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Sample records for extracellular fluid present

  1. The origin, function, and diagnostic potential of RNA within extracellular vesicles present in human biological fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Douglas D.; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tumor cells release membranous structures into their extracellular environment, which are termed exosomes, microvesicles or extracellular vesicles depending on specific characteristics, including size, composition and biogenesis pathway. These cell-derived vesicles can exhibit an array of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids derived from the originating tumor. This review focuses of the transcriptome (RNA) of these extracellular vesicles. Based on current da...

  2. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  3. The plasticity of extracellular fluid homeostasis in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyenbach, Klaus W

    2016-09-01

    In chemistry, the ratio of all dissolved solutes to the solution's volume yields the osmotic concentration. The present Review uses this chemical perspective to examine how insects deal with challenges to extracellular fluid (ECF) volume, solute content and osmotic concentration (pressure). Solute/volume plots of the ECF (hemolymph) reveal that insects tolerate large changes in all three of these ECF variables. Challenges beyond those tolerances may be 'corrected' or 'compensated'. While a correction simply reverses the challenge, compensation accommodates the challenge with changes in the other two variables. Most insects osmoregulate by keeping ECF volume and osmotic concentration within a wide range of tolerance. Other insects osmoconform, allowing the ECF osmotic concentration to match the ambient osmotic concentration. Aphids are unique in handling solute and volume loads largely outside the ECF, in the lumen of the gut. This strategy may be related to the apparent absence of Malpighian tubules in aphids. Other insects can suspend ECF homeostasis altogether in order to survive extreme temperatures. Thus, ECF homeostasis in insects is highly dynamic and plastic, which may partly explain why insects remain the most successful class of animals in terms of both species number and biomass.

  4. Organ-specific chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerra, R F; Nathanson, S D

    1989-05-01

    The preferential colonization of a distant organ by a circulating tumor cell (organ specific metastasis) may be regulated by chemotactic factors present within the extracellular matrix of the host organ. Organ-specific extracellular matrix was prepared from murine kidney and lung by high salt extraction and DNAase/RNAase digestion. A soluble protein fraction (S2) from each of the matricies was obtained by 4 M guanidine extraction and was tested for organ-specific chemotactic activity in a modified Boyden chamber. The lung colonizing B16-F10 and B16-BL6 tumor cell lines demonstrated organ-specific motility only toward the lung extract. The low metastasizing B16 parental line and liver colonizing B16-L4b line showed no preference for either lung or kidney. The lung activity resolves into five fractions by gel filtration chromatography, with the highest activity eluting at Mr approximately 71,000. Chemotactic factors present in lung extracellular matrix may regulate the preferential colonization of an organ by stimulating the migration of tumor cells in a specific manner. These factors may be released during the degradation of the extracellular matrix.

  5. Synovial fluid pretreatment with hyaluronidase facilitates isolation of CD44+ extracellular vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boere, Janneke; van de Lest, Chris H. A.; Libregts, Sten F. W. M.; Arkesteijn, Ger J. A.; Geerts, Willie J. C.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N. M.; Malda, Jos; van Weeren, P. René; Wauben, Marca H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) in synovial fluid (SF) are gaining increased recognition as important factors in joint homeostasis, joint regeneration, and as biomarkers of joint disease. A limited number of studies have investigated EVs in SF samples of patients with joint disease, but knowledge on the role of EVs in healthy joints is lacking. In addition, no standardized protocol is available for isolation of EVs from SF. Based on the high viscosity of SF caused by high concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) – a prominent extracellular matrix component – it was hypothesized that EV recovery could be optimized by pretreatment with hyaluronidase (HYase). Therefore, the efficiency of EV isolation from healthy equine SF samples was tested by performing sequential ultracentrifugation steps (10,000g, 100,000g and 200,000g) in the presence or absence of HYase. Quantitative EV analysis using high-resolution flow cytometry showed an efficient recovery of EVs after 100,000g ultracentrifugation, with an increased yield of CD44+ EVs when SF samples were pretreated with HYase. Morphological analysis of SF-derived EVs with cryo-transmission-electron microscopy did not indicate damage by high-speed ultracentrifugation and revealed that most EVs are spherical with a diameter of 20–200 nm. Further protein characterization by Western blotting revealed that healthy SF-derived EVs contain CD9, Annexin-1, and CD90/Thy1.1. Taken together, these data suggest that EV isolation protocols for body fluids that contain relatively high amounts of HA, such as SF, could benefit from treatment of the fluid with HYase prior to ultracentrifugation. This method facilitates recovery and detection of CD44+ EVs within the HA-rich extracellular matrix. Furthermore, based on the findings presented here, it is recommended to sediment SF-derived EVs with at least 100,000g for optimal EV recovery. PMID:27511891

  6. Local fluid transfer regulation in heart extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Maria P; Morykwas, Michael J; Jordan, James E; Wang, Rui; Argenta, Louis C

    2016-06-01

    The interstitial myocardial matrix is a complex and dynamic structure that adapts to local fluctuations in pressure and actively contributes to the heart's fluid exchange and hydration. However, classical physiologic models tend to treat it as a passive conduit for water and solute, perhaps because local interstitial regulatory mechanisms are not easily accessible to experiment in vivo. Here, we examined the interstitial contribution to the fluid-driving pressure ex vivo. Interstitial hydration potentials were determined from influx/efflux rates measured in explants from healthy and ischemia-reperfusion-injured pigs during colloid osmotic pressure titrations. Adaptive responses were further explored by isolating myocardial fibroblasts and measuring their contractile responses to water activity changes in vitro. Results show hydration potentials between 5 and 60 mmHg in healthy myocardia and shifts in excess of 200 mmHg in edematous myocardia after ischemia-reperfusion injury. Further, rates of fluid transfer were temperature-dependent, and in collagen gel contraction assays, myocardial fibroblasts tended to preserve the micro-environment's hydration volume by slowing fluid efflux rates at pressures above 40 mmHg. Our studies quantify components of the fluid-driving forces in the heart interstitium that the classical Starling's equation does not explicitly consider. Measured hydration potentials in healthy myocardia and shifts with edema are larger than predicted from the known values of hydrostatic and colloid osmotic interstitial fluid pressures. Together with fibroblast responses in vitro, they are consistent with regulatory mechanisms that add local biological controls to classic fluid-balance models.

  7. Handling and storage of human body fluids for analysis of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuana Yuana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Because procedures of handling and storage of body fluids affect numbers and composition of extracellular vesicles (EVs, standardization is important to ensure reliable and comparable measurements of EVs in a clinical environment. We aimed to develop standard protocols for handling and storage of human body fluids for EV analysis. Conditions such as centrifugation, single freeze–thaw cycle, effect of time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation and storage were investigated. Plasma is the most commonly studied body fluid in EV research. We mainly focused on EVs originating from platelets and erythrocytes and investigated the behaviour of these 2 types of EVs independently as well as in plasma samples of healthy subjects. EVs in urine and saliva were also studied for comparison. All samples were analysed simultaneously before and after freeze–thawing by resistive pulse sensing, nanoparticle tracking analysis, conventional flow cytometry (FCM and transmission (scanning electron microscopy. Our main finding is that the effect of centrifugation markedly depends on the cellular origin of EVs. Whereas erythrocyte EVs remain present as single EVs after centrifugation, platelet EVs form aggregates, which affect their measured concentration in plasma. Single erythrocyte and platelet EVs are present mainly in the range of 100–200 nm, far below the lower limit of what can be measured by conventional FCM. Furthermore, the effects of single freeze–thaw cycle, time delay between blood collection and plasma preparation up to 1 hour and storage up to 1 year are insignificant (p>0.05 on the measured concentration and diameter of EVs from erythrocyte and platelet concentrates and EVs in plasma, urine and saliva. In conclusion, in standard protocols for EV studies, centrifugation to isolate EVs from collected body fluids should be avoided. Freezing and storage of collected body fluids, albeit their insignificant effects, should be performed

  8. Extracellular vesicles such as prostate cancer cell fragments as a fluid biopsy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, S I; Kim, Y; Biggs, C N; Chin, J L; Leong, H S

    2015-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles generated through a process of cell membrane shedding or storage vesicle release, as occurs during apoptosis, necrosis or exocytosis. Initially perceived as cellular by-products or 'dust' of insignificant biological importance, recent research has shed light on the role of EVs as mediators of intercellular communication, blood coagulation and disease progression. The prostate is a source of EVs and their abundance in complex biological fluids such as plasma, serum and urine make them compelling entities for a 'fluid biopsy'. As such, prostate cancer cell fragments (PCCF) are EVs generated by the tumor resident within the prostate and are also present in blood, expressing a portion of biomarkers representative of the primary tumor. High-throughput analytical techniques to determine biomarker expression on EVs is the last hurdle towards translating the full potential of prostate EVs for clinical use. We describe current state-of-the-art methods for the analysis of prostate-derived EVs in patient fluids such as plasma and the challenges that lie ahead in this emerging field of translational research.

  9. Supercritical Fluid Extraction: Present Status and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J. W.

    2002-07-01

    Supercritical extraction (SFE), using primarily environmentally-benign carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as the extraction agent, is reviewed with respect to its present status and future use. SFE was developed for analytical application in the mid 1980's in response to the desire to reduce the use of organic solvents in the laboratory environment and is becoming a standard method for the preparation and analysis of lipid-containing sample matrices. Currently, analytical SFE is predominately practiced in the off-line mode, using both sequential and parallel extraction modes. Depending on the instrumental configuration, the preparation of up to 24 samples can be accomplished on one instrument on a daily basis. Several other benefits can be achieved using SFE, such as the processing of thermally-sensitive analytes and rapid analyte extraction kinetics relative to extraction with liquid solvents. Examples are provided not only of the analytical SFE of oils and fats, but of volatile solutes from an array of sample types. Finally, the relevance of analytical SFE to processing with supercritical fluids (SFs) is documented using examples from our own research involving a combinatorial approach to optimising processing conditions. (Author) 70 refs.

  10. Is There Volume Transmission Along Extracellular Fluid Pathways Corresponding to the Acupuncture Meridians?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Volume transmission is a new major communication signaling via extracellular fluid (interstitial fluid pathways. It was proposed by the current authors that such pathways can explain the meridian phenomena and acupuncture effects. To investigate whether meridian-like structures exist in fish body and operate via volume transmission in extracellular fluid pathways, we injected alcian blue (AB under anesthesia into Gephyrocharax melanocheir, which has a translucent body. The migration of AB could be seen directly and was recorded by a digital camera. The fish was then embedded and cut transversely to observe the position of tracks in three dimensions. Eight longitudinal threadlike blue tracks were recognized on the fish. The positions of these threadlike tracks were similar to meridians on the human body. Transverse sections showed that these tracks distributed to different layers of distinct subcutaneous loose connective tissues and intermuscular septa. Lymphatic vessels were sometimes associated with the extracellular blue tracks where the migration of AB occurred. Extracellular fluid pathways were found on fish through their transport of AB. These pathways operating via volume transmission appeared to be similar in positions and functions to the acupuncture meridians in Chinese medicine.

  11. A common theme in extracellular fluids of beetles: extracellular superoxide dismutases crucial for balancing ROS in response to microbial challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretscher, René R.; Streicher, Priska E.; Strauß, Anja S.; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Wang, Ding; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular Cu/Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical for balancing the level of reactive oxygen species in the extracellular matrix of eukaryotes. In the present study we have detected constitutive SOD activity in the haemolymph and defensive secretions of different leaf beetle species. Exemplarily, we have chosen the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae, as representative model organism to investigate the role of extracellular SODs in antimicrobial defence. Qualitative and quantitative proteome analyses resulted in the identification of two extracellular Cu/Zn SODs in the haemolymph and one in the defensive secretions of juvenile P. cochleariae. Furthermore, quantitative expression studies indicated fat body tissue and defensive glands as the main synthesis sites of these SODs. Silencing of the two SODs revealed one of them, PcSOD3.1, as the only relevant enzyme facilitating SOD activity in haemolymph and defensive secretions in vivo. Upon challenge with the entomopathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, PcSOD3.1-deficient larvae exhibited a significantly higher mortality compared to other SOD-silenced groups. Hence, our results serve as a basis for further research on SOD regulated host-pathogen interactions. In defensive secretions PcSOD3.1-silencing affected neither deterrent production nor activity against fungal growth. Instead, we propose another antifungal mechanism based on MRJP/yellow proteins in the defensive exudates. PMID:27068683

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction: Present status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King, Jerry W.

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical extraction (SFE, using primarily environmentally-benign carbon dioxide (CO2 as the extracting agent, is reviewed with respect to its present status and future use. SFE was developed for analytical application in the mid 1980’s in response to the desire to reduce the use of organic solvents in the laboratory environment and is becoming a standard method for the preparation and analysis of lipid-containing sample matrices. Currently, analytical SFE is predominately practiced in the off-line mode, using both sequential and parallel extraction modes. Depending on the instrumental configuration, the preparation of up to 24 samples can be accomplished on one instrument on a daily basis. Several other benefits can be achieved using SFE, such as the processing of thermally-sensitive analytes and rapid analyte extraction kinetics relative to extraction with liquid solvents. Examples are provided not only of the analytical SFE of oils and fats, but of volatile solutes from an array of sample types. Finally, the relevance of analytical SFE to processing with supercritical fluids (SFs is documented using examples from our own research involving a combinatorial approach to optimising processing conditions.Este artículo revisa el presente y el uso futuro de la extracción con fluidos supercríticos (SFE, principalmente dióxido de carbono (CO2 benigno para el ambiente. La extracción con fluidos supercríticos se desarrolló como aplicación analítica a mediados de los años 80 como respuesta al deseo de reducir el uso de disolventes orgánicos en el ambiente del laboratorio, y se está convirtiendo en un método estándar con respecto a la preparación y análisis de muestras conteniendo lípidos. Actualmente, la analítica de SFE es predominantemente aplicada en modo “off-line”, usando modos de extracción secuenciales y paralelos. Dependiendo de la configuración de la instrumentación, se pueden llegar a preparar diariamente

  13. Extracellular superoxide dismutase is present in secretory vesicles of human neutrophils and released upon stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Marie B; Gottfredsen, Randi H; Larsen, Ulrike G

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages and polymor......Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme present in the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it provides protection against oxidative degradation of matrix constituents including type I collagen and hyaluronan. The enzyme is known to associate with macrophages......), the protein was released into the extracellular space and found to associate with DNA released from stimulated cells. The functional consequences were evaluated by the use of neutrophils isolated from wild-type and EC-SOD KO mice, and showed that EC-SOD release significantly reduce the level of superoxide...

  14. Extracellular Mitochondria in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Neurological Recovery After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sherry H-Y; Lan, Jing; Esposito, Elga; Ning, MingMing; Balaj, Leonora; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H; Hayakawa, Kazuhide

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies suggest that extracellular mitochondria may be involved in the pathophysiology of stroke. In this study, we assessed the functional relevance of endogenous extracellular mitochondria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in rats and humans after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). A standard rat model of SAH was used, where an intraluminal suture was used to perforate a cerebral artery, thus leading to blood extravasation into subarachnoid space. At 24 and 72 hours after SAH, neurological outcomes were measured, and the standard JC1 (5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl-benzimidazolylcarbocyanineiodide) assay was used to quantify mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF. To further support the rat model experiments, CSF samples were obtained from 41 patients with SAH and 27 control subjects. Mitochondrial membrane potentials were measured with the JC1 assay, and correlations with clinical outcomes were assessed at 3 months. In the standard rat model of SAH, extracellular mitochondria was detected in CSF at 24 and 72 hours after injury. JC1 assays demonstrated that mitochondrial membrane potentials in CSF were decreased after SAH compared with sham-operated controls. In human CSF samples, extracellular mitochondria were also detected, and JC1 levels were also reduced after SAH. Furthermore, higher mitochondrial membrane potentials in the CSF were correlated with good clinical recovery at 3 months after SAH onset. This proof-of-concept study suggests that extracellular mitochondria may provide a biomarker-like glimpse into brain integrity and recovery after injury. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Response of atrial natriuretic factor to acute extracellular fluid volume in patients with pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, R; Rodríguez, E; Amato, D; Sánchez, G; Ron, O; Rodríguez, F; Herrera-Acosta, J

    2000-01-01

    Patients with pheochromocytoma have been reported to show high plasmatic atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) levels. Its source may not be the atrium because blood volume, the most important physiological stimulus for ANF release, is usually reduced in these patients. To evaluate ANF secretion functional integrity, we studied three patients with pheochromocytoma before and after surgical removal of the tumor. Extracellular fluid (ECF) volume, plasmatic ANF levels, and plasmatic renin activity (PRA) were measured. ANF was measured before and after an acute saline load of 1.5L in 90 min. Before surgery, ECF volume was normal or reduced, and PRA was normal but decreased after the saline load. By contrast, ANF was elevated and did not change after the saline load. After surgery ANF decreased, ECF volume rose, and the saline load induced a significant increase of plasma ANF and reduction of PRA. ANF was present in significant amounts in tumoral tissue homogenates. These data suggest that the tumor was the source of ANF in these patients with pheochromocytoma because high levels of ANF, despite reduced or normal ECF volume, as well as unresponsiveness to acute saline infusion, were found before surgery with subsequent normalization after tumor removal.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny C Akers

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA, tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS, vesicle flow cytometry (VFC, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs 150 nm in diameter, NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations.

  17. The prognostic value of brain extracellular fluid nitric oxide metabolites after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdall, Martin M; Rejdak, Konrad; Kitchen, Neil D; Smith, Martin; Petzold, Axel

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a compound with both protective and damaging effects on neurons. Quantification of NO metabolites in humans is limited by sample contamination with blood. In vivo cerebral microdialysis may offer an alternative approach as sampling of extracellular fluid (ECF) adjacent to neurons becomes possible. We investigate the prognostic value of brain ECF NO metabolites in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prospective case cohort of 195 ECF samples collected from 11 cases over 4 days following TBI was collected. Nitrate and nitrite concentrations ([NO x ]) were quantified using a vanadium-based colorimetric assay. Early ECF [NO x ] (survival (sensitivity 100%, specificity 75%). Early ECF NO x concentrations are of prognostic value after TBI. ECF NO x may be a useful biomarker for treatment trials targeted at nitric oxide metabolism.

  18. Acute extracellular fluid volume changes increase ileocolonic resistance to saline flow in anesthetized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Jr. A.T.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the effect of acute extracellular fluid volume changes on saline flow through 4 gut segments (ileocolonic, ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and proximal colon, perfused at constant pressure in anesthetized dogs. Two different experimental protocols were used: hypervolemia (iv saline infusion, 0.9% NaCl, 20 ml/min, volume up to 5% body weight and controlled hemorrhage (up to a 50% drop in mean arterial pressure. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 6 was gradually and significantly decreased during the expansion (17.1%, P<0.05 and expanded (44.9%, P<0.05 periods while mean ileal flow (N = 7 was significantly decreased only during the expanded period (38%, P<0.05. Mean colonic flow (N = 7 was decreased during expansion (12%, P<0.05 but returned to control levels during the expanded period. Mean ileocolonic sphincter flow (N = 6 was not significantly modified. Mean ileocolonic flow (N = 10 was also decreased after hemorrhage (retracted period by 17% (P<0.05, but saline flow was not modified in the other separate circuits (N = 6, 5 and 4 for ileal, ileocolonic sphincter and colonic groups, respectively. The expansion effect was blocked by atropine (0.5 mg/kg, iv both on the ileocolonic (N = 6 and ileal (N = 5 circuits. Acute extracellular fluid volume retraction and expansion increased the lower gastrointestinal resistances to saline flow. These effects, which could physiologically decrease the liquid volume being supplied to the colon, are possible mechanisms activated to acutely balance liquid volume deficit and excess.

  19. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by I-125-iothalamate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Folkert W.; Muntinga, Jaap H. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of I-125-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad ra

  20. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

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    Md Mahmodul Hasan Sohel

    Full Text Available Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  1. Exosomal and Non-Exosomal Transport of Extra-Cellular microRNAs in Follicular Fluid: Implications for Bovine Oocyte Developmental Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohel, Md Mahmodul Hasan; Hoelker, Michael; Noferesti, Sina Seifi; Salilew-Wondim, Dessie; Tholen, Ernst; Looft, Christian; Rings, Franca; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Spencer, Thomas E; Schellander, Karl; Tesfaye, Dawit

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell communication within the follicle involves many signaling molecules, and this process may be mediated by secretion and uptake of exosomes that contain several bioactive molecules including extra-cellular miRNAs. Follicular fluid and cells from individual follicles of cattle were grouped based on Brilliant Cresyl Blue (BCB) staining of the corresponding oocytes. Both Exoquick precipitation and differential ultracentrifugation were used to separate the exosome and non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid. Following miRNA isolation from both fractions, the human miRCURY LNA™ Universal RT miRNA PCR array system was used to profile miRNA expression. This analysis found that miRNAs were present in both exosomal and non-exosomal fraction of bovine follicular fluid. We found 25 miRNAs differentially expressed (16 up and 9 down) in exosomes and 30 miRNAs differentially expressed (21 up and 9 down) in non-exosomal fraction of follicular fluid in comparison of BCB- versus BCB+ oocyte groups. Expression of selected miRNAs was detected in theca, granulosa and cumulus oocyte complex. To further explore the potential roles of these follicular fluid derived extra-cellular miRNAs, the potential target genes were predicted, and functional annotation and pathway analysis revealed most of these pathways are known regulators of follicular development and oocyte growth. In order to validate exosome mediated cell-cell communication within follicular microenvironment, we demonstrated uptake of exosomes and resulting increase of endogenous miRNA level and subsequent alteration of mRNA levels in follicular cells in vitro. This study demonstrates for the first time, the presence of exosome or non-exosome mediated transfer of miRNA in the bovine follicular fluid, and oocyte growth dependent variation in extra-cellular miRNA signatures in the follicular environment.

  2. [Extracellular fluid, plasma and interstitial volume in cirrhotic patients without clinical edema or ascites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera Viñas, E C; Hames, W; Mothe, G; Barrionuevo, M P

    1989-01-01

    Extracellular fluid volume (E.C.F.) and plasma volume (P.V.), were measured with sodium sulfate labeled with 35I and 131I human serum albumin, respectively, by the dilution technique in control subjects and in cirrhotic patients without clinical ascites or edema, renal or hepatic failure, gastrointestinal bleeding or diuretics. Results are expressed as mean +/- DS in both ml/m2 and ml/kg. In normal subjects E.C.F. (n = 8) was 7,533 +/- 817 ml/m2 (201.3 +/- 182 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 11) 1,767 +/- 337 ml/m2 (47.2 +/- 9.3 ml/kg), and interstitial fluid (I.S.F.) (n = 7) 5,758 +/- 851 ml/m2 (Table 2). In cirrhotic patients E.C.F. (n = 11) was 10,318 +/- 2,980 ml/m2 (261.7 +/- 76.8 ml/kg), P.V. (n = 12) 2,649 +/- 558 ml/m2 (67.7 +/- 15.6 ml/kg) and I.S.F. (n = 11) 7,866 +/- 2,987 ml/m2 (Table 3). Cirrhotic patients compared with normal subjects have hypervolemia due to a significant E.C.F. and P.V. expansion (p less than 0.02 and less than 0.001 respectively) (Fig. 1). Reasons for E.C.F. and P.V. abnormalities in cirrhotic patients may reflect urinary sodium retention related to portal hipertension which stimulates aldosterone release or enhanced renal tubular sensitivity to the hormone. However, it is also possible that these patients, in the presence of hypoalbuminemia (Table 1), have no clinical edema or ascites due to increased glomerular filtration, suppressed release of vasopressin, increased natriuretic factor, and urinary prostaglandin excretion, in response to the intravascular expansion, all of which increased solute and water delivery to the distal nephron and improved renal water excretion. We conclude that in our clinical experience cirrhotic patients without ascites or edema have hypervolemia because of a disturbance in E.C.F.

  3. Amniotic fluid embolism and isolated coagulopathy: atypical presentation of amniotic fluid embolism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Awad, I T

    2012-02-03

    A 41-year-old multigravida presented at 32 weeks of gestation with polyhydramnios and an anencephalic fetus. Abnormal bleeding as a result of disseminated intravascular coagulation complicated an emergency Caesarean section for severe abdominal pain thought to be due to uterine rupture. Massive transfusion with blood products was necessary and the abdomen packed to control bleeding. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit where she made a slow but complete recovery. Amniotic fluid embolism with atypical presentation of isolated coagulopathy is the likely diagnosis in this case. The case serves to demonstrate that amniotic fluid embolism may present with symptoms and signs other than the classical pattern of dyspnoea, cyanosis and hypotension.

  4. Profiles of extracellular miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases correlate with disease status and features of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Kasandra; Malenica, Ivana; Metpally, Raghu; Courtright, Amanda; Rakela, Benjamin; Beach, Thomas; Shill, Holly; Adler, Charles; Sabbagh, Marwan; Villa, Stephen; Tembe, Waibhav; Craig, David; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2014-01-01

    The discovery and reliable detection of markers for neurodegenerative diseases have been complicated by the inaccessibility of the diseased tissue--such as the inability to biopsy or test tissue from the central nervous system directly. RNAs originating from hard to access tissues, such as neurons within the brain and spinal cord, have the potential to get to the periphery where they can be detected non-invasively. The formation and extracellular release of microvesicles and RNA binding proteins have been found to carry RNA from cells of the central nervous system to the periphery and protect the RNA from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs detectable in peripheral circulation can provide information about cellular changes associated with human health and disease. In order to associate miRNA signals present in cell-free peripheral biofluids with neurodegenerative disease status of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we assessed the miRNA content in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from postmortem subjects with full neuropathology evaluations. We profiled the miRNA content from 69 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 67 with Parkinson's disease and 78 neurologically normal controls using next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS). We report the average abundance of each detected miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and in serum and describe 13 novel miRNAs that were identified. We correlated changes in miRNA expression with aspects of disease severity such as Braak stage, dementia status, plaque and tangle densities, and the presence and severity of Lewy body pathology. Many of the differentially expressed miRNAs detected in peripheral cell-free cerebrospinal fluid and serum were previously reported in the literature to be deregulated in brain tissue from patients with neurodegenerative disease. These data indicate that extracellular miRNAs detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reflective of cell-based changes in pathology and can be used to assess

  5. Profiles of extracellular miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases correlate with disease status and features of pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasandra Burgos

    Full Text Available The discovery and reliable detection of markers for neurodegenerative diseases have been complicated by the inaccessibility of the diseased tissue--such as the inability to biopsy or test tissue from the central nervous system directly. RNAs originating from hard to access tissues, such as neurons within the brain and spinal cord, have the potential to get to the periphery where they can be detected non-invasively. The formation and extracellular release of microvesicles and RNA binding proteins have been found to carry RNA from cells of the central nervous system to the periphery and protect the RNA from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs detectable in peripheral circulation can provide information about cellular changes associated with human health and disease. In order to associate miRNA signals present in cell-free peripheral biofluids with neurodegenerative disease status of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, we assessed the miRNA content in cerebrospinal fluid and serum from postmortem subjects with full neuropathology evaluations. We profiled the miRNA content from 69 patients with Alzheimer's disease, 67 with Parkinson's disease and 78 neurologically normal controls using next generation small RNA sequencing (NGS. We report the average abundance of each detected miRNA in cerebrospinal fluid and in serum and describe 13 novel miRNAs that were identified. We correlated changes in miRNA expression with aspects of disease severity such as Braak stage, dementia status, plaque and tangle densities, and the presence and severity of Lewy body pathology. Many of the differentially expressed miRNAs detected in peripheral cell-free cerebrospinal fluid and serum were previously reported in the literature to be deregulated in brain tissue from patients with neurodegenerative disease. These data indicate that extracellular miRNAs detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid and serum are reflective of cell-based changes in pathology and can

  6. Simplified methods for assessment of renal function as the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to extracellular fluid volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars; Brøchner-Mortensen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Background: Instead of scaling glomerular filtration rate (GFR) to a body surface area of 1.73m2, it has been suggested to scale GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV). The ratio GFR/ECV has physiological meaning in that it indicates how often ‘that which is to be regulated’ (i.e. ECV) comes...... into contact with the ‘regulator’ (i.e. the kidneys). Aim: The aim of the present study was as follows: to analyse two published calculation methods for determining ECV and GFR/ECV; to develop a new simple and accurate formula for determining ECV; and to compare and evaluate these methods. Materials...... and methods: GFR was determined as 51Cr-EDTA clearance. The study comprised 128 individuals (35 women, 66 men and 27 children) with a full 51Cr-EDTA plasma concentration curve, determined from injection until 4–5 h p.i. Reference values for GFR and ECV were calculated from the full curve. One...

  7. α1-Adrenoceptor-mediated Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid and Ca2+-release from intracellular stores: No role for α(1A,B)-adrenoceptor subtypes in the pithed rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwietert, H.R.; Mathy, M.-J.; Wilhelm, D.; Wilffert, B.; Pfaffendorf, M.; Van Zwieten, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    1. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that in the pithed rat preparation two subtypes of the α1-adrenoceptor are linked to two different signal transduction mechanisms, both of which contribute to vasoconstriction, one facilitating Ca2+-entry from the extracellular fluid (α(1A)) and one

  8. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  9. Role of Microvascular Tone and Extracellular Matrix Contraction in the Regulation of Interstitial Fluid: Implications for Aortic Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of aortic dissection is poorly understood, and its risk is resistant to medical treatment. Most studies have focused on a proposed pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β in Marfan disease and related thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections. However, clinical testing of this concept using angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to block transforming growth factor-β signaling fell short of promise. Genetic mutations that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections affect components of the extracellular matrix and proteins involved in cellular force generation. Thus, a role for dysfunctional mechanosensing in abnormal aortic wall remodeling is emerging. However, how abnormal mechanosensing leads to aortic dissection remains a mystery. Here, we review current knowledge about the regulation of interstitial fluid dynamics and myogenic tone and propose that alteration in contractile force reduces vascular tone in the microcirculation (here, aortic vasa vasorum) and leads to elevations of blood flow, transmural pressure, and fluid flux into the surrounding aortic media. Furthermore, reduced contractile force in medial smooth muscle cells coupled with alteration of structural components of the extracellular matrix limits extracellular matrix contraction, further promoting the formation of intramural edema, a critical step in the initiation of aortic dissection. The concept is supported by several pathophysiological and clinical observations. A direct implication of this concept is that drugs that lower blood pressure and limit interstitial fluid accumulation while preserving or increasing microvascular tone would limit the risk of dissection. In contrast, drugs that substantially lower microvascular tone would be ineffective or may accelerate the disease and precipitate aortic dissection.

  10. Release of Active Peptidyl Arginine Deiminases by Neutrophils Can Explain Production of Extracellular Citrullinated Autoantigens in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Julia; Lugonja, Božo; Jimmy Ytterberg, A.; Zubarev, Roman A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Pearson, Mark J.; Grant, Melissa M.; Milward, Michael; Lundberg, Karin; Buckley, Christopher D.; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Cooper, Paul R.; Chapple, Iain L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antibodies specifically recognize citrullinated autoantigens that are generated by peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs). Neutrophils express high levels of PAD and accumulate in the synovial fluid (SF) of RA patients during disease flares. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that neutrophil cell death, induced by either NETosis (extrusion of genomic DNA–protein complexes known as neutrophil extracellular traps [NETs]) or necrosis, can contribute to production of autoantigens in the inflamed joint. Methods Extracellular DNA was quantified in the SF of patients with RA, patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Release of PAD from neutrophils was investigated by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, immunofluorescence staining, and PAD activity assays. PAD2 and PAD4 protein expression, as well as PAD enzymatic activity, were assessed in the SF of patients with RA and those with OA. Results Extracellular DNA was detected at significantly higher levels in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.001) or PsA SF (P < 0.05), and its expression levels correlated with neutrophil concentrations and PAD activity in RA SF. Necrotic neutrophils released less soluble extracellular DNA compared to NETotic cells in vitro (P < 0.05). Higher PAD activity was detected in RA SF than in OA SF (P < 0.05). The citrullinated proteins PAD2 and PAD4 were found attached to NETs and also freely diffused in the supernatant. PAD enzymatic activity was detected in supernatants of neutrophils undergoing either NETosis or necrosis. Conclusion Release of active PAD isoforms into the SF by neutrophil cell death is a plausible explanation for the generation of extracellular autoantigens in RA. PMID:26245941

  11. Dual Impact of Tolvaptan on Intracellular and Extracellular Water in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients with Fluid Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Murakami, Takuya; Igarashi, Yusuke; Okabe, Kyochika; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Saito, Takako; Sekiguchi, Chuji; Miyazawa, Yasuharu; Akimoto, Tetsu; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tolvaptan, an oral selective V2-receptor antagonist, is a water diuretic that ameliorates fluid retention with a lower risk of a worsening renal function than conventional loop diuretics. Although loop diuretics predominantly decrease extracellular water (ECW) compared with intracellular water (ICW), the effect of tolvaptan on fluid distribution remains unclear. We therefore examined how tolvaptan changes ICW and ECW in accordance with the renal function. Methods Six advanced chronic kidney disease patients (stage 4 or 5) with fluid retention were enrolled in this study. Tolvaptan (7.5 mg/day) added to conventional diuretic treatment was administered to remove fluid retention. The fluid volume was measured using a bioimpedance analysis device before (day 0) and after (day 5 or 6) tolvaptan treatment. Results Body weight decreased by 2.6%±1.3% (64.4±6.5 vs. 62.8±6.3 kg, p=0.06), and urine volume increased by 54.8%±23.9% (1,215±169 vs. 1,709±137 mL/day, p=0.03) between before and after tolvaptan treatment. Tolvaptan significantly decreased ICW (6.5%±1.5%, p=0.01) and ECW (7.5%±1.4%, p=0.02), which had similar reduction rates (p=0.32). The estimated glomerular filtration rate remained unchanged during the treatment (14.6±2.8 vs. 14.9±2.7 mL/min/1.732 m, p=0.35). Conclusion Tolvaptan ameliorates body fluid retention, and induces an equivalent reduction rate of ICW and ECW without a worsening renal function. Tolvaptan is a novel water diuretic that has a different effect on fluid distribution compared with conventional loop diuretics. PMID:27725533

  12. AFM Imaging of RGD Presenting Synthetic Extracellular Matrix using Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell-interactive polymers have been widely used as synthetic extracellular matrices (sECM) to regulate cell function and promote tissue regeneration. Although it is known that adhesion ligand density and distribution influence the proliferation and differentiation of various cell types, currently a...

  13. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 decreases the concentrations of antiepileptic drugs in cortical extracellular fluid in amygdale kindling rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-hui CHEN; Cui-cui WANG; Xia XIAO; Li WEI; Guoxiong XU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1) was responsible for drug resistence in refractory epilepsy in amygdale kindling rats.Methods:Rat amygdale kindling was used as a model of refractory epilepsy.The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein in the brains was examined using RT-PCR and Western blot.MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus were studied with immunohistochemical staining.The rats were intraperitoneally injected with phenytoin (50 mg/kg) or carbamazepine (20 mg/kg),and their concentrations in the cortical extracellular fluid were measured using microdialysis and HPLC.Probenecid,a MRP1 inhibitor (40 mmol/L,50 μL) was administered through an inflow tube into the cortex 30 min before injection of the antiepileptic drugs.Results:The expression of MRP1 mRNA and protein was significantly up-regulated in the cortex and hippocampus in amygdale kindling rats compared with the control group.Furthermore,the number of MRP1-positive cells in the cortex and hippocampus was also significantly increased in amygdale kindling rats.Microdialysis studies showed that the concentrations of phenytoin and carbamazepine in the cortical extracellular fluid were significantly decreased in amygdale kindling rats.Pre-administration of probenecid could restore the concentrations back to their control levels.Conclusion:Up-regulation of MRP1 is responsible for the resistance of brain cells to antiepileptic drugs in the amygdale kindling rats.

  14. A noninvasive method to study regulation of extracellular fluid volume in rats using nuclear magnetic resonance

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — NMR fluid measurements of commonly used rat strains when subjected to SQ normotonic or hypertonic salines, as well as physiologic comparisons to sedentary and...

  15. A Noninvasive Method to Study Regulation of Extracellular Fluid Volume in Rats Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR)-based measurement of body composition of rodents is an effective method to quickly and repeatedly measure proportions of fat, lean, and fluid without anesthesia. TD-NMR provides a measure of free water in a living animal, termed % f...

  16. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  17. [K+/Na+ in the animal extracellular fluid at weathering of granitoids and problem of the origin of life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V; Felitsyn, S B; Klimova, E V; Shakhmatova, E I

    2012-01-01

    Leaching of granitoids of the paleoproterozoic age was performed from several seconds to 360 days in water solutions (pH water reservoirs with predominance of K+ over Na+. The K+/Na+ ratio exceeding 1 has been shown in prokaryotes, in cells and tissues of the free living and parasitic species of invertebrate and vertebrate animals. At the same time in the extracellular fluid of the fresh water, marine, and terrestrial animals, in which the Na+ concentration varies from 13 to 482 mmol/l, the K+/Na+ ratio is preserved at the level of 0.034 +/- 0.001. These results are discussed in connection with the problem of origin of protocells and of concentration ratios of monovalent cations in water phases of multicellular organisms.

  18. How cancer cells dictate their microenvironment: present roles of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yutaka; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2017-02-01

    Intercellular communication plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression through secretory molecules, including growth factors and cytokines. Recent advances have revealed that small membrane vesicles, termed extracellular vesicles (EVs), served as a regulatory agent in the intercellular communication of cancer. EVs enable the transfer of functional molecules, including proteins, mRNA and microRNAs (miRNAs), into recipient cells. Cancer cells utilize EVs to dictate the unique phenotype of surrounding cells, thereby promoting cancer progression. Against such "education" by cancer cells, non-tumoral cells suppress cancer initiation and progression via EVs. Therefore, researchers consider EVs to be important cues to clarify the molecular mechanisms of cancer biology. Understanding the functions of EVs in cancer progression is an important aspect of cancer biology that has not been previously elucidated. In this review, we summarize experimental data that indicate the pivotal roles of EVs in cancer progression.

  19. Feasibility and impact of the measurement of extracellular fluid volume simultaneous with GFR by 125I-iothalamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Folkert W; Muntinga, Jaap H J; Dierckx, Rudi A; Navis, Gerjan

    2008-09-01

    The feasibility, validity, and possible applications of the assessment of extracellular fluid volume (ECFV) simultaneous with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed in a series of validation studies using the constant infusion method of (125)I-iothalamate (IOT). In 48 subjects with a broad range of GFR, distribution volume (V(d)) of IOT corresponded well with V(d) bromide (16.71 +/- 3.0 and 16.73 +/- 3.2 l, respectively, not significant), with a strong correlation (r = 0.933, P IOT during strictly standardized (50 mmol Na(+)/d) sodium intake. An increase in dietary sodium intake (200 mmol Na(+)/d) induced a corresponding rise in V(d) IOT of 1.11 +/- 1.5 l (P IOT. After appropriate validation, also other GFR tracers could be used for such a simultaneous estimation, providing a valuable resource of data on ECFV in renal studies and, moreover, allowing GFR to be indexed to the body fluid compartment it clears: the ECFV.

  20. Development of a Rat Plasma and Brain Extracellular Fluid Pharmacokinetic Model for Bupropion and Hydroxybupropion Based on Microdialysis Sampling, and Application to Predict Human Brain Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Thomas I F H; Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Rollema, Hans; Stratford, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Administration of bupropion [(±)-2-(tert-butylamino)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)propan-1-one] and its preformed active metabolite, hydroxybupropion [(±)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-[(1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-propanyl)amino]-1-propanone], to rats with measurement of unbound concentrations by quantitative microdialysis sampling of plasma and brain extracellular fluid was used to develop a compartmental pharmacokinetics model to describe the blood-brain barrier transport of both substances. The population model revealed rapid equilibration of both entities across the blood-brain barrier, with resultant steady-state brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio estimates of 1.9 and 1.7 for bupropion and hydroxybupropion, respectively, which is thus indicative of a net uptake asymmetry. An overshoot of the brain extracellular fluid/plasma unbound concentration ratio at early time points was observed with bupropion; this was modeled as a time-dependent uptake clearance of the drug across the blood-brain barrier. Translation of the model was used to predict bupropion and hydroxybupropion exposure in human brain extracellular fluid after twice-daily administration of 150 mg bupropion. Predicted concentrations indicate that preferential inhibition of the dopamine and norepinephrine transporters by the metabolite, with little to no contribution by bupropion, would be expected at this therapeutic dose. Therefore, these results extend nuclear imaging studies on dopamine transporter occupancy and suggest that inhibition of both transporters contributes significantly to bupropion's therapeutic efficacy.

  1. Glutamine deficiency in extracellular fluid exerts adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Milan; Sispera, Ludek

    2014-05-01

    Characteristic feature of critical illness, such as trauma and sepsis, is muscle wasting associated with activated oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (valine, leucine, isoleucine) and enhanced release of glutamine (GLN) to the blood. GLN consumption in visceral tissues frequently exceeds its release from muscle resulting in GLN deficiency that may exert adverse effects on the course of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of GLN depletion in extracellular fluid on GLN production and protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy, laparotomized, and septic rats. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as a model of sepsis. After 24 h, soleus muscle (SOL, slow-twitch, red muscle) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch, white muscle) were isolated and incubated in a medium containing 0.5 mM GLN or without GLN. L-[1-(14)C]leucine was used to estimate protein synthesis and leucine oxidation, 3-methylhistidine release was used to evaluate myofibrillar protein breakdown. CLP increased GLN release from muscle, protein breakdown and leucine oxidation, and decreased protein synthesis. The effects were more pronounced in EDL. Alterations induced by laparotomy were similar to those observed in sepsis, but of a lower extent. GLN deficiency in medium enhanced GLN release and decreased intramuscular GLN concentration, decreased protein synthesis in muscles of intact and laparotomized rats, and enhanced leucine oxidation in SOL of intact and protein breakdown in SOL of laparotomized rats. It is concluded that (1) fast-twitch fibers are more sensitive to septic stimuli than slow-twitch fibers, (2) extracellular GLN deficiency may exert adverse effects on protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle, and (3) muscles of healthy and laparotomized animals are more sensitive to GLN deficiency than muscles of septic animals.

  2. Phosphocreatine, an Intracellular High-Energy Compound, is Found in the Extracellular Fluid of the Seminal Vesicles in Mice and Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H. J.; Fillers, W. S.; Iyengar, M. R.

    1988-10-01

    High levels of phosphocreatine, a compound known to serve as an intracellular energy reserve, were found in the fluid contained in seminal vesicle glands. The concentrations of phosphocreatine in the extracellular fluid in the mouse and rat were found to be 5.6 ± 1.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8 μ mol/g, respectively, which are higher than the intracellular levels reported for smooth muscles. The creatine concentrations in the seminal vesicular fluid from these two species were 22.8 ± 3.1 and 13.0 ± 5.3 μ mol/g, respectively. These creatine levels are approximately 100 and 65 times higher than the creatine levels in mammalian blood. Smaller amounts of ATP (phosphocreatine/ATP ratio of 20-40) and traces of ADP were also found. Comparison of the pattern of distribution of macromolecules (proteins and DNA) with the distribution of phosphocreatine between the cells and the fluid of the seminal vesicle indicates that cell lysis did not account for the phosphocreatine in the seminal vesicle fluid. Rather, the available evidence strongly suggests that this high-energy compound is actively secreted. We found that in the testes, the sperm are exposed to the highest known creatine concentration in any mammalian tissue studied. Based on these results and other recent reports, we propose that the extracellular phosphocreatine, ATP, and creatine are involved in sperm metabolism.

  3. Comparative pharmacokinetics of tetramethylpyrazine phosphate in rat plasma and extracellular fluid of brain after intranasal, intragastric and intravenous administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of tetramethylpyrazine phosphate (TMPP in plasma and extracellular fluid of the cerebral cortex of rats via three delivery routes: intranasal (i.n., intragastric (i.g. and intravenous (i.v. administration. After i.n., i.g. and i.v. administration of a single-dose at 10 mg/kg, cerebral cortex dialysates and plasma samples drawn from the carotid artery were collected at timed intervals. The concentration of TMPP in the samples was analyzed by HPLC. The area under the concentration–time curve (AUC and the ratio of the AUCbrain to the AUCplasma (drug targeting efficiency, DTE was calculated to evaluate the brain targeting efficiency of the drug via these different routes of administration. After i.n. administration, TMPP was rapidly absorbed to reach its peak plasma concentration within 5 min and showed a delayed uptake into cerebral cortex (tmax=15 min. The ratio of the AUCbrain dialysates value between i.n. route and i.v. injection was 0.68, which was greater than that obtained after i.g. administration (0.43. The systemic bioavailability obtained with i.n. administration was greater than that obtained by the i.g. route (86.33% vs. 50.39%, whereas the DTE of the nasal route was 78.89%, close to that of oral administration (85.69%. These results indicate that TMPP is rapidly absorbed from the nasal mucosa into the systemic circulation, and then crosses the blood–brain barrier (BBB to reach the cerebral cortex. Intranasal administration of TMPP could be a promising alternative to intravenous and oral approaches.

  4. [Effect of synchronous perfusion of NaN3 in changes in content of cholinergic neurotransmitter in medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampal extra-cellular fluid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei-Yu; Sun, Dan-Dan; Liu, Yang; Cui, Yue; Zhao, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Guo; Wang, Dan-Qiao

    2014-02-01

    To observe the effect of synchronous perfusion of specific respiratory chain complex IV inhibitor sodium azide (NaN3) in brain on rat ventromedial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) contents in hippocampal extra-cellular fluid, and establish the AD rat model induced by mitochondrial acute injury. The synchronous dual-probe dual-channel brain microdialysis sampling technology was applied to synchronously perfuse modified Ringer's solution containing NaN3 (50 micro mol L-1) and neostigmine (2 micro mol L-1) into mPFC and hippocampus of conscious, freely moving normal rats, and continuously collect dialysates from different encephalic areas. Dynamic contents of ACh and Ch were determined by high performance liquid chromatography-post-column immobilized enzyme reactor-electrochemical process. ACh and Ch contents in mPFC extracellular fluid of normal rats were higher than that in hippocampus. During the process of perfusion, NaN3 could significantly reduce ACh in mPFC/hippocampal extra-cellular fluid, but remarkably increase Ch, and constantly inhibit the recovery of ACh and Ch contents in mPFC/hippocampus. The synchronous perfusion of NaN3in rat mPFC and hippocampus can injure functions of the cholinergic nerve projection area, and cause the acute AD model with ACh and Ch metabolic disorders. This model can be used in pathogenetic and pharmacological studies.

  5. Extracellular vesicles in blood, milk and body fluids of the female and male urogenital tract and with special regard to reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B P; Balassa, T; Benen, T D; Dominovic, M; Elmadjian, G K; Florova, V; Fransolet, M D; Kestlerova, A; Kmiecik, G; Kostadinova, I A; Kyvelidou, C; Meggyes, M; Mincheva, M N; Moro, L; Pastuschek, J; Spoldi, V; Wandernoth, P; Weber, M; Toth, B; Markert, U R

    2016-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released from almost all cells and tissues. They are able to transport substances (e.g. proteins, RNA or DNA) at higher concentrations than in their environment and may adhere in a receptor-controlled manner to specific cells or tissues in order to release their content into the respective target structure. Blood contains high concentrations of EVs mainly derived from platelets, and, at a smaller amount, from erythrocytes. The female and male reproductive tracts produce EVs which may be associated with fertility or infertility and are released into body fluids and mucosas of the urogenital organs. In this review, the currently relevant detection methods are presented and critically compared. During pregnancy, placenta-derived EVs are dynamically detectable in peripheral blood with changing profiles depending upon progress of pregnancy and different pregnancy-associated pathologies, such as preeclampsia. EVs offer novel non-invasive diagnostic tools which may reflect the situation of the placenta and the foetus. EVs in urine have the potential of reflecting urogenital diseases including cancers of the neighbouring organs. Several methods for detection, quantification and phenotyping of EVs have been established, which include electron microscopy, flow cytometry, ELISA-like methods, Western blotting and analyses based on Brownian motion. This review article summarises the current knowledge about EVs in blood and cord blood, in the different compartments of the male and female reproductive tracts, in trophoblast cells from normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies, in placenta ex vivo perfusate, in the amniotic fluid, and in breast milk, as well as their potential effects on natural killer cells as possible targets.

  6. Present State and Future Developments in Mechatronics and it's Influence on Fluid Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Georg Kronborg; Zhou, Jianjun; Conrad, Finn

    1998-01-01

    with electronics, software and mechanics. This synergetic integration is often called Mechatronics.The topic which is rather widespread will be treated in three sections: I) General overview of mechatronics and fluid power. In this section the general trends of mechatronics in fluid power is considered by relating...... trends in the neighbouring fields of software and electronic hardware to fluid power developments. II) Mechatronic case stories from IKS In this section the results of a conceptual design study : "Design of a frequency converter based hydraulic power supply" is presented together with a more detailed...

  7. Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea from a Persistent Tympanomeningeal Fissure Presenting as Recurrent Serous Otitis Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakaryan, Arman; Poulsgaard, Lars; Hollander, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    We describe spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) otorrhea through a patent tympanomeningeal (Hyrtl) fissure presenting as recurrent serous otitis media. The CSF leak was observed when a drain was placed through the tympanic membrane by an otologist. The diagnosis was then confirmed by computed...

  8. The Drug-Drug Effects of Rhein on the Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Clozapine in Rat Brain Extracellular Fluid by In Vivo Microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Mei-Ling; Lin, Chi-Hung; Lin, Lie-Chwen; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-10-01

    Clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic agent, is highly effective in treatment-resistant schizophrenia; however, its major side effect is constipation. Instead of laxatives, rhein is a pharmacologically active component found in Rheum palmatum L., a medicinal herbal remedy for constipation. The purpose of this study is to determine whether rhein impacts the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of clozapine in brain when used to relieve clozapine-induced constipation. Here, we have investigated not only the PK of clozapine in blood but also the effects of rhein on the PK of clozapine in blood and in brain extracellular fluid together with the PD effects on neurotransmitters in extracellular fluid. The concentrations of clozapine and norclozapine in biologic samples were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The drug-drug effects of rhein on extracellular neurotransmitter efflux in the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) produced by clozapine were assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. The results demonstrate that the clozapine PK was nonlinear. Pretreatment with rhein for 7 days increased the total blood concentration of clozapine, but significantly reduced the unbound clozapine concentrations in the mPFC by approximately 3-fold. Furthermore, 7 days of rhein pretreatment thoroughly abolished the efflux of dopamine and its metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid) and altered the profile of homovanillic acid, another metabolite of dopamine, in the mPFC. In conclusion, rhein was found to substantially decrease clozapine and norclozapine concentrations in the mPFC dialysate, and this is accompanied by lower concentrations in the neurotransmitters in the same biophase. These findings suggest that a detailed clinical study for drug-drug interactions is recommended.

  9. Effects of Drilling Fluid Exposure to Oil and Gas Workers Presented with Major Areas of Exposure and Exposure Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Broni-Bediako

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drilling fluid is any fluid which is circulated through a well in order to remove cuttings from a wellbore. They are used broadly in the oil and gas industry, on exploration rigs, and are critical to ensuring a safe and productive oil or gas well. During drilling, a large volume of fluids are circulated through the well and into open, partially enclosed or completely enclosed systems at elevated temperatures. When these drilling fluids are agitated during circulating process there is significant potential for chemical exposure to workers and subsequent health effects. This study seeks to identify major areas of drilling fluid exposure and health hazard associated with the use of drilling fluid. The study also presents some challenges in setting drilling fluid exposure standard which has always not been given the same attention or concern as effects and risk management of drilling fluid. Some exposure indicators are also presented.

  10. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

  11. Increases in extracellular fluid glucose levels in the rat hippocampus following an anesthetic dose of pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; McNay, Ewan C; Gold, Paul E

    2005-02-15

    Using in vivo microdialysis, we examined glucose levels in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the hippocampus and in the blood prior to and during pentobarbital (45 mg/kg) or ketamine-xylazine (66 mg/kg, 7 mg/kg) anesthesia. Anesthesia with either pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine significantly increased hippocampal ECF glucose levels (mean peak increases of +71% and +85%, respectively). In addition, there were substantial increases in blood glucose levels (mean peak increases of +24% and +30%, respectively). The increased levels of hippocampal ECF glucose during anesthesia complement past evidence for decreases in ECF glucose in the hippocampus observed while rats perform a memory task sensitive to hippocampal damage, providing further support for the view that ECF glucose levels in the hippocampus are dynamically coupled to local neural activity.

  12. Delayed presentation of traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Richard A; Turner, Justin H

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is one of several complications that can occur after traumatic skull base injury. Although most patients present soon after the injury occurs, some can present years later, with resulting morbidity and the need for additional procedures. We present a case of a patient with a sphenoid sinus CSF leak who presented 12 years after a closed head injury that included a sphenoethmoid skull base fracture. We also reviewed the literature on this topic, with a discussion of previous reports of CSF leaks that occurred months, years, or decades after trauma. A late onset CSF leak appears to be a rare but important complication of traumatic skull base injury. This case highlights the need for clinicians to remain vigilant to the possibility of delayed CSF rhinorrhea, even years after traumatic head injury.

  13. Conditions of Mytilus edulis extracellular body fluids and shell composition in a pH-treatment experiment: Acid-base status, trace elements and δ11B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Agnes; Fietzke, Jan; Melzner, Frank; BöHm, Florian; Thomsen, JöRn; Garbe-SchöNberg, Dieter; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus edulis were cultured for 3 months under six different seawater pCO2 levels ranging from 380 to 4000 μatm. Specimen were taken from Kiel Fjord (Western Baltic Sea, Germany) which is a habitat with high and variable seawater pCO2 and related shifts in carbonate system speciation (e.g., low pH and low CaCO3 saturation state). Hemolymph (HL) and extrapallial fluid (EPF) samples were analyzed for pH and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) to calculate pCO2 and [HCO3-]. A second experiment was conducted for 2 months with three different pCO2 levels (380, 1400 and 4000 μatm). Boron isotopes (δ11B) were investigated by LA-MC-ICP-MS (Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) in shell portions precipitated during experimental treatment time. Additionally, elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF of specimen from the second experiment were measured via ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry). Extracellular pH was not significantly different in HL and EPF but systematically lower than ambient water pH. This is due to high extracellular pCO2 values, a prerequisite for metabolic CO2 excretion. No accumulation of extracellular [HCO3-] was measured. Elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF increased slightly with pH which is in accordance with increasing growth and calcification rates at higher seawater pH values. Boron isotope ratios were highly variable between different individuals but also within single shells. This corresponds to a high individual variability in fluid B/Ca ratios and may be due to high boron concentrations in the organic parts of the shell. The mean δ11B value shows no trend with pH but appears to represent internal pH (EPF) rather than ambient water pH.

  14. [Present status and trend of heart fluid mechanics research based on medical image analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jianhong; Yin, Lixue; Xie, Shenghua; Li, Wenhua; Lu, Jing; Luo, Anguo

    2014-06-01

    With introduction of current main methods for heart fluid mechanics researches, we studied the characteristics and weakness for three primary analysis methods based on magnetic resonance imaging, color Doppler ultrasound and grayscale ultrasound image, respectively. It is pointed out that particle image velocity (PIV), speckle tracking and block match have the same nature, and three algorithms all adopt block correlation. The further analysis shows that, with the development of information technology and sensor, the research for cardiac function and fluid mechanics will focus on energy transfer process of heart fluid, characteristics of Chamber wall related to blood fluid and Fluid-structure interaction in the future heart fluid mechanics fields.

  15. Present State and Future Developments in Mechatronics and it's Influence on Fluid Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Georg Kronborg; Zhou, Jianjun; Conrad, Finn

    1998-01-01

    This paper tries to sketch the outlines for the future of : Fluid Power Control under the influence of the rapid advances of computer hardware and software technologies. The influences, when they improve the performance of fluid power, are seen as a synergetic integration of fluid power...

  16. Wavelength dependent SHG imaging and scattering probes of extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Tilbury, Karissa B.; Campbell, Kirby R.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Manish

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most deadly gynecological cancer with a poor aggregate survival rate. To improve upon this situation, we utilized collagen-specific Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging microscopy and optical scattering measurements to probe structural differences in the extracellular matrix of normal stroma, benign tumors, endometrioid tumors, and low and high-grade serous (LGS and HGS) tumors. The SHG signatures of the emission directionality and conversion efficiency as well as the optical scattering are related to the organization of collagen on the sub-micron size. The wavelength dependence of these readouts adds additional characterization of the size and distribution of collagen fibrils/fibers relative to the interrogating wavelengths. We found strong wavelength dependent dependencies of these metrics that were different between the different tumors that are related to respective structural attributes in the collagen organization. These sub-resolution determinations are consistent with the dualistic classification of type I and II serous tumors. However, type I endometrioid tumors have strongly differing ECM architecture than the serous malignancies. Moreover, our analyses are further consistent with LGS and benign tumors having similar etiology. We identified optimal wavelengths for the SHG metrics as well as optical scattering measurements. The SHG metrics and optical scattering measurements were then used to form a linear discriminant model to classify the tissues, and we obtained high accuracy ( 90%) between the tissue types. This delineation is superior to current clinical performance and has potential applicability in supplementing histological analysis, understanding the etiology, as well as development of an in vivo screening tool.

  17. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  18. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about colloidal assemblies present in human intestinal fluids (HIFs), such as bile salt micelles and phospholipid vesicles, is regarded of importance for a better understanding of the in vivo dissolution and absorption behavior of poorly soluble drugs (Biopharmaceutics Classification...... distinct size fraction of colloidal assemblies, whereas FeSSIF contained 2 fractions of colloidal species with significantly different sizes. These size fractions likely represent (1) mixed taurocholate-phospholipid-micelles, as indicated by a size range up to 70 nm (in diameter) and a strong UV absorption...... sizes of approximately 50 and 200 nm, respectively (intensity-weighted mean diameter, Dz), likely representing mixed cholate/phospholipid micelles and phospholipid vesicles, respectively. The sizes of the smaller 2 fractions being below the size range of multiangle laser light scattering analysis (

  19. Adding "hemodynamic and fluid leads" to the ECG. Part I: the electrical estimation of BNP, chronic heart failure (CHF) and extracellular fluid (ECF) accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabal, Falko; Pichler, Georg P; Gratze, Gerfried; Holler, Albert

    2014-07-01

    In primary care the diagnosis of CHF and ECF accumulation is no triviality. We aimed to predict plasma BNP, CHF and ECF accumulation with segmental impedance spectroscopy while using and extending the electrodes of the conventional electrocardiography. Three combined multiple electrodes were added to the 15 lead ECG for segmental impedance spectroscopy and for measuring the maximal rate of segmental fluid volume change with heart action at the thorax and the legs. The obtained signals were analyzed by partial correlation analyses in comparison with plasma BNP, CHF classes, ejection fraction by echocardiography and cardiac index by double gas re-breathing. 119 subjects (34 healthy volunteers, 50 patients with CHF, NYHA classes II to IV and 35 patients without CHF) were investigated. The maximal rate of volume change with heart action at the thorax and at the legs, as well as the ECF/ICF ratio at the legs contribute equally and independently to the prediction of BNP and heart failure in an unknown test sample of 49 patients (multiple r=0.88, p400 pg/ml gave an AUC=0.93. The absence or the presence of heart failure could be predicted correctly by a binomial logistic regression in 92.9 and 87.5% of cases, respectively. The methodology, which is based on inverse coupling of BNP release and of maximal blood acceleration and on sensitive detection of ECF overload, could enable the diagnosis of CHF with useful sensitivity and specificity while writing a routine-ECG. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Presenting with Seizure due to Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Gokhan; Yaman, Mesut Emre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage may commonly occur during spinal surgeries and it may cause dural tears. These tears may result in hemorrhage in the entire compartments of the brain. Most common site of such hemorrhages are the veins in the cerebellar region. We report a case of hemorrhage, mimicking aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a cerebrospinal fluid leakage following lumbar spinal surgery and discuss the possible mechanisms of action.

  1. P- V- T properties of fluids in the system H 2O ± CO 2 ± NaCl: New graphical presentations and implications for fluid inclusion studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Philip E.; Lamb, William M.

    1989-06-01

    Understanding the role of fluids in geologic processes requires a knowledge of the P- V- T properties of fluids over a wide range of conditions. Comparisons of several published equations of state with available experimental data for fluids composed of H 2O and CO 2 lead to the conclusion that the hard-sphere modified Redlich-Kwong equation of state of Kerrick and Jacobs (1981) most accurately predicts the P- V- T properties in this binary system. To model the volumetric properties in the H 2OCO 2NaCl system a formulation is presented involving a linear (ideal) interpolation between a pure-CO 2 isochore predicted by the equation of state of Kerrick. and Jacobs (1981) and an H 2O-NaCl isochore predicted by an empirical equation derived from the regression of available P- V- T data for the H 2O-NaCl system. This formulation is applicable over a wide range of temperatures (>350°C) and pressures (2-10 kbars) and is especially suitable for high pressures and low-to-moderate temperatures (fluid densities ≥ 1.0 cm 3). Determination of the appropriate isochore for an H 2OCO 2NaCl fluid inclusion requires (1) the relative salinity (NaCl/H 2O + NaCl), (2) bulk density of the combined gas and liquid CO 2 phases, and (3) volume percent estimate of the aqueous p the total homogenization temperature. The commonly encountered problem of estimating the volume percents of phases in inclusions may be avoided in some applications, and several new P- X(CO 2) diagrams have been constructed and contoured with (a) the solvi in the mixed volatile system and (b) the measured density of the CO 2 phase. The effects of H 2OCO 2 clathrates during microthermometric observations in the laboratory are evaluated and in most instances can be minimized or avoided. Application of these results to fluid inclusion studies have led to improved determinations of (1) pressures and temperatures of fluid entrapment in a variety of geologic settings and (2) pressures and temperatures of

  2. IgA Complexes in Plasma and Synovial Fluid of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Induce Neutrophil Extracellular Traps via FcαRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleyd, Esil; Al, Marjon; Tuk, Cornelis W; van der Laken, Conny J; van Egmond, Marjolein

    2016-12-15

    Autoantibodies, including rheumatoid factor (RF), are an important characteristic of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, several studies reported a correlation between the presence of IgA autoantibodies and worse disease course. We demonstrated previously that triggering the IgA Fc receptor (FcαRI) on neutrophils results in neutrophil recruitment and the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Because this can lead to tissue damage, we investigated whether IgA immune complexes in plasma and synovial fluid of RA patients activate neutrophils. RF isotypes were measured with ELISA, and immune complexes were precipitated using polyethylene glycol 6000. Isolated neutrophils were incubated with immune complexes, and activation and release of NETs were determined in the presence or absence of FcαRI-blocking Abs. Plasma and SF of RA patients contained IgM, IgG, and IgA RFs. Patient plasma IgA RF and IgM RF showed a strong correlation. No uptake of IgM and minimal endocytosis of IgG immune complexes by neutrophils was observed, in contrast to avid uptake of IgA complexes. Incubation of neutrophils with immune complexes resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species, as well as the release of NETs, lactoferrin, and chemotactic stimuli. Importantly, activation of neutrophils was reduced when FcαRI was blocked. Neutrophils were activated by IgA immune complexes, which suggests that neutrophils play a role in inducing joint damage in RA patients who have IgA autoantibody complexes, thereby increasing the severity of disease. Blocking FcαRI inhibited neutrophil activation and, as such, may represent an additional attractive novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of RA.

  3. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology Workshop. Volume 1: Presentation material and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, John C. (Editor); Devol, William (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of the workshop was to identify future NASA needs for technology that will allow the management of subcritical cryogenic fluids in the low gravity space environment. Workshop participants were asked to identify those technologies which will require in-space experimentation and are thus candidates for inclusion in the flight experiment being defined at the Lewis Research Center.

  4. Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (EC deliver aerosol by heating fluid containing nicotine. Cartomizer EC combine the fluid chamber and heating element in a single unit. Because EC do not burn tobacco, they may be safer than conventional cigarettes. Their use is rapidly increasing worldwide with little prior testing of their aerosol.We tested the hypothesis that EC aerosol contains metals derived from various components in EC.Cartomizer contents and aerosols were analyzed using light and electron microscopy, cytotoxicity testing, x-ray microanalysis, particle counting, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.The filament, a nickel-chromium wire, was coupled to a thicker copper wire coated with silver. The silver coating was sometimes missing. Four tin solder joints attached the wires to each other and coupled the copper/silver wire to the air tube and mouthpiece. All cartomizers had evidence of use before packaging (burn spots on the fibers and electrophoretic movement of fluid in the fibers. Fibers in two cartomizers had green deposits that contained copper. Centrifugation of the fibers produced large pellets containing tin. Tin particles and tin whiskers were identified in cartridge fluid and outer fibers. Cartomizer fluid with tin particles was cytotoxic in assays using human pulmonary fibroblasts. The aerosol contained particles >1 µm comprised of tin, silver, iron, nickel, aluminum, and silicate and nanoparticles (<100 nm of tin, chromium and nickel. The concentrations of nine of eleven elements in EC aerosol were higher than or equal to the corresponding concentrations in conventional cigarette smoke. Many of the elements identified in EC aerosol are known to cause respiratory distress and disease.The presence of metal and silicate particles in cartomizer aerosol demonstrates the need for improved quality control in EC design and manufacture and studies on how EC aerosol impacts the health of users and bystanders.

  5. Commercial cow milk contains physically stable extracellular vesicles expressing immunoregulatory TGF-β.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartijn C H Pieters

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, have been identified in all biological fluids and rediscovered as an important part of the intercellular communication. Breast milk also contains extracellular vesicles and the proposed biological function is to enhance the antimicrobial defense in newborns. It is, however, unknown whether extracellular vesicles are still present in commercial milk and, more importantly, whether they retained their bioactivity. Here, we characterize the extracellular vesicles present in semi-skimmed cow milk available for consumers and study their effect on T cells.Extracellular vesicles from commercial milk were isolated and characterized. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles contained several immunomodulating miRNAs and membrane protein CD63, characteristics of exosomes. In contrast to RAW 267.4 derived extracellular vesicles the milk-derived extracellular vesicles were extremely stable under degrading conditions, including low pH, boiling and freezing. Milk-derived extracellular vesicles were easily taken up by murine macrophages in vitro. Furthermore, we found that they can facilitate T cell differentiation towards the pathogenic Th17 lineage. Using a (CAGA12-luc reporter assay we showed that these extracellular vesicles carried bioactive TGF-β, and that anti-TGF-β antibodies blocked Th17 differentiation.Our findings show that commercial milk contains stable extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, and carry immunoregulatory cargo. These data suggest that the extracellular vesicles present in commercial cow milk remains intact in the gastrointestinal tract and exert an immunoregulatory effect.

  6. Responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells to bacterial antigens and autologous antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, I S; Melief, M J; Swaak, T J; Severijnen, A J; Hazenberg, M P

    1993-01-01

    The specificity of T cells in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been the subject of much study. Bacterial antigens are suspect in the aetiology of rheumatic diseases. The responsiveness of the mononuclear cell fraction of peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with RA and of patients with rheumatic diseases other than RA to bacterial antigens such as cell wall fragments of the anaerobic intestinal flora, cell wall fragments of Streptococcus pyogenes, intestinal flora derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide complexes, the 65 kilodalton protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and muramyldipeptide was investigated. No significant difference in response was found to all these bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA compared with the responses in patients with other rheumatic diseases. The highest responsiveness in the synovial fluid of the patients with RA was to the streptococcal cell wall fragments and to the 65 kilodalton protein. Higher responses to several bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA were found compared with peripheral blood from the same patient group. The antigen presenting cell population of the synovial fluid in patients with RA and the patients with other rheumatic diseases was found to be stimulatory for autologous peripheral blood T cells even in the absence of antigen. This suggests an important role for the synovial antigen presenting cell in the aetiology of inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:8447692

  7. [The study of naphthyzin present in material evidence and biological fluids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, D B; Volchenko, S V; Novokshonova, N A; Kuklin, V N

    2013-01-01

    The optimal conditions for isolation of naphazoline from naphthyzin preparations and biological fluids with chloroform at pH 9.18 are described. The compound of interest was identified with the use of color and precipitation reactions, IR and UV spectroscopy, thin-layer and gas chromatography, and chemical methods including high performance liquid chromatography, chromatodensitometry, and UV spectroscopy. The results obtained by the three methods are comparable.

  8. Endoscopic endonasal repair of spontaneous sphenoid sinus lateral wall meningocele presenting with cerebrospinal fluid leak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Erdem Yildirim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous sphenoid sinus lateral wall meningoceles are rare lesions with an unknown etiology. Endoscopic endonasal technique is a considerable route in the treatment of this condition. The aim of this paper is to report the etiology, surgical technique, and outcome in a patient repaired via endoscopic endonasal approach. A 51-year-old male patient applied with rhinorrhea started three months ago after an upper respiratory infection. There were no history of trauma or sinus operation. Biochemical analysis of the fluid was positive for beta-2-transferrin. This asypthomatic patient had undergone for repairment of lateral sphenoid sinus meningocele with endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. After endoscopic endonasal meningocele closure procedure no complications occured and a quick recovery was observed. Endoscopic endonasal approach is an effective and safe treatment modality of spontaneous lateral sphenoid sinus meningoceles and efficient in anterior skull base reconstruction.

  9. Endoscopic endonasal repair of spontaneous sphenoid sinus lateral wall meningocele presenting with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldırım, Ali Erdem; Dıvanlıoglu, Denizhan; Cetinalp, Nuri Eralp; Belen, Ahmed Deniz

    2014-04-01

    Spontaneous sphenoid sinus lateral wall meningoceles are rare lesions with an unknown etiology. Endoscopic endonasal technique is a considerable route in the treatment of this condition. The aim of this paper is to report the etiology, surgical technique, and outcome in a patient repaired via endoscopic endonasal approach. A 51-year-old male patient applied with rhinorrhea started three months ago after an upper respiratory infection. There were no history of trauma or sinus operation. Biochemical analysis of the fluid was positive for beta-2-transferrin. This asypthomatic patient had undergone for repairment of lateral sphenoid sinus meningocele with endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. After endoscopic endonasal meningocele closure procedure no complications occured and a quick recovery was observed. Endoscopic endonasal approach is an effective and safe treatment modality of spontaneous lateral sphenoid sinus meningoceles and efficient in anterior skull base reconstruction.

  10. Fluid-Structure Interactions of the Mitral Valve and Left Heart: Comprehensive Strategies, Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Daniel R.; Del Pin, Facundo; Jiao, Xiangmin; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Kunzelman, Karyn S.; Cochran, Richard P.; Guccione, Julius M.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The remodeling that occurs after a posterolateral myocardial infarction can alter mitral valve function by creating conformational abnormalities in the mitral annulus and in the posteromedial papillary muscle, leading to mitral regurgitation (MR). It is generally assumed that this remodeling is caused by a volume load and is mediated by an increase in diastolic wall stress. Thus, mitral regurgitation can be both the cause and effect of an abnormal cardiac stress environment. Computational modeling of ischemic MR and its surgical correction is attractive because it enables an examination of whether a given intervention addresses the correction of regurgitation (fluid-flow) at the cost of abnormal tissue stress. This is significant because the negative effects of an increased wall stress due to the intervention will only be evident over time. However, a meaningful fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart is not trivial; it requires a careful characterization of the in-vivo cardiac geometry, tissue parameterization though inverse analysis, a robust coupled solver that handles collapsing Lagrangian interfaces, automatic grid-generation algorithms that are capable of accurately discretizing the cardiac geometry, innovations in image analysis, competent and efficient constitutive models and an understanding of the spatial organization of tissue microstructure. In this manuscript, we profile our work toward a comprehensive fluid-structure interaction model of the left heart by reviewing our early work, presenting our current work and laying out our future work in four broad categories: data collection, geometry, fluid-structure interaction and validation. PMID:20454531

  11. Surface presentation of biochemical cues for stem cell expansion - Spatial distribution of growth factors and self-assembly of extracellular matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingyu

    Despite its great potential applications to stem cell technology and tissue engineering, matrix presentation of biochemical cues such as growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) components remains undefined. This is largely due to the difficulty in preserving the bioactivities of signaling molecules and in controlling the spatial distribution, cellular accessibility, molecular orientation and intermolecular assembly of the biochemical cues. This dissertation comprises of two parts that focuses on understanding surface presentation of a growth factor and ECM components, respectively. This dissertation addresses two fundamental questions in stem cell biology using two biomaterials platforms. How does nanoscale distribution of growth factor impact signaling activation and cellular behaviors of adult neural stem cells? How does ECM self-assembly impact human embryonic stem cell survival and proliferation? The first question was addressed by the design of a novel quantitative platform that allows the control of FGF-2 molecular presentation locally as either monomers or clusters when tethered to a polymeric substrate. This substrate-tethered FGF-2 enables a switch-like signaling activation in response to dose titration of FGF-2. This is in contrast to a continuous MAPK activation pattern elicited by soluble FGF-2. Consequently, cell proliferation, and spreading were also consistent with this FGF-2 does-response pattern. We demonstrated that the combination of FGF-2 concentration and its cluster size, rather than concentration alone, serves as the determinants to govern its biological effect on neural stem cells. The second part of this dissertation was inspired by the challenge that hESCs have extremely low clonal efficiency and hESC survival is critically dependent on cell substrate adhesion. We postulated that ECM integrity is a critical factor in preventing hESC anchorage-dependent apoptosis, and that the matrix for feeder-free culture need to be properly

  12. A soluble, high-affinity, interleukin-4-binding protein is present in the biological fluids of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Botran, R.; Vitetta, E.S. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 4 (IL-4) play a key role in the regulation of immune responses, but little is known about how their multiple activities are regulated in vivo. In this report, we demonstrate that an IL-4-binding protein (IL-4BP) is constitutively present in the biological fluids of mice (serum, ascites fluid, and urine). Binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to the IL-4BP is specific and saturable and can be inhibited by an excess of unlabeled IL-4 but not IL-2. The IL-4BP binds IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 with an affinity similar to that reported for the cellular IL-4 receptor (K{sub d} {approx}7 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} M) and has a molecular mass of 30-40 kDa and pI values of 3.6-4.8. IL-4BP-containing biological fluids or purified IL-4BP competitively inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to mouse T or B cells and inhibit the biological activity of IL-4 but not IL-2. The serum levels of IL-4BP in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice are lower than those of normal mice. The above findings suggest that IL-4BP plays an important immunoregulatory role in vivo.

  13. Remediation of an Organic Fluid Present Below the Water Table by Steam Injection Above

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudbjerg, J.; Jensen, K. H.; Sonnenborg, T. O.

    2001-12-01

    Injection of steam in the subsurface has been utilized to remediate contaminated sites where nonaqeuous phase liquid (NAPL) was present both above and below the water table. Steam injection is efficient because the vapor pressure of contaminants increase dramatically with temperature. Futhermore, since two immiscible liquids will boil when the sum of their vapor pressures is equal to the surrounding pressure all NAPLs will start to boil below the boiling point of water. This may be a dominant mechanism for the mass transfer of NAPL into the steam zone. In many cases a steady-state steam zone will be present above a saturated zone containing NAPL, which then will be heated by conduction. At a certain temperature boiling will occur and due to bouyancy gas will be transported from the saturated zone into the steam zone. This mass transfer mechanism is orders of magnitude faster than diffusionevaporation. Two-dimensional experiments in a sand box with the interior dimensions 122 \\times 58 \\times 8.5 cm were carried out to investigate this mechanism. The sand box was packed with a low permeable bottom layer and a high permeable top layer. TCE was injected at the top of the low permeable layer, which prevented it from further downward migration. The water table was located in the high permeable layer above the contaminant. Steam was injected in the left hand side of the sand box and effluent gasses were extracted at the right hand side. A steady-state steam zone formed in the top of the high permeable layer and the saturated zone below was only heated by conduction. When the temperature in the contaminated area reached approximately 74 oC boiling of TCE and water occured and the vapors were transported up in the unsaturated steam zone. This could be registered from the outflow of steam where separate phase TCE appeared in the condenser. The experiment was modeled using the numerical code T2VOC, which simulates multidimensional, non-isothermal, multiphase flow and

  14. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  15. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique Freire Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This dossier focuses on one of the essential debate topics today about the territorial dimension of the new development strategies concerned with the worsening of the global socioecological crisis, that is: the challenges related to the activation and integration in networks of localized agri-food systems. For its composition, some contributions presented and debated during the VI International Conference on Localized Agri-food System - The LAFS facing the opportunities and challenges of the new global context have been gathered. The event took place in the city of Florianópolis, from May 21th to 25th of 2013. The event was promoted by the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC and by the Center for the International Cooperation on Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD. Besides UFSC and CIRAD, EPAGRI, State University of Santa Catarina (UDESC, as well as research institutes and universities from other states (UFMG, IEA/SP, UFS, UFRGS and Mexican and Argentinian partners from the RED SIAL Latino Americana also participated in the organization of lectures, discussion tables and workshops.

  16. Presentation

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    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  17. Presentation

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    Helmut Renders

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present to our esteemed readers the second edition of our journal for 2008. We have chosen the theme “The life and work of Prof. Dr. Jürgen Moltmann” as its special emphasis. It is our way to pay homage to J. Moltmann in the year the Universidade Metodista de São Paulo awards him an honorary Doctor Honoris Causa degree. Sincethe seventies, Moltmann and Latin America have been in dialog. In his emblematic work “A Theology of Liberation”, Gustavo Gutiérrez, the Catholic, discussed with Moltmann, the Reformed, the relationship between eschatology and history (GUTIÉRREZ, Gustavo.Teologia da Libertação. 5ª edição. Petrópolis, RJ: Vozes, 1985, p. 27, 137-139. A dialog held in the premises of IMS, which nowadays is called UMESP, has produced the little book “Passion for life” (MOLTMANN, Jürgen. Paixão pela vida. São Paulo, SP: ASTE - Associaçãode Seminários Teológicos Evangélicos, 1978.In the following years, the wide theological work of J. Moltmann went all the way from debates to congresses and has conquered the classrooms. Most probably, J. Moltmann is nowadays the most widely read European author in Brazilian theological seminaries. Thisrecognition can only be held in unison and the wide response to our request for articles confirms the huge repercussion that Moltmann’s work has been having up to today in Brazil. The ecumenical theologian J. Moltmann is ecumenically read. We believe that thisway we may be better equipped to answer to anyone who asks us for the reason there is hope in us. We have organized the articles on J. Moltmann’s theology according to the original publication date of the books dealt with in each essay. We also communicate that some articles which were originally requested for this edition of the journal will be published in the journal Estudos de Regilião in May 2009.As it is usual with the journal Caminhando, we have, besides this thematic emphasis, yet other contributions in the areas of

  18. Presentation

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    Nicanor Lopes

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Journal Caminhando debuts with a new editorial format: eachmagazine will have a Dossier.In 2010 Christianity celebrated the centenary of Edinburgh. TheWorld Missionary Conference in Edinburgh in 1910 is regarded by manyas missiological watershed in the missionary and ecumenical movement.So the Faculty of Theology of the Methodist Church (FATEO decidedto organize a Wesleyan Week discussing the issue of mission. For anevent of this magnitude FATEO invited the Rev. Dr. Wesley Ariarajah,Methodist pastor and teacher of Sri Lanka with extensive experience inpastoral ministry in local churches and professor of History of Religionsand the New Testament at the Theological College of Lanka, maintainedby the Protestant Churches in Sri Lanka. In 1981 he was invited to jointhe World Council of Churches, where he presided for over ten years theCouncil of Interreligious Dialogue. From 1992 he served as Deputy GeneralSecretary of the WCC.The following texts are not the speeches of the Rev. Dr. WesleyAriarajah, for they will be published separately. Nevertheless, the journaldialogs with the celebrations of the centenary of Edinburgh, parting formthe intriguing theme: "Mission in the 21st century in Brazil". After all, howis it that mission takes place among us in personal, church, and communityactivities?Within the Dossier, as common to the journal, the textos are organizedas follows: Bible, Theology / History and Pastoral Care. Other items thatdo not fit within the Dossier, but, do articulate mission, can be found inthe section Declarations and Documents and Book Reviews.The authors of the Dossier have important considerations in buildinga contemporary missiological concept considering Brazilian reality.Anderson de Oliveira, in the Bible-Section, presents a significantexegeses of Matthew 26.6-13. What does it mean when Jesus is quotedwith the words: "For the poor always ye have with you, but me ye havenot always." Is this declaration challenging the gospels

  19. Inhibition of Brain Swelling after Ischemia-Reperfusion by β-Adrenergic Antagonists: Correlation with Increased K+ and Decreased Ca2+ Concentrations in Extracellular Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infarct size and brain edema following ischemia/reperfusion are reduced by inhibitors of the Na+, K+, 2Cl−, and water cotransporter NKCC1 and by β1-adrenoceptor antagonists. NKCC1 is a secondary active transporter, mainly localized in astrocytes, driven by transmembrane Na+/K+ gradients generated by the Na+,K+-ATPase. The astrocytic Na+,K+-ATPase is stimulated by small increases in extracellular K+ concentration and by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Larger K+ increases, as occurring during ischemia, also stimulate NKCC1, creating cell swelling. This study showed no edema after 3 hr medial cerebral artery occlusion but pronounced edema after 8 hr reperfusion. The edema was abolished by inhibitors of specifically β1-adrenergic pathways, indicating failure of K+-mediated, but not β1-adrenoceptor-mediated, stimulation of Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 transport during reoxygenation. Ninety percent reduction of extracellular Ca2+ concentration occurs in ischemia. Ca2+ omission abolished K+ uptake in normoxic cultures of astrocytes after addition of 5 mM KCl. A large decrease in ouabain potency on K+ uptake in cultured astrocytes was also demonstrated in Ca2+-depleted media, and endogenous ouabains are needed for astrocytic K+ uptake. Thus, among the ionic changes induced by ischemia, the decrease in extracellular Ca2+ causes failure of the high-K+-stimulated Na+,K+-ATPase/NKCC1 ion/water uptake, making β1-adrenergic activation the only stimulus and its inhibition effective against edema.

  20. Demonstration of extracellular peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using a novel assay for citrullination of fibrinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Senolt, Ladislav; Nielsen, Michael Friberg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Members of the peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) family catalyse the posttranslational conversion of peptidylarginine to peptidylcitrulline. Citrullination of proteins is well described in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and hypercitrullination of proteins may be related to inflammation...... in general. PAD activity has been demonstrated in various cell lysates, but so far not in synovial fluid. We aimed to develop an assay for detection of PAD activity, if any, in synovial fluid from RA patients. METHODS: An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human fibrinogen as the immobilized substrate...... for citrullination and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen antibody as the detecting agent were used for measurement of PAD activity in synovial fluid samples from five RA patients. The concentrations of PAD2 and calcium were also determined. RESULTS: Approximately 150 times lower levels of recombinant human PAD2 (rhPAD2...

  1. Human α-amylase present in lower-genital-tract mucosal fluid processes glycogen to support vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Gregory T; French, Audrey L; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Sullivan, Thomas H; Spear, William W; Landay, Alan; Micci, Sandra; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacillus colonization of the lower female genital tract provides protection from the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and from adverse pregnancy outcomes. While glycogen in vaginal epithelium is thought to support Lactobacillus colonization in vivo, many Lactobacillus isolates cannot utilize glycogen in vitro. This study investigated how glycogen could be utilized by vaginal lactobacilli in the genital tract. Several Lactobacillus isolates were confirmed to not grow in glycogen, but did grow in glycogen-breakdown products, including maltose, maltotriose, maltopentaose, maltodextrins, and glycogen treated with salivary α-amylase. A temperature-dependent glycogen-degrading activity was detected in genital fluids that correlated with levels of α-amylase. Treatment of glycogen with genital fluids resulted in production of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, the major products of α-amylase digestion. These studies show that human α-amylase is present in the female lower genital tract and elucidates how epithelial glycogen can support Lactobacillus colonization in the genital tract.

  2. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  3. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  4. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shin-Ichiro; Drummen, Gregor P C; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-02-06

    Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs), like a "message in a bottle" to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  5. Fluid Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; Liu, J.; Macias, B.; Martin, D. S.; Minkoff, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Sargsyan, A.; Smith, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  6. Differential decolorization of textile dyes in mixtures and the joint effect of laccase and cellobiose dehydrogenase activities present in extracellular extracts from Funalia trogii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilli, Silvia; Ciullini, Ilaria; Scozzafava, Andrea; Briganti, Fabrizio

    2011-10-10

    The largest part of the bio-decolorization investigations have been performed to date on a single dye without exploring the behavior in complex mixtures as the real dyeing baths. Therefore, mixtures of dyes belonging to azo and anthraquinonic classes, chosen among the most utilized in textile wool dyeing, were employed for comparative enzymatic decolorization studies using the extracellular extracts from the white rot fungus Funalia trogii, to understand how the concomitant presence of more than one dye could influence their degradation course and yield. Fungal extracts containing laccase activity only were capable to partially decolorize dyes mixtures from the different classes analyzed. The deconvolution of the decolorization with time allowed to monitor the degradation of the single dyes in the mixtures evidencing a time dependent differential decolorization not observed for the singles alone. Some dyes in the blend were in fact decolorized only when the most easily converted dyes were largely transformed. These experiments would allow to help the dyeing factories in the selection of the most readily degraded dyes. Since F. trogii grown on different media and activators shows diverse levels of expression of the redox enzymes laccase and cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH), the dyes mixtures recalcitrant to decolorization by laccase activity alone, were subjected to the combined action of extracts containing laccase and CDH. The use of CDH, in support to the activity of laccase, resulted in substantial decolorization increases (>84%) for all the refractory dyes mixtures.

  7. The effect of anhydrite saturation on the fate of sulfur during fluid-present melting of subducting basaltic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jego, S.; Dasgupta, R.

    2012-12-01

    The apparent sulfur enrichment of sub-arc mantle is thought to derive from an oxidized downgoing slab, and it has been suggested that the slab-derived sulfate species is responsible for oxidizing the mantle wedge [1]. However, the conditions and extent of sulfur transfer from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge are poorly understood. In particular, the relative mobility of sulfur as a function of oxygen fugacity (fO2) is unconstrained at sub-arc depths. To add to our recent study on sulfur mobility during fluid-present melting of a sulfide-bearing basaltic crust [2], here we constrain the fate of sulfur during similar melting at relatively oxidizing conditions, i.e., at sulfate saturation. Experiments were performed using a piston cylinder device at P = 2-3 GPa, T = 950-1050 °C. A synthetic MORB + 6.8 wt.% H2O doped with 1 wt% S (added as pyrite) was contained in AuPd inner capsules and hematite-magnetite (HM: ~FMQ+3.9 to +4.6) mixture used as fO2 buffer was housed in Pt outer capsules, following the recently proposed design of ref. [3]. Sulfur concentration in quenched silicate glasses, the major element phase compositions, and fO2 of the experiments based on dissolved Fe contents in AuPd and added Pt sensor [4, 5], were determined using EPMA. All experiments contain silicate melt, cpx, garnet, anhydrite, rutile and/or Ti-magnetite, and are fluid saturated. The partial melt compositions are rhyolitic to rhyodacitic with increasing T and melting degree. Sulfur contents in the melt range from ~700 to 3000 ppm, and increase with increasing P and T, in agreement with published SCAS models [6, 7]. Mass balance calculations show that the proportion of sulfur dissolved in silicate melt can be >13% of the bulk sulfur at 1050 °C. However, at slab surface (arc source mantle, instead of ~1 wt.% fluid in reducing conditions [2]. Experiments at lower temperatures (800-900 °C) and fO2s intermediate between ~FMQ and FMQ+4, using NixPd1-x-NiO alloy buffers, are underway

  8. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain isolated from cerebrospinal fluid from a patient presenting myelopathy post infectious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, T M; Theotonio, G; Paulino, R S; Benega, M A; Silva, D B B; Borborema, S E T; Ikeda, T I; Kisielius, J J; Ueda, M; Oliveira, M I; Santos, C L S

    2013-09-01

    Neurological involvement during influenza infection has been described during epidemics and is often consistent with serious sequelae or death. To investigate the etiologic agent involved in myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. This investigation focuses on virus isolation from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collected from a 19-year-old male student presenting with clinical diagnosis of myelopathy post influenza-like syndrome. To achieve this goal, different cell cultures and molecular methodologies were carried out. Influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was isolated in MDCK cell culture; virus particles were observed under electron microscopy. Phylogenetics analyses showed that the Brazilian influenza A(H3N2) strains were closely related to the A/Perth/16/2009-like. This study demonstrates that influenza virus A(H3N2) strain was the cause of illness of the students. According to the Brazilian influenza virus sentinel surveillance data A/Perth/16/2009-LIKE (H3N2) strain has predominated during the 2010 influenza virus season in Brasília-DF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diazepam-binding inhibitor. A brain neuropeptide present in human spinal fluid: studies in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaccia, M L; Costa, E; Ferrero, P; Guidotti, A; Roy, A; Sunderland, T; Pickar, D; Paul, S M; Goodwin, F K

    1986-12-01

    Diazepam-binding inhibitor is a novel peptide purified to homogeneity from rat and human brain. Diazepam-binding inhibitor is present, though not exclusively, in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons where it is believed to inhibit GABAergic neurotransmission mediated by GABA by binding to the benzodiazepine-GABA receptor complex. Since an impairment of central GABAergic tone has been postulated to be associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, we measured human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suffering from endogenous depression, schizophrenia, and dementia of the Alzheimer's type. Patients with major depression had significantly higher concentrations of human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in CSF when compared with age- and sex-matched normal volunteers, while no difference in CSF diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity was found in schizophrenics or patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type when compared with controls. The possibility is discussed that the increased CSF human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity observed in depressed patients may represent a functional disinhibition of GABAergic neurotransmission associated with depression.

  10. Filamentation and spatiotemporal distribution of extracellular polymeric substances: role on X.fastidiosa single cell adhesion and biofilm formation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janissen, Richard; Murillo, Duber M.; Niza, Barbara; Sahoo, Prasana K.; Monteiro, Moniellen P.; César, Carlos L.; Carvalho, Hernandes F.; de Souza, Alessandra A.; Cotta, Monica A.

    2016-04-01

    Biofilms can be defined as a community of microorganisms attached to a surface, living embedded in a self- produced matrix of hydrated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which comprises most of the biofilm mass. We have recently used an extensive pool of microscopy techniques (confocal fluorescence, electron and scanning probe microscopies) at the micro and nanoscales in order to create a detailed temporal observation of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation, using both wild type strain and Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-modified cells of this citrus phytopathogen. We have identified three different EPS compositions, as well as their spatial and temporal distribution from single cell to mature biofilm formation stages. In the initial adhesion stage, soluble-EPS (S-EPS) accumulates at cell polar regions and forms a surface layer which facilitates irreversible cell attachment and cell cluster formation. These small clusters are subsequently connected by filamentous cells; further S-EPS surface coverage facilitates cell attachment and form filaments, leading to a floating framework of mature biofilms. The important role of EPS in X.fastidiosa biology was further investigated by imunolabelling experiments to detect the distribution of XadA1 adhesin, which is expressed in early stages of biofilm formation and released in outer membrane vesicles. This protein is located mainly in S-EPS covered areas, as well as on the filaments, indicating a molecular pathway to the enhanced cell attachment previously observed. These results suggest that S-EPS may thus represent an important target for disease control, slow plant colonization by the bacteria, keeping the plant more productive in the field.

  11. Overview of Chronic Oral Toxicity Values for Chemicals Present in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids, Flowback and Produced Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    as part of EPA's Hydraulic Fracturing Drinking Water Assessment, EPA is summarizing existing toxicity data for chemicals reported to be used in hydraulic fracturing fluids and/or found in flowback or produced waters from hydraulically fractured wells

  12. Measurement of the ratio of glomerular filtration rate to plasma volume from the technetium-99m diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid renogram: comparison with glomerular filtration rate in relation to extracellular fluid volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Allison, H. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)); Ussov, W.Yu. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    We describe a technique which does not require a blood sample, is already normalised for plasma volume and uses the robust Patlak plot for measuring renal uptake. The rate of kidney uptake, dR(t)/dt, at time = 0, as a fraction of the injected dose, is equal to the fraction of the plasma volume (PV) filtered per minute, i.e. IKGFR/PV. The gradient dR(0)/dt cannot be accurately measured directly but is equal to [[alpha] . LV(0)], where [alpha] is the renal uptake constant (proportional to IKGFR) and LV is the count rate over a left ventricular ROI. LV(0) was obtained by extrapolation of LV(t), while [alpha] is the slope of the Patlak plot up to 3 min. GFR/PV (i.e. right plus left kidneys) in patients with normal renal function was about 0.04 min[sup -1], as would be expected from normal values of GFR (120 ml/min) and plasma volume (3 l). GFR/PV correlated significantly with the ratio of GFR to extracellular fluid volume (ECV), measured from the terminal exponential of the plasma clearance curve (GFR/PV = 3.2.GFR/ECV + 5.3 ml/min/l [r = 0.82, n = 82]). GFR/PV (r = 0.74) and GFR/ECV (r = 0.82) both correlated inversely and non-linearly with plasma creatinine in 43 studies where the measurement was made within 1 week of the [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA study. They also correlated significantly with the plasma cyclosporin trough level in 14 patients with dermatomyositis on the 30 occasions when this measurement was made within 1 week of the renogram (r = -0.38, P < 0.05 for GFR/PV and r = -0.77, P < 0.001 for GFR/ECV). The ratio of GFR/PV to GFR/ECV is the ratio of extracellular fluid volume to plasma volume, and this was 4.0 (SD 0.99). We conclude that both GFR/PV and GFR/ECV can be easily measured with [sup 99m]Tc-DTPA and are physiologically valid expressions of GFR. (orig./MG)

  13. 1997 to Present: Quality and Versatile Access to the Deep Biosphere with Coupled Advanced CORKs and Fluid Pumping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, J. P.; Lin, H.; Jungbluth, S.; Hsieh, C.; Rappe, M.; Glazer, B. T.; Matzinger, M.; Becker, K.; Fisher, A. T.; Amend, J. P.; Johnson, H. P.

    2011-12-01

    In 1997, a simple 'BioColumn' sampler was coupled to the CORK observatory at borehole 1026B to sample fluid chemistry, biomass and microbial community diversity (16S rRNA). The results demonstrated that the 65oC fluids from the 3.5 My old sediment-buried ocean basement support a diverse Bacteria and Archaea community (Cowen et al. 2003, Science 299, 120-123). The large bore of the overpressured CORK body provided high unassisted flow rates through the BioColumn, but possessed the disadvantage of the unknown extent to which the basement fluids were altered by the chemically and biologically (e.g., biofilm community) reactive surface of CORK's steel pipe. Subsequently, new generations of CORKs have incorporated less reactive materials in the CORK body, the use of stainless steel or inert PVDF (Teflon-like) 0.5" ID fluid delivery lines (FDL) running continuously from basement depths to accessible ports at the seafloor, and multiple FDLs from distinct depth horizons within basement. Simultaneously, we have developed increasingly capable fluid sensor and sampling systems for both real-time (Mobile Pumping and Sampling System-MPSS) and long-term autonomous applications (GeoMICROBE sleds). Both incorporate strong efficient pumps to overcome the drag inherent in the 0.5" or smaller bore FDL, multiple sensors (e.g., flow rate, temperature, O2, pH and redox-voltametry chemistry), versatile multi-port large volume fluid collection and/or in situ filtration systems, integrating computer controller/software and non-contaminating (inert) plumbing. These combined developments now provide unparalleled opportunities for access to large volumes of pristine basement samples for geochemical and microbial ecology studies. The MPSS and GeoMICROBE will be described. The multi-year results of organic geochemical and microbial community studies from recent studies at CORK observatories (boreholes 1301A, 1362A 1362B) on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank will be summarized.

  14. Extracellular RNAs: development as biomarkers of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph F. Quinn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten ongoing studies designed to test the possibility that extracellular RNAs may serve as biomarkers in human disease are described. These studies, funded by the NIH Common Fund Extracellular RNA Communication Program, examine diverse extracellular body fluids, including plasma, serum, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. The disorders studied include hepatic and gastric cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, neurodegenerative disease, brain tumours, intracranial haemorrhage, multiple sclerosis and placental disorders. Progress to date and the plans for future studies are outlined.

  15. Fluid-present disequilibrium melting in Neoarchean arc-related migmatites of Daeijak Island, western Gyeonggi Massif, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuyoung; Cho, Moonsup

    2013-10-01

    The melting process of meta-igneous rocks was investigated via field, petrographic and geochemical analyses of the Neoarchean (~ 2.51 Ga) migmatite complex in Daeijak Island, western Gyeonggi Massif. This complex consists primarily of garnet-free amphibolites and tonalitic migmatites, both of which contain hornblende, plagioclase and quartz as major constituents. Neosomes and leucosomes in the migmatite have dioritic-tonalitic and tonalitic-trondhjemitic compositions, respectively. Compositions of hornblende (XFe = 0.39-0.42) and plagioclase (An24-27) vary little between the neosomes and leucosomes. The amphibolites show distinct depletions in Nb, Ta, Zr, and Ti relative to large ion lithophile elements, suggesting an arc-related origin for their basaltic protolith. Leucosomes have lower contents of K2O, MgO, FeO*, TiO2, Zr, Rb, and rare earth elements (REE) than amphibolites and neosomes, but are higher in SiO2, Na2O, and Sr contents. Leucosomes and neosomes have positive [(Eu/Eu*)N = 1.32-7.26] and negative (0.71-0.97) Eu anomalies, respectively, which are attributed to the variable degree of plagioclase fractionation during the partial melting. The P-T condition for the migmatite formation was estimated to be ~ 700-730 °C and 4.7-5.5 kbar, primarily based on the hornblende-plagioclase thermobarometry and phase equilibria. Various lines of textural evidence, such as the channel flow of melt along migmatitic layers and the segregation of melt into shear bands or boudin necks suggest a syn-deformation crystallization of melt. Chemical disequilibrium in migmatites is documented not only by petrographic and geochemical data but also by the REE modeling between melt product and source rock. Disequilibrium process is most likely attributed to the rapidity of melt extraction or migration, compared to chemical diffusion rate. In summary, the fluid-present disequilibrium melting of dioritic-tonalitic protoliths has produced tonalitic-trondhjemitic leucosomes in a dynamic

  16. Identification of extracellular and intracellular signaling components of the mammary adipose tissue and its interstitial fluid in high risk breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J.E.; Cabezón, T.; Gromov, P.

    2005-01-01

    carcinoma cells. Very little is known, however, about which factors adipocytes produce that may orchestrate these actions and how this may come about. In an effort to shed some light on these questions, we present here a detailed proteomic analysis, using two-dimensional gel-based technology, mass...... proteins were identified, including numerous signaling molecules, hormones, cytokines, and growth factors, involved in a variety of biological processes such as signal transduction and cell communication; energy metabolism; protein metabolism; cell growth and/or maintenance; immune response; transport...... of their molecular cellular circuitry. In addition, the results open new possibilities to the study of obesity, which has a strong association with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and coronary heart disease. © 2005 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc....

  17. Fluid Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2001-01-01

    Fluid interaction, interaction by the user with the system that causes few breakdowns, is essential to many user interfaces. We present two concrete software systems that try to support fluid interaction for different work practices. Furthermore, we present specificity, generality, and minimality...... as design goals for fluid interfaces....

  18. Smart fast blood counting of trace volumes of body fluids from various mammalian species using a compact custom-built microscope cytometer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Gao, Tingjuan; Lin, Tzu-Yin; Carrade-Holt, Danielle; Lane, Stephen M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Dwyre, Denis M.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Cell counting in human body fluids such as blood, urine, and CSF is a critical step in the diagnostic process for many diseases. Current automated methods for cell counting are based on flow cytometry systems. However, these automated methods are bulky, costly, require significant user expertise, and are not well suited to counting cells in fluids other than blood. Therefore, their use is limited to large central laboratories that process enough volume of blood to recoup the significant capital investment these instruments require. We present in this talk a combination of a (1) low-cost microscope system, (2) simple sample preparation method, and (3) fully automated analysis designed for providing cell counts in blood and body fluids. We show results on both humans and companion and farm animals, showing that accurate red cell, white cell, and platelet counts, as well as hemoglobin concentration, can be accurately obtained in blood, as well as a 3-part white cell differential in human samples. We can also accurately count red and white cells in body fluids with a limit of detection ~3 orders of magnitude smaller than current automated instruments. This method uses less than 1 microliter of blood, and less than 5 microliters of body fluids to make its measurements, making it highly compatible with finger-stick style collections, as well as appropriate for small animals such as laboratory mice where larger volume blood collections are dangerous to the animal's health.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is present in the cerebrospinal fluid of a majority of infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Keys, B; Albert, J; Hagberg, L; Lundeberg, J; Uhlén, M; Fenyö, E M; Norkrans, G

    1992-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from 63 patients with different severities of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection, including asymptomatic virus carriers, were examined for the presence of HIV-1 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and virus isolation. Polyadenylated RNA, presumably associated with virus particles, was extracted and reverse transcribed, and the pol region was amplified in a nested PCR. Virus could be detected in 90% of the CSF specimens examined by PCR, and data on isolation of virus from CSF were in agreement with these figures. In fact, when several CSF specimens from the same individual were studied, HIV-1 could be isolated from 80% of the patients. The presence of the viral RNA in CSF was independent of the clinical stage of infection and of neurological symptoms. These results show that the spread of HIV-1 to the brain represents an early event during infection and occurs in the majority of asymptomatic individuals. PMID:1629333

  20. Interaction of uranium(VI) with bioligands present in human biological fluids. The case study of urea and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, A.A.A.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2013-05-01

    The complexation of uranium(VI) with bioligands found in human biological fluids, viz, urea and uric acid in aqueous solutions, has been investigated using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at room temperature, I = 0.1 M (NaClO4) and pH (3 for uric acid; 4 for urea). In both complex systems a static quench effect with increasing ligand concentration and no peaks shift upon complexation were observed. With uranium(VI) both ligands formed a fairly weak 1:1 complex with average stability constants of log {beta}{sub 110} = 4.67 {+-} 0.29 for uric acid and log {beta}{sub 110} = 3.79 {+-} 0.15 and 2.12 {+-} 0.18 for relatively low and relatively high urea concentrations, respectively. Application of the newly generated data on the U(VI) speciation modelling in biofluids, e.g., human urine was also discussed.

  1. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  2. Refrigerating fluids; Fluides frigorigenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-03-01

    Refrigerating fluids are experiencing a real revolution since few years. CFCs with their destructive effect on the ozone layer are now prohibited while HCFCs will be progressively eliminated and replaced by HFCs. However, HFCs can contribute to the increase of the greenhouse effect. The solutions proposed by thermal engineering professionals consist in the confinement of air-conditioning installations (elimination of recurrent leaks) and in the improvement of installations efficiency. HCFC fluids like the R 22 are still widely used in air-conditioning but they are supposed to be replaced by HFC fluids like the R 134a, the R 407C or the R 410A. This short paper gives a brief presentation of these fluids and of their chemical characteristics. (J.S.)

  3. Regulation of CFTR chloride channel macroscopic conductance by extracellular bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Song; Holstead, Ryan G; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The CFTR contributes to Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ transport across epithelial cell apical membranes. The extracellular face of CFTR is exposed to varying concentrations of Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ in epithelial tissues, and there is evidence that CFTR is sensitive to changes in extracellular anion concentrations. Here we present functional evidence that extracellular Cl⁻ and HCO₃⁻ regulate anion conduction in open CFTR channels. Using cell-attached and inside-out patch-clamp recordings from constitutively active mutant E1371Q-CFTR channels, we show that voltage-dependent inhibition of CFTR currents in intact cells is significantly stronger when the extracellular solution contains HCO₃⁻ than when it contains Cl⁻. This difference appears to reflect differences in the ability of extracellular HCO₃⁻ and Cl⁻ to interact with and repel intracellular blocking anions from the pore. Strong block by endogenous cytosolic anions leading to reduced CFTR channel currents in intact cells occurs at physiologically relevant HCO₃⁻ concentrations and membrane potentials and can result in up to ∼50% inhibition of current amplitude. We propose that channel block by cytosolic anions is a previously unrecognized, physiologically relevant mechanism of channel regulation that confers on CFTR channels sensitivity to different anions in the extracellular fluid. We further suggest that this anion sensitivity represents a feedback mechanism by which CFTR-dependent anion secretion could be regulated by the composition of the secretions themselves. Implications for the mechanism and regulation of CFTR-dependent secretion in epithelial tissues are discussed.

  4. Autonomic Neuropathy and Albuminocytologic Dissociation in Cerebrospinal Fluid As the Presenting Features of Primary Amyloidosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePrimary amyloidosis is a disease with a poor prognosis and multi-organ involvement. Here, we report the clinical and pathological features of a patient with primary amyloidosis featuring autonomic neuropathy as the initial symptom and albuminocytologic dissociation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF.MethodsThe patient was a 60-year-old Chinese male with numbness, orthostatic hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. For diagnosis, we performed an electromyogram (EMG, lumbar puncture, Bence Jones protein urine test, serum electrophoresis blood test, sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies, transthyretin (TTR gene sequencing, and bone marrow puncture.ResultsCongo red staining of sural nerve and rectal membrane biopsies showed amyloid deposition and apple-green birefringence was visualized under polarized light microscopy. TTR gene sequencing showed no causative mutation. Following lumbar puncture, normal CSF cell counts and elevated CSF protein concentration (1,680 mg/L were detected. Bone marrow puncture showed that out of the total number of whole blood cells, 0.56% were abnormal plasma cells and that 87.4% of the total number of plasma cells were abnormal. EMG results showed mixed peripheral nerve damage predominately in the sensory nerve fibers.ConclusionObvious symptoms of neuropathy, particularly autonomic neuropathy, albuminocytologic dissociation, and organ function damage suggested a diagnosis of amyloidosis. In such patients, neurologists should use caution to differentiate between chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, primary amyloidosis, and familial amyloid neuropathy.

  5. Fluid-present melting of sulfide-bearing ocean-crust: Experimental constraints on the transport of sulfur from subducting slab to mantle wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégo, Sébastien; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2013-06-01

    To constrain the sulfur enrichment of arc magma source-regions and the agent of sulfur transport from subducting slab to mantle wedge, here we report experimental measurements of sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) of slab-derived hydrous partial melts at 2.0 and 3.0 GPa and from 800 to 1050 °C, using Ni-NiO (NNO) and Co-CoO (CCO) external oxygen fugacity (fO2) buffers. A synthetic H2O-saturated MORB with 1 wt.% S (added as pyrite) was used as starting material. All experiments produced pyrrhotite- and fluid-saturated assemblages of silicate glass, clinopyroxene, garnet, quartz, and rutile (plus amphibole at 2 GPa/800 °C and phengite at 3 GPa/850 °C). The silicate partial melt composition evolves from rhyolitic to rhyodacitic compositions with increasing temperature and melting degree in equilibrium with an eclogitic residue, showing substantial decrease in SiO2 and Mg# and increase in FeOT, TiO2 and Na2O. At all temperatures melt sulfur concentrations are very low, with an average of 110 ± 50 ppm S, similar to previous measurements at lower pressures. Melt SCSS appears to be mainly controlled by the melt composition, the activity of water, aH2O and the sulfur fugacity, fS2 (calculated from the composition of pyrrhotite). Mass-balance calculations show that the proportion of bulk sulfur dissolved in the silicate melt is negligible (<0.005 wt.% of the bulk sulfur). In contrast, diminishing proportion of pyrrhotite with increasing temperature suggests that the fluid phase at equilibrium may contain as much as 10-15 wt.% S at ⩾1050 °C, and more than 40 wt.% of the bulk sulfur initially present in the slab may be transferred to the aqueous fluid. Our data also suggest that fluid/melt sulfur partitioning increases with increasing temperature, from ˜300 at 900 °C to ˜1200 at 1050 °C, whereas pressure appears to have less of an effect. With respect to fO2, no real difference of fluid/melt S partitioning, within data uncertainties, between NNO and CCO at

  6. Characterisation of Antigen B Protein Species Present in the Hydatid Cyst Fluid of Echinococcus canadensis G7 Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folle, Ana Maite; Kitano, Eduardo S.; Lima, Analía; Gil, Magdalena; Cucher, Marcela; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Iwai, Leo K.; Rosenzvit, Mara; Batthyány, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The larva of cestodes belonging to the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato (s.l.) complex causes cystic echinococcosis (CE). It is a globally distributed zoonosis with significant economic and public health impact. The most immunogenic and specific Echinococcus-genus antigen for human CE diagnosis is antigen B (AgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the hydatid cyst fluid (HF). The AgB protein moiety (apolipoprotein) is encoded by five genes (AgB1-AgB5), which generate mature 8 kDa proteins (AgB8/1-AgB8/5). These genes seem to be differentially expressed among Echinococcus species. Since AgB immunogenicity lies on its protein moiety, differences in AgB expression within E. granulosus s.l. complex might have diagnostic and epidemiological relevance for discriminating the contribution of distinct species to human CE. Interestingly, AgB2 was proposed as a pseudogene in E. canadensis, which is the second most common cause of human CE, but proteomic studies for verifying it have not been performed yet. Herein, we analysed the protein and lipid composition of AgB obtained from fertile HF of swine origin (E. canadensis G7 genotype). AgB apolipoproteins were identified and quantified using mass spectrometry tools. Results showed that AgB8/1 was the major protein component, representing 71% of total AgB apolipoproteins, followed by AgB8/4 (15.5%), AgB8/3 (13.2%) and AgB8/5 (0.3%). AgB8/2 was not detected. As a methodological control, a parallel analysis detected all AgB apolipoproteins in bovine fertile HF (G1/3/5 genotypes). Overall, E. canadensis AgB comprised mostly AgB8/1 together with a heterogeneous mixture of lipids, and AgB8/2 was not detected despite using high sensitivity proteomic techniques. This endorses genomic data supporting that AgB2 behaves as a pseudogene in G7 genotype. Since recombinant AgB8/2 has been found to be diagnostically valuable for human CE, our findings indicate that its use as antigen in immunoassays could contribute to false negative results in

  7. Proximal subcutaneous migration of the distal end of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt presenting with recurrent cerebrospinal fluid galactorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maknojia, Asif; Caron, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    The authors report an unusual case of recurrent proximal migration of the distal end of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter presenting as CSF galactorrhea. The authors review the pertinent literature and discuss the possible causes as well as techniques to prevent a similar occurrence.

  8. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  9. Hydrodynamics and convection enhanced macromolecular fluid transport in soft biological tissues: Application to solid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bibaswan; Sekhar, G P Raja

    2016-04-21

    This work addresses a theoretical framework for transvascular exchange and extravascular transport of solute macromolecules through soft interstitial space inside a solid tumor. Most of the soft biological tissues show materialistic properties similar to deformable porous material. They exhibit mechanical behavior towards the fluid motion since the solid phase of the tumor tissue gets compressed by the drag force that is associated with the extracellular fluid flow. This paper presents a general view about the transvascular and interstitial transport of solute nutrients inside a tumor in the macroscopic level. Modified Starling׳s equation is used to describe transvascular nutrient transport. On the macroscopic level, motion of extracellular fluid within the tumor interstitium is modeled with the help of biphasic mixture theory and a spherical symmetry solution is given as a simpler case. This present model describes the average interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), extracellular fluid velocity (EFV) and flow rate of extracellular fluid, as well as the deformation of the solid phase of the tumor tissue as an immediate cause of extracellular fluid flow. When the interstitial transport is diffusion dominated, an analytical treatment of advection-diffusion-reaction equation finds the overall nutrient distribution. We propose suitable criteria for the formation of necrosis within the tumor interstitium. This study introduces some parameters that represent the nutrient supply from tumor blood vessels into the tumor extracellular space. These transport parameters compete with the reversible nutrient metabolism of the tumor cells present in the interstitium. The present study also shows that the effectiveness factor corresponding to a first order nutrient metabolism may reach beyond unity if the strength of the distributive solute source assumes positive non-zero values.

  10. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  11. Haemodynamic imaging of thoracic stent-grafts by computational fluid dynamics (CFD): presentation of a patient-specific method combining magnetic resonance imaging and numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midulla, Marco; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre [University Hospital of Lille, Cardiovascular Radiology, Lille (France); Moreno, Ramiro; Rousseau, Herve [Rangueil University Hospital, Radiology, Toulouse (France); University of Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, INSERM/UMR 1048 Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Toulouse (France); Baali, Adil; Negre-Salvayre, Anne [University of Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, INSERM/UMR 1048 Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases, Toulouse (France); Chau, Ming [ASA, Advanced Solutions Accelerator, University of Toulouse 3 Paul Sabatier, Montpellier (France); Nicoud, Franck [University Montpellier II - CNRS UMR 5149 I3M, CC 051, Montpellier (France); Haulon, Stephan [University Hospital of Lille, Vascular Surgery, Lille (France)

    2012-10-15

    In the last decade, there was been increasing interest in finding imaging techniques able to provide a functional vascular imaging of the thoracic aorta. The purpose of this paper is to present an imaging method combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain a patient-specific haemodynamic analysis of patients treated by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). MRI was used to obtain boundary conditions. MR angiography (MRA) was followed by cardiac-gated cine sequences which covered the whole thoracic aorta. Phase contrast imaging provided the inlet and outlet profiles. A CFD mesh generator was used to model the arterial morphology, and wall movements were imposed according to the cine imaging. CFD runs were processed using the finite volume (FV) method assuming blood as a homogeneous Newtonian fluid. Twenty patients (14 men; mean age 62.2 years) with different aortic lesions were evaluated. Four-dimensional mapping of velocity and wall shear stress were obtained, depicting different patterns of flow (laminar, turbulent, stenosis-like) and local alterations of parietal stress in-stent and along the native aorta. A computational method using a combined approach with MRI appears feasible and seems promising to provide detailed functional analysis of thoracic aorta after stent-graft implantation. (orig.)

  12. Present Situation of the Treatment of Shale Gas Fracturing Flowback Fluid%页岩气返排液处理现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建勋

    2016-01-01

    页岩气作为一种清洁、低碳、高储量的非常规天然气,已成为未来天然气资源的新宠儿。但是目前其开发方式是水力压裂,该法在开发过程中会产生组分复杂的压裂液返排液。针对制约页岩气勘探开发的压裂返排液处理技术,系统梳理了国内外真对压裂返排液组成及处理技术的现状并通过与美国等发达国家技术的对比对我国未来页岩气发展进行了展望。%Shale gas as a clean and low carbon unconventional natural gas with high reserve has become a new darling of natural gas resources. But at present, its development mode is hydraulic fracturing, which can produce complex fracturing fluid in the process of development. In this paper, composition and treatment technologies of shale gas fracturing flowback fluid at home and abroad were discussed, and domestic treatment technology was compared with those of the United States and other developed countries. At last, future development trend of shale gas in China was prospected.

  13. Extracellular membrane vesicles in blood products-biology and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilija Krstova Krajnc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular membrane vesicles are fragments shed from plasma membranes off all cell types that are undergoing apoptosis or are being subjected to various types of stimulation or stress.  Even in the process of programmed cell death (apoptosis, cell fall apart of varying size vesicles. They expose phosphatidylserine (PS on the outer leaflet of their membrane, and bear surface membrane antigens reflecting their cellular origin. Extracellular membrane vesicles have been isolated from many types of biological fluids, including serum, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, saliva, tears and conditioned culture medium. Flow cytometry is one of the many different methodological approaches that have been used to analyze EMVs. The method attempts to characterize the EMVs cellular origin, size, population, number, and structure. EMVs are present and accumulate in blood products (erythrocytes, platelets as well as in fresh frozen plasma during storage. The aim of this review is to highlight the importance of extracellular vesicles as a cell-to-cell communication system and the role in the pathogenesis of different diseases. Special emphasis will be given to the implication of extracellular membrane vesicles in blood products and their clinical relevance. Although our understanding of the role of  EMVs in disease is far from comprehensive, they display promise as biomarkers for different diseases in the future and also as a marker of quality and safety in the quality control of blood products.

  14. Diversity of extracellular vesicles in human ejaculates revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna L. Höög

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human ejaculates contain extracellular vesicles (EVs, that to a large extent are considered to originate from the prostate gland, and are often denominated “prostasomes.” These EVs are important for human fertility, for example by promoting sperm motility and by inducing immune tolerance of the female immune system to the spermatozoa. So far, the EVs present in human ejaculate have not been studied in their native state, inside the seminal fluid without prior purification and isolation procedures. Using cryo-electron microscopy and tomography, we performed a comprehensive inventory of human ejaculate EVs. The sample was neither centrifuged, fixed, filtered or sectioned, nor were heavy metals added. Approximately 1,500 extracellular structures were imaged and categorized. The extracellular environment of human ejaculate was found to be diverse, with 5 major subcategories of EVs and 6 subcategories of extracellular membrane compartments, including lamellar bodies. Furthermore, 3 morphological features, including electron density, double membrane bilayers and coated surface, are described in all subcategories. This study reveals that the extracellular environment in human ejaculate is multifaceted. Several novel morphological EV subcategories are identified and clues to their cellular origin may be found in their morphology. This inventory is therefore important for developing future experimental approaches, and to interpret previously published data to understand the role of EVs for human male fertility.

  15. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...... of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...... reveals that the shear thickening fluid shows an instability in a shear flow for some regime and exhibits the shear thickening oscillation (i.e., the oscillatory shear flow alternating between the thickened and the relaxed states). The results of numerical simulations are presented for one- and two...

  16. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the extracellular DNA delivered to the nucleus of a living cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogachev Sergei S

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The blood plasma and other intertissue fluids usually contain a certain amount of DNA, getting there due to a natural cell death in the organism. Cells of this organism can capture the extracellular DNA, whereupon it is delivered to various cell compartments. It is hypothesized that the extracellular DNA is involved in the transfer of genetic information and its fixation in the genome of recipient cell. Results The existence of an active flow of extracellular DNA into the cell is demonstrated using human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7 cells as a recipient culture. The qualitative state of the DNA fragments delivered to the main cell compartments (cytoplasm and interchromosomal fraction was assessed. The extracellular DNA delivered to the cell is characterized quantitatively. Conclusion It is demonstrated that the extracellular DNA fragments in several minutes reach the nuclear space, where they are processed so that their linear size increases from about 500 bp to 10,000 bp. The amount of free extracellular DNA fragments simultaneously present in the nuclear space may reach up to 2% of the haploid genome. Using individual DNA fragments with a known molecular weight and sequence as an extracellular DNA, it is found that these fragments degrade instantly in the culture liquid in the absence of a competitor DNA and are delivered into the cell as degradants. When adding a sufficient amount of competitor DNA, the initial undegraded molecules of the DNA fragments with the known molecular weight and sequence are detectable both in the cytoplasm and nuclear space only at the zero point of experiments. The labeled precursor α-dNTP*, added to culture medium, was undetectable inside the cell in all the experiments.

  17. Protein Dynamics in the Plant Extracellular Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Pinheiro, Carla; Chaves, Inês; Barros, Danielle R.; Ricardo, Cândido P.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular space (ECS or apoplast) is the plant cell compartment external to the plasma membrane, which includes the cell walls, the intercellular space and the apoplastic fluid (APF). The present review is focused on APF proteomics papers and intends to draw information on the metabolic processes occurring in the ECS under abiotic and biotic stresses, as well as under non-challenged conditions. The large majority of the proteins detected are involved in “cell wall organization and biogenesis”, “response to stimulus” and “protein metabolism”. It becomes apparent that some proteins are always detected, irrespective of the experimental conditions, although with different relative contribution. This fact suggests that non-challenged plants have intrinsic constitutive metabolic processes of stress/defense in the ECS. In addition to the multiple functions ascribed to the ECS proteins, should be considered the interactions established between themselves and with the plasma membrane and its components. These interactions are crucial in connecting exterior and interior of the cell, and even simple protein actions in the ECS can have profound effects on plant performance. The proteins of the ECS are permanently contributing to the high dynamic nature of this plant compartment, which seems fundamental to plant development and adaptation to the environmental conditions. PMID:28248232

  18. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  19. Mixing and turbulent mixing in fluids, plasma and materials: summary of works presented at the 3rd International Conference on Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Serge; Keane, Christopher J.; Niemela, Joseph J.; Abarzhi, Snezhana I.

    2013-07-01

    Mixing and turbulent mixing are non-equilibrium processes that occur in a broad variety of processes in fluids, plasmas and materials. The processes can be natural or artificial, their characteristic scales can be astrophysical or atomistic, and energy densities can be low or high. Understanding the fundamental aspects of turbulent mixing is necessary to comprehend the dynamics of supernovae and accretion discs, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, mantle-lithosphere tectonics and volcanic eruptions, atmospheric and oceanographic flows in geophysics, and premixed and non-premixed combustion. It is crucial for the development of the methods of control in technological applications, including mixing mitigation in inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, and mixing enhancement in reactive flows, as well as material transformation under the action of high strain rates. It can improve our knowledge of realistic turbulent processes at low energy density involving walls, unsteady transport, interfaces and vortices, as well as high energy density hydrodynamics including strong shocks, explosions, blast waves and supersonic flows. A deep understanding of mixing and turbulent mixing requires one to go above and beyond canonical approaches and demands further enhancements in the quality and information capacity of experimental and numerical data sets, and in the methods of theoretical analysis of continuous dynamics and kinetics. This has the added potential then of bringing the experiment, numerical modelling, theoretical analysis and data processing to a new level of standards. At the same time, mixing and turbulent mixing being one of the most formidable and multi-faceted problems of modern physics and mathematics, is well open for a curious mind. In this article we briefly review various aspects of turbulent mixing, and present a summary of over 70 papers that were discussed at the third International Conference on 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2011, that

  20. Evaluation of solubility in simulated lung fluid of metals present in the sludge from a metallurgical industry to produce metallic zinc; Avaliacao da solubilidade em liquido pulmonar simulado dos metais presentes no rejeito gerado por uma industria metalurgica de zinco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Rosilda Maria Gomes de

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the solubility parameters (rapid and slow dissolution rates, rapid and slow dissolution fractions) metal particles present in a pile of sludge accumulated under exposure to weathering from the Cia Mercantil Inga, located at the Ilha da Madeira, Sepetiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro. Plant samples collected in the neighboring of the pile and bioindicators placed in the region and collected after some months indicated that the inhabitants of Ilha da Madeira have been exposed to trace elements such zinc, cadmium, mercury and lead, produced during the processing of zinc minerals (hemimorphite - Zn{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}.H{sub 2}O, and willemite - Zn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}). A static dissolution test in vitro was used to determine the solubility parameters using a simulated lung fluid (SLF), on a time basis ranging from 10 min to 1 year. The metal concentrations in the sludge samples and in the SLF were determined using Particle Induced X-rays Emission (PIXE). In conclusion, this study confirms the harmful effects on the neighboring population of the airborne particles containing these metals that came from the sludge. The solubility parameters obtained for Zn, Cd, Cr, Ni and Mn present in the rapid dissolution fraction in SLF were 0.945; 0.473; 0.226; 0.300 and 0.497, respectively, and the corresponding times for half life of dissolution of the rapid fraction were f{sub r} = 2.082 days; f{sub r} = 0.09 days; f{sub r} = 0.37 days; f{sub r} = 0.332 days ad f{sub r} = 0.99 days; for the slow dissolution fraction times were f{sub r} = 146.95 days; f{sub r} = 63 days; f{sub r} = 86.64 days; f{sub r} = 79.66 days and f{sub r} = 59.84 days. These values indicate that these metals present a moderate absorption level in SLF, and may be classified as M type, according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The use of solubility parameters allowed a better description of the kinetic behaviour of the sludge in

  1. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  2. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  3. BK polyomavirus with archetypal and rearranged non-coding control regions is present in cerebrospinal fluids from patients with neurological complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-Panero, Ana; Echevarría, Juan E; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Fedele, Giovanni; Royuela, Enrique; Gerits, Nancy; Moens, Ugo

    2012-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) has recently been postulated as an emerging opportunistic pathogen of the human central nervous system (CNS), but it is not known whether specific strains are associated with the neurotropic character of BKPyV. The presence of BKPyV large T-antigen DNA was examined in 2406 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from neurological patients with suspected JC polyomavirus infection. Twenty patients had a large T-antigen DNA-positive specimen. The non-coding control region (NCCR) of the BKPyV strains amplified from CSF from these 20 patients, strains circulating in renal and bone marrow transplant recipients and from healthy pregnant women was sequenced. The archetypal conformation was the most prevalent in all groups and 14 of the neurological patients harboured archetypal strains, while the remaining six patients possessed BKPyV with rearranged NCCR similar to previously reported variants from non-neurological patients. Transfection studies in Vero cells revealed that five of six early and four of six late rearranged promoters of these CSF isolates showed significantly higher activity than the corresponding archetypal promoter. From seven of the neurological patients with BKPyV DNA-positive CSF, paired serum samples were available. Five of them were negative for BKPyV DNA, while serum from the remaining two patients harboured BKPyV strains with archetypal NCCR that differed from those present in their CSF. Our results suggest that NCCR rearrangements are not a hallmark for BKPyV neurotropism and the dissemination of a rearranged NCCR from the blood may not be the origin of BKPyV CNS infection.

  4. Smoking is associated with increased levels of extracellular peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PAD2) in the lungs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Friberg Bruun Nielsen, Michael; Quisgaard Gaunsbaek, Maria

    2015-01-01

    lavage (BAL) fluid from smokers, but intracellularly located PAD cannot be responsible for citrullination of extracellular self-antigens. We aimed to establish a link between smoking and extracellular PAD2 in the lungs. METHODS: BAL fluid samples were obtained from 13 smokers and 11 nonsmoking controls...... fluids from smokers as compared to non-smokers (p=0.018). The PAD2 content correlated with the overall CRP levels (p=0.009) and cell count (p=0.016). CONCLUSIONS: This first demonstration of increased levels of extracellular PAD2 in the lungs of smokers supports the hypothesis that smoking promotes...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of anaplastic intraventricular meningioma: report of a case presenting with progressive brainstem dysfunction and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Motoki; Takanashi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Manami; Wada, Kei-ichiro; Machida, Yutaka; Kondo, Akihide; Hattori, Nobutaka; Miwa, Hideto

    2016-05-31

    It is extremely rare to see cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of intraventricular meningioma, particularly with the development of acute, progressive brainstem/cerebellar dysfunction with an absence of mass formation in the corresponding anatomical sites. An 81-year-old man was admitted because of double vision, right facial nerve palsy and truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed normal findings except for a tumor mass in the left lateral ventricle, which had been noted over 6 months previously. The patient developed hiccups, hyperventilation, and drowsiness, which worsened progressively, and did not respond to corticosteroid or intraventricular immunoglobulin therapy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed a mild elevation of protein, and cytology was negative. The patient died and an autopsy was performed. Postmortem investigation disclosed a malignant transformation of benign fibroid meningioma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of the malignant cells, diversely involving the surface of brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cords, secondarily resulting in extensive ischemia in the brain parenchyma by vessel occlusion. If a patient with an intraventricular tumor develops acute, progressive neurological symptoms, the possibility that it is be caused by cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of tumor cells, after malignant transformation, should be considered.

  6. Blackened bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in crack smokers. A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenebaum, E; Copeland, A; Grewal, R

    1993-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed on heavily pigmented pulmonary cytologic specimens from 14 hospital patients to determine the clinical features distinguishing these cases. The lavage fluid or sputum in each case was turbid and gray or black, exceeding the blackness usually seen in heavy tobacco smokers dwelling in the same urban environment. Excessive carbonaceous material was observed in the cytoplasm of pulmonary alveolar macrophages or the extracellular compartment of the smears. The latter feature is not seen in cigarette smokers. Many other pigmentary sources were ruled out, including melanin, hemosiderin, medicinal charcoal, India ink, and hematoxylin crystals. The common feature of the patients was that they recently or currently smoked the crack form of cocaine heavily; five patients also had positive toxicologic results for cocaine at admission. The authors suggest that blackened bronchoalveolar lavage fluid indicates the possibility of crack cocaine smoking and the associated sequelae, particularly when the carbonaceous material is present in the extracellular compartment.

  7. Biogenesis, delivery, and function of extracellular RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G. Patton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium was launched by the National Institutes of Health to focus on the extent to which RNA might function in a non-cell-autonomous manner. With the availability of increasingly sensitive tools, small amounts of RNA can be detected in serum, plasma, and other bodily fluids. The exact mechanism(s by which RNA can be secreted from cells and the mechanisms for the delivery and uptake by recipient cells remain to be determined. This review will summarize current knowledge about the biogenesis and delivery of exRNA and outline projects seeking to understand the functional impact of exRNA.

  8. Space Station fluid management logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Sam M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on space station fluid management logistics are presented. Topics covered include: fluid management logistics - issues for Space Station Freedom evolution; current fluid logistics approach; evolution of Space Station Freedom fluid resupply; launch vehicle evolution; ELV logistics system approach; logistics carrier configuration; expendable fluid/propellant carrier description; fluid carrier design concept; logistics carrier orbital operations; carrier operations at space station; summary/status of orbital fluid transfer techniques; Soviet progress tanker system; and Soviet propellant resupply system observations.

  9. Neutrophils cast extracellular traps in response to protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abi Abdallah, Delbert S; Denkers, Eric Y

    2012-01-01

    Release of extracellular traps by neutrophils is a now well-established phenomenon that contributes to the innate response to extracellular bacterial and fungal pathogens. The importance of NETs during protozoan infection has been less explored, but recent findings suggest an emerging role for release of neutrophil-derived extracellular DNA in response to this class of microbial pathogens. The present review summarizes findings to date regarding elicitation of NETs by Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Eimeria bovis, and Leishmania spp.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  11. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona

    2013-01-01

    their phenotype and determine their concentration in biological fluids. To identify circulating as well as cell culture-derived vesicles, the current standard is immunoblotting or a flow cytometrical analysis for specific proteins, both of which requires large amounts of purified vesicles....

  12. Wide-field synovial fluid imaging using polarized lens-free on-chip microscopy for point-of-care diagnostics of gout (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yibo; Lee, Seung Yoon; Zhang, Yun; Furst, Daniel; Fitzgerald, John; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Gout and pseudogout are forms of crystal arthropathy caused by monosodium urate (MSU) and calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate (CPPD) crystals in the joint, respectively, that can result in painful joints. Detecting the unique-shaped, birefringent MSU/CPPD crystals in a synovial fluid sample using a compensated polarizing microscope has been the gold-standard for diagnosis since the 1960's. However, this can be time-consuming and inaccurate, especially if there are only few crystals in the fluid. The high-cost and bulkiness of conventional microscopes can also be limiting for point-of-care diagnosis. Lens-free on-chip microscopy based on digital holography routinely achieves high-throughput and high-resolution imaging in a cost-effective and field-portable design. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, polarized lens-free on-chip imaging of MSU and CPPD crystals over a wide field-of-view (FOV ~ 20.5 mm2, i.e., slide, after which a quarter-wave-plate and an angle-mismatched linear polarizer are used to analyze the transmitted light. Two lens-free holograms of the MSU/CPPD sample are taken, with the sample rotated by 90°, to rule out any non-birefringent objects within the specimen. A phase-recovery algorithm is also used to improve the reconstruction quality, and digital pseudo-coloring is utilized to match the color and contrast of the lens-free image to that of a gold-standard microscope image to ease the examination by a rheumatologist or a laboratory technician, and to facilitate computerized analysis.

  13. Electric fluid pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  14. 多药转运蛋白对匹罗卡品癫(癎)大鼠模型脑内拉莫三嗪浓度的影响%Impact of multi-drug transporters on regulation of concentration of lamotrigine in hippocampal extracellular fluid in rat after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马爱梅; 张守文; 刘玉玺; 胡风云

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of multi-drug transporters including P-glycoprotein (PGP) and multi-drug resistance associated protein (MRP) on concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid in hippocampus of epilepsy rat models induced by pilocarpine, and to deduce the multi-drug resistance mechanisms in refractory epilepsy. Methods The epilepsy rat models were established by repeated administration (by ip) of pilocarpine. A microdialysis probe was placed into the hippocampus of the epileptic rats and dialysate was collected at five time-points from 30--150 minutes after systemic injections of lamotrigine (10 mg/kg). The concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid in the hippocampus was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Then PGP inhibitor verapamil and MRP inhibitor probenecid was added individually through microdialysis probe and the concentration of lamotrigine was detected again. Results Compared with control group (0. 41 ± 0. 10 in 60 minutes, 0. 50 ±0.04 in 90 minutes, 0. 39 ±0. 09 in 120 minutes and 0. 30±0.06 in 150 minutes), verapamil significantly increased the concentration of lamotrigine in extracellular fluid of the hippocampus 60--150 minutes (0. 65 ±0. 11, 0. 84 ± 0. 09, 0. 70± 0. 09 and 0. 58 ± 0. 08 respectively) after injection (F value were 5.01, 8.61, 10. 23 and 7.89, all P < 0. 05) and probenecid also enhanced the concentration of lamotrigine 90--150 minutes (0. 75 ± 0. 09, 0. 58±0. 10 and 0. 49±0. 07) after injection (F = 6. 58, 4. 56, 4. 75, all P < 0. 05). Conclusions Penetration of lamotrigine through blood-brain barrier in pilocarpine induced epilepsy rats is restricted by PGP and MRP, resulting in decreased concentration of lamotrigine in the extracellular fluid of the hippocampus. Therefore, increasing expression of PGP and MRP in brains of epilepsy patients might be an important mechanism involved in multi-drug resistance in refractory epilepsy.%目的 观察多药转运蛋

  15. Effects of fluid resuscitation with colloids vs crystalloids on mortality in critically ill patients presenting with hypovolemic shock: the CRISTAL randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annane, Djillali; Siami, Shidasp; Jaber, Samir; Martin, Claude; Elatrous, Souheil; Declère, Adrien Descorps; Preiser, Jean Charles; Outin, Hervé; Troché, Gilles; Charpentier, Claire; Trouillet, Jean Louis; Kimmoun, Antoine; Forceville, Xavier; Darmon, Michael; Lesur, Olivier; Reignier, Jean; Régnier, Jean; Abroug, Fékri; Berger, Philippe; Clec'h, Christophe; Cle'h, Christophe; Cousson, Joël; Thibault, Laure; Chevret, Sylvie

    2013-11-06

    Evidence supporting the choice of intravenous colloid vs crystalloid solutions for management of hypovolemic shock remains unclear. To test whether use of colloids compared with crystalloids for fluid resuscitation alters mortality in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with hypovolemic shock. A multicenter, randomized clinical trial stratified by case mix (sepsis, trauma, or hypovolemic shock without sepsis or trauma). Therapy in the Colloids Versus Crystalloids for the Resuscitation of the Critically Ill (CRISTAL) trial was open label but outcome assessment was blinded to treatment assignment. Recruitment began in February 2003 and ended in August 2012 of 2857 sequential ICU patients treated at 57 ICUs in France, Belgium, North Africa, and Canada; follow-up ended in November 2012. Colloids (n = 1414; gelatins, dextrans, hydroxyethyl starches, or 4% or 20% of albumin) or crystalloids (n = 1443; isotonic or hypertonic saline or Ringer lactate solution) for all fluid interventions other than fluid maintenance throughout the ICU stay. The primary outcome was death within 28 days. Secondary outcomes included 90-day mortality; and days alive and not receiving renal replacement therapy, mechanical ventilation, or vasopressor therapy. Within 28 days, there were 359 deaths (25.4%) in colloids group vs 390 deaths (27.0%) in crystalloids group (relative risk [RR], 0.96 [95% CI, 0.88 to 1.04]; P = .26). Within 90 days, there were 434 deaths (30.7%) in colloids group vs 493 deaths (34.2%) in crystalloids group (RR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86 to 0.99]; P = .03). Renal replacement therapy was used in 156 (11.0%) in colloids group vs 181 (12.5%) in crystalloids group (RR, 0.93 [95% CI, 0.83 to 1.03]; P = .19). There were more days alive without mechanical ventilation in the colloids group vs the crystalloids group by 7 days (mean: 2.1 vs 1.8 days, respectively; mean difference, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.09 to 0.48] days; P = .01) and by 28 days (mean: 14

  16. Extraction and Characterization of Extracellular Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications from Arabidopsis thaliana Suspension Cell Cultures and Seedlings: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Ghahremani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins secreted by plant cells into the extracellular space, consisting of the cell wall, apoplastic fluid, and rhizosphere, play crucial roles during development, nutrient acquisition, and stress acclimation. However, isolating the full range of secreted proteins has proven difficult, and new strategies are constantly evolving to increase the number of proteins that can be detected and identified. In addition, the dynamic nature of the extracellular proteome presents the further challenge of identifying and characterizing the post-translational modifications (PTMs of secreted proteins, particularly glycosylation and phosphorylation. Such PTMs are common and important regulatory modifications of proteins, playing a key role in many biological processes. This review explores the most recent methods in isolating and characterizing the plant extracellular proteome with a focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, highlighting the current challenges yet to be overcome. Moreover, the crucial role of protein PTMs in cell wall signalling, development, and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress is discussed.

  17. Extracellular proteins limit the dispersal of biogenic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, J.W.; Weber, P.K.; Martin, M.C.; Gilbert, B.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Banfield, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution secondary ion microprobe spectrometry, synchrotron radiation-based Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and polyacrylamide gel analysis demonstrated the intimate association of proteins with spheroidal aggregates of biogenic zinc sulfide nanocrystals, an example of extracellular biomineralization. Experiments involving synthetic zinc sulfide nanoparticles and representative amino acids indicated a driving role for cysteine in rapid nanoparticle aggregation. These findings suggest that microbially derived extracellular proteins can limit the dispersal of nanoparticulate metal-bearing phases, such as the mineral products of bioremediation, that may otherwise be transported away from their source by subsurface fluid flow.

  18. Amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carefully. Removing a sample of the fluid through amniocentesis can provide information about the sex, health, and development of the fetus. Images Amniocentesis Amniotic fluid Polyhydramnios Amniotic fluid References Cunningham FG, ...

  19. Multiple isoforms of the tumor protein p73 are expressed in the adult human telencephalon and choroid plexus and present in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Socorro, Alfredo; Pueyo Morlans, Mercedes; Suarez Sola, Maria Luisa; Gonzalez Delgado, Francisco J; Castañeyra-Perdomo, Agustin; Marin, Maria C; Meyer, Gundela

    2006-04-01

    p73, a homolog of the p53 tumor suppressor, codes for full-length transactivating (TA) and N-terminally truncated (DeltaN) isoforms, with pro- and anti-apoptotic activities, respectively. We examined the expression of the main p73 isoforms in adult human and mouse telencephalon and choroid plexus by immunohistochemistry on paraffin sections, and immunoblotting (IB) of tissue extracts and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), using antibodies against different protein domains. Cortical neurons expressed TAp73 predominantly in the cytoplasm and DeltaNp73 mainly in the nucleus, with partial overlap in the cytoplasm. Highest expression was found in the hippocampus. IB showed an array of TAp73 variants in adult human cortex and hippocampus. IB of human choroid plexus and CSF using TAp73-specific antibodies revealed the presence of a approximately 90-kDa protein whose molecular weight was reduced after N-deglycosylation, suggesting that glycosylated TAp73 is exported into the CSF. In the mouse, high expression of TAp73 was also detected in the subcommissural organ (SCO), an ependymal gland absent in adult humans. TAp73 colocalized with anti-fibra-Reissner-antibody (AFRU), which is a marker of Reissner's fiber, the secreted SCO product. p73-deficient mice had generalized cortical hypoplasia and hydrocephalus; in addition, we observed a dramatic size reduction of the choroid plexus. However, the SCOs were apparently unaltered and continued to secrete Reissner's fiber. Our findings point to complex and widespread p73 activities in the maintenance of adult cortical neurons and in brain homeostasis. TAp73 in the CSF may play important roles in the maintenance of the adult ventricular wall as well as in the development of the proliferating neuroepithelium.

  20. Impact of fluid status and inflammation and their interaction on survival: a study in an international hemodialysis patient cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekker, Marijke J E; Marcelli, Daniele; Canaud, Bernard J; Carioni, Paola; Wang, Yuedong; Grassmann, Aileen; Konings, Constantijn J A M; Kotanko, Peter; Leunissen, Karel M; Levin, Nathan W; van der Sande, Frank M; Ye, Xiaoling; Maheshwari, Vaibhav; Usvyat, Len A; Kooman, Jeroen P

    2017-05-01

    In hemodialysis patients extracellular fluid overload is a predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, and a relation with inflammation has been reported in previous studies. The magnitude and nature of this interaction and the effects of moderate fluid overload and extracellular fluid depletion on survival are still unclear. We present the results of an international cohort study in 8883 hemodialysis patients from the European MONDO initiative database where, during a three-month baseline period, fluid status was assessed using bioimpedance and inflammation by C-reactive protein. All-cause mortality was recorded during 12 months of follow up. In a second analysis a three-month baseline period was added to the first baseline period, and changes in fluid and inflammation status were related to all-cause mortality during six-month follow up. Both pre-dialysis estimated fluid overload and fluid depletion were associated with an increased mortality, already apparent at moderate levels of estimated pre-dialysis fluid overload (1.1-2.5L); hazard ratio 1.64 (95% confidence interval 1.35-1.98). In contrast, post-dialysis estimated fluid depletion was associated with a survival benefit (0.74 [0.62-0.90]). The concurrent presence of fluid overload and inflammation was associated with the highest risk of death. Thus, while pre-dialysis fluid overload was associated with inflammation, even in the absence of inflammation, fluid overload remained a significant risk factor for short-term mortality, even following improvement of fluid status. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  2. Immunogenic HLA-DR-Presented Self-Peptides Identified Directly from Clinical Samples of Synovial Tissue, Synovial Fluid, or Peripheral Blood in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis or Lyme Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Drouin, Elise E; Yao, Chunxiang; Zhang, Jiyang; Huang, Yu; Leon, Deborah R; Steere, Allen C; Costello, Catherine E

    2017-01-06

    Human leukocyte antigen-antigen D related (HLA-DR) molecules are highly expressed in synovial tissue (ST), the target of the immune response in chronic inflammatory forms of arthritis. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to identify HLA-DR-presented self-peptides in cells taken directly from clinical samples: ST, synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC), or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and eight with Lyme arthritis (LA). We identified 1593 non-redundant HLA-DR-presented peptides, derived from 870 source proteins. A total of 67% of the peptides identified in SFMC and 55% of those found in PBMC were found in ST, but analysis of SFMC/PBMC also revealed new antigen-presented peptides. Peptides were synthesized and examined for reactivity with the patients' PBMC. To date, three autoantigens in RA and four novel autoantigens in LA, presented in ST and/or PBMC, were shown to be targets of T- and B-cell responses in these diseases; ongoing analyses may add to this list. Thus, immunoprecipitation and LC-MS/MS can now identify hundreds of HLA-DR-presented self-peptides from individual patients' tissues or fluids with mixed cell populations. Importantly, identification of HLA-DR-presented peptides from SFMC or PBMC allows testing of more patients, including those early in the disease. Direct analysis of clinical samples facilitates identification of novel immunogenic T-cell epitopes.

  3. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol hydrochloride in the extracellular fluid of mouse frontal cortex studied by in vivo microdialysis%应用微透析技术研究盐酸曲马多在小鼠额叶皮质细胞外液中的药动学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马张庆; 陶芳; 方浩; 许涛; 洪宗元

    2013-01-01

    研究盐酸曲马多在小鼠大脑额叶皮质细胞外液中的药动学,探讨靶器官药动学研究方法.小鼠麻醉后,将微透析探针植入其额叶皮质,以2 μL·min-1速率向探针恒速灌注人工脑脊液.1h后,小鼠腹腔注射盐酸曲马多注射液50 mg·kg-1,注射完毕立即以12 min为间隔收集额叶皮质细胞外液透析液样本,连续收集6h.用HPLC-紫外检测法测定透析液中曲马多浓度,用DAS软件拟合药-时曲线,并计算药动学参数.结果显示,曲马多在小鼠额叶皮质细胞外液中的变化过程呈二室开放模型,其主要药动学参数t1/2α、t1/2β、tmax、Cmax和AUC0-∞分别为(0.27±0.05)h、(2.72±0.24)h、(0.50±0.10)h、(2 110.37±291.22) μg·L-1和(4 474.51±441.79)μg·L-1·h.本实验建立了一种应用微透析采样技术研究药物在靶器官中药动学的方法,该方法操作简单、可靠;盐酸曲马多在小鼠额叶皮质细胞外液中符合二房室模型,其分布半衰期和消除半衰期分别约为0.5 h和2.7h.%The paper aims to explore the studying method for the pharmacokinetics of drugs in target organs, the pharmacokinetic process of tramadol hydrochloride in the extracellular fluid of frontal cortex (FrCx) of mice was investigated. Six male mice (Kunming strain) were anaesthetized (urethane, 1.8 g·kg-1, ip) and secured on a stereotaxic frame. A microdialysis probe was implanted into the FrCx and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid at a flow rate of 2 μL·min-1. One hour later, mice were administrated (ip) with tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg·kg-1) and dialysates were collected continuously at 12-min intervals (24 μL each) for 6 h. The tramadol concentration in dialysates was determined by HPLC-Ultraviolet detection method, and the concentration-time curve and pharmacokinetic parameters of tramadol were calculated with DAS software. The results showed that the pharmacokinetic process of tramadol in the FrCx extracellular fluid of mice was

  4. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  5. Seizure-induced damage to substantia nigra and globus pallidus is accompanied by pronounced intra- and extracellular acidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inamura, K.; Smith, M.L.; Hansen, A.J.; Siesjoe, B.K. (Univ. of Lund (Sweden))

    1989-12-01

    Status epilepticus of greater than 30-min duration in rats gives rise to a conspicuous lesion in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNPR) and globus pallidus (GP). The objective of the present study was to explore whether the lesion, which encompasses necrosis of both neurons and glial cells, is related to intra- and extracellular acidosis. Using the flurothyl model previously described to produce seizures, we assessed regional pH values with the autoradiographic 5,5-dimethyl(2-14C)oxazolidine-2,4-dione technique. Regional pH values were assessed in animals with continuous seizures for 20 and 60 min, as well as in those allowed to recover for 30 and 120 min after seizure periods of 20 or 60 min. In additional animals, changes in extracellular fluid pH (pHe) were measured with ion-selective microelectrodes, and extracellular fluid (ECF) volume was calculated from the diffusion profile for electrophoretically administered tetramethylammonium. In structures such as the neocortex and the hippocampus, which show intense metabolic activation during seizures, status epilepticus of 20- and 60-min duration was accompanied by a reduction of the composite tissue pH (pHt) of 0.2-0.3 unit. Recovery of pHt was observed upon termination of seizures. In SNPR and in GP, the acidosis was marked to excessive after 20 and 60 min of seizures (delta pHt approximately 0.6 after 60 min).

  6. The soluble transcobalamin receptor (sCD320) is present in cerebrospinal fluid and correlates to dementia-related biomarkers tau proteins and amyloid-beta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abuyaman, Omar; Nexo, Ebba

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cellular uptake of vitamin B12 (B12) demands binding of the vitamin to transcobalamin (TC) and recognition of TC-B12 (holoTC) by the receptor CD320. Recently, we identified a soluble form of CD320 (sCD320) in human plasma. Here we present data on the occurrence of this soluble receptor...

  7. Hypogelsolinemia, a disorder of the extracellular actin scavenger system, in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmey Paul A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular gelsolin (GSN and GC-globulin/Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP appear to play an important role in clearing the actin from extracellular fluids and in modulating cellular responses to anionic bioactive lipids. In this study we hypothesized that cellular actin release and/or increase in bioactive lipids associated with multiple sclerosis (MS development will translate into alteration of the actin scavenger system protein concentrations in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with MS. Methods We measured GSN and DBP concentrations in blood and CSF obtained from patients diagnosed with MS (n = 56 in comparison to a control group (n = 20 that includes patients diagnosed with conditions such as idiopathic cephalgia (n = 11, idiopathic (Bell's facial nerve palsy (n = 7 and ischialgia due to discopathy (n = 2. GSN and DBP levels were measured by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. Results We found that the GSN concentration in the blood of the MS group (115 ± 78 μg/ml was significantly lower (p Conclusions The decrease of GSN concentration in blood and CSF of MS subjects suggests that this protein may be involved in chronic inflammation associated with neurodegeneration. Additionally, the results presented here suggest the possible utility of GSN evaluation for diagnostic purposes. Reversing plasma GSN deficiency might represent a new strategy in MS treatment.

  8. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-05

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs.

  9. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  10. Analgesic effect of sinomenine on SSNI model rats and monoamine neurotransmitters in striatal extracellular fluid%青藤碱对SSNI模型大鼠镇痛效应和纹状体细胞外液单胺类递质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张美玉; 李鹏; 王丹巧; 牛晓红; 王晔; 王志国; 张莹; 徐奭; 徐晓军

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the analgesic effect of sinomenine on the neuropathic pain rat model induced by SSNI,and discuss its impact on monoamine neurotransmitters in striatal extracellular fluid.Method:Male SD rats were randomly divided into the sham operation group,the SSNI model group,the gabapentin group (100 mg·kg-1),the sinomenine high dose group (40mg·kg-1) and the sinomenine low dose group (20mg·kg-1).Mechanical hyperalgesia and cold pain sensitivity were evaluated by Von Frey hairs and cold spray.Striatum was sampled by microdialysis.High performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD) were used to detect the content of such neurotransmitters as monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline (NE),dopamine (DA),5-hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT) and their metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic phenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA).Result:SSNI model rats showed significant improvement in mechanical withdrawal threshold and cold pain sensitivity,significant decrease in intracerebral NE and notable increase in DA,5-HT and their metabolites.Compared with the model group,the sinomenine high dose group showed significant increase in mechanical withdrawal threshold at 60,90,180 and 240 min after abdominal administration (P<0.01),significant decrease in cold pain sensitivity score during 30-240 min (P<0.05).Sinomenine can significantly up-regulated NE content in striatal extracellular fluid during 45-135 min (P<0.05),remarkably reduce DA content and DOPAC at 45,75 and 135 min (P<0.05),5-HT content during 45-135 min,DOPAC during 75-165 min (P<0.05),and 5-HIAA during 45-135 min (P<0.05).Conclusion:Sinomenine has the intervention effect on neuropathic pain in SSNI model rats.Its mechanism may be related to disorder of monoamine neurotransmitters in striatal extracellular fluid.%目的:观察青藤碱对部分坐骨神经损伤(SSNI)诱导的神经病理性疼痛大鼠模型镇痛效应,并探讨其对纹状体细胞外液

  11. Extracellular polymeric substances play roles in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, En-Hua; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells...... the extraction (Figure 1.a and 1.b). Comparing to cells in control group, MR-1 treated at 38 °C for EPS extraction showed different electrochemical characterizations as revealed by differential pulse voltammetry (Figure 1.c). EPS extracted from MR-1 also was proved to be electrochemically active. The present...

  12. Two-phase cooling fluids; Les fluides frigoporteurs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, A. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Lyon (France)

    1997-12-31

    In the framework of the diminution of heat transfer fluid consumption, the concept of indirect refrigerating circuits, using cooling intermediate fluids, is reviewed and the fluids that are currently used in these systems are described. Two-phase cooling fluids advantages over single-phase fluids are presented with their thermophysical characteristics: solid fraction, two-phase mixture enthalpy, thermal and rheological properties, determination of heat and mass transfer characteristics, and cold storage through ice slurry

  13. The Fluids RAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo

    2016-11-01

    After fifteen years of experience in rap, and ten in fluid mechanics, "I am coming here with high-Reynolds-number stamina; I can beat these rap folks whose flows are... laminar." The rap relates fluid flows to rap flows. The fluid concepts presented in the song have varying complexity and the listeners/viewers will be encouraged to read the explanations on a site dedicated to the rap. The music video will provide an opportunity to share high-quality fluid visualizations with a general audience. This talk will present the rap lyrics, the vision for the video, and the strategy for outreach. Suggestions and comments will be welcomed.

  14. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  15. Dimensional characterization of extracellular vesicles using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebaihi, N.; De Boeck, B.; Yuana, Y.; Nieuwland, R.; Pétry, J.

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are small biological entities released from cells into body fluids. EV are recognized as mediators in intercellular communication and influence important physiological processes. It has been shown that the concentration and composition of EV in body fluids may differ from healthy subjects to patients suffering from particular disease. So, EV have gained a strong scientific and clinical interest as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease. Due to their small size, accurate detection and characterization of EV remain challenging. The aim of the presented work is to propose a characterization method of erythrocyte-derived EV using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The vesicles are immobilized on anti-CD235a-modified mica and analyzed by AFM under buffer liquid and dry conditions. EV detected under both conditions show very similar sizes namely ~30 nm high and ~90 nm wide. The size of these vesicles remains stable over drying time as long as 7 d at room temperature. Since the detected vesicles are not spherical, EV are characterized by their height and diameter, and not only by the height as is usually done for spherical nanoparticles. In order to obtain an accurate measurement of EV diameters, the geometry of the AFM tip was evaluated to account for the lateral broadening artifact inherent to AFM measurements. To do so, spherical polystyrene (PS) nanobeads and EV were concomitantly deposited on the same mica substrate and simultaneously measured by AFM under dry conditions. By applying this procedure, direct calibration of the AFM tip could be performed together with EV characterization under identical experimental conditions minimizing external sources of uncertainty on the shape and size of the tip, thus allowing standardization of EV measurement.

  16. Characterization and biological role of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Wójtowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EV form a heterogeneous population of mostly spherical membrane structures released by almost all cells, including tumour cells, both in vivo and in vitro. Their size varies from 30 nm to 1 μm, and size is one of the main criteria of the selection of two categories of EV: small (30-100 nm, more homogeneous exosomes and larger fragments (0.1-1 μm called membrane microvesicles or ectosomes. The presence of EV has already been detected in many human body fluids: blood, urine, saliva, semen and amniotic fluid. Formation of EV is tightly controlled, and their function and biochemical composition depend on the cell type they originate from. EV are the “vehicles” of bioactive molecules, such as proteins, mRNA and microRNA, and may play an important role in intercellular communication and modulation of e.g. immune system cell activity. In addition, on the surface of tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV, called oncosomes, several markers specific for cancer cells were identified, which indicates a role of TMV in tumour growth and cancer development. On the other hand, TMV may be an important source of tumour-associated antigens (TAA which can be potentially useful as biomarkers with prognostic value, as well as in development of new forms of targeted immunotherapy of cancer.

  17. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  18. Fluid Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  19. Bioimpedance can solve problems of fluid overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Samer R; Zhu, Fansan; Levin, Nathan W

    2015-03-01

    Bioimpedance (BI) techniques for measuring normal hydration status (NHS) can be generally classified as (1) by frequency as single frequency at 50 kHz, BI analysis, and multifrequency BI spectroscopy and (2) by method as whole body (wrist to ankle) measurement and calf BI spectroscopy. The aim of this article was to review current BI methods for clinical practice in patients with end-stage of kidney disease. BI vector analysis using whole-body single-frequency BI at 50 kHz may be useful for population studies to indicate a range of degree of fluid loading and of nutritional status. Whole body multifrequency BI spectroscopy is used to estimate extracellular (ECV), intracellular fluid volume, and total body water in dialysis patients. The whole-body BI model is used in the body composition monitor (BCM). The whole-body BI model is established with ECV, intracellular fluid volume, and body weight based on parameters from regression analysis in healthy subjects to calculate fluid overload in dialysis patients. Calf BI methods have been developed to measure NHS by 2 ways: (1) continuous measurement of the intradialytic resistance curve until flattening occurs; (2) calf normalized resistivity in the range of healthy subjects (18.5 × 10(-2) Ω m(3)/kg in male and 19.1 × 10(-2) Ω m(3)/kg in female). In general, for population studies, BI vector analysis or ECV/total body water may be useful; BCM is a commercially available device that can certainly guide volume reduction safely over time. For more exact measure of fluid overload, calf BI methods appear to be most accurate, but these are at present research tools. BI techniques are not only useful in assessing NHS but also in the study of nutrition and body composition.

  20. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  1. The extracellular matrix of the lung and its role in edema formation

    OpenAIRE

    Paolo Pelosi; Rocco, Patricia R. M.; Daniela Negrini; Alberto Passi

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is composed of a three-dimensional fiber mesh filled with different macromolecules such as: collagen (mainly type I and III), elastin, glycosaminoglycans, and proteoglycans. In the lung, the extracellular matrix has several functions which provide: 1) mechanical tensile and compressive strength and elasticity, 2) low mechanical tissue compliance contributing to the maintenance of normal interstitial fluid dynamics, 3) low resistive pathway for an effective gas exchang...

  2. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  3. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  4. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  5. Extracellular MicroRNAs in Urologic Malignancies: Chances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs that are 19-23 nucleotides long, known as microRNAs (miRNAs, are involved in almost all biological mechanisms during carcinogenesis. Recent studies show that miRNAs released from live cells are detectable in body fluids and may be taken up by other cells to confer cell-cell communication. These released miRNAs (here referred to as extracellular miRNAs are often protected by RNA-binding proteins or embedded inside circulating microvesicles. Due to their relative stability, extracellular miRNAs are believed to be promising candidates as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of disease, or even as therapeutic agents for targeted treatment. In this review, we first describe biogenesis and characteristics of these miRNAs. We then summarize recent publications involving extracellular miRNA profiling studies in three representative urologic cancers, including: prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. We focus on the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential of these miRNAs in biological fluids, such as serum, plasma, and urine. Finally, we discuss advantages and challenges of these miRNAs in clinical applications.

  6. Fluid and sodium loss in whole-body-irradiated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1987-09-01

    Whole-body and organ fluid compartment sizes and plasma sodium concentrations were measured in conventional, GI decontaminated, bile duct ligated, and choledochostomized rats at different times after various doses of gamma radiation. In addition, sodium excretion was measured in rats receiving lethal intestinal radiation injury. After doses which were sublethal for 3-5 day intestinal death, transient decreases occurred in all the fluid compartments measured (i.e., total body water, extracellular fluid space, plasma volume). No recovery of these fluid compartments was observed in rats destined to die from intestinal radiation injury. The magnitude of the decreases in fluid compartment sizes was dose dependent and correlated temporally with the breakdown and recovery of the intestinal mucosa but was independent of the presence or absence of enteric bacteria or bile acids. Associated with the loss of fluid was an excess excretion of 0.83 meq of sodium between 48 and 84 h postirradiation. This represents approximately 60% of the sodium lost from the extracellular fluid space in these animals during this time. The remaining extracellular sodium loss was due to redistribution of sodium to other spaces. It is concluded that radiation-induced breakdown of the intestinal mucosa results in lethal losses of fluid and sodium as evidenced by significant decreases in total body water, extracellular fluid space, plasma volume, and plasma sodium concentration, with hemoconcentration. These changes are sufficient to reduce tissue perfusion leading to irreversible hypovolemic shock and death.

  7. Investigation of extracellular microRNAs in oral squamous cell carcinoma, rheumatoid arthritis and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Yan

    derived from RA PBMCs were dysregulated compared to healthy control using NGS. Moreover, EVs derived from RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA PBMCs contained miRNA information positively associated with T cell exhaustion. Studies have shown that EVs derived from osteoblastic differentiated......RNAs, using NGS. Some miRNAs were regulated in both two types of MSCs, while some miRNAs showed distinct changes in each cell type, which was also shown in EVs. The projects supported the important role of extracellular miRNAs in OSCC, RA and MSC differentiation.......Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) refer to cell-free miRNAs that are protected by extracellular vesicles (EVs) and protein complexes from degradation. Extracellular miRNAs are also known as circulating miRNAs that can circulate in bodily fluids. Studies have reported that extracellular miRNAs can...

  8. Differential Expression of Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factors by Embryoid Bodies in Hydrodynamic and Static Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridley, Krista M.; Nair, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    During development, cell fate specification and tissue development are orchestrated by the sequential presentation of soluble growth factors (GF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Similarly, differentiation of stem cells in vitro relies upon the temporal presence of extracellular cues within the microenvironment. Hydrodynamic culture systems are not limited by volume restrictions and therefore offer several practical advantages for scalability over static cultures; however, hydrodynamic cultures expose cells to physical parameters not present in static culture, such as fluid shear stress and mass transfer through convective forces. In this study, the differences between static and hydrodynamic culture conditions on the expression of ECM and GF molecules during the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells were examined at both the gene and protein level. The expression of ECM and GF genes exhibited an early decrease in static cultures based on heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis and a relative delayed increase in hydrodynamic cultures. Although the temporal patterns of specific ECM and GF protein expression were comparable between static and hydrodynamic cultures, several notable differences in the magnitudes of expression were observed at similar time points. These results describe the establishment of an analytical framework that can be used to examine the expression patterns of ECM and GF molecules expressed by pluripotent stem cells undergoing differentiation as 3D multicellular aggregates under different culture conditions, and suggest that physical parameters of stem cell microenvironments can alter endogenous ECM and GF expression profiles that may, in turn, influence cell fate decisions. PMID:25423310

  9. Fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Pijush K; Dowling, David R

    2011-01-01

    Fluid mechanics, the study of how fluids behave and interact under various forces and in various applied situations-whether in the liquid or gaseous state or both-is introduced and comprehensively covered in this widely adopted text. Revised and updated by Dr. David Dowling, Fluid Mechanics, 5e is suitable for both a first or second course in fluid mechanics at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. Along with more than 100 new figures, the text has been reorganized and consolidated to provide a better flow and more cohesion of topics.Changes made to the

  10. Extracellular ATP in the Exocrine Pancreas – ATP Release, Signalling and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena

    ATP plays an important role as an autocrine/paracrine signalling molecule, being released from a number of tissues, in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Released ATP induces Ca2+ - and/or cAMP - dependent cellular responses via activation of ubiquitously expressed P2X and P2......Y receptors. Previously, our group has shown that cholinergic stimulation of acini caused ATP release into ducts and ATP is an important regulator of ductal functions by being involved in ion and fluid secretion. Pancreatic duct cells are exposed to a number of stimuli, well known to induce ATP...... release. So far, the contribution of duct cells in purinergic signalling has never been studied. This work presents that both acinar and duct cells are sources of extracellular ATP in the exocrine pancreas. Here we show that duct cells release ATP in response to several physiological...

  11. Extracellular ATP in the Exocrine Pancreas – ATP Release, Signalling and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena

    ATP plays an important role as an autocrine/paracrine signalling molecule, being released from a number of tissues, in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. Released ATP induces Ca2+ - and/or cAMP - dependent cellular responses via activation of ubiquitously expressed P2X and P2......Y receptors. Previously, our group has shown that cholinergic stimulation of acini caused ATP release into ducts and ATP is an important regulator of ductal functions by being involved in ion and fluid secretion. Pancreatic duct cells are exposed to a number of stimuli, well known to induce ATP...... release. So far, the contribution of duct cells in purinergic signalling has never been studied. This work presents that both acinar and duct cells are sources of extracellular ATP in the exocrine pancreas. Here we show that duct cells release ATP in response to several physiological...

  12. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  13. Economical evolution: microbes reduce the synthetic cost of extracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2010-08-24

    Protein evolution is not simply a race toward improved function. Because organisms compete for limited resources, fitness is also affected by the relative economy of an organism's proteome. Indeed, many abundant proteins contain relatively high percentages of amino acids that are metabolically less taxing for the cell to make, thus reducing cellular cost. However, not all abundant proteins are economical, and many economical proteins are not particularly abundant. Here we examined protein composition and found that the relative synthetic cost of amino acids constrains the composition of microbial extracellular proteins. In Escherichia coli, extracellular proteins contain, on average, fewer energetically expensive amino acids independent of their abundance, length, function, or structure. Economic pressures have strategically shaped the amino acid composition of multicomponent surface appendages, such as flagella, curli, and type I pili, and extracellular enzymes, including type III effector proteins and secreted serine proteases. Furthermore, in silico analysis of Pseudomonas syringae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and over 25 other microbes spanning a wide range of GC content revealed a broad bias toward more economical amino acids in extracellular proteins. The synthesis of any protein, especially those rich in expensive aromatic amino acids, represents a significant investment. Because extracellular proteins are lost to the environment and not recycled like other cellular proteins, they present a greater burden on the cell, as their amino acids cannot be reutilized during translation. We hypothesize that evolution has optimized extracellular proteins to reduce their synthetic burden on the cell.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Ding, Fei; Gong, Leiiei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is produced by the resident cells in tissues and organs, and secreted into the surrounding medium to provide biophysical and biochemical support to the surrounding cells due to its content of diverse bioactive molecules. Recently, the extracellular matrix has been used as a promising approach for tissue engineering. Emerging studies demonstrate that extracellular matrix scaffolds are able to create a favorable regenerative microenvironment, promote tissue-specific remodeling, and act as an inductive template for the repair and functional reconstruction of skin, bone, nerve, heart, lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, and other organs. In the current review, we will provide a critical overview of the structure and function of various types of extracellular matrix, the construction of three-dimensional extracellular matrix scaffolds, and their tissue engineering applications, with a focus on translation of these novel tissue engineered products to the clinic. We will also present an outlook on future perspectives of the extracellular matrix in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  16. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  18. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  20. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  2. Zinc Determination in Pleural Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Nazan DEMİR; DEMİR, Yaşar

    2000-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatic zinc determination method was applied to pleural fluid, the basis of which was the regaining of the activity of apo carbonic anhydrase by the zinc present in the sample. The method was used for pleural fluid zinc determination in order to show the application to body fluids other than serum. For this purpose, pleural fluids were obtained from 20 patients and zinc concentrations were determined. Carbonic anhydrase was purified by affinity chromatography from bovine ...

  3. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  4. The impact of extracellular acidosis on dendritic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mónica Elba; Gamberale, Romina; Trevani, Analía Silvina; Martínez, Diego; Ceballos, Ana; Sabatte, Juan; Giordano, Mirta; Geffner, Jorge Raúl

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells. They are activated in the periphery by conserved pathogen molecules and by inflammatory mediators produced by a variety of cell types in response to danger signals. It is widely appreciated that inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues are usually associated with the development of acidic microenvironments. Surprisingly, there are relatively few studies directed to analyze the effect of extracellular acidosis on the immune response. We focus on the influence of extracellular acidosis on the function of immature DCs. The results presented here show that acidosis activates DCs. It increases the acquisition of extracellular antigens for MHC class I-restricted presentation and the ability of antigen-pulsed DCs to induce both specific CD8+ CTL and B-cell responses. These findings may have important implications to our understanding of the mechanisms through which DCs sense the presence of infection or inflammation in nonlymphoid tissues.

  5. Novel phosphate-activated macrophages prevent ectopic calcification by increasing extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Hamczyk, Magda R.; Andrés, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Phosphorus is an essential nutrient involved in many pathobiological processes. Less than 1% of phosphorus is found in extracellular fluids as inorganic phosphate ion (Pi) in solution. High serum Pi level promotes ectopic calcification in many tissues, including blood vessels. Here, we studied the effect of elevated Pi concentration on macrophage polarization and calcification. Macrophages, present in virtually all tissues, play key roles in health and disease and display remarkable plasticity, being able to change their physiology in response to environmental cues. Methods and results High-throughput transcriptomic analysis and functional studies demonstrated that Pi induces unpolarized macrophages to adopt a phenotype closely resembling that of alternatively-activated M2 macrophages, as revealed by arginine hydrolysis and energetic and antioxidant profiles. Pi-induced macrophages showed an anti-calcifying action mediated by increased availability of extracellular ATP and pyrophosphate. Conclusion We conclude that the ability of Pi-activated macrophages to prevent calcium-phosphate deposition is a compensatory mechanism protecting tissues from hyperphosphatemia-induced pathologic calcification. PMID:28362852

  6. Overview of Extracellular Microvesicles in Drug Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Vancells, Javier; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, Jose M.; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Liver is the major body reservoir for enzymes involved in the metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Recently, it has been shown that hepatocytes release exosome-like vesicles to the extracellular medium, and the proteomic characterization of these hepatocyte-secreted exosomes has revealed the presence of several of these enzymes on them. Areas covered in this review A systematic bibliographic search focus on two related aspects: 1) xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that have been detected in microvesicles, and 2) microvesicles which are in the blood stream or secreted by cell-types with clear interactions with this fluid. What the reader will gain A discussion of these hepatocyte-secreted vesicles along with others microvesicles as enzymatic carriers in the context of extrahepatic drug-metabolizing systems. Take home message The contribution of many tissues including the liver to the microvesicles plasma population is supported by several reports. On the other hand, many enzymes involved in the metabolism of drugs have been detected in microvesicles. Together, these observations argue positively through a role of hepatic-microvesicles in spreading the liver metabolizing activities through the body contributing in this manner to extrahepatic drug metabolism systems what could be relevant for body homeostasis and pharmaceutical interests. PMID:20192903

  7. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  8. Functions of Exosomes and Microbial Extracellular Vesicles in Allergy and Contact and Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Askenase, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are newly recognized intercellular conveyors of functional molecular mechanisms. Notably, they transfer RNAs and proteins between different cells that can then participate in the complex pathogenesis of allergic and related hypersensitivity responses and disease mechanisms, as described herein. This review highlights this important new appreciation of the in vivo participation of such extracellular vesicles in the interactions between allergy-mediating cells. We take into account paracrine epigenetic exchanges mediated by surrounding stromal cells and the endocrine receipt of exosomes from distant cells via the circulation. Exosomes are natural ancient nanoparticles of life. They are made by all cells and in some form by all species down to fungi and bacteria, and are present in all fluids. Besides a new focus on their role in the transmission of genetic regulation, exosome transfer of allergens was recently shown to induce allergic inflammation. Importantly, regulatory and tolerogenic exosomes can potently inhibit allergy and hypersensitivity responses, usually acting nonspecifically, but can also proceed in an antigen-specific manner due to the coating of the exosome surface with antibodies. Deep analysis of processes mediated by exosomes should result in the development of early diagnostic biomarkers, as well as allergen-specific, preventive and therapeutic strategies. These will likely significantly diminish the risks of current allergen-specific parenteral desensitization procedures, and of the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs. Since extracellular vesicles are physiological, they can be fashioned for the specific delivery of therapeutic molecular instructions through easily tolerated, noninvasive routes, such as oral ingestion, nasal administration, and perhaps even inhalation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  10. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  11. Dynamics of Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of recent progress in modelling the behaviour of complex fluid–fluid interfaces with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We will limit ourselves to frameworks employing the Gibbs dividing surface model, and start with a general discussion of the surface excess variables

  12. Extracellular biosynthesis of functionalized silver nanoparticles by strains of Cladosporium cladosporioides fungus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balaji, D. S.; Basavaraja, S.; Deshpande, R.; Mahesh, D. Bedre; Prabhakar, B. K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present investigation, we report the extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) employing the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides. The extracellular solution of C. cladosporioides was used for the reduction of AgNO(3) solution to AgNP. The present study includes time dependent

  13. Extracellular biosynthesis of functionalized silver nanoparticles by strains of Cladosporium cladosporioides fungus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balaji, D. S.; Basavaraja, S.; Deshpande, R.; Mahesh, D. Bedre; Prabhakar, B. K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present investigation, we report the extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) employing the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides. The extracellular solution of C. cladosporioides was used for the reduction of AgNO(3) solution to AgNP. The present study includes time dependent

  14. Role and Function of MicroRNAs in Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Pfeifer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular communication mediated by extracellular vesicles is crucial for preserving vascular integrity and in the development of cardiovascular disease. Extracellular vesicles consist of apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes that can be found in almost every fluid compartment of the body like blood, saliva, and urine. In the recent years, a lot of reports came up suggesting that major cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies like atherogenesis, heart failure, or diabetes are highly influenced by transfer of microRNAs via extracellular vesicles leading to altered protein expression and phenotypes of recipient cells. The following review will summarize the fast developing field of intercellular signaling in cardiovascular biology by microRNA-containing extracellular vesicles.

  15. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  16. Extracellular matrix of the bovine ovarian membrana granulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving Rodgers, H F

    2002-05-31

    Much is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones. The study of extracellular matrix in the ovary, though, is a relatively new area. To date much research has focused on identifying the matrix components present, and more recently, its production and the physiological roles. In this review we focus on the changes that occur in the follicular basal lamina from primordial follicles through to ovulation and formation of the corpus luteum, the changes that occur during follicular atresia, and we discuss our observations of a novel matrix which forms in the membrana granulosa. The follicular basal lamina changes considerably during follicular development in its expression pattern of type IV collagens. Of the laminin chains examined, there appears only to be an increase in amount, except for laminin alpha2. It is expressed only in a small proportion of healthy antral follicles and in the majority of atretic antral follicles. Call-Exner bodies have the same composition as the basal lamina, except they do not contain laminin alpha2, even when the follicular basal lamina does. The novel matrix that develops within the membrana granulosa is similar in composition to Call-Exner bodies which occur predominantly in preantral follicles, except that it is far more common in large antral follicles, does not induce polarization of the surrounding granulosa cells, and does not contain follicular fluid-like material as the Call-Exner bodies of some species do. The expression of this matrix occurs prior to and during the time when granulosa cells express steroidogenic enzymes. It does not exist in corpora lutea. In addition large luteal cells, derived from granulosa cells, do not appear to have a basal lamina. These findings suggest that the maturational changes in the membrana granulosa are accompanied by changes in the matrix.

  17. Noncommutative Fluid and Cosmological Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Praloy

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper we have developed a Non-Commutative (NC) generalization of perfect fluid model from first principles, in a Hamiltonian framework. The noncommutativity is introduced at the Lagrangian (particle) coordinate space brackets and the induced NC fluid bracket algebra for the Eulerian (fluid) field variables is derived. Together with a Hamiltonian this NC algebra generates the generalized fluid dynamics that satisfies exact local conservation laws for mass and energy thereby maintaining mass and energy conservation. However, nontrivial NC correction terms appear in charge and energy fluxes. Other non-relativistic spacetime symmetries of the NC fluid are also discussed in detail. This constitutes the NC fluid dynamics and kinematics. In the second part we construct an extension of Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model based on the NC fluid dynamics presented here. We outline the way in which NC effects generate cosmological perturbations bringing in anisotropy and inhomogeneity in th...

  18. Insight into the roles of tightly and loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances on a granular sludge in ammonium nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lilong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Hao, Guoxin; Guo, Yihan; Ren, Yuan; Yu, Liangbin; Bao, Xuefei; Zhang, Ying

    2016-12-01

    To explicitly understand the function of extracellular polymeric substances in the treatment of ammonium-nitrogen-rich wastewater using aerobic granular sludge, the three forms of nitrogen (ammonium, nitrite and nitrate nitrogen) contained in tightly and loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances were analyzed. The three forms of nitrogen were monitored in the tightly and loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances in aerobic granular sludge after adsorption. The ammonium nitrogen contained in the extracellular polymeric substances was distributed in both the tightly and loosely bound forms and decreased gradually as the aeration time increased. Ammonium nitrogen remained in the tightly bound extracellular polymeric substances even after aeration was complete. The nitrite and nitrate nitrogen species in the extracellular polymeric substances were mainly present in the loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances. The sources of the three nitrogen forms detected in the extracellular polymeric substances differed relative to the different nitrogen forms.

  19. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  20. R fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi R.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A theory of collisionless fluids is developed in a unified picture, where nonrotating (Ωf1 = Ωf2 = Ωf3 = 0 figures with some given random velocity component distributions, and rotating (Ωf1 = Ωf2 = Ωf3 figures with a different random velocity component distributions, make adjoint configurations to the same system. R fluids are defined as ideal, self-gravitating fluids satisfying the virial theorem assumptions, in presence of systematic rotation around each of the principal axes of inertia. To this aim, mean and rms angular velocities and mean and rms tangential velocity components are expressed, by weighting on the moment of inertia and the mass, respectively. The figure rotation is defined as the mean angular velocity, weighted on the moment of inertia, with respect to a selected axis. The generalized tensor virial equations (Caimmi and Marmo 2005 are formulated for R fluids and further attention is devoted to axisymmetric configurations where, for selected coordinate axes, a variation in figure rotation has to be counterbalanced by a variation in anisotropy excess and vice versa. A microscopical analysis of systematic and random motions is performed under a few general hypotheses, by reversing the sign of tangential or axial velocity components of an assigned fraction of particles, leaving the distribution function and other parameters unchanged (Meza 2002. The application of the reversion process to tangential velocity components is found to imply the conversion of random motion rotation kinetic energy into systematic motion rotation kinetic energy. The application of the reversion process to axial velocity components is found to imply the conversion of random motion translation kinetic energy into systematic motion translation kinetic energy, and the loss related to a change of reference frame is expressed in terms of systematic motion (imaginary rotation kinetic energy. A number of special situations are investigated in greater

  1. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  2. Targeting extracellular matrix remodeling in disease: Could resveratrol be a potential candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Agarwal, Puneet

    2017-02-01

    Disturbances of extracellular matrix homeostasis are associated with a number of pathological conditions. The ability of extracellular matrix to provide contextual information and hence control the individual or collective cellular behavior is increasingly being recognized. Hence, newer therapeutic approaches targeting extracellular matrix remodeling are widely investigated. We reviewed the current literature showing the effects of resveratrol on various aspects of extracellular matrix remodeling. This review presents a summary of the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix deposition and breakdown. Mechanisms of action of resveratrol in extracellular matrix deposition involving growth factors and their signaling pathways are discussed. Involvement of phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and role of transcription factors and sirtuins on the effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix homeostasis are summarized. It is evident from the literature presented in this review that resveratrol has significant effects on both the synthesis and breakdown of extracellular matrix. The major molecular targets of the action of resveratrol are growth factors and their signaling pathways, phosphoinositol-3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, transcription factors, and SIRT-1. The effects of resveratrol on extracellular matrix and the molecular targets appear to be related to experimental models, experimental environment as well as the doses.

  3. Complex mechanical behaviour of extracellular vesicles and artificial liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, W.H.; Vorselen, D.; Van Dommelen, S.M.; Van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Mackintosh, F.C.; Schiffelers, R.M.; Wuite, G.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Small and large unilamellar vesicles are ubiquitously present in cell biology, a prime example are extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs are endogenous particles involved in cell to cell communication. EVs transport proteins and RNA, play a role in disease and are potentially useful as a drug delivery s

  4. Fluid-fluid versus fluid-solid demixing in mixtures of parallel hard hypercubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Luis; Martínez-Ratón, Yuri

    2011-02-01

    It is well known that increase of the spatial dimensionality enhances the fluid-fluid demixing of a binary mixture of hard hyperspheres, i.e. the demixing occurs for lower mixture size asymmetry as compared to the three-dimensional case. However, according to simulations, in the latter dimension the fluid-fluid demixing is metastable with respect to the fluid-solid transition. According to the results obtained from approximations to the equation of state of hard hyperspheres in higher dimensions, the fluid-fluid demixing might become stable for high enough dimension. However, this conclusion is rather speculative since none of these works have taken into account the stability of the crystalline phase (by a minimization of a given density functional, by spinodal calculations or by MC simulations). Of course, the lack of results is justified by the difficulty of performing density functional calculations or simulations in high dimensions and, in particular, for highly asymmetric binary mixtures. In the present work, we will take advantage of a well tested theoretical tool, namely the fundamental measure density functional theory for parallel hard hypercubes (in the continuum and in the hypercubic lattice). With this, we have calculated the fluid-fluid and fluid-solid spinodals for different spatial dimensions. We have obtained, no matter what the dimensionality, the mixture size asymmetry or the polydispersity (included as a bimodal distribution function centered around the asymmetric edge lengths), that the fluid-fluid critical point is always located above the fluid-solid spinodal. In conclusion, these results point to the existence of demixing between at least one solid phase rich in large particles and one fluid phase rich in small ones, preempting a fluid-fluid demixing, independently of the spatial dimension or the polydispersity.

  5. Synchronous Pharmacokinetics Study on Effects of Shouwu Fang on Levodopa in Blood and in Extracellular Fluids of Striatum in Rats with Parkinson' s Disease%首乌方对帕金森病模型大鼠血液和纹状体细胞外液左旋多巴药代动力学影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓芳; 王丹巧; 吴兆恩; 李鹏; 牛建昭; 王继峰; 王巍

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To synchronously investigate the effects of Shouwu Fang on the pharmacokinetics of levodopa (L-DOPA) in blood and in extracellular fluids of striatum in rat with Parkinson' s disease (PD) , by simultaneous blood-brain microdialysis in freely moving rats. Method: SD rats were randomly divided into four groups: control group, model group ,L-DOPA group ( ip L-DOPA 24 mg· kg - 1 and benserazide 6 mg· kg - 1 ), SWF + L-DOPA group (ip L-DOPA pretreated with ig SWF). The rat model of Parkinson' s disease was induced by injecting 6-hydrodopamine (6-OHDA) into striatum of rats, blood-brain microdialysis technique was used for simultaneously sampling. High performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD) and high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ED) were used to detect the concentration of L-DOPA in blood and striatum. The data were analyzed with DAS program. Result: Compared with L-DOPA group, the blood L-DOPA concentration of SWF + L-DOPA group was increased significantly at 6 time points,the concentration in striatum was decreased at 15 min after drug administration. The blood pharmacokinetic parameters of L-DOPA group and SWF +L-DOPA group were as follows: AUC ( 1 627.7 ± 420. 57 ) mg· L - 1 · min - 1, ( 2 626.44 ± 980. 6 ) mg· L- 1. min - 1,Tmax :30 min, (37. 5 ± 8.22) min, MRT(0-t); ( 71.98 ± 3. 19 ) min, ( 83.44 ± 9. 53 ) min, striatum pharmacokinetic parameters: Tmax: (50 ± 15.49 ) min, ( 81 ± 27.25 ) min, MRT(0-t); (68.65 ± 15.39 ) min, ( 107.91 ± 26. 66 ) min.Compared with L-DOPA group,SWF ± L-DOPA group blood AUC was increased (P < 0. 05 ), Tmaxand MRT(0-t) were delayed ( P < O. 05 ); striatum Tmaxand MRT(0-t) were delayed too ( P < 0.05 ). Conclusion: Shouwu Fang delayed L-DOPA elimination,increased its absorption in blood,and reduced fluctuation of concentration in striatum.%目的:采用清醒自由活动大鼠血-脑双位点微透析采样的方法,同步探讨首乌方对左旋

  6. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  7. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  8. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  9. R Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caimmi, R.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A theory of collisionless fluids is developed in a unified picture, where nonrotating $(widetilde{Omega_1}=widetilde{Omega_2}= widetilde{Omega_3}=0$ figures with some given random velocity component distributions, and rotating $(widetilde{Omega_1} ewidetilde{Omega_2} e widetilde{Omega_3} $ figures with a different random velocity component distributions, make adjoint configurations to the same system. R fluids are defined as ideal, self-gravitating fluids satisfying the virial theorem assumptions, in presence of systematic rotation around each of the principal axes of inertia. To this aim, mean and rms angular velocities and mean and rms tangential velocity components are expressed, by weighting on the moment of inertia and the mass, respectively. The figure rotation is defined as the mean angular velocity, weighted on the moment of inertia, with respectto a selected axis. The generalized tensor virial equations (Caimmi and Marmo 2005 are formulated for R fluidsand further attention is devoted to axisymmetric configurations where, for selected coordinateaxes, a variation in figure rotation has to be counterbalanced by a variation in anisotropy excess and viceversa. A microscopical analysis of systematic and random motions is performed under a fewgeneral hypotheses, by reversing the sign of tangential or axial velocity components of anassigned fraction of particles, leaving the distribution function and other parametersunchanged (Meza 2002. The application of the reversion process to tangential velocitycomponents is found to imply the conversion of random motion rotation kinetic energy intosystematic motion rotation kinetic energy. The application ofthe reversion process to axial velocity components is found to imply the conversionof random motion translation kinetic energy into systematic motion translation kinetic energy, and theloss related to a change of reference frame is expressed in terms of systematic motion (imaginary rotation kinetic

  10. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  11. Analysis of cellular and extracellular DNA in fingerprints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, Julie M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-09-09

    It has been previously shown that DNA can be recovered from latent fingerprints left on various surfaces [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. However, the source of the DNA, extracellular versus cellular origin, is difficult to determine. If the DNA is cellular, it is believed to belong to skin cells while extracellular DNA is believed to originate from body fluids such as sweat [D. J. Daly et. al, Forensic Sci. Int. Genet. 6, 41-46 (2012); V. V. Vlassov et. al, BioEssays 29, 654-667 (2007)]. The origin of the DNA in fingerprints has implications for processing and interpretation of forensic evidence. The determination of the origin of DNA in fingerprints is further complicated by the fact that the DNA in fingerprints tends to be at a very low quantity [R. A. H. van Oorschot and M. K. Jones, Nature 387, 767 (1997)]. This study examined fingerprints from five volunteers left on sterilized glass slides and plastic pens. Three fingerprints were left on each glass slide (thumb, index, and middle fingers) while the pens were held as if one was writing with them. The DNA was collected from the objects using the wet swabbing technique (TE buffer). Following collection, the cellular and extracellular components of each sample were separated using centrifugation and an acoustofluidics system. Centrifugation is still the primary separation technique utilized in forensics laboratories, while acoustic focusing uses sound waves to focus large particles (cells) into low pressure nodes, separating them from the rest of the sample matrix. After separation, all samples were quantified using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The overall trend is that there is more DNA in the extracellular fractions than cellular fractions for both centrifugation and acoustofluidic processing. Additionally, more DNA was generally collected from the pen samples than the samples left on glass slides.

  12. Fluid control in microfluidic devices using a fluid conveyance extension and an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Po Ki

    2013-05-07

    This article presents a simple method for controlling fluid in microfluidic devices without the need for valves or pumps. A fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled to the enclosed outlet chamber of a microfluidic device. After a fluid is introduced into the microfluidic device and saturates the fluid conveyance extension, a fluid flow in the microfluidic device is generated by contacting an absorbent microfluidic flow modulator with the fluid conveyance extension to absorb the fluid from the fluid conveyance extension through capillary action. Since the fluid in the microfluidic device is fluidly coupled with the fluid conveyance extension and the fluid conveyance extension is fluidly coupled with the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator, which is the rate at which the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator absorbs fluid, matches the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device. Thus, the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is set by the absorption rate of the absorbent microfluidic flow modulator. Sheath flow and fluid switching applications are demonstrated using this simple fluid control method without the need for valves or pumps. Also, the ability to control the fluid flow rate in the microfluidic device is demonstrated using absorbent microfluidic flow modulators with various absorbent characteristics and dimensions.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Magoules, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Exploring new variations of classical methods as well as recent approaches appearing in the field, Computational Fluid Dynamics demonstrates the extensive use of numerical techniques and mathematical models in fluid mechanics. It presents various numerical methods, including finite volume, finite difference, finite element, spectral, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), mixed-element-volume, and free surface flow.Taking a unified point of view, the book first introduces the basis of finite volume, weighted residual, and spectral approaches. The contributors present the SPH method, a novel ap

  14. Drosophila glia use a conserved cotransporter mechanism to regulate extracellular volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiserson, William M; Forbush, Biff; Keshishian, Haig

    2011-02-01

    The nervous system is protected by blood barriers that use multiple systems to control extracellular solute composition, osmotic pressure, and fluid volume. In the human nervous system, misregulation of the extracellular volume poses serious health threats. Here, we show that the glial cells that form the Drosophila blood-nerve barrier have a conserved molecular mechanism that regulates extracellular volume: the Serine/Threonine kinase Fray, which we previously showed is an ortholog of mammalian PASK/SPAK; and the Na-K-Cl cotransporter Ncc69, which we show is an ortholog of human NKCC1. In mammals, PASK/SPAK binds to NKCC1 and regulates its activity. In Drosophila, larvae mutant for Ncc69 develop a peripheral neuropathy, where fluid accumulates between glia and axons. The accumulation of fluid has no detectable impact on action potential conduction, suggesting that the role of Ncc69 is to maintain volume or osmotic homeostasis. Drosophila Ncc69 has kinetics similar to human NKCC1, and NKCC1 can rescue Ncc69, suggesting that they function in a conserved physiological mechanism. We show that fray and Ncc69 are coexpressed in nerve glia, interact in a yeast-two-hybrid assay, and have an essentially identical bulging nerve phenotype. We propose that normally functioning nerves generate extracellular solutes that are removed by Ncc69 under the control of Fray. This mechanism may perform a similar role in humans, given that NKCC1 is expressed at the blood-brain barrier.

  15. Flow of polymer fluids through porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Zami-Pierre, Frédéric; Davit, Yohan; Loubens, Romain de; Quintard, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids are extensively used in enhanced oil recovery. However, understanding the flow of such fluids in complex porous media remains a challenging problem. In the presented study, we use computational fluid dynamics to investigate the creeping flow of a particular non-Newtonian fluid through porous media, namely a power-law fluid with a newtonian behavior below a critical shear rate. We show that the nonlinear effects induced by the rheology only weakly impact the topological st...

  16. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  17. Decrease of extracellular taurine in the rat dorsal hippocampus after central nervous administration of vasopressin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brust, P; Christensen, Thomas; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular amino acid concentrations in the left and right dorsal hippocampus of male rats were studied before and during application of vasopressin into the right hippocampus. The method of intracerebral microdialysis was used for both arginine vasopressin administration and monitoring...... of the composition of the extracellular fluid. The concentrations of 16 amino acids were measured by HPLC in the perfusate samples. The level of taurine declined 20% in the right hippocampus during perfusion with vasopressin, whereas o-phosphoethanolamine decreased in both sides, the left 20% and the right 24...

  18. Working memory and fluid intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Engel de Abreu, Pascale; Gathercole; Conway, A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates how working memory and fluid intelligence are related in young children and which aspect of working memory span tasks– short-term storage or controlled attention - might drive the relationship. A sample of 119 children were followed from kindergarten to 2nd grade and completed assessments of working memory, short-term memory, and fluid intelligence. The data showed that working memory, verbal short-term memory, and fluid intelligence were highly related but sepa...

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATION ON MULTI-FLUID INTERFACES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Enhancement of two-fluid mixing was numericallystudied by tracking the multi-fluid interfaces. Level set equations were used to capture the interfaces, and flow field was obtained by upwind TVD scheme to solve 2D Eulerian equations. The boundary conditions at interface of two fluids are determined by Ghost fluid method (GFM). The distributions of fluid parameters, such as pressure and density, were got at different time steps.The results show that the method presented in this paper can track the density discontinuity perfectly. Superior to previous results, the density discontinuity remains sharper. Also, the mixing of fluids can be greatly enhanced by setting disturbances along the initial fluid interfaces.``

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid sodium rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sodium levels have been reported to rise during episodic migraine. Since migraine frequently starts in early morning or late afternoon, we hypothesized that natural sodium chronobiology may predispose susceptible persons when extracellular CSF sodium increases. Since no mammalian brain sodium rhythms are known, we designed a study of healthy humans to test if cation rhythms exist in CSF. Methods Lumbar CSF was collected every ten minutes at 0.1 mL/min for 24 h from six healthy participants. CSF sodium and potassium concentrations were measured by ion chromatography, total protein by fluorescent spectrometry, and osmolarity by freezing point depression. We analyzed cation and protein distributions over the 24 h period and spectral and permutation tests to identify significant rhythms. We applied the False Discovery Rate method to adjust significance levels for multiple tests and Spearman correlations to compare sodium fluctuations with potassium, protein, and osmolarity. Results The distribution of sodium varied much more than potassium, and there were statistically significant rhythms at 12 and 1.65 h periods. Curve fitting to the average time course of the mean sodium of all six subjects revealed the lowest sodium levels at 03.20 h and highest at 08.00 h, a second nadir at 09.50 h and a second peak at 18.10 h. Sodium levels were not correlated with potassium or protein concentration, or with osmolarity. Conclusion These CSF rhythms are the first reports of sodium chronobiology in the human nervous system. The results are consistent with our hypothesis that rising levels of extracellular sodium may contribute to the timing of migraine onset. The physiological importance of sodium in the nervous system suggests that these rhythms may have additional repercussions on ultradian functions.

  1. 结核性脑膜炎临床表现及脑脊液细胞学结果分析%Clinical presentation of tuberculous meningitis and results of cytological determination of the cerebrospinal fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张继萍; 任丽娟; 李永利; 赵亚娟; 叶迎宾; 黄秀香; 邵艳新; 郑立恒

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical pictures of tuberculous meningitis ( TBM) and significance of cytological determination of the cerebrospi-nal fluid (CSF) for early diagnosis.Methods:The clinical presentations and cytological features of CSF were reviewed in 38 cases of TBM.Results:Thirty-eight cases were primarily sub-acute onset of TBM,and characterized by intracranial hypertension and meningeal irritation.CSF examination showed moder-ate increase of leukocyte count and protein,yet moderate decrease of glucose and chlorine.In early stage of the disease,CSF was presented with mixed cel-lular response to increased leucocytes.The percentage of neutrophil in CSF was slowly decreased slowly ,and this condition maintained for over one month . After regular anti-tuberculosis medication,37 patients were ameliorated and 1 was dead.Therapy started within 2 weeks after onset had better prognosis than delayed intervention.Conclusion:Cytological CSF examination combined with clinical presentation can be favorable differentiation of TMB for cases with lower positive pathogenic findings that makes hard early diagnosis.%目的:探讨结核性脑膜炎的临床表现和脑脊液细胞学检查对结核性脑膜炎及时诊治的指导意义。方法:回顾性分析38例结核性脑膜炎患者的临床病历资料,尤其是细胞学动态变化资料。结果:38例结核性脑膜炎患者多亚急性起病,以颅高压和脑膜刺激征为主要表现,脑脊液白细胞数、蛋白中度升高,葡萄糖、氯化物中度减低,脑脊液细胞学细胞数多中度升高,早期为混合细胞反应,嗜中性粒细胞比例下降较慢,可稳定在1个月以上,正规抗结核治疗后多数好转,发病2周内接受抗结核治疗的患者预后明显优于其他患者。结论:对于病原学检查阳性率低、早期确诊困难的结核性脑膜炎,脑脊液细胞学检查结合临床症状和其他检查对于其鉴别诊断和治疗评估有重要意义。

  2. Rhabdomyolysis Presenting as Orbital Apex Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Jae Min; Chi, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a condition in which striated muscle tissue breaks down rapidly and releases muscular cell constituents into extracellular fluid and the circulation. Renal symptoms, such as acute renal failure, are major complications of rhabdomyolysis. However, no previous report of rhabdomyolysis associated with orbital complication has been issued. Here, we report the first patient of rhabdomyolysis presenting as orbital apex syndrome. A 66-year-old man presented with right periorbital swelling with erythematous patches and conjunctival chemosis. In addition, swelling, redness, and vesicles were observed in both lower legs. He was found in a drunken state with the right side of his face pressed against a table. Ophthalmic examination showed right eye fixation in all directions and ischemic change of retina. Blood testing showed elevated muscle enzyme associated with muscle destruction. And computed tomography of the orbit showed swelling of right extraocular muscles and crowding of right orbital apex. Under a diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis-associated orbital apex syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion, intravenous steroid and antibiotics therapy with intraocular pressure-lowering topicals were begun. Clinical presentation, treatment course, and follow-up are discussed.

  3. Biomimetic aggrecan reduces cartilage extracellular matrix from degradation and lowers catabolic activity in ex vivo and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Lee, Aeju; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Youn, Inchan; Trippel, Stephen B; Panitch, Alyssa

    2013-09-01

    Aggrecan, a major macromolecule in cartilage, protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, aggrecan itself is also susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. Here, the use of a biomimetic proteoglycan (mAGC) is presented, which functionally mimics aggrecan but lacks the known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of this molecule in ex vivo (human OA synovial fluid) and in vivo (Sprague-Dawley rats) osteoarthritic models. These results indicate that mAGC's may protect articular cartilage against the loss of key ECM components, and lower catabolic protein and gene expression in both models. This suppression of matrix degradation has the potential to provide a healthy environment for tissue repair.

  4. EVpedia: an integrated database of high-throughput data for systemic analyses of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Kyum Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of extracellular vesicles is a general cellular activity that spans the range from simple unicellular organisms (e.g. archaea; Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria to complex multicellular ones, suggesting that this extracellular vesicle-mediated communication is evolutionarily conserved. Extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids with a mean diameter of 20–1,000 nm, which are known to contain various bioactive molecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Here, we present EVpedia, which is an integrated database of high-throughput datasets from prokaryotic and eukaryotic extracellular vesicles. EVpedia provides high-throughput datasets of vesicular components (proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, and lipids present on prokaryotic, non-mammalian eukaryotic, and mammalian extracellular vesicles. In addition, EVpedia also provides an array of tools, such as the search and browse of vesicular components, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis, network analysis of vesicular proteins and mRNAs, and a comparison of vesicular datasets by ortholog identification. Moreover, publications on extracellular vesicle studies are listed in the database. This free web-based database of EVpedia (http://evpedia.info might serve as a fundamental repository to stimulate the advancement of extracellular vesicle studies and to elucidate the novel functions of these complex extracellular organelles.

  5. Proteomics of body fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we present newly developed methods for biomarker discovery. We applied these methods to discover biomarkers of leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from breast cancer patients and in serum from patients with prostate cancer. Early diagnos

  6. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  7. Fluid mechanics fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Cengel, Yunus

    2013-01-01

    Cengel and Cimbala's Fluid Mechanics Fundamentals and Applications, communicates directly with tomorrow's engineers in a simple yet precise manner. The text covers the basic principles and equations of fluid mechanics in the context of numerous and diverse real-world engineering examples. The text helps students develop an intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics by emphasizing the physics, using figures, numerous photographs and visual aids to reinforce the physics. The highly visual approach enhances the learning of Fluid mechanics by students. This text distinguishes itself from others by the way the material is presented - in a progressive order from simple to more difficult, building each chapter upon foundations laid down in previous chapters. In this way, even the traditionally challenging aspects of fluid mechanics can be learned effectively. McGraw-Hill is also proud to offer ConnectPlus powered by Maple with the third edition of Cengel/Cimbabla, Fluid Mechanics. This innovative and powerful new sy...

  8. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: Principles and Applications, Third Edition presents students, engineers, and scientists with all they need to gain a solid understanding of the numerical methods and principles underlying modern computation techniques in fluid dynamics. By providing complete coverage of the essential knowledge required in order to write codes or understand commercial codes, the book gives the reader an overview of fundamentals and solution strategies in the early chapters before moving on to cover the details of different solution techniques. This updated edition includes new

  9. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  10. Melanoma affects the composition of blood cell-derived extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Koliha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are specifically loaded with nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins from their parental cell. Therefore, the constitution of extracellular vesicles reflects the type and status of the originating cell and extracellular vesicles in melanoma patient’s plasma could be indicative for the tumor. Likewise, extracellular vesicles might influence tumor progression by regulating immune responses. We performed a broad protein characterization of extracellular vesicles from plasma of melanoma patients and healthy donors as well as from T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and platelets using a multiplex bead-based platform. Using this method, we succeeded in analyzing 58 proteins that were differentially displayed on extracellular vesicles. Hierarchal clustering of protein intensity patterns grouped extracellular vesicles according to their originating cell type. The analysis of extracellular vesicles from stimulated B cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells revealed the transfer of surface proteins to vesicles depending on the cell status. The protein profiles of plasma vesicles resembled the protein profiles of extracellular vesicles from platelets, antigen presenting cells and natural cells as shown by platelet markers, costimulatory proteins, and a natural killer cell subpopulation marker. In comparison to healthy plasma vesicles, melanoma plasma vesicles showed altered signals for platelet markers indicating a changed vesicle secretion or protein loading of extracellular vesicles by platelets and a lower CD8 signal that might be associated with a diminished activity of natural killer cells or T cells. As we hardly detected melanoma-derived vesicles in patient’s plasma, we concluded that blood cells induced the observed differences. In summary, our results question a direct effect of melanoma cells on the composition of extracellular vesicles in melanoma plasma, but rather argue

  11. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Phytopathogenicity of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Chernov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the phytopathogenicity of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 (a ubiquitous mycoplasma that is one of the five common species of cell culture contaminants and is a causative agent for phytomycoplasmoses in Oryza sativa L. plants was studied. Data on the ability of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 to penetrate from the nutrient medium into overground parts of Oryza sativa L. through the root system and to cause alterations in ultrastructural organization of the plants were presented. As a result of the analysis of ultrathin leaf sections of plants grown in medium with A. laidlawii PG8 vesicles, we detected significant changes in tissue ultrastructure characteristic to oxidative stress in plants as well as their cultivation along with bacterial cells. The presence of nucleotide sequences of some mycoplasma genes within extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 allowed a possibility to use PCR (with the following sequencing to perform differential detection of cells and bacterial vesicles in samples under study. The obtained data may suggest the ability of extracellular vesicles of the mycoplasma to display in plants the features of infection from the viewpoint of virulence criteria—invasivity, infectivity—and toxigenicity—and to favor to bacterial phytopathogenicity.

  12. Extracellular heat shock proteins: a new location, a new function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maio, Antonio; Vazquez, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) is a basic and well-conserved cellular response to an array of stresses. These proteins are involved in the repair of cellular damage induced by the stress, which is necessary for the salutary resolution from the insult. Moreover, they confer protection from subsequent insults, which has been coined stress tolerance. Because these proteins are expressed in subcellular compartments, it was thought that their function during stress conditions was circumscribed to the intracellular environment. However, it is now well established that HSPs can also be present outside cells where they appear to display a function different than the well-understood chaperone role. Extracellular HSPs act as alert stress signals priming other cells, particularly of the immune system, to avoid the propagation of the insult and favor resolution. Because the majority of HSPs do not possess a secretory peptide signal, they are likely to be exported by a nonclassic secretory pathway. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the export of HSPs, including translocation across the plasma membrane and release associated with lipid vesicles, as well as the passive release after cell death by necrosis. Extracellular HSPs appear in various flavors, including membrane-bound and membrane-free forms. All of these variants of extracellular HSPs suggest that their interactions with cells may be quite diverse, both in target cell types and the activation signaling pathways. This review addresses some of our current knowledge about the release and relevance of extracellular HSPs.

  13. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  14. Coiling of yield stress fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Rahmani; M. Habibi; A. Javadi; D. Bonn

    2011-01-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the coiling of a filament of a yield stress fluid falling on a solid surface. We use two kinds of yield stress fluids, shaving foam and hair gel, and show that the coiling of the foam is similar to the coiling of an elastic rope. Two regimes of coiling (el

  15. An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, G. K.

    2000-02-01

    First published in 1967, Professor Batchelor's classic work is still one of the foremost texts on fluid dynamics. His careful presentation of the underlying theories of fluids is still timely and applicable, even in these days of almost limitless computer power. This reissue ensures that a new generation of graduate students experiences the elegance of Professor Batchelor's writing.

  16. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  17. Amniotic fluid embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiranpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE is one of the catastrophic complications of pregnancy in which amniotic fluid, fetal cells, hair, or other debris enters into the maternal pulmonary circulation, causing cardiovascular collapse. Etiology largely remains unknown, but may occur in healthy women during labour, during cesarean section, after abnormal vaginal delivery, or during the second trimester of pregnancy. It may also occur up to 48 hours post-delivery. It can also occur during abortion, after abdominal trauma, and during amnio-infusion. The pathophysiology of AFE is not completely understood. Possible historical cause is that any breach of the barrier between maternal blood and amniotic fluid forces the entry of amniotic fluid into the systemic circulation and results in a physical obstruction of the pulmonary circulation. The presenting signs and symptoms of AFE involve many organ systems. Clinical signs and symptoms are acute dyspnea, cough, hypotension, cyanosis, fetal bradycardia, encephalopathy, acute pulmonary hypertension, coagulopathy etc. Besides basic investigations lung scan, serum tryptase levels, serum levels of C3 and C4 complements, zinc coproporphyrin, serum sialyl Tn etc are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and uterine artery embolization have been tried from time to time. The maternal prognosis after amniotic fluid embolism is very poor though infant survival rate is around 70%.

  18. Rheology and non-Newtonian fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Irgens, Fridtjov

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a brief but thorough introduction to the fascinating subject of non-Newtonian fluids, their behavior and mechanical properties. After a brief introduction of what characterizes non-Newtonian fluids in Chapter 1 some phenomena characteristic of non-Newtonian fluids are presented in Chapter 2. The basic equations in fluid mechanics are discussed in Chapter 3. Deformation kinematics, the kinematics of shear flows, viscometric flows, and extensional flows are the topics in Chapter 4. Material functions characterizing the behavior of fluids in special flows are defined in Chapter 5. Generalized Newtonian fluids are the most common types of non-Newtonian fluids and are the subject in Chapter 6. Some linearly viscoelastic fluid models are presented in Chapter 7. In Chapter 8 the concept of tensors is utilized and advanced fluid models are introduced. The book is concluded with a variety of 26 problems. Solutions to the problems are ready for instructors.

  19. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Pleural Fluid Analysis Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Pleural Fluid Analysis Related tests: Pericardial Fluid Analysis , Peritoneal Fluid Analysis , ...

  20. Microencapsulation technology by nature: Cell derived extracellular vesicles with therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, A; Falus, A; Buzás, E

    2013-06-01

    Cell derived extracellular vesicles are submicron structures surrounded by phospholipid bilayer and released by both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The sizes of these vesicles roughly fall into the size ranges of microbes, and they represent efficient delivery platforms targeting complex molecular information to professional antigen presenting cells. Critical roles of these naturally formulated units of information have been described in many physiological and pathological processes. Extracellular vesicles are not only potential biomarkers and possible pathogenic factors in numerous diseases, but they are also considered as emerging therapeutic targets and therapeutic vehicles. Strikingly, current drug delivery systems, designed to convey therapeutic proteins and peptides (such as liposomes), show many similarities to extracellular vesicles. Here we review some aspects of therapeutic implementation of natural, cell-derived extracellular vesicles in human diseases. Exploration of molecular and functional details of extracellular vesicle release and action may provide important lessons for the design of future drug delivery systems.

  1. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  2. Matrilin-3 switches from anti- to pro-anabolic upon integration to the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincourt, Jean-Baptiste; Etienne, Stéphanie; Grossin, Laurent; Cottet, Justine; Bantsimba-Malanda, Claudie; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Libante, Virginie; Gillet, Pierre; Magdalou, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has long been viewed primarily as an organized network of solid-phase ligands for integrin receptors. During degenerative processes, such as osteoarthritis, the ECM undergoes deterioration, resulting in its remodeling and in the release of some of its components. Matrilin-3 (MATN3) is an almost cartilage specific, pericellular protein acting in the assembly of the ECM of chondrocytes. In the past, MATN3 was found required for cartilage homeostasis, but also involved in osteoarthritis-related pro-catabolic functions. Here, to better understand the pathological and physiological functions of MATN3, its concentration as a circulating protein in articular fluids of human osteoarthritic patients was determined and its functions as a recombinant protein produced in human cells were investigated with particular emphasis on the physical state under which it is presented to chondrocytes. MATN3 down-regulated cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and up-regulated catabolism when administered as a soluble protein. When artificially immobilized, however, MATN3 induced chondrocyte adhesion via a α5β1 integrin-dependent mechanism, AKT activation and favored survival and ECM synthesis. Furthermore, MATN3 bound directly to isolated α5β1 integrin in vitro. TGFβ1 stimulation of chondrocytes allowed integration of exogenous MATN3 into their ECM and ECM-integrated MATN3 induced AKT phosphorylation and improved ECM synthesis and accumulation. In conclusion, the integration of MATN3 to the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes critically determines the direction toward which MATN3 regulates cartilage metabolism. These data explain how MATN3 plays either beneficial or detrimental functions in cartilage and highlight the important role played by the physical state of ECM molecules.

  3. Vertebrate extracellular calcium-sensing receptor evolution: selection in relation to life history and habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberger, Amanda L; Loretz, Christopher A

    2013-03-01

    Ionic calcium (Ca(2+)) supports essential functions within physiological systems, and consequently its concentration is homeostatically regulated within narrow bounds in the body fluids of animals through endocrine effects at ion-transporting osmoregulatory tissues. In vertebrates, extracellular Ca(2+) is detected at the cell surface by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. Interestingly, the taxonomic distribution of CaSRs is restricted to vertebrates, with some CaSR-like receptors apparently present in non-vertebrate chordates. Since bone is a known Ca(2+) storage site and is characteristically restricted to the vertebrate lineage, we hypothesized a functional association of CaSR with vertebrate skeleton that may have an ancient origin. Protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of vertebrate CaSRs and related GPCRs of the glutamate receptor-like family expose similarities and indel differences among these receptors, and reveal the evolutionary history of CaSRs. Evolutionary selection was tested statistically by evaluating the relationship between non-synonymous (replacement, dN) versus synonymous (silent, dS) amino acid substitution rates (as dN/dS) of protein-coding DNA sequences among branches of the estimated protein phylogeny. On a background of strong purifying selection (dN/dS1) was detected on some branches to major clades in the CaSR phylogeny, especially to the tetrapod vertebrate CaSRs and chordate CaSR-like branches. Testing also revealed overall purifying selection at the codon level. At some sites relaxation from strong purifying selection was seen, but evidence for adaptive evolution was not detected for individual sites. The results suggest purifying selection of CaSRs, and of adaptive evolution among some major vertebrate clades, reflecting clade specific differences in natural history and organismal biology, including skeletal involvement in calcium homeostasis

  4. Are extracellular microRNAs involved in type 2 diabetes and related pathologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of evolutionary conserved non-coding RNAs of 19-22 nucleotides that function as negative regulators of gene expression. Originally discovered in C. elegans, miRNAs regulate fundamental cellular processes in diverse organisms, including the control of metabolic pathways involved in fat metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, energy homeostasis, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and inflammation. Several miRNAs have been identified as having a physiological role in tissues in which type 2 diabetes (T2DM) complications occur (liver, pancreas, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle). In addition, previous studies in animal models or in human tissues have demonstrated altered expression of microRNAs in insulin-sensitive tissues of T2DM patients suggesting a potential role for these small RNA molecules in the complications associated with the diabetic condition. However all these data assume that miRNAs reside and elicit their regulatory action within the producing cells. However, studies in the last 5years have demonstrated that miRNAs are not only found intracellularly, but are also detectable outside cells, including in various body fluids. This phenomenon raises questions about the biological functions of such extracellular miRNAs. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge of the impact of extracellular miRNAs on the development of obesity-associated T2DM, and its related complications including endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction. It also considers the possible use of blood miRNAs as biomarkers for the detection of T2DM, classification of the disease and detection of associated pathologies.

  5. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  6. Modulation of memory with septal injections of morphine and glucose: effects on extracellular glucose levels in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNay, Ewan C; Canal, Clinton E; Sherwin, Robert S; Gold, Paul E

    2006-02-28

    The concentration of glucose in the extracellular fluid (ECF) of the hippocampus decreases substantially during memory testing on a hippocampus-dependent memory task. Administration of exogenous glucose, which enhances task performance, prevents this decrease, suggesting a relationship between hippocampal glucose availability and memory performance. In the present experiment, spontaneous alternation performance and task-related changes in hippocampal ECF glucose were assessed in rats after intraseptal administration of morphine, which impairs memory on a spontaneous alternation task, and after co-administration of intraseptal glucose, which attenuates that impairment. Consistent with previous findings, spontaneous alternation testing resulted in a decrease in hippocampal ECF glucose levels in control rats. However, rats that received intraseptal morphine prior to testing showed memory impairments and an absence of the task-related decrease in hippocampal ECF glucose levels. Intraseptal co-administration of glucose with morphine attenuated the memory impairment, and ECF glucose levels in the hippocampus decreased in a manner comparable to that seen in control rats. These data suggest that fluctuations in hippocampal ECF glucose levels may be a marker of mnemonic processing and support the view that decreases in extracellular glucose during memory testing reflect increased glucose demand during memory processing.

  7. Correlation of cutting fluid performance in different machining operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Belluco, Walter

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of cutting fluid performance in different metal cutting operations is presented, based on experimental investigations in which type of operation, performance criteria, work material, and fluid type are considered. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming...

  8. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  9. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  10. Hybrid models for complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    This paper formulates a new approach to complex fluid dynamics, which accounts for microscopic statistical effects in the micromotion. While the ordinary fluid variables (mass density and momentum) undergo usual dynamics, the order parameter field is replaced by a statistical distribution on the order parameter space. This distribution depends also on the point in physical space and its dynamics retains the usual fluid transport features while containing the statistical information on the order parameter space. This approach is based on a hybrid moment closure for Yang-Mills Vlasov plasmas, which replaces the usual cold-plasma assumption. After presenting the basic properties of the hybrid closure, such as momentum map features, singular solutions and Casimir invariants, the effect of Yang-Mills fields is considered and a direct application to ferromagnetic fluids is presented. Hybrid models are also formulated for complex fluids with symmetry breaking. For the special case of liquid crystals, a hybrid formul...

  11. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  12. Basic Components of Connective Tissues and Extracellular Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjær, Michael

    2014-01-01

    of the extracellular matrix in soft tissues. Some of these are reviewed in this chapter. Besides their basic structure, biochemistry and physiology, their roles in disorders of soft tissues are discussed only briefly as most chapters in this volume deal with relevant individual compounds. Fibronectin with its...... network. Laminins contribute to the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular functions such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, stability of phenotype, and resistance towards apoptosis. Though the primary role of fibrinogen is in clot formation, after conversion to fibrin...... and TGFβ activity was observed in fibrotic skin disorders such as keloids and scleroderma. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) or thrombospondin-5 is primarily present in the cartilage. High levels of COMP are present in fibrotic scars and systemic sclerosis of the skin, and in tendon, especially...

  13. Supersaturation in human gastric fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevernage, Jan; Hens, Bart; Brouwers, Joachim; Tack, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Augustijns, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    The current study reports on supersaturation, precipitation and excipient mediated precipitation inhibition of five poorly soluble drugs (loviride, glibenclamide, itraconazole, danazol, and etravirine) in human and simulated gastric fluids. Upon induction of supersaturation in human gastric fluids (HGFs), simulated gastric fluid (SGF), and fasted state simulated gastric fluid (FaSSGF) using a solvent shift method, supersaturation and precipitation were assessed as a function of time. In addition, the precipitation inhibitory capacity of three polymers (Eudragit® E PO, HPMC-E5, and PVP K25) was investigated. Supersaturation in human gastric fluids was observed for all model compounds, but proved to be relatively unstable (fast precipitation), except for itraconazole. Only modest excipient-mediated stabilizing effects on supersaturation were observed using HPMC-E5 and Eudragit® E PO whereas PVP K25 exerted no effect. In contrast to SGF, the observed precipitation behavior in FaSSGF was similar to the behavior in human gastric fluids. The present study demonstrates that supersaturation stability of drugs in human gastric fluids is in general inferior to supersaturation stability in intestinal fluids. As the potential for excipient mediated precipitation inhibition in gastric fluids was only limited, our data suggest that supersaturation should preferably be targeted to the intestine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  15. Ascorbic acid: Nonradioactive extracellular space marker in canine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reil, G.H.; Frombach, R.; Kownatzki, R.; Quante, W.; Lichtlen, P.R. (Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (West Germany))

    1987-11-01

    The distribution pattern of ascorbic acid and L-({sup 14}C)ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue was compared with those of the classical radioactive extracellular space markers ({sup 3}H)-inulin, ({sup 3}H)sucrose, and Na{sup 82}Br. A new polarographic techniques was developed for analogue registration of ascorbic acid concentration in coronary venous blood. The kinetic data of the markers were studied in an open-chest canine heart preparation during a constant tracer infusion of up to 9 min. Distribution volumes were calculated based on the mean transit time method of Zierler. The distribution volume of ascorbic acid as well as of L-({sup 14}C)ascorbic acid in myocardial tissue agreed closely with those of ({sup 3}H)inulin and ({sup 3}H)sucrose as well as {sup 82}Br. The obtained kinetic data confirmed that ascorbic acid exhibits the physicochemical properties of an extracellular space marker, though this compound was shown to leak slowly into myocardial cells. Favorable attributes of this indicator are its low molecular weight, high diffusibility in interstitial fluid, low binding affinity to macromolecules, and high transcapillary as well as low transplasmalemmal penetration rate. Therefore, this nonradioactive marker can be applied in a safe and simple fashion, and without untoward side effects in experimental animals as well as in patients.

  16. Myeloid extracellular vesicles: messengers from the demented brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria eNigro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood-borne monocyte derived cells play a pivotal, initially unrecognized, role in most central nervous system disorders, including diseases initially classified as purely neurodegenerative (i.e. AD, PD, and ALS. Their trafficking to the brain and spinal cord has been extensively studied in classical neuroinflammatory disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Central nervous system resident myeloid cells, namely microglia and perivascular macrophages, also are in the spotlight of investigations on neurological disorders. Myeloid cells, such as infiltrating macrophages and microglia, have been described as having both protective and destructive features in neurological disorders, thus identification of their functional phenotype during disease evolution would be of paramount importance. Extracellular vesicles, namely exosomes and shed vesicles, are released by virtually any cell type and can be detected and identified in terms of cell origin in biological fluids. They therefore constitute an ideal tool to access information on cells residing in an inaccessible site such as the brain. We will review here available information on extracellular vesicles detection in neurological disorders with special emphasis on neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  18. Regulation of Non-Infectious Lung Injury, Inflammation, and Repair by the Extracellular Matrix Glycosaminoglycan Hyaluronan

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Dianhua; Liang, Jiurong; Noble, Paul W

    2010-01-01

    An important hallmark of tissue remodeling is the dynamic turnover of extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM performs a variety of functions in tissue repair including scaffold formation, modulation of fluid dynamics, and regulating cell behavior. During non-infectious tissue injury ECM degradation products are generated that acquire signaling functions not attributable to the native precursor molecules. Hyaluronan (HA) is a non-sulfated glycosaminoglycan which is produced in great abundance followi...

  19. Recent advances in understanding the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Colella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR, a ubiquitous class C G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR, is responsible for the control of calcium homeostasis in body fluids. It integrates information about external Ca2+ and a surfeit of other endogenous ligands into multiple intracellular signals, but how is this achieved? This review will focus on some of the exciting concepts in CaR signaling and pharmacology that have emerged in the last few years.

  20. Applied fluid mechanics; Mecanique des fluides appliquee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viollet, P.L.; Chabard, J.P.; Esposito, P.; Laurence, D. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees (ENPC), 75 - Paris (France)]|[Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    2002-07-01

    the authors'professional preoccupation with real-world problems. Yet the presentations focus on fundamentals, aimed squarely at the needs of advanced students, researchers, and professionals. Each chapter includes a section on problems and applications, providing further illustration and amplification of fundamental concepts through application to real-world situations and problems. The organization of this text is not traditional; and bears witness to' the authors'professional preoccupation with real-world problems. For example, the lack of universal descriptions of turbulence and its effective mathematical and physical conceptualization is a continuing, fundamental stumbling block in most areas of hydro-science and fluids engineering. The authors therefore tackle the turbulence problem in the very first technical chapter of the book, providing a frame of reference for the necessary empirical and quasi-analytical descriptions of turbulence in subsequent chapters. This chapter could be a textbook in itself, providing a very comprehensive and detailed description of the problem and attempts to resolve it. The material of the next chapter on steady flow in conduits follows naturally from, and builds on, the previous material on fundamental f low descriptions and turbulence. The chapter on flow-structure interaction is refreshing for its up-front recognition of the need to distinguish between non-accelerating and accelerating situations as equally important, leading naturally to the notions of added mass and its quantification. The chapter on geophysical flows provides an unusual and much-appreciated unified view of atmospheric and free-surface large-scale flows. The final two chapters on unsteady and steady channel flow embody very thoughtful and well-crafted discussions on the physical bases for waves of various scales, and on the basic notions of mobile-bed fluvial hydraulics. (authors)

  1. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  2. Getting to know the extracellular vesicle glycome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Jared Q; Griffin, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a diverse population of complex biological particles with diameters ranging from approximately 20 to 1000 nm. Tremendous interest in EVs has been generated following a number of recent, high-profile reports describing their potential utility in diagnostic, prognostic, drug delivery, and therapeutic roles. Subpopulations, such as exosomes, are now known to directly participate in cell-cell communication and direct material transfer. Glycomics, the 'omic' portion of the glycobiology field, has only begun to catalog the surface oligosaccharide and polysaccharide structures and also the carbohydrate-binding proteins found on and inside EVs. The EV glycome undoubtedly contains vital clues essential to better understanding the function, biogenesis, release and transfer of vesicles, however getting at this information is technically challenging and made even more so because of the small physical size of the vesicles and the typically minute yield from physiological-scale biological samples. Vesicle micro-heterogeneity which may be related to specific vesicle origins and functions presents a further challenge. A number of primary studies carried out over the past decade have turned up specific and valuable clues regarding the composition and roles of glycan structures and also glycan binding proteins involved EV biogenesis and transfer. This review explores some of the major EV glycobiological research carried out to date and discusses the potential implications of these findings across the life sciences.

  3. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  4. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  5. Force spectroscopy of hepatocytic extracellular matrix components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongsunthon, R., E-mail: YongsuntR@Corning.com [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States); Baker, W.A.; Bryhan, M.D.; Baker, D.E.; Chang, T.; Petzold, O.N.; Walczak, W.J.; Liu, J.; Faris, R.A.; Senaratne, W.; Seeley, L.A.; Youngman, R.E. [Corning Incorporated, SP-FR-01, R1S32D, Corning, NY 14831 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    We present atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy data of live hepatocytes (HEPG2/C3A liver cell line) grown in Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, a complex solution of salts and amino acids commonly used for cell culture. Contact-mode imaging and force spectroscopy of this system allowed correlation of cell morphology and extracellular matrix (ECM) properties with substrate properties. Force spectroscopy analysis of cellular 'footprints' indicated that the cells secrete large polymers (e.g., 3.5 {mu}m contour length and estimated MW 1000 kDa) onto their substrate surface. Although definitive identification of the polymers has not yet been achieved, fluorescent-labeled antibody staining has specified the presence of ECM proteins such as collagen and laminin in the cellular footprints. The stretched polymers appear to be much larger than single molecules of known ECM components, such as collagen and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, thus suggesting that the cells create larger entangled, macromolecular structures from smaller components. There is strong evidence which suggests that the composition of the ECM is greatly influenced by the hydrophobicity of the substrate surface, with preferential production and/or adsorption of larger macromolecules on hydrophobic surfaces.

  6. Extracellular vesicles: structure, function, and potential clinical uses in renal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.T. Borges

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the role of extracellular vesicles in various diseases including cancer has been increasing. Extracellular vesicles include microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, and argosomes, and are classified by size, content, synthesis, and function. Currently, the best characterized are exosomes and microvesicles. Exosomes are small vesicles (40-100 nm involved in intercellular communication regardless of the distance between them. They are found in various biological fluids such as plasma, serum, and breast milk, and are formed from multivesicular bodies through the inward budding of the endosome membrane. Microvesicles are 100-1000 nm vesicles released from the cell by the outward budding of the plasma membrane. The therapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles is very broad, with applications including a route of drug delivery and as biomarkers for diagnosis. Extracellular vesicles extracted from stem cells may be used for treatment of many diseases including kidney diseases. This review highlights mechanisms of synthesis and function, and the potential uses of well-characterized extracellular vesicles, mainly exosomes, with a special focus on renal functions and diseases.

  7. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Junying, E-mail: jyli04@nankai.edu.cn [Department of Biophysics, School of Physics and Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials of Education Ministry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  8. Performance Testing of Cutting Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter

    The importance of cutting fluid performance testing has increased with documentation requirements of new cutting fluid formulations based on more sustainable products, as well as cutting with minimum quantity of lubrication and dry cutting. Two sub-problems have to be solved: i) which machining...... tests feature repeatability, reproducibility and sensitivity to cutting fluids, and ii) to what extent results of one test ensure relevance to a wider set of machining situations. The present work is aimed at assessing the range of validity of the different testing methods, investigating correlation...... within the whole range of operations, materials, cutting fluids, operating conditions, etc. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping, and with respect to tool life, cutting forces, chip formation and product quality (dimensional accuracy and surface integrity...

  9. Extracellular Matrix Components Regulate Cellular Polarity and Tissue Structure in the Developing and Mature Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Shweta; Hunter, Dale D; Brunken, William J

    2015-01-01

    While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  10. Extracellular Matrix components regulate cellular polarity and tissue structure in the developing and mature Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available While genetic networks and other intrinsic mechanisms regulate much of retinal development, interactions with the extracellular environment shape these networks and modify their output. The present review has focused on the role of one family of extracellular matrix molecules and their signaling pathways in retinal development. In addition to their effects on the developing retina, laminins play a role in maintaining Müller cell polarity and compartmentalization, thereby contributing to retinal homeostasis. This article which is intended for the clinical audience, reviews the fundamentals of retinal development, extracellular matrix organization and the role of laminins in retinal development. The role of laminin in cortical development is also briefly discussed.

  11. Ethyl Pyruvate Provides Therapeutic Benefits to Resuscitation Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    described in previous studies [40]. Animals without resuscitation were characterized by uremia, metabolic acidosis and hyperglycemia. Both resuscitation...AnGap) and negative base excess of extracellular fluid (BEecf). Resuscitation with Hextend alone or with ethyl pyruvate improved metabolic acidosis , anion...gap and BEecf . These effects on metabolic acidosis did not correlate with changes in bicarbonate, gases (total and partial CO2), or

  12. Extracellular matrix mediates epithelial effects on chondrogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Zanetti, N C; Linsenmayer, T F; Reiter, R S

    1984-10-01

    It has been previously observed that single chick embryonic limb mesenchymal cells can differentiate into chondrocytes without cell-cell interactions when cultured in collagen or agarose gels. In the present study, limb ectoderm, but not dermis, inhibits chondrogenesis when placed on such collagen gel cultures. The inhibitory influence can be transmitted extensive distances in the gel, even when the ectoderm is placed on a porous filter. Collagen gels, preconditioned with limb ectoderms, are also inhibitory to chondrogenesis. On the other hand, chondrogenesis is less inhibited by ectoderm when the mesenchymal cells are placed in agarose. These results suggest that the antichondrogenic effect of limb ectoderm is mediated through alterations of the collagenous extracellular matrix and support the idea that the extracellular matrix must be considered as an organized, functional unit capable of regulating cell differentiation.

  13. Electrorheologic fluids; Fluidos electroreologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejon G, Leonardo; Lopez G, Francisco; Montoya T, Gerardo [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Manero B, Octavio [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM.(Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present article has as an objective to offer a review of the research work made in the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) on the study of the electrorheologic fluids whose flow properties can abruptly change in the presence of an electric field when this is induced by a direct current. The electrorheologic fluids have their main application in the manufacture of self-controlling damping systems. [Spanish] El presente articulo tiene por objetivo ofrecer una resena de los trabajos de investigacion realizados en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) sobre el estudio de los fluidos electroreologicos cuyas propiedades de flujo pueden cambiar abruptamente en presencia de un campo electrico cuando este es inducido por una corriente directa. Los fluidos electroreologicos tienen su principal aplicacion en la fabricacion de sistemas de amortiguamiento autocontrolables.

  14. Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5-mediated synthesis of extracellular silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jae H; Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon J; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Jin, Chi-Gyu; Yang, Deok C

    2016-09-01

    The biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles is of great interest in the field of nanotechnology. The present work highlights the extracellular biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5. The particles were synthesized in the culture supernatant within 48 h of incubation. Extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the culture supernatant was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, which showed the absorption peak at 428 nm, and also under field emission transmission electron microscopy which displayed the spherical shape. In addition, the particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, which corresponds to the crystalline nature of nanoparticles, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis which exhibited the intense peak at 3 keV, resembling the silver nanoparticles. Further, the synthesized nanoparticles were examined by elemental mapping which displayed the dominance of the silver element in the synthesized product, and dynamic light scattering which showed the distribution of silver nanoparticles with respect to intensity, volume, and number of particles. Moreover, the silver nanoparticles have been found to be quite active in antimicrobial activity and biofilm inhibition activity against pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, the present work emphasized the prospect of using the P. deceptionensis DC5 to achieve the extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a facile and environmental manner.

  15. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  16. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  17. Highly virulent strains of Pseudomonas solanacearum that are defective in extracellular-polysaccharide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peilin; Iwata, Michiaki; Sequeira, L. (Dept. of Agriculture (USA)); Leong, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has long been regarded as one of the mos important factors involved in wilting of plants by Pseudomonas solanacearum. By means of transposon Tn5 mutagensis, the authors have isolated a class of mutants that have an afluidal colony morphology but retain the ability to cause severe wilting and death of tobacco plants. One such mutant, KD700, was studied in detail. By marker exchange mutagenesis, the altered colony morphology was shown to be the result of a single Tn5 insertion in a 14.3-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This defect could be corrected by introducing a homologous clone from a cosmid library of the wild-type, parental strain K60. The Tn5-containing fragment was introduced into other P. solanacearum wild-type strains by marker exchange, and these altered strains had the same afluidal phenotype as KD700. N-Acetylgalactosamine (GalNac), the major constituent of EPS of all wild-type strains of P. solanacearum, was not detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of vascular fluids from wilting plants infected by KD700. In contrast, GalNac was readily detected in similar fluids of plants infected by K60. Polysaccharides extracted from culture filtrates of KD700 contained approximately one-fifth of the GalNac present in polysaccharides from K60. No differences in growth rates in culture or in planta between the mutant and the parental strains were observed. Since strains that are deficient in EPS production can remain highly virulent to tobacco, they conclude that EPS, or at least its GalNac-containing component, may not be required for disease development by P. solanacearum.

  18. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  19. Physical exercise induces rapid release of small extracellular vesicles into the circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Frühbeis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells secrete extracellular vesicles (EVs by default and in response to diverse stimuli for the purpose of cell communication and tissue homeostasis. EVs are present in all body fluids including peripheral blood, and their appearance correlates with specific physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we show that physical activity is associated with the release of nano-sized EVs into the circulation. Healthy individuals were subjected to an incremental exercise protocol of cycling or running until exhaustion, and EVs were isolated from blood plasma samples taken before, immediately after and 90 min after exercise. Small EVs with the size of 100–130 nm, that carried proteins characteristic of exosomes, were significantly increased immediately after cycling exercise and declined again within 90 min at rest. In response to treadmill running, elevation of small EVs was moderate but appeared more sustained. To delineate EV release kinetics, plasma samples were additionally taken at the end of each increment of the cycling exercise protocol. Release of small EVs into the circulation was initiated in an early phase of exercise, before the individual anaerobic threshold, which is marked by the rise of lactate. Taken together, our study revealed that exercise triggers a rapid release of EVs with the characteristic size of exosomes into the circulation, initiated in the aerobic phase of exercise. We hypothesize that EVs released during physical activity may participate in cell communication during exercise-mediated adaptation processes that involve signalling across tissues and organs.

  20. Cross-talk between cancer and mesenchymal stem cells through extracellular vesicles carrying nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana eLopatina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are considered to be a novel complex mechanism of cell communication within the tumor microenvironment. EVs may act as vehicles for transcription factors and nucleic acids inducing epigenetic changes in recipient cells. Since tumor EVs may be present in patient biological fluids, it is important to investigate their function and molecular mechanisms of action. It has been shown that tumor cells release EVs, which are capable in regulating cell apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as well as, to suppress activity of immune cells, to enhance angiogenesis, and to prepare a favorable microenvironment for metastasis. On the other hand EVs derived from stromal cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells, may influence the phenotype of tumor cells through reciprocal crosstalk greatly influenced by the transcription factors and nucleic acids they carry. In particular, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA, including microRNAs and long ncRNA RNAs, have recently been identified as the main candidates for the phenotypic changes induced in the recipient cells by EVs. Non-coding RNAs, which are important regulators of mRNA and protein expression, can function either as tumor suppressors or as oncogenes, depending on their targets. Herein, we have attempted to revise actual evidence reported in the literature on the role of EVs in tumor biology with particular regards to the crosstalk of ncRNAs between cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

  1. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  2. Present time

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E

    2014-01-01

    The idea of a moving present or `now' seems to form part of our most basic beliefs about reality. Such a present, however, is not reflected in any of our theories of the physical world. I show in this article that presentism, the doctrine that only what is present exists, is in conflict with modern relativistic cosmology and recent advances in neurosciences. I argue for a tenseless view of time, where what we call `the present' is just an emergent secondary quality arising from the interaction of perceiving self-conscious individuals with their environment. I maintain that there is no flow of time, but just an ordered system of events.

  3. Noncommutative geometry and fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Praloy; Ghosh, Subir [Indian Statistical Institute, Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Kolkata (India)

    2016-11-15

    In the present paper we have developed a Non-Commutative (NC) generalization of perfect fluid model from first principles, in a Hamiltonian framework. The noncommutativity is introduced at the Lagrangian (particle) coordinate space brackets and the induced NC fluid bracket algebra for the Eulerian (fluid) field variables is derived. Together with a Hamiltonian this NC algebra generates the generalized fluid dynamics that satisfies exact local conservation laws for mass and energy, thereby maintaining mass and energy conservation. However, nontrivial NC correction terms appear in the charge and energy fluxes. Other non-relativistic spacetime symmetries of the NC fluid are also discussed in detail. This constitutes the study of kinematics and dynamics of NC fluid. In the second part we construct an extension of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model based on the NC fluid dynamics presented here. We outline the way in which NC effects generate cosmological perturbations bringing about anisotropy and inhomogeneity in the model. We also derive a NC extended Friedmann equation. (orig.)

  4. Advances in Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T

    2010-01-01

    Environmental fluid mechanics (EFM) is the scientific study of transport, dispersion and transformation processes in natural fluid flows on our planet Earth, from the microscale to the planetary scale. This book brings together scientists and engineers working in research institutions, universities and academia, who engage in the study of theoretical, modeling, measuring and software aspects in environmental fluid mechanics. It provides a forum for the participants, and exchanges new ideas and expertise through the presentations of up-to-date and recent overall achievements in this field.

  5. Molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Lloyd L

    2013-01-01

    Molecular Thermodynamics of Nonideal Fluids serves as an introductory presentation for engineers to the concepts and principles behind and the advances in molecular thermodynamics of nonideal fluids. The book covers related topics such as the laws of thermodynamics; entropy; its ensembles; the different properties of the ideal gas; and the structure of liquids. Also covered in the book are topics such as integral equation theories; theories for polar fluids; solution thermodynamics; and molecular dynamics. The text is recommended for engineers who would like to be familiarized with the concept

  6. Heat transfer by fluids in granulite metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Ashwal, Lewis D.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal role of fluids in granulite metamorphism was presented. It was shown that for granulites to be formed in the middle crust, heat must be advected by either magma or by volatile fluids, such as water or CO2. Models of channelized fluid flow indicate that there is little thermal difference between channelized and pervasive fluid flow, for the same total fluid flux, unless the channel spacing is of the same order or greater than the thickness of the layer through which the fluids flow. The volumes of volatile fluids required are very large and are only likely to be found associated with dehydration of a subducting slab, if volatile fluids are the sole heat source for granulite metamorphism.

  7. Visual Simulation of Multiple Unmixable Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Zheng; Jun-Hai Yong; Jean-Claude Paul

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel grid-based method for simulating multiple unmixable fluids moving and interacting.Unlike previous methods that can only represent the interface between two fluids (usually between liquid and gas), this method can handle an arbitrary number of fluids through multiple independent level sets coupled with a constrain condition.To capture the fluid surface more accurately, we extend the particle level set method to a multi-fluid version.It shares the advantages of the particle level set method, and has the ability to track the interfaces of multiple fluids.To handle the dynamic behavior of different fluids existing together, we use a multiphase fluid formulation based on a smooth weight function.

  8. Spike library based simulator for extracellular single unit neuronal signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorbergsson, P T; Jorntell, H; Bengtsson, F; Garwicz, M; Schouenborg, J; Johansson, A

    2009-01-01

    A well defined set of design criteria is of great importance in the process of designing brain machine interfaces (BMI) based on extracellular recordings with chronically implanted micro-electrode arrays in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to compare algorithms and evaluate their performance under various circumstances, ground truth about their input needs to be present. Obtaining ground truth from real data would require optimal algorithms to be used, given that those exist. This is not possible since it relies on the very algorithms that are to be evaluated. Using realistic models of the recording situation facilitates the simulation of extracellular recordings. The simulation gives access to a priori known signal characteristics such as spike times and identities. In this paper, we describe a simulator based on a library of spikes obtained from recordings in the cat cerebellum and observed statistics of neuronal behavior during spontaneous activity. The simulator has proved to be useful in the task of generating extracellular recordings with realistic background noise and known ground truth to use in the evaluation of algorithms for spike detection and sorting.

  9. Extracellular Proteins: Novel Key Components of Metal Resistance in Cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Pereira, Sara B; Bovea-Marco, Miquel; Futschik, Matthias E; Tamagnini, Paula; Oliveira, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities, and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias toward the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  10. Extracellular proteins in pea root tip and border cell exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Fushi; VanEtten, Hans D; Tsaprailis, George; Hawes, Martha C

    2007-02-01

    Newly generated plant tissue is inherently sensitive to infection. Yet, when pea (Pisum sativum) roots are inoculated with the pea pathogen, Nectria haematococca, most newly generated root tips remain uninfected even though most roots develop lesions just behind the tip in the region of elongation. The resistance mechanism is unknown but is correlated spatially with the presence of border cells on the cap periphery. Previously, an array of >100 extracellular proteins was found to be released while border cell separation proceeds. Here we report that protein secretion from pea root caps is induced in correlation with border cell separation. When this root cap secretome was proteolytically degraded during inoculation of pea roots with N. haematococca, the percentage of infected root tips increased from 4% +/- 3% to 100%. In control experiments, protease treatment of conidia or roots had no effect on growth and development of the fungus or the plant. A complex of >100 extracellular proteins was confirmed, by multidimensional protein identification technology, to comprise the root cap secretome. In addition to defense-related and signaling enzymes known to be present in the plant apoplast were ribosomal proteins, 14-3-3 proteins, and others typically associated with intracellular localization but recently shown to be extracellular components of microbial biofilms. We conclude that the root cap, long known to release a high molecular weight polysaccharide mucilage and thousands of living cells into the incipient rhizosphere, also secretes a complex mixture of proteins that appear to function in protection of the root tip from infection.

  11. Structural basis for Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How such large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened (SMO), which contains two distinct ligand-binding sites in its TMD and CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain (LD). Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, LD and TMD stabilises the inactive state of SMO. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to SMO in the CRD-binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of SMO to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-LD-TMD interface. Our work elucidates the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  12. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  13. Regulation of amniotic fluid volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M H; van den Wijngaard, J P H M; van Gemert, M J C; Ross, M G

    2007-01-01

    Water arrives in the mammalian gestation from the maternal circulation across the placenta. It then circulates between the fetal water compartments, including the fetal body compartments, the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is created by the flow of fluid from the fetal lung and bladder. A major pathway for amniotic fluid resorption is fetal swallowing; however, in many cases the amounts of fluid produced and absorbed do not balance. A second resorption pathway, the intramembranous pathway (across the amnion to the fetal circulation), has been proposed to explain the maintenance of normal amniotic fluid volume. Amniotic fluid volume is thus a function both of the amount of water transferred to the gestation across the placental membrane, and the flux of water across the amnion. Water flux across biologic membranes may be driven by osmotic or hydrostatic forces; existing data suggest that intramembranous flow in humans is driven by the osmotic difference between the amniotic fluid and the fetal serum. The driving force for placental flow is more controversial, and both forces may be in effect. The mechanism(s) responsible for regulating water flow to and from the amniotic fluid is unknown. In other parts of the body, notably the kidney, water flux is regulated by the expression of aquaporin water channels on the cell membrane. We hypothesize that aquaporins have a role in regulating water flux across both the amnion and the placenta, and present evidence in support of this theory. Current knowledge of gestational water flow is sufficient to allow prediction of fetal outcome when water flow is abnormal, as in twin-twin transfusion syndrome. Further insight into these mechanisms may allow novel treatments for amniotic fluid volume abnormalities with resultant improvement in clinical outcome.

  14. Stimulation of Suicidal Erythrocyte Death by Increased Extracellular Phosphate Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Anemia in renal insufficiency results in part from impaired erythrocyte formation due to erythropoietin and iron deficiency. Beyond that, renal insufficiency enhances eryptosis, the suicidal erythrocyte death characterized by phosphatidylserine-exposure at the erythrocyte surface. Eryptosis may be stimulated by increase of cytosolic Ca2+-activity ([Ca2+]i. Several uremic toxins have previously been shown to stimulate eryptosis. Renal insufficiency is further paralleled by increase of plasma phosphate concentration. The present study thus explored the effect of phosphate on erythrocyte death. Methods: Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter, phosphatidylserine-exposure from annexin V binding, and [Ca2+]i from Fluo3-fluorescence. Results: Following a 48 hours incubation, the percentage of phosphatidylserine exposing erythrocytes markedly increased as a function of extracellular phosphate concentration (from 0-5 mM. The exposure to 2 mM or 5 mM phosphate was followed by slight but significant hemolysis. [Ca2+]i did not change significantly up to 2 mM phosphate but significantly decreased at 5 mM phosphate. The effect of 2 mM phosphate on phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly augmented by increase of extracellular Ca2+ to 1.7 mM, and significantly blunted by nominal absence of extracellular Ca2+, by additional presence of pyrophosphate as well as by presence of p38 inhibitor SB203580. Conclusion: Increasing phosphate concentration stimulates erythrocyte membrane scrambling, an effect depending on extracellular but not intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is hypothesized that suicidal erythrocyte death is triggered by complexed CaHPO4.

  15. Microfluidic filtration system to isolate extracellular vesicles from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ryan T; Kim, Junho; Jang, Su Chul; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Gho, Yong Song; Park, Jaesung

    2012-12-21

    Extracellular vesicles are released by various cell types, particularly tumor cells, and may be potential targets for blood-based cancer diagnosis. However, studies performed on blood-borne vesicles to date have been limited by lack of effective, standardized purification strategies. Using in situ prepared nanoporous membranes, we present a simple strategy employing a microfluidic filtration system to isolate vesicles from whole blood samples. This method can be applied to purify nano-sized particles from blood allowing isolation of intact extracellular vesicles, avoiding the need for laborious and potentially damaging centrifugation steps or overly specific antibody-based affinity purification. Porous polymer monoliths were integrated as membranes into poly(methyl methacrylate) microfluidic chips by benchtop UV photopolymerization through a mask, allowing precise positioning of membrane elements while preserving simplicity of device preparation. Pore size could be manipulated by changing the ratio of porogenic solvent to prepolymer solution, and was tuned to a size proper for extraction of vesicles. Using the membrane as a size exclusion filter, we separated vesicles from cells and large debris by injecting whole blood under pressure through the microfluidic device. To enhance isolation purity, DC electrophoresis was employed as an alternative driving force to propel particles across the filter and increase the separation efficiency of vesicles from proteins. From the whole blood of melanoma-grown mice, we isolated extracellular vesicles and performed RT-PCR to verify their contents of RNA. Melan A mRNA derived from melanoma tumor cells were found enriched in filtered samples, confirming the recovery of vesicles via their cargo. This filtration system can be incorporated into other on-chip processes enabling integrated sample preparation for the downstream analysis of blood-based extracellular vesicles.

  16. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Møller Jørgensen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles, 2013; 2: 10 has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment or purification prior to analysis.

  17. Potentials and capabilities of the Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene Møller; Bæk, Rikke; Varming, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) and exosomes are difficult to enrich or purify from biofluids, hence quantification and phenotyping of these are tedious and inaccurate. The multiplexed, highly sensitive and high-throughput platform of the EV Array presented by Jørgensen et al., (J Extracell Vesicles......, 2013; 2: 10) has been refined regarding the capabilities of the method for characterization and molecular profiling of EV surface markers. Here, we present an extended microarray platform to detect and phenotype plasma-derived EVs (optimized for exosomes) for up to 60 antigens without any enrichment...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of cryogenic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Leachman, Jacob; Lemmon, Eric; Penoncello, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This update to a classic reference text provides practising engineers and scientists with accurate thermophysical property data for cryogenic fluids. The equations for fifteen important cryogenic fluids are presented in a basic format, accompanied by pressure-enthalpy and temperature-entropy charts and tables of thermodynamic properties. It begins with a chapter introducing the thermodynamic relations and functional forms for equations of state, and goes on to describe the requirements for thermodynamic property formulations, needed for the complete definition of the thermodynamic properties of a fluid. The core of the book comprises extensive data tables and charts for the most commonly-encountered cryogenic fluids. This new edition sees significant updates to the data presented for air, argon, carbon monoxide, deuterium, ethane, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen and xenon. The book supports and complements NIST’s REFPROP - an interactive database and tool for the calculation of thermodynamic propertie...

  19. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  20. Presentation of the new Department of Drilling, Special Deep Drilling Equipment and Mining Machinery of the Institute of Drilling and Fluid Mining of TU Bergakademie Freiberg University; Vorstellung des neuen Lehrstuhls fuer Bohrtechnik, Spezialtiefbauausruestungen und Bergbaumaschinen am Institut fuer Bohrtechnik und Fluidbergbau der TU Bergakademie Freiberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M.; Ksienzyk, F. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    The paper presents the new Department of Drilling, Special Deep Drilling Equipment and Mining Machinery of the Institute of Drilling and Fluid Mining of TU Bergakademie Freiberg University. The new combination of drilling technology and mechanical engineering reflects the rapid technological development of deep drilling during the past two decades. Teaching subjects and research activities are described. Although trends are positive, there are still not enough students of drilling and fluid mining. If the rapidly increasing demand for engineers specializing in drilling technology and petroleum and natural gas production is to be met on a medium-term basis, joint efforts of industry and universities will be necessary as discussed in this paper. (orig.)

  1. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  2. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  3. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  4. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  5. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  6. Extracellular functions of glycolytic enzymes of parasites: unpredicted use of ancient proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Hector; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Michels, Paul A M; Avilán, Luisana

    2014-02-01

    In addition of their usual intracellular localization where they are involved in catalyzing reactions of carbohydrate and energy metabolism by glycolysis, multiple studies have shown that glycolytic enzymes of many organisms, but notably pathogens, can also be present extracellularly. In the case of parasitic protists and helminths, they can be found either secreted or attached to the surface of the parasites. At these extracellular localizations, these enzymes have been shown to perform additional, very different so-called "moonlighting" functions, such as acting as ligands for a variety of components of the host. Due to this recognition, different extracellular glycolytic enzymes participate in various important parasite-host interactions such as adherence and invasion of parasites, modulation of the host's immune and haemostatic systems, promotion of angiogenesis, and acquisition of specific nutrients by the parasites. Accordingly, extracellular glycolytic enzymes are important for the invasion of the parasites and their establishment in the host, and in determining their virulence.

  7. The universality and biological significance of signal molecules with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Generally,cell signal molecules are classified into the extracellular signal molecules (the first messengers) and the intracellular signal ones (the second messengers).Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP),calcium ions and calmodulin (CaM) are the traditional intracellular messengers,but they are also present in extracellular matrix (ECM).Some of them have been discovered to act as the first messengers through cell surface receptors.Other second messengers,such as cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP),cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and annexin,are also found existing outside animal and plant cells.The existence of these messengers with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions in cells may be a regular biological phenomenon.These compatible messengers might be the communication factors between intracellular and extracellular regions or among the cell populations,and are also important in regulating cell development procedure.

  8. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Kritina L.; Thompson, Shelby G.; Sandor, Aniko; McCann, Robert S.; Kaiser, Mary K.; Adelstein, Barnard D.; Begault, Durand R.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.; Godfroy, Martine

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. In addition to addressing display design issues associated with information formatting, style, layout, and interaction, the Information Presentation DRP is also working toward understanding the effects of extreme environments encountered in space travel on information processing. Work is also in progress to refine human factors-based design tools, such as human performance modeling, that will supplement traditional design techniques and help ensure that optimal information design is accomplished in the most cost-efficient manner. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within the Information Presentation DRP for FY10 are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. The poster will highlight completed and planned work for each subtask.

  9. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.

  10. Mathematical theory of compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Von Mises, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical Theory of Compressible Fluid Flow covers the conceptual and mathematical aspects of theory of compressible fluid flow. This five-chapter book specifically tackles the role of thermodynamics in the mechanics of compressible fluids. This text begins with a discussion on the general theory of characteristics of compressible fluid with its application. This topic is followed by a presentation of equations delineating the role of thermodynamics in compressible fluid mechanics. The discussion then shifts to the theory of shocks as asymptotic phenomena, which is set within the context of

  11. On Radiative Fluids in Anisotropic Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Shogin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We apply the second-order Israel-Stewart theory of relativistic fluid- and thermodynamics to a physically realistic model of a radiative fluid in a simple anisotropic cosmological background. We investigate the asymptotic future of the resulting cosmological model and review the role of the dissipative phenomena in the early Universe. We demonstrate that the transport properties of the fluid alone, if described appropriately, do not explain the presently observed accelerated expansion of the Universe. Also, we show that, in constrast to the mathematical fluid models widely used before, the radiative fluid does approach local thermal equilibrium at late times, although very slowly, due to the cosmological expansion.

  12. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  13. PREFACE: XXI Fluid Mechanics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyd, Janusz S.; Fornalik-Wajs, Elzbieta; Jaszczur, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This Conference Volume contains the papers presented at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) held at AGH - University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland, 15-18 June 2014, and accepted for Proceedings published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The Fluid Mechanics Conferences have been taking place every two years since 1974, a total of forty years. The 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference (XXI FMC) is being organized under the auspices of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Committee of Mechanics. The goal of this conference is to provide a forum for the exposure and exchange of ideas, methods and results in fluid mechanics. Conference topics include, but are not limited to Aerodynamics, Atmospheric Science, Bio-Fluids, Combustion and Reacting Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Experimental Fluid Mechanics, Flow Machinery, General Fluid Dynamics, Hydromechanics, Heat and Fluid Flow, Measurement Techniques, Micro- and Nano- Flow, Multi-Phase Flow, Non-Newtonian Fluids, Rotating and Stratified Flows, Turbulence. Within the general subjects of this conference, the Professor Janusz W. Elsner Competition for the best fluid mechanics paper presented during the Conference is organized. Authors holding a M.Sc. or a Ph.D. degree and who are not older than 35 years of age may enter the Competition. Authors with a Ph.D. degree must present individual papers; authors with a M.Sc. degree may present papers with their supervisor as coauthor, including original results of experimental, numerical or analytic research. Six state-of-the-art keynote papers were delivered by world leading experts. All contributed papers were peer reviewed. Recommendations were received from the International Scientific Committee, reviewers and the advisory board. Accordingly, of the 163 eligible extended abstracts submitted, after a review process by the International Scientific Committee, 137 papers were selected for presentation at the 21st Fluid Mechanics Conference, 68

  14. 丘脑底核电刺激对大鼠黑质网状部及苍白球细胞外神经递质的影响%Neurotransmitter' schange of extracellular fluid in substantia nigra and globus pallidus during electricai stimulation of subthalamic uncieus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初君盛; 张斌; 张建国; 张颖

    2009-01-01

    目的 通过电刺激正常及癫痫大鼠丘脑底核(STN),研究黑质网状部(SNr)及苍白球(GP)细胞外液中谷氨酸(Glu)、γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)的变化,探讨电刺激治疗癫痫的机制.方法 正常大鼠和癫痫大鼠各加只,将刺激电极植入一侧STN,分别用130 Hz和260 Hz进行刺激,同时在同侧的SNr和GP收集细胞外液,用高压液相色谱法检测其Glu和GABA的含量.结果 癫痫大鼠SNr的GABA基础值明显高于正常大鼠.电刺激使两组SNr的GABA明显升高.130 Hz和260 Hz刺激明显增高两组GP和SNr的Glu含量,但130 Hz的更显著.结论 SNr细胞外GABA升高在STN电刺激治疗中起重要作用.电刺激增加了GP细胞的活动,STN电刺激治疗癫痫机制不能单纯解释为"功能的毁损".%Objective To study the change of extracellular glutamate(Glu)and γ-aminobutyric acid(GABA)in substantia nigra(SNr)and globus pallidus(GP)during high frequency stimulation of subthalamic nucleus(STN)in normal and epileptic rats.Methods Two animal groups:20 epilepsy model rats and 20 normal rats were used.Concentric bipolar electrodes were stereotaxically implanted in the unilateral STN,stimulated in high frequency 130 Hz,260 Hz in each group.The microdialysis probes were unilaterally lowered into the ipsilateral GP and SNr.The concentrations of Glu and GABA in dialysate samples Were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC).Results There was significant increase in the basal level GABA in SNr of epileptic rats.In both groups.electrical stimulation of STN induced increases of GABA contents in SNr.In addition.the frequency of 130 Hz provoked the maximal increase of Glu contents both in GP and SNr.whereas 260 Hz induced less effect.Conclusions The increase of GA BA during electrical STN stimulation plays an important role in acting against the seizure.The GP activity is increased by STN stimulation.The impact of STN HFS should not be considered as a simple"functionai lesion"of STN.

  15. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  16. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  17. Physics of complex and supermolecular fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safran, S.A.; Clark, N.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present a collection of papers from the International Symposium on Complex and Supermolecular Fluids presents tutorials and minireviews focusing on the physical properties of complex fluids using the concepts and techniques of condensed matter physics. The book stresses the unifying principles, rather than chemical details, behind the physics of diverse materials. Principal topics include colloids, microemulsions, ferrofluids, and micellar systems. It characterizes supermolecular and complex fluids by exploiting their analogies to atomic systems.

  18. Auxillary Fluid Flowmeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    RezaNejad Gatabi, Javad; Forouzbakhsh, Farshid; Ebrahimi Darkhaneh, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    and with measuring its travel time between two different positions, its velocity could be calculated. Given the velocity of the auxiliary fluid, the velocity of the main fluid could be calculated. Using this technique, it is possible to measure the velocity of any kind of fluids, if an appropriate auxiliary fluid...

  19. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  20. Gamble and Darrow: pathfinders in body fluid physiology and fluid therapy for children, 1914-1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, M A

    2000-12-01

    The development of body fluid physiology and fluid therapy in pediatrics has special importance in the history of medicine because this development introduced physiology into clinical practice. James Gamble and Dan Darrow were leaders in this enterprise. Gamble was part of the group John Howland attracted to Johns Hopkins to establish the first organized program for clinical investigators in pediatrics. This group initiated fluid therapy as effective treatment for diarrheal dehydration and, led by Gamble, developed the discipline of body fluid physiology. Gamble was the first to describe the nature of extracellular fluid (ECF) to clinicians, using the new terminology for characterizing electrolytes in solution. In doing so, he became the teacher of body fluid physiology to a generation of medical students. Inexplicably, in his later years he failed to adopt yet newer terminology defining cations, anions, and acid-base status. This failure compromised his legacy. Dan Darrow extended our understanding of how body fluids react to hyper- and hyponatremia and to potassium deficiency. He was the first to add potassium to parenteral fluid therapy. In doing so, he broadened clinicians' understanding of body fluids but changed the emphasis of fluid therapy from rapid ECF restoration to replacement of estimated deficits. Unfortunately, this change in concept, taught by his successors as deficit therapy, slowed the adoption of oral rehydration therapy for treating diarrheal dehydration. The lapses noted for each of these men, now seen in hindsight, pale in comparison to their contributions. Pediatrics, medicine, and surgery are all indebted to the research of each, which emphasized the value of basic physiology in clinical practice.

  1. Extracellular DNA-induced antimicrobial peptide resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn eLewenza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA (eDNA is in the environment, bodily fluids, in the matrix of biofilms, and accumulates at infection sites. Extracellular DNA can function as a nutrient source, a universal biofilm matrix component and an innate immune effector in extracellular DNA traps. In biofilms, eDNA is required for attachment, aggregation and stabilization of microcolonies. We have recently shown that eDNA can sequester divalent metal cations, which has interesting implications on antibiotic resistance. Extracellular DNA binds metal cations and thus activates the Mg2+-responsive PhoPQ and PmrAB two-component systems. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa and many other Gram-negative bacteria, the PhoPQ/PmrAB systems control various genes required for virulence and resisting killing by antimicrobial peptides, including the pmr genes (PA3552-PA3559 that are responsible for the addition of aminoarabinose to lipid A. The PA4773-PA4775 genes are a second DNA-induced cluster and are required for the production of spermidine on the outer surface, which protects the outer membrane from antimicrobial peptide treatment. Both modifications mask the negative surface charges and limit membrane damage by antimicrobial peptides. DNA-enriched biofilms or planktonic cultures have increased antibiotic resistance phenotypes to antimicrobial peptides and aminoglycosides. These dual antibiotic resistance and immune evasion strategies may be expressed in DNA-rich environments and contribute to long-term survival.

  2. Videotapes and Movies on Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Bobbie; Young, Virginia E.

    1996-01-01

    Chapter 17 of Handbook of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machinery: Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics, Volume 11. A list of videorecordings and 16mm motion pictures about Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines.

  3. Voting Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Lo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During his time as a state senator in Illinois, Barack Obama voted “Present” 129 times, a deliberate act of nonvoting that subsequently became an important campaign issue during the 2008 presidential elections. In this article, I examine the use of Present votes in the Illinois state senate. I find evidence that Present votes can largely be characterized as protest votes used as a legislative tool by the minority party. Incorporating information from Present votes into a Bayesian polytomous item-response model, I find that this information increases the efficiency of ideal point estimates by approximately 35%. There is little evidence of significant moderation by Obama when Present votes are accounted for, though my results suggest that Obama’s voting record may have moderated significantly before his subsequent election to the U.S. Senate. My results also suggest that because legislative nonvoting may occur for a variety of reasons, naive inclusion of nonvoting behavior into vote choice models may lead to biased results.

  4. Dipolar fluids under external perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, Sabine H L [Stranski-Laboratorium fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie Sekretariat TC7, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 124, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-04-20

    We discuss recent developments and present new findings on the structural and phase properties of dipolar model fluids influenced by various external perturbations. We concentrate on systems of spherical particles with permanent (point) dipole moments. Starting from what is known about the three-dimensional systems, particular emphasis is given to dipolar fluids in different confining situations involving both simple and complex (disordered) pore geometries. Further topics concern the effect of quenched positional disorder, the influence of external (electric or magnetic) fields, and the fluid-fluid phase behaviour of various dipolar mixtures. It is demonstrated that due to the translational-orientational coupling and due to the long range of dipolar interactions even simple perturbations such as hard walls can have a profound impact on the systems. (topical review)

  5. Body fluid identification in forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Hyun An1, Kyoung-Jin Shin1,2, Woo Ick Yang1 & Hwan Young Lee1,2,*

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At a crime scene can give important insights into crime scenereconstruction by supporting a link between sample donorsand actual criminal acts. For more than a century, numeroustypes of body fluid identification methods have beendeveloped, such as chemical tests, immunological tests,protein catalytic activity tests, spectroscopic methods andmicroscopy. However, these conventional body fluididentification methods are mostly presumptive, and are carriedout for only one body fluid at a time. Therefore, the use of amolecular genetics-based approach using RNA profiling orDNA methylation detection has been recently proposed tosupplant conventional body fluid identification methods.Several RNA markers and tDMRs (tissue-specific differentiallymethylated regions which are specific to forensically relevantbody fluids have been identified, and their specificities andsensitivities have been tested using various samples. In thisreview, we provide an overview of the present knowledge andthe most recent developments in forensic body fluididentification and discuss its possible practical application toforensic casework.

  6. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Explorations and analysis of soundscapes have, since Canadian R. Murray Schafer's work during the early 1970's, developed into various established research - and artistic disciplines. The interest in sonic environments is today present within a broad range of contemporary art projects and in arch...... are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so....... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  7. Structure and function of the skeletal muscle extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Allison R; Lieber, Richard L

    2011-09-01

    The skeletal muscle extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in muscle fiber force transmission, maintenance, and repair. In both injured and diseased states, ECM adapts dramatically, a property that has clinical manifestations and alters muscle function. Here we review the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of skeletal muscle ECM; describe the cells that contribute to the maintenance of the ECM; and, finally, overview changes that occur with pathology. New scanning electron micrographs of ECM structure are also presented with hypotheses about ECM structure–function relationships. Detailed structure–function relationships of the ECM have yet to be defined and, as a result, we propose areas for future study.

  8. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    RADIOSPARES, the leading catalogue distributor of components (electronic, electrical, automation, etc.) and industrial supplies will be at CERN on Friday 3 October 2008 (Main Building, Room B, from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m.) to introduce its new 2008/2009 catalogue. This will be the opportunity for us to present our complete range of products in more detail: 400 000 part numbers available on our web site (Radiospares France, RS International, extended range of components from other manufacturers); our new services: quotations, search for products not included in the catalogue, SBP products (Small Batch Production: packaging in quantities adapted to customers’ requirements); partnership with our focus manufacturers; demonstration of the on-line purchasing tool implemented on our web site in conjunction with CERN. RADIOSPARES will be accompanied by representatives of FLUKE and TYCO ELECTRONICS, who will make presentations, demonstrate materials and answer any technical questio...

  9. Overview Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, John

    2001-01-01

    This report provides an overview presentation of the 2000 NPSS (Numerical Propulsion System Simulation) Review and Planning Meeting. Topics include: 1) a background of the program; 2) 1999 Industry Feedback; 3) FY00 Status, including resource distribution and major accomplishments; 4) FY01 Major Milestones; and 5) Future direction for the program. Specifically, simulation environment/production software and NPSS CORBA Security Development are discussed.

  10. Fluid Sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    are tempo, time, voice, sound and music. Our goal is to bring analytical and performative awareness to academic means of expression, and the audio paper provides us with a new and experimental platform to do so. Our thoughts about and definition of the audio paper is explained in the first text of the issue...... by introducing a new format: The Audio Paper. The purpose of the audio paper is to extend the written academic text: to present discussions and explorations of a certain argument or problem in sound. The audio paper is an extension of expressive means: Not only words and syntax are means of expression – so...

  11. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  12. Transport Coefficients of Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Eu, Byung Chan

    2006-01-01

    Until recently the formal statistical mechanical approach offered no practicable method for computing the transport coefficients of liquids, and so most practitioners had to resort to empirical fitting formulas. This has now changed, as demonstrated in this innovative monograph. The author presents and applies new methods based on statistical mechanics for calculating the transport coefficients of simple and complex liquids over wide ranges of density and temperature. These molecular theories enable the transport coefficients to be calculated in terms of equilibrium thermodynamic properties, and the results are shown to account satisfactorily for experimental observations, including even the non-Newtonian behavior of fluids far from equilibrium.

  13. Conformal fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, P D

    2006-01-01

    We present a conformal theory of a dissipationless relativistic fluid in 2 space-time dimensions. The theory carries with it a representation of the algebra of 2-$D$ area-preserving diffeomorphisms in the target space of the complex scalar potentials. A complete canonical description is given, and the central charge of the current algebra is calculated. The passage to the quantum theory is discussed in some detail; as a result of operator ordering problems, full quantization at the level of the fields is as yet an open problem.

  14. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  15. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  16. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  17. Current approaches to model extracellular electrical neural microstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eJoucla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, high-density microelectrode arrays provide unprecedented possibilities to precisely activate spatially well-controlled central nervous system (CNS areas. However, this requires optimizing stimulating devices, which in turn requires a good understanding of the effects of microstimulation on cells and tissues. In this context, modeling approaches provide flexible ways to predict the outcome of electrical stimulation in terms of CNS activation. In this paper, we present state-of-the-art modeling methods with sufficient details to allow the reader to rapidly build numerical models of neuronal extracellular microstimulation. These include 1 the computation of the electrical potential field created by the stimulation in the tissue, and 2 the response of a target neuron to this field. Two main approaches are described: First we describe the classical hybrid approach that combines the finite element modeling of the potential field with the calculation of the neuron’s response in a cable equation framework (compartmentalized neuron models. Then, we present a whole finite element approach allows the simultaneous calculation of the extracellular and intracellular potentials, by representing the neuronal membrane with a thin-film approximation. This approach was previously introduced in the frame of neural recording, but has never been implemented to determine the effect of extracellular stimulation on the neural response at a sub-compartment level. Here, we show on an example that the latter modeling scheme can reveal important sub-compartment behavior of the neural membrane that cannot be resolved using the hybrid approach. The goal of this paper is also to describe in detail the practical implementation of these methods to allow the reader to easily build new models using standard software packages. These modeling paradigms, depending on the situation, should help build more efficient high-density neural prostheses for CNS rehabilitation.

  18. Therapeutic application of extracellular vesicles in acute and chronic renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, Jordi; Diekmann, Fritz; Campistol, Josep M; Ramírez-Bajo, María José

    2016-07-23

    A new cell-to-cell communication system was discovered in the 1990s, which involves the release of vesicles into the extracellular space. These vesicles shuttle bioactive particles, including proteins, mRNA, miRNA, metabolites, etc. This particular communication has been conserved throughout evolution, which explains why most cell types are capable of producing vesicles. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are involved in the regulation of different physiological processes, as well as in the development and progression of several diseases. EVs have been widely studied over recent years, especially those produced by embryonic and adult stem cells, blood cells, immune system and nervous system cells, as well as tumour cells. EV analysis from bodily fluids has been used as a diagnostic tool for cancer and recently for different renal diseases. However, this review analyses the importance of EVs generated by stem cells, their function and possible clinical application in renal diseases and kidney transplantation.

  19. Toxocariasis Presenting as Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Helsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a farmer who presented with a clinical picture of a transverse thoracic myelitis. MRI showed inflammatory lesions in brain and thoracic spinal cord. Toxocariasis was suspected because of eosinophilia in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and this diagnosis was confirmed immunologically. He was successfully treated with antihelminthics in combination with corticosteroids. Neurotoxocariasis is rare and diagnosis can be difficult because of the different and atypical clinical manifestations. It should be considered in every case of central neurological syndrome associated with eosinophilia.

  20. Extracellular matrix hydrogels from decellularized tissues: Structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldin, Lindsey T; Cramer, Madeline C; Velankar, Sachin S; White, Lisa J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) bioscaffolds prepared from decellularized tissues have been used to facilitate constructive and functional tissue remodeling in a variety of clinical applications. The discovery that these ECM materials could be solubilized and subsequently manipulated to form hydrogels expanded their potential in vitro and in vivo utility; i.e. as culture substrates comparable to collagen or Matrigel, and as injectable materials that fill irregularly-shaped defects. The mechanisms by which ECM hydrogels direct cell behavior and influence remodeling outcomes are only partially understood, but likely include structural and biological signals retained from the native source tissue. The present review describes the utility, formation, and physical and biological characterization of ECM hydrogels. Two examples of clinical application are presented to demonstrate in vivo utility of ECM hydrogels in different organ systems. Finally, new research directions and clinical translation of ECM hydrogels are discussed. More than 70 papers have been published on extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels created from source tissue in almost every organ system. The present manuscript represents a review of ECM hydrogels and attempts to identify structure-function relationships that influence the tissue remodeling outcomes and gaps in the understanding thereof. There is a Phase 1 clinical trial now in progress for an ECM hydrogel. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  2. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different phy...

  3. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zoraida Andreu Martínez; María eYáñez-Mó

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physi...

  4. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  5. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  6. In vivo monitoring of quantum dots in the extracellular space using push-pull perfusion sampling, online in-tube solid phase extraction, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C K; Huang, C W; Yang, C S; Wang, Y J; Sun, Y C

    2010-09-01

    To monitor the dynamic changes of extracellular quantum dots (QDs) in vivo in the livers of anesthetized rats, we developed an automatic online analytical system comprising push-pull perfusion (PPP) sampling, the established in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The method takes advantage of the retention of QDs onto the interior surface of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube as a means of extracting the QDs from complicated push-pull perfusates. For the injected QDs present in the liver extracellular fluid (ECF) at low picomolar levels, a temporal resolution of 10 min was required to collect sufficient amounts of QDs to meet the sensitivity requirements of the ICPMS system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to exploit the PPP technique for the collection of QDs from living animals and PTFE tubing as a SPE adsorbent for the online extraction of QDs and the removal of biological matrix prior to ICPMS analysis of cadmium-containing inorganic nanocrystal. We confirmed the analytical reliability of this method from measurements of the spike recoveries of saline samples; in addition, we demonstrated the systems' applicability through in vivo monitoring of the time-dependent concentration profile of liver extracellular QDs in living rats after intravenous administration.

  7. Extracellular polysaccharide production by Thraustochytrid protists

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, R.; Raghukumar, S.; Tharanathan, R.; Bhosle, N.B.

    and thixotrophic paints), flocculants (in water clarification and ore extraction), foam stabilizers (in beer and fire-fighting fluids), gelling agents (in cell and enzyme technology and foods), hydrating agents (in cosmetics and pharmaceuticals), and as inhibitors...

  8. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  9. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  10. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  11. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  12. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  13. Technical presentation

    CERN Multimedia

    FP Department

    2009-01-01

    07 April 2009 Technical presentation by Leuze Electronics: 14.00 – 15.00, Main Building, Room 61-1-017 (Room A) Photoelectric sensors, data identification and transmission systems, image processing systems. We at Leuze Electronics are "the sensor people": we have been specialising in optoelectronic sensors and safety technology for accident prevention for over 40 years. Our dedicated staff are all highly customer oriented. Customers of Leuze Electronics can always rely on one thing – on us! •\tFounded in 1963 •\t740 employees •\t115 MEUR turnover •\t20 subsidiaries •\t3 production facilities in southern Germany Product groups: •\tPhotoelectric sensors •\tIdentification and measurements •\tSafety devices

  14. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  15. Vascular basement membranes as pathways for the passage of fluid into and out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alan W J; Sharp, Matthew MacGregor; Albargothy, Nazira J; Fernandes, Rute; Hawkes, Cheryl A; Verma, Ajay; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of conventional lymphatics, drainage of interstitial fluid and solutes from the brain parenchyma to cervical lymph nodes is along basement membranes in the walls of cerebral capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Perivascular pathways are also involved in the entry of CSF into the brain by the convective influx/glymphatic system. The objective of this study is to differentiate the cerebral vascular basement membrane pathways by which fluid passes out of the brain from the pathway by which CSF enters the brain. Experiment 1: 0.5 µl of soluble biotinylated or fluorescent Aβ, or 1 µl 15 nm gold nanoparticles was injected into the mouse hippocampus and their distributions determined at 5 min by transmission electron microscopy. Aβ was distributed within the extracellular spaces of the hippocampus and within basement membranes of capillaries and tunica media of arteries. Nanoparticles did not enter capillary basement membranes from the extracellular spaces. Experiment 2: 2 µl of 15 nm nanoparticles were injected into mouse CSF. Within 5 min, groups of nanoparticles were present in the pial-glial basement membrane on the outer aspect of cortical arteries between the investing layer of pia mater and the glia limitans. The results of this study and previous research suggest that cerebral vascular basement membranes form the pathways by which fluid passes into and out of the brain but that different basement membrane layers are involved. The significance of these findings for neuroimmunology, Alzheimer's disease, drug delivery to the brain and the concept of the Virchow-Robin space are discussed.

  16. Characteristic of Extracellular Zn(2+) Influx in the Middle-Aged Dentate Gyrus and Its Involvement in Attenuation of LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Koike, Yuta; Osaw, Misa; Tamano, Haruna

    2017-03-13

    An increased influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into neurons is a cause of cognitive decline. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells was compared between young and middle-aged rats because of vulnerability of the dentate gyrus to aging. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells was increased in middle-aged rats after injection of AMPA and high K(+) into the dentate gyrus, but not in young rats. Simultaneously, high K(+)-induced attenuation of LTP was observed in middle-aged rats, but not in young rats. The attenuation was rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator. Intracellular Zn(2+) in dentate granule cells was also increased in middle-aged slices with high K(+), in which the increase in extracellular Zn(2+) was the same as young slices with high K(+), suggesting that ability of extracellular Zn(2+) influx into dentate granule cells is greater in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, extracellular zinc concentration in the hippocampus was increased age-dependently. The present study suggests that the influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells is more readily increased in middle-aged rats and that its increase is a cause of age-related attenuation of LTP in the dentate gyrus.

  17. Ultraviolet light-responsive photorheological fluids: as a new class of smart fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min-Young; Kim, Ji-Sik; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Choi, Seung-Bok; Kim, Gi-Woo

    2017-05-01

    We present a comprehensive introduction to the photorheological (PR) fluids whose rheological behavior can be changed by ultraviolet (UV) light with a wavelength of 365 nm. When the PR fluid was exposed to UV light, the viscosity of the fluid decreased, while the viscosity recovered to its initial value when UV light was turned off, indicating that the viscosity of these types of fluids can be reversible and tunable by UV light. Contrary to conventional smart fluids, such as electrorheological and magnetorheological fluids, PR fluid does not suffer from a phase splitting problem because it exists in a single-phase solution. Additionally, the PR fluid does not require any contact component, such as electrodes, and electric wires that are essential components for conventional smart fluids. In this work, the PR fluids were synthesized by doping lecithin/sodium deoxycholate reverse micelles with a photo-chromic spiropyran compound. It is demonstrated that the viscosity changes of PR fluids can be induced by UV light, and their rheological properties are examined in detail. In addition, an example of tailoring rheological properties using photoluminescence was introduced for improved response time. One of the potential applications, such as microfluidic flow control using the PR fluids, is also briefly presented.

  18. A comprehensive Guyton model analysis of physiologic responses to preadapting the blood volume as a countermeasure to fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Myrick, E. E.; Blomkalns, A. L.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Guyton model of fluid, electrolyte, and circulatory regulation is an extensive mathematical model capable of simulating a variety of experimental conditions. It has been modified for use at NASA to simulate head-down tilt, a frequently used analog of weightlessness. Weightlessness causes a headward shift of body fluids that is believed to expand central blood volume, triggering a series of physiologic responses resulting in large losses of body fluids. We used the modified Guyton model to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume before weightless exposure could counteract the central volume expansion caused by fluid shifts, and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses that result in body fluid losses. Simulation results show that circulatory preadaptation, by a procedure resembling blood donation immediately before head-down bedrest, is effective in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After 10 hours of head-down tilt, preadaptation also produces higher blood volume, extracellular volume, and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest, compared with non-preadapted control. These results indicate that circulatory preadaptation before current Space Shuttle missions may be beneficial for the maintenance of reentry and postflight orthostatic tolerance in astronauts. This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the simulation results pertaining to changes in relevant physiologic variables produced by blood volume reduction before a prolonged head-down tilt. The objectives were to study and develop the countermeasure theoretically, to aid in planning experimental studies of the countermeasure, and to identify potentially disadvantageous physiologic responses that may be caused by the countermeasure.

  19. A comprehensive Guyton model analysis of physiologic responses to preadapting the blood volume as a countermeasure to fluid shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Myrick, E. E.; Blomkalns, A. L.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Guyton model of fluid, electrolyte, and circulatory regulation is an extensive mathematical model capable of simulating a variety of experimental conditions. It has been modified for use at NASA to simulate head-down tilt, a frequently used analog of weightlessness. Weightlessness causes a headward shift of body fluids that is believed to expand central blood volume, triggering a series of physiologic responses resulting in large losses of body fluids. We used the modified Guyton model to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume before weightless exposure could counteract the central volume expansion caused by fluid shifts, and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses that result in body fluid losses. Simulation results show that circulatory preadaptation, by a procedure resembling blood donation immediately before head-down bedrest, is effective in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After 10 hours of head-down tilt, preadaptation also produces higher blood volume, extracellular volume, and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest, compared with non-preadapted control. These results indicate that circulatory preadaptation before current Space Shuttle missions may be beneficial for the maintenance of reentry and postflight orthostatic tolerance in astronauts. This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the simulation results pertaining to changes in relevant physiologic variables produced by blood volume reduction before a prolonged head-down tilt. The objectives were to study and develop the countermeasure theoretically, to aid in planning experimental studies of the countermeasure, and to identify potentially disadvantageous physiologic responses that may be caused by the countermeasure.

  20. Intra-abdominal pressure correlates with extracellular water content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Dąbrowski

    Full Text Available Secondary increase in intra-abdominal pressure (IAP may result from extra-abdominal pathology, such as massive fluid resuscitation, capillary leak or sepsis. All these conditions increase the extravascular water content. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between IAP and body water volume.Adult patients treated for sepsis or septic shock with acute kidney injury (AKI and patients undergoing elective pharyngolaryngeal or orthopedic surgery were enrolled. IAP was measured in the urinary bladder. Total body water (TBW, extracellular water content (ECW and volume excess (VE were measured by whole body bioimpedance. Among critically ill patients, all parameters were analyzed over three consecutive days, and parameters were evaluated perioperatively in surgical patients.One hundred twenty patients were studied. Taken together, the correlations between IAP and VE, TBW, and ECW were measured at 408 time points. In all participants, IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE. In critically ill patients, IAP correlated with ECW and VE. In surgical patients, IAP correlated with ECW and TBW. IAP strongly correlated with ECW and VE in the mixed population. IAP also correlated with VE in critically ill patients. ROC curve analysis showed that ECW and VE might be discriminative parameters of risk for increased IAP.IAP strongly correlates with ECW.

  1. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Mó, María; Siljander, Pia R.-M.; Andreu, Zoraida; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buzas, Edit I.; Buzas, Krisztina; Casal, Enriqueta; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Colás, Eva; Silva, Anabela Cordeiro-da; Fais, Stefano; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Ghobrial, Irene M.; Giebel, Bernd; Gimona, Mario; Graner, Michael; Gursel, Ihsan; Gursel, Mayda; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Hendrix, An; Kierulf, Peter; Kokubun, Katsutoshi; Kosanovic, Maja; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Laitinen, Saara; Lässer, Cecilia; Lener, Thomas; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Linē, Aija; Lipps, Georg; Llorente, Alicia; Lötvall, Jan; Manček-Keber, Mateja; Marcilla, Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria; Nazarenko, Irina; Hoen, Esther N.M. Nolte-‘t; Nyman, Tuula A.; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Olivan, Mireia; Oliveira, Carla; Pállinger, Éva; del Portillo, Hernando A.; Reventós, Jaume; Rigau, Marina; Rohde, Eva; Sammar, Marei; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Santarém, N.; Schallmoser, Katharina; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Stoorvogel, Willem; Stukelj, Roman; Van der Grein, Susanne G.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Wauben, Marca H. M.; De Wever, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system. PMID:25979354

  2. Biological properties of extracellular vesicles and their physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Yáñez-Mó

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, extracellular vesicles (EVs have been recognized as potent vehicles of intercellular communication, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. This is due to their capacity to transfer proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, thereby influencing various physiological and pathological functions of both recipient and parent cells. While intensive investigation has targeted the role of EVs in different pathological processes, for example, in cancer and autoimmune diseases, the EV-mediated maintenance of homeostasis and the regulation of physiological functions have remained less explored. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the current understanding of the physiological roles of EVs, which has been written by crowd-sourcing, drawing on the unique EV expertise of academia-based scientists, clinicians and industry based in 27 European countries, the United States and Australia. This review is intended to be of relevance to both researchers already working on EV biology and to newcomers who will encounter this universal cell biological system. Therefore, here we address the molecular contents and functions of EVs in various tissues and body fluids from cell systems to organs. We also review the physiological mechanisms of EVs in bacteria, lower eukaryotes and plants to highlight the functional uniformity of this emerging communication system.

  3. Aerodynamic Effects Of Deicing And Anti-Icing Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Runyan, L. James; Zierten, Thomas A.; Hill, Eugene G.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents results of wind-tunnel tests of aerodynamic effects of deicing and anti-icing fluids on airplane wings. Tests conducted on three-dimensional half-model airplane and two-dimensional airfoil model at temperatures ranging from -29 to +10 degrees C. Fluids used included three commercial fluids available for use during 1987-1988 winter season, one discontinued commercial fluid, and eight newer fluids experimental at time of test.

  4. Extracellular proteins: Novel key components of metal resistance in cyanobacteria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin eGiner-Lamia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metals are essential for all living organisms and required for fundamental biochemical processes. However, when in excess, metals can turn into highly-toxic agents able to disrupt cell membranes, alter enzymatic activities and damage DNA. Metal concentrations are therefore tightly controlled inside cells, particularly in cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria are ecologically relevant prokaryotes that perform oxygenic photosynthesis and can be found in many different marine and freshwater ecosystems, including environments contaminated with heavy metals. As their photosynthetic machinery imposes high demands for metals, homeostasis of these micronutrients has been widely studied in cyanobacteria. So far, most studies have focused on how cells are capable of controlling their internal metal pools, with a strong bias towards the analysis of intracellular processes. Ultrastructure, modulation of physiology, dynamic changes in transcription and protein levels have been studied, but what takes place in the extracellular environment when cells are exposed to an unbalanced metal availability remains largely unknown. The interest in studying the subset of proteins present in the extracellular space has only recently begun and the identification and functional analysis of the cyanobacterial exoproteomes are just emerging. Remarkably, metal-related proteins such as the copper-chaperone CopM or the iron-binding protein FutA2 have already been identified outside the cell. With this perspective, we aim to raise the awareness that metal-resistance mechanisms are not yet fully known and hope to motivate future studies assessing the role of extracellular proteins on bacterial metal homeostasis, with a special focus on cyanobacteria.

  5. Ultrasonic techniques for fluids characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Povey, Malcolm J W

    1997-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive and practical guide to the use of ultrasonic techniques for the characterization of fluids. Focusing on ultrasonic velocimetry, the author covers the basic topics and techniques necessaryfor successful ultrasound measurements on emulsions, dispersions, multiphase media, and viscoelastic/viscoplastic materials. Advanced techniques such as scattering, particle sizing, and automation are also presented. As a handbook for industrial and scientific use, Ultrasonic Techniques for Fluids Characterization is an indispensable guide to chemists and chemical engineers using ultrasound for research or process monitoring in the chemical, food processing, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, biotechnology,and fuels industries. Key Features * Appeals to anyone using ultrasound to study fluids * Provides the first detailed description of the ultrasound profiling technique for dispersions * Describes new techniques for measuring phase transitions and nucleation, such as water/ice and oil/fat * Presents the l...

  6. Single fluid inclusion study by SRXRF microprobe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.He; G.C.Li; K.X.Lin; Y.Y.Huang; K.F.Li

    2001-01-01

    The nondestructive analysis technique of single fluid inclusions by SRXRF microprobe at BSRF was developed.To test the method,A canning analysis reult of a single fluid inclusion in quartz crystal was presented.With this technique,the semi-quantitative inorganic ompositions of two typical individual organic fluid inclusions were also determined by using a thin glass film of known compositions as a standard.2001 Elsevier Science B.V.All rights reserved.

  7. Thermodynamics of Angular Propulsion in Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polihronov, Jeliazko G.; Straatman, Anthony G.

    2012-08-01

    The presented study examines the energetics of confined fluid flow in a rotating reference frame. Parallels are drawn to the corresponding scenario of rectilinear motion, where ejection of fluid results in linear propulsion of the frame. Absorption of flow energy into the frame motion leads to cooling of the ejected fluid. Relevance of the observed energetics to the temperature separation phenomenon in Ranque-Hilsch vortex tubes is discussed.

  8. On Radiative Fluids in Anisotropic Spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    Shogin, Dmitry; Amundsen, Per Amund

    2016-01-01

    We apply the second-order Israel-Stewart theory of relativistic fluid- and thermodynamics to a physically realistic model of a radiative fluid in a simple anisotropic cosmological background. We investigate the asymptotic future of the resulting cosmological model and review the role of the dissipative phenomena in the early Universe. We demonstrate that the transport properties of the fluid alone, if described appropriately, do not explain the presently observed accelerated expansion of the ...

  9. Introduction to the physics of fluids and solids

    CERN Document Server

    Trefil, J S

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to the Physics of Fluids and Solids presents a way to learn continuum mechanics without mastering any other systems. It discusses an introduction to the principles of fluid mechanics. Another focus of study is the fluids in astrophysics. Some of the topics covered in the book are the rotation of the galaxy, the concept of stability, the fluids in motion, and the waves in fluids, the theory of the tides, the vibrations of the earth, and nuclear fission. The viscosity in fluids is covered. The flow of viscous fluids is discussed. The text identifies the general circulation of the a

  10. Extracellular acidosis promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation to MHC class II-expressing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliyev, Boris K; Sumarokov, Alexander B; Buriachkovskaia, Lyudmila I; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation in peripheral tissues is usually associated with local acidosis. In the present study, we demonstrate that extracellular acidification enhances GM-CSF- and IFN-γ-induced expression of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 in human neutrophils (neutrophil transdifferentiation), and potentiates antigen-capturing capacities (both endocytosis and phagocytosis) of the transdifferentiated cells. Furthermore, in acidic conditions the transdifferentiated neutrophils have stronger antigen-presenting capacity, inducing more intense proliferation of autologous T lymphocytes in the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxin A. Thus, extracellular acidosis can represent a factor that promotes neutrophil transdifferentiation and potentiates the functional abilities of the transdifferentiated cells in inflammatory foci in vivo.

  11. Synovial fluid analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bursae (fluid-filled sacs in the joints), and tendon sheaths. After the joint area is cleaned, the ... HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes ...

  12. Amniotic fluid (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. ... of fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  13. Pericardial Fluid Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help diagnose the cause of inflammation of the pericardium (pericarditis) and/or fluid accumulation around the heart ( ... pressure within blood vessels or inflammation of the pericardium. An initial set of tests, including fluid protein ...

  14. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... staining a sample of fluid taken from the pericardium. This is the sac surrounding the heart to ... sample of fluid will be taken from the pericardium. This is done through a procedure called pericardiocentesis . ...

  15. Lectures on fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Shinbrot, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Readable and user-friendly, this high-level introduction explores the derivation of the equations of fluid motion from statistical mechanics, classical theory, and a portion of the modern mathematical theory of viscous, incompressible fluids. 1973 edition.

  16. The dual CCR5 and CCR2 inhibitor cenicriviroc does not redistribute HIV into extracellular space: implications for plasma viral load and intracellular DNA decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Victor G; Hassounah, Said; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Lefebvre, Eric; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Cenicriviroc is a potent antagonist of the chemokine coreceptors 5 and 2 (CCR5/CCR2) and blocks HIV-1 entry. The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been shown in tissue culture to be able to repel cell-free virions from the cell surface into extracellular space. We hypothesized that cenicriviroc might exhibit a similar effect, and tested this using clinical samples from the Phase IIb study 652-2-202, by measuring rates of intracellular DNA decline. We also monitored viral RNA levels in culture fluids. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of cenicriviroc (20 nM) or maraviroc (50 nM) or controls. Viral load levels and p24 were measured by ELISA, quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR at 4 h post-infection. Frozen PBMC DNA samples from 30 patients with virological success in the Phase IIb study were studied, as were early and late reverse transcript levels. Docking studies compared binding between cenicriviroc/CCR5 and maraviroc/CCR5. Unlike maraviroc, cenicriviroc did not cause an increase in the amount of virus present in culture fluids at 4 h compared with baseline. The use of cenicriviroc did, however, result in lower levels of intracellular viral DNA after 4 h. Structural modelling indicates that cenicriviroc binds more deeply than maraviroc to the hydrophobic pocket of CCR5, providing an explanation for the absence of viral rebound with cenicriviroc. In contrast to maraviroc, cenicriviroc does not repel virus back into extracellular space. Differences in results may be due to superior binding of cenicriviroc to CCR5 compared with maraviroc. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Fluid force transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  18. Working fluid selection for organic Rankine cycles - Impact of uncertainty of fluid properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Andreasen, Jesper Graa; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    of processmodels and constraints 2) selection of property models, i.e. Penge Robinson equation of state 3)screening of 1965 possible working fluid candidates including identification of optimal process parametersbased on Monte Carlo sampling 4) propagating uncertainty of fluid parameters to the ORC netpower output......This study presents a generic methodology to select working fluids for ORC (Organic Rankine Cycles)taking into account property uncertainties of the working fluids. A Monte Carlo procedure is described as a tool to propagate the influence of the input uncertainty of the fluid parameters on the ORC...

  19. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Seper

    Full Text Available The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  20. Sound scattering at fluid-fluid rough surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Extinction theorem was used to deduce the first order scattering cross-section including the double scattering effects for the fluid-fluid rough surface. If the double scattering effects are neglected in the present method, the scattering cross-section agrees with the result obtained by the perturbation method based on Rayleigh hypothesis. Calculations of scattering strength were carried out, and comparisons with the first-order perturbation method based on Rayleigh hypothesis were also done. The results show that double scattering effects are obvious with the increase of the root mean square of surface height and the grazing angle when the valid condition k1h < 1 is satisfied.

  1. Extracellular enolase of Candida albicans is involved in colonization of mammalian intestinal epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Cardoso Silva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Enolase is secreted by C. albicans and is present in its biofilms although its extracellular function is unknown. Here we show that extracellular enolase mediates the colonization of small intestine mucosa by C. albicans. Assays using intestinal mucosa disks show that C. albicans adhesion is inhibited, in a dose dependent mode, either by pretreatment of intestinal epithelium mucosa disks with recombinant C. albicans enolase (70% at 0.5 mg/ml enolase or by pretreatment of C. albicans yeasts with anti-enolase antibodies (48% with 20 µg antiserum. Also using flow cytometry, immunoblots of conditioned media and confocal microscopy we demonstrate that enolase is present in biofilms and that the extracellular enolase is not an artifact due to cell lysis, but must represent functional secretion of a stable form. This is the first direct evidence that C. albicans extracellular enolase mediates colonization on its primary translocation site. Also, because enolase is encoded by a single locus in C. albicans, its dual role peptide, as glycolytic enzyme and extracellular peptide, is a remarkable example of gene sharing in fungi.

  2. Resorbable extracellular matrix grafts in urologic reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Santucci

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is an increasingly large body of literature concerning tissue-engineering products that may be used in urology. Some of these are quite complex (such as multilayer patient-specific cell-seeded implants yet the most simple and successful products to date are also the most uncomplicated: resorbable acellular extra-cellular matrices (ECMs harvested from animals. ECMs have been used in a variety of difficult urologic reconstruction problems, and this review is intended to summarize this complex literature for the practicing urologist. METHODS: Medline search of related terms such as "SIS, small intestinal submucosa, ECM, extracellular matrix, acellular matrix and urologic reconstruction". Manuscripts missed in the initial search were taken from the bibliographies of the primary references. RESULTS: Full review of potential clinical uses of resorbable extra-cellular matrices in urologic reconstruction. CONCLUSIONS: Currently, the "state of the art" in tissue engineering solutions for urologic reconstruction means resorbable acellular xenograft matrices. They show promise when used as a pubovaginal sling or extra bolstering layers in ureteral or urethral repairs, although recent problems with inflammation following 8-ply pubovaginal sling use and failures after 1- and 4-ply SIS repair of Peyronie's disease underscore the need for research before wide adoption. Preliminary data is mixed concerning the potential for ECM urethral patch graft, and more data is needed before extended uses such as bladder augmentation and ureteral replacement are contemplated. The distant future of ECMs in urology likely will include cell-seeded grafts with the eventual hope of producing "off the shelf" replacement materials. Until that day arrives, ECMs only fulfill some of the requirements for the reconstructive urologist.

  3. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    reveal insights into pathological conditions such as epilepsy, migraine, and spreading depolarization following cerebral ischemia. In addition, particular neurological diseases occur as a result of mutations in the α2- (familial hemiplegic migraine type 2) and α3 isoforms (rapid-onset dystonia...... parkinsonism/alternating hemiplegia of childhood). This review addresses aspects of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in the regulation of extracellular K(+) in the central nervous system as well as the related pathophysiology. Understanding the physiological setting in non-pathological tissue would provide a better...

  4. Extracellular polymeric bacterial coverages as minimal surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Saa, A; Saa, Alberto; Teschke, Omar

    2005-01-01

    Surfaces formed by extracellular polymeric substances enclosing individual and some small communities of {\\it Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans} on plates of hydrophobic silicon and hydrophilic mica are analyzed by means of atomic force microscopy imaging. Accurate nanoscale descriptions of such coverage surfaces are obtained. The good agreement with the predictions of a rather simple but realistic theoretical model allows us to conclude that they correspond, indeed, to minimal area surfaces enclosing a given volume associated with the encased bacteria. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first shape characterization of the coverage formed by these biomolecules, with possible applications to the study of biofilms.

  5. Bidirectional extracellular matrix signaling during tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Normal tissue development and function are regulated by the interplay between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM provides biochemical and mechanical contextual information that is conveyed from the cell membrane through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus to direct cell phenotype. Cells, in turn, remodel the ECM and thereby sculpt their local microenvironment. Here we review the mechanisms by which cells interact with, respond to, and influence the ECM, with particular emphasis placed on the role of this bidirectional communication during tissue morphogenesis. We also discuss the implications for successful engineering of functional tissues ex vivo. PMID:19896886

  6. Fluid Dynamics and Entropic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nagle, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A new entropic gravity inspired derivation of general relativity from thermodynamics is presented. This generalizes, within Einstein gravity, the "Thermodynamics of Spacetime" approach by T. Jacobson, which relies on the Raychaudhuri evolution equation. Here the rest of the first law of thermodynamics is incorporated by using the Damour-Navier-Stokes equation, known from the membrane paradigm for describing fluid dynamics on the horizon.

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN BIOFILMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-09-12

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms.

  8. Detection of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alane Beatriz Vermelho

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We present herein an improved assay for detecting the presence of extracellular proteases from microorganisms on agar plates. Using different substrates (gelatin, BSA, hemoglobin incorporated into the agar and varying the culture medium composition, we were able to detect proteolytic activities from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus and Serratia marcescens as well as the influence that these components displayed in the expression of these enzymes. For all microorganisms tested we found that in agar-BHI or yeast extract medium containing gelatin the sensitivity of proteinase detection was considerably greater than in BSA-agar or hemoglobin-agar. However, when BSA or hemoglobin were added to the culture medium, there was an increase in growth along with a marked reduction in the amount of proteinase production. In the case of M. luteus the incorporation of glycerol in BHI or yeast extract gelatin-agar induced protease liberation. Our results indicate that the technique described here is of value for detecting extracellular proteases directly in the culture medium, by means of a qualitative assay, simple, inexpensive, straight forward method to assess the presence of the proteolytic activity of a given microorganism colony with great freedom in substrate selection.

  9. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  10. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.

  11. Modeling biofilms with dual extracellular electron transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Kuprat, Andrew; Schenk, Jim; Ivory, Cornelius; Fredrickson, Jim; Beyenal, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemically active biofilms have a unique form of respiration in which they utilize solid external materials as terminal electron acceptors for their metabolism. Currently, two primary mechanisms have been identified for long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET): a diffusion- and a conduction-based mechanism. Evidence in the literature suggests that some biofilms, particularly Shewanella oneidensis, produce the requisite components for both mechanisms. In this study, a generic model is presented that incorporates the diffusion- and the conduction-based mechanisms and allows electrochemically active biofilms to utilize both simultaneously. The model was applied to S. oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms using experimentally generated data found in the literature. Our simulation results show that 1) biofilms having both mechanisms available, especially if they can interact, may have a metabolic advantage over biofilms that can use only a single mechanism; 2) the thickness of G. sulfurreducens biofilms is likely not limited by conductivity; 3) accurate intrabiofilm diffusion coefficient values are critical for current generation predictions; and 4) the local biofilm potential and redox potential are two distinct parameters and cannot be assumed to have identical values. Finally, we determined that simulated cyclic and squarewave voltammetry based on our model are currently not capable of determining the specific percentages of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in a biofilm. The developed model will be a critical tool for designing experiments to explain EET mechanisms. PMID:24113651

  12. Immunometabolism of human autoimmune diseases: from metabolites to extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Candia, Paola; De Rosa, Veronica; Gigantino, Vincenzo; Botti, Gerardo; Ceriello, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-06-26

    Immunometabolism focuses on the mechanisms regulating the impact of metabolism on lymphocyte activity and autoimmunity outbreak. The adipose tissue is long known to release adipokines, either pro- or anti-inflammatory factors bridging nutrition and immune function. More recently, adipocytes were discovered to also release extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing a plethora of biological molecules, including metabolites and microRNAs, which can regulate cell function/metabolism in distant tissues, suggesting that immune regulatory function by the adipose tissue may be far more complex than originally thought. Moreover, EVs were also identified as important mediators of immune cell-to-cell communication, adding a further microenvironmental mechanism of plasticity to fine-tune specific lymphocyte responses. This Review will first focus on the known mechanisms by which metabolism impacts immune function, presenting a systemic (nutrition and long-ranged adipokines) and a cellular point of view (metabolic pathway derangement in autoimmunity). It will then discuss the new discoveries concerning how EVs may act as nanometric vehicles integrating immune/metabolic responses at the level of the extracellular environment and affecting pathological processes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Extracellular vesicles derived from preosteoblasts influence embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Rekha; Santos, Lívia; Awasthi, Siddhant; von Erlach, Thomas; Chow, Lesley W; Bertazzo, Sergio; Stevens, Molly M

    2014-07-15

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into all cell types of the body and, therefore, hold tremendous promise for cell-based regenerative medicine therapies. One significant challenge that should be addressed before using ESCs in the clinic is to improve methods of efficiently and effectively directing the differentiation of this heterogeneous cell population. The work presented here examines the potential of harnessing naturally derived extracellular vesicles to deliver genetic material from mature cells to undifferentiated ESCs for the purpose of manipulating stem cell fate. Vesicles were isolated from preosteoblast cells and were found to be ∼170 nm in diameter and to express the CD40 surface marker. Multiple interactions were visualized between vesicles and ESCs using confocal microscopy, and no significant difference in cell viability was noted. Incubation with vesicles caused significant changes in ESC gene expression, including persistence of pluripotent gene levels as well as increased neurectoderm differentiation. Genetic cargo of the vesicles as well as the cells from which they were derived were examined using a small microRNA (miRNA) gene array. Interestingly, ∼20% of the examined miRNAs were increased more than twofold in the vesicles compared with preosteoblast cells. Together, these results suggest that extracellular vesicles may be utilized as a novel method of directing stem cell differentiation. Future work examining methods for controlled delivery of vesicles may improve the clinical potential of these physiological liposomes for therapeutic applications.

  14. Extracellular N-acetylaspartate depletion in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Antonio; Sen, Jon; Petzold, Axel; Russo, Salvatore; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin; Tavazzi, Barbara; Vagnozzi, Roberto; Signoretti, Stefano; Amorini, Angela Maria; Bellia, Francesco; Lazzarino, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) is almost exclusively localized in neurons in the adult brain and is present in high concentration in the CNS. It can be measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and is seen as a marker of neuronal damage and death. NMR spectroscopy and animal models have shown NAA depletion to occur in various types of chronic and acute brain injury. We investigated 19 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Microdialysis was utilized to recover NAA, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol and glutamate, at 12-h intervals. These markers were correlated with survival and a 6-month Glasgow Outcome Score. Eleven patients died and eight survived. A linear mixed model analysis showed a significant effect of outcome and of the interaction between time of injury and outcome on NAA levels (p = 0.009 and p = 0.004, respectively). Overall, extracellular NAA was 34% lower in non-survivors. A significant non-recoverable fall was observed in this group from day 4 onwards, with a concomitant rise in lactate-pyruvate ratio and glycerol. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is a significant contributor to poor outcome following TBI and propose extracellular NAA as a potential marker for monitoring interventions aimed at preserving mitochondrial function.

  15. Extracellular enzyme activity in a willow sewage treatment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinska, Maria Swiontek; Lalke-Porczyk, Elżbieta; Kalwasińska, Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the results of studies on the activity of extra-cellular enzymes in soil-willow vegetation filter soil which is used in the post-treatment of household sewage in an onsite wastewater treatment system located in central Poland. Wastewater is discharged from the detached house by gravity into the onsite wastewater treatment system. It flows through a connecting pipe into a single-chamber septic tank and is directed by the connecting pipe to a control well to be further channelled in the soil-willow filter by means of a subsurface leaching system. Soil samples for the studies were collected from two depths of 5 cm and 1 m from three plots: close to the wastewater inflow, at mid-length of the plot and close to its terminal part. Soil samples were collected from May to October 2009. The activity of the extra-cellular enzymes was assayed by the fluorometric method using 4-methylumbelliferyl and 7-amido-4-methylcoumarin substrate. The ranking of potential activity of the assayed enzymes was the same at 5 cm and 1 m soil depths, i.e. esterase > phosphmomoesterase > leucine-aminopeptidase > β-glucosidase > α-glucosidase. The highest values of enzymatic activity were recorded in the surface layer of the soil at the wastewater inflow and decreased with increasing distance from that point.

  16. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edginton, Ryan S; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-09-15

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis.

  17. Combustion, Complex Fluids, and Fluid Physics Experiments on the ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Brian; Urban, David

    2012-01-01

    From the very first days of human spaceflight, NASA has been conducting experiments in space to understand the effect of weightlessness on physical and chemically reacting systems. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio has been at the forefront of this research looking at both fundamental studies in microgravity as well as experiments targeted at reducing the risks to long duration human missions to the moon, Mars, and beyond. In the current International Space Station (ISS) era, we now have an orbiting laboratory that provides the highly desired condition of long-duration microgravity. This allows continuous and interactive research similar to Earth-based laboratories. Because of these capabilities, the ISS is an indispensible laboratory for low gravity research. NASA GRC has been actively involved in developing and operating facilities and experiments on the ISS since the beginning of a permanent human presence on November 2, 2000. As the lead Center both Combustion, Fluid Physics, and Acceleration Measurement GRC has led the successful implementation of an Acceleration Measurement systems, the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) as well as the continued use of other facilities on the ISS. These facilities have supported combustion experiments in fundamental droplet combustion fire detection fire extinguishment soot phenomena flame liftoff and stability and material flammability. The fluids experiments have studied capillary flow magneto-rheological fluids colloidal systems extensional rheology pool and nucleate boiling phenomena. In this paper, we provide an overview of the experiments conducted on the ISS over the past 12 years. We also provide a look to the future development. Experiments presented in combustion include areas such as droplet combustion, gaseous diffusion flames, solid fuels, premixed flame studies, fire safety, and super critical oxidation processes. In fluid physics, experiments are discussed in

  18. The pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis exports extracellular vesicles containing highly immunogenic α-Galactosyl epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Milene C; Matsuo, Alisson L; Ganiko, Luciane; Medeiros, Lia C Soares; Miranda, Kildare; Silva, Luiz S; Freymüller-Haapalainen, Edna; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Almeida, Igor C; Puccia, Rosana

    2011-03-01

    Exosome-like vesicles containing virulence factors, enzymes, and antigens have recently been characterized in fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Here, we describe extracellular vesicles carrying highly immunogenic α-linked galactopyranosyl (α-Gal) epitopes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. P. brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that causes human paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). For vesicle preparations, cell-free supernatant fluids from yeast cells cultivated in Ham's defined medium-glucose were concentrated in an Amicon ultrafiltration system and ultracentrifuged at 100,000 × g. P. brasiliensis antigens were present in preparations from phylogenetically distinct isolates Pb18 and Pb3, as observed in immunoblots revealed with sera from PCM patients. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), vesicle components containing α-Gal epitopes reacted strongly with anti-α-Gal antibodies isolated from both Chagas' disease and PCM patients, with Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) (a lectin that recognizes terminal α-Gal), but only faintly with natural anti-α-Gal. Reactivity was inhibited after treatment with α-galactosidase. Vesicle preparations analyzed by electron microscopy showed vesicular structures of 20 to 200 nm that were labeled both on the surface and in the lumen with MOA. In P. brasiliensis cells, components carrying α-Gal epitopes were found distributed on the cell wall, following a punctuated confocal pattern, and inside large intracellular vacuoles. Lipid-free vesicle fractions reacted with anti-α-Gal in ELISA only when not digested with α-galactosidase, while reactivity with glycoproteins was reduced after β-elimination, which is indicative of partial O-linked chain localization. Our findings open new areas to explore in terms of host-parasite relationships in PCM and the role played in vivo by vesicle components and α-galactosyl epitopes.

  19. Involvement of extracellular signal regulated kinases in traumatic brain injury-induced depression in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jinn-Rung; Cheng, Yi-Hsuan; Chen, Yi-Shion; Chio, Chung-Ching; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the most common cause of death and acquired disability among children and young adults in the developed countries. In clinical studies, the incidence of depression is high after TBI, and the mechanisms behind TBI-induced depression remain unclear. In the present study, we subjected rats to a moderate fluid percussion into the closed cranial cavity to induce TBI. After 3 days of recovery, injured rats were given a forced swim test (FST) and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. We found that TBI rats exhibited increased duration of immobility and longer latency to begin chewing food in a new environment compared with sham-operated rats. Western blot analysis showed that TBI led to a decrease in the phosphorylated levels of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), significantly reduced the duration of immobility when administered once per day for 14 days. Consistent with behavioral tests, fluoxetine treatment reversed TBI-induced decrease in p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK levels. Pre-treatment with a selective tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) blocked the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. PCPA also prevented the effect of fluoxetine on ERK1/2 phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with ERK inhibitor SL327 but not p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 prevented the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine. These results suggest that ERK1/2 plays a critical role in TBI-induced depression.

  20. Respiratory infections cause the release of extracellular vesicles: implications in exacerbation of asthma/COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suffwan Eltom

    Full Text Available Infection-related exacerbations of respiratory diseases are a major health concern; thus understanding the mechanisms driving them is of paramount importance. Despite distinct inflammatory profiles and pathological differences, asthma and COPD share a common clinical facet: raised airway ATP levels. Furthermore, evidence is growing to suggest that infective agents can cause the release of extracellular vesicle (EVs in vitro and in bodily fluids. ATP can evoke the P2X7/caspase 1 dependent release of IL-1β/IL-18 from EVs; these cytokines are associated with neutrophilia and are increased during exacerbations. Thus we hypothesized that respiratory infections causes the release of EVs in the airway and that the raised ATP levels, present in respiratory disease, triggers the release of IL-1β/IL-18, neutrophilia and subsequent disease exacerbations.To begin to test this hypothesis we utilised human cell-based assays, ex vivo murine BALF, in vivo pre-clinical models and human samples to test this hypothesis.Data showed that in a murine model of COPD, known to have increased airway ATP levels, infective challenge causes exacerbated inflammation. Using cell-based systems, murine models and samples collected from challenged healthy subjects, we showed that infection can trigger the release of EVs. When exposed to ATP the EVs release IL-1β/IL-18 via a P2X7/caspase-dependent mechanism. Furthermore ATP challenge can cause a P2X7 dependent increase in LPS-driven neutrophilia.This preliminary data suggests a possible mechanism for how infections could exacerbate respiratory diseases and may highlight a possible signalling pathway for drug discovery efforts in this area.

  1. [Arterial pressure curve and fluid status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Fukui, K

    2009-04-01

    Fluid optimization is a major contributor to improved outcome in patients. Unfortunately, anesthesiologists are often in doubt whether an additional fluid bolus will improve the hemodynamics of the patient or not as excess fluid may even jeopardize the condition. This article discusses physiological concepts of liberal versus restrictive fluid management followed by a discussion on the respective capabilities of various monitors to predict fluid responsiveness. The parameter difference in pulse pressure (dPP), derived from heart-lung interaction in mechanically ventilated patients is discussed in detail. The dPP cutoff value of 13% to predict fluid responsiveness is presented together with several assessment techniques of dPP. Finally, confounding variables on dPP measurements, such as ventilation parameters, pneumoperitoneum and use of norepinephrine are also mentioned.

  2. Tribodynamic Modeling of Digital Fluid Power Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per

    In fluid power engineering, efficiency and reliability optimization have become a major objective. The interest in using fluid power transmission in wind and wave energy applications are producing requirements concerning efficiency and reliability in order to compete with other transmission systems...... of digital fluid power displacement units has been able to address this problem. The main idea of the digital fluid power displacement technology is to disable individual chambers, by use of electrical actuated valves. A displacement chamber is disabled by keeping the valve, between the chamber and the low...... design methods and tools are important to the development of digital fluid power machines. The work presented in this dissertation is part of a research program focusing on the development of digital fluid power MW-motors for use in hydraulic drive train in wind turbines. As part of this development...

  3. The Subscale Orbital Fluid Transfer Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meserole, J. S.; Collins, Frank G.; Jones, Ogden; Antar, Basil; Menzel, Reinhard; Gray, Perry

    1989-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Spacecraft Propulsion (CASP) is a subcontractor to Boeing Aerospace Corporation to provide support for the concept definition and design of a subscale orbital fluid transfer experiment (SOFTE). SOFTE is an experiment that will look at the fluid mechanics of the process of transfer of a saturated fluid between two tanks. The experiment will be placed in two get away special (GAS) can containers; the tanks will be in one container and the power and electronics will be in a second container. Since GAS cans are being used, the experiment will be autonomous. The work during the present year consisted of examining concepts for visual observation of the fluid transfer process, methods for accurately metering the amount of fluid transferred between the two tanks, possible test fluids, and materials for the elastomeric diaphragm.

  4. Sideload vanes for fluid pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Scott R. (Inventor); Dills, Michael H. (Inventor); Rodriguez, Jose L. (Inventor); Tepool, John Eric (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A fluid pump assembly includes a rotatable component that can be rotated about an axis and a static vane assembly located adjacent to the rotatable component. The static vane assembly includes a circumferential surface axially spaced from the rotatable component, and one or more vanes extending from the circumferential surface toward the rotatable component. The one or more vanes are configured to produce a radial load on the rotatable component when the rotatable component is rotating about the axis and a fluid is present between the static vane assembly and the rotatable component.

  5. Fluid-phase endocytosis in yeasts other than Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, N; Puente, P; Leal, F

    1990-05-01

    A FITC-dextran internalization assay with Saccharomyces cerevisiae as positive control was used to determine whether fluid-phase endocytosis is a general characteristic of yeasts. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Pichia polymorpha, Kluyveromyces phaseolosporus, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida albicans were clearly positive, whereas results obtained with Debaryomyces marama were inconclusive. In all cases internalized FITC-dextran was found to be localized in the vacuoles and the process was always time- and temperature-dependent. Lower eucaryotes, particularly yeasts, appear to have the ability to incorporate substances from the extracellular medium through fluid-phase endocytosis.

  6. Addition of thrombin reduces the recovery of extracellular vesicles from blood plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anush Arakelyan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are widely studied as a system of intercellular communication, as markers of various diseases, as well as a vehicle for delivery of various bioactive molecules to various cells. Investigation of EVs’ structure and function requires their isolation and precise quantification. However, in the current literature, there are significant discrepancies in the estimated numbers of EVs in different body fluids. In part, this discrepancy is due to the difference in EVs isolation protocols used by different investigators. A common protocol that includes ExoQuick ™ is often used to isolate EVs from body fluids and culture medium. Here, we show that in the case of isolation of EVs from blood, thrombin should be omitted from the protocol as clots formed due to the thrombin-triggered coagulation may entrap many EVs thus leading to the underestimation of their numbers.

  7. Fluid and particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Michell, S J

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and Particle Mechanics provides information pertinent to hydraulics or fluid mechanics. This book discusses the properties and behavior of liquids and gases in motion and at rest. Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the science of fluid mechanics that is subdivided accordingly into two main branches, namely, fluid statics and fluid dynamics. This text then examines the flowmeter devices used for the measurement of flow of liquids and gases. Other chapters consider the principle of resistance in open channel flow, which is based on improper application of th

  8. Numerical study of fluid motion in bioreactor with two mixers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleva, I., E-mail: izheleva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Heat Technology, Hydraulics and Ecology, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria); Lecheva, A., E-mail: alecheva@uni-ruse.bg [Department of Mathematics, Angel Kanchev University of Rousse, 8 Studentska str., 7017 Rousse (Bulgaria)

    2015-10-28

    Numerical study of hydrodynamic laminar behavior of a viscous fluid in bioreactor with multiple mixers is provided in the present paper. The reactor is equipped with two disk impellers. The fluid motion is studied in stream function-vorticity formulation. The calculations are made by a computer program, written in MATLAB. The fluid structure is described and numerical results are graphically presented and commented.

  9. PKN problem for non-Newtonian fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents analytical solution for hydraulic fracture driven by a non-Newtonian fluid and propagating under plane strain conditions in cross sections parallel to the fracture front. Conclusions are drawn on the influence of the fluid properties on the fracture propagation.

  10. Molecular tumor-diagnostics in body fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jacques Benno de

    2000-01-01

    Tumor-derived nucleic acids are frequently present in body fluids (e.g. urine, blood, sputum, stool, bile, and cerebrospinal fluid) that had contact with malignant or premalignant tissues. Detection of this mutant DNA or quantification of aberrant gene expression may offer new noninvasive methods fo

  11. Cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Erich

    1987-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center's cryogenic fluid management program flight concept definition is presented in viewgraph form. Diagrams are given of the cryogenic fluid management subpallet and its configuration with the Delta launch vehicle. Information is given in outline form on feasibility studies, requirements definition, and flight experiments design.

  12. Fluid fragmentation from hospital toilets

    CERN Document Server

    Traverso, G; Lu, C -C; Maa, R; Langer, R; Bourouiba, L

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections represent significant health and financial burdens to society. Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a particularly challenging bacteria with the potential to cause severe diarrhea and death. One mode of transmission for C. difficile, as well as other pathogens, which has received little attention is the potential air contamination by pathogen-bearing droplets emanating from toilets. In the fluid dynamics video submitted to the APS DFD Gallery of Fluid Motion 2013, we present flow visualizations via high-speed recordings showing the capture of the product of the fluid fragmentation generated by hospital toilet high-pressure flushes. Important quantities of both large and small droplets are observed. We illustrate how high-pressure flushes and cleaning products currently used in hospital toilets result in aggravating, rather than alleviating, the suspension and recirculation of tenacious airborne pathogen-bearing droplets.

  13. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  14. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  15. Thermoreversible copolymer gels for extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, B; Kim, S W; Bae, Y H

    2000-07-01

    To improve the properties of a reversible synthetic extracellular matrix based on a thermally reversible polymer, copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylic acid were prepared in benzene with varying contents of acrylic acid (0 to 3%) and the thermal properties were evaluated. The poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and copolymers made with acrylic acid had molecular weights from 0.8 to 1.7 x10(6) D. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed the high-molecular-weight acrylic acid copolymers had similar onset temperatures to the homopolymers, but the peak width was considerably increased with increasing acrylic acid content. DSC and cloud point measurements showed that polymers with 0 to 3% acrylic acid exhibit a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition between 30 degrees and 37 degrees C. In swelling studies, the homopolymer showed significant syneresis at temperatures above 31 degrees C. Copolymers with 1 and 1.5% showed syneresis beginning at 32 degrees and 37 degrees C, respectively. At 37 degrees C the copolymers with 1.5-3% acrylic acid showed little or no syneresis. Due to the high water content and a transition near physiologic conditions (below 37 degrees C), the polymers with 1.5-2.0% acrylic acid exhibited properties that would be useful in the development of a refillable synthetic extracellular matrix. Such a matrix could be applied to several cell types, including islets of Langerhans, for a biohybrid artificial pancreas.

  16. [Glutamic acid as a universal extracellular signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing view is that both glutamic (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric (GABA) acids play a role as an amino acid neurotransmitter released from neurons. However, little attention has been paid to the possible expression and functionality of signaling machineries required for amino acidergic neurotransmission in cells other than central neurons. In line with our first demonstration of the presence of Glu receptors outside the brain, in this review I will outline our recent findings accumulated since then on the physiological and pathological significance of neuronal amino acids as an extracellular signal essential for homeostasis in a variety of phenotypic cells. In undifferentiated neural progenitor cells, for instance, functional expression is seen with different signaling machineries used for glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in neurons. Moreover, Glu plays a role in mechanisms underlying suppression of proliferation for self-replication in undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells. There is more accumulating evidence for neuronal amino acids playing a role as an extracellular autocrine or paracrine signal commonly used in different phenotypic cells. Evaluation of drugs currently used could be thus beneficial for the efficient prophylaxis and/or the therapy of a variety of diseases relevant to disturbance of amino acid signaling in diverse organs.

  17. Extracellular superoxide dismutase of boar seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalowka, M; Wysocki, P; Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2008-08-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzymatic component of the antioxidant defense system that protects spermatozoa by catalysing the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Age and season effects on SOD activity in the seminal plasma were measured in boars at the onset of 8 months through a 35-month period. It was found that age-related changes in SOD activity in the seminal plasma were markedly higher in boars less than 2 years of age. However, it appeared that SOD activity was established at the early sexual maturity age (8-12 months). There were variations in SOD activity throughout the season, being significantly higher in spring and autumn than in summer. A secretory extracellular form of SOD (EC-SOD) was purified to homogeneity (350-fold) from boar seminal plasma, using a three-step purification protocol (affinity chromatography followed by ion exchange and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography). The molecular properties and specificity of SOD (molecular mass, isoelectric point, optimum pH, thermostability and susceptibility to inhibitors) confirmed that the purified enzyme is an extracellular form of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase occurring in boar seminal plasma. The results of this study indicate that EC-SOD is an important antioxidant enzyme of boar seminal plasma, which plays an important physiological role in counteracting oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

  18. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  19. Extracellular entrapment and degradation of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrera, Consol; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Lazzaretto, Beatrice; Andón, Fernando T.; Hultenby, Kjell; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials.Neutrophils extrude neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) consisting of a network of chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins to enable non-phagocytic killing of microorganisms. Here, utilizing a model of ex vivo activated human neutrophils, we present evidence of entrapment and degradation of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in NETs. The degradation of SWCNTs was catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO) present in purified NETs and the reaction was facilitated by the addition of H2O2 and NaBr. These results show that SWCNTs can undergo acellular, MPO-mediated biodegradation and imply that the immune system may deploy similar strategies to rid the body of offending microorganisms and engineered nanomaterials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Suppl. Fig. 1 - length distribution of SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 2 - characterization of pristine vs. oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 3 - endotoxin evaluation; suppl. Fig. 4 - NET characterization; suppl. Fig. 5 - UV-Vis/NIR analysis of biodegradation of oxidized SWCNTs; suppl. Fig. 6 - cytotoxicity of partially degraded SWCNTs. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr06047k

  20. Neuropeptide Y infusion into the shell region of the rat nucleus accumbens increases extracellular levels of dopamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wegener, Gregers; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen;

    2009-01-01

    Increases in extracellular dopamine in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens are centrally involved in mediating reinforcement of addictive drugs. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its receptors are present in the nucleus accumbens and have been implicated in addiction mechanisms. This study further...... explored the potential role of NPY in addiction mechanisms using microdialysis to measure extracellular dopamine in vivo after infusion of NPY directly into the accumbal shell region of adult rats. NPY was found to dose-dependently increase extracellular dopamine levels, indicating that NPY could play...

  1. New exact perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's equations. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggla, Claes; Rosquist, Kjell

    1990-12-01

    A family of new spatially homogeneous Bianchi type VIh perfect fluid solutions of the Einstein equations is presented. The fluid flow is orthogonal to the spatially homogeneous hypersurfaces, and the pressure is proportional to the energy density.

  2. Extracellular matrix in canine mammary tumors with special focus on versican, a versatile extracellular proteoglycan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdélyi, Ildikó

    2006-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) research has become fundamental to understand cancer. This thesis focuses on the exploration of ECM composition and organization in canine mammary tumors, with a special interest in the large chondroitin-sulfate proteoglycan (PG), versican. Chapter 1 gives an overvie

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived Semaphorin3B orients neuroepithelial cell divisions in the apicobasal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeille, Elise; Reynaud, Florie; Sanyas, Isabelle; Bozon, Muriel; Kindbeiter, Karine; Causeret, Frédéric; Pierani, Alessandra; Falk, Julien; Moret, Frédéric; Castellani, Valérie

    2015-02-27

    The spatial orientation of cell divisions is fundamental for tissue architecture and homeostasis. Here we analysed neuroepithelial progenitors in the developing mouse spinal cord to determine whether extracellular signals orient the mitotic spindle. We report that Semaphorin3B (Sema3B) released from the floor plate and the nascent choroid plexus in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) controls progenitor division orientation. Delivery of exogenous Sema3B to neural progenitors after neural tube opening in living embryos promotes planar orientation of their division. Preventing progenitor access to cues present in the CSF by genetically engineered canal obstruction affects the proportion of planar and oblique divisions. Sema3B knockout phenocopies the loss of progenitor access to the CSF. Sema3B binds to the apical surface of mitotic progenitors and exerts its effect via Neuropilin receptors, GSK3 activation and subsequent inhibition of the microtubule stabilizer CRMP2. Thus, extrinsic control mediated by the Semaphorin signalling orients progenitor divisions in neurogenic zones.

  4. The calcium-sensing receptor and the parathyroid: past, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur David Conigrave

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid hormone (PTH defends the extracellular fluid from hypocalcemia and has powerful and well-documented actions on the skeleton and renal tubular system. To achieve a satisfactory stable plasma calcium level, the secretion of PTH, and the resulting serum PTH level, is titrated carefully to the prevailing plasma ionized Ca2+ concentration via a Ca2+ sensing mechanism that mediates feedback inhibition of PTH secretion. Herein, I consider the properties of the parathyroid Ca2+ sensing mechanism, the identity of the Ca2+ sensor, the intracellular biochemical mechanisms that it controls, the manner of its integration with other components of the PTH secretion control mechanism, and its modulation by other nutrients. Together the well established, recently elucidated, and yet-to-be discovered elements of the story constitute the past, present, and future of the parathyroid and its calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR.

  5. Prevalence, extension and characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in bone and soft tissue tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyck, P. van; Venstermans, C.; Gielen, J.; Parizel, P.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, F.M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); AZ St-Maarten, Department of Radiology, Duffel/Mechelen (Belgium); Vogel, J. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kroon, H.M.; Bloem, J.L. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Schepper, A.M.A. de [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence, extension and signal characteristics of fluid-fluid levels in a large series of 700 bone and 700 soft tissue tumors. Out of a multi-institutional database, MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a bone tumor and MRI of 700 consecutive patients with a soft tissue neoplasm were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of fluid-fluid levels. Extension (single, multiple and proportion of the lesion occupied by fluid-fluid levels) and signal characteristics on magnetic resonance imaging of fluid-fluid levels were determined. In all patients, pathologic correlation was available. Of 700 patients with a bone tumor, 19 (10 male and 9 female; mean age, 29 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.7%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included aneurysmal bone cyst (ten cases), fibrous dysplasia (two cases), osteoblastoma (one case), simple bone cyst (one case), telangiectatic osteosarcoma (one case), ''brown tumor'' (one case), chondroblastoma (one case) and giant cell tumor (two cases). Of 700 patients with a soft tissue tumor, 20 (9 males and 11 females; mean age, 34 years) presented with a fluid-fluid level (prevalence 2.9%). Multiple fluid-fluid levels occupying at least one half of the total volume of the lesion were found in the majority of patients. Diagnoses included cavernous hemangioma (12 cases), synovial sarcoma (3 cases), angiosarcoma (1 case), aneurysmal bone cyst of soft tissue (1 case), myxofibrosarcoma (1 case) and high-grade sarcoma ''not otherwise specified'' (2 cases). In our series, the largest reported in the literature to the best of our knowledge, the presence of fluid-fluid levels is a rare finding with a prevalence of 2.7 and 2.9% in bone and soft tissue tumors, respectively. Fluid-fluid levels remain a non-specific finding and can

  6. Importance of extracellular proteins in maintaining structural integrity of aerobic granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanghui; Liu, Yu

    2013-12-01

    Aerobic granules developed through self-immobilization of microorganisms are compact and structured microbial consortia embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This study investigated the contribution of extracellular proteins (PN) to maintaining the structural integrity of aerobic granule. It was found that hydrolysis of PN induced by Proteinase K led to significant disintegration of aerobic granules, whereas a substantial reduction of extracellular polysaccharides (PS) was also observed. It was proposed that hydrolysis of extracellular proteins present in the EPS matrix of aerobic granules led to collapse of the EPS matrix, and subsequent disintegration of aerobic granule. These suggested that extracellular proteins would be essential for maintaining structural stability of EPS matrix of aerobic granules. In addition, it was revealed that production of signaling molecules, such as autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) was also inhibited probably due to hydrolysis of quorum sensing receptor proteins by Proteinase K. This in turn provided an additional explanation for the observed Proteinase K-triggered dispersal of aerobic granules.

  7. Extracellular vesicles: Pharmacological modulators of the peripheral and central signals governing obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbank, Edward; Martinez, M Carmen; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its metabolic resultant dysfunctions such as insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hypertension, grouped as the "metabolic syndrome", are chronic inflammatory disorders that represent one of the most severe epidemic health problems. The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, leading to an excess of body fat and an increase of cardiovascular and diabetes risks, is regulated by the interaction between central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral signals in order to regulate behavior and finally, the metabolism of peripheral organs. At present, pharmacological treatment of obesity comprises actions in both CNS and peripheral organs. In the last decades, the extracellular vesicles have emerged as participants in many pathophysiological regulation processes. Whether used as biomarkers, targets or even tools, extracellular vesicles provided some promising effects in the treatment of a large variety of diseases. Extracellular vesicles are released by cells from the plasma membrane (microvesicles) or from multivesicular bodies (exosomes) and contain lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, such as DNA, protein coding, and non-coding RNAs. Owing to their composition, extracellular vesicles can (i) activate receptors at the target cell and then, the subsequent intracellular pathway associated to the specific receptor; (ii) transfer molecules to the target cells and thereby change their phenotype and (iii) be used as shuttle of drugs and, thus, to carry specific molecules towards specific cells. Herein, we review the impact of extracellular vesicles in modulating the central and peripheral signals governing obesity.

  8. Acute extracellular ethanol load does not produce hyponatremia by internal osmoregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.E.; Tzamaloukas, A.H.; Long, D.A.

    1986-03-05

    Hyponatremia is frequently present in subjects intoxicated with ethanol. To study whether an acute increase in extracellular osmolality by addition of ethanol creates any clinically appreciable osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, they infused over 20 sec 11 mmol/kg of ethanol intravenously into 5 anesthetized dogs (2 with intact renal function, 3 anuric) and measured plasma sodium and ethanol concentrations and osmolality at frequent intervals for 100 min after the end of the infusion. For a range of ethanol concentration between 4 and 120 mmol/l, changes in osmolality were equal to ethanol concentration in plasma water (y = -0.49 + 1.06 x mosm/kg per mmol/l, r = 0.981, p < 0.01). Plasma sodium concentration remained unchanged from baseline throughout the experiments, even at 1 min post-infusion, when osmolality was 78 +/- 25 mosm/kg above the baseline. An acute increase in extracellular osmolality created by rapid intravenous infusion of a large dose of ethanol does not create any osmotic shift of intracellular water extracellularly, that can be detected by dilution of extracellular sodium. The mechanism of hyponatremia in ethanol intoxication is not internal osmoregulation, but abnormalities in external balance of body water and/or solute.

  9. Supercritical fluid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penninger, J.M.L.; McHugh, M.A.; Radosz, M.; Krukonis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in the science and technology of supercritical fluid (scf) processing. Current research as described in the book, focuses on developments in equations of state for binary and multicomponent mixtures (including polymer solutions), solubility measurements at near-critical conditions, measurements of critical properties of binary mixtures and their correlation with equations of state. Progress in thermodynamics, coupled with advances in the design and construction of high pressure equipment, has opened up a wide avenue of commercial application (e.g. decaffeination of coffee beans, extractions of flavours and spices, purification of pharmaceutical products, separations of polymeric materials, deodorization and deacidification of vegetable oils, fractionation of fatty acids, coal liquefaction, wood delignitication, etc.)

  10. International Society for Extracellular Vesicles: first annual meeting, April 17–21, 2012: ISEV-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Elisa; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Hoen, Esther Nolte-‘t; Peinado, Hector; Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna Maria; Rao, Pooja; van Niel, Guillaume; Yáñez-Mó, María; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular micro- and nano-scale membrane vesicles produced by different cells are recognised as an essential entity of physiological fluids in a variety of organisms and function as mediators of intercellular communication employed for the regulation of multiple systemic and local processes. In the last decade, an exponential amount of experimental work was dedicated to exploring the biogenesis and secretion mechanisms, physiological and pathological functions and potential applications of the extracellular vesicles (EVs). Noteworthy is the large heterogeneity of in vitro and in vivo models applied, technical approaches developed in these studies and the diversity of designations assigned to different or similar types of EVs. Hence, there is a clear necessity for a uniform nomenclature and standardisation of methods to isolate and characterise these vesicles. In April 2012, the first meeting of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) took place bringing together this exponentially grown scientific community. The University of Gothenburg (Krefting Research Centre) together with the Interim Board of the Society created in September 2011 (Jan Lötvall, Clotilde Théry, Xandra Breakefield, Marca Wauben, Yong Song Gho, Lawrence Rajendran, Graça Raposo, Douglas Taylor, Margareta Sjöstrand and Esbjörn Telemo) organised this fantastic event that counted 488 registered and contributing participants. This meeting report provides a retrospective summary of the broad spectrum of ISEV-2012 sessions. Again, we emphasise novel findings, discussions and decisions met by the community during the meeting. PMID:26082071

  11. International Society for Extracellular Vesicles: first annual meeting, April 17–21, 2012: ISEV-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Araldi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular micro- and nano-scale membrane vesicles produced by different cells are recognised as an essential entity of physiological fluids in a variety of organisms and function as mediators of intercellular communication employed for the regulation of multiple systemic and local processes. In the last decade, an exponential amount of experimental work was dedicated to exploring the biogenesis and secretion mechanisms, physiological and pathological functions and potential applications of the extracellular vesicles (EVs. Noteworthy is the large heterogeneity of in vitro and in vivo models applied, technical approaches developed in these studies and the diversity of designations assigned to different or similar types of EVs. Hence, there is a clear necessity for a uniform nomenclature and standardisation of methods to isolate and characterise these vesicles. In April 2012, the first meeting of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV took place bringing together this exponentially grown scientific community. The University of Gothenburg (Krefting Research Centre together with the Interim Board of the Society created in September 2011 (Jan Lötvall, Clotilde Théry, Xandra Breakefield, Marca Wauben, Yong Song Gho, Lawrence Rajendran, Graça Raposo, Douglas Taylor, Margareta Sjöstrand and Esbjörn Telemo organised this fantastic event that counted 488 registered and contributing participants. This meeting report provides a retrospective summary of the broad spectrum of ISEV-2012 sessions. Again, we emphasise novel findings, discussions and decisions met by the community during the meeting.

  12. l-Amino acid sensing by the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Conigrave, Arthur D; Quinn, Stephen J.; Brown, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    The extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor (CaR) recognizes and responds to (i.e., “senses”) Ca2+o as its principal physiological ligand. In the present studies, we document that the CaR is activated not only by extracellular calcium ions but also by amino acids, establishing its capacity to sense nutrients of two totally different classes. l-Amino acids, especially aromatic amino acids, including l-phenylalanine and l-tryptophan, stereoselectively mobilized Ca2+ ions in the presence ...

  13. An easy ratiometric compensation for the extracellular Ca2+ indicator-caused fluorescence artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2009-07-15

    Measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics is one of the most central real-time assays for cellular signaling. Ratiometric methods reduce the need for internal calibration and also effectively compensate for most artifacts when used in imaging. However, ratiometric calculation cannot compensate for extracellularly leaked (and fluorescent) Ca(2+) indicator and will instead indicate erroneous Ca(2+) concentration. This frequently occurs in systems where extracellular indicator is accumulated such as fluorescence spectrophotometers and plate readers. Here I present a method that, for the first time, fully compensates for this phenomenon. The method uses a single-step internal calibration together with a predefined ratiometric calibration protocol.

  14. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  15. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  16. Engineering 3D bio-artificial heart muscle: the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nikita M; Tao, Ze-Wei; Mohamed, Mohamed A; Hogan, Matt K; Gutierrez, Laura; Birla, Ravi K

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies in left ventricular systolic dysfunction and end-stage heart failure include mechanical assist devices or transplant. The development of a tissue-engineered integrative platform would present a therapeutic option that overcomes the limitations associated with current treatment modalities. This study provides a foundation for the fabrication and preliminary viability of the acellular ventricular extracellular matrix (AVEM) model. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix was fabricated by culturing 4 million rat neonatal cardiac cells around an excised acellular ventricular segment. Acellular ventricular extracellular matrix generated a maximum spontaneous contractile force of 388.3 μN and demonstrated a Frank-Starling relationship at varying pretensions. Histologic assessment displayed cell cohesion and adhesion within the AVEM as a result of passive cell seeding.

  17. Adherence of extracellular matrix components to modified surfaces of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, C.; Uhlmann, E.; Meinke, M.; Lademann, J.; Hansen, U.

    2009-04-01

    The adherence of biological materials on metal surfaces is of special importance in biology and medicine. The underlying interactions between surface and biological materials (e.g. extracellular matrix components or cells) are responsible for the application as a medical device. Numerous products are made of pure titanium and titanium alloys. This paper shows the influence of a laser production technology on machined surfaces of TiAl6V4 and the resulting adherence of biological material on the basis of the surface characterisation. In this study, different machined TiAl6V4 surfaces were used for coatings with extracellular matrix components. For this process, different coating with collagen I monomers and a complex mixture of extracellular matrix proteins derived from the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone were analysed. The efficiency of the coating was analysed by different methods and the results are presented in this paper.

  18. Extracellular modulation of Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling through heparan sulfate proteoglycans in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Isao; Kimura-Yoshida, Chiharu

    2013-08-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) signaling plays crucial roles in multiple cellular processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and migration during mammalian embryogenesis. In the extracellular matrix, as well as at the cell surface, the movement of FGF ligands to target cells and the subsequent complex formations with their receptors are positively and negatively controlled extracellularly by heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) such as syndecans, glypicans, and perlecan. Additionally, spreading of HSPGs by cleavage with sheddases such as proteinases and heparanases, and the overall length and sulfation level of specific heparan sulfate structures further generate a great diversity of FGF signaling outcomes. This review presents our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of FGF signaling in extracellular spaces through HSPGs in mammalian development.

  19. Antioxidant defenses in human blood plasma and extra-cellular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    I had the fortune to be introduced to Helmut Sies during the mid 1980s, while working as a post-doctoral scientist at the University of California, Berkeley. At that time, Helmut was a frequent visitor of the Bruce Ames' laboratory and a leading authority in antioxidants and oxidative stress. His concepts, ideas and willingness to listen and make constructive suggestions have been far-reaching and visionary. Moreover, they have also been highly infectious, so much so that much of my research to this day has been on the same topic. The following is a personal recount on how the field of antioxidants has evolved since those exciting days in Berkeley.

  20. Prion Protein on Astrocytes or in Extracellular Fluid Impedes Neurodegeneration Induced by Truncated Prion Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly; Race, Richard; Baumann, Frank; Aguzzi, Adriano; Chesebro, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is a host-encoded membrane-anchored glycoprotein which is required for susceptibility to prion disease. PrP may also be important for normal brain functions such as hippocampal spatial memory. Previously transgenic mice expressing amino terminally truncated mouse PrP (Δ32–134) spontaneously developed a fatal disease associated with degeneration of cerebellar granular neurons as well as vacuolar degeneration of deep cerebellar and brain stem white matter. This disease could...

  1. Multimodality molecular imaging and extracellular vesicle release based genetic profiling with porphyrin nanodroplets (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemp, Roger J.; Paproski, Robert J.

    2017-03-01

    For emerging tissue-engineering applications, transplants, and cell-based therapies it is important to assess cell viability and function in vivo in deep tissues. Bioluminescence and fluorescence methods are poorly suited to deep monitoring applications with high resolution and require genetically-engineered reporters which are not always feasible. We report on a method for imaging cell viability using deep, high-resolution photoacoustic imaging. We use an exogenous dye, Resazurin, itself weakly fluorescent until it is reduced from blue to a pink color with bright red fluorescence. Upon cell death fluorescence is lost and an absorption shift is observed. The irreversible reaction of resazurin to resorufin is proportional to aerobic respiration. We detect colorimetric absorption shifts using multispectral photoacoustic imaging and quantify the fraction of viable cells. SKOV-3 cells with and without ±80oC heat treatment were imaged after Resazurin treatment. High 575nm:620nm ratiometric absorption and photoacoustic signals in viable cells were observed with a much lower ratio in low-viability populations.

  2. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is Present in the Vascular Extracellular Matrix and Promotes Angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller-Enbergs, Helmut; Hu, Jiong; Popp, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily of proteins and is implicated in innate immunity, cell polarity, and differentiation. Here we studied the role of DMBT1 in endothelial cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: DMBT1 was secreted ...

  3. Immersed Boundary Simulations of Active Fluid Droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Whitfield, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of active fluid droplets immersed in an external fluid in 2-dimensions. We use an Immersed Boundary method to simulate the fluid droplet interface as a Lagrangian mesh. We present results from two example systems, firstly a droplet filled with an active polar fluid with polar anchoring at the droplet interface. Secondly, an active isotropic fluid consisting of particles that can bind and unbind from the interface and generate surface tension gradients through active contractility. These two systems demonstrate spontaneous symmetry breaking and steady state dynamics resembling cell motility and division and show complex feedback mechanisms with minimal degrees of freedom. The simulations outlined here will be useful for quantifying the wide range of dynamics observable in these active systems and modelling the effects of confinement in a consistent and adaptable way.

  4. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  5. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  6. Substrates with patterned extracellular matrix and subcellular stiffness gradients reveal local biomechanical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Peter; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-02-26

    A substrate fabrication process is developed to pattern both the extracellular matrix (ECM) and rigidity at sub-cellular spatial resolution. When growing cells on these substrates, it is found that cells respond locally in their cytoskeleton assembly. The presented method allows unique insight into the biological interpretation of mechanical signals, whereas photolithography-based fabrication is amenable to integration with complex microfabricated substructures.

  7. Biochemical properties and three-dimensional structures of two extracellular lipolytic enzymes from Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggert, Thorsten; Pouderoyen, Gertie van; Pencreac’h, Gaëlle; Douchet, Isabelle; Verger, Robert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews our present knowledge on the extracellular lipolytic enzymes LipA and LipB from Bacillus subtilis. Growth of B. subtilis to the late logarithmic growth phase results in a total lipolytic activity of 12–18 units per liter of culture supernatant. Immunodetection with LipA- and Lip

  8. Intracellular signal transduction by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor of Xenopus melanotrope cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, MJ van den; Cruijsen, P.M.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Roubos, E.W.; Jenks, B.G.

    2008-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is expressed in various types of endocrine pituitary cell, but the intracellular mechanism this G protein-coupled receptor uses in these cells is not known. In the present study we investigated possible intracellular signal transduction pathway(s)

  9. Inter-laboratory comparison on the size and stability of monodisperse and bimodal synthetic reference particles for standardization of extracellular vesicle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, Anaïs; Meli, Felix; van der Pol, Edwin; Yuana, Yuana; Gollwitzer, Christian; Krumrey, Michael; Cizmar, Petr; Buhr, Egbert; Pétry, Jasmine; Sebaihi, Noham; de Boeck, Bert; Fokkema, Vincent; Bergmans, Rob; Nieuwland, Rienk

    2016-03-01

    In future, measurements of extracellular vesicles in body fluids could become a standard diagnostic tool in medicine. For this purpose, reliable and traceable methods, which can be easily applied in hospitals, have to be established. Within the European Metrological Research Project (EMRP) ‘Metrological characterization of micro-vesicles from body fluids as non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers’ (www.metves.eu), various nanoparticle reference materials were developed and characterized. We present results of an international comparison among four national metrology institutes and a university hospital. The size distributions of five monodisperse and two bimodal spherical particle samples with diameters ranging from 50 nm to 315 nm made out of silica and polystyrene were compared. Furthermore, the stability of the samples was verified over a period of 18 months. While monodisperse reference particle samples above a certain size level lead to good agreements of the size measurements among the different methods, small and bimodal samples show the limitations of current ‘clinical’ methods. All samples proved to be stable within the uncertainty of the applied methods.

  10. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  11. Variable Volumetric Stiffness Fluid Mount Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Vahdati

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive fluid mounts are commonly used in the automotive and aerospace applications to isolate the cabin from the engine noise and vibration. Due to manufacturing and material variabilities, no two identical fluid mount designs act the same. So, fluid mounts are tuned one by one before it is shipped out to customers. In some cases, for a batch of fluid mounts manufactured at the same time, one is tuned and the rest is set to the same settings. In some cases they are shipped as is with its notch frequency not being in its most optimum location. Since none of the passive fluid mount parameters are controllable, the only way to tune the mount is to redesign the mount by changing fluid, changing inertia track length or diameter, or changing rubber stiffness. This trial and error manufacturing process is very costly. To reduce the fluid mount notch frequency tuning cycle time, a new fluid mount design is proposed. In this new fluid mount design, the notch frequency can be easily modified without the need for any redesigns. In this paper, the new design concept, and its mathematical model and simulation results will be presented.

  12. An assay for the rate of removal of extracellular hydrogen peroxide by cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A. Wagner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells have a wide range of capacities to remove extracellular hydrogen peroxide. At higher concentrations of extracellular H2O2 (micromolar the rate of removal can be approximated by a rate equation that is first-order in the concentration of H2O2 and cell density. Here we present a method to determine the observed rate constant for the removal of extracellular H2O2 on a per cell basis. In the cells examined, when exposed to 20 μM H2O2, these rate constants (kcell range from 0.46×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L for Mia-PaCa-2 cells (human pancreatic carcinoma to 10.4×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L for U937 cells (human histiocytic lymphoma. For the relatively small red blood cell kcell=2.9×10−12 s−1 cell−1 L. These rate constants, kcell, can be used to compare the capacity of cells to remove higher levels of extracellular H2O2, as often presented in cell culture experiments. They also provide a means to estimate the rate of removal of extracellular H2O2, rate=−kcell [H2O2] (cells L−1, and the half-life of a bolus of H2O2. This information is essential to optimize experimental design and interpret data from experiments that expose cells to extracellular H2O2.

  13. Interdigital cell death in the embryonic limb is associated with depletion of Reelin in the extracellular matrix

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Interdigital cell death is a physiological regression process responsible for sculpturing the digits in the embryonic vertebrate limb. Changes in the intensity of this degenerative process account for the different patterns of interdigital webbing among vertebrate species. Here, we show that Reelin is present in the extracellular matrix of the interdigital mesoderm of chick and mouse embryos during the developmental stages of digit formation. Reelin is a large extracellular glycoprotein which...

  14. Physiology and pathology of extracellular vesicules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first publication about blood plasma microparticles. Initially considered as cell fragments or “platelet dust”, extracellular vesicles currently attracted the attention of biochemists, biophysicists, physicians, pharmacists around the world. They are heterogeneous in structure and derived from many cell types, express different antigen and contain variety of biomolecules that determines wide range of biological activity, including procoagulant, regenerative, immunomodulating, and others. They play an important role in the pathophysiology of different diseases and conditions – from infarction, injuries and pregnancies to the “graft versus host” disease. The vesicles as medicaments and their carriers, as well as the drugs that affect them, are a rapidly developing field of research.

  15. Neutrophil extracellular traps in tissue pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Daigo; Kumar, Santosh; Desai, Jyaysi; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are innate immune systems against invading pathogens. NETs are characterized as released DNA mixed with cytoplasmic antimicrobial proteins such as myeloperoxidase, proteinase3 and neutrophil elastase. While NETs are thought to have an important role in host defense, recent work has suggested that NETs contribute to tissue injury in non-infectious disease states. Uncontrolled NET formation in autoimmune diseases, metabolic disorders, cancers and thrombotic diseases can exacerbate a disease or even be a major initiator of tissue injury. But spotting NETs in tissues is not easy. Here we review the available histopathological evidence on the presence of NETs in a variety of diseases. We discuss technical difficulties and potential sources of misinterpretation while trying to detect NETs in tissue samples.

  16. Extracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, a new cancer metabokine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grolla, Ambra A; Travelli, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we focus on the secreted form of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT); extracellular NAMPT (eNAMPT), also known as pre‐B cell colony‐enhancing factor or visfatin. Although intracellular NAMPT is a key enzyme in controlling NAD metabolism, eNAMPT has been reported to function as a cytokine, with many roles in physiology and pathology. Circulating eNAMPT has been associated with several metabolic and inflammatory disorders, including cancer. Because cytokines produced in the tumour micro‐environment play an important role in cancer pathogenesis, in part by reprogramming cellular metabolism, future improvements in cancer immunotherapy will require a better understanding of the crosstalk between cytokine action and tumour biology. In this review, the knowledge of eNAMPT in cancer will be discussed, focusing on its immunometabolic function as a metabokine, its secretion, its mechanism of action and possible roles in the cancer micro‐environment. PMID:27128025

  17. Extracellular Vesicles in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Kadota

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by the progression of irreversible airflow limitation and is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although several crucial mechanisms of COPD pathogenesis have been studied, the precise mechanism remains unknown. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes, microvesicles, and apoptotic bodies, are released from almost all cell types and are recognized as novel cell–cell communication tools. They have been shown to carry and transfer a wide variety of molecules, such as microRNAs, messenger RNAs, and proteins, which are involved in physiological functions and the pathology of various diseases. Recently, EVs have attracted considerable attention in pulmonary research. In this review, we summarize the recent findings of EV-mediated COPD pathogenesis. We also discuss the potential clinical usefulness of EVs as biomarkers and therapeutic agents for the treatment of COPD.

  18. Extracellular Matrix Molecules Facilitating Vascular Biointegration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.C. Ng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available All vascular implants, including stents, heart valves and graft materials exhibit suboptimal biocompatibility that significantly reduces their clinical efficacy. A range of biomolecules in the subendothelial space have been shown to play critical roles in local regulation of thrombosis, endothelial growth and smooth muscle cell proliferation, making these attractive candidates for modulation of vascular device biointegration. However, classically used biomaterial coatings, such as fibronectin and laminin, modulate only one of these components; enhancing endothelial cell attachment, but also activating platelets and triggering thrombosis. This review examines a subset of extracellular matrix molecules that have demonstrated multi-faceted vascular compatibility and accordingly are promising candidates to improve the biointegration of vascular biomaterials.

  19. Active endocannabinoids are secreted on extracellular membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Martina; Battista, Natalia; Riganti, Loredana; Prada, Ilaria; Antonucci, Flavia; Cantone, Laura; Matteoli, Michela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    Endocannabinoids primarily influence neuronal synaptic communication within the nervous system. To exert their function, endocannabinoids need to travel across the intercellular space. However, how hydrophobic endocannabinoids cross cell membranes and move extracellularly remains an unresolved problem. Here, we show that endocannabinoids are secreted through extracellular membrane vesicles produced by microglial cells. We demonstrate that microglial extracellular vesicles carry on their surface N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), which is able to stimulate type-1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1), and inhibit presynaptic transmission, in target GABAergic neurons. This is the first demonstration of a functional role of extracellular vesicular transport of endocannabinoids.

  20. An extracellular proteasome releases endostatin from human collagen XVIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Pistilli, Maria L V; Schuppan, Detlef; Barroso, Madalena M S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Farias, Shirley; Lery, Letícia; Bauer, Michael; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A; Coelho-Sampaio, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    Endostatin is a potent anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor protein capable of regressing tumors without inducing acquired resistance. Since it is a fragment of the parental molecule, collagen XVIII, its endogenous production depends on the activity of a specific proteolytic enzyme. While such an enzyme has been described in mice, a human counterpart has not been identified so far. Here, we searched for this enzyme by using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptide containing the cleavage site of human collagen XVIII. We found that the cleavage activity was present in various murine and human tumor cells but not in untransformed cells. It was ascribed to a large protein complex identified as an extracellular form of proteasome 20S. Since circulating proteasome 20S has recently emerged as an important marker of tumor progression, the possibility of proteasomes controlling the production of angiostatic endostatin may inspire the development of new anticancer therapies.

  1. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  2. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  3. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results.

  4. Filter based phase distortions in extracellular spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yael, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular recordings are the primary tool for extracting neuronal spike trains in-vivo. One of the crucial pre-processing stages of this signal is the high-pass filtration used to isolate neuronal spiking activity. Filters are characterized by changes in the magnitude and phase of different frequencies. While filters are typically chosen for their effect on magnitudes, little attention has been paid to the impact of these filters on the phase of each frequency. In this study we show that in the case of nonlinear phase shifts generated by most online and offline filters, the signal is severely distorted, resulting in an alteration of the spike waveform. This distortion leads to a shape that deviates from the original waveform as a function of its constituent frequencies, and a dramatic reduction in the SNR of the waveform that disrupts spike detectability. Currently, the vast majority of articles utilizing extracellular data are subject to these distortions since most commercial and academic hardware and software utilize nonlinear phase filters. We show that this severe problem can be avoided by recording wide-band signals followed by zero phase filtering, or alternatively corrected by reversed filtering of a narrow-band filtered, and in some cases even segmented signals. Implementation of either zero phase filtering or phase correction of the nonlinear phase filtering reproduces the original spike waveforms and increases the spike detection rates while reducing the number of false negative and positive errors. This process, in turn, helps eliminate subsequent errors in downstream analyses and misinterpretations of the results. PMID:28358895

  5. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an organism in normal and diseased states. EV shedding from ciliated cells and EV-cilia interactions are evolutionarily conserved phenomena, yet remarkably little is known about the relationship between the cilia and EVs and the fundamental biology of EVs. Studies in the model organisms Chlamydomonas and C. elegans have begun to shed light on ciliary EVs. Chlamydomonas EVs are shed from tips of flagella and are bioactive. C. elegans EVs are shed and released by ciliated sensory neurons in an intraflagellar transport (IFT)-dependent manner. C. elegans EVs play a role in modulating animal-to-animal communication, and this EV bioactivity is dependent on EV cargo content. Some ciliary pathologies, or ciliopathies, are associated with abnormal EV shedding or with abnormal cilia-EV interactions, suggest the cilium may be an important organelle as an EV donor or as an EV target. Until the past few decades, both cilia and EVs were ignored as vestigial or cellular junk. As research interest in these two organelles continues to gain momentum, we envision a new field of cell biology emerging. Here, we propose that the cilium is a dedicated organelle for EV biogenesis and EV reception. We will also discuss possible mechanisms by which EVs exert bioactivity and explain how what is learned in model organisms regarding EV biogenesis and function may provide insight to human ciliopathies. PMID:26983828

  6. Role of extracellular superoxide dismutase in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongora, Maria Carolina; Qin, Zhenyu; Laude, Karine; Kim, Ha Won; McCann, Louise; Folz, J Rodney; Dikalov, Sergey; Fukai, Tohru; Harrison, David G

    2006-09-01

    We previously found that angiotensin II-induced hypertension increases vascular extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD), and proposed that this is a compensatory mechanism that blunts the hypertensive response and preserves endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. To test this hypothesis, we studied ecSOD-deficient mice. ecSOD(-/-) and C57Blk/6 mice had similar blood pressure at baseline; however, the hypertension caused by angiotensin II was greater in ecSOD(-/-) compared with wild-type mice (168 versus 147 mm Hg, respectively; P<0.01). In keeping with this, angiotensin II increased superoxide and reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in small mesenteric arterioles to a greater extent in ecSOD(-/-) than in wild-type mice. In contrast to these findings in resistance vessels, angiotensin II paradoxically improved endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, reduced intracellular and extracellular superoxide, and increased NO production in aortas of ecSOD(-/-) mice. Whereas aortic expression of endothelial NO synthase, Cu/ZnSOD, and MnSOD were not altered in ecSOD(-/-) mice, the activity of Cu/ZnSOD was increased by 80% after angiotensin II infusion. This was associated with a concomitant increase in expression of the copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD in the aorta but not in the mesenteric arteries. Moreover, the angiotensin II-induced increase in aortic reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity was diminished in ecSOD(-/-) mice as compared with controls. Thus, during angiotensin II infusion, ecSOD reduces hypertension, minimizes vascular superoxide production, and preserves endothelial function in resistance arterioles. We also identified novel compensatory mechanisms involving upregulation of copper chaperone for Cu/ZnSOD, increased Cu/ZnSOD activity, and decreased reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity in larger vessels. These compensatory mechanisms preserve large vessel function when ecSOD is absent in

  7. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  8. Metalworking and machining fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  9. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor in human pancreatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, G Z; Kittel, Á; Riccardi, D; Case, R M; Elliott, A C; Varga, G

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaR) plays a key role in the calcium homeostatic system and is therefore widely expressed in tissues involved in calcium metabolism. However, the CaR has also been identified in other tissues where its role is less clear. We have investigated the presence of the CaR in the human pancreas. Methods: Messenger RNA for the CaR was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the protein was localised by immunostaining. CaR function was assayed in Capan-1 cells by measuring intracellular calcium and [3H] thymidine incorporation. Results: The receptor was highly expressed in human pancreatic ducts. It was also expressed in exocrine acinar cells, in islets of Langerhans, and in intrapancreatic nerves and blood vessels. The CaR was expressed in both normal and neoplastic human tissue samples but was detected in only one of five ductal adenocarcinoma cells lines examined. Experiments on the CaR expressing adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 showed that the CaR was functional and was linked to mobilisation of intracellular calcium. Stimulation of the CaR reduced Capan-1 cell proliferation. Conclusions: We propose that the CaR may play multiple functional roles in the human pancreas. In particular, the CaR on the duct luminal membrane may monitor and regulate the Ca2+ concentration in pancreatic juice by triggering ductal electrolyte and fluid secretion. This could help to prevent precipitation of calcium salts in the duct lumen. The CaR may also help to regulate the proliferation of pancreatic ductal cells. PMID:12377811

  10. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  12. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  13. Differential contribution of storage pools to the extracellular amount of accumbal dopamine in high and low responders to novelty: effects of reserpine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Cools, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of reserpine on the extracellular concentration of accumbal dopamine in high responders (HR) and low responders (LR) to novelty rats. Reserpine reduced the baseline concentration of extracellular accumbal dopamine more in HR than in LR, indicating that the dopa

  14. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance and Kidney Function Research in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsk, P.; Juel, N.; Kramer, H. J.; de Santo, N. G.; Regnard, J.; Heer, M.

    2005-06-01

    Fluid and electrolyte regulation in humans is modulated by gravitational stress through a complex interaction of cardiovascular reflexes, neuroendocrine variables, physical factors and renal function.Weightlessness is a unique tool to obtain more information on integrated fluid volume control. Results from space, however, have been unexpected and unpredictable from the results of ground- based simulations.The concept of how weightlesness and gravity modulate the regulation of body fluids and associated blood components must therefore be revised and a new simulation model developed. There are several main questions to be asked. Does weightlessness induce diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of spaceflight, leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Why are fluid- and sodium-retaining systems activated by spaceflight, and why are the renal responses to saline and water stimuli attenuated? Can excess sodium be stored in an hitherto unknown way, in particular during spaceflight? How can the effects of weightlessness on fluid and electrolyte regulation be correctly simulated on the ground? The information obtained from space might help us to understand how gravity degrades the fluid and electrolyte balance in sodium-retaining and oedema- forming states, such as in heart failure.

  15. Unsteady fluid flow in smart material actuated fluid pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Shaju; Cadou, Christopher

    2005-05-01

    Smart materials' ability to deliver large block forces in a small package while operating at high frequencies makes them extremely attractive for converting electrical to mechanical power. This has led to the development of hybrid actuators consisting of co-located smart material actuated pumps and hydraulic cylinders that are connected by a set of fast-acting valves. The overall success of the hybrid concept hinges on the effectiveness of the coupling between the smart material and the fluid. This, in turn, is strongly dependent on the resistance to fluid flow in the device. This paper presents results from three-dimensional unsteady simulations of fluid flow in the pumping chamber of a prototype hybrid actuator powered by a piezo-electric stack. The results show that the forces associated with moving the fluid into and out of the pumping chamber already exceed 10% of the piezo stack blocked force at relatively low frequencies ~120 Hz and approach 40% of the blocked force at 800 Hz. This reduces the amplitude of the piston motion in such a way that the volume flow rate remains approximately constant above operating frequencies of 500 Hz while the efficiency of the pump decreases rapidly.

  16. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  17. Neurosyphilis presenting as parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, John; Hughes, Gaenor

    2015-09-28

    In the postantibiotic era, neurosyphilis continues to have a significant incidence, especially in certain subpopulations. We report, for the first time, neurosyphilis presenting as parkinsonism without more typical neurosyphilitic clinical features. A 53-year-old man developed clinical features of gradual onset consistent with idiopathic Parkinson's disease but was found to have positive treponemal serology and cerebrospinal fluid Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VRDL) reaction. Antibiotic treatment dramatically improved all the parkinsonian symptoms. However, over the subsequent 15 years, the patient slowly deteriorated again in a manner typical of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. A dopaminergic deficit was demonstrated on ((123)I)FP-CIT SPECT. This is the first report in the postantibiotic era of neurosyphilis presenting as relatively pure parkinsonism. Blood test screening for syphilis is therefore appropriate if there is any clinical doubt about an idiopathic parkinsonian presentation. The patient's late second deterioration may suggest that the neurosyphilitic basal ganglial insult primed or accelerated development of idiopathic-like disease. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Incorporation of Tenascin-C into the Extracellular Matrix by Periostin Underlies an Extracellular Meshwork Architecture*

    OpenAIRE

    Kii, Isao; Nishiyama, Takashi; Li, Minqi; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichi; Saito, Mitsuru; Amizuka, Norio; Kudo, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) underlies a complicated multicellular architecture that is subjected to significant forces from mechanical environment. Although various components of the ECM have been enumerated, mechanisms that evolve the sophisticated ECM architecture remain to be addressed. Here we show that periostin, a matricellular protein, promotes incorporation of tenascin-C into the ECM and organizes a meshwork architecture of the ECM. We found that both periostin null mice and tenascin-C...

  19. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  20. The impact of extracellular syntaxin4 on HaCaT keratinocyte behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadono, Nanako; Miyazaki, Takafumi; Okugawa, Yoji [Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University (Japan); Nakajima, Kiichiro [KNC Bio-Research Center, KNC Laboratories Co. Ltd. (Japan); Hirai, Yohei, E-mail: y-hirai@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Kwansei Gakuin University (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A subpopulation of syntaxin4 localizes extracellularly in the keratinocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epimorphin and syntaxin4 confer the resistance to the oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epimorphin suppresses and syntaxin4 accelerates the CCE formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The antagonistic peptide to syntaxin4 blocks the syntaxin4-dependent CCE formation. -- Abstract: Syntaxin4 belongs to t-SNARE protein family and functions as a vesicular fusion mediator in the plasma membrane in a wide variety of cell types. This protein resembles another family member, epimorphin, a subpopulation of which has been shown to be secreted extracellularly in order to exert signaling functions. Here, we demonstrate the secretion of syntaxin4 via a non-classical pathway and its extracellular functions by using the functionally normal keratinocyte HaCaT. Extracellularly presented syntaxin4 appeared to elicit many cell responses similar to epimorphin with an important exception: it clearly facilitated keratinocyte cornification. The circularized peptide ST4n1 was synthesized from the putative functional core of syntaxin4 (a.a. 103-108), which is equivalent to the previously generated antagonist of epimorphin, and neutralized this contradictory effect. Intriguingly, an epimorphin mutant (EP4M) in which the functional core was replaced by that of syntaxin4 behaved like epimorphin, which was again antagonized by ST4n1. Electrophoresis-based analyses demonstrated the distinct structure of syntaxin4 compared to epimorphin or EP4M. These results revealed, for the first time, the extracellular role of syntaxin4 and shed light on the division of the extracellular effects exerted by epimorphin and syntaxin4 on keratinocyte cornification.

  1. Saliva: a fluid of study for OMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Santiago-García, Juan

    2014-02-01

    Saliva is a fluid that can be collected easily and noninvasively. Its functions in the oral cavity are well known. Advances in molecular biology and technology, as well as research conducted by the various disciplines of omics (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and metagenomics) have contributed to the identification and characterization of salivary components, including DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and microorganisms. These biomolecules enter the saliva through extracellular and intracellular routes, providing information from several organs and systems and raising the possibility of their use as disease biomarkers. In recent years, these factors have expanded the potential use of saliva as a diagnostic fluid for oral and systemic diseases. This review integrates information regarding salivary biomolecules studied through omics and explores their utility as biomarkers for the diagnosis of several infectious and noninfectious diseases, and the opportunity they represent for the development of point of care devices for clinical application. We also discuss the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges to be overcome in order to establish saliva as a useful fluid for the accurate diagnosis and monitoring of a wide range of diseases.

  2. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto; Apon Zaenal Mustopa; Kustiariyah Tarman

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii) KT30. Methods:In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results:Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions:Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  3. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii KT30. Methods: In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results: Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions: Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  4. A balanced view of the cerebrospinal fluid composition and functions: Focus on adult humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Reynold; Robert Snodgrass, S; Johanson, Conrad E

    2015-11-01

    In this review, a companion piece to our recent examination of choroid plexus (CP), the organ that secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), we focus on recent information in the context of reliable older data concerning the composition and functions of adult human CSF. To accomplish this, we define CSF, examine the methodology employed in studying the CSF focusing on ideal or near ideal experiments and discuss the pros and cons of several widely used analogical descriptions of the CSF including: the CSF as the "third circulation," the CSF as a "nourishing liquor," the similarities of the CSF/choroid plexus to the glomerular filtrate/kidney and finally the CSF circulation as part of the "glymphatic system." We also consider the close interrelationship between the CSF and extracellular space of brain through gap junctions and the paucity of data suggesting that the cerebral capillaries secrete a CSF-like fluid. Recently human CSF has been shown to be in dynamic flux with heart-beat, posture and especially respiration. Functionally, the CSF provides buoyancy, nourishment (e.g., vitamins) and endogenous waste product removal for the brain by bulk flow into the venous (arachnoid villi and nerve roots) and lymphatic (nasal) systems, and by carrier-mediated reabsorptive transport systems in CP. The CSF also presents many exogenous compounds to CP for metabolism or removal, indirectly cleansing the extracellular space of brain (e.g., of xenobiotics like penicillin). The CSF also carries hormones (e.g., leptin) from blood via CP or synthesized in CP (e.g., IGF-2) to the brain. In summary the CP/CSF, the third circulation, performs many functions comparable to the kidney including nourishing the brain and contributing to a stable internal milieu for the brain. These tasks are essential to normal adult brain functioning.

  5. Investigations of Cutting Fluid Performance Using Different Machining Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Belluco, Walter

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of cutting fluid performance in dif-ferent metal cutting operations is presented based on performance criteria, work material and fluid type. Cutting fluid performance was evaluated in turning, drilling, reaming and tapping operations, with respect to tool life, cutting forces and prod...

  6. Determination of trace elements in body fluids by XRF spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadj, M.; Injuk, J.; Valcovic, V.; Lakatos, J.

    1987-04-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy is used for trace element analysis of body fluids. Analytical procedures that include sample preparation and XRF setup are described for the analysis of blood serum and amniotic fluid samples for different gravidity stages. The comparison between the distribution of these elements in amniotic fluid and serum is presented and discussed.

  7. Dynamic modeling of fluid power transmissions for wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin Laguna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid power transmission for wind turbines is quietly gaining more ground/interest. The principle of the various concepts presented so far is to convert aerodynamic torque of the rotor blades into a pressurized fluid flow by means of a positive displacement pump. At the other end of the fluid power

  8. Improved acoustic viscosimeter technique. [for determining fluid shear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, M. R.; Moeller, R. P.; Carome, E. F.

    1976-01-01

    An improved technique has been developed for studies of the shear viscosity of fluids. It utilizes an acoustic resonator as a four-terminal electrical device; the resonator's amplitude response may be determined directly and simply related to the fluid's viscosity. The use of this technique is discussed briefly and data obtained in several fluids is presented.

  9. Dynamic modeling of fluid power transmissions for wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin Laguna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid power transmission for wind turbines is quietly gaining more ground/interest. The principle of the various concepts presented so far is to convert aerodynamic torque of the rotor blades into a pressurized fluid flow by means of a positive displacement pump. At the other end of the fluid power

  10. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and

  11. Atypical presentation of colon adenocarcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumwine Lynnette K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the most common histopathological type of colorectal cancer. In Western Europe and the United States, it is the third most common type and accounts for 98% of cancers of the large intestine. In Uganda, as elsewhere in Africa, the majority of patients are elderly (at least 60 years old. However, more recently, it has been observed that younger patients (less than 40 years of age are presenting with the disease. There is also an increase in its incidence and most patients present late, possibly because of the lack of a comprehensive national screening and preventive health-care program. We describe the clinicopathological features of colorectal carcinoma in the case of a young man in Kampala, Uganda. Case presentation A 27-year-old man from Kampala, Uganda, presented with gross abdominal distension, progressive loss of weight, and fever. He was initially screened for tuberculosis, hepatitis, and lymphoma, and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome infection. After a battery of tests, a diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma was finally established with hematoxylin and eosin staining of a cell block made from the sediment of a liter of cytospun ascitic fluid, which showed atypical glands floating in abundant extracellular mucin, suggestive of adenocarcinoma. Ancillary tests with alcian blue/periodic acid Schiff and mucicarmine staining revealed that it was a mucinous adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry showed strong positivity with CDX2, confirming that the origin of the tumor was the colon. Conclusions Colorectal carcinoma has been noted to occur with increasing frequency in young adults in Africa. Most patients have mucinous adenocarcinoma, present late, and have rapid disease progression and poor outcome. Therefore, colorectal malignancy should no longer be excluded from consideration only on the basis of a patient's age. A high index of suspicion is important in the

  12. Super-strong magneto-rheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.

    2001-03-01

    A typical MR fluid is a suspension of magnetic particles of micrometer size in a liquid. Upon application of a strong magnetic field, the fluid turns into a solid. This process is reversible and the response time is of milliseconds. MR fluids presently have a yield shear stress around 80 kPa, which is adequate for applications in shock absorbers and vibration dampers, but is inadequate for automobile clutch etc. Efforts in searching for new materials in the past decades came with limited results. Thus we have developed a new approach to change the microstructure of MR fluids and make them super-strong. It is well known that under a strong magnetic field, the ideal structure of MR fluids is a body-centered tetragonal (bct) lattice. The mechanical strength of MR fluids strongly depends on the microstructure. A bct-lattice based thick column has a much higher yield stress than a single-chain structure. When a magnetic field is applied to a MR fluid, the particles first form chains. With time, the chains may aggregate into columns. However, the unassisted aggregation is not very useful, as it is slow and produces columns with a limited thickness. Our method is based on assisted aggregations. Immediately after a magnetic field is applied, we compress the MR fluid in the field direction before a shear force is applied. The compression pushes the induced chains together to form thick columns. This microstructure change greatly enhances the yield stress. The experiment on an iron-based MR fluid finds 800 kPa for the yield stress, ten times stronger than that without the compression. When the magnetic field is removed, the MR fluid still returns to the liquid state quickly. The upper limit of this structure-enhanced yield stress seems well above 800 kPa. The super-strong MR fluids are suitable for many industrial applications. *Supported by NSF Grant 0196022

  13. Hidden Symmetry of a Fluid Dynamical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, C

    2001-01-01

    A connection between solutions of the relativistic d-brane system in (d+1) dimensions with the solutions of a Galileo invariant fluid in d-dimensions is by now well established. However, the physical nature of the light-cone gauge description of a relativistic membrane changes after the reduction to the fluid dynamical model since the gauge symmetry is lost. In this work we argue that the original gauge symmetry present in a relativistic d-brane system can be recovered after the reduction process to a d-dimensional fluid model. To this end we propose, without introducing Wess-Zumino fields, a gauge invariant theory of isentropic fluid dynamics and show that this symmetry corresponds to the invariance under local translation of the velocity potential in the fluid dynamics picture. We show that different but equivalent choices of the sympletic sector lead to distinct representations of the embedded gauge algebra.

  14. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuma, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  15. Conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2012-06-01

    We present a generally covariant formulation of conformal higher-order viscoelastic fluid mechanics with strain allowed to take arbitrarily large values. We give a general prescription to determine the dynamics of a relativistic viscoelastic fluid in a way consistent with the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium and the second law of thermodynamics. We then elaborately study the transient time scales at which the strain almost relaxes and becomes proportional to the gradients of velocity. We particularly show that a conformal second-order fluid with all possible parameters in the constitutive equations can be obtained without breaking the hypothesis of local thermodynamic equilibrium, if the conformal fluid is defined as the long time limit of a conformal second-order viscoelastic system. We also discuss how local thermodynamic equilibrium could be understood in the context of the fluid/gravity correspondence.

  16. Fluid loading responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the peri-operative phase are dependent on physicians and nurses for their fluid intake. Volume status optimization is required to maximize oxygen delivery to vital organs. Unnecessary fluid administration can, however, lead to general and pulmonary

  17. Fluid loading responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the peri-operative phase are dependent on physicians and nurses for their fluid intake. Volume status optimization is required to maximize oxygen delivery to vital organs. Unnecessary fluid administration can, however, lead to general and pulmonary oe

  18. Peritoneal fluid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - peritoneal fluid ... sent to the laboratory for Gram stain and culture. The sample is checked to see if bacteria ... The peritoneal fluid culture may be negative, even if you have ... diagnosis of peritonitis is based on other factors, in addition ...

  19. Applications of fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, G.R.; Garg, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes flexible and practical approach to learning the basics of fluid dynamics. Each chapter is a self-contained work session and includes a fluid dynamics concept, an explanation of the principles involved, an illustration of their application and references on where more detailed discussions can be found.

  20. Fluid loading responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and in the peri-operative phase are dependent on physicians and nurses for their fluid intake. Volume status optimization is required to maximize oxygen delivery to vital organs. Unnecessary fluid administration can, however, lead to general and pulmonary oe