultures has no effect on lifespan. {yields} Intracellular GABA levels do not differ in longevity mutants and wild-type cells. {yields} Levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlate with lifespan. -- Abstract: Many of the genes involved in aging have been identified in organisms ranging from yeast to human. Our previous study showed that deletion of the UGA3 gene-which encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor necessary for {gamma}-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-dependent induction of the UGA1 (GABA aminotransferase), UGA2 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), and UGA4 (GABA permease) genes-extends replicative lifespan in the budding yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae. Here, we found that deletion of UGA1 lengthened the lifespan, as did deletion of UGA3; in contrast, strains with UGA2 or UGA4 deletions exhibited no lifespan extension. The {Delta}uga1 strain cannot deaminate GABA to succinate semialdehyde. Deletion of GAD1, which encodes the glutamate decarboxylase that converts glutamate into GABA, also increased lifespan. Therefore, two genes in the GABA metabolism pathway, UGA1 and GAD1, were identified as aging genes. Unexpectedly, intracellular GABA levels in mutant cells (except for {Delta}uga2 cells) did not differ from those in wild-type cells. Addition of GABA to culture media, which induces transcription of the UGA structural genes, had no effect on replicative lifespan of wild-type cells. Multivariate analysis of {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for the whole-cell metabolite levels demonstrated a separation between long-lived and normal-lived strains. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of identified metabolites showed that levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates positively correlated with lifespan

  6. Mutations in the GABA Transporter SLC6A1 Cause Epilepsy with Myoclonic-Atonic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; McMahon, Jacinta M; Schneider, Amy;

    2015-01-01

    GAT-1, encoded by SLC6A1, is one of the major gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporters in the brain and is responsible for re-uptake of GABA from the synapse. In this study, targeted resequencing of 644 individuals with epileptic encephalopathies led to the identification of six SLC6A1 mutations...... in seven individuals, all of whom have epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures (MAE). We describe two truncations and four missense alterations, all of which most likely lead to loss of function of GAT-1 and thus reduced GABA re-uptake from the synapse. These individuals share many...

  7. Effects and mechanisms of chronic morphine exposure on extracellular glutamate concentration in C6 cells%吗啡慢性暴露对C6细胞胞外谷氨酸浓度的影响及其机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅艳妮; 郭明炎; 刘玲; 纪风涛; 刘安民; 曹铭辉

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性吗啡暴露对C6胶质瘤细胞胞外谷氨酸浓度的影响及其机制.方法 培养好的C6细胞随机分为4组:对照组(细胞培养液培养,不加任何药物)、10 Mor组(10 μmol/L吗啡处理48 h)、撤药组(10 μmol/L吗啡预处理48 h后停药12 h)、5 Mor组(10 μmol/L吗啡预处理48 h、停药12h后再以5μmol/L吗啡复处理4h).采用磺酰罗丹明B(SRB)法检测细胞存活率,高效液相色谱测定细胞外液谷氨酸(Glu)水平,Western blot法检测细胞兴奋性氨基酸转运蛋白3(EAAT3)蛋白表达,实时定量反转录聚合酶链反应(RT-qPCR)检测EAAT3 mRNA表达水平.结果 (1)对照组细胞外液谷氨酸浓度为(18.03 ±1.11) mg/L.10 μmol/L吗啡作用C6细胞48 h后细胞外液Glu浓度上升至(41.76 ±7.14) mg/L,与对照组比较明显增加(P<0.05).撤药12 h后Glu浓度降至(25.22±2.26) mg/L,后再以5μmol/L吗啡处理4h后,细胞外液Glu浓度再次升至(40.18±7.08) mg/L,较对照组与撤药12h均明显增加(P<0.05).(2)C6细胞经吗啡作用48 h后EAAT3蛋白表达较对照组明显减少(P<0.05),撤药12h后EAAT3蛋白表达水平与对照组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);5μmol/L吗啡再次处理4h,EAAT3蛋白表达再次明显升高(P<0.05).(3)4组中EAAT3 mRNA表达水平差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 吗啡慢性暴露引起C6细胞胞外Glu浓度增加,与EAAT3蛋白表达下降有关,EAAT3表达下调可能为转录后水平调节.%Objective To explore the effects and mechanisms of chronic morphine exposure on extracellular glutamate (Glu) concentration in C6 cells.Methods Well-grown C6 cells were divided into 4 groups: control group (C6 cells were treated with no drugs), 10 Mor group (10 μmol/L morphine treatment for 48 h), withdrawal group (after 10 μmol/L morphine treatment for 48 h, C6 cells were cultured in medium without morphine for 12 h, a simulation of the abstinence process), 5 Mor group (after C6 cells experienced morphine exposure

  8. Effects of Vigabatrin, an Irreversible GABA Transaminase Inhibitor, on Ethanol Reinforcement and Ethanol Discriminative Stimuli in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, William C.; Nguyen, Shaun A.; Deleon, Christopher P.; Middaugh, Lawrence D.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the irreversible gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) transaminase inhibitor, γ-vinyl GABA (Vigabatrin; VGB) would reduce ethanol reinforcement and enhance the discriminative stimulus effect of ethanol, effectively reducing ethanol intake. The present studies used adult C57BL/6J (B6) mice in well-established operant, two-bottle choice consumption, locomotor activity and ethanol discrimination procedures, to examine comprehensively the effects of VGB on ethanol-supported behaviors. VGB dose-dependently reduced operant responding for ethanol as well as ethanol consumption for long periods of time. Importantly, a low dose (200 mg/kg) of VGB was selective for reducing ethanol responding without altering intake of food or water reinforcement. Higher VGB doses (>200 mg/kg) still reduced ethanol intake, but also significantly increased water consumption and, more modestly, increased food consumption. While not affecting locomotor activity on its own, VGB interacted with ethanol to reduce the stimulatory effects of ethanol on locomotion. Finally, VGB (200 mg/kg) significantly enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of ethanol as evidenced by significant left-ward and up-ward shifts in ethanol generalization curves. Interestingly, VGB treatment was associated with slight increases in blood ethanol concentrations. The reduction in ethanol intake by VGB appears to be related to the ability of VGB to potentiate the pharmacological effects of ethanol. PMID:22336593

  9. Extracellular potassium homeostasis: insights from hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Kuo, Elizabeth; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-05-01

    Extracellular potassium makes up only about 2% of the total body's potassium store. The majority of the body potassium is distributed in the intracellular space, of which about 80% is in skeletal muscle. Movement of potassium in and out of skeletal muscle thus plays a pivotal role in extracellular potassium homeostasis. The exchange of potassium between the extracellular space and skeletal muscle is mediated by specific membrane transporters. These include potassium uptake by Na(+), K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase and release by inward-rectifier K(+) channels. These processes are regulated by circulating hormones, peptides, ions, and by physical activity of muscle as well as dietary potassium intake. Pharmaceutical agents, poisons, and disease conditions also affect the exchange and alter extracellular potassium concentration. Here, we review extracellular potassium homeostasis, focusing on factors and conditions that influence the balance of potassium movement in skeletal muscle. Recent findings that mutations of a skeletal muscle-specific inward-rectifier K(+) channel cause hypokalemic periodic paralysis provide interesting insights into the role of skeletal muscle in extracellular potassium homeostasis. These recent findings are reviewed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release and changes in the concentration of intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) were studied in cultured GABAergic cerebral cortical neurons, from mice, upon depolarization with either an unphysiologically high potassium concentration (55 mM) or the physiological excitatory...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... in nature whereas that induced by the neurotransmitter glutamate is not....

  11. Neuromodulatory properties of fluorescent carbon dots: effect on exocytotic release, uptake and ambient level of glutamate and GABA in brain nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Nazarova, Anastasia; Dekaliuk, Mariia; Krisanova, Natalia; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Borysov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2015-02-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots), a recently discovered class of fluorescent nano-sized particles with pure carbon core, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of fluorescent C-dots obtained from β-alanine by microwave heating were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on the key characteristics of GABA- and glutamatergic neurotransmission in isolated rat brain nerve terminals. It was found that C-dots (40-800 μg/ml) in dose-dependent manner: (1) decreased exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (2) reduced acidification of synaptic vesicles; (3) attenuated the initial velocity of Na(+)-dependent transporter-mediated uptake of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (4) increased the ambient level of the neurotransmitters, nevertheless (5) did not change significantly the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Almost complete suppression of exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters was caused by C-dots at a concentration of 800 μg/ml. Fluorescent and neuromodulatory features combined in C-dots create base for their potential usage for labeling and visualization of key processes in nerve terminals, and also in theranostics. In addition, natural presence of carbon-containing nanoparticles in the human food chain and in the air may provoke the development of neurologic consequences.

  12. Sleep-promoting effects of the GABA/5-HTP mixture in vertebrate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki-Bae; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the sleep-promoting effect of combined γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) on sleep quality and quantity in vertebrate models. Pentobarbital-induced sleep test and electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis were applied to investigate sleep latency, duration, total sleeping time and sleep quality of two amino acids and GABA/5-HTP mixture. In addition, real-time PCR and HPLC analysis were applied to analyze the signaling pathway. The GABA/5-HTP mixture significantly regulated the sleep latency, duration (pHTP mixture modulates both GABAergic and serotonergic signaling. Moreover, the sleep architecture can be controlled by the regulation of GABAA receptor and GABA content with 5-HTP.

  13. Excitatory actions of gaba during development: the nature of the nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2002-09-01

    In the immature brain, GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is excitatory, and GABA-releasing synapses are formed before glutamatergic contacts in a wide range of species and structures. GABA becomes inhibitory by the delayed expression of a chloride exporter, leading to a negative shift in the reversal potential for choride ions. I propose that this mechanism provides a solution to the problem of how to excite developing neurons to promote growth and synapse formation while avoiding the potentially toxic effects of a mismatch between GABA-mediated inhibition and glutamatergic excitation. As key elements of this cascade are activity dependent, the formation of inhibition adds an element of nurture to the construction of cortical networks.

  14. Multiple facets of GABAergic neurons and synapses: multiple fates of GABA signalling in epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart, Rosa; Bernard, Christophe; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-02-01

    Because blocking GABAergic neurotransmission in control tissue generates seizures and because GABA boosters control epilepsy in many patients, studies on epilepsies have been dominated by the axiom that seizures are generated by a failure of GABA-mediated inhibition. However, GABAergic interneurons and synapses are heterogeneous and have many roles that go beyond the straightforward concept of "inhibition of the target". Operation of such a diversified system cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism. In epileptic tissue, GABAergic networks undergo complex rewiring at the anatomical, physiological and functional levels; GABAergic synapses are still operative but show unique features, including excitatory effects. Therefore, inhibition is not a uniform notion and the concept of "failure" of inhibition in epilepsies must be reassessed. Seizures are not generated in a normal circuit in which GABA-mediated inhibition is simply impaired, but in a profoundly rewired network in which several properties of GABA function are altered. This review is part of the TINS Interneuron Diversity series.

  15. Epileptogenic actions of GABA and fast oscillations in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilov, Ilgam; Le Van Quyen, Michel; Gozlan, Henri; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2005-12-08

    GABA excites immature neurons and inhibits adult ones, but whether this contributes to seizures in the developing brain is not known. We now report that in the developing, but not the adult, hippocampus, seizures beget seizures only if GABAergic synapses are functional. In the immature hippocampus, seizures generated with functional GABAergic synapses include fast oscillations that are required to transform a naive network to an epileptic one: blocking GABA receptors prevents the long-lasting sequels of seizures. In contrast, in adult neurons, full blockade of GABA(A) receptors generates epileptogenic high-frequency seizures. Therefore, purely glutamatergic seizures are not epileptogenic in the developing hippocampus. We suggest that the density of glutamatergic synapses is not sufficient for epileptogenesis in immature neurons; excitatory GABAergic synapses are required for that purpose. We suggest that the synergistic actions of GABA and NMDA receptors trigger the cascades involved in epileptogenesis in the developing hippocampus.

  16. Altered response to benzodiazepine anxiolytics in mice lacking GABA B(1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombereau, Cedric; Kaupmann, Klemens; van der Putten, Herman; Cryan, John F

    2004-08-16

    Recently, we demonstrated that mice lacking the GABA(B(1)) subunit were more anxious than wild-type animals in several behavioural paradigms, most notably in the light-dark test. In an attempt to assess the effects of classical benzodiazepine anxiolytics on anxiety-like behaviour observed in these mice, animals were administered either chlordiazepoxide (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or diazepam (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) prior to testing in the light-dark box. Surprisingly, in contrast with the wild-type mice, neither benzodiazepines decreased anxiety-like behaviour in GABA(B(1))(-/-) mice. These data suggest that targeted deletion of GABA(B(1)) subunit alters GABA(A) receptor function in vivo.

  17. [Local GABA-ergic modulation of serotonergic neuron activity in the nucleus raphe magnus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniushkin, A N; Merkulova, N A; Orlova, A O; Iniushkina, E M

    2009-07-01

    In voltage-clamp experimental on slices of the rat brainstem the effects of 5-HT and GABA on serotonergic neurons of nucleus raphe magnus were investigated. Local applications of 5-HT induced an increase in IPCSs frequency and amplitude in 45% of serotonergic cells. The effect suppressed by the blocker of fast sodium channels tetradotoxin. Antagonist of GABA receptor gabazine blocked IPSCs in neurons both sensitive and non-sensitive to 5-HT action. Applications of GABA induced a membrane current (I(GABA)), which was completely blocked by gabazine. The data suggest self-control of the activity of serotonergic neurons in nucleus raphe magnus by negative feedback loop via local GABAergic interneurons.

  18. GABA-ERGIC NEURONS IN THE RAT STRIATUM UNDER NORMAL AND ISCHEMIC INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Petrova

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD-67 is a marker of GABA-ergic neurons. The purpose of this study is to examine the distribution of GAD-67-immunopositive neurons in the striatum of rats under experimental conditions, reproducing brief focal cerebral ischemia. Endovascular occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery in rats was performed. Duration of circulatory disorders was 30 min, the time of reperfusion was 48 hours. With counting GAD-67-immunopositive neurons in the striatum was found that the number of GABA-ergic neurons in the striatum ipsilateral hemisphere is reduced by 40%. In the contralateral hemisphere, the distribution and structure of the neurons is not different from controls. It is shown that GABA-ergic neurons are less susceptible to damage, as compared to other neurons phenotypes.

  19. GABA application to hippocampal CA3 or CA1 stratum lacunosum-moleculare excites an interneuron network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Katherine L

    2002-03-01

    Whole cell voltage-clamp recording and focal application of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were used to investigate the ability of exogenous GABA applied to different locations within the guinea pig hippocampal slice to trigger a giant GABA-mediated postsynaptic current (GPSC) in pyramidal cells. A GPSC reflects the synchronous release of GABA from a group of interneurons. Recordings were done in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and blockers of ionotropic glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Spontaneous GPSCs occurred rhythmically in pyramidal cells under these conditions. Brief focal pressure application of GABA (500 microM; 30-200 ms) to CA3 stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM) or to the border between CA3 s. radiatum (SR) and SLM triggered an "all-or-none" GPSC in CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells that looked like the spontaneous GPSCs. During the refractory period following a spontaneous GPSC, application of GABA could not trigger a GPSC. Both spontaneous GPSCs and GPSCs triggered by exogenous GABA were blocked by suppressing synaptic transmission with high Mg(2+)/low Ca(2+) bath solution. On the other hand, focal application of GABA to CA3 s. oriens (SO) or to proximal SR did not trigger a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell; instead it produced a graded response. Focal application of GABA to regions other than CA3 was also tested. Focal application of GABA to CA1 SLM always triggered a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell. Focal application of GABA within the outer two-thirds of the dentate molecular layer often elicited a GPSC in the CA3 pyramidal cell. In contrast, focal application of GABA to CA1 SO, to CA1 SR, or to the hilus elicited no current response in the CA3 pyramidal cell. These data indicate that the GPSC recorded in pyramidal cells that was triggered by focal GABA application resulted from the synchronous synaptic release of GABA from activated interneurons rather than from the binding of exogenous GABA to receptors on the pyramidal cell

  20. 多药转运蛋白对匹罗卡品癫(癎)大鼠模型脑内拉莫三嗪浓度的影响%Impact of multi-drug transporters on regulation of concentration of lamotrigine in hippocampal extracellular fluid in rat after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马爱梅; 张守文; 刘玉玺; 胡风云

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of multi-drug transporters including P-glycoprotein (PGP) and multi-drug resistance associated protein (MRP) on concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid in hippocampus of epilepsy rat models induced by pilocarpine, and to deduce the multi-drug resistance mechanisms in refractory epilepsy. Methods The epilepsy rat models were established by repeated administration (by ip) of pilocarpine. A microdialysis probe was placed into the hippocampus of the epileptic rats and dialysate was collected at five time-points from 30--150 minutes after systemic injections of lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). The concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid in the hippocampus was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then PGP inhibitor verapamil and MRP inhibitor probenecid was added individually through microdialysis probe and the concentration of lamotrigine was detected again. Results Compared with control group (0. 41 ± 0. 10 in 60 minutes, 0. 50 ±0.04 in 90 minutes, 0. 39 ±0. 09 in 120 minutes and 0. 30±0.06 in 150 minutes), verapamil significantly increased the concentration of lamotrigine in extracellular fluid of the hippocampus 60--150 minutes (0. 65 ±0. 11, 0. 84 ± 0. 09, 0. 70± 0. 09 and 0. 58 ± 0. 08 respectively) after injection (F value were 5.01, 8.61, 10. 23 and 7.89, all P < 0. 05) and probenecid also enhanced the concentration of lamotrigine 90--150 minutes (0. 75 ± 0. 09, 0. 58±0. 10 and 0. 49±0. 07) after injection (F = 6. 58, 4. 56, 4. 75, all P < 0. 05). Conclusions Penetration of lamotrigine through blood-brain barrier in pilocarpine induced epilepsy rats is restricted by PGP and MRP, resulting in decreased concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid of the hippocampus. Therefore, increasing expression of PGP and MRP in brains of epilepsy patients might be an important mechanism involved in multi-drug resistance in refractory epilepsy.%目的 观察多药转运蛋

  1. GABA-shunt enzymes activity in GH3 cells with reduced level of PMCA2 or PMCA3 isoform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Antoni, E-mail: antoni.kowalski@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Zylinska, Ludmila, E-mail: ludmila.zylinska@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Boczek, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.boczek@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland); Rebas, Elzbieta, E-mail: elzbieta.rebas@umed.lodz.pl [Department of Molecular Neurochemistry, Medical University of Lodz, 6/8 Mazowiecka Str., 92-215 Lodz (Poland)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Suppression of PMCA2 or PMCA3 slows down proliferation of GH3 cells. {yields} PMCA2 suppression lowers the activity of GABA-shunt enzymes. {yields} PMCA3 suppression increases the expression of glutamate decarboxylase 65. {yields} PMCA2 and PMCA3 function appears to be linked to regulation of GABA metabolism. -- Abstract: GABA ({gamma}-aminobutyric acid) is important neurotransmitter and regulator of endocrine functions. Its metabolism involves three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67), GABA aminotransferase (GABA-T) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH). As many cellular processes GABA turnover can depend on calcium homeostasis, which is maintained by plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs). In excitable cells PMCA2 and PMCA3 isoforms are particularly important. In this study we focused on GABA-metabolizing enzymes expression and activity in rat anterior pituitary GH3 cells with suppressed expression of PMCA2 or PMCA3. We observed that PMCA3-reduced cells have increased GAD65 expression. Suppression of PMCA2 caused a decrease in total GAD and GABA-T activity. These results indicate that PMCA2 and PMCA3 presence may be an important regulatory factor in GABA metabolism. Results suggest that PMCA2 and PMCA3 function is rather related to regulation of GABA synthesis and degradation than supplying cells with metabolites, which can be potentially energetic source.

  2. Effect of THIP and SL 76002, two clinically experimented GABA-mimetic compounds, on anterior pituitary GABA receptors and prolactin secretion in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apud, J.A.; Masotto, C.; Racagni, G.

    1987-03-02

    In the present study, the ability of three direct GABA agonists, muscimol, THIP and SL 76002 to displace /sup 3/H-GABA binding from anterior pituitary and medio-basal hypothalamus membranes was evaluated. Further, the effect of both THIP and SL 76002 on baseline prolactin levels or after stimulation of hormone release with haloperidol has been also studied. Either muscimol, THIP or SL 76002 have shown to posses 7-, 7- and 3-fold higher affinity, respectively, for the central nervous system than for the anterior pituitary /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites. Moreover, THIP and SL 76002 have demonstrated to be respectively, 25- and 1000- fold less potent than muscimol in inhibiting /sup 3/H- GABA binding at the level of the anterior pituitary and about 25- and 2700-fold less potent at the level of the medio-basal hypothalamus. Under basal conditions, either THIP or SL 76002 were ineffective to reduce prolactin release. However, after stimulation of prolactin secretion through blockade of the dopaminergic neurotransmission with haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg), both THIP (10 mg/kg) and SL 76002 (200 mg/kg) significantly counteracted the neuroleptic-induced prolactin rise with a potency which is in line with their ability to inhibit /sup 3/H-GABA binding in the anterior pituitary. The present results indicate that both compounds inhibit prolactin release under specific experimental situations probably through a GABAergic mechanism. In view of the endocrine effects of these GABA-mimetic compounds, the possibility arises for an application of these type of drugs in clinical neuroendocrinology. 35 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Glutamate and GABA activate different receptors and Cl(-) conductances in crab peptide-secretory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, S; Cooke, I M

    2000-01-01

    Responses to rapid application of glutamic acid (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), 0.01-3 mM, were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp of cultured crab (Cardisoma carnifex) X-organ neurons. Responses peaked within 200 ms. Both Glu and GABA currents had reversal potentials that followed the Nernst Cl(-) potential when [Cl(-)](i) was varied. A Boltzmann fit to the normalized, averaged dose-response curve for Glu indicated an EC(50) of 0.15 mM and a Hill coefficient of 1.05. Rapid (t(1/2) approximately 1 s) desensitization occurred during Glu but not GABA application that required >2 min for recovery. Desensitization was unaffected by concanavalin A or cyclothiazide. N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, quisqualate, and kainate (to 1 mM) were ineffective, nor were Glu responses influenced by glycine (1 microM) or Mg(2+) (0-26 mM). Glu effects were imitated by ibotenic acid (0.1 mM). The following support the conclusion that Glu and GABA act on different receptors: 1) responses sum; 2) desensitization to Glu or ibotenic acid did not diminish GABA responses; 3) the Cl(-)-channel blockers picrotoxin and niflumic acid (0.5 mM) inhibited Glu responses by approximately 90 and 80% but GABA responses by approximately 50 and 20%; and 4) polyvinylpyrrolydone-25 (2 mM in normal crab saline) eliminated Glu responses but left GABA responses unaltered. Thus crab secretory neurons have separate receptors responsive to Glu and to GABA, both probably ionotropic, and mediating Cl(-) conductance increases. In its responses and pharmacology, this crustacean Glu receptor resembles Cl(-)-permeable Glu receptors previously described in invertebrates and differs from cation-permeable Glu receptors of vertebrates and invertebrates.

  4. GABA: a pioneer transmitter that excites immature neurons and generates primitive oscillations.

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Tyzio, Roman; Khazipov, Rustem

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Developing networks follow common rules to shift from silent cells to coactive networks that operate via thousands of synapses. This review deals with some of these rules and in particular those concerning the crucial role of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobuytric acid (GABA), which operates primarily via chloride-permeable GABA(A) receptor channels. In all developing animal species and brain structures investigated, neurons have a higher intracellular chloride concen...

  5. GABA and Glutamate are not colocalized in mossy fiber terminals of developing rodent hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Arroyo, Edguardo; Elkind, Jaclynn; Kundu, Suhali; Johnson, Brian; Smith, Colin J.; Cohen, Noam A.; Grady, Sean M.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that, in the developing rodent hippocampus, mossy fiber terminals release GABA together with glutamate. Here, we used transgenic glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67)-GFP expressing mice and multi-label immunohistochemistry to address whether glutamatergic and GABAergic markers are colocalized. We demonstrate that in the dentate gyrus, interneurons positive for GABA/GAD are sparsely distributed along the edge of the hilus, in a different pattern than the densely pack...

  6. GABA(A) receptor subtype-selectivity of novel bicuculline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramerstorfer, Joachim; Foppa, Verena; Thiery, Hanna; Hermange, Philippe; Janody, Simon; Berger, Michael L; Dodd, Robert H; Sieghart, Werner

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and are targets of clinically important drugs modulating GABA induced ion flux by interacting with distinct allosteric binding sites. ROD 185 is a previously investigated structural analogue of the GABA site antagonist bicuculline, and a positive allosteric modulator acting via the benzodiazepine binding site. Here, we investigated 13 newly synthesized structural analogues of ROD 185 for their interaction with rat GABA(A) receptors. Using [(3)H]flunitrazepam binding assays, we identified four compounds exhibiting a higher affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site than ROD 185. Two electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at recombinant GABA(A) receptors indicated that most of these compounds positively modulated GABA-induced currents at these receptors. Additionally, these experiments revealed that this compound class not only interacts with the benzodiazepine binding site at αβγ receptors but also with a novel, so far unidentified binding site present in αβ receptors. Compounds with a high affinity for the benzodiazepine binding site stimulated GABA-induced currents stronger at αβγ than at αβ receptors and preferred α3β3γ2 receptors. Compounds showing equal or smaller effects at αβγ compared to αβ receptors differentially interacted with various αβ or αβγ receptor subtypes. Surprisingly, five of these compounds interacting with αβ receptors showed a strong stimulation at α6β3γ2 receptors. The absence of any direct effects at GABA(A) receptors, as well as their potential selectivity for receptor subtypes not being addressed by benzodiazepines, make this compound class to a starting point for the development of drugs with a possible clinical importance.

  7. Differential effects of petit mal anticonvulsants and convulsants on thalamic neurones: GABA current blockade.

    OpenAIRE

    COULTER, D. A.; Huguenard, J. R.; PRINCE, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Currents evoked by applications of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to acutely dissociated thalamic neurones were analysed by voltage-clamp techniques, and the effects of the anticonvulsant succinimides ethosuximide (ES) and alpha-methyl-alpha-phenylsuccinimide (MPS) and the convulsants tetramethylsuccinimide (TMS), picrotoxin, pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), and bicuculline methiodide were assessed. 2. TMS (1 microM-10 microM) reduced responses to iontophoretically applied GABA, as did picrotoxin ...

  8. A molecular characterization of the agonist binding site of a nematode cys-loop GABA receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Mark D; Kwaka, Ariel; Callanan, Micah K; Nusrat, Humza; Desaulniers, Jean-Paul; Forrester, Sean G

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cys-loop GABA receptors represent important targets for human chemotherapeutics and insecticides and are potential targets for novel anthelmintics (nematicides). However, compared with insect and mammalian receptors, little is known regarding the pharmacological characteristics of nematode Cys-loop GABA receptors. Here we have investigated the agonist binding site of the Cys-loop GABA receptor UNC-49 (Hco-UNC-49) from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus. Experimental Approach We used two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology to measure channel activation by classical GABA receptor agonists on Hco-UNC-49 expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, along with site-directed mutagenesis and in silico homology modelling. Key Results The sulphonated molecules P4S and taurine had no effect on Hco-UNC-49. Other classical Cys-loop GABAA receptor agonists tested on the Hco-UNC-49B/C heteromeric channel had a rank order efficacy of GABA > trans-4-aminocrotonic acid > isoguvacine > imidazole-4-acetic acid (IMA) > (R)-(−)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [R(−)-GABOB] > (S)-(+)-4-amino-3-hydroxybutyric acid [S(+)-GABOB] > guanidinoacetic acid > isonipecotic acid > 5-aminovaleric acid (DAVA) (partial agonist) > β-alanine (partial agonist). In silico ligand docking revealed some variation in binding between agonists. Mutagenesis of a key serine residue in binding loop C to threonine had minimal effects on GABA and IMA but significantly increased the maximal response to DAVA and decreased twofold the EC50 for R(−)- and S(+)-GABOB. Conclusions and Implications The pharmacological profile of Hco-UNC-49 differed from that of vertebrate Cys-loop GABA receptors and insect resistance to dieldrin receptors, suggesting differences in the agonist binding pocket. These findings could be exploited to develop new drugs that specifically target GABA receptors of parasitic nematodes. PMID:25850584

  9. In vivo quantification of intracerebral GABA by single-voxel {sup 1}H-MRS-How reproducible are the results?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogner, W. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: wolfgang@nmr.at; Gruber, S. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: stephan@nmr.at; Doelken, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Austria)], E-mail: marc.doelken@uk-erlangen.de; Stadlbauer, A. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Austria)], E-mail: andi@nmr.at; Ganslandt, O. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Austria)], E-mail: oliver.ganslandt@uk-erlangen.de; Boettcher, U. [Siemens Medical Solution, Karl-Schall Str. 6, D-91052 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: uwe.boettcher@siemens.com; Trattnig, S. [MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at; Doerfler, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Austria)], E-mail: a.doerfler@nrad.imed.uni-erlangen.de; Stefan, H. [Center Epilepsy Erlangen (ZEE), Department of Neurology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: Hermann.Stefan@uk-erlangen.de; Hammen, T. [Center Epilepsy Erlangen (ZEE), Department of Neurology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: thilo.hammen@uk-erlangen.de

    2010-03-15

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the human brain. It plays a decisive role in a variety of nervous system disorders, such as anxiety disorders, epilepsy, schizophrenia, insomnia, and many others. The reproducibility of GABA quantification results obtained with a single-voxel spectroscopy J-difference editing sequence with Point Resolved Spectroscopy localization (MEGA-PRESS) was determined on a 3.0 Tesla MR scanner in healthy adults. Eleven volunteers were measured in long- and short-term intervals. Intra- and inter-subject reproducibility were evaluated. Internal referencing of GABA+ to total creatine (tCr) and water (H{sub 2}O), as well as two different post-processing methods for the evaluation (signal integration and time-domain fitting) were compared. In all subjects lower coefficient of variation and therefore higher reproducibility can be observed for fitting compared to integration. The GABA+/tCr ratio performs better than the GABA+/H{sub 2}O ratio or GABA+ without internal referencing for both fitting and integration (GABA+/tCr: 13.3% and 17.0%; GABA+/H{sub 2}O: 15.0% and 17.8%; GABA+: 19.2% and 21.7%). Four-day measurements on three subjects showed higher intra- than inter-subject reproducibility (GABA+/tCr {approx}10-12%). With a coefficient of variation of about 13% for inter-subject and 10-12% for intra-subject variability of GABA+/tCr, this technique seems to be a precise tool that can detect GABA confidently. The results of this study show the reproducibility limitations of GABA quantification in vivo, which are necessary for further clinical studies.

  10. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  11. Histamine H{sub 3} receptor activation selectively inhibits dopamine D{sub 1} receptor-dependent [{sup 3}H]GABA release from depolarization-stimulated slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, J. [Departmento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico (Mexico); Young, J.M. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arias-Montano, J.A.; Floran, B.; Garcia, M. [Departmento de Fisiologia, Biofisica y Neurociencias, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Apartado postal 14-740, 07000 Mexico (Mexico)

    1997-06-25

    The release of [{sup 3}H]GABA from slices of rat substantia nigra pars reticulata induced by increasing extracellular K{sup +} from 6 to 15 mM in the presence of 10 {mu}M sulpiride was inhibited by 73{+-}3% by 1 {mu}M SCH 23390, consistent with a large component of release dependent upon D{sub 1} receptor activation. The histamine H{sub 3} receptor-selective agonist immepip (1 {mu}M) and the non-selective agonist histamine (100 {mu}M) inhibited [{sup 3}H]GABA release by 78{+-}2 and 80{+-}2%, respectively. The inhibition by both agonists was reversed by the H{sub 3} receptor antagonist thioperamide (1 {mu}M). However, in the presence of 1 {mu}M SCH 23390 depolarization-induced release of [{sup 3}H]GABA was not significantly decreased by 1 {mu}M immepip. In rats depleted of dopamine by pretreatment with reserpine, immepip no longer inhibited control release of [{sup 3}H]GABA, but in the presence of 1 {mu}M SKF 38393, which produced a 7{+-}1-fold stimulation of release, immepip reduced the release to a level not statistically different from that in the presence of immepip alone. Immepip (1 {mu}M) also inhibited the depolarization-induced release of [{sup 3}H]dopamine from substantia nigra pars reticulata slices, by 38{+-}3%.The evidence is consistent with the proposition that activation of histamine H{sub 3} receptors leads to the selective inhibition of the component of depolarization-induced [{sup 3}H]GABA release in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices which is dependent upon D{sub 1} receptor activation. This appears to be largely an action at the terminals of the striatonigral GABA projection neurons, which may be enhanced by a partial inhibition of dendritic [{sup 3}H]dopamine release. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Unravelling the unusual signalling properties of the GABA(B) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew R; Fairfax, Benjamin; Moss, Stephen J; Pangalos, Menelas N

    2004-10-15

    GABA(B) receptors are the cornerstone receptors in the modulation of inhibitory signalling in the central nervous system and continue to be targets for the amelioration of a number of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders. Unravelling the molecular identity of this receptor has spurred much research over the past five or so years and generated a renewed interest and excitement in the field. Many questions are being answered and lessons learnt, not only about GABA(B) receptor function but also about general mechanisms of G-protein-coupled receptor signalling. However, as questions are being answered as many new questions are being raised and many GABA(B)-related conundrums continue to remain unanswered. In this report, we review some of the most recent work in the area of GABA(B) receptor research. In particular, we focus our attentions on the emerging mechanisms thought to be important in GABA(B) receptor signalling and the growing complex of associated proteins that we consider to be part of the GABA(B) receptor "signalosome."

  13. Some dipeptides reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on /sup 35/S-TBPS binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, R.F.; Saederup, E.

    1987-05-01

    All known GABA-A receptor blocker reverse the inhibitory effect of GABA on /sup 35/S-t-butylphosphorothionate (TBPS) binding to rat brain membranes in vitro. This system has already been used to identify several novel GABA antagonists. The authors now report that 12 out of 52 dipeptides tested (all containing L-amino acids), at 1 mM, significantly reverse the inhibitory effect of 1 ..mu..M GABA, which inhibits specific /sup 35/S-TBPS binding about 60%. Most of the active dipeptides contain an aromatic and a basic amino acid. Tryptophan usually conferred greater activity than phe or tyr, while arg usually conferred greater activity than lys or his. Several larger peptides containing the HFRW sequence found in ACTH were also GABA antagonists; ACTH(1-24), ACTH(1-18), ACTH(1-13), ACTH(4-10) and ..gamma..-MSH while ACTH(11-24) was inactive. The excitatory effects of these later peptides may be in part due to blockade of GABA-A receptors.

  14. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Inhibition of Activity of GABA Transporter GAT1 by δ-Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Pu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia is a well-documented effect of acupuncture. A critical role in pain sensation plays the nervous system, including the GABAergic system and opioid receptor (OR activation. Here we investigated regulation of GABA transporter GAT1 by δOR in rats and in Xenopus oocytes. Synaptosomes of brain from rats chronically exposed to opiates exhibited reduced GABA uptake, indicating that GABA transport might be regulated by opioid receptors. For further investigation we have expressed GAT1 of mouse brain together with mouse δOR and μOR in Xenopus oocytes. The function of GAT1 was analyzed in terms of Na+-dependent [3H]GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated currents. Coexpression of δOR led to reduced number of fully functional GAT1 transporters, reduced substrate translocation, and GAT1-mediated current. Activation of δOR further reduced the rate of GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated current. Coexpression of μOR, as well as μOR activation, affected neither the number of transporters, nor rate of GABA uptake, nor GAT1-mediated current. Inhibition of GAT1-mediated current by activation of δOR was confirmed in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on rat brain slices of periaqueductal gray. We conclude that inhibition of GAT1 function will strengthen the inhibitory action of the GABAergic system and hence may contribute to acupuncture-induced analgesia.

  16. Local and global ligand-induced changes in the structure of the GABA(A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Czajkowski, Cynthia; Jackson, Meyer B

    2006-06-13

    Ligand-gated channels mediate synaptic transmission through conformational transitions triggered by the binding of neurotransmitters. These transitions are well-defined in terms of ion conductance, but their structural basis is poorly understood. To probe these changes in structure, GABA(A) receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and labeled at selected sites with environment-sensitive fluorophores. With labels at two different residues in the alpha1 subunit in loop E of the GABA-binding pocket, GABA elicited fluorescence changes opposite in sign. This pattern of fluorescence changes is consistent with a closure of the GABA-binding cavity at the subunit interface. The competitive antagonist SR-95531 inverted this pattern of fluorescence change, but the noncompetitive antagonist picrotoxin failed to elicit optical signals. In response to GABA (but not SR-95531), labels at the homologous residues in the beta2 subunit showed the same pattern of fluorescence change as the alpha1-subunit labels, indicating a global transition with comparable movements in homologous regions of different subunits. Incorporation of the gamma2 subunit altered the fluorescence changes of alpha1-subunit labels and eliminated them in beta2-subunit labels. Thus, the ligand-induced structural changes in the GABA(A) receptor can extend over considerable distances or remain highly localized, depending upon subunit composition and ligand.

  17. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-05-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice.

  18. GABA potency at GABAA receptors found in synaptic and extrasynaptic zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eMortensen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The potency of GABA is vitally important for its primary role in activating GABAA receptors and acting as an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Although numerous laboratories have presented information, directly or indirectly, on GABA potency, it is often difficult to compare across such studies given the inevitable variations in the methods used, the cell types studied, whether native or recombinant receptors are examined, and their relevance to native synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors. In this review, we list the most relevant isoforms of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAA receptors that are thought to assemble in surface membranes of neurons in the central nervous system. Using consistent methodology in one cell type, the potencies of the endogenous neurotransmitter GABA are compared across a spectrum of GABAA receptors. The highest potency for GABA is measured when activating extrasynaptic-type α6 subunit-containing receptors, whereas synaptic-type α2β3γ2 and α3β3γ2 receptors exhibited the lowest potency, and other GABAA receptor subtypes that are found both in synaptic and extrasynaptic compartments, showed intermediate sensitivities to GABA. The relatively simple potency relationship between GABA and its target receptors is important as it serves as one of the major determinants of GABAA receptor activation, with consequences for the development of inhibition, either by tonic or phasic mechanisms.

  19. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  20. Delineation of the Role of Astroglial GABA Transporters in Seizure Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, Arne; Madsen, Karsten K

    2017-02-11

    Studies of GABA transport in neurons and astrocytes have provided evidence that termination of GABA as neurotransmitter is brought about primarily by active transport into the presynaptic, GABAergic nerve endings. There is, however, a considerable transport capacity in the astrocytes surrounding the synaptic terminals, a transport which may limit the availability of transmitter GABA leading to a higher probability of seizure activity governed by the balance of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. Based on this it was hypothesized that selective inhibition of astrocytic GABA transport might prevent such seizure activity. A series of GABA analogs of restricted conformation were synthesized and in a number of collaborative investigations between Prof. Steve White at the University of Utah and medicinal chemists and pharmacologists at the School of Pharmacy and the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, GABA analogs with exactly this pharmacological property were identified. The most important analogs identified were N-methyl-exo-THPO (N-methyl-3-hydroxy-4-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1,2-benzisoxazole) and its lipophilic analog EF-1502 ((RS)-4-[N-[1,1-bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)but-1-en-4-yl]-N-methylamino]-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol) both of which turned out to be potent anticonvulsants in animal models of epilepsy.

  1. Systematic Regional Variations of GABA, Glutamine, and Glutamate Concentrations Follow Receptor Fingerprints of Human Cingulate Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dou, Weiqiang; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kaufmann, Joern; Zhong, Kai; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Speck, Oliver; Walter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of glutamatergic or GABAergic measures in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was found altered in psychiatric disorders and predictive of interindividual variations of functional responses in healthy populations. Several ACC subregions have been parcellated into re

  2. The GABA excitatory/inhibitory developmental sequence: a personal journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Y

    2014-10-24

    The developing brain is talkative but its language is not that of the adult. Most if not all voltage and transmitter-gated ionic currents follow a developmental sequence and network-driven patterns differ in immature and adult brains. This is best illustrated in studies engaged almost three decades ago in which we observed elevated intracellular chloride (Cl(-))i levels and excitatory GABA early during development and a perinatal excitatory/inhibitory shift. This sequence is observed in a wide range of brain structures and animal species suggesting that it has been conserved throughout evolution. It is mediated primarily by a developmentally regulated expression of the NKCC1 and KCC2 chloride importer and exporter respectively. The GABAergic depolarization acts in synergy with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated and voltage-gated calcium currents to enhance intracellular calcium exerting trophic effects on neuritic growth, migration and synapse formation. These sequences can be deviated in utero by genetic or environmental insults leading to a persistence of immature features in the adult brain. This "neuroarcheology" concept paves the way to novel therapeutic perspectives based on the use of drugs that block immature but not adult currents. This is illustrated notably with the return to immature high levels of chloride and excitatory actions of GABA observed in many pathological conditions. This is due to the fact that in the immature brain a down regulation of KCC2 and an up regulation of NKCC1 are seen. Here, I present a personal history of how an unexpected observation led to novel concepts in developmental neurobiology and putative treatments of autism and other developmental disorders. Being a personal account, this review is neither exhaustive nor provides an update of this topic with all the studies that have contributed to this evolution. We all rely on previous inventors to allow science to advance. Here, I present a personal summary of this

  3. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  4. Decrease in pyridoxal-5'-phosphate concentration and increase in pyridoxal concentration in rat plasma by 4'-O-methylpyridoxine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Teruki; Johno, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Mika; Sasaki, Keiko; Wada, Keiji

    2015-07-01

    Food poisoning from Ginkgo biloba seeds can cause epilepsy because of a decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentrations in the brain. We previously demonstrated that 4'-O-methylpyridoxine (MPN) is responsible for this observed toxicity of G biloba seeds; however, the mechanism for the decrease in GABA and plasma concentration profile of MPN has not been clarified. Our hypothesis is that MPN induces a decrease in vitamin B6 concentrations, resulting in a decrease in GABA concentration. This study aimed to characterize the plasma concentration profile of MPN and intrinsic vitamin B6 concentrations (pyridoxal [PL], PL-5'-phosphate [PLP], and 4-pyridoxic acid) using a rat model. Plasma concentrations of B6 vitamers after intravenous MPN administration (5 mg/kg) were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The half-life of MPN (0.91 ± 0.05 hours) was shorter in rats than the previously reported value in humans. We found a significant decrease in the plasma concentration of PLP, an active form of vitamin B6, after MPN administration. We also observed an increase in plasma PL and 4-pyridoxic acid concentrations; the increase in PL concentration may be caused by either metabolism of MPN to PL or by MPN-mediated inhibition of PL kinase. The present study is the first in vivo study showing relatively rapid elimination of MPN in rats and a decrease in plasma PLP concentration caused by MPN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of surface functionalization of hydrophilic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ on glutamate and GABA transport in brain synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kociołek, Daria; Banski, Mateusz; Borisova, Tatiana; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Borysov, Arsenii; Dudarenko, Marina; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-08-01

    Specific rare earth doped nanocrystals (NCs), a recent class of nanoparticles with fluorescent features, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport process in nerve terminals isolated from rat brain (synaptosomes). Two types of hydrophilic NCs were examined in this work: (i) coated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and (ii) with OH groups at the surface. It was found that NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH within the concentration range of 0.5-3.5 and 0.5-1.5 mg/ml, respectively, did not influence Na+-dependent transporter-dependent l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA uptake and the ambient level of the neurotransmitters in the synaptosomes. An increase in NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH concentrations up to 7.5 and 3.5 mg/ml, respectively, led to the (1) attenuation of the initial velocity of uptake of l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA and (2) elevation of ambient neurotransmitters in the suspension of nerve terminals. In the mentioned concentrations, nanocrystals did not influence acidification of synaptic vesicles that was shown with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, however, decreased the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. In comparison with other nanoparticles studied with similar methodological approach, NCs start to exhibit their effects on neurotransmitter transport at concentrations several times higher than those shown for carbon dots, detonation nanodiamonds and an iron storage protein ferritin, whose activity can be registered at 0.08, 0.5 and 0.08 mg/ml, respectively. Therefore, NCs can be considered lesser neurotoxic as compared to above nanoparticles.

  6. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  7. Editing modifies the GABA(A) receptor subunit alpha3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlson, Johan; Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Haussler, David

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I) pre-mRNA editing by the ADAR enzyme family has the potential to increase the variety of the proteome. This editing by adenosine deamination is essential in mammals for a functional brain. To detect novel substrates for A-to-I editing we have used an experimental method...... to find selectively edited sites and combined it with bioinformatic techniques that find stem-loop structures suitable for editing. We present here the first verified editing candidate detected by this screening procedure. We show that Gabra-3, which codes for the alpha3 subunit of the GABA(A) receptor......, is a substrate for editing by both ADAR1 and ADAR2. Editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA recodes an isoleucine to a methionine. The extent of editing is low at birth but increases with age, reaching close to 100% in the adult brain. We therefore propose that editing of the Gabra-3 mRNA is important for normal brain...

  8. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  9. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  10. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  11. Airway epithelium is a predominant source of endogenous airway GABA and contributes to relaxation of airway smooth muscle tone

    OpenAIRE

    Gallos, George; Townsend, Elizabeth; Yim, Peter; Virag, Laszlo; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Bacchetta, Matthew; Emala, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are characterized by hyperreactive airway responses that predispose patients to episodes of acute airway constriction. Recent studies suggest a complex paradigm of GABAergic signaling in airways that involves GABA-mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle. However, the cellular source of airway GABA and mechanisms regulating its release remain unknown. We questioned whether epithelium is a major source of GABA in the airway and whether the ab...

  12. GABA production and structure of gadB/gadC genes in Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains from human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, R A; Poluektova, E U; Dyachkova, M S; Klimina, K M; Kovtun, A S; Averina, O V; Orlova, V S; Danilenko, V N

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) is an active biogenic substance synthesized in plants, fungi, vertebrate animals and bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria are considered the main producers of GABA among bacteria. GABA-producing lactobacilli are isolated from food products such as cheese, yogurt, sourdough, etc. and are the source of bioactive properties assigned to those foods. The ability of human-derived lactobacilli and bifidobacteria to synthesize GABA remains poorly characterized. In this paper, we screened our collection of 135 human-derived Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains for their ability to produce GABA from its precursor monosodium glutamate. Fifty eight strains were able to produce GABA. The most efficient GABA-producers were Bifidobacterium strains (up to 6 g/L). Time profiles of cell growth and GABA production as well as the influence of pyridoxal phosphate on GABA production were studied for L. plantarum 90sk, L. brevis 15f, B. adolescentis 150 and B. angulatum GT102. DNA of these strains was sequenced; the gadB and gadC genes were identified. The presence of these genes was analyzed in 14 metagenomes of healthy individuals. The genes were found in the following genera of bacteria: Bacteroidetes (Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, Alistipes, Odoribacter, Prevotella), Proteobacterium (Esherichia), Firmicutes (Enterococcus), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium). These data indicate that gad genes as well as the ability to produce GABA are widely distributed among lactobacilli and bifidobacteria (mainly in L. plantarum, L. brevis, B. adolescentis, B. angulatum, B. dentium) and other gut-derived bacterial species. Perhaps, GABA is involved in the interaction of gut microbiota with the macroorganism and the ability to synthesize GABA may be an important feature in the selection of bacterial strains - psychobiotics.

  13. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  14. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  16. Generation of a 3D model for human GABA transporter hGAT-1 using molecular modeling and investigation of the binding of GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, Thomas; Wanner, Klaus T

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter hGAT-1 was developed by homology modeling and refined by subsequent molecular modeling using the crystal structure of a bacterial homologue leucine transporter from Aquifex aeolicus (LeuT(Aa)) as the template. Protein structure quality checks show that the resulting structure is particularly suited for the analysis of the substrate binding pocket and virtual screening experiments. Interactions of GABA and the substrate binding pocket were investigated using docking studies. The difference of 6 out of 13 substrate interacting side chains between hGAT-1 and LeuT(Aa) lead to the different substrate preference which can be explained using our three-dimensional model of hGAT-1. In particular the replacement of serine 256 and isoleucine 359 in LeuT(Aa) with glycine and threonine in hGAT-1 seems to facilitate the selection of GABA as the main substrate by changing the hydrogen bonding pattern in the active site to the amino group of the substrate. For a set of 12 compounds flexible docking experiments were performed using LigandFit in combination with the Jain scoring function. With few exceptions the obtained rank order of potency was in line with experimental data. Thus, the method can be assumed to give at least a rough estimate of the potency of the potential of GABA uptake inhibitors.

  17. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    treatment did not lead to formation of low affinity GABA receptors. Studies of the ultrastructure of the cells (4-day-old cultures) showed that exposure to bromide or valinomycin mimicked the ability of THIP to enhance the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles...

  18. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  19. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  20. Effect of extracellular calcium on the additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamkuwar Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At different extracellular calcium concentrations, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in combination with theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been evaluated in the isolated frog heart and the isolated guinea pig left atria to investigate whether extracellular calcium produces any effect on the additive effect of the theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine. Cumulative dose response study of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in presence of theophylline at different extracellular calcium concentration was performed. The study revealed an increase in additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine with increase in extracellular calcium concentration, but increase in extracellular calcium concentration decreased the myocardial responsiveness to additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination. The mechanism of positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and in combination with theophylline involves increase in intracellular cAMP by different pathways and extracellular calcium produces positive inotropic effect by initiating the interaction between the contractile proteins actin and myosin. The study revealed that an increase in the concentration of extracellular calcium increased the additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination, but a decrease in the myocardial responsiveness was observed.

  1. Multiple motifs regulate the trafficking of GABA(B) receptors at distinct checkpoints within the secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restituito, Sophie; Couve, Andrés; Bawagan, Hinayana; Jourdain, Sabine; Pangalos, Menelas N; Calver, Andrew R; Freeman, Katie B; Moss, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABA(B)R1 and GABA(B)R2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, the mechanisms that regulate receptor surface expression remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that access to the cell surface for GABA(B)R1 is sequentially controlled by an RSR(R) motif and a LL motif within its cytoplasmic domain. In addition, we reveal that msec7-1, a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of GTPases, critical regulators of vesicular membrane trafficking, interacts with GABA(B)R1 via the LL motif in this subunit. Finally, we establish that msec7-1 modulates the cell surface expression of GABA(B) receptors, a process that is dependent upon the integrity of the LL motif in GABA(B)R1. Together, our results demonstrate that the cell surface expression of the GABA(B)R1 subunit is regulated by multiple motifs, which act at distinct checkpoints in the secretory pathway, and also suggest a novel role for msec7-1 in regulating the membrane trafficking of GABA(B)R1 subunits.

  2. GABA uptake into astrocytes is not associated with significant metabolic cost: implications for brain imaging of inhibitory transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, Jean-Yves; Pellerin, Luc; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2003-10-14

    Synaptically released glutamate has been identified as a signal coupling excitatory neuronal activity to increased glucose utilization. The proposed mechanism of this coupling involves glutamate uptake into astrocytes resulting in increased intracellular Na+ (Nai+) and activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase. Increased metabolic demand linked to disruption of Nai+ homeostasis activates glucose uptake and glycolysis in astrocytes. Here, we have examined whether a similar neurometabolic coupling could operate for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), also taken up by Na+-dependent transporters into astrocytes. Thus, we have compared the Nai+ response to GABA and glutamate in mouse astrocytes by microspectrofluorimetry. The Nai+ response to GABA consisted of a rapid rise of 4-6 mM followed by a plateau that did not, however, significantly activate the pump. Indeed, the GABA transporter-evoked Na+ influxes are transient in nature, almost totally shutting off within approximately 30 sec of GABA application. The metabolic consequences of the GABA-induced Nai+ response were evaluated by monitoring cellular ATP changes indirectly in single cells and measuring 2-deoxyglucose uptake in astrocyte populations. Both approaches showed that, whereas glutamate induced a robust metabolic response in astrocytes (decreased ATP levels and glucose uptake stimulation), GABA did not cause any measurable metabolic response, consistent with the Nai+ measurements. Results indicate that GABA does not couple inhibitory neuronal activity with glucose utilization, as does glutamate for excitatory neurotransmission, and suggest that GABA-mediated synaptic transmission does not contribute directly to brain imaging signals based on deoxyglucose.

  3. Determination and comparison of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) content in pu-erh and other types of Chinese tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Ma, Yan; Wei, Zhen-zhen; Yuan, Wen-xia; Li, Ya-li; Zhang, Chun-hua; Xue, Xiao-ting; Zhou, Hong-jie

    2011-04-27

    Two previous studies have reported that pu-erh tea contains a high level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and has several physiological functions. However, two other researchers have demonstrated that the GABA content of several pu-erh teas was low. Due to the high value and health benefits of GABA, analysis of mass-produced pu-erh tea is necessary to determine whether it is actually enriched with GABA. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the determination of GABA in tea, the results of which were verified by amino acid analysis using an Amino Acid Analyzer (AAA). A total of 114 samples of various types of Chinese tea, including 62 pu-erh teas, 13 green teas, 8 oolong teas, 8 black teas, 3 white teas, 4 GABA teas, and 16 process samples from two industrial fermentations of pu-erh tea (including the raw material and the first to seventh turnings), were analyzed using HPLC. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the GABA content in pu-erh tea was significantly lower than that in other types of tea (p content decreased during industrial fermentation of pu-erh tea (p content in pu-erh tea. In addition, the GABA content in white tea was found to be significantly higher than that in the other types of tea (p < 0.05), leading to the possibility of producing GABA-enriched white tea.

  4. Lead-induced neurodegenerative events and abnormal behaviors occur via ORXRergic/GABA(A)Rergic mechanisms in a marine teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizza, Merylin; Giusi, Giuseppina; Crudo, Michele; Canonaco, Marcello; Facciolo, Rosa Maria

    2013-01-15

    The hindering effects of metals and in particular lead (Pb) are representing a growing threat to aquatic organisms such as fish. This observation derives from toxic concentrations of Pb accounting for altered neurophysiological activities of some interesting teleost models like Thalassoma pavo, a fish species highly known for its host-cleaning symbiosis. In this study, the nominal PbNO(3) concentration of 1.6 mg/L was capable of reducing feeding and resting bouts as early as 24 h of exposure while hyperactive swimming episodes were also detected. Such abnormal behaviors were tightly correlated to up-regulated orexin receptor (ORXR) mRNA expression levels in some brain areas such as the lateral thalamic nucleus (+213%) and the optic tectum (+90%) with respect to controls. Interestingly, these transcriptional effects seemed to be attenuated when Pb-exposed fish received either 100 ng/g of ORX-A (-70%) or 0.1 μg/g of γ-aminobutyric acid(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist muscimol (MUS; -97%) compared to fish exposed to Pb alone. Moreover, a net neurodegener