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Sample records for extracellular cyclic amp

  1. Reversal of TGF-β1 stimulation of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix components by cyclic AMP in Dupuytren's - derived fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibroblasts, a derived subset of fibroblasts especially important in scar formation and wound contraction, have been found at elevated levels in affected Dupuytren's tissues. Transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is characterized by expression of alpha- smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, both events of relevance to connective tissue remodeling. We propose that increasing the activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway will inhibit transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1-induced ECM synthesis and myofibroblast formation and may provide a means to blunt fibrosis. Methods Fibroblasts derived from areas of Dupuytren's contracture cord (DC, from adjacent and phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF, and from palmar fascia from patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (CTR; CT were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml and/or forskolin (10 μM (a known stimulator of cAMP. Total RNA and protein extracted was subjected to real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results The basal mRNA expression levels of fibronectin- extra domain A (FN1-EDA, type I (COL1A2 and type III collagen (COL3A1, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were all significantly increased in DC- and in PF-derived cells compared to CT-derived fibroblasts. The TGF-β1 stimulation of α-SMA, CTGF, COL1A2 and COL3A1 was greatly inhibited by concomitant treatment with forskolin, especially in DC-derived cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 stimulation of FN1-EDA showed similar levels of reduction with the addition of forskolin in all three cell types. Conclusion In sum, increasing cAMP levels show potential to inhibit the formation of myofibroblasts and accumulation of ECM components. Molecular agents that increase cAMP may therefore prove useful in mitigating DC progression or recurrence.

  2. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  3. STUDY OF CYCLIC AMP IN HUMAN SEMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGNing

    1989-01-01

    It had been observed that there was a close relationship between cyclic AMP and the motility, energy metabolism, capaeitation and acrosome reaction of spermatozoa. In this study a radio-immunoassay procedure for measuring cAMP concentration in sperm and

  4. The critical roles of cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in platelet physiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong YAN; Suping LI; Kesheng DAI

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are the primary players in both thrombosis and hemostasis.Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are important signaling molecules in the regulation of platelet function,such as adhesion,aggregation,and secretion.Elevation of intracellular cAMP,which induces the activation of PKA,results in the inhibition of platelet function.Thus,tight control of the intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling pathway has great implications for platelet-dependent hemostasis and effective cardiovascular therapy.In this review,we summarize the PKA substrates and their contributions to platelet function,especially the advancing understanding of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway in platelet physiology.In addition,we suggest the possibility that cAMP/PKA is involved in the platelet procoagulant process and receptor ectodomain shedding.

  5. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  6. Detection of cyclic di-AMP using a competitive ELISA with a unique pneumococcal cyclic di-AMP binding protein

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    Underwood, Adam J.; Zhang, Yang; Metzger, Dennis W.; Bai, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a signaling molecule that has been shown to play important roles in bacterial physiology and infections. Currently, c-di-AMP detection and quantification relies mostly on the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of c-di-AMP was developed, which utilizes a novel pneumococcal c-di-AMP binding protein (CabP) and a newly commercialized c-di-AMP derivative. With this new method, c-di-AMP concentrations in biological samples can be quickly and accurately quantified. Furthermore, this assay is much more efficient than current methods as it requires less overall cost and training while processing many samples at once. Therefore, this assay can be extensively used in research into c-di-AMP signaling. PMID:25239824

  7. Cyclic AMP efflux inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for leukemia

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    Perez, Dominique R.; Smagley, Yelena; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark B.; Evangelisti, Annette; Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia; Winter, Stuart S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic evasion is a hallmark of cancer. We propose that some cancers may evade cell death by regulating 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is associated with pro-apoptotic signaling. We hypothesize that leukemic cells possess mechanisms that efflux cAMP from the cytoplasm, thus protecting them from apoptosis. Accordingly, cAMP efflux inhibition should result in: cAMP accumulation, activation of cAMP-dependent downstream signaling, viability loss, and apoptosis. We developed a novel assay to assess cAMP efflux and performed screens to identify inhibitors. In an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, several identified compounds reduced cAMP efflux, appropriately modulated pathways that are responsive to cAMP elevation (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, and deactivation of Very Late Antigen-4 integrin), and induced mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activation. Blocking adenylyl cyclase activity was sufficient to reduce effects of the most potent compounds. These compounds also decreased cAMP efflux and viability of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines and primary patient samples, but not of normal primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data suggest that cAMP efflux is a functional feature that could be therapeutically targeted in leukemia. Furthermore, because some of the identified drugs are currently used for treating other illnesses, this work creates an opportunity for repurposing. PMID:27129155

  8. Phosphodiesterase 4 and compartmentalization of cyclic AMP signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhengChao; SHI FangXiong

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), as a second messenger, plays a critical role in cellular signaling transduction. However, it is not clear how this apparently identical cAMP signal induces divergent physiological responses. The potential explanation that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized was proposed by Buxton and Brunton twenty years ago. Compartmentalization of cAMP signaling allows spatially distinct pools of protein kinase A (PKA) to be differently activated. Research on cAMP signaling has regained impetus in many fields of life sciences due to the progress in understanding cAMP signaling complexity and functional diversity. The cAMP/PKA signaling compartments are maintained by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) which bind PKA and other signaling proteins, and by PDEs which hydrolyse cAMP and thus terminate PKA activity. PDE4 enzymes belong to PDE superfamily and stand at a crossroad that allows them to integrate various signaling pathways with that of cAMP in spatially distinct compartments. In the current review, the nomenclature, taxonomy and gene expression of PDE4, and the system and region of its effect are described. In addition, the idiographic molecules, mechanisms, and regulation models of PDE4 are summarized. Furthermore, the important roles PDE4 plays in the maturation of rat granulosa cells and cAMP signaling compartmentalization are discussed.

  9. Discovery of a cAMP deaminase that quenches cyclic AMP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Alissa M; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M; Cronan, John E

    2013-12-20

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3',5'-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes.

  10. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

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    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  11. Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels in glandular stomach of restrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrindast, M R; Sharghi, G; Gerayesh-Nejad, S; Djahanguiri, B

    1977-10-01

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP were measured in glandular stomach of rats subjected to saline administration, cold (4 degrees C), restraint and restraint+cold after 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes. All animals subjected to restraint+cold had gastric ulceration after 2 hours. A significant but transient decrease in cAMP was observed 15 minutes after restraint+cold. A marked, sustained and significant decrease of cGMP was observed in the same group of animals. It is concluded that it seems unlikely to be a correlation between cAMP and cGMP changes of the stomach and the restraint-induced gastric ulceration.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  13. Regulation of cyclic GMP, cyclic amp and lactate dehydrogenase by putative neutrotransmitters in the C6 rat glioma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottenstein, J.E.; de Vellis, J.

    1977-01-01

    In C6 cells norepinephrine and dopamine caused transient increases in cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP, as well as an induction of lactate dehydrogenase. All of these responses were blocked by 1-propranolol, suggesting mediation by a ..beta..-receptor. Phentolamine potentiated the NE-increased cAMP levels by 5-fold when NE was used at suboptimal doses, suggesting the presence of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors in C6 cells. Carbamylcholine decreased the levels of both cyclic nucleotides, with hexamethonium partially reversing the effect on cyclic GMP. Dibutyryl-cyclic GMP or carbamylcholine reduced catecholamine-induced cyclic AMP levels. Serotonin increased cyclic GMP levels 60% and decreased cyclic AMP levels 36%. Calcium- and magnesium-free media inhibited the norepinephrine-induced levels of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP respectively.

  14. Regulation of cyclic GMP, cyclic AMP and lactate dehydrogenase by putative neurotransmitters in the C6 rat glioma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottenstein, J.E.; de Vellis, J.

    1978-01-01

    In C6 cells norepinephrine and dopamine caused transient increases in cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP, as well as an induction of lactate dehydrogenase. All of these responses were blocked by l-propranolol, suggesting mediation by a ..beta..-receptor. Phentolamine potentiated the NE-increased cAMP levels by 5-fold when NE was used at suboptimal doses, suggesting the presence of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors in C6 cells. Carbamylcholine decreased the levels of both cyclic nucleotides, with hexamethonium partially reversing the effect on cyclic GMP. Dibutyryl-cyclic GMP or carbamylcholine reduced catecholamine-induced cyclic AMP levels. Serotonin increased cyclic GMP levels 60% and decreased cyclic AMP levels 36%. Calcium- and magnesium-free media inhibited the norepinephrine-induced levels of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP respectively.

  15. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for cAMP-dependent ......Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c......AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho...

  16. Cyclic GMP-AMP displays mucosal adjuvant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Škrnjug

    Full Text Available The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity--a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines.

  17. Analogs of Cyclic AMP as Chemoattractants and Inhibitors of Dictyostelium Chemotaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Jastorff, Bernd; Pinas, Johan E.; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Aggregative amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, D. mucoroides, D. purpureum, and D. rosarium react chemotactically to cyclic AMP (cAMP). We measured the chemotactic activity of 14 cAMP analogs and found that these four species have a similar sensitivity to chemical modifications of cAMP; this sugge

  18. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated transm

  19. Postaggregative Differentiation Induction by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium : Intracellular Transduction Pathway and Requirement for Additional Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Pauline; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Driel, Roel van; Spek, Wouter; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Pinas, Johan

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal indu

  20. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

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    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  1. [Thermostable extracellular cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

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    Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I; Orlov, N Ia

    2006-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase secreted by Physarum polycephalum plasmodium into extracellular medium has been partially purified by DEAE cellulose chromatography, ultrafiltration, and HPLC. The results obtained by gel filtration, HPLC, electrophoresis, and isoelectric focusing suggest that, the native enzyme in solution is a monomer with a molecular mass of about 90 kDa and pI in the range 3.6 - 4.0. The Km values were estimated to be about 0.9 mM and 7.7 mM, respectively, and Vm for both substrates were similar (up to several thousand micromoles of cAMP hydrolyzed/hour per mg of enzyme). The partially purified enzyme was shown to be extremely stable. It did not lose the activity after heat treatment at 100 degrees C during 30 min. The enzyme was active in the presence of 1% SDS, but it was fully inactivated under the same conditions in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The properties of the phosphodiesterase from Physarum polycephalum are discussed.

  2. Postaggregative differentiation induction by cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium: intracellular transduction pathway and requirement for additional stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaap, P; Van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Van Driel, R; Spek, W; Van Haastert, P J; Pinas, J

    1986-11-01

    Cyclic AMP induces postaggregative differentiation in aggregation competent cells of Dictyostelium by interacting with cell surface cAMP receptors. We investigated the transduction pathway of this response and additional requirements for the induction of postaggregative differentiation. Optimal induction of postaggregative gene expression requires that vegetative cells are first exposed to 2-4 hr of nanomolar cAMP pulses, and subsequently for 4-6 hr to steady-state cAMP concentrations in the micromolar range. Cyclic AMP pulses, which are endogenously produced before and during aggregation, induce full responsiveness to cAMP as a morphogen. The transduction pathway from the cell surface cAMP receptor to postaggregative gene expression may involve Ca2+ ions as intracellular messengers. A cAMP-induced increase in intracellular cAMP or cGMP levels is not involved in the transduction pathway.

  3. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) C...... are required for efficient CytR repression of deoCp2. Models for the action of CytR are discussed in light of these findings.......We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt......R selectively regulated cAMP-CRP-dependent initiations, although transcription started from the same site in deoCp2 in the absence or presence of cAMP-CRP; (ii) deletion of the uppermost cAMP-CRP target (CRP-2) resulted in loss of CytR regulation, but had only a minor effect on positive control by the c...

  4. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt......R selectively regulated cAMP-CRP-dependent initiations, although transcription started from the same site in deoCp2 in the absence or presence of cAMP-CRP; (ii) deletion of the uppermost cAMP-CRP target (CRP-2) resulted in loss of CytR regulation, but had only a minor effect on positive control by the c...... are required for efficient CytR repression of deoCp2. Models for the action of CytR are discussed in light of these findings....

  5. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) confers drug resistance against DNA damaging agents via PKAIA in CML cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling-Yi; Kan, Wai-Ming

    2017-01-05

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates many vital functions such as metabolism, proliferation, differentiation and death. Depending on cell types and stimulators, cAMP could either promote or attenuate cell death. cAMP signal can be transduced by protein kinase A (PKA) and/or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC). In CML cells, cAMP may suppress their proliferation and enhance their differentiation. However, the role of cAMP on DNA damaging agent toxicity and the mechanism involved has not been studied. In this study, we studied the effect of cAMP on the sensitivity of CML cells to DNA damaging agents. We observed that forskolin (FSK) and dibutyryl-cAMP (DBcAMP) decreased cisplatin and etoposide-induced cell death in K562 cells. Moreover, PKA activator prevented K562 cells from DNA damaging agent-induced cell death while EPAC activator had no effect. Furthermore, we found that the PKA subtype, PKAIA, was involved in cAMP-attenuated resistance in K562 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that increased cAMP level confers CML cells to acquire a novel mechanism against DNA damaging agent toxicity via PKAIA. Thus, PKAIA inhibitor may be helpful in overcoming the resistance to DNA damaging agents in CML cells.

  6. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...

  7. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the cAMP

  8. Dopamine-induced cyclic AMP increase in canine myocardium, kidney and superior mesenteric artery.

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    Kazuno,Hiroshi

    1982-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dopamine on cyclic AMP levels in tissue slices of canine myocardium and kidney, and in chopped superior mesenteric arterial wall was investigated to identify dopamine receptors. Tissues were incubated in modified Krebs-Henseleit Ringer bicarbonate solution at 37 degrees C for 20 min with test drugs, after 20-min preincubation. In the presence of 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, dopamine and apomorphine caused dose-dependent increases in cyclic AMP levels in the myocardium, kidney and superior mesenteric artery. Phentolamine significantly intensified the cyclic AMP-increasing effect of dopamine in the superior mesenteric artery, but it did not influence the cyclic AMP increase caused by dopamine or apomorphine in the myocardium and kidney. Propranolol markedly blocked the effect of dopamine on cyclic AMP levels in all tissues studied. Haloperidol slightly inhibited the effect of dopamine and completely blocked the effect of apomorphine in the myocardium and kidney. These data suggest that dopamine increases cyclic AMP levels by activating predominantly beta-adrenergic receptors and partly dopamine receptors in the canine myocardium, kidney and superior mesenteric artery. The present results also suggest that dopamine acts not only on beta-adrenergic and dopamine receptors but also on alpha-adrenergic receptors in the superior mesenteric artery. Contrary to the activation of beta-adrenergic and dopamine receptors, the activation of alpha-adrenergic receptors resulted in a decrease in cyclic AMP levels in this tissue.

  9. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  10. An EAL domain protein and cyclic AMP contribute to the interaction between the two quorum sensing systems in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianxuan Zhou; Xiaoming Meng; Baolin Sun

    2008-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-cell communication process by which bacteria communicate using extracellular signals called autoinducers. Two QS systems have been identified in Escherichia coli K-12,including an intact QS system 2 that is stimulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex and a partial QS system 1 that consists of SdiA (suppressor of cell division inhibitor) responding to signals generated by other microbialspecies. The relationship between QS system 1 and system 2 in E. coli,however,remains obscure. Here,we show that an EAL domain protein,encoded by ydiV,,and cAMP are involved in the interaction between the two QS systems in E.coli. Expression of sdiA and ydiV is inhibited by glucose. SdiA binds to the ydiV promoter region in a dose-dependent,hut nonspecific,manner; extracellular autoinducer 1 from other species stimulates ydiV expression in an sdiA-depen-dent manner. Furthermore,we discovered that the double sdiA-ydiV mutation,but not the single mutation,causes a 2-fold decrease in intracellular cAMP concentration that leads to the inhibition of QS system 2. These results indicate that signaling pathways that respond to important environmental cues,such as autoinducers and glucose,are linkedtogether for their control in E. coll.

  11. Analogs of cyclic AMP as chemoattractants and inhibitors of Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haastert, P J; Jastorff, B; Pinas, J E; Konijn, T M

    1982-01-01

    Aggregative amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, D. mucoroides, D. purpureum, and D. rosarium react chemotactically to cyclic AMP (cAMP). We measured the chemotactic activity of 14 cAMP analogs and found that these four species have a similar sensitivity to chemical modifications of cAMP; this suggests that the cAMP receptor is identical in all of these species. Besides the induction of a chemotactic response, cAMP analogs also may delay or prevent cell aggregation. cAMP analogs like N1-O-cAMP, 2'-H-cAMP, and 5'NH-cAMP are chemotactically nearly as active as cAMP and induced no, or only a short, delay of cell aggregation. Other cAMP derivatives, such as 6-Cl-cPMP and 8-Br-cAMP, are chemotactically active only at high concentrations and delayed cell aggregation for several hours. Still other cAMP analogs, which do not induce a chemotactic reaction in D. mucoroides, D. purpureum, and D. rosarium, either prevented cell aggregation [cAMPS(S), cAMPS(R), and 3'-NH-cAMP[ or had no effect on cell aggregation [cAMPN(CH3)2(S) and cAMPN(CH3)2(R)]. cAMP analog 3'-NH-cAMP prevented cell aggregation by the inhibition of chemotaxis, whereas cell locomotion was not affected. Although we cannot provide a satisfactory explantation for these observations, our data suggest that occupation and activation of the cAMP receptors do not always induced a chemotactic response.

  12. Cyclic-di-GMP and cyclic-di-AMP activate the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Sater, Ali A; Tattoli, Ivan; Jin, Lei; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Levi, Assaf; Koller, Beverly H; Allen, Irving C; Beaucage, Serge L; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Cambier, John C; Girardin, Stephen E; Schindler, Christian

    2013-10-01

    The cyclic dinucleotides 3'-5'diadenylate (c-diAMP) and 3'-5' diguanylate (c-diGMP) are important bacterial second messengers that have recently been shown to stimulate the secretion of type I Interferons (IFN-Is) through the c-diGMP-binding protein MPYS/STING. Here, we show that physiologically relevant levels of cyclic dinucleotides also stimulate a robust secretion of IL-1β through the NLRP3 inflammasome. Intriguingly, this response is independent of MPYS/STING. Consistent with most NLRP3 inflammasome activators, the response to c-diGMP is dependent on the mobilization of potassium and calcium ions. However, in contrast to other NLRP3 inflammasome activators, this response is not associated with significant changes in mitochondrial potential or the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Thus, cyclic dinucleotides activate the NLRP3 inflammasome through a unique pathway that could have evolved to detect pervasive bacterial pathogen-associated molecular patterns associated with intracellular infections.

  13. Rasd1 Modulates the Coactivator Function of NonO in the Cyclic AMP Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shufen Angeline Ong; Jen Jen Tan; Wai Loon Tew; Ken-Shiung Chen

    2011-01-01

    All living organisms exhibit autonomous daily physiological and behavioural rhythms to help them synchronize with the environment. Entrainment of circadian rhythm is achieved via activation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. NonO (p54nrb) is a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional activation of the cAMP pathway and is involved in circadian rhythm control. Rasd1 is a monomeric G protein implicated to play a pivotal role in potentiating b...

  14. Cyclic AMP Effectors Regulate Myometrial Oxytocin Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulia, Angela; Singh, Natasha; Lei, Kaiyu; Sooranna, Suren R; Johnson, Mark R

    2016-11-01

    The factors that initiate human labor are poorly understood. We have tested the hypothesis that a decline in cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) function leads to the onset of labor. Initially, we identified myometrial cAMP/PKA-responsive genes (six up-regulated and five down-regulated genes) and assessed their expression in myometrial samples taken from different stages of pregnancy and labor. We found that the oxytocin receptor (OTR) was one of the cAMP-repressed genes, and, given the importance of OTR in the labor process, we studied the mechanisms involved in greater detail using small interfering RNA, chemical agonists, and antagonists of the cAMP effectors. We found that cAMP-repressed genes, including OTR, increased with the onset of labor. Our in vitro studies showed that cAMP acting via PKA reduced OTR expression but that in the absence of PKA, cAMP acts via exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) to increase OTR expression. In early labor myometrial samples, PKA levels and activity declined and Epac1 levels increased, perhaps accounting for the increase in myometrial OTR mRNA and protein levels at this time. In vitro exposure of myometrial cells to stretch and IL-1β increased OTR levels and reduced basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP and PKA activity, as judged by phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein levels, but neither stretch nor IL-1β had any effect on PKA or EPAC1 levels. In summary, there is a reduction in the activity of the cAMP/PKA pathway with the onset of human labor potentially playing a critical role in regulating OTR expression and the transition from myometrial quiescence to activation.

  15. GEMM-I riboswitches from Geobacter sense the bacterial second messenger cyclic AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Colleen A; Wilson, Stephen C; Hickey, Scott F; Gonzalez, Tania L; Su, Yichi; Hallberg, Zachary F; Brewer, Thomas F; Iavarone, Anthony T; Carlson, Hans K; Hsieh, Yu-Fang; Hammond, Ming C

    2015-04-28

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an expanding class of signaling molecules that control many aspects of bacterial physiology. A synthase for cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG, also referenced as 3'-5', 3'-5' cGAMP) called DncV is associated with hyperinfectivity of Vibrio cholerae but has not been found in many bacteria, raising questions about the prevalence and function of cAG signaling. We have discovered that the environmental bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces cAG and uses a subset of GEMM-I class riboswitches (GEMM-Ib, Genes for the Environment, Membranes, and Motility) as specific receptors for cAG. GEMM-Ib riboswitches regulate genes associated with extracellular electron transfer; thus cAG signaling may control aspects of bacterial electrophysiology. These findings expand the role of cAG beyond organisms that harbor DncV and beyond pathogenesis to microbial geochemistry, which is important to environmental remediation and microbial fuel cell development. Finally, we have developed an RNA-based fluorescent biosensor for live-cell imaging of cAG. This selective, genetically encodable biosensor will be useful to probe the biochemistry and cell biology of cAG signaling in diverse bacteria.

  16. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated wit...

  17. The effect of in vitro procedures on cyclic AMP accumulation in human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G; Rasmussen, A K;

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various methodological procedures or protocols on cyclic AMP formation in human leucocytes. The data showed that: (1) ATP content and lactate production was unaffected by hypotonic lysis during leucocyte isolation; (2) there was a linear...... relation between cell number/sample and the production of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP); (3) the interindividual variation markedly affected cAMP production during long observation periods (years), whereas day-to-day variation within a week was less important; (4) whole blood could be stored...... for up to 4 h (at 4 degrees C or 23 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; (5) isolated MNL could be stored for up to 2 h (at 4 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; and finally that (6) choice and concentration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors markedly influenced the basal...

  18. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    with stress and starvation and stimulates processes like glycogen degradation and lipolysis to distribute the stored energy through the body. Although in energy preserving tissues insulin inhibit cAMP signalling, in fat precursor cells cAMP potentiates insulin action and promote adipogenesis. Activation...... of insulin signalling. Moreover, I am investigating how increased insulin secretion caused by sucrose consumption, affects insulin signaling in peripheral tissues.......Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated...

  19. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  20. Cyclic AMP-dependent memory mutants are defective in the food choice behavior of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motosaka, Katsunori; Koganezawa, Masayuki; Narikawa, Satoko; Furuyama, Akira; Shinozaki, Kenji; Isono, Kunio; Shimada, Ichiro

    2007-02-01

    Acute choice behavior in ingesting two different concentrations of sucrose in Drosophila is presumed to include learning and memory. Effects on this behavior were examined for four mutations that block associative learning (dunce, rutabaga, amnesiac, and radish). Three of these mutations cause cyclic AMP signaling defects and significantly reduced taste discrimination. The exception was radish, which affects neither. Electrophysiological recordings confirmed that the sensitivity of taste receptors is almost indistinguishable in all flies, whether wild type or mutant. These results suggest that food choice behavior in Drosophila involves central nervous learning and memory operating via cyclic AMP signaling pathways.

  1. Both cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP can act as regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2013-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) are important signaling molecules that control a range of cellular functions and modulate different reactions. It is known that under abiotic or biotic stress plant cells synthesize these nucleotides and that they also enhance the activity of the phenylpropanoid pathway. Wondering what is the relation between these two facts, we investigated how the exogenously applied membrane-permeable derivatives, 8-Br-cAMP or 8-Br-cGMP, which are believed to act as the original cyclic nucleotides, affect the expression of the genes for and the specific activity of three enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We found that the expression of the genes of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL2), 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL1) and chalcone synthase (CHS), and the specific activities of PAL (EC 4.3.1.5), 4CL (EC 6.2.1.12) and CHS (EC 2.3.1.74) were induced in the same way by either of these cyclic nucleotides used at 5 μM concentration. None of the possible cAMP and cGMP degradation products (AMP, GMP, adenosine or guanosine) evoked such effects. Expression of PAL1, 4CL2 and 4CL3 were practically not affected. Although the investigated nucleotides induced rapid expression of the aforementioned enzymes, they did not affect the level of anthocyanins within the same period. We discuss the effects exerted by the exogenously administered cyclic nucleotides, their relation with stress and the role which the phenylpropanoid pathways the cyclic nucleotides may play in plants.

  2. Sustained cyclic AMP production by parathyroid hormone receptor endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, Sébastien; Feinstein, Timothy N; Castro, Marian; Wang, Bin; Bouley, Richard; Potts, John T; Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Cell signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) is fundamental to bone and kidney physiology. It has been unclear how the two ligand systems--PTH, endocrine and homeostatic, and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), paracrine--can effectively operate with only one receptor and trigger different durations of the cAMP responses. Here we analyze the ligand response by measuring the kinetics of activation and deactivation for each individual reaction step along the PTHR signaling cascade. We found that during the time frame of G protein coupling and cAMP production, PTHrP(1-36) action was restricted to the cell surface, whereas PTH(1-34) had moved to internalized compartments where it remained associated with the PTHR and Galpha(s), potentially as a persistent and active ternary complex. Such marked differences suggest a mechanism by which PTH and PTHrP induce differential responses, and these results indicate that the central tenet that cAMP production originates exclusively at the cell membrane must be revised.

  3. Cyclic AMP functions as a primary sexual signal in gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, S M; Goodenough, U W

    1987-11-01

    When Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gametes of opposite mating type are mixed together, they adhere by a flagella-mediated agglutination that triggers three rapid mating responses: flagellar tip activation, cell wall loss, and mating structure activation accompanied by actin polymerization. Here we show that a transient 10-fold elevation of intracellular cAMP levels is also triggered by sexual agglutination. We further show that gametes of a single mating type can be induced to undergo all three mating responses when presented with exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP). These events are also induced by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous cAMP levels and act synergistically with db-cAMP. Non-agglutinating mutants of opposite mating type will fuse efficiently in the presence of db-cAMP. No activation of mating events is induced by calcium plus ionophores, 8-bromo-cGMP, dibutyryl-cGMP, nigericin at alkaline pH, phorbol esters, or forskolin. H-8, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase, inhibits mating events in agglutinating cells and antagonizes the effects of cAMP on non-agglutinating cells. Adenylate cyclase activity was detected in both the gamete cell body and flagella, with the highest specific activity displayed in flagellar membrane fractions. The flagellar membrane adenylate cyclase is preferentially stimulated by Mn++, unresponsive to NaF, GTP, GTP gamma S, AlF4-, and forskolin, and is inhibited by trifluoperazine. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is also present in flagella. Our observations indicate that cAMP is a sufficient initial signal for all of the known mating reaction events in C. reinhardtii, and suggest that the flagellar cyclase and/or phosphodiesterase may be important loci of control for the agglutination-stimulated production of this signal.

  4. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  5. Total biosynthesis of the cyclic AMP booster forskolin from Coleus forskohlii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Jensen, Nils Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Forskolin is a unique structurally complex labdane type diterpenoid used in the treatment of glaucoma and heart failure based on its activity as a cyclic AMP booster. Commercial production of forskolin relies exclusively on extraction from its only known natural source, the plant Coleus forskohlii...

  6. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  7. Phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol induces migraine-like attacks via cyclic AMP increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    and that cilostazol-induced attacks responded to their usual migraine treatment. Median time of medication intake was 6 h (range 4-11 h). The present study suggests that intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation plays a crucial role in migraine induction. This knowledge is a further step in our understanding...

  8. Cell behavior in Dictyostelium discoideum: preaggregation response to localized cyclic AMP pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futrelle, R P; Traut, J; McKee, W G

    1982-03-01

    The motion of cells in the aggregation phase of Dictyostelium discoideum development is complex. To probe its mechanisms we applied precisely timed (+/- 1 s) and positioned (+/-2 micrometers) pulses of cyclic AMP to fields of cells of moderate density using a micropipette. We recorded cell behavior by time lapse microcinematography and extracted cell motion data from the film with our Galatea computer system. Analysis of these data reveals: (a) Chemotaxis lasts only about as long as the cyclic AMP signal; in particular, brief pulses (approximately 5 s) do not induce chemotaxis. (b) Chemotactic competence increases gradually from within an hour after the initiation of development (starvation) to full competence at approximately 15 h when aggregation begins under our conditions. (c) Cell motion reverses rapidly (within 20 s) when the external gradient is reversed. There is no refractory period for motion. We present a new description of the process of aggregation consistent with our result and other recent findings. (d) The behavioral response to cyclic AMP includes a phenomenon we call "cringing." In a prototypical cringe the cell speed drops within 3 s after a brief cyclic AMP stimulus, and the cell stops and rounds and then resumes motion after 25 s. (e) The development of the speed response in cringing as the cells age closely parallels the development of the cyclic AMP-induced light-scattering response of cells in suspension. (f) Cringing occurs in natural populations during weak oriented movement. The computerized analysis of cell behavior proves to be a powerful technique which can reveal significant phenomena that are not apparent to the eye even after repeated examination of the film.

  9. Cyclic AMP-inducible genes respond uniformly to seasonal lighting conditions in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessert, R; Gupta, B B P; Rohleder, N; Gerhold, S; Engel, L

    2006-12-01

    The encoding of photoperiodic information ensues in terms of the daily profile in the expression of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible genes such as the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin formation. In the present study, we compared the influence of the photoperiodic history on the cAMP-inducible genes AA-NAT, inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER), fos-related antigen-2 (FRA-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), nerve growth factor inducible gene-A (NGFI-A) and nerve growth factor inducible gene-B (NGFI-B) in the pineal gland of rats. For this purpose, we monitored the daily profiles of each gene in the same pineal gland under a long (light/dark 16:8) and a short (light/dark 8:16) photoperiod by measuring the respective mRNA amounts by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. We found that, for all genes under investigation, the duration of increased nocturnal expression is lengthened and, in relation to light onset, the nocturnal rise is earlier under the long photoperiod (light/dark 16:8). Furthermore, with the exception of ICER, all other cAMP-inducible genes tend to display higher maximum expression under light/dark 8:16 than under light/dark 16:8. Photoperiod-dependent changes persist for all of the cAMP-inducible genes when the rats are kept for two cycles under constant darkness. Therefore, all cAMP-inducible genes are also influenced by the photoperiod of prior entrained cycles. Our study indicates that, despite differences regarding the expressional control and the temporal phasing of the daily profile, cAMP-inducible genes are uniformly influenced by photoperiodic history in the rat pineal gland.

  10. Looking downstream: the role of cyclic AMP-regulated genes in axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa M Siddiq

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels has proven to be one of the most effective means of overcoming inhibition of axonal regeneration by myelin-associated inhibitors such as myelin-associated glycoprotein, Nogo, and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein. Pharmacological manipulation of cAMP through the administration of dibutyryl cAMP or rolipram leads to enhanced axonal growth both in vivo and in vitro, and importantly, upregulation of cAMP within dorsal root ganglion neurons is responsible for the conditioning lesion effect, which indicates that cAMP plays a significant role in the endogenous mechanisms that promote axonal regeneration. The effects of cAMP are transcription-dependent and are mediated through the activation of protein kinase A and the transcription factor CREB. This leads to the induction of a variety of genes, several of which have been shown to overcome myelin-mediated inhibition in their own right. In this review, we will highlight the pro-regenerative effects of arginase I, interleukin-6, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and metallothionein-I/II, and discuss their potential for therapeutic use in spinal cord injury.

  11. Cyclic AMP represents a crucial component of Treg cell-mediated immune regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Bopp

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network (ITN and a plethora of manuscripts has described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for in principle two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC directly to the effector T cells (Teff leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine which trigger the adenylate cyclases (AC in Teff via A2A and A2B receptors thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  12. Separation of effects of adenosine on energy metabolism from those on cyclic AMP in rat thymic lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeen, S.K.; Young, D.A.

    1977-08-10

    In rat thymic lymphocytes incubated for 2 h without exogenous energy-providing substrate, adenosine may be substituted for glucose as a means of maximally restoring energy metabolism and those cellular functions whose rates are sensitive to small changes in the energy balance, such as protein synthesis and uridine utilization for RNA synthesis. Since effects of adenosine in thymocytes and other cells have frequently been attributed to changes in cyclic AMP, this report investigates its possible involvement in these glucose-like restorative actions of adenosine. Although the same range of doses of adenosine effective at raising cyclic AMP also elicit roughly parallel stimulations of protein synthesis and uridine utilization, further results dissociate the restorative actions from those on cyclic AMP. (a) Other purine nucleosides mimic the glucose-like actions of adenosine without increasing cyclic AMP; (b) conversely, prostaglandin E/sub 1/ mimics the cyclic AMP response without restoring energy metabolism or energy-dependent functions; and (c) potentiation of the cyclic AMP response, either by inhibiting phosphodiesterase or adenosine deaminase, does not enhance the restorative response to a range of doses of adenosine. Finally, cyclic AMP-mediated glycogenolysis cannot account for the glucose-like effects since addition of adenosine increases, not decreases, levels of glycogen.

  13. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  14. Cyclic AMP in oocytes controls meiotic prophase I and primordial folliculogenesis in the perinatal mouse ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijing; Teng, Zhen; Li, Ge; Mu, Xinyi; Wang, Zhengpin; Feng, Lizhao; Niu, Wanbao; Huang, Kun; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Xia, Guoliang

    2015-01-15

    In mammalian ovaries, a fixed population of primordial follicles forms during the perinatal stage and the oocytes contained within are arrested at the dictyate stage of meiotic prophase I. In the current study, we provide evidence that the level of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in oocytes regulates oocyte meiotic prophase I and primordial folliculogenesis in the perinatal mouse ovary. Our results show that the early meiotic development of oocytes is closely correlated with increased levels of intra-oocyte cAMP. Inhibiting cAMP synthesis in fetal ovaries delayed oocyte meiotic progression and inhibited the disassembly and degradation of synaptonemal complex protein 1. In addition, inhibiting cAMP synthesis in in vitro cultured fetal ovaries prevented primordial follicle formation. Finally, using an in situ oocyte chromosome analysis approach, we found that the dictyate arrest of oocytes is essential for primordial follicle formation under physiological conditions. Taken together, these results suggest a role for cAMP in early meiotic development and primordial follicle formation in the mouse ovary. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Cyclic AMP enhances calcium-dependent potassium current in Aplysia neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, D; Eckert, R

    1983-12-01

    The effect on the Ca-dependent potassium current, IK(Ca), of procedures that increase intracellular cAMP levels was studied in Aplysia neurons using three different pharmacological approaches. Exposure to cAMP analogues which were either resistant to or protected from phosphodiesterase hydrolysis caused an increase in IK(Ca) from 30 to 50% in 10 min. The degree of reversibility of this effect varied from complete with db cAMP to very little with pcpt cAMP. Exposure to cholera toxin, which stimulates the synthesis of endogenous cAMP, increased IK(Ca) 25% in 10 min and the effect was not reversible. Both approaches were effective in all seven neuron types studied. Application of serotonin plus phosphodiesterase inhibitor caused an increase in IK(Ca) in neuron R15 but not in the other neuron types. Application of pentylene tetrazole (PTZ) led to a decrease in IK(Ca). It is proposed that elevation of cyclic AMP mediates an increased sensitivity of the IK(Ca) channel to Ca ions.

  16. Cyclic AMP intoxication of macrophages by a Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylate cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nisheeth; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Gupta, Radhika; Nolan, Scott; Bishai, William R

    2009-07-02

    With 8.9 million new cases and 1.7 million deaths per year, tuberculosis is a leading global killer that has not been effectively controlled. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, proliferates within host macrophages where it modifies both its intracellular and local tissue environment, resulting in caseous granulomas with incomplete bacterial sterilization. Although infection by various mycobacterial species produces a cyclic AMP burst within macrophages that influences cell signalling, the underlying mechanism for the cAMP burst remains unclear. Here we show that among the 17 adenylate cyclase genes present in M. tuberculosis, at least one (Rv0386) is required for virulence. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Rv0386 adenylate cyclase facilitates delivery of bacterial-derived cAMP into the macrophage cytoplasm. Loss of Rv0386 and the intramacrophage cAMP it delivers results in reductions in TNF-alpha production via the protein kinase A and cAMP response-element-binding protein pathway, decreased immunopathology in animal tissues, and diminished bacterial survival. Direct intoxication of host cells by bacterial-derived cAMP may enable M. tuberculosis to modify both its intracellular and tissue environments to facilitate its long-term survival.

  17. Pharmacological elevation of cyclic AMP and transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, W F; Singh, Y N; Gordon, T; Lazarenko, G

    1988-03-01

    Intracellular recordings of spontaneous and evoked end-plate potentials have been made at the neuromuscular junction of mouse hemidiaphragms to determine a possible role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the release of acetylcholine from presynaptic terminals. Spontaneous release, as determined from the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials, was increased by drugs that inhibit phosphodiesterase: isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), SQ 20,009, theophylline, and caffeine; drugs that stimulate adenylate cyclase: forskolin, fluoride, and cholera toxin, and the stable analogue of cAMP: 8-bromo-cAMP but not dibutyryl cAMP. Release increased with time during maintained exposure to the drugs and generally followed a simple exponential time course with time constants ranging from 8 to 17 min at 20 degrees C, except for SQ 20,009 and cholera toxin which required longer exposure times for effect. The order of potency of the phosphodiesterase inhibitors was IBMX = SQ 20,009 greater than theophylline = caffeine. This is consistent with an effect mediated by an increase in cAMP concentrations within the nerve terminal. Evoked release, determined from the quantal content of the end-plate potential, was increased to a lesser extent than spontaneous release. The results are discussed with reference to the possible involvement of second messengers in the release of vesicles from nerve terminals in vertebrate synapses.

  18. Cyclic-di-GMP and cyclic-di-AMP activate the NLRP3 inflammasome

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul-Sater, Ali A.; Tattoli, Ivan; Jin, Lei; Grajkowski, Andrzej; Levi, Assaf; Koller, Beverly H.; Irving C Allen; Beaucage, Serge L.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Cambier, John C.; Stephen E Girardin; Schindler, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides have been recently shown to induce type I interferon secretion. This study shows they also activate the NLRP3 inflammasome to stimulate robust IL-1b secretion through a novel pathway that does not generate mitochondrial ROS.

  19. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  20. Cyclic AMP in female mouse brain is altered by the adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) analogue organon 2766.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D R; Felt, B T; Murphy, S; Goldman, H

    1981-09-01

    Cyclic AMP content was determined in 12 brain regions of young adult female mice at 30 min and at 24 h following an intraperitoneal injection of the tri-substituted adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) [ACTH(4-9)] analogue Organon 2766 [ORG 2766]. Animals were killed by focused 3.5 kW microwave radiation applied for 350 ms. Unlike previously reported responses in male mice, at 30 min post-injection there were no detectable differences in cyclic AMP content between the placebo and ORG 2766-treated animals. By contrast, 24 h after injection, the content of cyclic AMP was changed significantly in 8 of the 12 brain regions examined: medulla-pons, septal area, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and parietal and occipital cortices. In most of the regions examined, differences consisted of 50% or greater reductions of tissue cyclic AMP content. The changes were unrelated to the estrus cycle of these animals.

  1. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  2. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c

  3. Increase in levels of cyclic AMP during avian limb chondrogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M; Reiter, R; Ahrens, P B; Pratt, R M

    1979-01-01

    In the present study the level of cAMP was measured during in vitro chondrogenesis of wing mesenchyme of stage 24 chick embryos and was found to increase significantly from 6.3 pmol/mg protein at the end of the first day of culture to 9.7 pmol/mg protein on the second day, when chondrogenic expression is first detected by the appearance of an Alcian blue staining extracellular matrix. Nonchondrogenic cultures derived from wings of stage 19 embryos had a lower level of cAMP (4.4 +/- 0.07 pmol/mg protein). The level of cAMP in intact wings was 4.5 +/- 0.4 pmol/mg protein and did not change between stages 19 through 25. The correlatin between increased levels of cAMP and the onset of chondrogenesis is consistent with a role of cAMP in the expression of differentiated functions in chondrocytes, as well as in some other cell types.

  4. The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Olaf; Kuhl, Herbert; Busse, Rudi; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2000-01-01

    The progestin and oestrogen component of oral contraceptives have been involved in the development of venous thromboembolic events in women. In the present study we determined the vasoactive effects of sex steroids used in oral contraceptives in isolated preconstricted rabbit jugular veins in the presence of diclofenac and examined the underlying mechanisms.The natural hormone progesterone, the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene and chlormadinone acetate, and the synthetic estrogen 17 α-ethinyloestradiol induced concentration-dependent relaxations of endothelium-intact veins constricted with U46619. Levonorgestrel also inhibited constrictions evoked by either a high potassium (K+) solution or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the absence and presence of extracellular calcium (Ca2+). In addition, levonorgestrel depressed contractions evoked by Ca2+ and reduced 45Ca2+ influx in depolarized veins.Relaxations to levonorgestrel in U46619-constricted veins were neither affected by the presence of the endothelium nor by the inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, NS2028, but were significantly improved either by the selective cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram or in the absence of diclofenac, and decreased by the protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Rolipram also potentiated relaxations to levonorgestrel in PMA-constricted veins in the presence, but not in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Levonorgestrel increased levels of cyclic AMP and inhibited PMA-induced activation of protein kinase C in veins.These findings indicate that levonorgestrel caused endothelium-independent relaxations of jugular veins via inhibition of Ca2+ entry and of protein kinase C activation. In addition, the cyclic AMP effector pathway contributes to the levonorgestrel-induced relaxation possibly by depressing Ca2+ entry. PMID:10952682

  5. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans.

  6. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Aykaç Fas

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM. The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  7. Neuronal cyclic AMP controls the developmental loss in ability of axons to regenerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Qiu, J; Cao, Z; McAtee, M; Bregman, B S; Filbin, M T

    2001-07-01

    Unlike neonatal axons, mammalian adult axons do not regenerate after injury. Likewise, myelin, a major factor in preventing regeneration in the adult, inhibits regeneration from older but not younger neurons. Identification of the molecular events responsible for this developmental loss of regenerative capacity is believed key to devising strategies to encourage regeneration in adults after injury. Here, we report that the endogenous levels of the cyclic nucleotide, cAMP, are dramatically higher in young neurons in which axonal growth is promoted both by myelin in general and by a specific myelin component, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), than in the same types of neurons that, when older, are inhibited by myelin-MAG. Inhibiting a downstream effector of cAMP [protein kinase A (PKA)] prevents myelin-MAG promotion from young neurons, and elevating cAMP blocks myelin-MAG inhibition of neurite outgrowth in older neurons. Importantly, developmental plasticity of spinal tract axons in neonatal rat pups in vivo is dramatically reduced by inhibition of PKA. Thus, the switch from promotion to inhibition by myelin-MAG, which marks the developmental loss of regenerative capacity, is mediated by a developmentally regulated decrease in endogenous neuronal cAMP levels.

  8. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  9. Non-Enzymatic Oligomerization of 3’, 5’ Cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Timperio, Anna Maria; Šponer, Judit E.; Šponer, Jiří; Nováková, Olga; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies illustrate that short oligonucleotide sequences can be easily produced from nucleotide precursors in a template-free non-enzymatic way under dehydrating conditions, i.e. using essentially dry materials. Here we report that 3’,5’ cyclic AMP may also serve as a substrate of the reaction, which proceeds under moderate conditions yet with a lower efficiency than the previously reported oligomerization of 3’,5’ cyclic GMP. Optimally the oligomerization requires (i) a temperature of 80°C, (ii) a neutral to alkaline environment and (iii) a time on the order of weeks. Differences in the yield and required reaction conditions of the oligomerizations utilizing 3’,5’ cGMP and cAMP are discussed in terms of the crystal structures of the compounds. Polymerization of 3’,5’ cyclic nucleotides, whose paramount relevance in a prebiotic chemistry context has been widely accepted for decades, supports the possibility that the origin of extant genetic materials might have followed a direct uninterrupted path since its very beginning, starting from non-elaborately pre-activated monomer compounds and simple reactions. PMID:27802310

  10. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie W C; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease.

  11. Control of Vibrio fischeri lux gene transcription by a cyclic AMP receptor protein-luxR protein regulatory circuit.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence genes (lux genes) requires two transcriptional activators: the V. fischeri luxR gene product with autoinducer and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) with cAMP. It has been established that autoinducer and the luxR gene product are required for transcriptional activation of the luxICDABE operon, which contains a gene required for autoinducer synthesis and genes required for light emission. However, the role of cAMP-CRP in the induction o...

  12. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  13. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  14. Improvement on the competitive binding assay for the measurement of cyclic AMP by using ammonium sulphate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa-Coloma, T A; Bley, M A; Charreau, E H

    1987-08-01

    The protein-binding assay developed by Brown, Albano, Ekins, Sgherzi & Tampion [(1971) Biochem. J. 121, 561-562] and Brown, Ekins & Albano [(1972) Adv. Cyclic Nucleotide Res. 2, 25-40] was modified by using precipitation with (NH4)2SO4 of the protein-cyclic AMP complex instead of adsorption of the free nucleotide on charcoal. The half-life of the protein-cyclic AMP complex obtained in the presence of charcoal was lower than that of the (NH4)2SO4-precipitated complex. In consequence, owing to the great stability of the precipitated protein-cyclic AMP complex, this method allows more accurate and reproducible determinations.

  15. ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB in astrocytes via noncanonical Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP independent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriba, Paulina; Pardo, Luis; Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Lichtenstein, Mathieu P; Saura, Carlos A; Pujol, Aurora; Masgrau, Roser; Galea, Elena

    2012-09-01

    In neurons, it is well established that CREB contributes to learning and memory by orchestrating the translation of experience into the activity-dependent (i.e., driven by neurotransmitters) transcription of plasticity-related genes. The activity-dependent CREB-triggered transcription requires the concerted action of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A and Ca(2+) /calcineurin via the CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC). It is not known, however, whether a comparable molecular sequence occurs in astrocytes, despite the unquestionable contribution of these cells to brain plasticity. Here we sought to determine whether and how ATP and noradrenaline cause CREB-dependent transcription in rat cortical astrocyte cultures. Both transmitters induced CREB phosphorylation (Western Blots), CREB-dependent transcription (CRE-luciferase reporter assays), and the transcription of Bdnf, a canonical regulator of synaptic plasticity (quantitative RT-PCR). We indentified a Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol-independent protein kinase C at the uppermost position of the cascade leading to CREB-dependent transcription. Notably, CREB-dependent transcription was partially dependent on ERK1/2 and CRTC, but independent of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A or Ca(2+) /calcineurin. We conclude that ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB-dependent transcription in cortical astrocytes via an atypical protein kinase C. It is of relevance that the signaling involved be starkly different to the one described in neurons since there is no convergence of Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways on CRTC, which, moreover, exerts a modulatory rather than a central role. Our data thus point to the existence of an alternative, non-neuronal, glia-based role of CREB in plasticity.

  16. A Novel Indirect Sequence Readout Component in the E. coli Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold......The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid...

  17. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  18. Ionized calcium and cyclic AMP in plasma and urine. Biochemical evaluation in calcium metabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, J

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of ionized calcium and cAMP in plasma and urine are used as sensitive parameters for the evaluation of calcium disorders. Ionized calcium is accepted as the biologically active form of calcium in the extracellular fluid, while urine cAMP provides an in vivo receptor assay for the biologically active parathyroid hormone. When urine is included as part of the calcium metabolic investigation it usually requires 24 h urine collection with a variety of different laboratory tests. Ionized calcium and cAMP are described in the literature in terms of several derived quantities, nomenclatures, and units which are rather unsystematic. The author developed reliable techniques and proposed systematic names and symbols and reference values for these quantities. Due to the lack of guidelines for the collection of urines in calcium metabolic evaluation, the author presented a simplified protocol (4 h standardized urine collection). In clinical investigation plasma and urine cAMP have been used to differentiate idiopathic hypoparathyroidism from pseudohypoparathyroidism (PsHP) based on the results of i.v. injection of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Nephrogenous cAMP has also been used for the detection of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism with a high nosographic sensitivity (90%) (Broadus). The author showed that measurement of cAMP after i.v. PTH was a reliable and sensitive test to establish the diagnosis of PsHP, and that the urinary cAMP was useful for the diagnosis of secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with jejunoileal bypass, but could not confirm the high nosographic sensitivity for the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism. Further data are needed for proper conclusion. Although pursued vigorously the research into idiopathic stone formation using different protocols has not prevented stone recurrence nor indicated where further progress might be made. For the evaluation of recurrent calcium disease, the author proposed a simplified 4 h

  19. The RGS protein Crg2 regulates pheromone and cyclic AMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Gui; Wang, Yan-Li; Whittington, Amy; Li, Lie; Wang, Ping

    2008-09-01

    Crg1 and Crg2 are regulators of G-protein signaling homologs found in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Crg1 negatively regulates pheromone responses and mating through direct inhibition of Galpha subunits Gpa2 and Gpa3. It has also been proposed that Crg2 has a role in mating, as genetic crosses involving Deltacrg2 mutants resulted in formation of hyperfilaments. We found that mutation of Gpa2 and Gpa3 partially suppressed the hyperfilamentation, mutation of Gpa3 alleviated Deltacrg2-specfic cell swelling, and mutation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase Cpk1 blocked both processes. These findings indicate that Gpa2 and Gpa3 function downstream of Crg2 and that Gpa3 is also epistatic to Crg2 in a Cpk1-dependent morphogenesis process linked to mating. Significantly, we found that Deltacrg2 mutants formed enlarged capsules that mimic cells expressing a constitutively active GPA1(Q284L) allele and that the levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) were also elevated, suggesting that Crg2 also negatively regulates the Gpa1-cAMP signaling pathway. We further showed that Crg2 interacted with Gpa3 and Gpa1, but not Gpa2, in a pulldown assay and that Crg2 maintained a higher in vitro GTPase-activating protein activity toward Gpa3 and Gpa1 than to Gpa2. Finally, we found that dysregulation of cAMP due to the Crg2 mutation attenuated virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Taken together, our study reveals Crg2 as an RGS (regulator of G-protein signaling) protein of multiregulatory function, including one that controls mating distinctly from Crg1 and one that serves as a novel inhibitor of Gpa1-cAMP signaling.

  20. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  1. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  2. Cyclic GMP-AMP Containing Mixed Phosphodiester Linkages Is An Endogenous High Affinity Ligand for STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2′-OH of GMP and 5′-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3′-OH of AMP and 5′-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2′3′-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2′3′-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation. PMID:23747010

  3. Biguanides suppress hepatic glucagon signalling by decreasing production of cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A; Chu, Qingwei; Xie, Jianxin; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2013-02-14

    Glucose production by the liver is essential for providing a substrate for the brain during fasting. The inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose output is a major aetiological factor in the hyperglycaemia of type-2 diabetes mellitus and other diseases of insulin resistance. For fifty years, one of the few classes of therapeutics effective in reducing glucose production has been the biguanides, which include phenformin and metformin, the latter the most frequently prescribed drug for type-2 diabetes. Nonetheless, the mechanism of action of biguanides remains imperfectly understood. The suggestion a decade ago that metformin reduces glucose synthesis through activation of the enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been challenged by genetic loss-of-function experiments. Here we provide a novel mechanism by which metformin antagonizes the action of glucagon, thus reducing fasting glucose levels. In mouse hepatocytes, metformin leads to the accumulation of AMP and related nucleotides, which inhibit adenylate cyclase, reduce levels of cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity, abrogate phosphorylation of critical protein targets of PKA, and block glucagon-dependent glucose output from hepatocytes. These data support a mechanism of action for metformin involving antagonism of glucagon, and suggest an approach for the development of antidiabetic drugs.

  4. Cyclic AMP Recruits a Discrete Intracellular Ca2+ Store by Unmasking Hypersensitive IP3 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Konieczny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 stimulates Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and the response is potentiated by 3′,5′-cyclic AMP (cAMP. We investigated this interaction in HEK293 cells using carbachol and parathyroid hormone (PTH to stimulate formation of IP3 and cAMP, respectively. PTH alone had no effect on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, but it potentiated the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol. Surprisingly, however, the intracellular Ca2+ stores that respond to carbachol alone could be both emptied and refilled without affecting the subsequent response to PTH. We provide evidence that PTH unmasks high-affinity IP3 receptors within a discrete Ca2+ store. We conclude that Ca2+ stores within the ER that dynamically exchange Ca2+ with the cytosol maintain a functional independence that allows one store to be released by carbachol and another to be released by carbachol with PTH. Compartmentalization of ER Ca2+ stores adds versatility to IP3-evoked Ca2+ signals.

  5. Effect of glucocorticoid on prostaglandin E1 mediated cyclic AMP formation by vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Takeda, T

    1988-12-01

    The effect of glucocorticoid on the prostaglandin E1 (PGE1)-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from renal arteries (RA) was studied in rats. Dexamethasone (DEX) at concentrations ranging from 10(-10) to approximately 10(-8) mol/l dose-dependently potentiates the PGE1-mediated response. This facilitation began at 6 h and reached its maximum after 24 h of DEX administration. Aldosterone (10(-6) mol/l) did not affect the dose-response curve of PGE1. Inhibitors of protein and RNA synthesis blocked this glucocorticoid effect. The basal activity of adenylate cyclase in DEX-treated cells was twice as high as in control cells. Treatment of VSMC with DEX increased cholera toxin- and pertussis toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. DEX treatment also augments forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that DEX increases PGE1-mediated cAMP formation of VSMC from RA through a mechanism that involves the induction of protein synthesis, and that the activation of the catalytic unit may play some role in this facilitating process.

  6. Equivalence between Pfr and Cyclic AMP in the Induction of d-Usnic Acid Dehydrogenase in the Lichen Evernia prunastri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, A; Vicente, C

    1987-07-01

    d-Usnic acid dehydrogenase is induced in Evernia prunastri thalli by a supply of exogenous d-usnic acid in light. This effect is enhanced by red light pulses through a two step way: a very rapid increase of activity after the first 10 minutes of red light, which is not reversed by far-red light, and a slow enhancement following successive red light pulses at the beginning of each hour of incubation. The last response is completely reversed by far-red following red light. Although induction of the enzyme is not achieved in the dark, 0.1 and 0.5 millimolar cyclic AMP, or 0.1 millimolar dibutyryl cyclic AMP substitutes light action and, then, the enzyme is produced. In addition, phytochrome-far red-absorbing form-increases the amount of endogenously produced cyclic AMP and this effect is shown to be photoreversible when ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid is inhibiting adenylate cyclase.

  7. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  8. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  9. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (c...

  10. The cyclic di-nucleotide c-di-AMP is an allosteric regulator of metabolic enzyme function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precit, Mimi; Delince, Matthieu; Pensinger, Daniel; Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Jurado, Ashley R.; Goo, Young Ah; Sadilek, Martin; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a broadly conserved second messenger required for bacterial growth and infection. However, the molecular mechanisms of c-di-AMP signaling are still poorly understood. Using a chemical proteomics screen for c-di-AMP interacting proteins in the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we identified several broadly conserved protein receptors, including the central metabolic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (LmPC). Biochemical and crystallographic studies of the LmPC-c-di-AMP interaction revealed a previously unrecognized allosteric regulatory site 25 Å from the active site. Mutations in this site disrupted c-di-AMP binding and affected enzyme catalysis of LmPC as well as PC from pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis. C-di-AMP depletion resulted in altered metabolic activity in L. monocytogenes. Correction of this metabolic imbalance rescued bacterial growth, reduced bacterial lysis, and resulted in enhanced bacterial burdens during infection. These findings greatly expand the c-di-AMP signaling repertoire and reveal a central metabolic regulatory role for a cyclic di-nucleotide. PMID:25215494

  11. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is an Innate Immune Sensor of HIV and Other Retroviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daxing; Wu, Jiaxi; Wu, You-Tong; Du, Fenghe; Aroh, Chukwuemika; Yan, Nan; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses, including HIV, can activate innate immune responses, but the host sensors for retroviruses are largely unknown. Here we show that HIV infection activates cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) to produce cGAMP, which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce type-I interferons and other cytokines. Inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, but not integrase, abrogated interferon-β induction by the virus, suggesting that the reverse transcribed HIV DNA triggers the innate immune response. Knockout or knockdown of cGAS in mouse or human cell lines blocked cytokine induction by HIV, murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). These results indicate that cGAS is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses. PMID:23929945

  12. Cyclic AMP stabilizes a class of developmentally regulated Dictyostelium discoideum mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, G; Ceccarelli, A; Lodish, H F

    The stability of mRNA is an important facet of the regulation of protein synthesis. In mammalian cells most mRNAs have long half-lives (5-15 hours) but a substantial fraction are much less stable. There are few examples where the stability of a particular mRNA or class of mRNAs is specifically affected by environmental or developmental stimuli. Certain hormones cause specific stabilization of mRNAs species and preferential mRNA stability is important in the accumulation of globin and myosin mRNAs during the terminal stages of erythropoesis or myogenesis, respectively. Disaggregation of Dictyostelium discoideum aggregates induces the specific destabilization of a large class of developmentally regulated mRNAs; thus, this system is an excellent one in which to determine how such controls are effected. Here we show that addition of cyclic AMP to disaggregated cells specifically prevents the destabilization of these mRNAs.

  13. Cyclic AMP affects the haemocyte responses of larval Galleria mellonella to selected antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, David; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2005-05-01

    Signal transduction of the innate immediate responses of insect haemocytes to foreign matter is rarely considered. Herein using a combination of adenylate cyclase inhibitors and activators and phosphodiesterase inhibitors we determined that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at high levels normally impairs non-self response. Haemocyte contact with glass and bacteria lowered cAMP in vitro. Inactive phosphodiesterases, including type 4, impaired haemocyte reactions in vitro. Using the drugs in vivo to modulate adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterases altered the total and types of haemocytes. Adenylate cyclase inhibitors and etazolate (a type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor) alone produced changes in the haemograms similar to those caused by Bacillus subtilis. Sequential injections of an enzyme modulator followed by B. subtilis impaired bacterial removal due (1) in the case of enzyme inhibitors, to the removal of haemocytes prior to bacterial challenge and (2) in the case of forskolin and IBMX to the shut-down of the haemocytes. Activating adenylate cyclase or inhibiting phosphodiesterase impaired bacterial removal when co-injecting the compounds and bacteria.

  14. Antagonistic effect of Na+ and Mg2+ on P2z purinoceptor-associated pores in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated NG108-15 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, S L; Chueh, S H

    1996-10-01

    The effect of replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMG) on P2 receptor signaling pathways was investigated in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated NG108-15, cells. Benzoylbenzoic ATP (BzATP) dose-dependently increased the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) with an EC50 value of 230 microM. Replacement of Na+ with NMG as well as removal of Mg2+ from the bathing buffer potentiated ethidium bromide uptake, [Ca2+]i increase, and 45Ca2+ uptake in response to ATP or BzATP. In contrast, in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ to limit the amount of ATP4-, replacement of Na+ with NMG had no effect on the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase but caused a markedly larger [Ca2+]i increase when the calculated concentration of ATP4- was > 10 microM. The calculated EC50 value for ATP4- stimulation of the [Ca2+]i increase was 23 microM in NG108-15 cells. In vascular smooth muscle cells, intracellular Ca2+ release was the major pathway for the ATP-induced [Ca2+]i increase; both removal of Mg2+ and replacement of Na+ with NMG did not affect the action of ATP. These data suggest that ATP(4-)-promoted pores are antagonized by Na+ and Mg2+ in dibutyryl cyclic AMP-differentiated NG108-15 cells.

  15. Cyclic di-AMP Is Critical for Listeria monocytogenes Growth, Cell Wall Homeostasis, and Establishment of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Chelsea E.; Whiteley, Aaron T.; Burke, Thomas P.; Sauer, John-Demian; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes infection leads to robust induction of an innate immune signaling pathway referred to as the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP), characterized by expression of beta interferon (IFN-β) and coregulated genes. We previously identified the IFN-β stimulatory ligand as secreted cyclic di-AMP. Synthesis of c-di-AMP in L. monocytogenes is catalyzed by the diadenylate cyclase DacA, and multidrug resistance transporters are necessary for secretion. To identify additional bacterial factors involved in L. monocytogenes detection by the CSP, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutants that induced altered levels of IFN-β. One mutant that stimulated elevated levels of IFN-β harbored a transposon insertion in the gene lmo0052. Lmo0052, renamed here PdeA, has homology to a cyclic di-AMP phosphodiesterase, GdpP (formerly YybT), of Bacillus subtilis and is able to degrade c-di-AMP to the linear dinucleotide pApA. Reduction of c-di-AMP levels by conditional depletion of the di-adenylate cyclase DacA or overexpression of PdeA led to marked decreases in growth rates, both in vitro and in macrophages. Additionally, mutants with altered levels of c-di-AMP had different susceptibilities to peptidoglycan-targeting antibiotics, suggesting that the molecule may be involved in regulating cell wall homeostasis. During intracellular infection, increases in c-di-AMP production led to hyperactivation of the CSP. Conditional depletion of dacA also led to increased IFN-β expression and a concomitant increase in host cell pyroptosis, a result of increased bacteriolysis and subsequent bacterial DNA release. These data suggest that c-di-AMP coordinates bacterial growth, cell wall stability, and responses to stress and plays a crucial role in the establishment of bacterial infection. PMID:23716572

  16. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  17. Dual chemotaxis signalling regulates Dictyostelium development: intercellular cyclic AMP pulses and intracellular F-actin disassembly waves induce each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Michael G; Grutsch, James F

    2008-10-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae periodically emit and relay cAMP, which regulates their chemotaxis and morphogenesis into a multicellular, differentiated organism. Cyclic AMP also stimulates F-actin assembly and chemotactic pseudopodium extension. We used actin-GFP expression to visualise for the first time intracellular F-actin assembly as a spatio-temporal indicator of cell reactions to cAMP, and thus the kinematics of cell communication, in aggregating streams. Every natural cAMP signal pulse induces an autowave of F-actin disassembly, which propagates from each cell's leading end to its trailing end at a linear rate, much slower than the calculated and measured velocities of cAMP diffusion in aggregating Dictyostelium. A sequence of transient reactions follows behind the wave, including anterior F-actin assembly, chemotactic pseudopodium extension and cell advance at the cell front and, at the back, F-actin assembly, extension of a small retrograde pseudopodium (forcing a brief cell retreat) and chemotactic stimulation of the following cell, yielding a 20s cAMP relay delay. These dynamics indicate that stream cell behaviour is mediated by a dual signalling system: a short-range cAMP pulse directed from one cell tail to an immediately following cell front and a slower, long-range wave of intracellular F-actin disassembly, each inducing the other.

  18. Structural Insights into the Distinct Binding Mode of Cyclic Di-AMP with SaCpaA_RCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ko-Hsin; Liang, Juin-Ming; Yang, Jauo-Guey; Shih, Min-Shao; Tu, Zhi-Le; Wang, Yu-Chuang; Sun, Xing-Han; Hu, Nien-Jen; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2015-08-11

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a relatively new member of the family of bacterial cyclic dinucleotide second messengers. It has attracted significant attention in recent years because of the abundant roles it plays in a variety of Gram-positive bacteria. The structural features that allow diverse bacterial proteins to bind c-di-AMP are not fully understood. Here we report the biophysical and structural studies of c-di-AMP in complex with a bacterial cation-proton antiporter (CpaA) RCK (regulator of the conductance of K(+)) protein from Staphylococcus aureus (Sa). The crystal structure of the SaCpaA_RCK C-terminal domain (CTD) in complex with c-di-AMP was determined to a resolution of 1.81 Å. This structure revealed two well-liganded water molecules, each interacting with one of the adenine bases by a unique H2Olp-π interaction to stabilize the complex. Sequence blasting using the SaCpaA_RCK primary sequence against the bacterial genome database returned many CpaA analogues, and alignment of these sequences revealed that the active site residues are all well-conserved, indicating a universal c-di-AMP binding mode for CpaA_RCK. A proteoliposome activity assay using the full-length SaCpaA membrane protein indicated that c-di-AMP binding alters its antiporter activity by approximately 40%. A comparison of this structure to all other reported c-di-AMP-receptor complex structures revealed that c-di-AMP binds to receptors in either a "U-shape" or "V-shape" mode. The two adenine rings are stabilized in the inner interaction zone by a variety of CH-π, cation-π, backbone-π, or H2Olp-π interaction, but more commonly in the outer interaction zone by hydrophobic CH-π or π-π interaction. The structures determined to date provide an understanding of the mechanisms by which a single c-di-AMP can interact with a variety of receptor proteins, and how c-di-AMP binds receptor proteins in a special way different from that of c-di-GMP.

  19. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Urasaki, Tomoka; Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito; Inoue, Atsuko

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction.

  20. An op-amp gain error-compensated SC cyclic D/A converter converting from least significant bit

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 卓; 松本, 寛樹

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a switched-capacitor (SC) cyclic digital-to-analog converter (DAC) which compensate for the gain error and the offset voltage of operational amplifier (op-amp). The DAC convert from least significant bit (LSB). Even when the gain of op-amp is poor, compensated circuit can keep up a resolution. Circuit operation is evaluated on SIMetrix. An error analysis presented that shows an accuracy greater than 8-bits, where amplifier gain is 60 dB.

  1. A novel indirect sequence readout component in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2014-03-21

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid nucleobase interactions in the major groove of the two operator half-sites. Crystal structure analyses have revealed that the interaction results in two strong kinks at the TG/CA steps closest to the 6-base-pair spacer (N6). This spacer exhibits high sequence variability among the more than 100 natural binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold or abolished by varying the N6 spacer sequences. Furthermore, on the basis of sequence analysis and uranyl (UO2(2+)) probing data, we propose that the underlying mechanism relies on N6 deformability.

  2. Purification and Characterization of Cyclic AMP-Binding Protein from Ganoderma lucidum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qi; KIM Jung-Sik; CHUNG Ki-Chul

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-binding protein was purified 30 fold from the mycelia of Ganoderma lucidum by the methods of ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE-cellulose, phospho-cellulose ion exchange chromatography and Sephacryl S-100 gel filtration. The molecular mass of the purified protein is 34.5 kDa and 17 kDa by Sephacryl S-100 gel filtration and SDS-ployacrylamide gel electrophoresis, respectively. From these results it is suggested that the protein has a homometric dimmer structure. The pI of the purified protein is pH 8. 2 by native isoelectric focusing gel. The half-life of the protein activity in 10% glycerol at 4 ℃ is 7 d in crude extract, but its half-life is only 3 d under purifying conditions. The optimal conditions of the protein activity are at 1 ℃ and pH 7. 5. Its activity is increased 6 times by 1 mmol/L Zn2+ and is slightly inhibited by cGMP,Cu2+ and Mn2+.

  3. [Adrenergic beta-2 receptors and cyclic AMP in lymphocytes and their relationship to uterine contractility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mandach, U

    1994-01-01

    It is especially in the long-term application where the pharmacodynamics of the betamimetics determine their effectiveness. According to the time and dosis, there is a decrease in the density and function of the beta 2-adrenoceptors (desensitization). Clinically, this means a loss of effectiveness. This study investigated whether in the course of a normal pregnancy (n = 22) there is a change in the effectiveness of the betamimetics, as expressed by a change in the number of beta 2-adrenoceptors or their function. The results show a 50% decrease in the number of beta 2-adrenoceptors to the 36th gestational week and an increase to initial values after delivery. A similar pattern is found for the function of the beta 2-adrenoceptors (cyclic AMP). The implications for the uterus might be that, with advancing pregnancy, it becomes less prone to relaxation and that the betaadrenergic system, as a mechanism supporting prepare the way for delivery at term, becomes less significant. For tocolysis with betamimetics, the decrease of the beta 2-adrenoceptor density means that, with increasing gestational age, the responsiveness of the uterus to betamimetics decreases.

  4. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  5. Regulation of Cox-2 by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Protein in Prostate Cancer: Potential Role for Nexrutine

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Ghosh; Gretchen E. Garcia; Katherine Crosby; Hiroyasu Inoue; Thompson, Ian M.; Troyer, Dean A.; Kumar, Addanki P.

    2007-01-01

    We recently showed that NexrutineR, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. Our data also indicate that the antiproliferative effects of NexrutineR are mediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB). Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2), a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and suppresses a...

  6. [Involvement of extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase in control of motile activity of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, N B; Morozov, M A; Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Teplov, V A; Beĭlina, S I

    2010-01-01

    Possible involvement of extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase in the control of cell motile behavior has been investigated in Physarum polycephalum plasmodium, a multinuclear amoeboid cell with the autooscillatory mode of motility. It was found that the rate of the hydrolysis of 10 mM cAMP by a partially purified preparation of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase secreted by the plasmodium in the course of migration decreases 20-30 times under the action of 1 mM dithiothreitol. In the presence of 1-5 mM of this strong reducing agent, the onset of the plasmodium spreading and the transition to the stage of migration were delayed in a concentration-dependent manner. In accordance with the morphological pattern of motile behavior, the duration of the maintenance of high frequency autooscillations, which normally precede the increase in the rate of the spreading and appear also in response to the application of attractants at spatially uniform concentrations, strongly increased by the action of dithiothreitol. The results obtained suggest that the autocrine production of cAMP and extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase is an important constituent of the mechanism controlling the motile behavior of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium.

  7. Cyclic AMP analog blocks kinase activation by stabilizing inactive conformation: conformational selection highlights a new concept in allosteric inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W; Taylor, Susan S; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S

    2011-03-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound "B" and C-subunit-bound "H"-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through "induced fit" alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially "select" inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all "binding" constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation.

  8. Effect of cyclic AMP and acridine orange on the enzymatic reduction of usnic acid in the lichen Usnea aurantiaco-atra (Jacq. Bory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescence-detection HPLC procedure has been applied to identify and quantify acridine orange in lichen samples. The dye accumulates in thalli of the lichen Usnea aurantiaco-atra and, in part, it is recovered from protamine-precipitated nucleic acids extracted from the samples. A supply of exogenous cyclic AMP reverses the uptake of acridine orange by thallus samples and its binding to nucleic acids. The dye impedes neither the loss of endogenously-produced cyclic AMP by thallus samples nor inhibits the uptake of that exogenously supplied. However, part of the endogenously produced cyclic AMP is secreted to the incubation medium in which phosphodiesterase activity has never been detected. Since the synthesis of D-usnic acid: NAD+(H oxido-reductase is impeded by acridine orange, oxidative catabolism of usnic acid is inhibited in thalli floated on the dye. Cyclic AMP reverses this effect.

  9. [Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Edyta; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2012-07-20

    PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme's intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  10. The role of Zn-alpha2 glycoprotein in sperm motility is mediated by changes in cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Fei; Ying, Xiaoqian; Guo, Wei; Guo, Qiangsu; Chen, Guowu; Liu, Yue; Ding, Zhide

    2007-10-01

    Sperm motility is essential for male reproduction or natural fertilization. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway is generally recognized as one of the significant signaling pathways in the regulation of mammalian spermatozoan motility. Since Zn-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) activity in mammalian adipose tissue is mediated via the beta(3)-adrenoreceptor, with upregulation of the cAMP pathway, we hypothesize that ZAG may play the same role in sperm motility regulation, a new factor of regulation of sperm motility. Therefore, the gene encoding human ZAG was cloned and polyclonal antibodies were generated, and then laser scanning confocal microscopy and flow cytometry were employed to identify this protein in human spermatozoa. The results showed that ZAG protein was mostly localized on the pre-equatorial region covering the acrosome, neck, and middle piece of the flagellum of spermatozoa. Furthermore, using computer-assisted sperm analysis, we found that anti-human ZAG antibodies could significantly reduce the motility of human swim-up spermatozoa after 90- or 120-min incubation (Pspermatozoa and may be involved in the regulation of sperm motility via the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway.

  11. Properties of the luminal membrane of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts. Effect of cyclic AMP and blockers of chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by what transport mechanism does HCO-3 cross the luminal membrane of pancreatic duct cells, and how do the cells respond to stimulation with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). For this purpose a newly developed preparation of isolated and perfused intra......) hyperpolarized PDbl by 10.3 +/- 1.7 mV (n = 10); and SITS hyperpolarized PDbl by 7.8 +/- 0.9 mV (n = 4). Stimulation of the ducts with db-cAMP in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2 resulted in depolarization of PDbl, the ductal lumen became more negative and the fractional resistance of the luminal membrane...... decreased. Together with forskolin (10(-6) M), db-cAMP (10(-4) M) caused a fast depolarization of PDbl by 33.8 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 6). When db-cAMP (5 x 10(-4) M) was given alone in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2, PDbl depolarized by 25.3 +/- 4.2 mV (n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  12. Differences in beta-adrenergic regulation of cyclic AMP formation in cerebral cortical slices of the rat and spiny mouse--Acomys cahirinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalecka-Franaszek, E; Nalepa, I; Vetulani, J

    1990-01-01

    In both the rat and Acomys cahirinus the adrenergic cyclic AMP generating system in the brain is dependent not only on beta-, but also on alpha-adrenoceptors. The relative role of alpha-adrenoceptors is much greater in the Acomys cahirinus. This feature makes the Acomys an interesting animal model for investigating the role of alpha-beta-adrenoceptor coupling in generation of cyclic AMP and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatment.

  13. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  14. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, and acetylcholine on accumulation of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, G; Lindl, T

    1980-02-01

    We investigated in vitro accumulation of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine) and of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (induced by acetylcholine) in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus. The response to 5-hydroxytryptamine exceeded that induced by equimolar concentrations of dopamine. 1-methyl lysergic acid, a 5-hydroxytryptamine-blocking agent, diminished the 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced increase of cyclic AMP level. This parallels the effect of this amine on the contracted muscle. Acetylcholine, which causes a tonic contraction of the muscle, increased intracellular levels of cyclic GMP in a dose-dependent (max. 45-fold at 10(-4) M ACh) manner. The time course of the rise in cyclic GMP level was rapid and transient (peak concentration of cyclic GMP at 2 min). Mytolon was the most effective of all cholinergic blockers tested. It was concluded that cyclic nucleotides may play a role in the modulatory process of the transmitters. A direct relation to the relaxation-contraction process could not be established.

  15. Cyclic AMP enhances TGFβ responses of breast cancer cells by upregulating TGFβ receptor I expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Oerlecke

    Full Text Available Cellular functions are regulated by complex networks of many different signaling pathways. The TGFβ and cAMP pathways are of particular importance in tumor progression. We analyzed the cross-talk between these pathways in breast cancer cells in 2D and 3D cultures. We found that cAMP potentiated TGFβ-dependent gene expression by enhancing Smad3 phosphorylation. Higher levels of total Smad3, as observed in 3D-cultured cells, blocked this effect. Two Smad3 regulating proteins, YAP (Yes-associated protein and TβRI (TGFβ receptor 1, were responsive to cAMP. While YAP had little effect on TGFβ-dependent expression and Smad3 phosphorylation, a constitutively active form of TβRI mimicked the cAMP effect on TGFβ signaling. In 3D-cultured cells, which show much higher levels of TβRI and cAMP, TβRI was unresponsive to cAMP. Upregulation of TβRI expression by cAMP was dependent on transcription. A proximal TβRI promoter fragment was moderately, but significantly activated by cAMP suggesting that cAMP increases TβRI expression at least partially by activating TβRI transcription. Neither the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB nor the TβRI-regulating transcription factor Six1 was required for the cAMP effect. An inhibitor of histone deacetylases alone or together with cAMP increased TβRI expression by a similar extent as cAMP alone suggesting that cAMP may exert its effect by interfering with histone acetylation. Along with an additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and TGFβ on p21 expression an additive inhibitory effect of these agents on proliferation was observed. Finally, we show that mesenchymal stem cells that interact with breast cancer cells can simultaneously activate the cAMP and TGFβ pathways. In summary, these data suggest that combined effects of cAMP and TGFβ, as e.g. induced by mesenchymal stem cells, involve the upregulation of TβRI expression on the transcriptional level, likely due to changes in histone acetylation

  16. Functional roles of arcA, etrA, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein, and cya in the arsenate respiration pathway in Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Julie N; Durbin, K James; Saltikov, Chad W

    2009-02-01

    Microbial arsenate respiration can enhance arsenic release from arsenic-bearing minerals--a process that can cause arsenic contamination of water. In Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, the arsenate respiration genes (arrAB) are induced under anaerobic conditions with arsenate and arsenite. Here we report how genes that encode anaerobic regulator (arcA and etrA [fnr homolog]) and carbon catabolite repression (crp and cya) proteins affect arsenate respiration in ANA-3. Transcription of arcA, etrA, and crp in ANA-3 was similar in cells grown on arsenate and cells grown under aerobic conditions. ANA-3 strains lacking arcA and etrA showed minor to moderate growth defects, respectively, with arsenate. However, crp was essential for growth on arsenate. In contrast to the wild-type strain, arrA was not induced in the crp mutant in cultures shifted from aerobic to anaerobic conditions containing arsenate. This indicated that cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cyclic AMP receptor (CRP) activates arr operon transcription. Computation analysis for genome-wide CRP binding motifs identified a putative binding motif within the arr promoter region. This was verified by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with cAMP-CRP and several DNA probes. Lastly, four putative adenylate cyclase (cya) genes were identified in the genome. One particular cya-like gene was differentially expressed under aerobic versus arsenate respiration conditions. Moreover, a double mutant lacking two of the cya-like genes could not grow with arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor; exogenous cAMP could complement growth of the double cya mutant. It is concluded that the components of the carbon catabolite repression system are essential to regulating arsenate respiratory reduction in Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3.

  17. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleberg Karen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024. The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2.

  18. Critical role of transcription factor cyclic AMP response element modulator in beta1-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Geertje; Matus, Marek; Basu, Abhijit; Frebel, Karin; Rohsbach, Sebastian Pius; Safronenko, Andrej; Seidl, Matthias Dodo; Stümpel, Frank; Buchwalow, Igor; König, Simone; Engelhardt, Stefan; Lohse, Martin J; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Müller, Frank Ulrich

    2009-01-06

    Chronic stimulation of the beta(1)-adrenoceptor (beta(1)AR) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of heart failure; however, underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The regulation by transcription factors cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and cyclic AMP response element modulator (CREM) represents a fundamental mechanism of cyclic AMP-dependent gene control possibly implicated in beta(1)AR-mediated cardiac deterioration. We studied the role of CREM in beta(1)AR-mediated cardiac effects, comparing transgenic mice with heart-directed expression of beta(1)AR in the absence and presence of functional CREM. CREM inactivation protected from cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, and left ventricular dysfunction in beta(1)AR-overexpressing mice. Transcriptome and proteome analysis revealed a set of predicted CREB/CREM target genes including the cardiac ryanodine receptor, tropomyosin 1alpha, and cardiac alpha-actin as altered on the mRNA or protein level along with the improved phenotype in CREM-deficient beta(1)AR-transgenic hearts. The results imply the regulation of genes by CREM as an important mechanism of beta(1)AR-induced cardiac damage in mice.

  19. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes h

  20. Cyclic-AMP regulation of calcium-dependent K channels in an insect central neurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, J A; Pitman, R M

    1996-01-26

    In the cockroach fast coxal depressor motoneurone, either the muscarinic agonist McN-A-343 or dibutyryl cAMP (Db-cAMP) induced a reduction in voltage-dependent outward current. The response to McN is due to suppression of a calcium-dependent potassium current (IK,Ca) produced secondarily to a reduction in voltage-dependent calcium current (ICa). The response to Db-cAMP was investigated in order to establish whether cAMP might mediate the response to McN. ICa was suppressed by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) but not by Db-cAMP. The effects of IBMX were therefore unlikely to be the result of phosphodiesterase inhibition. Since caffeine also suppressed ICa, the observed effect of IBMX is probably due to release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. IK,Ca, evoked by injection of Ca2+, was reduced by Db-cAMP or forskolin but not by McN. These results indicate that the electrical response to McN in this neurone is not mediated by changes in cAMP.

  1. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  2. Characterization of cyclic AMP accumulation in cultured human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, L S; Valcic, M; Melman, A; Giraldi, A; Wagner, G; Christ, G J

    1994-10-01

    Intracavernous pharmacotherapy relies heavily on the use of vasoactive agents which act by increasing intracellular cAMP levels in human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. Yet little is known about the cAMP generating system in this tissue, and how it may affect observed patient variability. Thus, the goal of these studies was to better characterize the biochemistry of cAMP formation in human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle, and thus provide more insight into the mechanisms of corporal smooth muscle relaxation in vivo. We studied both receptor and nonreceptor mediated increases in cAMP formation in short-term cultures of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells. Both isoproterenol (ISO) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) produced concentration-dependent increases in cAMP, but histamine, serotonin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not. Forskolin, a relatively specific activator of adenylate cyclase, was also a potent stimulant of cAMP formation in these cells. Moreover, there was a direct correlation between the degree of forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in cultured corporal smooth muscle cells and the magnitude of the forskolin-induced relaxation response of precontracted isolated corporal smooth muscle strips. Prostaglandin E1 and ISO concentration response curves (CRCs) were then assayed in the absence and presence of subthreshold forskolin (0.1 microM.). In the presence of forskolin, the calculated maximal PGE1-induced cAMP accumulation (Emax) was significantly greater than that elicited by PGE1 alone, ISO alone, or ISO + forskolin (p protocol was used to demonstrate that both 80:20 and 70:30 FMRs (but not 95:5 or 90:10), were associated with significantly greater cAMP Emax values than that observed for PGE1 alone (p < or = 0.01). These data provide direct evidence that the degree of cAMP formation in cultured corporal smooth muscle cells is strongly correlated with the magnitude of relaxation of isolated corporal smooth muscle strips. In addition, since

  3. Cyclic 3', 5'-AMP relay in Dictyostelium discoideum: adaptation is independent of activation of adenylate cyclase

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, binding of cAMP to high affinity surface receptors leads to a rapid activation of adenylate cyclase followed by subsequent adaptation within several minutes. The rate of secretion of [ 3H ]cAMP, which reflects the state of activation of the enzyme, was measured. Caffeine noncompetitively inhibited the response to cAMP. Inhibition was rapidly reversible and pretreatment of cells with caffeine for up to 22 min had little effect on the subsequent responsiveness to cA...

  4. Cyclic-AMP levels in the lichen Evernia prunastri are modulated by light quantity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, María; Gordillo, Francisco J L; Figueroa, Félix L

    2003-07-01

    Changes in the accumulation of cAMP levels were measured by the isotope dilution assay using protein kinase A in the lichen Evernia prunastri at varying light conditions. cAMP levels decreased following exposure to low irradiance (20 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1), and below the compensation point for photosynthesis) of red light (600-710-nm wave length) and increased by 50% after far-red light illumination (15 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1), 710-800-nm wavelength). Far-red partially reverted the effect of red light when the former was supplied after the latter. cAMP increased to its maximum level under high irradiance supplied by a non-photomorphogenic yellow light source (400 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1), reaching photosynthetic saturation). The addition of small quantities of red and far-red light, however, had profound restricting effects on cAMP accumulation. The addition of inhibitors of electron transport chains did not promote any significant change in cAMP levels in any of the treatments, indicating that cAMP accumulation could not depend on ATP synthesis. We propose that the response of cAMP accumulation at low irradiance comprises the activation of a morphogenic pathway through a red/far-red photoreceptor. In addition, at high irradiance the response would occur most likely through photosystems II and I acting as sensors of light quantity, that can be strongly modified by the red/far-red photomorphogenic system. Thus, cAMP would be involved in sensing the overall light environment.

  5. Vascular effects and cyclic AMP production produced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, PACAP-38, and NPY on rabbit ovarian artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, W; Sheikh, S P; Ottesen, B;

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between vessel tone and cAMP production induced by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine methionine (PHM), peptide histidine valine (PHV), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27 and PACAP-38), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was investigated......-38 all increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. The cAMP accumulation induced by PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 was five times higher than the cAMP content induced by the other three peptides. The peptide-induced smooth muscle relaxation did not correlate to the cAMP accumulation. NPY (10......(-7) M) markedly reversed the relaxations induced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, and PACAP-38, but did not influence the cAMP production induced by these peptides. In conclusion, the relaxation induced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, and PACAP-38 and the contraction induced by NPY are not solely related...

  6. Extracellular modulation of the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor activity by cyclic nucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Odorants and pheromones are essential to insects as chemical cues for finding food or an appropriate mating partner. These volatile compounds bind to olfactory receptors (Ors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons. Each insect Or functions as a ligand-gated ion channel and is a heteromeric complex that comprises one type of canonical Or and a highly conserved Orco subunit. Because there are many Or types, insect Ors can recognize with high specificity a myriad of chemical cues. Cyclic nucleotides can modulate the activity of insect Or-Orco complexes; however, the mechanism of action of these nucleotides is under debate. Here, we show that cyclic nucleotides, including cAMP and cGMP, interact with the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor complex, BmOr-1-BmOrco, from the outside of the cell and that these nucleotides act as antagonists at low concentrations and weak agonists at high concentrations. These cyclic nucleotides do not compete with the sex pheromone, bombykol, for binding to the BmOr-1 subunit. ATP and GTP also weakly inhibited BmOr-1-BmOrco activity, but D-ribose had no effect; these findings indicated that the purine moiety was crucial for the inhibition. Only the bombykol receptors have been so far shown to be subject to modulation by nucleotide-related compounds, indicating that this responsiveness to these compounds is not common for all insect Or-Orco complexes.

  7. The Application of Nanofiltration in the Extraction of jujube Cyclic Adenosinemonophosphate(cAMP)%纳膜过滤在提取红枣环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春霞; 路福平; 刘逸寒; 杜连祥; 李明润

    2011-01-01

    Nanofiltration was used in the extraction of cAMP from Jujube.Jujube was first soaked , then through puree, enzyme hydrolysis, filtration, resin adsorption and formic acid elution.The results showed: Nanofiltration fraction have a peak at a wavelength of 258nm by UV which was the same as the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)standard; the Nanofiltration discard part has no peak at 258nm; HPLC showed that Nanofiltration interception fraction has the same retention time as the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) reference, while the Nanofiltration discard liquid do not have the peak at the same time point.This indicated that nanofiltration intercepted the target product of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), successfully separated molecular , purified and concentrated cAMP.%红枣经过浸泡、打浆、酶解、压滤、树脂吸附、甲酸洗脱后,采用150 nm纳滤膜在压差为0.5~1 MPa下过滤,结果表明:纳滤截留组分经过紫外扫描在波长258 nm处峰值与环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)标准品相同,而纳滤液组分(弃去液)在波长258 nm处无峰;又经过HPLC检测纳滤截留组分与环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)标准品出峰时间相同,而纳滤液组分(弃去液)在此时间处无峰.表明纳滤截留目标产物环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)效果明显,分离了大分子组分及小分子组分,纳滤后利于浓缩、纯化得到环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)成品.

  8. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  9. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity.

  10. The cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase RegA critically regulates encystation in social and pathogenic amoebas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingyou; Schilde, Christina; Birgersson, Elin; Chen, Zhi-hui; McElroy, Stuart; Schaap, Pauline

    2014-02-01

    Amoebas survive environmental stress by differentiating into encapsulated cysts. As cysts, pathogenic amoebas resist antibiotics, which particularly counteracts treatment of vision-destroying Acanthamoeba keratitis. Limited genetic tractability of amoeba pathogens has left their encystation mechanisms unexplored. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum forms spores in multicellular fruiting bodies to survive starvation, while other dictyostelids, such as Polysphondylium pallidum can additionally encyst as single cells. Sporulation is induced by cAMP acting on PKA, with the cAMP phosphodiesterase RegA critically regulating cAMP levels. We show here that RegA is deeply conserved in social and pathogenic amoebas and that deletion of the RegA gene in P. pallidum causes precocious encystation and prevents cyst germination. We heterologously expressed and characterized Acanthamoeba RegA and performed a compound screen to identify RegA inhibitors. Two effective inhibitors increased cAMP levels and triggered Acanthamoeba encystation. Our results show that RegA critically regulates Amoebozoan encystation and that components of the cAMP signalling pathway could be effective targets for therapeutic intervention with encystation.

  11. Cyclic AMP stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey reticulospinal neurons without substantially altering their biophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale, T; Frisch, E B; McClellan, A D

    2013-08-15

    Reticulospinal (RS) neurons are critical for initiation of locomotor behavior, and following spinal cord injury (SCI) in the lamprey, the axons of these neurons regenerate and restore locomotor behavior within a few weeks. For lamprey RS neurons in culture, experimental induction of calcium influx, either in the growth cone or cell body, is inhibitory for neurite outgrowth. Following SCI, these neurons partially downregulate calcium channel expression, which would be expected to reduce calcium influx and possibly provide supportive conditions for axonal regeneration. In the present study, it was tested whether activation of second messenger signaling pathways stimulates neurite outgrowth of lamprey RS neurons without altering their electrical properties (e.g. spike broadening) so as to possibly increase calcium influx and compromise axonal growth. First, activation of cAMP pathways with forskolin or dbcAMP stimulated neurite outgrowth of RS neurons in culture in a PKA-dependent manner, while activation of cGMP signaling pathways with dbcGMP inhibited outgrowth. Second, neurophysiological recordings from uninjured RS neurons in isolated lamprey brain-spinal cord preparations indicated that dbcAMP or dbcGMP did not significantly affect any of the measured electrical properties. In contrast, for uninjured RS neurons, forskolin increased action potential duration, which might have increased calcium influx, but did not significantly affect most other electrical properties. Importantly, for injured RS neurons during the period of axonal regeneration, forskolin did not significantly alter their electrical properties. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP signaling by dbcAMP stimulates neurite outgrowth, but does not alter the electrical properties of lamprey RS neurons in such a way that would be expected to induce calcium influx. In conclusion, our results suggest that activation of cAMP pathways alone, without compensation for possible

  12. Equivalence between Pfr and Cyclic AMP in the Induction of d-Usnic Acid Dehydrogenase in the Lichen Evernia prunastri1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, A.; Vicente, C.

    1987-01-01

    d-Usnic acid dehydrogenase is induced in Evernia prunastri thalli by a supply of exogenous d-usnic acid in light. This effect is enhanced by red light pulses through a two step way: a very rapid increase of activity after the first 10 minutes of red light, which is not reversed by far-red light, and a slow enhancement following successive red light pulses at the beginning of each hour of incubation. The last response is completely reversed by far-red following red light. Although induction of the enzyme is not achieved in the dark, 0.1 and 0.5 millimolar cyclic AMP, or 0.1 millimolar dibutyryl cyclic AMP substitutes light action and, then, the enzyme is produced. In addition, phytochrome—far red-absorbing form—increases the amount of endogenously produced cyclic AMP and this effect is shown to be photoreversible when ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid is inhibiting adenylate cyclase. PMID:16665525

  13. Effect of electromagnetic field on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a human mu-opioid receptor cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    During the cell communication process, endogenous and exogenous signaling affect normal as well as pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences such as extra-low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) have been shown to effect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein receptors, down-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and affecting the calcium/calmodulin/nitric oxide pathway. Investigators have reported changes in opioid receptors and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in opiate tolerance and dependence by showing how repeated exposure to morphine decreases adenylate cyclase activity causing cAMP to return to control levels in the tolerant state, and increase above control levels during withdrawal. Resonance responses to biological systems using exogenous EMF signals suggest that frequency response characteristics of the target can determine the EMF biological response. In our past research we found significant down regulation of inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) using 5 Hz EMF frequency. In this study cAMP was stimulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human mu-opioid receptors, then exposed to 5 Hz EMF, and outcomes were compared with morphine treatment. Results showed a 23% greater inhibition of cAMP-treating cells with EMF than with morphine. In order to test our results for frequency specific effects, we ran identical experiments using 13 Hz EMF, which produced results similar to controls. This study suggests the use of EMF as a complementary or alternative treatment to morphine that could both reduce pain and enhance patient quality of life without the side-effects of opiates.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Subunit 3 Is Involved in the Switch from Tachyzoite to Bradyzoite Development

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    Tatsuki Sugi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Asexual reproduction in T. gondii allows it to switch between the rapidly replicating tachyzoite and quiescent bradyzoite life cycle stages. A transient cyclic AMP (cAMP pulse promotes bradyzoite differentiation, whereas a prolonged elevation of cAMP inhibits this process. We investigated the mechanism(s by which differential modulation of cAMP exerts a bidirectional effect on parasite differentiation. There are three protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunits (TgPKAc1 to -3 expressed in T. gondii. Unlike TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2, which are conserved in the phylum Apicomplexa, TgPKAc3 appears evolutionarily divergent and specific to coccidian parasites. TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2 are distributed in the cytomembranes, whereas TgPKAc3 resides in the cytosol. TgPKAc3 was genetically ablated in a type II cyst-forming strain of T. gondii (PruΔku80Δhxgprt and in a type I strain (RHΔku80Δhxgprt, which typically does not form cysts. The Δpkac3 mutant exhibited slower growth than the parental and complemented strains, which correlated with a higher basal rate of tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX treatment, which elevates cAMP levels, maintained wild-type parasites as tachyzoites under bradyzoite induction culture conditions (pH 8.2/low CO2, whereas the Δpkac3 mutant failed to respond to the treatment. This suggests that TgPKAc3 is the factor responsible for the cAMP-dependent tachyzoite maintenance. In addition, the Δpkac3 mutant had a defect in the production of brain cysts in vivo, suggesting that a substrate of TgPKAc3 is probably involved in the persistence of this parasite in the intermediate host animals.

  15. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  16. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  17. Cyclic AMP imaging sheds light on PDF signaling in circadian clock neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchik, Seth M; Davis, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    In Drosophila, the neuropeptide PDF is required for circadian rhythmicity, but it is unclear where PDF acts. In this issue of Neuron, Shafer et al. use a novel bioimaging methodology to demonstrate that PDF elevates cAMP in nearly all clock neurons. Thus, PDF apparently exerts more widespread effects on the circadian clock network than suggested by previous studies of PDF receptor expression.

  18. Cyclic AMP induces IPC leukemia cell apoptosis via CRE-and CDK-dependent Bim transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseby, S; Gausdal, G; Keen, T J; Kjærland, E; Krakstad, C; Myhren, L; Brønstad, K; Kunick, C; Schwede, F; Genieser, H-G; Kleppe, R; Døskeland, S O

    2011-12-08

    The IPC-81 cell line is derived from the transplantable BNML model of acute myelogenic leukemia (AML), known to be a reliable predictor of the clinical efficiency of antileukemic agents, like the first-line AML anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR). We show here that cAMP acted synergistically with DNR to induce IPC cell death. The DNR-induced death differed from that induced by cAMP by (1) not involving Bim induction, (2) being abrogated by GSK3β inhibitors, (3) by being promoted by the HSP90/p23 antagonist geldanamycin and truncated p23 and (4) by being insensitive to the CRE binding protein (CREB) antagonist ICER and to cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) inhibitors. In contrast, the apoptosis induced by cAMP correlated tightly with Bim protein expression. It was abrogated by Bim (BCL2L11) downregulation, whether achieved by the CREB antagonist ICER, by CDK inhibitors, by Bim-directed RNAi, or by protein synthesis inhibitor. The forced expression of BimL killed IPC-81(WT) cells rapidly, Bcl2-overexpressing cells being partially resistant. The pivotal role of CREB and CDK activity for Bim transcription is unprecedented. It is also noteworthy that newly developed cAMP analogs specifically activating PKA isozyme I (PKA-I) were able to induce IPC cell apoptosis. Our findings support the notion that AML cells may possess targetable death pathways not exploited by common anti-cancer agents.

  19. Cyclic AMP enhancing drugs modulate eicosanoid release from human alveolar macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D. Beusenberg; H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); I.L. Bonta; J.G.C. van Amsterdam (Jan)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX), salbutamol and sodium nitroprusside was evaluated regarding PGE2 and LTB4 release and cAMP and cGMP level in human alveolar macrophages obtained from controls and COPD patients. Basal levels per five million co

  20. The cyclic AMP response element modulator regulates transcription of the TCR zeta-chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenbrock, K; Kyttaris, VC; Ahlmann, M; Ehrchen, JA; Tolnay, M; Melkonyan, H; Mawrin, C; Roth, J; Sorg, C; Juang, YT; Tsokos, GC

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematusus T cells display decreased amounts of TCR zeta mRNA that results in part from limited binding of the transcriptional enhancer Elf-1 to the TCR zeta promoter. We have identified a new cis-binding site for the cAMP response element (CRE) modulator (CREM) on the TCR zeta pro

  1. Identification and function of exchange proteins activated directly by cyclic AMP (Epac in mammalian spermatozoa.

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    Alvaro Miro-Moran

    Full Text Available The role of cAMP in spermatic functions was classically thought to be mediated exclusively through the activation of Protein Kinase A (PKA. However, it has recently been shown that cAMP also exerts its effects through a PKA-independent pathway activating a family of proteins known as Epac proteins. Therefore, many of the spermatic functions thought to be regulated by cAMP through the activation of PKA are again under study. We aimed to identify and to investigate the role of Epac proteins in spermatozoa using a specific permeable analog (8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP. Also, we aimed to study its relationship with E-cadherin, an adhesion protein involved in fertility. Our results demonstrate the presence and sub-cellular distribution of Epac 1 and Epac 2 in mammalian spermatozoa. Capacitation and the acrosome reaction induced a change in the localization of Epac proteins in sperm. Moreover, incubation with 8-Br-2'-O-Me-cAMP prompted an increase in Rap1 activation, in the scrambling of plasma membrane phospholipids (necessary for the capacitation process, the acrosome reaction, motility, and calcium mobilization, when spermatozoa were incubated in acrosome reaction conditions. Finally, the activation of Epac proteins induced a change in the distribution of E-cadherin. Therefore, the increase in the acrosome reaction, together with the increase in calcium (which is known to be essential for fertilization and the Epac nteraction with E-cadherin, might indicate that Epac proteins have an important role in gamete recognition and fertilization.

  2. Protein kinases mediate increment of the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP -responsive element binding protein in spinal cord of rats following capsaicin injection

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    Li Junfa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong noxious stimuli cause plastic changes in spinal nociceptive neurons. Intracellular signal transduction pathways from cellular membrane to nucleus, which may further regulate gene expression by critical transcription factors, convey peripheral stimulation. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB is a well-characterized stimulus-induced transcription factor whose activation requires phosphorylation of the Serine-133 residue. Phospho-CREB can further induce gene transcription and strengthen synaptic transmission by the activation of the protein kinase cascades. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which CREB phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinases during nociception. This study was designed to use Western blot analysis to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC in regulating the phosphorylation of CREB in the spinal cord of rats following intraplantar capsaicin injection. Results We found that capsaicin injection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of CREB in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord. Pharmacological manipulation of MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC with their inhibitors (U0126, H89 and NPC 15473, respectively significantly blocked this increment of CREB phosphorylation. However, the expression of CREB itself showed no change in any group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the activation of intracellular MAP kinase, PKA and PKC cascades may contribute to the regulation of phospho-CREB in central nociceptive neurons following peripheral painful stimuli.

  3. Cyclic AMP effectors in African trypanosomes revealed by genome-scale RNA interference library screening for resistance to the phosphodiesterase inhibitor CpdA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Matthew K; Bachmaier, Sabine; Ali, Juma A M; Alsford, Sam; Tagoe, Daniel N A; Munday, Jane C; Schnaufer, Achim C; Horn, David; Boshart, Michael; de Koning, Harry P

    2013-10-01

    One of the most promising new targets for trypanocidal drugs to emerge in recent years is the cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity encoded by TbrPDEB1 and TbrPDEB2. These genes were genetically confirmed as essential, and a high-affinity inhibitor, CpdA, displays potent antitrypanosomal activity. To identify effectors of the elevated cAMP levels resulting from CpdA action and, consequently, potential sites for adaptations giving resistance to PDE inhibitors, resistance to the drug was induced. Selection of mutagenized trypanosomes resulted in resistance to CpdA as well as cross-resistance to membrane-permeable cAMP analogues but not to currently used trypanocidal drugs. Resistance was not due to changes in cAMP levels or in PDEB genes. A second approach, a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) library screen, returned four genes giving resistance to CpdA upon knockdown. Validation by independent RNAi strategies confirmed resistance to CpdA and suggested a role for the identified cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs) in cAMP action. CARP1 is unique to kinetoplastid parasites and has predicted cyclic nucleotide binding-like domains, and RNAi repression resulted in >100-fold resistance. CARP2 and CARP4 are hypothetical conserved proteins associated with the eukaryotic flagellar proteome or with flagellar function, with an orthologue of CARP4 implicated in human disease. CARP3 is a hypothetical protein, unique to Trypanosoma. CARP1 to CARP4 likely represent components of a novel cAMP signaling pathway in the parasite. As cAMP metabolism is validated as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei, cAMP effectors highly divergent from the mammalian host, such as CARP1, lend themselves to further pharmacological development.

  4. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  5. Sequential alterations in the hepatic content and metabolism of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP induced by DL-ethionine: evidence for malignant transformation of liver with a sustained increase in cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRubertis, F R; Craven, P A

    1976-12-01

    There is evidence than adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) may have antagonistic actions on cell growth, with cAMP inhibiting and cGMP stimulating this process. However, reductions in cAMP and increases in cGMP are not charactersitic of all neoplastic tissues. Thus, benign and malignant tissues from hepatoma-bearing rats exposed to the hepatic carcinogen DL-ethionine have elevated rather than depressed cAMP, compared to control liver, and parenteral administration of this drug increases hepatic cAMP within hours. In the present study, the effects of ethionine ingestion on the hepatic content and metabolism of both cAMP and cGMP were examined sequentially in rats at 2 and then 6 wk intervals, from the initiation of drug administration until the development of hepatomas. After 2 wk, cAMP content of quick-frozen liver from rats receiving ethionine (E) was significantly increased (826 +/- 91 pmole/g wet weight) above that of liver from pair-fed controls (C, 415 +/- 44), whether calculated by tissue wet weight, protein, or DNA content. In benign tissue from E, higher cAMP was still evident after in vitro incubations of slices with 2 mM 1-methyl-3-iso-butylxanthine (MIX) and was associated with enhanced adenylate cyclase and unchanged high or low Km cAMP-phosphodiesterase activities. These findings are compatible with accelerated cAMP generation in liver from E. Protein kinase activity ratios were significantly increased in frozen liver from E (0.52 +/- 0.04 versus 0.36 +/- 0.03 in C), and the percent glycogen synthetase in the I form was clearly reduced (19% +/- 2% in E versus 47% +/- 5% in c). incubation of hepatic slices from E or C with MIX and/or 10 muM glucagon further increased cAMP and protein kinase activity ratios, data which imply higher effective, as well as total, cellular cAMP in E. Changes in cAMP metabolism and action observed at 2 wk persisted throughout the 38-wk period of drug ingestion. Adenylate cyclase

  6. Cyclic AMP control measured in two compartments in HEK293 cells: phosphodiesterase K(M is more important than phosphodiesterase localization.

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    Karina Matthiesen

    Full Text Available The intracellular second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDE. The knowledge of individual families and subtypes of PDEs is considerable, but how the different PDEs collaborate in the cell to control a cAMP signal is still not fully understood. In order to investigate compartmentalized cAMP signaling, we have generated a membrane-targeted variant of the cAMP Bioluminiscence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET sensor CAMYEL and have compared intracellular cAMP measurements with it to measurements with the cytosolic BRET sensor CAMYEL in HEK293 cells. With these sensors we observed a slightly higher cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation at the plasma membrane compared to the cytosol, which is in accordance with earlier results from Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET sensors. We have analyzed PDE activity in fractionated lysates from HEK293 cells using selective PDE inhibitors and have identified PDE3 and PDE10A as the major membrane-bound PDEs and PDE4 as the major cytosolic PDE. Inhibition of membrane-bound or cytosolic PDEs can potentiate the cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation, but we see no significant difference between the potentiation of the cAMP response at the plasma membrane and in cytosol when membrane-bound and cytosolic PDEs are inhibited. When different levels of stimulation were tested, we found that PDEs 3 and 10 are mainly responsible for cAMP degradation at low intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas PDE4 is more important for control of cAMP at higher concentrations.

  7. Co-crystal structures of PKG Iβ (92-227 with cGMP and cAMP reveal the molecular details of cyclic-nucleotide binding.

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    Jeong Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs are central mediators of the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and phosphorylate downstream substrates that are crucial for regulating smooth muscle tone, platelet activation, nociception and memory formation. As one of the main receptors for cGMP, PKGs mediate most of the effects of cGMP elevating drugs, such as nitric oxide-releasing agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are used for the treatment of angina pectoris and erectile dysfunction, respectively.We have investigated the mechanism of cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG by determining crystal structures of the amino-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD-A of human PKG I bound to either cGMP or cAMP. We also determined the structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound nucleotide. The crystal structures of CNBD-A with bound cAMP or cGMP reveal that cAMP binds in either syn or anti configurations whereas cGMP binds only in a syn configuration, with a conserved threonine residue anchoring both cyclic phosphate and guanine moieties. The structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound cyclic nucleotide was similar to that of the cyclic nucleotide bound structures. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that CNBD-A binds both cGMP and cAMP with a relatively high affinity, showing an approximately two-fold preference for cGMP.Our findings suggest that CNBD-A binds cGMP in the syn conformation through its interaction with Thr193 and an unusual cis-peptide forming residues Leu172 and Cys173. Although these studies provide the first structural insights into cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG, our ITC results show only a two-fold preference for cGMP, indicating that other domains are required for the previously reported cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

  8. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is a Cytosolic DNA Sensor that Activates the Type-I Interferon Pathway

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    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers the host immune responses such as the production of type-I interferons (IFN). Cytosolic DNA induces IFN through the production of cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced IFNβ in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and IFNβ induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP. PMID:23258413

  9. Molecular basis for the specific recognition of the metazoan cyclic GMP-AMP by the innate immune adaptor protein STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Chen, Zhijian J; Chen, Chuo

    2015-07-21

    Cyclic GMP-AMP containing a unique combination of mixed phosphodiester linkages (2'3'-cGAMP) is an endogenous second messenger molecule that activates the type-I IFN pathway upon binding to the homodimer of the adaptor protein STING on the surface of endoplasmic reticulum membrane. However, the preferential binding of the asymmetric ligand 2'3'-cGAMP to the symmetric dimer of STING represents a physicochemical enigma. Here we show that 2'3'-cGAMP, but not its linkage isomers, adopts an organized free-ligand conformation that resembles the STING-bound conformation and pays low entropy and enthalpy costs in converting into the active conformation. Our results demonstrate that analyses of free-ligand conformations can be as important as analyses of protein conformations in understanding protein-ligand interactions.

  10. Monitoring magnesium efflux cyclic AMP-induced in HL60 cells by using a new hydroxyquinoline fluorescent chemosensor

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    Chiara Marraccini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis of magnesium is still unclear. Several studies documented the occurrence of fluxes of magnesium across the plasmamembrane within minutes from the application of metabolic or hormonal stimuli. These fluxes, however, result in limited variation of free Mg2+ intracellular concentration and large changes in total Mg content. It has been reported that a stimulation with cyclic AMP caused a movement of total magnesium within 10 min after treatment in cardiomyocytes. In this study we tested this hypothesis in HL60 leukemic cells, not excitable but highly proliferating cell model. We evaluated Mg flux by DCHQ5, the phenyl-derivative of hydroxyquinoline fluorescent probe family. We observed a drastic decrease of intracellular total magnesium in the first 3 min. We also verified that at least 10% of the total intracellular amount of magnesium moved in the supernatant of stimulated cells.

  11. Evidence that acute taurine treatment alters extracellular AMP hydrolysis and adenosine deaminase activity in zebrafish brain membranes.

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    Rosemberg, Denis Broock; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Etchart, Renata Jardim; Rico, Eduardo Pacheco; Langoni, Andrei Silveira; Dias, Renato Dutra; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Bonan, Carla Denise; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2010-09-06

    Taurine is one of the most abundant free amino acids in excitable tissues. In the brain, extracellular taurine may act as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, and neuroprotector. Nucleotides are ubiquitous signaling molecules that play crucial roles for brain function. The inactivation of nucleotide-mediated signaling is controlled by ectonucleotidases, which include the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) family and ecto-5'-nucleotidase. These enzymes hydrolyze ATP/GTP to adenosine/guanosine, which exert a modulatory role controlling several neurotransmitter systems. The nucleoside adenosine can be inactivated in extracellular or intracellular milieu by adenosine deaminase (ADA). In this report, we tested whether acute taurine treatment at supra-physiological concentrations alters NTPDase, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ADA activities in zebrafish brain. Fish were treated with 42, 150, and 400 mg L(-1) taurine for 1h, the brains were dissected and the enzyme assays were performed. Although the NTPDase activities were not altered, 150 and 400 mg L(-1) taurine increased AMP hydrolysis (128 and 153%, respectively) in zebrafish brain membranes and significantly decreased ecto-ADA activity (29 and 38%, respectively). In vitro assays demonstrated that taurine did not change AMP hydrolysis, whereas it promoted a significant decrease in ecto-ADA activity at 150 and 400 mg L(-1) (24 and 26%, respectively). Altogether, our data provide the first evidence that taurine exposure modulates the ecto-enzymes responsible for controlling extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. These findings could be relevant to evaluate potential beneficial effects promoted by acute taurine treatment in the central nervous system (CNS) of this species. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  13. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  14. CAP1, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein gene, regulates bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and cyclic AMP levels and is required for virulence of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Y S; Sundstrom, P

    2001-05-01

    In response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans exits the budding cycle, producing germ tubes and hyphae concomitant with expression of virulence genes, such as that encoding hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1). Biochemical studies implicate cyclic AMP (cAMP) increases in promoting bud-hypha transitions, but genetic evidence relating genes that control cAMP levels to bud-hypha transitions has not been reported. Adenylate cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) of nonpathogenic fungi interact with Ras and adenylate cyclase to increase cAMP levels under specific environmental conditions. To initiate studies on the relationship between cAMP signaling and bud-hypha transitions in C. albicans, we identified, cloned, characterized, and disrupted the C. albicans CAP1 gene. C. albicans strains with inactivated CAP1 budded in conditions that led to germ tube formation in isogenic strains with CAP1. The addition of 10 mM cAMP and dibutyryl cAMP promoted bud-hypha transitions and filamentous growth in the cap1/cap1 mutant in liquid and solid media, respectively, showing clearly that cAMP promotes hypha formation in C. albicans. Increases in cytoplasmic cAMP preceding germ tube emergence in strains having CAP1 were markedly diminished in the budding cap1/cap1 mutant. C. albicans strains with deletions of both alleles of CAP1 were avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. The avirulence of a germ tube-deficient cap1/cap1 mutant coupled with the role of Cap1 in regulating cAMP levels shows that the Cap1-mediated cAMP signaling pathway is required for bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and the pathogenesis of candidiasis.

  15. Cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase IIIA1 inhibitors decrease cytosolic Ca2+ concentration and increase the Ca2+ content of intracellular storage sites in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roevens, P; de Chaffoy de Courcelles, D

    1993-06-09

    The effect of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors on Ca2+ homeostasis in human platelets was studied using both quin-2 (2-(bis-(acetylamino)-5-methyl-phenoxy)methyl-6-methoxy-8-bis-(acetylami no) quinoline) and chlorotetracycline (CTC) to measure changes in cytosolic Ca2+ as well as changes in the amount of Ca2+ accumulated in intracellular storage sites. At therapeutic concentrations (1 microM) milrinone and R 80 122 but not enoximone decreased the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in the resting platelet while the Ca2+ content in intracellular stores was increased. These observations are in accord with the proposed mechanism of action of cAMP-PDE inhibitors on cardiomyocites and highlight the particular role of cAMP in regulation of Ca2+ homeostasis.

  16. Inhibition of thyrotropin-stimulated DNA synthesis by microinjection of inhibitors of cellular Ras and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, E; Wen, W; Meinkoth, J L

    1993-08-01

    Microinjection of a dominant interfering mutant of Ras (N17 Ras) caused a significant reduction in thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH])-stimulated DNA synthesis in rat thyroid cells. A similar reduction was observed following injection of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Coinjection of both inhibitors almost completely abolished TSH-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast to TSH, overexpression of cellular Ras protein did not stimulate the expression of a cyclic AMP response element-regulated reporter gene. Similarly, injection of N17 Ras had no effect on TSH-stimulated reporter gene expression. Moreover, overexpression of cellular Ras protein stimulated similar levels of DNA synthesis in the presence or absence of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor. Together, these results suggest that in Wistar rat thyroid cells, a full mitogenic response to TSH requires both Ras and cyclic APK-dependent protein kinase.

  17. One-day treatment of small molecule 8-bromo-cyclic AMP analogue induces cell-based VEGF production for in vitro angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Kevin W-H; Kan, Ho Man; Gagnon, Keith A; Laurencin, Cato T

    2016-10-01

    Small molecule-based regenerative engineering is emerging as a promising strategy for regenerating bone tissue. Small molecule cAMP analogues have been proposed as novel biofactors for bone repair and regeneration and, while promising, the effect that these small molecules have on angiogenesis, a critical requirement for successful bone regeneration, is still unclear. Our previous research demonstrated that the small molecule cAMP analogue 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) was able to promote initial osteoblast adhesion on a polymeric scaffold via cAMP signalling cascades. Here, we report that 8-Br-cAMP is capable of inducing in vitro cell-based VEGF production for angiogenesis promotion. We first demonstrated that treating osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells with 8-Br-cAMP for 1 day significantly increased VEGF production and secretion. We then demonstrated that 8-Br-cAMP-induced cell-secreted VEGF is biologically active and may promote angiogenesis, as evidenced by increased human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) migration and tubule formation. In addition, treatment of MC3T3-E1 cells with 8-Br-cAMP for as short as a single day resulted in enhanced ALP activity as well as matrix mineralization, demonstrating in vitro osteoblastic differentiation. A short-term 8-Br-cAMP treatment also addresses the concern of non-specific cytotoxicity, as our data indicate that a 1-day 8-Br-cAMP treatment scheme supports cellular proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells as well as HUVECs. While the major concern associated with small molecule drugs is the risk of non-specific cytotoxicity, the short exposure treatment outlined in this paper provides a very promising strategy to mitigate the risk associated with small molecules. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  19. Aspergillus fumigatus allergen expression is coordinately regulated in response to hydrogen peroxide and cyclic AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowyer Paul

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A. fumigatus has been associated with a wide spectrum of allergic disorders such as ABPA or SAFS. It is poorly understood what allergens in particular are being expressed during fungal invasion and which are responsible for stimulation of immune responses. Study of the dynamics of allergen production by fungi may lead to insights into how allergens are presented to the immune system. Methods Expression of 17 A. fumigatus allergen genes was examined in response to various culture conditions and stimuli as well as in the presence of macrophages in order to mimic conditions encountered in the lung. Results Expression of 14/17 allergen genes was strongly induced by oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -10, -13, -17 and -18, all >10-fold and Asp f 11, -12, and -22, 5-10-fold and 16/17 allergen genes were repressed in the presence of cAMP. The 4 protease allergen genes (Asp f -5, -10, -13 and -18 were expressed at very low levels compared to the comparator (β-tubulin under all other conditions examined. Mild heat shock, anoxia, lipid and presence of macrophages did not result in coordinated changes in allergen gene expression. Growth on lipid as sole carbon source contributed to the moderate induction of most of the allergen genes. Heat shock (37°C > 42°C caused moderate repression in 11/17 genes (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -9, -10, -13, -17, -18 and -23 (2- to 9-fold, which was mostly evident for Asp f 1 and -9 (~9-fold. Anaerobic stress led to moderate induction of 13/17 genes (1.1 to 4-fold with one, Asp f 8 induced over 10-fold when grown under mineral oil. Complex changes were seen in gene expression during co-culture of A. fumigatus with macrophages. Conclusions Remarkable coordination of allergen gene expression in response to a specific condition (oxidative stress or the presence of cAMP has been observed, implying that a single biological stimulus may play a role in allergen gene

  20. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1.  Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Edyta Makuch; Janusz Matuszyk

    2012-01-01

     PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regio...

  2. Changes in levels of argininosuccinate lyase mRNA during induction by glucagon and cyclic AMP in cultured foetal-rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renouf, S; Buquet, C; Fairand, A; Benamar, M; Husson, A

    1993-01-01

    During the perinatal period, the activity of the urea-cycle enzyme argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is regulated by glucocorticoids, glucagon and insulin. In this study, the effects of glucagon and cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogues were examined on the synthesis of ASL and on the level of its corresponding mRNA in cultured foetal hepatocytes. Northern-blot analysis revealed that these agents only gave a transient induction of ASL mRNA amount, which reached a peak at 6 h and declined thereafter. This induction preceded the increase in enzyme activity and amount which could be observed for 2 or 3 days of culture. Stimulation of ASL mRNA accumulation by a combination of cAMP analogues and dexamethasone was additive, indicating that glucocorticoids and cAMP are both necessary to promote hepatocyte differentiation and that inductions could occur via independent pathways. Induction by cAMP analogues could be abolished by actinomycin D, suggesting a control mechanism at the transcriptional level. Puromycin was without effect on ASL mRNA induction by cAMP, indicating that no ongoing protein synthesis was required in the stimulation process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8387274

  3. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Aca1 regulates virulence and differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans via the cyclic AMP-protein kinase A cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Hicks, Julie K; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway controls cell functions in response to environmental cues in organisms as diverse as yeast and mammals. In the basidiomycetous human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the cAMP pathway governs virulence and morphological differentiation. Here we identified and characterized adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, Aca1, which functions in parallel with the Galpha subunit Gpa1 to control the adenylyl cyclase (Cac1). Aca1 interacted with the C terminus of Cac1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. By molecular and genetic approaches, Aca1 was shown to play a critical role in mating by regulating cell fusion and filamentous growth in a cAMP-dependent manner. Aca1 also regulates melanin and capsule production via the Cac1-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Genetic epistasis studies support models in which Aca1 and Gpa1 are necessary and sufficient components that cooperate to activate adenylyl cyclase. Taken together, these studies further define the cAMP signaling cascade controlling virulence of this ubiquitous human fungal pathogen.

  4. Prostaglandin E2 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and function through cyclic AMP and EP2/EP4 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Bak-Jensen, Kristian S; Li, Ying; Blumenschein, Wendy M; McGeachy, Mandy J; McClanahan, Terrill K; McKenzie, Brent S; Kastelein, Robert A; Cua, Daniel J; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2009-03-16

    Prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play an important role during inflammation. This is exemplified by the clinical use of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, which interfere with PGE2 synthesis, as effective antiinflammatory drugs. Here, we show that PGE2 directly promotes differentiation and proinflammatory functions of human and murine IL-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells. In human purified naive T cells, PGE2 acts via prostaglandin receptor EP2- and EP4-mediated signaling and cyclic AMP pathways to up-regulate IL-23 and IL-1 receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 synergizes with IL-1beta and IL-23 to drive retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, IL-17, IL-17F, CCL20, and CCR6 expression, which is consistent with the reported Th17 phenotype. While enhancing Th17 cytokine expression mainly through EP2, PGE2 differentially regulates interferon (IFN)-gamma production and inhibits production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Th17 cells predominantly through EP4. Furthermore, PGE2 is required for IL-17 production in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Hence, the combination of inflammatory cytokines and noncytokine immunomodulators, such as PGE2, during differentiation and activation determines the ultimate phenotype of Th17 cells. These findings, together with the altered IL-12/IL-23 balance induced by PGE2 in dendritic cells, further highlight the crucial role of the inflammatory microenvironment in Th17 cell development and regulation.

  5. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nair; V A Vaidya

    2006-09-01

    Depression is the major psychiatric ailment of our times, afflicting ∼20% of the population. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology of this complex disorder is not well understood. In addition, although antidepressants have been in existence for the past several decades, the mechanisms that underlie their therapeutic effects remain elusive. Building evidence implicates a role for the plasticity of specific neuro-circuitry in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Damage to limbic regions is thought to contribute to the etiology of depression and antidepressants have been reported to reverse such damage and promote adaptive plasticity. The molecular pathways that contribute to the damage associated with depression and antidepressant-mediated plasticity are a major focus of scientific enquiry. The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action.

  6. Regulation of Cox-2 by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Protein in Prostate Cancer: Potential Role for Nexrutine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ghosh

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that NexrutineR, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. Our data also indicate that the antiproliferative effects of NexrutineR are mediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB. Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2, a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and suppresses apoptosis. Treatment of LNCaP cells with NexrutineR reduced tumor necrosis factor α-induced enzymatic as well as promoter activities of Cox-2. NexrutineR also reduced the expression and promoter activity of Cox-2 in PC-3 cells that express high constitutive levels of Cox-2. Deletion analysis coupled with mutational analysis of the Cox-2 promoter identified CRE as being sufficient for mediating NexrutineR response. Immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate tumors show increased expression of CREB and DNA binding activity in high-grade tumors (three-fold higher in human prostate tumors compared to normal prostate; P = .01. We have identified CREB-mediated activation of Cox-2 as a potential signaling pathway in prostate cancer which can be blocked with a nontoxic, cost-effective dietary supplement like NexrutineR, demonstrating a prospective for development of NexrutineR for prostate cancer management.

  7. Reverse relationship between malignancy and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Yoshida rat ascites hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Nakamura, S; Nomura, M; Yamamoto, H; Sanae, F; Hidaka, H

    1993-08-31

    Rat ascites hepatoma (AH) cells (10(6) cells/head) inoculated intraperitoneally into rats had host-killing ability (malignancy) in the order AH66F > AH44 > AH13 > AH7974 > AH109A > AH66 > AH130. The life span of the rats after inoculation closely correlated with the activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) in the tumor cells but not the activity of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C). N-[2-[N-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5- isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-87), a potent, selective inhibitor of protein kinase A, inhibited in vitro growth of these hepatoma cells with a similar potency and, intraperitoneally injected, prolonged the lives of rats bearing less malignant AH66 cells (with high protein kinase A activity) but did not affect the life span of rats bearing highly malignant AH66F cells (with low protein kinase A activity). On the other hand N-(2-methylpiperazyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, inhibited AH66F cells more than AH66 cells, but did not influence the life span of rats bearing either hepatoma. From these results it is deduced that protein kinase A may be important in the regulation of malignancy and in vivo proliferation of AH cells.

  8. Cyclic-di-GMP signalling meets extracellular polysaccharide synthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Jan; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-06-01

    In order to resist harmful environmental conditions, many bacteria form multicellular aggregates called biofilms. In these biofilms, they protect themselves in a self-produced matrix consisting of extracellular polysaccharides, proteins and DNA. In many bacteria, biofilm formation is stimulated in the presence of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP. In this issue of Environmental Microbiology Reports, Bedrunka and Graumann have studied matrix production by the proteins encoded in the Bacillus subtilis ydaJKLMN operon. For the first time, they were able to provide a link between c-di-GMP signalling and matrix production in this bacterium. The work demonstrates that the c-di-GMP receptor protein YdaK forms a membrane-bound complex with the YdaM and YdaN proteins, and that this interaction with YdaK is required for polysaccharide production by YdaL, YdaM and YdaN. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Rolipram-induced elevation of cAMP or chondroitinase ABC breakdown of inhibitory proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, E; Ladak, A; Furey, M; Brushart, T; Tyreman, N; Gordon, T

    2010-05-01

    The inhibitory growth environment of myelin and extracellular matrix proteoglycans in the central nervous system may be overcome by elevating neuronal cAMP or degrading inhibitory proteoglycans with chondroitinase ABC (ChABC). In this study, we asked whether similar mechanisms operate in peripheral nerve regeneration where effective Wallerian degeneration removes myelin and extracellular proteoglycans slowly. We repaired transected common peroneal (CP) nerve in rats and either elevated cAMP in the axotomized neurons by subcutaneous rolipram, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase IV, and/or promoted degradation of proteoglycans in the distal nerve stump by local ChABC administration. Rolipram treatment significantly increased the number of motoneurons that regenerated axons across the repair site at 1 and 2 weeks, and increased the number of sensory neurons that regenerated axons across the repair site at 2 weeks. Local application of ChABC had a similar effect to rolipram treatment in promoting motor axon regeneration, the effect being no greater when rolipram and ChABC were administered simultaneously. We conclude that blocking inhibitors of axon regeneration by elevating cAMP or degrading proteoglycans in the distal nerve stump promotes peripheral axon regeneration after surgical repair of a transected nerve. It is likely that elevated cAMP is sufficient to encourage axon outgrowth despite the inhibitory growth environment such that simultaneous enzymatic proteoglycan degradation does not promote more axon regeneration than either elevated cAMP or proteoglycan degradation alone.

  10. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion is mediated by cyclic-AMP and protein kinase C signal transduction pathways in rat corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Endo, K; Nakata, K

    1998-05-01

    Ocular surface mucin is secreted from both goblet cells in the conjunctival epithelium and corneal epithelial cells. To clarify its mechanism of secretion in corneal epithelial cells, a rat cornea organ culture system was used to evaluate the second messenger roles of cyclic-AMP (cAMP), cyclic-GMP (cGMP) and protein kinase C (PKC) in modulating mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Rat cornea sections (3 mm diameter) were cultured in TC-199 medium, and radiolabeled with sodium sulfate for 18 hr. After washing, the corneas were treated with various second messenger modulating agents for 30 min. The culture media were reacted with Dolichos biflorus (DBA)-lectin, and mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein secretion, whereas after corneal epithelial debridement the secretion was markedly inhibited by 81%. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner following elevation of cAMP levels by exposure to either forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Concomitant exposure to the cAMP dependent protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720 completely inhibited their stimulatory effects. Neither exposure to dibutyryl cGMP nor nitroprusside affected mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Stimulation by PKC, phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also increased mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. The PKC inhibitor, calphostin C completely inhibited the stimulation by PDBu of mucine-like glycoprotein secretion. These results demonstrate that corneal epithelial cells secrete mucin-like glycoprotein, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC signal transduction pathways.

  11. Stimulation of inositol phosphate formation in FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells by catecholamines and its relationship to changes in 45Ca2+ efflux and cyclic AMP accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, M I; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1987-12-01

    Catecholamines specifically stimulated the rapid formation of inositol phosphates, bisphosphates and trisphosphates in a concentration-dependent manner in FRTL-5 thyroid cells. Further analysis by high performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of two isomers of inositol trisphosphate, 1,4,5- and 1,3,4-trisphosphate, suggesting that the 1,4,5-trisphosphate of inositol is further metabolized to the 1,3,4-trisphosphate isomer. The alpha 1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, prazosin, inhibited the effects of epinephrine, while the alpha 2-adrenoreceptor antagonist, yohimbine, was without effect. Treatment of FRTL-5 cells with pertussis toxin (to inhibit Ni) did not abolish the epinephrine effect on inositol trisphosphate formation. Carbachol, N6-[L-2-phenylisopropyl]-adenosine and forskolin were without effect on phosphoinositide metabolism. Both epinephrine and the calcium ionophore A23187 stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux from 45Ca2+-loaded FRTL-5 cells. The time-course of the epinephrine effect indicates that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation (t1/2 approximately 1 s) precedes both the efflux of 45Ca2+ (t1/2 approximately 30 s) as well as the reduction of cyclic AMP levels (t1/2 approximately 90 s) in response to epinephrine. These results strongly suggest that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate has the appropriate properties to act as a second messenger by which alpha 1-adrenergic hormones, through mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ and activation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, reduce cyclic AMP levels in FRTL-5 cells.

  12.  Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Makuch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme’s intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  13. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-16

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Local and systemic alterations in cyclic 3',5' AMP phosphodiesterase activity in relation to tail regeneration under hypothyroidism and T4 replacement in the lizard, Mabuya carinata.

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    Ramachandran, A V; Swamy, M S; Kurup, A K

    1996-09-01

    To establish the relationship between thyroid hormone and cyclic Adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) during lacertilian tail regeneration, cAMP phosphodiesterase, the hydrolytic enzyme of cAMP, was assayed in the tail regenerate, liver, and skeletal muscle of control (group A), chemically thyroidectomized (group B), and thyroidectomized and T4-replaced (group C) animals during various periods of tail regeneration. Enzyme activity was elevated in all three tissues of group B animals. Animals of group C showed an intermediate level of enzyme activity between controls (group A) and experimental animals (group B). These observations suggest a possible regulatory role of thyroxine in maintaining optimum levels of phosphodiesterase. The retardation in regeneration observable in the hypothyroid group of animals may be correlated with low levels of tissue cAMP. However, the operation of other influencing factors on phosphodiesterase during regeneration can be surmised from the observed tendency to exhibit similar patterns of phase-specific modulations in enzyme activity. Our observations are discussed in terms of phase-specific involvement of cAMP in regeneration, as well as its role in other metabolic aspects and the possible mode of indirect control exerted by thyroxine on lacertilian tail regeneration.

  15. A mechanism for the auto-inhibition of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel opening and its relief by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Madoka; Zhang, Zaiyong; Boulton, Stephen; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; VanSchouwen, Bryan; Gloyd, Melanie; Accili, Eric A; Lange, Oliver F; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels control neuronal and cardiac electrical rhythmicity. There are four homologous isoforms (HCN1-4) sharing a common multidomain architecture that includes an N-terminal transmembrane tetrameric ion channel followed by a cytoplasmic "C-linker," which connects a more distal cAMP-binding domain (CBD) to the inner pore. Channel opening is primarily stimulated by transmembrane elements that sense membrane hyperpolarization, although cAMP reduces the voltage required for HCN activation by promoting tetramerization of the intracellular C-linker, which in turn relieves auto-inhibition of the inner pore gate. Although binding of cAMP has been proposed to relieve auto-inhibition by affecting the structure of the C-linker and CBD, the nature and extent of these cAMP-dependent changes remain limitedly explored. Here, we used NMR to probe the changes caused by the binding of cAMP and of cCMP, a partial agonist, to the apo-CBD of HCN4. Our data indicate that the CBD exists in a dynamic two-state equilibrium, whose position as gauged by NMR chemical shifts correlates with the V½ voltage measured through electrophysiology. In the absence of cAMP, the most populated CBD state leads to steric clashes with the activated or "tetrameric" C-linker, which becomes energetically unfavored. The steric clashes of the apo tetramer are eliminated either by cAMP binding, which selects for a CBD state devoid of steric clashes with the tetrameric C-linker and facilitates channel opening, or by a transition of apo-HCN to monomers or dimer of dimers, in which the C-linker becomes less structured, and channel opening is not facilitated.

  16. Physiological properties of neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells using a dibutyryl cyclic AMP-based protocol.

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    Belinsky, Glenn S; Moore, Anna R; Short, Shaina M; Rich, Matthew T; Antic, Srdjan D

    2011-10-01

    Neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells hold promise for the therapy of neurological diseases. Quality inspection of human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons has often been based on immunolabeling for neuronal markers. Here we put emphasis on their physiological properties. Electrophysiological measurements were carried out systematically at different stages of neuronal in vitro development, including the very early stage, neuroepithelial rosettes. Developing human neurons are able to generate action potentials (APs) as early as 10 days after the start of differentiation. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive (putative dopaminergic, DA) neurons tend to aggregate into clumps, and their overall yield per coverslip is relatively low (8.3%) because of areas void of DA neurons. On the same in vitro day, neighboring neurons can be in very different stages of differentiation, including repetitive AP firing, single full-size AP, and abortive AP. Similarly, the basic electrophysiological parameters (resting membrane potential, input resistance, peak sodium, and peak potassium currents) are scattered in a wide range. Visual appearance of differentiating neurons, and number of primary and secondary dendrites cannot be used to predict the peak sodium current or AP firing properties of cultured neurons. Approximately 13% of neurons showed evidence of hyperpolarization-induced current (I(h)), a characteristic of DA neurons; however, no neurons with repetitive APs showed I(h). The electrophysiological measurements thus indicate that a standard DA differentiation (dibutyryl cyclic AMP-based) protocol, applied for 2-5 weeks, produces a heterogeneous ensemble of mostly immature neurons. The overall quality of human neurons under present conditions (survival factors were not used) begins to deteriorate after 12 days of differentiation.

  17. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  18. Innate hemocyte responses of Malacosoma disstria larvae (C. Insecta) to antigens are modulated by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulii, Vladislav; Dunphy, Gary B; Mandato, Craig A

    2009-08-01

    Invertebrate intracellular hemocyte signaling pathways affecting cellular-antigen responses, although defined for molluscs and some arthropods including dipteran insects, is less known for lepidopterans. Hemocytic-antigen responses of the arboreal pest lepidopteran Malacosoma disstria are linked to cAMP-dependent protein kinase A implicating cAMP in cellular hemocyte immune responses. The purpose in the present study was to determine intracellular cAMP effects on larval M. disstria hemocytes adhering to slides and bacteria. Altering adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities as well as cAMP levels in vitro and in vivo changed hemocyte responses to antigens. Quiescent hemocytes had high cAMP levels due to adenylate cyclase activity and possibly low phosphodiesterase (type 4) activity. Antigen contact diminished hemocytic cAMP levels. Inhibiting adenylate cyclase increased hemocyte-antigen and hemocyte-hemocyte adhesion, the latter producing nodules in vivo without bacterial antigens. Inhibiting phosphodiesterase type 4 produced the reverse effects. Pharmacologically increasing intracellular cAMP in attached hemocytes caused many of the cells to detach. Diminished intracellular cAMP changed hemograms in vivo in bacteria-free larvae comparable to changes induced by the bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, by producing nodules. Lowering cAMP enhanced also the removal of Xenorhabdus nematophila and B. subtilisin vivo.

  19. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 receptor/cyclic AMP/T-type Ca(2+) channel pathway mediates neuritogenesis in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Maeda, Takashi; Tanaka, Yukari; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-03-01

    We investigated mechanisms for the neuritogenesis caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells. PGE2 caused neuritogenesis, an effect abolished by an EP4 receptor antagonist or inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (AC) or protein kinase A (PKA) and mimicked by the AC activator forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), and selective activators of PKA or Epac. ND7/23 cells expressed both Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels). The neuritogenesis induced by db-cAMP or PGE2 was abolished by T-channel blockers. T-channels were functionally upregulated by db-cAMP. The PGE2/EP4/cAMP/T-channel pathway thus appears to mediate neuritogenesis in sensory neurons.

  20. Cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) exerts proliferative and anti-proliferative effects in pituitary cells of different types by activating both cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, E; Peverelli, E; Giardino, E; Locatelli, M; Lasio, G B; Beck-Peccoz, P; Spada, A; Lania, A G; Mantovani, G

    2014-03-05

    In the pituitary the activation of cyclic adenosine 3'-5'-monophosphate (cAMP) dependent pathways generates proliferative signals in somatotrophs, whereas in pituitary cells of other lineages its effect remains uncertain. Moreover, the specific role of the two main cAMP effectors, protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac), has not been defined. Aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cAMP on pituitary adenomatous cells proliferation and to identify PKA and Epac differential involvement. We found that cAMP increased DNA synthesis and cyclin D1 expression in somatotropinomas, whereas it reduced both parameters in prolactinomas and nonfunctioning adenomas, these effects being replicated in corresponding cell lines. Moreover, the divergent cAMP effects were mimicked by Epac and PKA analogs, which activated Rap1 and CREB, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that cAMP exerted opposite effects on different pituitary cell types proliferation, these effects being mediated by both Epac and PKA.

  1. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) regulatory subunits are packaged and secreted by many exocrine and endocrine cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mednieks, M.I.; Hand, A.R.

    1986-05-01

    Regulatory (R) subunits of cAPK were identified by us as components of rat and human saliva by photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 32/P)-8-azido cyclic AMP. Photoaffinity labeling of purified rat parotid granule contents and immunogold labeling of thin sections with monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of R subunits in granules. The authors now report that cAPK R subunits are present in secretory granules and are apparently secreted by many exocrine and endocrine cell types. Labeling of thin sections of rat tissues with antibody to R subunits and protein A-gold shows gold particles over secretory granules of endocrine cells of the pituitary, pancreas and intestine. Zymogen granules of exocrine pancreatic acinar cells, the dense cores of secretory granules of seminal vesicle epithelial cells and secretory product in the seminal vesicle lumina were prominently labeled with gold. Photoaffinity labeling shows that pancreatic secretions and seminal vesicle contents have cAPK components. Phosphorylative modification of cellular proteins by cAMP controls hormonally stimulated protein secretion by many cell types. Although no catalytic activity was detected, identification of R subunits in granules and as secretory products indicates that they may have multiple roles in cellular mechanisms of action of cyclic AMP-mediated events in secretory cells.

  2. Macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha inhibits postentry steps of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection via suppression of intracellular cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amella, Carol-Ann; Sherry, Barbara; Shepp, David H; Schmidtmayerova, Helena

    2005-05-01

    Primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) predominantly use chemokine receptor CCR5 to enter target cells. The natural ligands of CCR5, the beta-chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, and RANTES, interfere with HIV-1 binding to CCR5 receptors and decrease the amount of virions entering cells. Although the inhibition of HIV-1 entry by beta-chemokines is well documented, their effects on postentry steps of the viral life cycle and on host cell components that control the outcome of infection after viral entry are not well defined. Here, we show that all three beta-chemokines, and MIP-1alpha in particular, inhibit postentry steps of the HIV-1 life cycle in primary lymphocytes, presumably via suppression of intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Productive HIV-1 infection of primary lymphocytes requires cellular activation. Cell activation increases intracellular cAMP, which is required for efficient synthesis of proviral DNA during early steps of viral infection. Binding of MIP-1alpha to cognate receptors decreases activation-induced intracellular cAMP levels through the activation of inhibitory G proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of one of the downstream targets of cAMP, cAMP-dependent PKA, significantly inhibits synthesis of HIV-1-specific DNA without affecting virus entry. These data reveal that beta-chemokine-mediated inhibition of virus replication in primary lymphocytes combines inhibitory effects at the entry and postentry levels and imply the involvement of beta-chemokine-induced signaling in postentry inhibition of HIV-1 infection.

  3. Responsiveness of glycogen breakdown to cyclic AMP in perfused liver from rats with insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vardanega-Peicher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The responsiveness of glycogen breakdown to cAMP was investigated in isolated perfused liver from male Wistar fed rats (200-220 g with insulin-induced hypoglycemia. The activation of glycogenolysis by 3 µM cAMP was decreased (P<0.05 in livers from rats with hypoglycemia induced by the administration of insulin or during the direct infusion of insulin into the isolated liver. The direct effect of insulin on glycogen catabolism promoted by 3 µM cAMP occurred as early as 3 min after starting insulin infusion. In contrast, the cAMP agonists resistant to phosphodiesterases, 8Br-cAMP and 6MB-cAMP, used at the same concentration as cAMP, i.e., 3 µM, did not modify the effect of insulin. The data suggest that the decreased hepatic responsiveness of glycogen breakdown during insulin-induced hypoglycemia is a direct effect of insulin decreasing the intracellular levels of cAMP.

  4. Elevated extracellular calcium increases fibroblast growth factor-2 gene and protein expression levels via a cAMP/PKA dependent pathway in cementoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Sousuke; Nemoto, Eiji; Ebe, Yukari; Somerman, Martha J; Shimauchi, Hidetoshi

    2010-09-01

    Cementoblasts, tooth root lining cells, are responsible for laying down cementum on the root surface, a process that is indispensable for establishing a functional periodontal ligament. Cementoblasts share phenotypical features with osteoblasts. Elevated levels of extracellular Ca(2+) have been implicated in osteogenesis by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of extracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cementogenesis has not been examined. Using RT-PCR, we found that elevated levels of extracellular Ca(2+) increase fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 gene expression with a peak at 6h. Pretreatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, or an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, MDL-12,330A, inhibited Ca(2+)-stimulated Fgf-2 expression. In contrast, pretreatment with the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF-109203X or the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122 did not affect the expression of Fgf-2 transcripts, suggesting that the increase in Fgf-2 expression was dependent on the PKA but not the PLC/PKC signaling pathway. Treatment with an activator of adenylate cyclase, forskolin, or a cell-permeable analog of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP, enhanced Ca(2+)-stimulated Fgf-2 expression, but a single treatment with forskolin or 8-Br-cAMP did not, suggesting that cAMP generation is indispensable but not sufficient for Ca(2+)-stimulated FGF2 expression. Next, we examined the cation specificity of the putative receptor and showed that treatment with trivalent/divalent inorganic ions, Ca(2+), Gd(3+), Sr(2+), or Al(3+), caused a dose-dependent increase in Fgf-2 mRNA levels in a cAMP-dependent fashion, whereas Mg(2+) and the organic ions neomycin and spermine had no effect on Fgf-2 gene expression levels. These findings suggest that an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing mechanism is present in cementoblasts and its activation leads to FGF-2 stimulation in a cAMP/PKA dependent fashion. Understanding the pathway regulating key genes involved in modulating the

  5. Several isoforms of locustatachykinins may be involved in cyclic AMP-mediated release of adipokinetic hormones from the locust Corpora cardiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, D R; Vullings, H G; Passier, P C; Lundquist, C T; Schoofs, L; Diederen, J H; Van der Horst, D J

    1999-03-01

    Four locustatachykinins (LomTK I-IV) were identified in about equal amounts in extracts of corpora cardiaca of locusts, using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay with synthetic LomTK I-IV as standards. Brain extracts also contained the four isoforms in roughly equimolar concentrations. Retrograde tracing of the nervi corporis cardiaci II (NCC II) in vitro with Lucifer yellow in combination with LomTK immunocytochemistry revealed that about half of the secretomotor neurons in the lateral part of the protocerebrum projecting into the glandular lobe of the corpora cardiaca (CCG) contain LomTK-immunoreactive material. Since the four LomTKs are present in the CCG, these four or five neurons in each hemisphere are likely to contain colocalized LomTK I-IV. The role of two of the LomTKs in the regulation of the release of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) from the adipokinetic cells in the CCG in the locust was investigated. Experiments performed in vitro showed that LomTK I and II induced release of AKH in a dose-dependent manner. These peptides also rapidly and transiently elevated the cyclic AMP-content of the CCG. The peak level of cyclic AMP occurred about 45 seconds after stimulation with LomTK. These results support the proposal that LomTKs are involved in controlling the release of the adipokinetic hormones and suggest that all LomTK isoforms may participate in this cyclic AMP-mediated event. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Cyclic-AMP regulates postnatal development of neural and behavioral responses to NaCl in rats

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    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Heck, Gerard L.; DeSimone, John A.; West, David; Mahavadi, Sunila; Hojati, Deanna; Murthy, Karnam S.; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Spielman, Andrew I.; Özdener, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-01-01

    During postnatal development rats demonstrate an age-dependent increase in NaCl chorda tympani (CT) responses and the number of functional apical amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in salt sensing fungiform (FF) taste receptor cells (TRCs). Currently, the intracellular signals that regulate the postnatal development of salt taste have not been identified. We investigated the effect of cAMP, a downstream signal for arginine vasopressin (AVP) action, on the postnatal development of NaCl responses in 19–23 day old rats. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were monitored after lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) under open-circuit conditions and under ±60 mV lingual voltage clamp. Behavioral responses were tested using 2 bottle/24h NaCl preference tests. The effect of [deamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (dDAVP, a specific V2R agonist) was investigated on ENaC subunit trafficking in rat FF TRCs and on cAMP generation in cultured adult human FF taste cells (HBO cells). Our results show that in 19–23 day old rats, the ENaC-dependent maximum NaCl CT response was a saturating sigmoidal function of 8-CPT-cAMP concentration. 8-CPT-cAMP increased the voltage-sensitivity of the NaCl CT response and the apical Na+ response conductance. Intravenous injections of dDAVP increased ENaC expression and γ-ENaC trafficking from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment in rat FF TRCs. In HBO cells dDAVP increased intracellular cAMP and cAMP increased trafficking of γ- and δ-ENaC from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment 10 min post-cAMP treatment. Control 19–23 day old rats were indifferent to NaCl, but showed clear preference for appetitive NaCl concentrations after 8-CPT-cAMP treatment. Relative to adult rats, 14 day old rats demonstrated significantly less V2R antibody binding in circumvallate TRCs. We conclude that an age-dependent increase in V2R expression produces an AVP-induced incremental increase in cAMP that

  7. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alleviates Extracellular Matrix Accumulation in High Glucose-Induced Renal Fibroblasts through mTOR Signaling Pathway

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    Xia Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular matrix accumulation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Although AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been found to inhibit extracellular matrix synthesis by experiments in vivo and vitro, its role in alleviating the deposition of extracellular matrix in renal interstitial fibroblasts has not been well defined. Methods: Currently, we conducted this study to investigate the effects of AMPK on high glucose-induced extracellular matrix synthesis and involved intracellular signaling pathway by using western blot in the kidney fibroblast cell line (NRK-49f. Results: Collagen IV protein levels were significantly increased by high glucose in a time-dependent manner. This was associated with a decrease in Thr72 phosphorylation of AMPK and an increase in phosphorylation of mTOR on Ser2448. High glucose-induced extracellular matrix accumulation and mTOR activation were significantly inhibited by the co-treatment of rAAV-AMPKα1312 (encoding constitutively active AMPKα1 whereas activated by r-AAV-AMPKα1D157A (encoding dominant negative AMPKα1. In cultured renal fibroblasts, overexpression of AMPKα1D157A upregulated mTOR signaling and matrix synthesis, which were ameliorated by co-treatment with the inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that AMPK exerts renoprotective effects by inhibiting the accumulation of extracellular matrix through mTOR signaling pathway.

  8. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  9. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  10. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis.

  11. An antisense oligodeoxynucleotide that depletes RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase induces growth inhibition in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokozaki, H; Budillon, A; Tortora, G; Meissner, S; Beaucage, S L; Miki, K; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1993-02-15

    Enhanced expression of the RI alpha subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase type I has been correlated with cancer cell growth. We provide evidence that RI alpha is a growth-inducing protein that may be essential for neoplastic cell growth. Human colon, breast, and gastric carcinoma and neuroblastoma cell lines exposed to a 21-mer human RI alpha antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (S-oligodeoxynucleotide) exhibited growth inhibition with no sign of cytotoxicity. Mismatched sequence (random) S-oligodeoxynucleotides of the same length exhibited no effect. The growth inhibitory effect of RI alpha antisense oligomer correlated with a decrease in the RI alpha mRNA and protein levels and with an increase in RII beta (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) expression. The growth inhibition was abolished, however, when cells were exposed simultaneously to both RI alpha and RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotides. The RII beta antisense S-oligodeoxynucleotide alone, exhibiting suppression of RII beta along with enhancement of RI alpha expression, led to slight stimulation of cell growth. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of cyclic AMP receptor proteins, RI alpha and RII beta, are reciprocally related in the growth control of cancer cells and that the RI alpha antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, which efficiently depletes the growth stimulatory RI alpha, is a powerful biological tool toward suppression of malignancy.

  12. Modulation by cyclic AMP and phorbol myristate acetate of cephaloridine-induced injury in rat renal cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Y; Gemba, M

    2001-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and protein kinase C (PKC) have been suggested to modulate the generation of free radicals. We investigated the effects of cAMP and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC activator, on cephaloridine (CER)-induced renal cell injury, which has been reported to be due to the generation of free radicals. Incubation of rat renal cortical slices with CER resulted in increases in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and in decreases in gluconeogenesis and p-aminohippurate (PAH) accumulation in rat renal cortical slices, suggesting free radical-induced injury in slices exposed to CER. A derivative of cAMP ameliorated not only the increase in lipid peroxidation but also the renal cell damage induced by CER. This amelioration by a cAMP derivative of lipid peroxidation and renal cell damage caused by CER was blocked by KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Lipid peroxidation and the indices of cell injury were increased by PMA. PMA also enhanced CER-induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the slices. This enhancement by PMA of CER-induced injury was blocked by H-7, a PKC inhibitor. These results indicated that intracellular signaling pathways of cAMP and PKC modulate free radical-mediated nephrotoxicity induced by CER.

  13. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  14. Characterization of a DNA-damage-recognition protein from F9 teratocarcinoma cells, which is inducible by retinoic acid and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, C C; Sun, N K; Lin-Chao, S

    1993-02-15

    A nuclear protein that recognizes u.v.-damaged DNA was detected in extracts from murine F9 embryonic stem cells using a DNA-binding assay. The nuclear-protein-binding activity was increased in cells after treatment with retinoic acid/dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP), with optimum induction at 6 days. In vitro treatment of nuclear extracts with agents that affect protein conformation (such as urea, Nonidet P40 and Ca2+) slightly modulated the damage-recognition activity. Furthermore, treatment of nuclear extracts with phosphatase dramatically inhibited the binding activity. In addition, damaged-DNA recognition of the nuclear extracts was effectively inhibited by damaged double- and single-stranded DNA. The expression of the nuclear protein with similar characteristics was abundant in HeLa cells and was increased in drug- or u.v.-resistant cells. The findings suggest that the recognition of a u.v.-DNA adduct is modulated, at least in part, by an activity that is induced during retinoic acid/dbcAMP-induced differentiation. These results also imply that the identified damage-recognition protein may be important for the sensitivity or resistance of mammalian cells to DNA damage.

  15. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism.

  16. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

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    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  17. Cyclic-AMP mediated drugs: differential or global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis in the isolated rat lung?

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    Mark J. Post

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the question was addressed whether cAMP mediated drugs induce a differential reduction of branches of the arachidonic acid metabolism rather than a global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis. The isolated lungs of actively sensitized rats were employed to study prostaglandin and leukotriene release in the presence and absence of the cAMP mediated drugs theophylline, milrinone, sulmazole, isobutyl-methylxanthine and salbutamol. The release of eicosanoids as measured by RIA was predominantly basal and continuous, with a mild antigen induced stimulation only for TXB2 and the leukotrienes. All drugs reduced eicosanoid release globally. It is concluded that cAMP mediated drugs interfere with arachidonic acid metabolism at a site proximal to the branching into lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase pathways.

  18. Cyclic AMP-guanine exchange factor activation inhibits JNK-dependent lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes

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    Kathleen Ponzetti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen Ponzetti1, Melissa King1, Anna Gates1, M Sawkat Anwer2, Cynthia RL Webster11Department of Clinical Science, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Grafton MA, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Sciences, Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Grafton MA, USAAbstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is known to damage hepatocytes by cytokines released from activated Kupffer cells, but the ancillary role of LPS as a direct hepatotoxin is less well characterized. The aim of this study was to determine the direct effect of LPS on hepatocyte viability and the underlying signaling mechanism. Rat hepatocyte cultures treated overnight with LPS (500 ng/mL induced apoptosis as monitored morphologically (Hoechst 33258 and biochemically (cleavage of caspase 3 and 9 and the appearance of cytochrome C in the cytoplasm. LPS-induced apoptosis was additive to that induced by glycochenodeoxycholate or Fas ligand, was associated with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase B (JNK and p38 mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAPK, and inhibition of protein kinase (AKT. Inhibition of JNK by SP600125, but not of p38 MAPK by SB203580 attenuated LPS-induced apoptosis, indicating JNK dependency. CPT-2-Me-cAMP, an activator of cAMP-GEF, decreased apoptosis due to LPS alone or in combination with glycochenodeoxycholate or Fas ligand. CPT-2-Me-cAMP also prevented LPS-induced activation of JNK and inhibition of AKT. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS can induce hepatocyte apoptosis directly in vitro in a JNK-dependent manner and activation of cAMP-GEF protects against the LPS-induced apoptosis most likely by reversing the effect of LPS on JNK and AKT.Keywords: apoptosis, cAMP-GEF, AKT, exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC, lipopolysaccharide, JNK

  19. Cyclic AMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk protein-tyrosine kinases through platelet membrane glycoprotein VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinohe, T; Takayama, H; Ezumi, Y; Yanagi, S; Yamamura, H; Okuma, M

    1995-11-24

    Platelet glycoprotein (GP) VI is a so-far uncharacterized 62-kDa membrane protein, whose deficiency results in selective impairment in collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Our group previously reported a human polyclonal antibody (anti-p62 IgG) that induces activation of normal, but not of GPVI-deficient, platelets in an Fc-independent manner. The F(ab')2 fragments of this antibody (F(ab')2-anti-p62) stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins, which was not prevented even in the presence of cAMP-increasing agents such as prostacyclin. Pretreatment of platelets with the protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor tyrphostin A47 completely abolished F(ab')2-anti-p62-induced platelet aggregation in parallel with dose-dependent inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating an essential requirement of PTK activity for generating GPVI-mediated signaling. We found that two cytosolic PTKs, c-Src and Syk, became rapidly activated in response to F(ab')2-anti-p62 in a way insensitive to elevation of cAMP. In contrast, in the presence of prostacyclin, F(ab')2-anti-p62 did not stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase. cAMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk was also observed in collagen but not thrombin-stimulated platelets. Moreover, either F(ab')2-anti-p62 or collagen stimulated cAMP-insensitive tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 2. These results indicate that the receptor-mediated activation of several PTKs in platelets is regulated through a cAMP-sensitive or -insensitive mechanism depending on the nature of each stimulus, and also suggest that GPVI engagement is coupled to cAMP-insensitive activation of c-Src and Syk accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous substrates including phospholipase C-gamma 2 in a manner similar to collagen stimulation.

  20. Timing, rather than the concentration of cyclic AMP, correlates to osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Doorn, Joyce; Liu, Jun; Langerwerf, Eli; Arends, Roel; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that protein kinase A (PKA) activation using dibutyryl-cAMP in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) induces in vitro osteogenesis and bone formation in vivo. To further investigate the physiological role of PKA in hMSC osteogenesis, we tested a selection of G-protein-coup

  1. Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic AMP 2 (Epac2) Plays a Specific and Time-Limited Role in Memory Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostroveanu, Anghelus; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Schmidt, Martina; Nijholt, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in memory retrieval is limited due to the lack of tools to study this stage of the memory process. Here we report that exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epac) play a surprisingly specific role in memory retrieval. Intrahippocampal injection of the

  2. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  3. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  4. Stimulation of cyclic AMP production in human alveolar macrophages induced by inflammatory mediators and β-sympathicomimetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D. Beusenberg; J.G.C. van Amsterdam (Jan); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); P.R.M. Hekking (P. R M); J.W. Brouwers; H.P. Schermers (H.); I.L. Bonta

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract We have investigated the effects of inflammatory mediators and β-adrenoceptor agonists on the adenylyl cyclase responsiveness in alveolar macrophages from control subjects, patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthmatics. Basal cyclic

  5. Functional status and relationships of melanocortin 1 receptor signaling to the cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2012-12-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a major determinant of skin phototype frequently mutated in melanoma, is a Gs protein-coupled receptor that regulates pigment production in melanocytes. MC1R stimulation activates cAMP synthesis and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) ERK1 and ERK2. In human melanocytes, ERK activation by MC1R relies on cAMP-independent transactivation of the c-KIT receptor. Thus MC1R functional coupling to the cAMP and ERK pathways may involve different structural requirements giving raise to biased effects of skin cancer-associated mutations. We evaluated the impact of MC1R mutations on ERK activation, cAMP production and agonist binding. We found that MC1R mutations impair cAMP production much more often than ERK activation, suggesting less stringent requirements for functional coupling to the ERK pathway. We examined the crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL human melanoma cells (wild-type for MC1R, NRAS and BRAF). ERK activation by constitutively active upstream effectors or pharmacological inhibition had little effect on MC1R-stimulated cAMP synthesis. High cAMP levels were compatible with normal ERK activation but, surprisingly, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin abolished ERK activation by MC1R, most likely by a cAMP-independent mechanism. These results indicate little crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL melanoma cells. Finally, we studied cAMP accumulation in a panel of 22 human melanoma cell lines stimulated with MC1R agonists or forskolin. cAMP synthesis was often inhibited, even in cells wild-type for MC1R and NRAS. Therefore, the cAMP pathway is more frequently impaired in melanoma than could be predicted by the MC1R or NRAS genotype.

  6. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cyclic AMP attenuates acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yang; Li, Ke; Wang, Na; Cai, Gui-Dong; Zhang, Ting; Lin, Yan; Gui, Bao-Song; Liu, En-Qi; Li, Zong-Fang; Zhou, Wuding

    2015-02-01

    The pathogenesis of pyelonephritis caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is not well understood. Here, we show that besides UPEC virulence, the severity of the host innate immune response and invasion of renal epithelial cells are important pathogenic factors. Activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP significantly attenuated acute pyelonephritis in mice induced by UPEC. Administration of forskolin (a potent elevator of intracellular cAMP) reduced kidney infection (ie, bacterial load, tissue destruction); this was associated with attenuated local inflammation, as evidenced by the reduction of renal production of proinflammatory mediators, renal infiltration of inflammatory cells, and renal myeloperoxidase activity. In primary cell culture systems, forskolin not only down-regulated UPEC-stimulated production of proinflammatory mediators by renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells (eg, monocyte/macrophages) but also reduced bacterial internalization by renal tubular epithelial cells. Our findings clearly indicate that activation of endogenous anti-inflammatory mediator cAMP is beneficial for controlling UPEC-mediated acute pyelonephritis in mice. The beneficial effect can be explained at least in part by limiting excessive inflammatory responses through acting on both renal tubular epithelial cells and inflammatory cells and by inhibiting bacteria invasion of renal tubular epithelial cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Conformational analysis of PKI(5-22)amide, the active inhibitory fragment of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J; De Ropp, J S; Trewhella, J; Glass, D B; Liddle, W K; Bradbury, E M; Kinzel, V; Walsh, D A

    1989-12-01

    Fourier-transform i.r. spectroscopy, 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy and X-ray scattering were used to study the conformation and shape of the peptide PKI(5-22)amide, which contains the active site of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase [Cheng, Van Pattern, Smith & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 231, 655-661]. The X-ray-scattering solution studies show that the peptide has a compact structure with Rg 0.9 nm (9.0 A) and a linear maximum dimension of 2.5 nm (25A). Compatible with this, Fourier-transform i.r. and n.m.r. determinations indicate that the peptide contains approx. 26% alpha-helix located in the N-terminal one-third of the molecule. This region contains the phenylalanine residue that is one essential recognition determinant for high-affinity binding to the protein kinase catalytic site.

  8. LTQ-XL mass spectrometry proteome analysis expands the Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR regulon to include cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterases and phosphoproteins, and identifies novel open reading frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Hansi; Murugapiran, Senthil K; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Merighi, Massimo; Sarracino, David; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2014-01-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is well known for its antibiotic resistance and intricate regulatory network, contributing to its success as an opportunistic pathogen. This study is an extension of our transcriptomic analyses (microarray and RNA-Seq) to understand the global changes in PAO1 upon deleting a gene encoding a transcriptional regulator AmpR, in the presence and absence of β-lactam antibiotic. This study was performed under identical conditions to explore the proteome profile of the ampR deletion mutant (PAOΔampR) using LTQ-XL mass spectrometry. The proteomic data identified ~53% of total PAO1 proteins and expanded the master regulatory role of AmpR in determining antibiotic resistance and multiple virulence phenotypes in P. aeruginosa. AmpR proteome analysis identified 853 AmpR-dependent proteins, which include 102 transcriptional regulators and 21 two-component system proteins. AmpR also regulates cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PA4367, PA4969, PA4781) possibly affecting major virulence systems. Phosphoproteome analysis also suggests a significant role for AmpR in Ser, Thr and Tyr phosphorylation. These novel mechanisms of gene regulation were previously not associated with AmpR. The proteome analysis also identified many unannotated and misannotated ORFs in the P. aeruginosa genome. Thus, our data sheds light on important virulence regulatory pathways that can potentially be exploited to deal with P. aeruginosa infections. The AmpR proteome data not only confirmed the role of AmpR in virulence and resistance to multiple antibiotics, but also expanded the perimeter of AmpR regulon. The data presented here points to the role of AmpR in regulating cyclic di-GMP levels and phosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr, adding another dimension to the regulatory functions of AmpR. We also identify some previously unannotated/misannotated ORFs in the P. aeruginosa genome, indicating the limitations of existing ORF analyses software. This study will contribute towards

  9. Efficient and robust differentiation of endothelial cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells via lineage control with VEGF and cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuno, Takeshi; Masumoto, Hidetoshi; Yamamizu, Kohei; Yoshioka, Miki; Minakata, Kenji; Ikeda, Tadashi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Yamashita, Jun K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood vessels are essential components for many tissues and organs. Thus, efficient induction of endothelial cells (ECs) from human pluripotent stem cells is a key method for generating higher tissue structures entirely from stem cells. We previously established an EC differentiation system with mouse pluripotent stem cells to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is essential to induce ECs and that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synergistically enhances VEGF effects. Here we report an efficient and robust EC differentiation method from human pluripotent stem cell lines based on a 2D monolayer, serum-free culture. We controlled the direction of differentiation from mesoderm to ECs using stage-specific stimulation with VEGF and cAMP combined with the elimination of non-responder cells at early EC stage. This “stimulation-elimination” method robustly achieved very high efficiency (>99%) and yield (>10 ECs from 1 hiPSC input) of EC differentiation, with no purification of ECs after differentiation. We believe this method will be a valuable technological basis broadly for regenerative medicine and 3D tissue engineering. PMID:28288160

  10. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyun-Yi; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Wang, Chau-Zen; Ho, Mei-Ling; Yeh, Ming-Long; Wang, Yan-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR) 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), Interleukin-1β (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and Interleukin-8 (IL-8)). LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP), which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy.

  11. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and Interleukin-8 (IL-8. LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP, which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy.

  12. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  13. L-4F Inhibits Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein-induced Inflammatory Adipokine Secretion via Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Signaling Pathway in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhu Xie

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: OxLDL induces C/EBPβ protein synthesis in a time-dependent manner and enhances MCP-1 secretion and expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. L-4F dose-dependently counterbalances the pro-inflammatory effect of oxLDL, and cyclic AMP/PKA-C/EBPβ signaling pathway may participate in it.

  14. Membrane physical properties do not explain increased cyclic AMP production in hepatocytes from rats fed menhaden oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizeau, M E; Hazel, J R

    2000-06-01

    To study the effect of altering plasma membrane fatty acid composition on the glucagon signal transduction pathway, cAMP accumulation was measured in hepatocytes from rats fed diets containing either menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CO). Hepatocytes from MO-fed animals produced significantly more cAMP in response to glucagon and forskolin compared to CO-fed animals. Glucagon receptor number and affinity were similar in MO- and CO-fed rats. Liver plasma membranes from MO-fed animals were enriched in long-chain n-3 fatty acids and contained significantly lower amounts of saturated C10-C16 and 18:1n-9 than CO-fed animals. Membrane physical properties were examined using both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). FTIR analysis revealed that below 34 degrees C, CO membranes were more ordered than MO membranes. However, as assay temperature approached 37 degrees C, MO and CO membranes became similarly ordered. DPH polarization values indicated no differences in membrane order at 37 degrees C, whereas membrane order was decreased in CO-fed animals at 25 degrees C. These data indicate the importance of assay temperature in assessing the influence of membrane physical properties on the activity of signal transduction pathways. Whereas increased signal transduction activity has been correlated to reduced membrane order in MO-fed animals, these data indicate that at physiological temperatures membrane order did not vary between groups. Enhanced cAMP accumulation in response to forskolin indicates that adenylate cyclase activity or content may be elevated in MO- vs. CO-fed rats. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity may result, in part, from changes in specific fatty acids in hepatocyte plasma membranes without demonstrable changes in membrane physical properties.

  15. Neomycin binding preserves extracellular matrix in bioprosthetic heart valves during in vitro cyclic fatigue and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Devanathan; Starcher, Barry C; Vyavahare, Naren R

    2009-05-01

    Bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) cusps have a complex architecture consisting of an anisotropic arrangement of collagen, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and elastin. Glutaraldehyde (GLUT) is used as a fixative for all clinical BHV implants; however, it only stabilizes the collagen component of the tissue, and other components such as GAGs and elastin are lost from the tissue during processing, storage or after implantation. We have shown previously that the effectiveness of the chemical crosslinking can be increased by incorporating neomycin trisulfate, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, to prevent the enzyme-mediated GAG degradation. In the present study, we optimized carbodiimide-based GAG-targeted chemistry to incorporate neomycin into BHV cusps prior to conventional GLUT crosslinking. This crosslinking leads to enhanced preservation of GAGs during in vitro cyclic fatigue and storage. The neomycin group showed greater GAG retention after both 10 and 50 million accelerated fatigue cycles and after 1 year of storage in GLUT solution. Thus, additional binding of neomycin to the cusps prior to standard GLUT crosslinking could enhance tissue stability and thus heart valve durability.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the bovine leukemia virus promoter by the cyclic AMP-response element modulator tau isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyên, Thi Lien-Anh; de Walque, Stéphane; Veithen, Emmanuelle; Dekoninck, Ann; Martinelli, Valérie; de Launoit, Yvan; Burny, Arsène; Harrod, Robert; Van Lint, Carine

    2007-07-20

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) expression is controlled at the transcriptional level through three Tax(BLV)-responsive elements (TxREs) responsive to the viral transactivator Tax(BLV). The cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) has been shown to interact with CRE-like sequences present in the middle of each of these TxREs and to play critical transcriptional roles in both basal and Tax(BLV)-transactivated BLV promoter activity. In this study, we have investigated the potential involvement of the cAMP-response element modulator (CREM) in BLV transcriptional regulation, and we have demonstrated that CREM proteins were expressed in BLV-infected cells and bound to the three BLV TxREs in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using BLV-infected cell lines demonstrated in the context of chromatin that CREM proteins were recruited to the BLV promoter TxRE region in vivo. Functional studies, in the absence of Tax(BLV), indicated that ectopic CREMtau protein had a CRE-dependent stimulatory effect on BLV promoter transcriptional activity. Cross-link of the B-cell receptor potentiated CREMtau transactivation of the viral promoter. Further experiments supported the notion that this potentiation involved CREMtau Ser-117 phosphorylation and recruitment of CBP/p300 to the BLV promoter. Although CREB and Tax(BLV) synergistically transactivated the BLV promoter, CREMtau repressed this Tax(BLV)/CREB synergism, suggesting that a modulation of the level of Tax(BLV) transactivation through opposite actions of CREB and CREMtau could facilitate immune escape and allow tumor development.

  17. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were

  18. In Vivo Synthesis of Cyclic-di-GMP Using a Recombinant Adenovirus Preferentially Improves Adaptive Immune Responses against Extracellular Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaqoub, Fadel S; Aldhamen, Yasser A; Koestler, Benjamin J; Bruger, Eric L; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Waters, Christopher M; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-02-15

    There is a compelling need for more effective vaccine adjuvants to augment induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. Recent reports suggested the bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic-dimeric-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) acts as an innate immune system modulator. We recently incorporated a Vibrio cholerae diguanylate cyclase into an adenovirus vaccine, fostering production of c-di-GMP as well as proinflammatory responses in mice. In this study, we recombined a more potent diguanylate cyclase gene, VCA0848, into a nonreplicating adenovirus serotype 5 (AdVCA0848) that produces elevated amounts of c-di-GMP when expressed in mammalian cells in vivo. This novel platform further improved induction of type I IFN-β and activation of innate and adaptive immune cells early after administration into mice as compared with control vectors. Coadministration of the extracellular protein OVA and the AdVCA0848 adjuvant significantly improved OVA-specific T cell responses as detected by IFN-γ and IL-2 ELISPOT, while also improving OVA-specific humoral B cell adaptive responses. In addition, we found that coadministration of AdVCA0848 with another adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing the HIV-1-derived Gag Ag or the Clostridium difficile-derived toxin B resulted in significant inhibitory effects on the induction of Gag and toxin B-specific adaptive immune responses. As a proof of principle, these data confirm that in vivo synthesis of c-di-GMP stimulates strong innate immune responses that correlate with enhanced adaptive immune responses to concomitantly administered extracellular Ag, which can be used as an adjuvant to heighten effective immune responses for protein-based vaccine platforms against microbial infections and cancers.

  19. Monitoring In Vivo Changes in Tonic Extracellular Dopamine Level by Charge-Balancing Multiple Waveform Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yoonbae; Park, Cheonho; Kim, Do Hyoung; Shin, Hojin; Kang, Yu Min; DeWaele, Mark; Lee, Jeyeon; Min, Hoon-Ki; Blaha, Charles D; Bennet, Kevin E; Kim, In Young; Lee, Kendall H; Jang, Dong Pyo

    2016-11-15

    Dopamine (DA) modulates central neuronal activity through both phasic (second to second) and tonic (minutes to hours) terminal release. Conventional fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), in combination with carbon fiber microelectrodes, has been used to measure phasic DA release in vivo by adopting a background subtraction procedure to remove background capacitive currents. However, measuring tonic changes in DA concentrations using conventional FSCV has been difficult because background capacitive currents are inherently unstable over long recording periods. To measure tonic changes in DA concentrations over several hours, we applied a novel charge-balancing multiple waveform FSCV (CBM-FSCV), combined with a dual background subtraction technique, to minimize temporal variations in background capacitive currents. Using this method, in vitro, charge variations from a reference time point were nearly zero for 48 h, whereas with conventional background subtraction, charge variations progressively increased. CBM-FSCV also demonstrated a high selectivity against 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and ascorbic acid, two major chemical interferents in the brain, yielding a sensitivity of 85.40 ± 14.30 nA/μM and limit of detection of 5.8 ± 0.9 nM for DA while maintaining selectivity. Recorded in vivo by CBM-FSCV, pharmacological inhibition of DA reuptake (nomifensine) resulted in a 235 ± 60 nM increase in tonic extracellular DA concentrations, while inhibition of DA synthesis (α-methyl-dl-tyrosine) resulted in a 72.5 ± 4.8 nM decrease in DA concentrations over a 2 h period. This study showed that CBM-FSCV may serve as a unique voltammetric technique to monitor relatively slow changes in tonic extracellular DA concentrations in vivo over a prolonged time period.

  20. The AreA transcription factor mediates the regulation of deoxynivalenol (DON) synthesis by ammonium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling in Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Rui; Jiang, Cong; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2015-12-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), a trichothecene mycotoxin produced by Fusarium graminearum, is harmful to humans and animals. Because different nitrogen sources are known to have opposite effects on DON production, in this study, we characterized the regulatory mechanisms of the AREA transcription factor in trichothecene biosynthesis. The ΔareA mutant showed significantly reduced vegetative growth and DON production in cultures inoculated with hyphae. Suppression of TRI gene expression and DON production by ammonium were diminished in the ΔareA mutant. The deletion of AREA also affected the stimulatory effects of arginine on DON biosynthesis. The AreA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion complemented the ΔareA mutant, and its localization to the nucleus was enhanced under nitrogen starvation conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the conserved predicted protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site S874 was important for AreA function, indicating that AreA may be a downstream target of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-PKA pathway, which is known to regulate DON production. We also showed that AreA interacted with Tri10 in co-immunoprecipitation assays. The interaction of AreA with Tri10 is probably related to its role in the regulation of TRI gene expression. Interestingly, the ΔareA mutant showed significantly reduced PKA activity and expression of all three predicted ammonium permease (MEP) genes, in particular MEP1, under low ammonium conditions. Taken together, our results show that AREA is involved in the regulation of DON production by ammonium suppression and the cAMP-PKA pathway. The AreA transcription factor may interact with Tri10 and control the expression and up-regulation of MEP genes.

  1. Interactions between the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and cyclic AMP signaling pathways regulate larval molting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, K; Siddhartha, G; Joshi, R; Patel, S; Hasan, G

    2001-05-01

    Larval molting in Drosophila, as in other insects, is initiated by the coordinated release of the steroid hormone ecdysone, in response to neural signals, at precise stages during development. In this study we have analyzed, using genetic and molecular methods, the roles played by two major signaling pathways in the regulation of larval molting in Drosophila. Previous studies have shown that mutants for the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor gene (itpr) are larval lethals. In addition they exhibit delays in molting that can be rescued by exogenous feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone. Here we show that mutants for adenylate cyclase (rut) synergize, during larval molting, with itpr mutant alleles, indicating that both cAMP and InsP(3) signaling pathways function in this process. The two pathways act in parallel to affect molting, as judged by phenotypes obtained through expression of dominant negative and dominant active forms of protein kinase A (PKA) in tissues that normally express the InsP(3) receptor. Furthermore, our studies predict the existence of feedback inhibition through protein kinase A on the InsP(3) receptor by increased levels of 20-hydroxyecdysone.

  2. Functional Similarities between the Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Regulator PrfA and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein: the PrfA* (Gly145Ser) Mutation Increases Binding Affinity for Target DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Vega, Yolanda; Dickneite, Carmen; Ripio, Maria Teresa; Böckmann, Regine; González Zörn, Bruno; Novella, Susanna; Dominguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; Vazquez-Boland, Jose A

    1998-01-01

    Most Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes are positively regulated by the PrfA protein, a transcription factor sharing sequence similarities with cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). Its coding gene, prfA, is regulated by PrfA itself via an autoregulatory loop mediated by the upstream PrfA-dependent plcA promoter. We have recently characterized prfA* mutants from L. monocytogenes which, as a result of a single amino acid substitution in PrfA, Gly145Ser, constitutively overexpress prfA ...

  3. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  4. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  5. Altered extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis in blood serum of sedentary individuals after an acute, aerobic, moderate exercise session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Cesar Eduardo Jacintho; Teixeira, Bruno Costa; Rockenbach, Liliana; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro; Casali, Emerson André; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2017-02-01

    Nucleotidases participate in the regulation of physiological and pathological events, such as inflammation and coagulation. Exercise promotes distinct adaptations, and can influence purinergic signaling. In the present study, we investigated soluble nucleotidase activities in the blood serum of sedentary young male adults at pre- and post-acute moderate aerobic exercise. In addition, we evaluated how this kind of exercise could influence adenine nucleotide concentrations in the blood serum. Sedentary individuals were submitted to moderate aerobic exercise on a treadmill; blood samples were collected pre- and post-exercise, and serum was separated for analysis. Results showed increases in ATP, ADP, and AMP hydrolysis post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise values. The ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase was also evaluated, showing an increased activity post-exercise, compared to pre-exercise. Purine levels were analyzed by HPLC in the blood serum, pre- and post-exercise. Decreased levels of ATP and ADP were found post-exercise, in contrast with pre-exercise values. Conversely, post-exercise levels of adenosine and inosine increased compared to pre-exercise levels. Our results indicate an influence of acute exercise on ATP metabolism, modifying enzymatic behavior to promote a protective biological environment.

  6. Upregulation of skeletal muscle PGC-1α through the elevation of cyclic AMP levels by Cyanidin-3-glucoside enhances exercise performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Toshiya; Motojima, Hideko; Sato, Yuki; Takahashi, Shinya; Villareal, Myra O.; Isoda, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    Regular exercise and physical training enhance physiological capacity and improve metabolic diseases. Skeletal muscles require peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) in the process of their adaptation to exercise owing to PGC-1α’s ability to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, angiogenesis, and oxidative metabolism. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3G) is a natural polyphenol and a nutraceutical factor, which has several beneficial effects on human health. Here, the effect of Cy3G on exercise performance and the underlying mechanisms involved were investigated. ICR mice were given Cy3G (1 mg/kg, orally) everyday and made to perform weight-loaded swimming exercise for 15 days. The endurance of mice orally administered with Cy3G was improved, enabling them to swim longer (time) and while the levels of exercise-induced lactate and fatigue markers (urea nitrogen, creatinine and total ketone bodies) were reduced. Additionally, the expression of lactate metabolism-related genes (lactate dehydrogenase B and monocarboxylate transporter 1) in gastrocnemius and biceps femoris muscles was increased in response to Cy3G-induced PGC-1α upregulation. In vitro, using C2C12 myotubes, Cy3G-induced elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP levels increased PGC-1α expression via the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase pathway. This study demonstrates that Cy3G enhances exercise performance by activating lactate metabolism through skeletal muscle PGC-1α upregulation. PMID:28317895

  7. Complex structure and biochemical characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein PstA, the founding member of a new signal transduction protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeotto, Ivan; Zhang, Yong; Mladenov, Miroslav G; Freemont, Paul S; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-30

    Signaling nucleotides are integral parts of signal transduction systems allowing bacteria to cope with and rapidly respond to changes in the environment. The Staphylococcus aureus PII-like signal transduction protein PstA was recently identified as a cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein. Here, we present the crystal structures of the apo- and c-di-AMP-bound PstA protein, which is trimeric in solution as well as in the crystals. The structures combined with detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed that the protein belongs to a new family of proteins with a similar core fold but with distinct features to classical PII proteins, which usually function in nitrogen metabolism pathways in bacteria. The complex structure revealed three identical c-di-AMP-binding sites per trimer with each binding site at a monomer-monomer interface. Although distinctly different from other cyclic-di-nucleotide-binding sites, as the half-binding sites are not symmetrical, the complex structure also highlighted common features for c-di-AMP-binding sites. A comparison between the apo and complex structures revealed a series of conformational changes that result in the ordering of two anti-parallel β-strands that protrude from each monomer and allowed us to propose a mechanism on how the PstA protein functions as a signaling transduction protein.

  8. Structural Studies of Potassium Transport Protein KtrA Regulator of Conductance of K+ (RCK) C Domain in Complex with Cyclic Diadenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henna; Youn, Suk-Jun; Kim, Seong Ok; Ko, Junsang; Lee, Jie-Oh; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2015-06-26

    Although it was only recently identified as a second messenger, c-di-AMP was found to have fundamental importance in numerous bacterial functions such as ion transport. The potassium transporter protein, KtrA, was identified as a c-di-AMP receptor. However, the co-crystallization of c-di-AMP with the protein has not been studied. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the KtrA RCK_C domain in complex with c-di-AMP. The c-di-AMP nucleotide, which adopts a U-shaped conformation, is bound at the dimer interface of RCK_C close to helices α3 and α4. c-di-AMP interacts with KtrA RCK_C mainly by forming hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. c-di-AMP binding induces the contraction of the dimer, bringing the two monomers of KtrA RCK_C into close proximity. The KtrA RCK_C was able to interact with only c-di-AMP, but not with c-di-GMP, 3',3-cGAMP, ATP, and ADP. The structure of the KtrA RCK_C domain and c-di-AMP complex would expand our understanding about the mechanism of inactivation in Ktr transporters governed by c-di-AMP.

  9. Neonatal handling and the maternal odor preference in rat pups: involvement of monoamines and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein pathway in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raineki, C; De Souza, M A; Szawka, R E; Lutz, M L; De Vasconcellos, L F T; Sanvitto, G L; Izquierdo, I; Bevilaqua, L R; Cammarota, M; Lucion, A B

    2009-03-03

    Early-life environmental events, such as the handling procedure, can induce long-lasting alterations upon several behavioral and neuroendocrine systems. However, the changes within the pups that could be causally related to the effects in adulthood are still poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of neonatal handling on behavioral (maternal odor preference) and biochemical (cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5-HT) levels in the olfactory bulb (OB)) parameters in 7-day-old male and female rat pups. Repeated handling (RH) abolished preference for the maternal odor in female pups compared with nonhandled (NH) and the single-handled (SH) ones, while in RH males the preference was not different than NH and SH groups. In both male and female pups, RH decreased NA activity in the OB, but 5-HT activity increased only in males. Since preference for the maternal odor involves the synergic action of NA and 5-HT in the OB, the maintenance of the behavior in RH males could be related to the increased 5-HT activity, in spite of reduction in the NA activity in the OB. RH did not alter CREB phosphorylation in the OB of both male and females compared with NH pups. The repeated handling procedure can affect the behavior of rat pups in response to the maternal odor and biochemical parameters related to the olfactory learning mechanism. Sex differences were already detected in 7-day-old pups. Although the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to stressors is reduced in the neonatal period, environmental interventions may impact behavioral and biochemical mechanisms relevant to the animal at that early age.

  10. The cyclic AMP receptor protein, CRP, is required for both virulence and expression of the minimal CRP regulon in Yersinia pestis biovar microtus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lingjun; Han, Yanping; Yang, Lei; Geng, Jing; Li, Yingli; Gao, He; Guo, Zhaobiao; Fan, Wei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a bacterial regulator that controls more than 100 promoters, including those involved in catabolite repression. In the present study, a null deletion of the crp gene was constructed for Yersinia pestis bv. microtus strain 201. Microarray expression analysis disclosed that at least 6% of Y. pestis genes were affected by this mutation. Further reverse transcription-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses disclosed a set of 37 genes or putative operons to be the direct targets of CRP, and thus they constitute the minimal CRP regulon in Y. pestis. Subsequent primer extension and DNase I footprinting assays mapped transcriptional start sites, core promoter elements, and CRP binding sites within the DNA regions upstream of pla and pst, revealing positive and direct control of these two laterally acquired plasmid genes by CRP. The crp disruption affected both in vitro and in vivo growth of the mutant and led to a >15,000-fold loss of virulence after subcutaneous infection but a pestis and, particularly, is more important for infection by subcutaneous inoculation. It can further be concluded that the reduced in vivo growth phenotype of the crp mutant should contribute, at least partially, to its attenuation of virulence by both routes of infection. Consistent with a previous study of Y. pestis bv. medievalis, lacZ reporter fusion analysis indicated that the crp deletion resulted in the almost absolute loss of pla promoter activity. The plasminogen activator encoded by pla was previously shown to specifically promote Y. pestis dissemination from peripheral infection routes (subcutaneous infection [flea bite] or inhalation). The above evidence supports the notion that in addition to the reduced in vivo growth phenotype, the defect of pla expression in the crp mutant will greatly contribute to the huge loss of virulence of this mutant strain in subcutaneous infection.

  11. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-06

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  12. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways.

  13. Species differences in the effects of prostaglandins on inositol trisphosphate accumulation, phosphatidic acid formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and contraction in iris sphincter of the mammalian eye: interaction with the cyclic AMP system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousufzai, S Y; Chen, A L; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1988-12-01

    Comparative studies on the effects of prostaglandins (PGs) on 1,2-diacylglycerol, measured as phosphatidic acid (PA), and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production, cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and contraction in the iris sphincter smooth muscle of rabbit, bovine and other mammalian species were undertaken and functional and biochemical relationships between the IP3-Ca++ and cAMP second messenger systems were demonstrated. The findings obtained from these studies can be summarized as follows: 1) all PGs investigated, including PGE2, PGF2 alpha, PGF2 alpha-ester, PGE1 and PGA2 increased IP3 accumulation and PA formation, and the extent of stimulation was dependent on the animal species. Thus, PGF2 alpha-ester (1 microM), the most potent of the PGs, increased IP3 accumulation in rabbit and bovine sphincters by 33 and 58%, respectively, and increased PA formation by 67 and 56%, respectively. The PG increased IP3 accumulation in both rabbit and bovine sphincters very rapidly (T1/2 values about 26 sec) and in a dose-dependent manner. 2) The PG had no effect on MLC phosphorylation in the rabbit sphincter, but it increased that of the bovine by 36%. 3) The PG increased cAMP formation by 75% in the rabbit sphincter but it had no effect on that of the bovine. 4) The PG induced a maximal contractile response in the bovine sphincter but it had no effect on that of the rabbit. 5) In the bovine, PGA2 induced IP3 accumulation and contraction, without an effect on cAMP formation; however, in the rabbit, cat and dog it increased cAMP formation and had no effect on IP3 accumulation and contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Interaction between phosphoinositide turnover system and cyclic AMP pathway for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, K; Funakoshi, A; Kitayama, N; Matsuoka, Y

    1992-06-30

    It is found that secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells is regulated through muscarinic receptor-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositide hydrolysis system. In this report, whether the cAMP pathway interacts with the phosphoinositide turnover system for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin from QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptors was studied. Stimulation of QGP-1N cells with carbachol increased intracellular cAMP levels. The carbachol-induced increase in cAMP levels was inhibited by atropine. Calcium ionophore (A23187) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased cAMP synthesis. Dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin and theophylline stimulated secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin. When either dibutyryl cAMP, forskolin or theophylline was added in culture medium with A23187, phorbol ester or carbachol, a synergistic effect was found on pancreastatin and somatostatin secretion. These results suggest that interaction between the phosphoinositide turnover system and the cAMP pathway occurs in QGP-1N cells through muscarinic receptor stimulation for the secretion of pancreastatin and somatostatin.

  15. Magnesium sulphate increases lymphocyte adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Mandach, U; Bürgi, M; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-01-01

    We determined the effect of i.v. magnesium sulphate, which is often combined with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists for tocolytic therapy, on lymphocyte cyclic AMP production, extracellular magnesium and blood calcium concentrations. Sixteen healthy volunteers received i.v. magnesium sulphate 1 g h-1 over 8 h; seven volunteers also had infusion of NaCl 18 mg h-1 as control. Venous blood was taken pre- and post-infusion to determine basal lymphocyte cyclic AMP and the increase evoked by 0.1 mM isoprenaline, as well as serum and plasma concentrations of total and non-protein-bound magnesium and calcium. Following magnesium sulphate there was a significant rise in the isoprenaline-evoked increase in cyclic AMP (P < 0.05) and in the magnesium concentrations (P < 0.01) and a decrease in the free calcium concentration (P < 0.01). PMID:8385975

  16. Magnesium sulphate increases lymphocyte adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Mandach, U; Bürgi, M; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-03-01

    We determined the effect of i.v. magnesium sulphate, which is often combined with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists for tocolytic therapy, on lymphocyte cyclic AMP production, extracellular magnesium and blood calcium concentrations. Sixteen healthy volunteers received i.v. magnesium sulphate 1 g h-1 over 8 h; seven volunteers also had infusion of NaCl 18 mg h-1 as control. Venous blood was taken pre- and post-infusion to determine basal lymphocyte cyclic AMP and the increase evoked by 0.1 mM isoprenaline, as well as serum and plasma concentrations of total and non-protein-bound magnesium and calcium. Following magnesium sulphate there was a significant rise in the isoprenaline-evoked increase in cyclic AMP (P < 0.05) and in the magnesium concentrations (P < 0.01) and a decrease in the free calcium concentration (P < 0.01).

  17. Insulin elevates leptin secretion and mRNA levels via cyclic AMP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes deprived of glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Insulin alone stimulates leptin secretion and elevates leptin mRNA levels via cAMP under the lack of glucose metabolism, while glucose is a significant and ambivalent effector on the insulin effects of leptin.

  18. Cyclic-AMP metabolism in synaptic growth, strength and precision: Neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc PDE and rut AC mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cAMP synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrate that dnc mutation...

  19. The universality and biological significance of signal molecules with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Generally,cell signal molecules are classified into the extracellular signal molecules (the first messengers) and the intracellular signal ones (the second messengers).Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP),calcium ions and calmodulin (CaM) are the traditional intracellular messengers,but they are also present in extracellular matrix (ECM).Some of them have been discovered to act as the first messengers through cell surface receptors.Other second messengers,such as cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP),cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR) and annexin,are also found existing outside animal and plant cells.The existence of these messengers with intracellular-extracellular compatible functions in cells may be a regular biological phenomenon.These compatible messengers might be the communication factors between intracellular and extracellular regions or among the cell populations,and are also important in regulating cell development procedure.

  20. Levels of cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP in porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes and cumulus-free oocytes derived from small and middle follicles during the first 24-hour period of in vitro maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudaira, Yuichi; Wakai, Takuya; Funahashi, Hiroaki

    2017-02-23

    The objective of this study was to compare the cAMP and cGMP levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) derived from the middle follicles (MFs, 3-6 mm in diameter) and small follicles (SFs, 1-3 mm in diameter) of pre-pubertal gilts during the first 24-h period of maturation in vitro (IVM). Both cAMP and cGMP levels in MF- and SF-derived oocytes did not change during this period. Although the cAMP levels increased in the COCs at 10 and 20 h after the start of IVM, the levels of cAMP were significantly higher in MF-derived COCs than in SF-derived COCs at 20 h after the start of IVM. On the other hand, the cGMP levels in COCs decreased to basal levels between 10 and 20 h after the start of the IVM, whereas cGMP levels were lower in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs during the first 10 h. The number of cumulus cells was larger in the MF-derived COCs than in the SF-derived COCs during the first 20-h period of IVM. The estimated cAMP level per cumulus cell at 10 h after the start of the IVM was higher in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs, whereas the estimated cGMP level per cumulus cell was no different between MF- and SF-derived COCs. From these results, we conclude that cAMP and cGMP levels in COCs, but not in oocytes, drastically change during the first 20-h period of IVM, and that both cAMP and cGMP levels significantly differ between MF- and SF-derived COCs.

  1. Widespread receptivity to neuropeptide PDF throughout the neuronal circadian clock network of Drosophila revealed by real-time cyclic AMP imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Orie T; Kim, Dong Jo; Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Taghert, Paul H

    2008-04-24

    The neuropeptide PDF is released by sixteen clock neurons in Drosophila and helps maintain circadian activity rhythms by coordinating a network of approximately 150 neuronal clocks. Whether PDF acts directly on elements of this neural network remains unknown. We address this question by adapting Epac1-camps, a genetically encoded cAMP FRET sensor, for use in the living brain. We find that a subset of the PDF-expressing neurons respond to PDF with long-lasting cAMP increases and confirm that such responses require the PDF receptor. In contrast, an unrelated Drosophila neuropeptide, DH31, stimulates large cAMP increases in all PDF-expressing clock neurons. Thus, the network of approximately 150 clock neurons displays widespread, though not uniform, PDF receptivity. This work introduces a sensitive means of measuring cAMP changes in a living brain with subcellular resolution. Specifically, it experimentally confirms the longstanding hypothesis that PDF is a direct modulator of most neurons in the Drosophila clock network.

  2. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  3. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  4. Cows are not mice: the role of cyclic AMP, phosphodiesterases, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes is initiated during fetal development, and is then arrested at the dictyate stage - possibly for several years. Oocyte meiosis resumes in preovulatory follicles in response to the lutenizing hormone (LH) surge or spontaneously when competent oocytes are removed from follicles and cultured. The mechanisms involved in meiotic arrest and resumption in bovine oocytes are not fully understood, and several studies point to important differences between oocytes from rodent and livestock species. This paper reviews earlier and contemporary studies on the effects of cAMP-elevating agents and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme inhibitors on the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes in vitro. Contrary to results obtained with mouse oocytes, bovine oocyte meiosis is inhibited by activators of the energy sensor adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, mammalian gene PRKA), which is activated by AMP, the degradation product of cAMP. It is not clear whether or not the effects were due to AMPK activation, and they may depend on culture conditions. Evidence suggests that other signaling pathways (for example, the cGMP/nitric oxide pathway) are involved in bovine oocyte meiotic arrest, but further studies are needed to understand the interactions between the signaling pathways that lead to maturation promoting factor (MPF) being inactive or active. An improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in the control of bovine oocyte meiosis will facilitate better control of the process in vitro, resulting in increased developmental competence and increased efficiency of in vitro embryo production procedures.

  5. Multiple facets of cAMP signalling and physiological impact : cAMP compartmentalization in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, Anouk; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP) are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelli

  6. Molecular determinants and interaction data of cyclic peptide inhibitor with the extracellular domain of TrkB receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Chitranshi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available TrkB is a high affinity receptor for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its phosphorylation stimulates activation of several intracellular signalling pathways linked to cellular growth, differentiation and maintenance. Identification of various activators and inhibitors of the TrkB receptor and greater understanding their binding mechanisms is critical to elucidate the biochemical and pharmacological pathways and analyse various protein crystallization studies. The data presented here is related to the research article entitled “Brain Derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β signalling” [1]. Cyclotraxin B (CTXB is a disulphide bridge linked cyclic peptide molecule that interacts with TrkB receptor and inhibits the BDNF/TrkB downstream signalling. This article reports for the first time binding mechanism and interaction parameters of CTXB with the TrkB receptor. The molecular model of CTXB has been generated and it’s docking with TrkB domain carried out to determine the critical residues involved in the protein peptide interaction.

  7. Supra-normal stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors in the prelimbic cortex blocks behavioral expression of both aversive and rewarding associative memories through a cyclic-AMP-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Nicole M; Bechard, Melanie; Ahmad, Tasha; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptor transmission through either D(1) or D(2)-like subtypes is involved critically in the processing of emotional information within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However the functional role of specific DA D(1)-like receptor transmission in the expression of emotionally salient associative memories (either aversive or rewarding) is not currently understood. Here we demonstrate that specific activation of DA D(1) receptors in the prelimbic (PLC) division of the mPFC causes a transient block in the behavioral expression of both aversive and rewarding associative memories. We report that intra-PLC microinfusions of a selective D(1) receptor agonist block the spontaneous expression of an associative olfactory fear memory, without altering the stability of the original memory trace. Furthermore, using an unbiased place conditioning procedure (CPP), intra-PLC D(1) receptor activation blocks the spontaneous expression of an associative morphine (5 mg/kg; i.p.) reward memory, while leaving morphine-primed memory expression intact. Interestingly, both intra-PLC D(1)-receptor mediated block of either fear-related or reward-related associative memories were dependent upon downstream cyclic-AMP (cAMP) signaling as both effects were rescued by co-administration of a cAMP signaling inhibitor. The blockade of both rewarding and aversive associative memories is mediated through a D(1)-specific signaling pathway, as neither forms of spontaneous memory expression were blocked by intra-PLC microinfusions of a D(2)-like receptor agonist. Our results demonstrate that the spontaneous expression of either rewarding or aversive emotionally salient memories shares a common, D(1)-receptor mediated substrate within the mPFC.

  8. [Involvement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the control of motile behavior of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, N B; Teplov, V A; Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of autocrine factors into the control of motile behavior via a receptor-mediated mechanism was investigated in Physarum polycephalum plasmodium, a multinuclear amoeboid cell with the auto-oscillatory mode of motility. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, its involvement into the control of plasmodium motile behavior was proved by action of its strong inhibitor, were regarded as putative autocrine factors. It was shown that the plasmodium secreted cAMP. When it was introduced into agar support, 0,1-1 mM cAMP induced a delay of the plasmodium spreading and its transition to migration. When locally applied, cAMP at the same concentrations induced typical for attractant action the increase in oscillation frequency and the decrease of ectoplasm elasticity. The ability to exhibit positive chemotaxis in cAMP gradient and the dependence of its realization were shown to depend on the plasmodium state. Chemotaxis test specimens obtained from the migrating plasmodium, unlike those obtained from growing culture, generate alternative fronts which compete effectively with fronts oriented towards the attractant increment. The results obtained support our supposition stated earlier that advance of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium leading edge is determined by local extracellular cAMP gradients arising from a time delay between secretion and hydrolysis of the nucleotide.

  9. The μ opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts-Thomson Sarah J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the μ opioid receptor (MOP agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+ responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation.

  10. Mechanisms of lung neutrophil activation after hemorrhage or endotoxemia: roles of reactive oxygen intermediates, NF-kappa B, and cyclic AMP response element binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1999-07-15

    Acute inflammatory lung injury occurs frequently in the setting of severe infection or blood loss. Accumulation of activated neutrophils in the lungs and increased pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine levels are major characteristics of acute lung injury. In the present experiments, we examined mechanisms leading to neutrophil accumulation and activation in the lungs after endotoxemia or hemorrhage. Levels of IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 mRNA were increased in lung neutrophils from endotoxemic or hemorrhaged mice compared with those present in lung neutrophils from control mice or in peripheral blood neutrophils from endotoxemic, hemorrhaged, or control mice. The transcriptional regulatory factors NF-kappa B and cAMP response element binding protein were activated in lung but not blood neutrophils after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition, achieved by feeding allopurinol or tungsten-containing diets, did not affect neutrophil trafficking to the lungs after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Xanthine oxidase inhibition did prevent hemorrhage- but not endotoxemia-induced increases in proinflammatory cytokine expression among lung neutrophils. Hemorrhage- or endotoxemia-associated activation of NF-kappa B in lung neutrophils was not affected by inhibition of xanthine oxidase. cAMP response element binding protein activation was increased after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia, in mice fed xanthine oxidase-inhibiting diets. Our results indicate that xanthine oxidase modulates cAMP response element binding protein activation and proinflammatory cytokine expression in lung neutrophils after hemorrhage, but not endotoxemia. These findings suggest that the mechanisms leading to acute inflammatory lung injury after hemorrhage differ from those associated with endotoxemia.

  11. B cell receptor-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in WEHI-231 immature B lymphoma cells involve cyclic AMP and Epac proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grandoch, Maria; de Jesus, Maider Lopez; Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Weber, Artur-Aron; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Signaling by the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is essential for B lymphocyte homeostasis and immune function. In immature B cells, ligation of the BCR promotes growth arrest and apoptosis, and BCR-driven balancing between pro-apoptotic extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and antia

  12. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) mediates cAMP-dependent but protein kinase A-insensitive modulation of vascular ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Gregor I; Kamishima, Tomoko; Davies, Lowri M; Quayle, John M; Dart, Caroline

    2009-07-15

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epacs or cAMP-GEF) represent a family of novel cAMP-binding effector proteins. The identification of Epacs and the recent development of pharmacological tools that discriminate between cAMP-mediated pathways have revealed previously unrecognized roles for cAMP that are independent of its traditional target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Here we show that Epac exists in a complex with vascular ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel subunits and that cAMP-mediated activation of Epac modulates KATP channel activity via a Ca2+-dependent mechanism involving the activation of Ca2+-sensitive protein phosphatase 2B (PP-2B, calcineurin). Application of the Epac-specific cAMP analogue 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, at concentrations that activate Epac but not PKA, caused a 41.6 +/- 4.7% inhibition (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 7) of pinacidil-evoked whole-cell KATP currents recorded in isolated rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Importantly, similar results were obtained when cAMP was elevated by addition of the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in the presence of the structurally distinct PKA inhibitors, Rp-cAMPS or KT5720. Activation of Epac by 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP caused a transient 171.0 +/- 18.0 nM (n = 5) increase in intracellular Ca2+ in Fura-2-loaded aortic myocytes, which persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Inclusion of the Ca2+-specific chelator BAPTA in the pipette-filling solution or preincubation with the calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporin A or ascomycin, significantly reduced the ability of 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP to inhibit whole-cell KATP currents. These results highlight a previously undescribed cAMP-dependent regulatory mechanism that may be essential for understanding the physiological and pathophysiological roles ascribed to arterial KATP channels in the control of vascular tone and blood flow.

  13. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro. PMID:26664379

  14. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 suppresses renin gene transcription by blocking the activity of the cyclic AMP response element in the renin gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Weihua; Pan, Wei; Kong, Juan; Zheng, Wei; Szeto, Frances L; Wong, Kari E; Cohen, Ronald; Klopot, Anna; Zhang, Zhongyi; Li, Yan Chun

    2007-10-12

    We have shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) down-regulates renin expression. To explore the molecular mechanism, we analyzed the mouse Ren-1c gene promoter by luciferase reporter assays. Deletion analysis revealed two DNA fragments from -2,725 to -2,647 (distal fragment) and from -117 to +6 (proximal fragment) that are sufficient to mediate the repression. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE) in the distal fragment blunted forskolin stimulation as well as 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) inhibition of the transcriptional activity, suggesting the involvement of CRE in 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced suppression. EMSA revealed that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) markedly inhibited nuclear protein binding to the CRE in the promoter. ChIP and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that liganded VDR blocked the binding of CREB to the CRE by directly interacting with CREB with the ligand-binding domain, and the VDR-mediated repression can be rescued by CREB, CBP, or p300 overexpression. These data indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) suppresses renin gene expression at least in part by blocking the formation of CRE-CREB-CBP complex.

  16. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  17. Minocycline upregulates cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus of cerebral ischemia rats and improves behavioral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Xiao, Ming; He, Wenbo; Cai, Zhiyou

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) plays an important role in the mechanism of cognitive impairment and is also pivotal in the switch from short-term to long-term memory. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems a promising avenue in the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury since this neurotrophin could stimulate structural plasticity and repair cognitive impairment. Several findings have displayed that the dysregulation of the CREB-BDNF cascade has been involved in cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cerebral ischemia on learning and memory as well as on the levels of CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), and BDNF, and to determine the effect of minocycline on CREB, pCREB, BDNF, and behavioral functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. The animal model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Behavior was evaluated 5 days before decapitation with Morris water maze and open-field task. Four days after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, minocycline was administered by douche via the stomach for 4 weeks. CREB and pCREB were examined by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. BDNF was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The model rats after minocycline treatment swam shorter distances than control rats before finding the platform (P=0.0007). The number of times the platform position was crossed for sham-operation rats was more than that of the model groups in the corresponding platform location (P=0.0021). The number of times the platform position was crossed for minocycline treatment animals was significantly increased compared to the model groups in the corresponding platform position (P=0.0016). CREB, pCREB, and BDNF were downregulated after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries in the model group. Minocycline increased the expression of CREB

  18. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  19. Studies of mice with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) defects reveal the critical role of PKA's catalytic subunits in anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briassoulis, George; Keil, Margaret F.; Naved, Bilal; Liu, Sophie; Starost, Matthew F.; Nesterova, Maria; Gokarn, Nirmal; Batistatos, Anna; Wu, T. John; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is critically involved in the regulation of behavioral responses. Previous studies showed that PKA's main regulatory subunit, R1α, is involved in anxiety-like behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine how the catalytic subunit, Cα, might affect R1α's function and determine its effects on anxiety-related behaviors. The marble bury (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests were used to assess anxiety-like behavior and the hotplate test to assess nociception in wild type (WT) mouse, a Prkar1a heterozygote (Prkar1a+/-) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the regulatory subunit (R1α), a Prkaca heterozygote (Prkaca+/-) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the catalytic subunit (Cα), and a double heterozygote mouse (Prkar1a+/-/Prkaca+/-) with haploinsufficiency for both R1α and Cα. We then examined specific brain nuclei involved in anxiety. Results of MB test showed a genotype effect, with increased anxiety-like behavior in Prkar1a+/- and Prkar1a+/-/Prkaca+/- compared to WT mice. In the EPM, Prkar1a+/- spent significantly less time in the open arms, while Prkaca+/- and Prkar1a+/-/Prkaca+/- mice displayed less exploratory behavior compared to WT mice. The loss of one Prkar1a allele was associated with a significant increase in PKA activity in the basolateral (BLA) and central (CeA) amygdala and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) in both Prkar1a+/- and Prkar1a+/- /Prkaca+/- mice. Alterations of PKA activity induced by haploinsufficiency of its main regulatory or most important catalytic subunits result in anxiety-like behaviors. The BLA, CeA, and VMH are implicated in mediating these PKA effects in brain. PMID:26992826

  20. Functional Characterization of Cyclic Adenosine Monphosphate (cAMP)Recptor Protein Gene (crp) from Erwinia amylovora%梨火疫菌(Erwinia amylovora)环腺苷酸受体蛋白基因(crp)的功能分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘倩倩; 于洋洋; 宋俊贤; 胡白石; 范加勤; 刘凤权

    2010-01-01

    梨火疫菌(Erwinia amylovora)可引起梨、苹果等蔷薇科(Rosaceae)植物的火疫病.在菊欧文氏菌(Erwinia chrysanthemi)中,由crp基因编码的环腺苷酸受体蛋白(cyclic adenosine monphosphate(cAMP)receptor protein,CRP)对果胶酶基因的表达调控和菌株致病性起着重要的作用.本研究首次鉴定并克隆出梨火疫菌中的crp同源基因,命名为Eacrp,并通过同源重组的方法,构建了梨火疫菌的crp基因突变体Ea△crp以及互补子,进行了致病性、过敏性反应、胞外多糖、鞭毛运动等一系列相关表型的鉴定.结果表明,crp基因影响着梨火疫菌的致病性、胞外多糖、游动性、生长情况等多种生物学特性,然而,Ea△crp仍能引起烟草过敏性反应,并且在过氧化氢敏感度以及沉降性、生物膜和AI-2信号分子的生成方面与野生型菌株相比差异明显.本研究结果说明,梨火疫菌crp基因对病菌的胞外多糖分泌、生长、游动性以及致病性方面具有关键作用.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein and neuropeptide Y decline as early as middle age in the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S; Shetty, Geetha A; Shetty, Ashok K

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus is very susceptible to aging. Severely diminished dentate neurogenesis at middle age is one of the most conspicuous early changes in the aging hippocampus, which is likely linked to an early decline in the concentration of neurotrophic factors and signaling proteins that influence neurogenesis. We analyzed three proteins that are well-known to promote dentate neurogenesis and learning and memory function in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats. These include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the transcription factor phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and the neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY). The BDNF was analyzed via ELISA and BDNF immunohistochemistry, the p-CREB through densitometric analysis of p-CREB immunopositive cells, and the NPY via stereological counting of NPY-immunopositive interneurons. We provide new evidence that the BDNF concentration, the p-CREB immunoreactivity and the number of NPY immunopositive interneurons decline considerably by middle age in both dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. However, both BDNF concentration and NPY immunopositive interneuron numbers exhibit no significant decrease between middle age and old age. In contrast, the p-CREB immunoreactivity diminishes further during this period, which is also associated with reduced BDNF immunoreaction within the soma of dentate granule cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these results suggest that severely dampened dentate neurogenesis observed at middle age is linked at least partially to reduced concentrations of BDNF, p-CREB and NPY, as each of these proteins is a positive regulator of dentate neurogenesis. Dramatically diminished CREB phosphorylation (and persistently reduced levels of BDNF and NPY) at old age may underlie the learning and memory impairments observed during senescence.

  2. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    A variety of experimental evidence suggests that calmodulin and protein kinases, especially protein kinase C, may participate in regulating neurite development in cultured neurons, particularly neurite initiation. However, the results are somewhat contradictory. Further, the roles of calmodulin and protein kinases on many aspects of neurite development, such as branching or elongation of axons vs dendrites, have not been extensively studied. Cultured embryonic rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop readily identifiable axons and dendrites. We used this culture system and the new generation of highly specific protein kinase inhibitors to investigate the roles of protein kinases and calmodulin in neurite development. Neurons were cultured for 2 days in the continuous presence of calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C), KT5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase), KN62 (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), or calmidazolium (inhibitor of calmodulin), each at concentrations from approximately 1 to 10 times the concentration reported in the literature to inhibit each kinase by 50%. The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (an activator of protein kinase C) and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (an inactive phorbol ester) were also tested. At concentrations that had no effect on neuronal viability, calphostin C reduced neurite initiation and axon branching without significantly affecting the number of dendrites per neuron, dendrite branching, dendrite length, or axon length. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased axon branching and the number of dendrites per cell, compared to the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. KT5720 inhibited only axon branching. KN62 reduced axon length, the number of dendrites per neuron, and both axon and dendrite branching. At low concentrations, calmidazolium had no effect on any aspect of neurite development, but at high concentrations, calmidazolium inhibited every

  3. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  4. Isolation and Partial Characterization of a Cyclic GMP-Dependent Cyclic GMP-Specific Phosphodiesterase from Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulgakov, Roman; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    The cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, contains at least two classes of phosphodiesterase activity. One class of enzymes hydrolyses cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) with approximately equal rates. Another enzyme, which is less than 5% of the total activity, specifically hydrolyses

  5. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-07-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed.

  6. Mechanism of action of extracellular calcium on isoprenaline-evoked amylase secretion from isolated rat parotid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argent, B E; Arkle, S

    1985-12-01

    The effects of extracellular Ca2+ deprivation on amylase secretion, 45Ca efflux and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) metabolism were investigated in incubated parotid glands of young rats. Reducing the extracellular Ca2+ concentration from 2.5 X 10(-3) M to 10(-6) M had no effect on amylase secretion but did increase the rate of 45Ca efflux from unstimulated glands. Isoprenaline (10(-5) M) increased amylase secretion and the rate of 45Ca efflux in media containing 2.5 X 10(-3) M-Ca2+, and also increased the parotid cyclic AMP content. When glands were pre-incubated for either 10, 20, or 30 min in media containing either 10(-3) or 10(-6) M-Ca2+ there was no effect on the peak rate of amylase secretion stimulated by isoprenaline but the response took longer to develop. The effects of the same experimental manoeuvre on the net change in 45Ca efflux stimulated by isoprenaline were consistent with the idea that the beta-adrenergic agonist mobilizes Ca2+ from a number of intracellular pools. When glands were pre-incubated for 100 min in Ca2+-depleted buffers and then exposed to isoprenaline a triphasic effect on amylase secretion was observed. The secretory response was depressed when the extracellular Ca2+ concentration was lowered from 2.5 X 10(-3) M to 10(-3) M; remained unaffected when the extracellular Ca2+ was further reduced to 10(-5) M; and was virtually abolished when the extracellular Ca2+ concentration was decreased to 10(-6) M. When glands were pre-incubated for 100 min in media containing Ca2+ at concentrations above 10(-5) M and then stimulated with isoprenaline parallel changes in cyclic AMP content and amylase secretion were observed. At lower Ca2+ concentrations there was no further reduction in cyclic AMP content. The lipophilic cyclic AMP analogue N6,O2-dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (dibutyryl cyclic AMP) mimicked the effects of isoprenaline on amylase secretion and 45Ca efflux. However, the amylase secretory response took

  7. 丙泊酚对大鼠海马cAMP效应元件结合蛋白磷酸化和cAMP效应元件结合蛋白mRNA表达水平的影响%Effects of propofol on cyclic AMP response element binding protein phosphorylation and cyclic AMP response element binding protein mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英; 吴新海; 郑利民

    2011-01-01

    Objective to investigate the effects of propofol on cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and CREB mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats. Methods Sixty -four male Sprague -Dawley (SD) rats weighting 250 g-280 g were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=32) with Randomization Adviser 1.0 software: normal saline treated (Group S) and propofol treated (Group P). Animals of both groups underwent a continuous multiple -trial inhibitory avoidance training. The times of trial needed for each animal to attain the learning criterion( 100 seconds) were recorded. Each animal was given intraperitoneal propofol 9 mg/kg or normal saline 2 ml/kg at 15 min before training. The memory retention was tested at 1, 3 and 24 h( n=8, at each time point) after the training session and the memory latency was recorded. Animals were sacrificed at 15 min after reagent administration (T0) and after the memory testing (T1~3). Hippocampus was obtained to determine the phosphorylation of CRKB (pCREB) and CREB mRNA expression. Results The times of trials required for the rats to learn the task in Group S and Group P is 1 (0.25) and 3 (1.25), respectively. Learning ability was significantly impaired in rats of Group P(P<0.01 ). Rats of Group S had a median retention latency more than 300 s at each memory testing. The median retention latency of rats in Group P at T1, T2and T3 was 319( 144) s, 131( 114) s and 56(30) s, respectively. Compared with group S, there was a decrease of CREB phosphorylation expression at T0-3 in Group P (P<0.01). The CREB mRNA expression in Group P was decreased at T3 (P<0.01). Conclusion Propofol can inhibit CREB phosphorylation, and downregulate CREB mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats.%目的 探讨丙泊酚对大鼠海马cAMP效应元件结合蛋白(cAMP response element binding protein,CREB)磷酸化和CREB mRNA表达水平的影响.方法 成年雄性SD大鼠64只,体重250 g~280 g,采用RandA1.0随机分组软件

  8. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  9. Calcium regulates motility and protein phosphorylation by changing cAMP and ATP concentrations in boar sperm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinhong; Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Zhen, Linqing; Fu, Jieli; Yang, Qiangzhen

    2016-09-01

    Considering the importance of calcium (Ca(2+)) in regulating sperm capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction, little is known about the molecular mechanism of action of this ion in this process. In the present study, assessment of the molecular mechanism from the perspective of energy metabolism occurred. Sperm motility variables were determined using computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) and the phosphorylation of PKA substrates, tyrosine residues and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed by Western blot. Moreover, intracellular sperm-specific glyceraldehyde 3-phosphatedehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentrations were assessed in boar sperm treated with Ca(2+). Results of the present study indicated that, under greater extracellular Ca(2+)concentrations (≥3.0mM), sperm motility and protein phosphorylation were inhibited. Interestingly, these changes were correlated with that of GAPDH activity, AMPK phosphorylation, cAMP and ATP concentrations. The negative effects of Ca(2+) on these intracellular processes were attenuated by addition of the calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor W7 and the inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), KN-93. In the presence of greater extracellular Ca(2+), however, the phosphorylation pathway was suppressed by H-89. Taken together, these results suggested that Ca(2+) had a dual role in regulating boar sperm motility and protein phosphorylation due to the changes of cAMP and ATP concentrations, in response to cAMP-mediated signal transduction and the Ca(2+) signaling cascade. The present study provided some novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the effects of Ca(2+) on boar sperm as well as the involvement of energy metabolism in this mechanism.

  10. Direct Light-up of cAMP Derivatives in Living Cells by Click Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 8-Azidoadenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-azido cAMP was directly detected in living cells, by applying Cu-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition to probe cAMP derivatives by fluorescence light-up. Fluorescence emission was generated by two non-fluorescent molecules, 8-azido cAMP as a model target and difluorinated cyclooctyne (DIFO reagent as a probe. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction between 8-azido cAMP and DIFO induces fluorescence in 8-azido cAMP. The fluorescence emission serves as a way to probe 8-azido cAMP in cells.

  11. The effects of hyperglycemia on calcium load and cyclic cAMP content in rat skeletal muscle%高血糖对大鼠骨骼肌钙负载和cAMP含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金文胜; 张忠辉; 张平

    2000-01-01

    目的探讨高浓度葡萄糖对正常和糖尿病大鼠骨骼肌钙负载和环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)含量的影响.方法体内实验直接测定糖尿病和正常大鼠骨骼肌钙负载和cAMP含量,体外实验用比目鱼肌与5.6mmol/L和16.7mm ol/L葡萄糖保温后测定钙负载和cAMP,二者分别采用原子光谱吸收法和放免法测定.结果高血糖对骨骼肌具有升高cAMP、降低钙负载的作用.糖尿病本身可升高cAMP,并且高血糖是升cAMP必要的辅助因素;同时糖尿病倾向于阻碍高血糖引起的钙负载下降.结论高血糖对大鼠骨骼肌钙负载和cAMP含量的影响与其抗胰岛素作用相一致,可能与葡萄糖毒性的发生有关.

  12. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  13. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the occurrence and potential functions of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP), a potent and ubiquitous metabolic regulatory molecule in heterotrophic organisms, in phytoplankton and in natural aquatic communities. Laboratory-cultured phytoplankton were grown under both optimal and suboptimal nutrient regimes under constant temperature and illumination regimes. Cellular and extracellular cAMP production, characterized by a number of biochemical techniques, was correlated with growth rate dynamics, chlorophyll a synthesis, /sup 14/C-bicarbonate uptake, alkaline phosphatase activity, and heterocyst formation. The blue-green alga Anabaena flos-aquae was used as a model system in the examination of these metabolic variables. Additionally, this alga was used to test the effects of perturbation of cAMP levels on the aforementioned metabolic variables. Investigations on the occurrence and seasonal dynamics of cAMP in aquatic systems were conducted on Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and on Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan. Putative cAMP from both systems was characterized by several biochemical techniques. Weekly sampling of particulate and dissolved cAMP in the epilimnia of both lakes was correlated with data on the rates of primary productivity, alkaline phosphatase activity, chlorophyll a synthesis and changes in phytoplankton community structure.

  14. The role of cAMP in nerve growth factor-promoted neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells has been described to be synergistically potentiated by the simultaneous addition of dibutyryl cAMP. To elucidate further the role of cAMP in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth we have used the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin, cAMP, and a set of chemically modified cAMP analogues, including the adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphorothioates (cAMPS) (Rp)-cAMPS and (Sp)-cAMPS. These diastereomers have differentia...

  15. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases, NF-kappa B, and cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element-binding protein in lung neutrophils occurs by differing mechanisms after hemorrhage or endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, E; Arcaroli, J; Shenkar, R

    2001-01-01

    Acute lung injury is frequently associated with sepsis or blood loss and is characterized by a proinflammatory response and infiltration of activated neutrophils into the lungs. Hemorrhage or endotoxemia result in activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and NF-kappa B in lung neutrophils as well as increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha and macrophage-inflammatory peptide-2, by these cells. Activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway occurs in stress responses and is involved in CREB activation. In the present experiments, hemorrhage or endotoxemia produced increased activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)1/2 and ERK2 (p42), but not of ERK1 (p44), in lung neutrophils. ERK1, ERK2, and MEK1/2 were not activated in peripheral blood neutrophils after hemorrhage or endotoxemia. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase led to further increase in the activation of MEK1/2 and ERK2 in lung neutrophils after hemorrhage, but not after endotoxemia. Alpha-adrenergic blockade before hemorrhage resulted in increased activation in lung neutrophils of MEK1/2, ERK1, ERK2, and CREB, but decreased activation of NF-kappa B. In contrast, alpha-adrenergic blockade before endotoxemia was associated with decreased activation of MEK1/2, ERK2, and CREB, but increased activation of NF-kappa B. Beta-adrenergic blockade before hemorrhage did not alter MEK1/2 or ERK1 activation in lung neutrophils, but decreased activation of ERK2 and CREB, while increasing activation of NF-kappa B. Beta-adrenergic inhibition before endotoxemia did not affect activation of MEK1/2, ERK1, ERK2, CREB, or NF-kappa B. These data indicate that the pathways leading to lung neutrophil activation after hemorrhage are different from those induced by endotoxemia.

  16. Regulation of oxidative response and extracellular polysaccharide synthesis by a diadenylate cyclase in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xingqun; Zheng, Xin; Zhou, Xuedong; Zeng, Jumei; Ren, Zhi; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Li, Yuqing

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) has been implicated in the control of many important bacterial activities. However, the function of this molecule in Streptococcus mutans, the primary aetiological agent of human dental caries, is unknown. In this study, we identified and characterized a diadenylate cyclase, named CdaA, in S. mutans. Furthermore, we showed that in-frame deletion of the cdaA gene in S. mutans causes decreased c-di-AMP levels, increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and increased production of extracellular polysaccharides. Global gene expression profiling revealed that more than 200 genes were significantly upregulated or downregulated (> 2.0-fold) in the cdaA mutant. Interestingly, genes with increased or decreased expression were clustered in cellular polysaccharide biosynthetic processes and oxidoreductase activity respectively. Notably, the expression of several genomic islands, such as GTF-B/C, TnSmu, CRISPR1-Cas and CRISPR2-Cas, was found to be altered in the cdaA mutant, indicating a possible link between these genomic islands and c-di-AMP signalling. Collectively, the results reported here show that CdaA is an important global modulator in S. mutans and is required for optimal growth and environmental adaption. This report also paves the way to unveil further the roles of c-di-AMP signalling networks in the biology and pathogenicity of S. mutans.

  17. Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling in Kidney Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Schinner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure.

  18. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  19. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  20. Differential Effects of Temperature on cAMP-induced Excitation, Adaptation, and Deadaptation of Adenylate and Guanylate Cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular cAMP induces excitation of adenylate and guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum. Continuous stimulation with cAMP leads to adaptation, while cells deadapt upon removal of the cAMP stimulus. Excitation of guanylate cyclase by cAMP has a lag time of ~1 s; excitation of adenylate c

  1. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  2. Dissociation of beta-adrenoceptor-induced effects on amylase secretion and cyclic adenosine 3', 5' monophosphate accumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsöö, B.; Danielsson, A.; Henriksson, R; Idahl, L. A.

    1982-01-01

    By using a multi-channel microperifusion system the effects of noradrenaline, the beta1-adrenoceptor agonist prenalterol, and the beta2-selective agonist terbutaline were studied on amylase pig submandibular glands. 2 Noradrenaline caused significant amylase discharge and cyclic AMP accumulation. 3 Prenalterol was as effective as noradrenaline in causing amylase release but did not significantly affect the cyclic AMP content. 4 Terbutaline stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation, but had little ef...

  3. Mutations of PKA cyclic nucleotide-binding domains reveal novel aspects of cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Robin; Moon, Eui-Whan; Kim, Jeong Joo; Schmidt, Sven H; Sankaran, Banumathi; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Kim, Choel; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2017-07-06

    Cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP are ubiquitous second messengers that regulate the activity of effector proteins in all forms of life. The main effector proteins, the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG), are preferentially activated by cAMP and cGMP, respectively. However, the molecular basis of this cyclic nucleotide selectivity is still not fully understood. Analysis of isolated cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains of PKA regulatory subunit type Iα (RIα) reveals that the C-terminal CNB-B has a higher cAMP affinity and selectivity than the N-terminal CNB-A. Here, we show that introducing cGMP-specific residues using site-directed mutagenesis reduces the selectivity of CNB-B, while the combination of two mutations (G316R/A336T) results in a cGMP-selective binding domain. Furthermore, introducing the corresponding mutations (T192R/A212T) into the PKA RIα CNB-A turns this domain into a highly cGMP-selective domain, underlining the importance of these contacts for achieving cGMP specificity. Binding data with the generic purine nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic inosine monophosphate (cIMP) reveal that introduced arginine residues interact with the position 6 oxygen of the nucleobase. Co-crystal structures of an isolated CNB-B G316R/A336T double mutant with either cAMP or cGMP reveal that the introduced threonine and arginine residues maintain their conserved contacts as seen in PKG I CNB-B. These results improve our understanding of cyclic nucleotide binding and the molecular basis of cyclic nucleotide specificity. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  4. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  5. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  6. ACTH, cyclic nucleotides, and brain protein phosphorylation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiers, H; Veldhuis, H D; Schotman, P; Gispen, W H

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous phosphorylation of proteins from rat brain synaptosomal plasma membranes was studied in vitro. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) markedly stimulated(32)P incorporation in three protein bands with molecular weights of 75,000, 57,000, and 54,000, respectively. The effect of the behaviorally active peptide

  7. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  8. Selective down-regulation of cell surface cAMP-binding sites and cAMP-induced responses in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1985-01-01

    Extracellular cAMP induces an intracellular accumulation of cAMP and cGMP levels in Dictyostelium discoideum, cAMP is detected by cell-surface receptors which are composed of a class of fast-dissociating sites (t1/2 = 1-2 s) and a class of slow-dissociating sites (t1/2 = 15-150 s). Exposure of D. di

  9. Identification of novel cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Adriana V; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Mild, Jesica G; Mc Cormack, Bárbara; Pantano, Sergio; Altschuler, Daniel L; Edreira, Martin M

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic AMP has been implicated as second messenger in a wide range of cellular processes. In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, cAMP is involved in the development of the parasite's life cycle. While cAMP effectors have been widely studied in other eukaryotic cells, little is known about cAMP's mechanism of action in T. cruzi. To date, only a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) has been cloned and characterised in this parasite; however experimental evidence indicates the existence of cAMP-dependent, PKA-independent events. In order to identify new cAMP binding proteins as potential cAMP effectors, we carried out in silico studies using the predicted T. cruzi proteome. Using a combination of search methods 27 proteins with putative cNMP binding domains (CBDs) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the CBDs presented a homogeneous distribution, with sequences segregated into two main branches: one containing kinases-like proteins and the other gathering hypothetical proteins with different function or no other known. Comparative modelling of the strongest candidates provides support for the hypothesis that these proteins may give rise to structurally viable cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Pull-down and nucleotide displacement assays strongly suggest that TcCLB.508523.80 could bind cAMP and eventually be a new putative PKA-independent cAMP effector in T. cruzi.

  10. Modulation of the cAMP signaling pathway after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Oliva, Anthony A.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Pearse, Damien D.; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in both focal and diffuse brain pathologies that are exacerbated by the inflammatory response and progress from hours to days after the initial injury. Using a clinically relevant model of TBI, the parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI) model, we found injury-induced impairments in the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway. Levels of cAMP were depressed in the ipsilateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, as well as activation of its downstream targ...

  11. Minocycline upregulates cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus of cerebral ischemia rats and improves behavioral deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhao,1 Ming Xiao,2 Wenbo He,3 Zhiyou Cai3 1Department of Neurology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan Renmin Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB plays an important role in the mechanism of cognitive impairment and is also pivotal in the switch from short-term to long-term memory. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF seems a promising avenue in the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury since this neurotrophin could stimulate structural plasticity and repair cognitive impairment. Several findings have displayed that the dysregulation of the CREB–BDNF cascade has been involved in cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cerebral ischemia on learning and memory as well as on the levels of CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB, and BDNF, and to determine the effect of minocycline on CREB, pCREB, BDNF, and behavioral functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. Methods: The animal model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Behavior was evaluated 5 days before decapitation with Morris water maze and open-field task. Four days after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, minocycline was administered by douche via the stomach for 4 weeks. CREB and pCREB were examined by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. BDNF was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: The model rats after minocycline treatment swam shorter distances than control rats before finding the platform (P=0.0007. The number of times the

  12. Identification of c-di-AMP-Binding Proteins Using Magnetic Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Jan; Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Treffon, Katrin; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    To identify cytosolic proteins that bind to cyclic di-AMP, a biotinylated analog of the nucleotide is used for protein pull-down experiments. In this approach, biotinylated c-di-AMP is coupled to Streptactin-covered beads. After protein separation using standard SDS-PAGE, the protein(s) of interest are identified by mass spectrometric analyses.

  13. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  14. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  15. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A. [Drug Discovery Research Center, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Ave, Suite 3029, Mobile, AL 36604 (United States); Tinsley, Heather N., E-mail: htinsley@montevallo.edu [Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL 35115 (United States)

    2014-02-26

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers.

  16. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita eNunes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic carotid body (CB activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio. Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review provides an outline on 1 the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, 2 present recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and 3 discuss how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations.

  17. Cyclic derangements

    CERN Document Server

    Assaf, Sami H

    2010-01-01

    A classic problem in enumerative combinatorics is to count the number of derangements, that is, permutations with no fixed point. Inspired by a recent generalization to facet derangements of the hypercube by Gordon and McMahon, we generalize this problem to enumerating derangements in the wreath product of any finite cyclic group with the symmetric group. We also give q- and (q, t)-analogs for cyclic derangements, generalizing results of Brenti and Gessel.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  19. cAMP Signals in Drosophila Motor Neurons Are Confined to Single Synaptic Boutons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Maiellaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. Although there is evidence for local control of synaptic transmission and plasticity, it is less clear whether a similar spatial confinement of cAMP signaling exists. Here, we suggest a possible biophysical basis for the site-specific regulation of synaptic plasticity by cAMP, a highly diffusible small molecule that transforms the physiology of synapses in a local and specific manner. By exploiting the octopaminergic system of Drosophila, which mediates structural synaptic plasticity via a cAMP-dependent pathway, we demonstrate the existence of local cAMP signaling compartments of micrometer dimensions within single motor neurons. In addition, we provide evidence that heterogeneous octopamine receptor localization, coupled with local differences in phosphodiesterase activity, underlies the observed differences in cAMP signaling in the axon, cell body, and boutons.

  20. The cAMP analogs have potent anti-proliferative effects on medullary thyroid cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicitore, Alessandra; Grassi, Elisa Stellaria; Caraglia, Michele; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Gaudenzi, Germano; Hofland, Leo J; Persani, Luca; Vitale, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic activation of the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene has a main role in the pathogenesis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Several lines of evidence suggest that RET function could be influenced by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) activity. We evaluated the in vitro anti-tumor activity of 8-chloroadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP) and PKA type I-selective cAMP analogs [equimolar combination of the 8-piperidinoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-PIP-cAMP) and 8-hexylaminoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-HA-cAMP) in MTC cell lines (TT and MZ-CRC-1)]. 8-Cl-cAMP and the PKA I-selective cAMP analogs showed a potent anti-proliferative effect in both cell lines. In detail, 8-Cl-cAMP blocked significantly the transition of TT cell population from G2/M to G0/G1 phase and from G0/G1 to S phase and of MZ-CRC-1 cells from G0/G1 to S phase. Moreover, 8-Cl-cAMP induced apoptosis in both cell lines, as demonstrated by FACS analysis for annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide, the activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. On the other hand, the only effect induced by PKA I-selective cAMP analogs was a delay in G0/G1-S and S-G2/M progression in TT and MZ-CRC-1 cells, respectively. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that cAMP analogs, particularly 8-Cl-cAMP, significantly suppress in vitro MTC proliferation and provide rationale for a potential clinical use of cAMP analogs in the treatment of advanced MTC.

  1. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  2. Crystal structure of a c-di-AMP riboswitch reveals an internally pseudo-dimeric RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2014-11-18

    Cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a second messenger that is essential for growth and homeostasis in bacteria. A recently discovered c-di-AMP-responsive riboswitch controls the expression of genes in a variety of bacteria, including important pathogens. To elucidate the molecular basis for specific binding of c-di-AMP by a gene-regulatory mRNA domain, we have determined the co-crystal structure of this riboswitch. Unexpectedly, the structure reveals an internally pseudo-symmetric RNA in which two similar three-helix-junction elements associate head-to-tail, creating a trough that cradles two c-di-AMP molecules making quasi-equivalent contacts with the riboswitch. The riboswitch selectively binds c-di-AMP and discriminates exquisitely against other cyclic dinucleotides, such as c-di-GMP and cyclic-AMP-GMP, via interactions with both the backbone and bases of its cognate second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments indicate that global folding of the riboswitch is induced by the two bound cyclic dinucleotides, which bridge the two symmetric three-helix domains. This structural reorganization likely couples c-di-AMP binding to gene expression.

  3. Pleiotropic effects of cAMP on germination, antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological development in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süsstrunk, U; Pidoux, J; Taubert, S; Ullmann, A; Thompson, C J

    1998-10-01

    In wild-type Streptomyces coelicolor MT1110 cultures, cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) was synthesized throughout the developmental programme with peaks of accumulation both during germination and later when aerial mycelium and actinorhodin were being produced. Construction and characterization of an adenylate cyclase disruption mutant (BZ1) demonstrated that cAMP facilitated these developmental processes. Although pulse-labelling experiments showed that a similar germination process was initiated in BZ1 and MT1110, germ-tube emergence was severely delayed in BZ1 and never occurred in more than 85% of the spores. Studies of growth and development on solid glucose minimal medium (SMMS, buffered or unbuffered) showed that MT1110 and BZ1 produced acid during the first rapid growth phase, which generated substrate mycelium. Thereafter, on unbuffered SMMS, only MT1110 resumed growth and produced aerial mycelium by switching to an alternative metabolism that neutralized its medium, probably by reincorporating and metabolizing extracellular acids. BZ1 was not able to neutralize its medium or produce aerial mycelium on unbuffered SMMS; these defects were suppressed by high concentrations (>1 mM) of cAMP during early growth or on buffered medium. Other developmental mutants (bldA, bldB, bldC, bldD, bldG) also irreversibly acidified this medium. However, these bald mutants were not suppressed by exogenous cAMP or neutralizing buffer. BZ1 also differentiated when it was cultured in close proximity to MT1110, a property observed in cross-feeding experiments between bald mutants and commonly thought to reflect diffusion of a discrete positively acting signalling molecule. In this case, MT1110 generated a more neutral pH environment that allowed BZ1 to reinitiate growth and form aerial mycelium. The fact that actinorhodin synthesis could be induced by concentrations of cAMP (< 20 microM) found in the medium of MT1110 cultures, suggested that it may serve as a

  4. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  5. Cyclic Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dennis H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a simple experiment that has become popular in chemical research because it can provide useful information about redox reactions in a form which is easily obtained and interpreted. Discusses principles of the method and illustrates its use in the study of four electrode reactions. (Author/JN)

  6. Biological roles of cAMP: variations on a theme in the different kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo, Juana M

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) plays a key regulatory role in most types of cells; however, the pathways controlled by cAMP may present important differences between organisms and between tissues within a specific organism. Changes in cAMP levels are caused by multiple triggers, most affecting adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes that synthesize cAMP. Adenylyl cyclases form a large and diverse family including soluble forms and others with one or more transmembrane domains. Regulatory mechanisms for the soluble adenylyl cyclases involve either interaction with diverse proteins, as happens in Escherichia coli or yeasts, or with calcium or bicarbonate ions, as occurs in mammalian cells. The transmembrane cyclases can be regulated by a variety of proteins, among which the α subunit and the βγ complex from G proteins coupled to membrane receptors are prominent. cAMP levels also are controlled by the activity of phosphodiesterases, enzymes that hydrolyze cAMP. Phosphodiesterases can be regulated by cAMP, cGMP or calcium-calmodulin or by phosphorylation by different protein kinases. Regulation through cAMP depends on its binding to diverse proteins, its proximal targets, this in turn causing changes in a variety of distal targets. Specifically, binding of cAMP to regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs) affects the activity of substrates of PKA, binding to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac) regulates small GTPases, binding to transcription factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) or the virulence factor regulator (Vfr) modifies the rate of transcription of certain genes, while cAMP binding to ion channels modulates their activity directly. Further studies on cAMP signalling will have important implications, not only for advancing fundamental knowledge but also for identifying targets for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  7. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myofibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs. In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target.

  8. Cyclic multiverses

    CERN Document Server

    Marosek, Konrad; Balcerzak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Starting with the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we first study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating mass density and pressure regularized by varying gravitational constant $G$. Then, we extend this idea onto the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two "parallel" universes with their physical evolution (physical coupling constants $c(t)$ and $G(t)$) being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion -- the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory.

  9. Increases in cAMP, MAPK Activity and CREB Phosphorylation during REM Sleep: Implications for REM Sleep and Memory Consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X.; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G.; Storm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Since mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylat...

  10. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp chemosensory system regulates intracellular cAMP levels by modulating adenylate cyclase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B; Holliday, Phillip M; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J; Wolfgang, Matthew C

    2010-05-01

    Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signalling molecule adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems.

  11. Allostery and conformational dynamics in cAMP-binding acyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Marjetka; Siddiqui, Nida; Rebolj, Katja; Nambi, Subhalaxmi; Merzel, Franci; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2014-06-06

    Mycobacteria harbor unique proteins that regulate protein lysine acylation in a cAMP-regulated manner. These lysine acyltransferases from Mycobacterium smegmatis (KATms) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (KATmt) show distinctive biochemical properties in terms of cAMP binding affinity to the N-terminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain and allosteric activation of the C-terminal acyltransferase domain. Here we provide evidence for structural features in KATms that account for high affinity cAMP binding and elevated acyltransferase activity in the absence of cAMP. Structure-guided mutational analysis converted KATms from a cAMP-regulated to a cAMP-dependent acyltransferase and identified a unique asparagine residue in the acyltransferase domain of KATms that assists in the enzymatic reaction in the absence of a highly conserved glutamate residue seen in Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase-like acyltransferases. Thus, we have identified mechanisms by which properties of similar proteins have diverged in two species of mycobacteria by modifications in amino acid sequence, which can dramatically alter the abundance of conformational states adopted by a protein.

  12. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes in guinea-pig tracheal muscle and bronchorelaxation by alkylxanthines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Kurita, M; Sakai, R; Sanae, F; Wakusawa, S; Takagi, K

    1994-09-15

    In this study the phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in guinea-pig trachealis smooth muscle were separated by DEAE-Sepharose anion exchange chromatography, identified, and characterized. Furthermore the effect of theophylline and 1-n-butyl-3-n-propylxanthine (BPX) on the isolated PDE isoenzymes and on their tracheal relaxant effect were investigated and compared with the nonxanthine PDE inhibitors amrinone and Ro 20-1724. We identified five distinct isoenzymes in guinea-pig tracheal muscle; calcium/calmodulin-stimulated cyclic AMP PDE (PDE I), cyclic GMP-stimulated cyclic AMP PDE (PDE II), cyclic GMP-inhibited and amrinone-sensitive cyclic AMP PDE (PDE III), cyclic AMP-specific and Ro 20-1724-sensitive PDE (PDE IV), and cyclic GMP-specific PDE (PDE V). BPX strongly inhibited the PDE IV isoenzyme with high selectivity, while the inhibitory effect of theophylline was weak. The PDE IV inhibitors BPX and Ro 20-1724 synergistically increased the relaxant effect of the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol in carbachol-contracted trachea much more strongly than theophylline. In contrast, amrinone, a PDE III inhibitor, hardly influenced the relaxant effect of salbutamol, suggesting that the PDE IV isoenzyme is functionally associated with beta 2-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig trachea and that inhibition of this enzyme potentiates the ability of salbutamol to increase the intracellular cyclic AMP content. These results indicate that the PDE IV isoenzyme plays a significant role in alkylxanthine-mediated relaxation of guinea-pig trachea.

  13. Extracellular calpains increase tubular epithelial cell mobility. Implications for kidney repair after ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangié, Carlos; Zhang, Wenhui; Perez, Joëlle; Dubois, Yi-Chun Xu; Haymann, Jean-Philippe; Baud, Laurent

    2006-09-08

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-dependent cysteine proteases that are released in the extracellular milieu by tubular epithelial cells following renal ischemia. Here we show that externalized calpains increase epithelial cell mobility and thus are critical for tubule repair. In vitro, exposure of human tubular epithelial cells (HK-2 cells) to mu-calpain limited their adhesion to extracellular matrix and increased their mobility. Calpains acted primarily by promoting the cleavage of fibronectin, thus preventing fibronectin binding to the integrin alphavbeta3. Analyzing downstream integrin effects, we found that the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway was activated in response to alphavbeta3 disengagement and was essential for calpain-mediated increase in HK-2 cell mobility. In a murine model of ischemic acute renal failure, injection of a fragment of calpastatin, which specifically blocked calpain activity in extracellular milieu, markedly delayed tubule repair, increasing functional and histological lesions after 24 and 48 h of reperfusion. These findings suggest that externalized calpains are critical for tubule repair process in acute renal failure.

  14. Molecular mechanism by which cyclic amp regulates myocardial contractility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidlack, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    From these experiments, it appears that the phosphorylated 22,000 dalton protein does not regulate the transport properties of the ATPase. Instead phosphorylation of the 22,000 dalton protein causes it to become buried in the membrane, transporting Ca/sup 2 +/ into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and thereby, elevating the Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration in the sarcoplasmic reticulum available for release to the myofibrils.

  15. Binding of the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b to HCN channels shifts the mode of action of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Santoro, Bina; Saponaro, Andrea; Liu, Haiying; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated cation (HCN) channels generate the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in many neurons. These channels are directly regulated by the binding of cAMP, which both shifts the voltage dependence of HCN channel opening to more positive potentials and increases maximal Ih at extreme negative voltages where voltage gating is complete. Here we report that the HCN channel brain-specific auxiliary subunit TRIP8b produces opposing actions on these two effects of cAMP. In the first action, TRIP8b inhibits the effect of cAMP to shift voltage gating, decreasing both the sensitivity of the channel to cAMP (K1/2) and the efficacy of cAMP (maximal voltage shift); conversely, cAMP binding inhibits these actions of TRIP8b. These mutually antagonistic actions are well described by a cyclic allosteric mechanism in which TRIP8b binding reduces the affinity of the channel for cAMP, with the affinity of the open state for cAMP being reduced to a greater extent than the cAMP affinity of the closed state. In a second apparently independent action, TRIP8b enhances the action of cAMP to increase maximal Ih. This latter effect cannot be explained by the cyclic allosteric model but results from a previously uncharacterized action of TRIP8b to reduce maximal current through the channel in the absence of cAMP. Because the binding of cAMP also antagonizes this second effect of TRIP8b, application of cAMP produces a larger increase in maximal Ih in the presence of TRIP8b than in its absence. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the wide variability in the effects of modulatory transmitters on the voltage gating and maximal amplitude of Ih reported for different neurons in the brain.

  16. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  17. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    an enthusiastic worshipping of life, one that holds youth, health, strength and beauty as its primary attributes, and which was prevalent in all aspects of cultural life around 1900. But even the post war founders of the Vitalist re-conceptualisation of this era, Wolfdietrich Rasch and Gunter Martens, warned...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...

  18. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  19. Cyclic multiverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  20. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis. c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become an

  1. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistance. Report 2. Effect of cyclic nucleotides on mammalian radioresistance and tissular oxygen tension. [X rays; mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulinskii, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    In experiments on mice, 3',5'-AMP, N/sup 6/,O/sup 2/-dibutyryl-3',5'-AMP (DB), 2',3'-AMP, theophylline, papaverine, imidazole, and nicotinate presented neither a sensitizing or radioprotective (RPE) effect. However, preadministration of ..beta..-adrenolytic agents revealed a moderate RPE in DB. Probably, along with the RPE, there is an antiprotective component in the action of cyclic nucleotides (CN), which is expressed via ..beta..-receptors. The absence of RPE in 3',5'-AMP, 2',3'-AMP, DB, theophylline, and phentolamine is combined with decline of tissular pO/sub 2/. The significance of this phenomenon is discussed.

  2. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs.

  3. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    of taking such a unilateral view of what constituted a Vitalist concept of life. It could lead to a misunderstanding of Vitalist way of thinking, Rasch said, if the focus were only set upon the enthusiastic surplus, the worshipping of youth and health. To Vitalists, life is more than that. It is a totality...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...... of the era. The analyses include a further sub-categorisation to capture the different types of Life Force dealt with in the texts. By way of an introduction, Vitalism is discussed within the context of the scientific and social developments of the 19th Century....

  4. Extracellular siderophores of rapidly growing Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Charlang, G; Horowitz, R M; Lowy, P H; Ng, B.; Poling, S M; Horowitz, N. H.

    1982-01-01

    The highly active extracellular siderophores previously detected in young cultures of Aspergillus nidulans and Penicillium chrysogenum have been identified as the cyclic ester fusigen (fusarinine C), and its open-chain form, fusigen B (fusarinine B).

  5. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate signal pathway in targeted therapy of lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Ai-xia; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal pathway in the pathogenesis oflymphoma and explore a potential lymphoma therapy targeted on this signaling pathway.Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in Medline and PubMed,published from January 1995 to June 2009. The search terms were "cAMP" and "lymphoma".Study selection Articles regarding the role of the cAMP pathway in apoptosis of lymphoma and associated cells and itspotential role in targeted therapy of lymphoma.Results In the transformation of lymphocytic malignancies, several signal pathways are involved. Among of them, thecAMP pathway has attracted increasing attention because of its apoptosis-inducing role in several lymphoma cells. cAMPpathway impairment is found to influence the prognosis of lymphoma. Targeted therapy to the cAMP pathway seems tobe a new direction for lymphoma treatment, aiming at restoring the cAMP function.Conclusions cAMP signal pathway has different effects on various lymphoma cells. cAMP analogues andphosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) inhibitors have potential clinical significance. However, many challenges remain inunderstanding the various roles of such agents.

  7. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and germination of sporangiospores from the fungus Mucor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, M

    1980-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) metabolism was examined in germinating sporangiospores of Mucor genevensis and Mucor mucedo. Exogenous cAMP prevented normal hyphal development from sporangiospores. Internal pools of cAMP fluctuated profoundly during development. Spherical growth of the spores was characterized by large pools of cAMP whereas germ tube emergence and hyphal elongation were characterized by small pools of cAMP. These observations suggest a possible role for cAMP in sporangiospore germination. Adenylate cyclase activities fluctuated significantly during germination with maximum values attained during spherical growth. In contrast, cAMP phosphodiesterase activities remained constant throughout germination. Internal cAMP levels may therefore be regulated by adjustment of adenylate cyclase activities. The binding of cAMP by soluble cell proteins was measured. cAMP-binding activity changed greatly during germination. Dormant and spherically growing spores possessed the highest activities. Developing hyphae contained the lowest activities. Use of the photoaffinity label, 8-azido-[32P]cAMP, in conjunction with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis allowed the identification of a small population of morphogenetic-stage-specific proteins which bind cAMP and may be of regulatory significance to development.

  8. Interaction between cAMP, volume‑regulated anion channels and the Na+‑HCO3‑‑cotransporter, NBCe1, in the regulation of nutrient‑ and hypotonicity‑induced insulin release from isolated rat pancreatic islets and tumoral insulin‑producing BRIN‑BD11 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulur, Nurdan; Crutzen, Raphael; Malaisse, Willy J; Sener, Abdullah; Beauwens, Renaud; Golstein, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) has been hypothesized to play a role in insulin secretion. The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between adenosine 3',5'‑cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), volume‑regulated anion channels (VRACs) and the electrogenic sodium bicarbonate (Na+‑HCO3‑) cotransporter, NBCe1, in the regulation of nutrient‑ and hypotonicity‑induced insulin release from rat pancreatic islets and tumoral insulin‑producing BRIN‑BD11 cells. In the islets, 5‑nitro‑2‑(3‑phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB) and 5‑chloro‑2‑hydroxy‑3‑(thiophene‑2‑carbonyl)indole‑1‑carboxamide (tenidap) reduced glucose‑stimulated insulin release, however, only NPPB suppressed the enhancing action of cAMP analogs upon such a release. Insulin output from the BRIN‑BD11 cells was stimulated by 2‑ketoisocaproate (KIC) or extracellular hypoosmolarity. cAMP analogs and 3‑isobutyl‑1‑methylxanthine increased the insulin output recorded in the isotonic medium to a greater relative extent than that in the hypotonic medium. The secretory response to KIC or hypotonicity was inhibited by NPPB or tenidap, which both also opposed the enhancing action of cAMP analogs. Inhibitors of mitogen‑activated protein (MAP) kinase decreased insulin output in isotonic and hypotonic media. The inhibitor of sAC, 2‑hydroxyestriol, caused only a modest inhibition of insulin release, whether in the isotonic or hypotonic medium, even when tested at a concentration of 100 µM. The omission of NaHCO3 markedly decreased the secretory response to KIC or extracellular hypotonicity. The omission of Na+ suppressed the secretory response to extracellular hypotonicity. The observations of the present study do not support the hypothesis of a major role for sAC in the regulation of insulin release.

  9. Melanocyte response to gravitational stress: an overview with a focus on the role of cyclic nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Eiermann, Peter; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    Human melanocytes are responsible for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin. A well known modulator of melanogenesis is the second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophos-phate (cAMP). It has also been reported that the nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) pathway is involved in UVB-induced melanogenesis. Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals during oxidative stress, but it may additionally act as a photosensitizer that generates active oxygen species upon UV radiation, which may initiate hypopigmentary disorders (e.g., vitiligo) as well as UV-induced oncogene cell transformation. Melanoma, a deadly skin cancer which arises from transformed melanocytes, is characterized by a resistance to chemotherapy. In our studies we were able to show that hu-man melanocytic cells differentially respond to gravitational stress. Hypergravity (up to 5 g for 24 h) stimulated cGMP efflux in cultured human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cells, but not in metastatic phenotypes under the conditions of limited degradation [e.g., in the presence of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors] or stimulated synthesis of cGMP [e.g., by NO donors, but not natriuretic peptides], whereas cellular proliferation and morphology were not altered. Interestingly, long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated an increase in both intra-cellular as well as extracellular cAMP levels as well as melanogenesis in pigmented melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cells. As some cAMP-PDEs are regulated by cGMP, it seems that the hypergravity-induced alteration of melanocyte pigmentation could be a result of a cross-talk between these two cyclic nucleotides. Hypergravity induced further an increase in the mRNA and protein levels of the selective cGMP and cAMP exporters, the multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) 4 and 5 -but not 8 -, whereas simulated microgravity (up to 1.21x10-2 g for 24 h) -provided by a fast-rotating clinostat

  10. HeLa human cervical cancer cell migration is inhibited by treatment with dibutyryl-cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jiyoung; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates both protein kinase A (PKA) and guanine-nucleotide exchange factor exchange protein directly activated by CAMP (EPAC)-mediated Ras-related Protein1 (RAP1) GTPase that regulates various cellular functions including cell migration. Herein, we investigated whether cAMP-mediated PKA and EPAC1/RAP1 pathways differentially control HeLa cervical cancer cell migration. Although HeLa cell migration was reduced by dibutyryl-cAMP, we observed an increase in cAMP/PKA, cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase, and RAC1-GTPase. HeLa cell migration and RAC1-GTPase were increased by treatment with 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cAMP analogue to activate EPAC-specific signaling pathways. When HeLa cells were treated with H-89, a PKA inhibitor, cell migration was enhanced but RAC1-GTPase was inhibited. In addition, cell migration induced by dibutyryl-cAMP was reversed but the activity of Rac1-GTPase was inhibited by H-89 treatment. Taken together, these data demonstrate that cAMP/PKA and cAMP/EPAC1/RAP1-GTPase might inversely control cervical cancer cell migration, although both signaling pathways may up-regulate RAC1-GTPase. It also suggests that cAMP-mediated cancer cell migration was independent of RAC1-GTPase activation.

  11. Role of cAMP in the reactivation of demembranated ram spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Agustin, J T; Witman, G B

    1994-01-01

    Ejaculated ram sperm were demembranated with Triton X-100, separated from the detergent-soluble matrix, and reactivated [San Agustin and Witman (1993): Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 24:264-273]. The percent motility of models prepared from freshly washed sperm was comparable to that of the washed sample before demembranation, regardless of whether cAMP was included in the reactivation medium. However, demembranated models derived from aging or metabolically inhibited sperm exhibited a lower percent reactivation and required cAMP to attain the level of motility of freshly washed sperm. Cyclic AMP was approximately 100 times more effective than cGMP. The requirement for cAMP could be bypassed by addition of porcine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunit to the reactivation medium, demonstrating that cAMP was acting via PKA. The cAMP stimulation of reactivation was not affected by inclusion of the PKA inhibitor PKI(5-24) in the reactivation medium, but was decreased when the models were preincubated with PKI(5-24) prior to reactivation. The cytosol-free models retained > 90% of the sperm PKA activity; therefore, the PKA appears to be anchored to internal sperm structures. This PKA could not be extracted by cAMP or Triton X-100 alone, but only by cAMP and Triton X-100 in combination. We conclude that cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation is critical for sperm motility, but that the essential protein phosphate sites turn over slowly under our reactivation conditions, so that the cAMP requirement is apparent only in models prepared from sperm having a low internal ATP or cAMP content. Interestingly, reactivation was rapidly blocked by the peptide arg-lys-arg-ala-arg-lys-glu, which has been reported to be a selective inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

  12. Kinetics and concentration dependency of cAMP-induced desensitization of a subpopulation of surface cAMP receptors in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1987-11-17

    Extracellular cAMP induces the rapid activation of guanylate cyclase, which adapts within 10 s to constant cAMP concentrations. A new response can be induced either by a higher cAMP concentration or by the same cAMP concentration at some time (t/sub 1/2/ = 90 s) after removal of the previous stimulus. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase is supposed to be mediated by a subpopulation of cell surface cAMP receptors (B-sites). These sites can exist in three states, B/sup F/, B/sup S/, and B/sup SS/, which interconvert in a cAMP and guanine nucleotide dependent manner. It has been proposed that the transition of B/sup S/ to B/sup SS/ represents the activation of a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein. Binding of (/sup 3/H)cAMP to these sites was measured after a short preincubation with an identical concentration of nonradioacative cAMP. (/sup 3/H)cAMP could still bind to B/sup F/ and B/sup S/, but not to B/sup SS/, indicating that the transition of B/sup S/ to B/sup SS/ is blocked by the preincubation with cAMP. This blockade was rapid and showed first-order kinetics with t/sub 1/2/ = 4 s. A half-maximal blockade was induced by 0.7 nM cAMP; at this concentration on 5% of the B-sites are occupied with cAMP. The blockade of the transition of B/sup S/ to B/sup SS/ was released by two conditions: (i) When the concentration of cAMP was increased, the blockade was released within a few seconds. (ii) When cAMP was removed, the blockade was released slowly with t/sub 1/2/ = 90 s. Finally, cAMP did not induce the blockade under conditions where guanylate cyclase did not adapt, i.e., at 0/sup 0/C and in cells starved for 2 h or less. These results suggest that the interaction of cAMP with the B-sites induces a rapid and reversible blockade of the terminal step in the generation of an active G-protein and that this blockade could be the molecular basis of adaptation of guanylate cyclase.

  13. Schistosoma mansoni c-AMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA): A Potential New Drug Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-07

    chloroadenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate in breast cancer patients and xenograft bearing mice. Ann Oncol 7: 291-296. 129. Tortora G, Ciardiello F, Pepe S...cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases by using cyclic nucleotide analogs. Eur J Biochem 181: 19-31. 47. Yokozaki H, Tortora G, Pepe S, Maronde E...181: 19-31. 150 28. Ally S, Tortora G, Clair T, Grieco D, Merlo G, et al. (1988) Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site

  14. Effects of plant extract neferine on cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels in rabbit corpus cavernosum in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Ji-Hong Liu; Tao Wang; Heng-Jun Xiao; Chun-Ping Yin; Jun Yang

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To further investigate the relaxation mechanism of neferine (Nef), a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid extracted (isolated) from the green seed embryo of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn in China, on rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue in vitro. Methods: The effects of Nef on the concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in isolated and incubated rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue were re-corded using125Ⅰ radioimmunoassay. Results: The basal concentration of cAMP in corpus cavernosum tissue was 5.67±0.97 pmol/mg. Nef increased the cAMP concentration in a dose-dependent manner (P 0.05). The accumulation of cAMP induced by prostaglandin E1(PGE1, a stimulator of cAMP production) was also augmented by Nef in a dose-dependent manner (P 0.05). Also,sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a stimulator of cGMP production)-induced cGMP production was not enhanced by Nef (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Nef, with its relaxation mechanism, can enhance the concentration of cAMP in rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue, probably by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity.

  15. Dynamics of β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling and morphological changes in cultured astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardjan, Nina; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The morphology of astrocytes, likely regulated by cAMP, determines the structural association between astrocytes and the synapse, consequently modulating synaptic function. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-AR), which increase cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i ), may affect cell morphology. However, the real-time dynamics of β-AR-mediated cAMP signaling in single live astrocytes and its effect on cell morphology have not been studied. We used the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensor Epac1-camps to study time-dependent changes in [cAMP]i ; morphological changes in primary rat astrocytes were monitored by real-time confocal microscopy. Stimulation of β-AR by adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline, a specific agonist of β-AR, rapidly increased [cAMP]i (∼15 s). The FRET signal response, mediated via β-AR, was faster than in the presence of forskolin (twofold) and dibutyryl-cAMP (>35-fold), which directly activate adenylyl cyclase and Epac1-camps, respectively, likely due to slow entry of these agents into the cytosol. Oscillations in [cAMP]i have not been recorded, indicating that cAMP-dependent processes operate in a slow time domain. Most Epac1-camps expressing astrocytes revealed a morphological change upon β-AR activation and attained a stellate morphology within 1 h. The morphological changes exhibited a bell-shaped dependency on [cAMP]i . The 5-10% decrease in cell cross-sectional area and the 30-50% increase in cell perimeter are likely due to withdrawal of the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and the appearance of protrusions on the surface of astrocytes. Because astrocyte processes ensheath neurons, β-AR/cAMP-mediated morphological changes can modify the geometry of the extracellular space, affecting synaptic, neuronal, and astrocyte functions in health and disease.

  16. Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscarsson Jan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. Results The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 μm, AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05–0.2 μm were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. Conclusion Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  17. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

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    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  18. A cell-autonomous molecular cascade initiated by AMP-activated protein kinase represses steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Houssein S; Bergeron, Francis; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2014-12-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production.

  19. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

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    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  20. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  1. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Li

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator, PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  2. Sleutelmag en amp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Rossouw

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available As die Heidelbergse Kategismus (Sondag 31 handel oor die sleutels van die Koninkryk, dan word die betrokkenheid van die ampte slegs per implikasie veronderstel. Meer eksplisiet word die amp en sleutelmag in die Nederlandse Geloofsbelydenis gekoppel; “ons glo dat hierdie ware kerk ooreenkomstig die geestelike bestuurswyse wat ons Here ons in sy Woord geleer het, geregeer moet word... hulle (moet sorg dra dat die ware godsdiens onderhou (word, die ware leer orals versprei, die oortreders op geestelike wyse vermaan en in toom gehou (word... (N.G.B. art. 30 en: “Ons glo verder dat die regeerders van die kerk, al is dit nuttig en goed om onder mekaar ’n bepaalde orde tot instandhouding van die liggaam van die kerk in te stel en te handhaaf, tog noukeurig moet oppas om nie af te wyk van wat Christus, ons enigste Meester, vir ons ingestel het nie... Ons aanvaar derhalwe slegs wat kan dien om eendrag en eenheid te bewaar en te bevorder, en om alles in gehoorsaamheid van God te onderhou. Daarvoor is nodig die ban en alles wat daarmee saamhang, toegepas ooreenkomstig die Woord van God” (N.G.B. art. 32.

  3. A reduced mechanical model for cAMP-modulated gating in HCN channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißgraeber, Stephanie; Saponaro, Andrea; Thiel, Gerhard; Hamacher, Kay

    2017-01-01

    We developed an in silico mechanical model to analyze the process of cAMP-induced conformational modulations in hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which conduct cations across the membrane of mammalian heart and brain cells. The structural analysis reveals a quaternary twist in the cytosolic parts of the four subunits in the channel tetramer. This motion augments the intrinsic dynamics of the very same protein structure. The pronounced differences between the cAMP bound and unbound form include a mutual interaction between the C-linker of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) and the linker between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domain of the channel. This allows a mechanistic annotation of the twisting motion in relation to the allosteric modulation of voltage-dependent gating of this channel by cAMP. PMID:28074902

  4. A reduced mechanical model for cAMP-modulated gating in HCN channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißgraeber, Stephanie; Saponaro, Andrea; Thiel, Gerhard; Hamacher, Kay

    2017-01-01

    We developed an in silico mechanical model to analyze the process of cAMP-induced conformational modulations in hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which conduct cations across the membrane of mammalian heart and brain cells. The structural analysis reveals a quaternary twist in the cytosolic parts of the four subunits in the channel tetramer. This motion augments the intrinsic dynamics of the very same protein structure. The pronounced differences between the cAMP bound and unbound form include a mutual interaction between the C-linker of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) and the linker between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domain of the channel. This allows a mechanistic annotation of the twisting motion in relation to the allosteric modulation of voltage-dependent gating of this channel by cAMP.

  5. Dual role of cAMP and involvement of both G-proteins and ras in regulation of ERK2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knetsch, M L; Epskamp, S J; Schenk, P W; Wang, Y; Segall, J E; Snaar-Jagalska, B E

    1996-07-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum expresses two Extracellular signal Regulated Kinases, ERK1 and ERK2, which are involved in growth, multicellular development and regulation of adenylyl cyclase. Binding of extracellular cAMP to cAMP receptor 1, a G-protein coupled cell surface receptor, transiently stimulates phosphorylation, activation and nuclear translocation of ERK2. Activation of ERK2 by cAMP is dependent on heterotrimeric G-proteins, since activation of ERK2 is absent in cells lacking the Galpha4 subunit. The small G-protein rasD also activates ERK2. In cells overexpressing a mutated, constitutively active rasD, ERK2 activity is elevated prior to cAMP stimulation. Intracellular cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are essential for adaptation of the ERK2 response. This report shows that multiple signalling pathways are involved in regulation of ERK2 activity in D.discoideum.

  6. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  7. [cAMP analogue 8-CPT-cAMP inducing differentiation in the M2b subtype of acute myeloid leukemia cell line Kasumi-1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qi; Hu, Jun-Pei; Jia, Pei-Min; Wang, Zhen-Yi; Tong, Jian-Hua

    2008-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the possible effects of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-CPT-cAMP) on the M(2b) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M(2b)) cells. AML-M(2b) is characterized by the non-random chromosome translocation t (8; 21) (q22; q22), through which AML1 (acute myeloid leukemia 1) gene on chromosome 21 is fused with ETO (eight twenty-one) gene on chromosome 8, coding correspondent AML1-ETO fusion protein, which plays a crucial role in the leukemogenesis of AML-M(2b). The AML-M(2b) cell line Kasumi-1 cells were used as an in vitro model. The influences of 8-CPT-cAMP on the proliferation and differentiation of Kasumi-1 cells were evaluated according to cellular morphology, changes in cell surface antigen and cell cycle, as well as nitroblue-tetrazolium (NBT) assay. Meanwhile, semi-quantity RT-PCR and Western blot assay were used to detect the degradation of AML1-ETO fusion protein in Kasumi-1 cells before and after the treatment. The results showed that 8-CPT-cAMP (200 micromol/L) could significantly inhibit cell growth and induce differentiation of Kasumi-1 cells. However, it must be pointed out that 8-CPT-cAMP-induced differentiation in Kasumi-1 is not a typical terminal differentiation. Furthermore, 8-CPT-cAMP exerted little influence on the expression of AML1-ETO fusion gene and its product in Kasumi-1 cells. In conclusion, the 8-CPT-cAMP induced differentiation in Kasumi-1 cells. This results may provide experimental and theoretical basis for the breakthrough of differentiation-induced therapy extended to another leukemia.

  8. The role of type 4 phosphodiesterases in generating microdomains of cAMP: large scale stochastic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo F Oliveira

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP and its main effector Protein Kinase A (PKA are critical for several aspects of neuronal function including synaptic plasticity. Specificity of synaptic plasticity requires that cAMP activates PKA in a highly localized manner despite the speed with which cAMP diffuses. Two mechanisms have been proposed to produce localized elevations in cAMP, known as microdomains: impeded diffusion, and high phosphodiesterase (PDE activity. This paper investigates the mechanism of localized cAMP signaling using a computational model of the biochemical network in the HEK293 cell, which is a subset of pathways involved in PKA-dependent synaptic plasticity. This biochemical network includes cAMP production, PKA activation, and cAMP degradation by PDE activity. The model is implemented in NeuroRD: novel, computationally efficient, stochastic reaction-diffusion software, and is constrained by intracellular cAMP dynamics that were determined experimentally by real-time imaging using an Epac-based FRET sensor (H30. The model reproduces the high concentration cAMP microdomain in the submembrane region, distinct from the lower concentration of cAMP in the cytosol. Simulations further demonstrate that generation of the cAMP microdomain requires a pool of PDE4D anchored in the cytosol and also requires PKA-mediated phosphorylation of PDE4D which increases its activity. The microdomain does not require impeded diffusion of cAMP, confirming that barriers are not required for microdomains. The simulations reported here further demonstrate the utility of the new stochastic reaction-diffusion algorithm for exploring signaling pathways in spatially complex structures such as neurons.

  9. PKA and Epac activation mediates cAMP-induced vasorelaxation by increasing endothelial NO production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Verónica; Cuíñas, Andrea; Elíes, Jacobo; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Vascular relaxation induced by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is both endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent, although the underlying signaling pathways are not fully understood. Aiming to uncover potential mechanisms, we performed contraction-relaxation experiments on endothelium-denuded and intact rat aorta rings and measured NO levels in isolated human endothelial cells using single cell fluorescence imaging. The vasorelaxant effect of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, was decreased after selective inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), a cAMP-activated kinase, or L-NAME, an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, only in intact aortic rings. Both selective activation of PKA with 6-Bnz-cAMP and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) with 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP significantly relaxed phenylephrine-induced contractions. The vasorelaxant effect of the Epac activator, but not that of the PKA activator, was reduced by endothelium removal. Forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (a cAMP analogue), 6-Bnz-cAMP and 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP increased NO levels in endothelial cells and the forskolin effect was significantly inhibited by inactivation of both Epac and PKA, and eNOS inhibition. Our results indicate that the endothelium-dependent component of forskolin/cAMP-induced vasorelaxation is partially mediated by an increase in endothelial NO release due to an enhanced eNOS activity through PKA and Epac activation in endothelial cells.

  10. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  11. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  12. Atrazine Acts as an Endocrine Disrupter by Inhibiting cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2014-01-01

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. PMID:23022511

  13. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or the flu eating certain foods, such as chocolate or cheese, or additives such as caffeine, nitrites— ... people with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition During the prodrome and vomiting phases of cyclic ...

  14. Superextensions of cyclic semigroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Gavrylkiv

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Given a cyclic semigroup $S$ we study right and left zeros,singleton left ideals, the minimal ideal, left cancelable andright cancelable elements of superextensions $lambda(S$ andcharacterize cyclic semigroups whose superextensions arecommutative.

  15. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  16. Cyclic Railway Timetable Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W.P. Peeters (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCyclic Railway Timetable Optimization describes mathematical models and solution methods for constructing high quality cyclic railway timetables. In a cyclic timetable, a train for a certain destination leaves a certain station at the same time every cycle time, say every half an hour,

  17. The catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabowol, K T; Fink, J S; Gilman, M Z; Walsh, D A; Goodman, R H; Feramisco, J R

    1988-11-03

    Transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genes by cyclic AMP requires a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A kinase). Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the holoenzyme of the A kinase induces transcription. The regulatory subunits of the A kinase, which bind cAMP and DNA, and have amino-acid homology with the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein could directly stimulate gene expression. Alternatively, phosphorylation by the catalytic subunits could induce transcription by activating proteins involved in gene transcription. To distinguish between these models, we microinjected purified preparations of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of A kinase into tissue culture cells and monitored expression of a stably integrated fusion gene containing a cAMP-responsive human promoter fused to a bacterial reporter gene, or of the endogenous c-fos gene. The catalytic subunit stimulated expression of these genes, whereas the regulatory subunit did not. These results indicate that the catalytic subunit of A kinase is sufficient to induce expression of two cAMP-responsive genes, without increasing levels of cAMP.

  18. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  19. 腺苷酸活化蛋白激酶通过抑制 mTOR 信号通路缓解糖尿病大鼠肾脏细胞外基质沉积%AMP-activated Protein Kinase Alleviates the Accumulation of Renal Extracellular Matrix in Diabetic Rats through Inhibiting mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗霞; 邓玲艳; 许文娟; 程黎明

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the protective effect of adenosine 5’‐monophosphate(AMP)‐activated protein kinase (AMPK)on the kidneys of diabetic rats and the involved mechanism after recombinant adeno‐associated viruses(rAAVs)encoding constitutively active AMPK‐CA(AMPKα1312 ,T172 D) were injected into the diabetic rat models (via tail veins)which were established by using streptozocin(STZ)as well as diets enriched in both glucose and fat.Methods A total of 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control(n= 8)and experimental groups(n= 16).Rats in the experimental group were fed on high‐glucose and high‐fat diets and were injected with STZ to induce diabetes mellitus (DM). They were allocated to two subgroups randomly after 8 weeks.Diabetic rats in the two subgroups were injected with rAAV2 expressing AMPK‐CA gene(CA subgroup)or GFP gene(GFP subgroup ,as controls)through tail veins.Rats were killed and the kidneys removed after another 12 weeks. PAS staining was performed to evaluate the renal pathological changes. The expression of extracellular matrix mRNA was detected by Real‐time PCR and protein levels of collagen Ⅳ α1(Col4α1) ,AMPK ,p‐AMPK ,phospho‐acetyl‐CoA carboxylase (p‐ACC) ,mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) ,p‐mTOR and its downstream targets were measured by Western blot.Results The expressions of p‐AMPK and p‐ACC proteins were significantly declined in GFP subgroup compared with normal control group. rAAV2‐AMPK‐CA treatment could elevate p‐ACC expression and improve the pathological changes of diabetic nephropathy(kidney weight/body weight ,mean glomerular volume ,mesangial matrix area)in comparison with GFP subgroup. Furthermore ,rAAV2‐AMPK‐CA reversed the mRNA expressions of FN ,Col4α1 and Col4α5 and protein levels of Col4α1 ,p‐mTOR ,p‐eEF2K and p‐4EBP1 which were increased in the GFP group.Conclusion rAAV2‐AMPK‐CA gene treatment could protect the kidney in diabetic rats by increasing the

  20. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  1. A-raf and B-raf are dispensable for normal endochondral bone development, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide suppresses extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation in hypertrophic chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provot, Sylvain; Nachtrab, Gregory; Paruch, Jennifer; Chen, Adele Pin; Silva, Alcino; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and the parathyroid hormone-PTHrP receptor increase chondrocyte proliferation and delay chondrocyte maturation in endochondral bone development at least partly through cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signaling pathways. Because data suggest that the ability of cAMP to stimulate cell proliferation involves the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase B-Raf, we hypothesized that B-Raf might mediate the proliferative action of PTHrP in chondrocytes. Though B-Raf is expressed in proliferative chondrocytes, its conditional removal from cartilage did not affect chondrocyte proliferation and maturation or PTHrP-induced chondrocyte proliferation and PTHrP-delayed maturation. Similar results were obtained by conditionally removing B-Raf from osteoblasts. Because A-raf and B-raf are expressed similarly in cartilage, we speculated that they may fulfill redundant functions in this tissue. Surprisingly, mice with chondrocytes deficient in both A-Raf and B-Raf exhibited normal endochondral bone development. Activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected primarily in hypertrophic chondrocytes, where C-raf is expressed, and the suppression of ERK activation in these cells by PTHrP or a MEK inhibitor coincided with a delay in chondrocyte maturation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that B-Raf and A-Raf are dispensable for endochondral bone development and they indicate that the main role of ERK in cartilage is to stimulate not cell proliferation, but rather chondrocyte maturation.

  2. Dibutyryl c-AMP as an inducer of sporidia formation: Biochemical and antigenic changes during morphological differentiation of Karnal bunt (Tilletia indica) pathogen in axenic culture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar; Kaushlendra Tripathi; Manish Rana; Shalini Purwar; G K Garg

    2004-03-01

    Effect of dibutyryl adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (dbc-AMP), an analogue of c-AMP, was investigated on growth and morphological differentiation of Tilletia indica. Exponential growth was observed up to 21 days in both presence and absence of dbc-AMP; however, increasing concentration of dbc-AMP was deleterious to mycelial growth in liquid culture. A slow increase of mycelial biomass up to 21 days and decline at 30 days in the presence of 2.5 mM dbc-AMP was observed, therefore, this concentration was chosen in subsequent investigations. The inhibitory influence of dbc-AMP was further substantiated by decrease in soluble protein. The fungus on exposure to dbc-AMP experienced morphological differentiation from vegetative mycelial phase to sporogenous mycelial phase, and was induced to produce filiform sporidia. Use of quantitative ELISA further suggested that sporidia formation took more than 21 days in the presence of dbc-AMP. Variations of proteins during different stages of T. indica grown in the presence and absence of dbc-AMP suggested the expression of stage-specific proteins or differential expression of proteins induced by dbc-AMP. The changes in expression of cell surface antigens as evidenced from decrease and increase binding of anti-mycelial and anti-sporidial anti-bodies in dbc-AMP treated culture by ELISA was further interpreted on the basis of morphological differentiation from mycelial to sporidial phase.

  3. Genetically-encoded yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator with an expanded dynamic range for dual-color imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Odaka

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous second messenger, which mediates many cellular responses mainly initiated by activation of cell surface receptors. Various Förster resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric cAMP indicators have been created for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of cAMP at the single-cell level. However, single fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicators have been poorly developed, with improvement required for dynamic range and brightness. Based on our previous yellow fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicator, Flamindo, we developed an improved yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator named Flamindo2. Flamindo2 has a 2-fold expanded dynamic range and 8-fold increased brightness compared with Flamindo by optimization of linker peptides in the vicinity of the chromophore. We found that fluorescence intensity of Flamindo2 was decreased to 25% in response to cAMP. Live-cell cAMP imaging of the cytosol and nucleus in COS7 cells using Flamindo2 and nlsFlamindo2, respectively, showed that forskolin elevated cAMP levels in each compartment with different kinetics. Furthermore, dual-color imaging of cAMP and Ca2+ with Flamindo2 and a red fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, R-GECO, showed that cAMP and Ca2+ elevation were induced by noradrenaline in single HeLa cells. Our study shows that Flamindo2, which is feasible for multi-color imaging with other intracellular signaling molecules, is useful and is an alternative tool for live-cell imaging of intracellular cAMP dynamics.

  4. Genetically-Encoded Yellow Fluorescent cAMP Indicator with an Expanded Dynamic Range for Dual-Color Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Haruki; Arai, Satoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous second messenger, which mediates many cellular responses mainly initiated by activation of cell surface receptors. Various Förster resonance energy transfer-based ratiometric cAMP indicators have been created for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of cAMP at the single-cell level. However, single fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicators have been poorly developed, with improvement required for dynamic range and brightness. Based on our previous yellow fluorescent protein-based cAMP indicator, Flamindo, we developed an improved yellow fluorescent cAMP indicator named Flamindo2. Flamindo2 has a 2-fold expanded dynamic range and 8-fold increased brightness compared with Flamindo by optimization of linker peptides in the vicinity of the chromophore. We found that fluorescence intensity of Flamindo2 was decreased to 25% in response to cAMP. Live-cell cAMP imaging of the cytosol and nucleus in COS7 cells using Flamindo2 and nlsFlamindo2, respectively, showed that forskolin elevated cAMP levels in each compartment with different kinetics. Furthermore, dual-color imaging of cAMP and Ca2+ with Flamindo2 and a red fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, R-GECO, showed that cAMP and Ca2+ elevation were induced by noradrenaline in single HeLa cells. Our study shows that Flamindo2, which is feasible for multi-color imaging with other intracellular signaling molecules, is useful and is an alternative tool for live-cell imaging of intracellular cAMP dynamics. PMID:24959857

  5. Evidence against mediation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the bud-inducing effect of cytokinins in moss protonemata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scheneider

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects Oif adenosdne-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP, N6,O2-dibuityryl adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (DBcAMP, caffeine and theophylline on the bud-inducing activity of cytokinin in the protonema of two moss species, Ceratodon purpureus and Funaria hygrometrica were examined. The sub-stances have been found ineffective as gametophore bud inducers. Some synergism between cytokinin and cAMP or DBcAMP was observed with relation to the buds' growth, but this effect is nonspecific since it can be obtained with 5'-AMP or 5'-GMiP as well, The results seem to exclude the possibility of an involvement of cAMP as a second messenger in the mechanism of cytokinin action on morphogenetic processes in moss protonemata.

  6. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  7. Involvement of G proteins and cAMP in the production of chitinolytic enzymes by Trichoderma harzianum Envolvimento de proteínas G e cAMP na produção de enzimas quitinolíticas por Trichoderma harzianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre A.P. Firmino

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of G protein modulators and cyclic AMP (cAMP on N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGase production was investigated during 84 h of growth of a Trichoderma harzianum strain in chitin-containing medium. Caffeine (5 mM, N6--2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate sodium salt (dBcAMP (1 mM and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX (2 mM decreased extracellular NAGase activity by 80%, 77% and 37%, respectively. AlCl3/KF (100 µM/10 mM and 200 µM/ 20 mM decreased the activity by 85% and 95%, respectively. Cholera (10 µ/mL and pertussis (20 µ/mL toxins also affected NAGase activity, causing a decrease of approximately 75%. Upon all treatments, protein bands of approximately 73 kDa, 68 kDa and 45 kDa had their signals diminished whilst a 50 kDa band was enhanced only by treatment with cholera and pertussis toxins. N-terminal sequencing analysis identified the 73 kDa and 68 kDa proteins as being T. harzianum NAGase in two different truncated forms whereas the 45 kDa band comprised a T. harzianum endochitinase. The 50 kDa protein showed sequence similarity to Coriolus vesicolor cellobiohydrolase. The above results suggest that a signaling pathway comprising G-proteins, adenylate cyclase and cAMP may be involved in the synthesis of T. harzianum chitinases.O efeito de cAMP e de moduladores de proteínas G sobre a produção de N-acetilglicosaminidase (NAGase foi investigado durante o crescimento de Trichoderma harzianum em meio contendo quitina. Cafeína (5 mM, dBcAMP (1mM e IBMX (2 mM provocaram diminuições na atividade extracelular de NAGase em 80%, 77% e 37%, respectivamente. Por outro lado, a presença de AlCl3/KF nas concentrações de 100 µM/10 mM e 200 µM/ 20 mM causou decréscimo na atividade em 85% e 95%, respectivamente. A toxina do cólera (10 µ/mL e a toxina pertussis (20 µ/mL também afetaram a atividade de NAGase, causando um decréscimo de aproximadamente 75%. Análises eletroforéticas mostraram que todos os tratamentos

  8. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, Ariel; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations -- cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measu...

  9. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucka, Marek [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Stojilkovic, Stanko S. [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kovacevic, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.kovacevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  10. Influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-HongLIU; YangLI; Zheng-GuoCAO; Zhang-QunYE

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To study the influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro. Methods: Semen samples, aseptically obtained by masturbation and prepared by swim-up technique from 20 fertile men, were incubated with different concenlrations of dbcAMP and forskolin at 37℃. Measurements were carried out after l0 min, 20 min, 30 min and 60 min incubation. Motility parameters were estimated by using an automatic analyzing system. Results: Treatment with dbcAMP or forskolin resulted in a significant increase in sperm motility and progressive motility. The larger the concenlrations of dbcAMP or forskolin,the greater the effect appeared. The straight linear velocity and curvilinear velocity were not affected by both agents.Conclusion: dbcAMP and forskolin increase the motility and progressive motility of human sperm in vitro. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 113-115)

  11. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  12. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mandach, U; Gubler, H P; Engel, G; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-02-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists.

  13. Polarized Th1 and Th2 cells are less responsive to negative feedback by receptors coupled to the AC/cAMP system compared to freshly isolated T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Irene H; Vellenga, Edo; Borger, Peter; Postma, Dirkje S; Monchy, Jan G R de; Kauffman, Henk F

    2003-01-01

    1 The adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) system is known to negatively regulate transcriptional activity of T cells, thereby possibly modulating T-cell-mediated responses at the sites of inflammation. Effects of cAMP have been widely studied in freshly isolated T cells and T

  14. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon I. Lall-Ramnarine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonylamide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners.

  15. Analysis of substrate specificity and kinetics of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases with N'-methylanthraniloyl-substituted purine and pyrimidine 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides by fluorescence spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reinecke

    Full Text Available As second messengers, the cyclic purine nucleotides adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP play an essential role in intracellular signaling. Recent data suggest that the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides cytidine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cCMP and uridine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cUMP also act as second messengers. Hydrolysis by phosphodiesterases (PDEs is the most important degradation mechanism for cAMP and cGMP. Elimination of cUMP and cCMP is not completely understood, though. We have shown that human PDEs hydrolyze not only cAMP and cGMP but also cyclic pyrimidine nucleotides, indicating that these enzymes may be important for termination of cCMP- and cUMP effects as well. However, these findings were acquired using a rather expensive HPLC/mass spectrometry assay, the technical requirements of which are available only to few laboratories. N'-Methylanthraniloyl-(MANT-labeled nucleotides are endogenously fluorescent and suitable tools to study diverse protein/nucleotide interactions. In the present study, we report the synthesis of new MANT-substituted cyclic purine- and pyrimidine nucleotides that are appropriate to analyze substrate specificity and kinetics of PDEs with more moderate technical requirements. MANT-labeled nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates (MANT-cNMPs are shown to be substrates of various human PDEs and to undergo a significant change in fluorescence upon cleavage, thus allowing direct, quantitative and continuous determination of hydrolysis via fluorescence detection. As substrates of several PDEs, MANT-cNMPs show similar kinetics to native nucleotides, with some exceptions. Finally, they are shown to be also appropriate tools for PDE inhibitor studies.

  16. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  17. An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Luo, Shukun; Pensinger, Daniel; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide cyclic di-3′,5′- adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) was recently identified as an essential and widespread second messenger in bacterial signaling. Among c-di-AMP–producing bacteria, altered nucleotide levels result in several physiological defects and attenuated virulence. Thus, a detailed molecular understanding of c-di-AMP metabolism is of both fundamental and practical interest. Currently, c-di-AMP degradation is recognized solely among DHH-DHHA1 domain-containing phosphodiesterases. Using chemical proteomics, we identified the Listeria monocytogenes protein PgpH as a molecular target of c-di-AMP. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that the PgpH His-Asp (HD) domain bound c-di-AMP with high affinity and specifically hydrolyzed this nucleotide to 5′-pApA. PgpH hydrolysis activity was inhibited by ppGpp, indicating a cross-talk between c-di-AMP signaling and the stringent response. Genetic analyses supported coordinated regulation of c-di-AMP levels in and out of the host. Intriguingly, a L. monocytogenes mutant that lacks c-di-AMP phosphodiesterases exhibited elevated c-di-AMP levels, hyperinduced a host type-I IFN response, and was significantly attenuated for infection. Furthermore, PgpH homologs, which belong to the 7TMR-HD family, are widespread among hundreds of c-di-AMP synthesizing microorganisms. Thus, PgpH represents a broadly conserved class of c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with possibly other physiological functions in this crucial signaling network. PMID:25583510

  18. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available In Schwann cells (SCs, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC, on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  19. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    In Schwann cells (SCs), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical) cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  20. 坐骨神经结扎对大鼠背根神经节和脊髓背角神经元磷酸化环酸腺苷反应元件结合蛋白表达的影响%Increased phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the dorsal root ganglia and superficial dorsal hornneurons following chronic constriction injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永兴; 祝继洪; 宋学军; 张励才; 曾因明

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve of rats could produce alterations in the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding(CREB) protein in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and superficial dorsal horn neurons of the spinal cord. Methods Chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve was employed as a model of neuropathic pain. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Naive, Sham, CCI 2w(received CCI for 2 weeks) and CCI 4w(received CCI for 4 weeks)groups. Hind paw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli and withdrawal latency to thermal stimuli were used to determine the mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Then all the rats were deeply anesthetized and perfused intracardially with paraformaldehyde. The fixed L4-5 spinal cord and the L5 DRG ipsilateral to CCI were harvested for fixation. The pCREB-immunoreactive(pCREB-IR) cells in both DRG and superficial dorsal horn neurons were quantified for analysis using immunohistochemistry methods. Results On the 14th day after sciatic nerve injury, all the rats exhibited significant mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. The mechanical withdrawal thresholds to yon Frey filament from CCI 2w group decreased significantly compared to both baseline values and those of Sham group( P < 0.01); Thermal withdwal latencies from CCI 2w group decreased significantly compared to both baseline values and those of Sham group( P <0.01). Some rats from Sham group also showed mechanical hyperalgesia compared to hoth baseline values and those of Naive group( P < 0.01 ). 28 days after CCI, both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were significantly alleviated, with no statistical significance compared to those of Sham group. On the 14th day after CCI, the number of pCREB-IR cells significantly increased in ipsilateral L5 DRGs and superficial dorsal horns( P <0.01) compared to Sham group. The number of phosphorylated CREB-IR cells in the ipsilateral DRGs

  1. Effect of cAMP on short-circuit current in isolated human ciliary body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning; HU Qian-qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) could activate chloride channels in bovine ciliary body and trigger an increase in the ionic current (short-circuit current,Isc) across the ciliary processes in pigs.The purpose of this study was to investigate how cAMP modulates Isc in isolated human ciliary processes and the possible involvement of chloride transport across the tissue in cAMP-induced Isc change.Methods In an Ussing-type chamber system,the Isc changes induced by the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP and an adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in isolated human ciliary processes were assessed.The involvement of Cl-component in the bath solution was investigated.The effect of Cl-channel (10 μmol/L niflumic acid and 1 mmol/L 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS)),K+ channel (10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA)),or Na+ channel blockers (1 mmol/L amiloride) on 8-bromo-cAMP-induced Isc change was also studied.Results Dose-dependently,8-bromo-cAMP (10 nmol/L-30 μmol/L) or forskolin (10 nmol/L-3 μmol/L) increased Isc across the ciliary processes with an increase in negative potential difference on the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) side of the tissue.Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP was more pronounced when the drug was applied on the NPE side than on the pigmented epithelium side.When the tissue was bathed in low Cl-solutions,the Isc increase was significantly inhibited.Finally,niflumic acid and DIDS,but not TEA or amiloride,significantly prevented the Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP.Conclusions cAMP stimulates stroma-to-aqueous anionic transport in isolated human ciliary processes.Chloride is likely to be among the ions,the transportation of which across the tissue is triggered by cAMP,suggesting the potential role of cAMP in the process of aqueous humor formation in human eyes.

  2. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  3. Affordable Cyclic Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Greg; Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Amend, John R.; Collins, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is an important component of the undergraduate chemical curriculum. Unfortunately, undergraduate students rarely have the opportunity to conduct experiments in cyclic voltammetry owing to the high cost of potentiostats, which are required to control these experiments. By using MicroLab data acquisition interfaces in conjunction…

  4. Salidroside Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Cell Damage Through a cAMP-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Deng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside, a major component of Rhodiola rosea L., has shown various pharmacological functions, including antioxidant effects, but the signal transduction pathway of its antioxidant effects is not very clear. In this study, we found that salidroside could attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced HL-7702 cell damage, inhibit H2O2-induced cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i elevation, scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS and increase 3’-5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP level in a dose-dependent manner, but it couldn’t influence 3’-5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP levels. Therefore, these results indicated that the antioxidant effects of salidroside were associated with down-regulation of [Ca2+]i, ROS occur via a cAMP-dependent pathway.

  5. cAMP signaling in blood platelets - old friends and new players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher eRaslan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherothrombosis, the pathology underlying numerous cardiovascular diseases, is a major cause of death globally. Hyperactive blood platelets play a key role in the atherothrombotic process through the release of inflammatory mediators and formation of thrombi. In healthy blood vessels, excessive platelet activation is restricted by endothelial-derived prostacyclin (PGI2 through cyclic adenosine-5’-monophosphate (cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA-dependent mechanisms. Elevation in intracellular cAMP is associated with the control of a number of distinct platelet functions including actin polymerisation, granule secretion, calcium mobilisation and integrin activation. Unfortunately, in atherosclerotic disease the protective effects of cAMP are compromised, which may contribute to pathological thrombosis. The cAMP signalling network in platelets is highly complex with the presence of multiple isoforms of adenylyl cyclase (AC, PKA and phosphodiesterases (PDE. However, a precise understanding of the relationship between specific AC, PKA and PDE isoforms, and how individual signalling substrates are targeted to control distinct platelet functions is still lacking. In other cells types, compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling has emerged as a key mechanism to allow precise control of specific cell functions. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs play an important role in this spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signalling networks. Evidence of AKAP-mediated compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling in blood platelets has begun to emerge and is providing new insights into the regulation of platelet function. Dissecting the mechanisms that allow cAMP to control excessive platelet activity without preventing effective haemostasis may unleash the possibility of therapeutic targeting of the pathway to control unwanted platelet activity.

  6. Cyclic anamorphic cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Ijjas, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic models of the universe have the advantage of avoiding initial conditions problems related to postulating any sort of beginning in time. To date, the only known viable examples of cyclic models have been ekpyrotic. In this paper, we show that the recently proposed anamorphic scenario can also be made cyclic. The key to the cyclic completion is a classically stable, non-singular bounce. Remarkably, even though the bounce construction was originally developed to connect a period of contraction with a period of expansion both described by Einstein gravity, we show here that it can naturally be modified to connect an ordinary contracting phase described by Einstein gravity with a phase of anamorphic smoothing. The paper will present the basic principles and steps in constructing cyclic anamorphic models.

  7. Ultraviolet light induction of skin carcinoma in the mouse; influence of cAMP modifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajdela, F; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    A short review of pathogenic factors in U.V. light skin carcinogenesis in the mouse is presented. Caffeine and theophylline applied locally during U.V. irradiation caused a 50 percent reduction of skin tumour induction in Swiss mice. These two chemicals are inhibitors of DNA postreplication repair, but they also raise the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase with, as a consequence, a possible slowing down of cellular growth. Control experiments using three different chemicals capable of raising the cAMP level in epidermal cells gave negative results. These experimental data are compatible with our original hypothesis according to which production of skin cancers by U.V. radiation is in same way related to DNA repair which helps the cell to survive but allows or favours the occurrence of errors in cellular DNA.

  8. Involvement of the second messenger cAMP in gravity-signal transduction in physarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Rabien, H.; Ivanova, K.

    The aim of the investigation was to clarify, whether cellular signal processing following graviperception involves second messenger pathways. The test object was a most gravisensitive free-living ameboid cell, the myxomycete (acellular slime mold) Physarum polycephalum. It was demonstrated that the motor response is related to acceleration-dependent changes in the levels of the cellular second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Rotating Physarum plasmodia in the gravity field of the Earth about a horizontal axis increased their cAMP concentration. Depriving the cells for a few days of the acceleration stimulus (near weightlessness in a space experiment on STS-69) slightly lowered plasmodial cAMP levels. Thus, the results provide first indications that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  9. 8-OH-DPAT facilitated memory consolidation and increased hippocampal and cortical cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel-Apolinar, L; Meneses, A

    2004-01-05

    Animals were submitted to an associative learning task named Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping (P/I-A) and treated with selective 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor agonists and antagonists. Next, they were sacrificed, their brains removed, dissected and changes on cortical and hippocampal cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production were determined. Results revealed that, the 8-OH-DPAT treatment facilitated memory consolidation of autoshaping and that effect was blocked completely by WAY100635 and partially by DR4004. WAY100635 or DR4004 alone had no effect on autoshaping. The cAMP results were complex and yielded no clear relationship to the memory results. Thus, cortical and hippocampal increased on cAMP production was observed following administration of the 5-HT(1A/7) agonist 8-OH-DPAT. The memory effect was, completely or partially, reversed by the selective antagonists WAY100635 (5-HT1A) or DR4004 (5-HT7), respectively.

  10. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  11. Stochastic noise and synchronisation during Dictyostelium aggregation make cAMP oscillations robust

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, J

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary The molecular network, which underlies the oscillations in the concentration of adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) during the aggregation phase of starvation-induced development in Dictyostelium discoideum, achieves remarkable levels of robust performance in the face of environmental variations and cellular heterogeneity. However, the reasons for this robustness remain poorly understood. Tools and concepts from the field of control engineering provide powerful methods...

  12. 大麻素受体2激动剂JWH-015对骨癌痛大鼠脊髓背角磷酸化环磷酸腺苷反应元件结合蛋白的影响%The effect of intraperitoneal injection cannabinoid 2 receptor agonist JWH-015 on the expression of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein in spinal dorsal horn in a rat model of bone cancer pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙蓓; 张羽; 冷鑫; 顾小萍; 马正良

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨腹腔注射大麻素受体(cannabinoid receptor,CB)2激动剂对骨癌痛大鼠脊髓背角磷酸化环磷酸腺苷反应元件结合蛋白(phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein,pCREB)表达的影响. 方法 运用随机数字表法将63只雌性SD大鼠分为3组:肿瘤给药组(J组,15只)、肿瘤对照组(D组,24只)和假手术对照组(S组,24只).J组、D组的大鼠左侧胫骨上端骨髓腔被注入5μlWalker256大鼠乳腺癌细胞制备骨癌痛模型;S组则注入等量的生理盐水.在造模后第10天,J组腹腔注射JWH-015(100 μg/500μl),D组、S组注射等量JWH-015溶剂二甲基亚髓砜(dimethylsulfoxide,DMSO).每组大鼠于造模前1d,造模后4、7、10 d,腹腔注射后2、6、24、48、72 h,检测手术侧机械刺激缩足阈值(paw withdrawal mechanicalthreshold,PWMT)和行走痛行为学评分.D组和S组大鼠于造模后4、7d,J组、D组和S组大鼠于造模后10 d及腹腔注射后6、24、72 h,取脊髓腰膨大进行免疫印迹分析. 结果 与S组比较,J组和D组大鼠造模后7 d PWMT开始降低(P<0.05),造模后10 d行走痛行为学评分增加(P<0.05),脊髓背角pCREB表达水平于7、10 d上调(P<0.05).与D组比较,腹腔注射JWH-015后24 h,J组PWMT(8.7±1.6)g显著上升(P<0.05),行走痛行为学评分(1.0±0.6)分和pCREB的表达(0.56±0.10)明显下降(P<0.05). 结论 腹腔注射JWH-015可能通过下调脊髓背角pCREB的表达改善骨癌痛大鼠的痛行为.%Objective To investigate the change of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB) in spinal dorsal horn in a rat model of bone cancer pain,after intraperitoneal injection JWH-015.Methods Sixty-three female SD rats were randomly divided into 3 group:medication administration of JWH-015 group (group J,n=15),medication administration of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) group (group D,n=15) and sham group (group S,n=21).Group J,D:5 μl Walker256 breast cancer cells of rat were implanted

  13. Role of the cAMP-binding protein Epac in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métrich, Mélanie; Berthouze, Magali; Morel, Eric; Crozatier, Bertrand; Gomez, Ana Maria; Lezoualc'h, Frank

    2010-03-01

    Exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP (Epac) were discovered 10 years ago as new sensors for the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Epac family, including Epac1 and Epac2, are guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the Ras-like small GTPases Rap1 and Rap2 and function independently of protein kinase A. Given the importance of cAMP in the cardiovascular system, numerous molecular and cellular studies using specific Epac agonists have analyzed the role and the regulation of Epac proteins in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. The specific functions of Epac proteins may depend upon their microcellular environments as well as their expression and localization. This review discusses recent data showing the involvement of Epac in vascular cell migration, endothelial permeability, and inflammation through specific signaling pathways. In addition, we present evidence that Epac regulates the activity of various cellular compartments of the cardiac myocyte and influences calcium handling and excitation-contraction coupling. The potential role of Epac in cardiovascular disorders such as cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling is also discussed.

  14. The importance of dietary modulation of cAMP and insulin signaling in adipose tissue and the development of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize knowledge of the seemingly paradoxical roles of insulin and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in adipocyte differentiation and function, emphasizing the interplay between the two...... branches of cAMP signaling, the canonical protein kinase A-dependent pathways and the novel exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac)-dependent pathways, and insulin signaling. We discuss how macronutrients via changes in the balance between insulin- and cAMP-dependent signaling can affect the development...... of obesity by changing energy expenditure and/or feed efficiency. We review results demonstrating how the balance between different classes of carbohydrates and proteins modulates the obesigenic action of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids pointing to insulin as a key determinant in the regulation...

  15. 17β-Estradiol Regulates SKP2 Expression in Cultured Immature Boar Sertoli Cells Mainly via Estrogen Receptorβ, cAMP-PKA and ERK1/2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xian-zhong; ZHU Feng-wei; WANG Yong; WANG Yi; ZHANG Jiao-jiao; ZHANG Jia-hua

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen plays an important role in regulating testicular Sertoli cell number. Furthermore, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) plays a central role in mammalian cell cycle progression. The objective of this study was to determine whether 17 β-estradiol can regulate the expression of SKP2, and the Sertoli cell cycle, via estrogen receptor β (ERβ), the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. When cultured immature boar Sertoli cells were treated with 17β-estradiol, a time-dependent increase in SKP2 mRNA and protein level was observed by real-time PCR and Western blot, and 17β-estradiol activity peaked at 30 min. Treatment with ICI182780 and ERβ antagonist reduced 17β-estradiol-induced expression of SKP2 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), while increasing the protein concentration of p27kip1. However, the effect of ERa antagonist on these parameters was lower than that of ICI182780 and ERβ. Forskolin had a similar effect as 17β-estradiol on the expression of SKP2, PCNA and p27kip1. Rp-cAMP, H-89 and U0126 treatment reduced 17β-estradiol-induced changes, while H-89 also inhibited ERK1/2 activation. Therefore, 17β-estradiol mainly regulates SKP2 mRNA and protein expression via ERβ-cAMP-PKA and ERK1/2 activation. SKP2 and PCNA expression were positively correlated, while increased SKP2 expression likely resulted in p27kip1 degradation.

  16. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  17. Modulatory effects of cAMP and PKC activation on gap junctional intercellular communication among thymic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves-dos-Santos Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of the signaling molecules, cyclic AMP (cAMP and protein-kinase C (PKC, on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC between thymic epithelial cells (TEC. Results Treatment with 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog; or forskolin, which stimulates cAMP production, resulted in an increase in dye transfer between adjacent TEC, inducing a three-fold enhancement in the mean fluorescence of coupled cells, ascertained by flow cytometry after calcein transfer. These treatments also increased Cx43 mRNA expression, and stimulated Cx43 protein accumulation in regions of intercellular contacts. VIP, adenosine, and epinephrine which may also signal through cyclic nucleotides were tested. The first two molecules did not mimic the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, however epinephrine was able to increase GJIC suggesting that this molecule functions as an endogenous inter-TEC GJIC modulators. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol-myristate-acetate inhibited inter-TEC GJIC. Importantly, both the enhancing and the decreasing effects, respectively induced by cAMP and PKC, were observed in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, experiments using mouse thymocyte/TEC heterocellular co-cultures suggested that the presence of thymocytes does not affect the degree of inter-TEC GJIC. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that cAMP and PKC intracellular pathways are involved in the homeostatic control of the gap junction-mediated communication in the thymic epithelium, exerting respectively a positive and negative role upon cell coupling. This control is phylogenetically conserved in the thymus, since it was seen in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, our work provides new clues for a better understanding of how the thymic epithelial network can work as a physiological syncytium.

  18. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    The main topics of this thesis are real topological Hochschild homology and real topological cyclic homology. If a ring or a ring spectrum is equipped with an anti-involution, then it induces additional structure on the topological Hochschild homology spectrum. The group O(2) acts on the spectrum......, where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  19. Cup products in Hopf cyclic cohomology via cyclic modules I

    CERN Document Server

    Rangipour, Bahram

    2007-01-01

    This is the first one in a series of two papers on the continuation of our study in cup products in Hopf cyclic cohomology. In this note we construct cyclic cocycles of algebras out of Hopf cyclic cocycles of algebras and coalgebras. In the next paper we consider producing Hopf cyclic cocycle from "equivariant" Hopf cyclic cocycles. Our approach in both situations is based on (co)cyclic modules and bi(co)cyclic modules together with Eilenberg-Zilber theorem which is different from the old definition of cup products defined via traces and cotraces on DG algebras and coalgebras.

  20. Cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linder Markus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania represent a complex of important human pathogens that belong to the systematic order of the kinetoplastida. They are transmitted between their human and mammalian hosts by different bloodsucking sandfly vectors. In their hosts, the Leishmania undergo several differentiation steps, and their coordination and optimization crucially depend on numerous interactions between the parasites and the physiological environment presented by the fly and human hosts. Little is still known about the signalling networks involved in these functions. In an attempt to better understand the role of cyclic nucleotide signalling in Leishmania differentiation and host-parasite interaction, we here present an initial study on the cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major. Results This paper presents the identification of three class I cyclic-nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs from L. major, PDEs whose catalytic domains exhibit considerable sequence conservation with, among other, all eleven human PDE families. In contrast to other protozoa such as Dictyostelium, or fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ssp or Neurospora, no genes for class II PDEs were found in the Leishmania genomes. LmjPDEA contains a class I catalytic domain at the C-terminus of the polypeptide, with no other discernible functional domains elsewhere. LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 are coded for by closely related, tandemly linked genes on chromosome 15. Both PDEs contain two GAF domains in their N-terminal region, and their almost identical catalytic domains are located at the C-terminus of the polypeptide. LmjPDEA, LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were further characterized by functional complementation in a PDE-deficient S. cerevisiae strain. All three enzymes conferred complementation, demonstrating that all three can hydrolyze cAMP. Recombinant LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were shown to be cAMP-specific, with Km values in the low micromolar range

  1. Cyclic polymers from alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christopher D.; Li, Hong; Abboud, Khalil A.; Wagener, Kenneth B.; Veige, Adam S.

    2016-08-01

    Cyclic polymers have dramatically different physical properties compared with those of their equivalent linear counterparts. However, the exploration of cyclic polymers is limited because of the inherent challenges associated with their synthesis. Conjugated linear polyacetylenes are important materials for electrical conductivity, paramagnetic susceptibility, optical nonlinearity, photoconductivity, gas permeability, liquid crystallinity and chain helicity. However, their cyclic analogues are unknown, and therefore the ability to examine how a cyclic topology influences their properties is currently not possible. We have solved this challenge and now report a tungsten catalyst supported by a tetraanionic pincer ligand that can rapidly polymerize alkynes to form conjugated macrocycles in high yield. The catalyst works by tethering the ends of the polymer to the metal centre to overcome the inherent entropic penalty of cyclization. Gel-permeation chromatography, dynamic and static light scattering, viscometry and chemical tests are all consistent with theoretical predictions and provide unambiguous confirmation of a cyclic topology. Access to a wide variety of new cyclic polymers is now possible by simply choosing the appropriate alkyne monomer.

  2. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  3. cAMP level modulates scleral collagen remodeling, a critical step in the development of myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijin Tao

    Full Text Available The development of myopia is associated with decreased ocular scleral collagen synthesis in humans and animal models. Collagen synthesis is, in part, under the influence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. We investigated the associations between cAMP, myopia development in guinea pigs, and collagen synthesis by human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs. Form-deprived myopia (FDM was induced by unilateral masking of guinea pig eyes. Scleral cAMP levels increased selectively in the FDM eyes and returned to normal levels after unmasking and recovery. Unilateral subconjunctival treatment with the adenylyl cyclase (AC activator forskolin resulted in a myopic shift accompanied by reduced collagen mRNA levels, but it did not affect retinal electroretinograms. The AC inhibitor SQ22536 attenuated the progression of FDM. Moreover, forskolin inhibited collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion by HSFs. The inhibition was reversed by SQ22536. These results demonstrate a critical role of cAMP in control of myopia development. Selective regulation of cAMP to control scleral collagen synthesis may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating myopia.

  4. Effects of diazepam on orthodontic tooth movement and alveolar bone cAMP levels in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, S J; Sammon, P J; Tuncay, O C

    1986-08-01

    Cyclic AMP has been suggested as a possible intracellular mediator in bone remodeling during tooth movement. Accordingly, an increase in the level of this nucleotide should result in faster tooth movement. Breakdown of cAMP was inhibited by administration of diazepam in eight cats undergoing orthodontic tooth movement; another matched group of eight animals served as controls. Orthodontic appliances consisted of coil springs stretching between the right side maxillary and mandibular canines and third premolars. The data for tooth movement and cAMP concentrations were analyzed by repeated measures factorial analyses of variance. The results indicated that administration of diazepam increased the rate of tooth movement at P less than 0.0005 and, interestingly, although diazepam had no effect on undisturbed tissues, it lowered the cAMP levels in the periodontal tissues of orthodontically moved teeth at P less than 0.01. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the concentration of cAMP did not correlate with bone remodeling in this model and perhaps should not be used as an index of periodontal-tissue response during orthodontic tooth movement.

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  6. Biochemical characterization and cellular imaging of a novel, membrane permeable fluorescent cAMP analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccolo Manuela

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A novel fluorescent cAMP analog (8-[Pharos-575]- adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate was characterized with respect to its spectral properties, its ability to bind to and activate three main isoenzymes of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA-Iα, PKA-IIα, PKA-IIβ in vitro, its stability towards phosphodiesterase and its ability to permeate into cultured eukaryotic cells using resonance energy transfer based indicators, and conventional fluorescence imaging. Results The Pharos fluorophore is characterized by a Stokes shift of 42 nm with an absorption maximum at 575 nm and the emission peaking at 617 nm. The quantum yield is 30%. Incubation of the compound to RIIα and RIIβ subunits increases the amplitude of excitation and absorption maxima significantly; no major change was observed with RIα. In vitro binding of the compound to RIα subunit and activation of the PKA-Iα holoenzyme was essentially equivalent to cAMP; RII subunits bound the fluorescent analog up to ten times less efficiently, resulting in about two times reduced apparent activation constants of the holoenzymes compared to cAMP. The cellular uptake of the fluorescent analog was investigated by cAMP indicators. It was estimated that about 7 μM of the fluorescent cAMP analog is available to the indicator after one hour of incubation and that about 600 μM of the compound had to be added to intact cells to half-maximally dissociate a PKA type IIα sensor. Conclusion The novel analog combines good membrane permeability- comparable to 8-Br-cAMP – with superior spectral properties of a modern, red-shifted fluorophore. GFP-tagged regulatory subunits of PKA and the analog co-localized. Furthermore, it is a potent, PDE-resistant activator of PKA-I and -II, suitable for in vitro applications and spatial distribution evaluations in living cells.

  7. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  8. Forskolin's effect on transient K current in nudibranch neurons is not reproduced by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, J; Thompson, S

    1987-02-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene extracted from Coleus forskolii, stimulates the production of cAMP in a variety of cells and is potentially an important tool for studying the role of cAMP in the modulation of neuronal excitability. We studied the effects of forskolin on neurons of nudibranch molluscs and found that it caused characteristic, reversible changes in the amplitude and waveform of the transient K current, IA, and also activated an inward current similar to the cAMP-dependent inward current previously described in molluscan neurons. Forskolin altered the time course of IA activation and inactivation but did not affect the voltage dependence or the reversal potential of the current. IA normally inactivates exponentially, but in forskolin the time course of inactivation can be fit by the sum of 2 exponentials with an initial rate that is faster than the control and a final rate that is much slower. On depolarization in forskolin, IA begins to activate at the normal rate, but a slower component of activation is also seen. The changes in IA in the nudibranch cells were qualitatively different than the changes caused by forskolin in Aplysia bag cell neurons (Strong, 1984). Experiments were performed to determine whether these effects of forskolin require cAMP. Intracellular injection of cAMP, application of membrane-permeable analogs of cAMP, application of phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and intracellular injection of the active catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase did not affect the amplitude or waveform of IA. Also, the changes in IA that are caused by forskolin were not prevented or reversed by intracellular injection of an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Cyclic AMP did, however, activate inward current at voltages near the resting potential. We conclude that the changes in IA and the activation of inward current represent separate affects of forskolin. The inward current appears to depend on an increase in intracellular cAMP, while the

  9. Waterborne Epoxy Resin Modified by AMPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A stable epoxy emulsion was prepared with epoxy resin (EP) as raw material, 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) as modifier and benzoyl peroxide as initiator. By criterion of yield of the copolymer AMPS-EP, water-solubility, change of the acid value and intrinsic viscosity [η] along with reaction time, the copolymerization course was deduced. It is found that during the process, AMPS takes part in both the grafting copolymerization with epoxy principal chain and the ring-opening polyaddition with epoxy group. It is also discovered that the yield of AMPS-EP and water dispersing varies with reaction time. When it reaches 1.5 h,AMPS-EP can obtain good water-solubility; but the water-solubility will go bad gradually ifit exceeds 3.5 h.( )R spectrum analysis indicates that partial epoxy group partially remains and the others create sulfonic ester.

  10. Blocking of Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP Leads to Reduced Replication of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xinrong; Mei, Feng; Agrawal, Anurodh; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections and diseases represents a potential threat for worldwide spread and requires development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we revealed a novel positive function of an exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (cAMP-1; Epac-1) on MERS-CoV replication. Specifically, we have shown that Epac-specific inhibitor treatment or silencing Epac-1 gene expression rendered cells resistant to viral infection. We believe Epac-1 inhibitors deserve further study as potential therapeutic agents for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24453361

  11. Generalized Wideband Cyclic MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Meng Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of Spectral Correlation-Signal Subspace Fitting (SC-SSF fails to separate wideband cyclostationary signals with coherent second-order cyclic statistics (SOCS. Averaged Cyclic MUSIC (ACM method made up for the drawback to some degree via temporally averaging the cyclic cross-correlation of the array output. This paper interprets ACM from another perspective and proposes a new DOA estimation method by generalizing ACM for wideband cyclostationary signals. The proposed method successfully makes up for the aforementioned drawback of SC-SSF and obtains a more satisfying performance than ACM. It is also demonstrated that ACM is a simplified form of the proposed method when only a single spectral frequency is exploited, and the integration of the frequencies within the signal bandwidth helps the new method to outperform ACM.

  12. The cyclic reduction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Dario; Meini, Beatrice

    2009-05-01

    Cyclic reduction is an algorithm invented by G.H. Golub and R. W. Hockney in the mid 1960s for solving linear systems related to the finite differences discretization of the Poisson equation over a rectangle. Among the algorithms of Gene Golub, it is one of the most versatile and powerful ever created. Recently, it has been applied to solve different problems from different applicative areas. In this paper we survey the main features of cyclic reduction, relate it to properties of analytic functions, recall its extension to solving more general finite and infinite linear systems, and different kinds of nonlinear matrix equations, including algebraic Riccati equations, with applications to Markov chains, queueing models and transport theory. Some new results concerning the convergence properties of cyclic reduction and its applicability are proved under very weak assumptions. New formulae for overcoming breakdown are provided.

  13. The camp analogue, dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit reproductive functions: I. Effect on ovarian folliculogenesis, ovulation and embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrenek P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the influence of administration of N6,2’-dibutyryladenosine 3’5’-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP, a cAMP agonist, on ovarian folliculogenesis and atresia, as well as on reproductive efficiency in rabbits, whose ovarian cycle and ovulation was induced by gonadotropins. Ovarian cycle and ovulation of control rabbits were induced by 20 IU/kg PMSG followed by 35 IU/kg hCG administration. Experimental animals received PMSG and hCG together with dbcAMP (at 5, 25 or 50 μg/animal. After ovulation and insemination, the animals were sacrificed. Ovaries were weighted, histological sections of ovaries were prepared, and the presence of ovulated and not ovulated follicles and different stages of atresia was evaluated by light microscopy. The eggs were flushed from the oviducts after insemination and cultured up to blastocyst cell stage. Numbers of ovarian Corpora lutea, ovulated oocytes and oocyte-derived zygotes and embryos reaching hatched blastocyst stage were determined. Administration of dbcAMP (at doses 25 or 50 μg/animal, but not at 5 μg/animal was able to increase the proportion of follicles with cystic and luteinization-related atresia. Furthermore, dbcAMP (50 μg/animal, but not lower doses increased the ovarian mass, number of Corpora lutea, number of harvested oocytes, zygotes and embryos at blastocyst stage derived from these zygotes after culture. These data demonstrate that dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit ovarian follicle atresia, ovulation, oocyte, zygote and embryo yield and development. Furthermore, they confirm in the involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent intracellular mechanisms in the control of rabbit reproductive functions and potential practical usefulness of dbcAMP in improving animal reproduction and fertility.

  14. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  15. Three Yersinia enterocolitica AmpD Homologs Participate in the Multi-Step Regulation of Chromosomal Cephalosporinase, AmpC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Xin; Chen, Yuhuang; Hao, Huijing; Li, Xu; Liang, Junrong; Duan, Ran; Li, Chuchu; Zhang, Jing; Shao, Shihe; Jing, Huaiqi

    2016-01-01

    In many gram negative bacilli, AmpD plays a key role in both cell well-recycling pathway and β-lactamase regulation, inactivation of the ampD causes the accumulation of 1,6-anhydromuropeptides, and results in the ampC overproduction. In Yersinia enterocolitica, the regulation of ampC expression may also rely on the ampR-ampC system, the role of AmpD in this species is still unknown. In this study, three AmpD homologs (AmpD1, AmpD2, and AmpD3) have been identified in complete sequence of strain Y. enterocolitica subsp. palearctica 105.5R(r). To understand the role of three AmpD homologs, several mutant strains were constructed and analyzed where a rare ampC regulation mechanism was observed: low-effective ampD2 and ampD3 cooperate with the high-effective ampD1 in the three levels regulation of ampC expression. Enterobacteriaceae was used to be supposed to regulate ampC expression by two steps, three steps regulation was only observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this study, we first reported that Enterobacteriaceae Y. enterocolitica can also possess a three steps stepwise regulation mechanism, regulating the ampC expression precisely.

  16. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated protection against bile acid-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C R; Anwer, M S

    1998-05-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to modulate apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cAMP in bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we studied the effect of agents that increase cAMP on the induction of apoptosis by glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) in cultured rat hepatocytes. GCDC induced apoptosis in 26.5%+/-1.1% of hepatocytes within 2 hours. Twenty-minute pretreatment of hepatocytes with 100 micromol/L 8-(4-chlorothiophenyl) cAMP (CP-cAMP) resulted in a reduction in the amount of apoptosis to 35.2%+/-3.8% of that seen in hepatocytes treated with GCDC alone. Other agents that increase intracellular cAMP, including dibutyryl cAMP (100 micromol/L), glucagon (200 nmol/L), and a combination of forskolin (20 micromol/L) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (20 micromol/L), also inhibited GCDC-induced apoptosis to a similar extent. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720, prevented the protective effect of CP-cAMP and inhibited CP-cAMP-induced activation of PKA activity. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), wortmannin (50 nmol/L), or Ly 294002 (20 micromol/L) also prevented the cytoprotective effect of cAMP. PI3K assays confirmed that wortmannin (50 nmol/L) inhibited PI3K activity, while CP-cAMP had no effect on the activity of this lipid kinase. GCDC increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, but had no effect on stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) activity in hepatocytes. cAMP decreased basal and GCDC-induced MAPK activity and increased SAPK activity. The MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, inhibited both GCDC-mediated MAPK activation and GCDC-induced apoptosis. 1) agents that increase intracellular cAMP protect against hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids; 2) activation of MAPK by GCDC may be involved in bile acid-induced apoptosis; and 3) cAMP-mediated cytoprotection against bile acid-induced apoptosis appears to involve PKA, MAPK, and PI3K.

  17. Antidiabetic sulfonylureas and cAMP cooperatively activate Epac2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshimasa; Shibasaki, Tadao; Takahashi, Harumi; Sugawara, Kenji; Ono, Aika; Inoue, Naoko; Furuya, Toshio; Seino, Susumu

    2013-10-22

    Sulfonylureas are widely used drugs for treating insulin deficiency in patients with type 2 diabetes. Sulfonylureas bind to the regulatory subunit of the pancreatic β cell potassium channel that controls insulin secretion. Sulfonylureas also bind to and activate Epac2A, a member of the Epac family of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-binding proteins that promote insulin secretion through activation of the Ras-like guanosine triphosphatase Rap1. Using molecular docking simulation, we identified amino acid residues in one of two cyclic nucleotide-binding domains, cNBD-A, in Epac2A predicted to mediate the interaction with sulfonylureas. We confirmed the importance of the identified residues by site-directed mutagenesis and analysis of the response of the mutants to sulfonylureas using two assays: changes in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of an Epac2A-FRET biosensor and direct sulfonylurea-binding experiments. These residues were also required for the sulfonylurea-dependent Rap1 activation by Epac2A. Binding of sulfonylureas to Epac2A depended on the concentration of cAMP and the structures of the drugs. Sulfonylureas and cAMP cooperatively activated Epac2A through binding to cNBD-A and cNBD-B, respectively. Our data suggest that sulfonylureas stabilize Epac2A in its open, active state and provide insight for the development of drugs that target Epac2A.

  18. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digestive diseases specialist (gastroenterologist). If you or your child is in the middle of a severe vomiting episode, the doctor may ... system disorders There's no cure for cyclic vomiting syndrome, so treatment ... may be prescribed: Anti-nausea drugs Sedatives Medications ...

  19. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  20. On Expanded Cyclic Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yingquan

    2008-01-01

    The paper has a threefold purpose. The first purpose is to present an explicit description of expanded cyclic codes defined in $\\GF(q^m)$. The proposed explicit construction of expanded generator matrix and expanded parity check matrix maintains the symbol-wise algebraic structure and thus keeps many important original characteristics. The second purpose of this paper is to identify a class of constant-weight cyclic codes. Specifically, we show that a well-known class of $q$-ary BCH codes excluding the all-zero codeword are constant-weight cyclic codes. Moreover, we show this class of codes achieve the Plotkin bound. The last purpose of the paper is to characterize expanded cyclic codes utilizing the proposed expanded generator matrix and parity check matrix. We analyze the properties of component codewords of a codeword and particularly establish the precise conditions under which a codeword can be represented by a subbasis. With the new insights, we present an improved lower bound on the minimum distance of...

  1. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Benschoten, James J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a three-part experiment designed to introduce cyclic voltammetry to graduate/undergraduate students. Part 1 demonstrates formal reduction potential, redox electron transfer, diffusion coefficient, and electrochemical reversibility. Part 2 investigates electrochemical behavior of acetaminophen. Part 3 examines such experimental variables…

  2. Novel role of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in the protection of neutrophil extracellular traps against degradation by bacterial nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Ariane; Völlger, Lena; Berends, Evelien T.M.; Molhoek, E. Margo; Stapels, Daphne A.C.; Midon, Marika; Friães, Ana; Pingoud, Alfred; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.; Richard L Gallo; Mörgelin, Matthias; Nizet, Victor; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a fundamental innate immune defense mechanism. These NETs consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with different antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are able to engulf and kill pathogens. The AMP LL-37, a member of the cathelicidin family, is highly present in NETs. However, the function of LL-37 within the NETs is still unknown, since LL-37 loses its antimicrobial activity when bound to DNA in the NETs.

  3. Control of ligand specificity in cyclic nucleotide-gated channels from rod photoreceptors and olfactory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhofen, W; Ludwig, J; Eismann, E; Kraus, W; Bönigk, W; Kaupp, U B

    1991-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated ionic channels in photoreceptors and olfactory sensory neurons are activated by binding of cGMP or cAMP to a receptor site on the channel polypeptide. By site-directed mutagenesis and functional expression of bovine wild-type and mutant channels in Xenopus oocytes, we have tested the hypothesis that an alanine/threonine difference in the cyclic nucleotide-binding site determines the specificity of ligand binding, as has been proposed for cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases [Weber, I.T., Shabb, J.B. & Corbin, J.D. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 6122-6127]. The wild-type olfactory channel is approximately 25-fold more sensitive to both cAMP and cGMP than the wild-type rod photoreceptor channel, and both channels are 30- to 40-fold more sensitive to cGMP than to cAMP. Substitution of the respective threonine by alanine in the rod photoreceptor and olfactory channels decreases the cGMP sensitivity of channel activation 30-fold but little affects activation by cAMP. Substitution of threonine by serine, an amino acid that also carries a hydroxyl group, even improves cGMP sensitivity of the wild-type channels 2- to 5-fold. We conclude that the hydroxyl group of Thr-560 (rod) and Thr-537 (olfactory) forms an additional hydrogen bond with cGMP, but not cAMP, and thereby provides the structural basis for ligand discrimination in cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

  4. PET measurements of cAMP-mediated phosphodiesterase-4 with (R)-[11C]rolipram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenk, Miran; Thomas, Adam; Lortie, Mireille; Dekemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob S; Dasilva, Jean N

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is the common second messenger in signal-transduction cascades originating at a number of monoamine receptors involved in neurotransmission, cardiac function and smooth muscle contraction. Altered regulation of cAMP synthesis (at receptors, G-protein subunits or adenylyl cyclase) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes have been implicated in a number of pathologies. The PDE4 inhibitor (R)-rolipram, and the less active (S)- enantiomer, have been labeled with carbon-11 and characterized by in vivo and in vitro experiments for use in the evaluation of altered PDE4 levels in the brain and cardiac tissues. (R)-[11C]Rolipram has been shown to bind selectively to PDE4 over other PDE isozymes, with specific binding reflecting approximately 80 and 40% of the total detected radioactivity in the rat brain and the heart, respectively. Tracer retention in PDE4-rich tissues is increased by cAMP-elevating treatments, as detected by in vivo PET studies and ex vivo biodistribution experiments. In vivo PET imaging studies display strong region-specific signal in the brain and heart, as evaluated in rats, pigs, monkeys and humans. Impaired cAMP-mediated signaling was observed in animal models of aging, obesity, anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity and myocardial infarction using (R)-[11C]rolipram. Given the critical role of cAMP in multiple hormonal pathways, the good safety profile and well-characterized pharmacokinetics, (R)-[11C]rolipram PET imaging provides a novel tool for serial monitoring of cAMP-mediated signaling at the PDE4 level, yielding insight into pathological progression with potential for directing therapy.

  5. -Adrenergic receptors on rat ventricular myocytes: characteristics and linkage to cAMP metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-08-01

    When incubated with purified cardiomyocytes from adult rat ventricle, the 1-antagonist (TH)prazosin binds to a single class of sites with high affinity. Competition for (TH)prazosin binding by the 2-selective antagonist yohimbine and the nonselective -antagonist phentolamine demonstrates that these receptors are of the 1-subtype. In addition, incubation of myocyte membranes with (TH)yohimbine results in no measurable specific binding. Agonist competition for (TH)prazosin binding to membranes prepared from purified myocytes demonstrates the presence of two components of binding: 28% of 1-receptors interact with norepinephrine with high affinity (K/sub D/ = 36 nM), whereas the majority of receptors (72%) have a low affinity for agonist (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). After addition of 10 M GTP, norepinephrine competes for (TH)prazosin binding to a single class of sites with lower affinity (K/sub D/ = 2.2 M). Incubation of intact myocytes for 2 min with 1 M norepinephrine leads to significantly less cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation than stimulation with either norepinephrine plus prazosin or isoproterenol. Likewise, incubation of intact myocytes with 10 W M norepinephrine leads to significantly less activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase than when myocytes are stimulated by both norepinephrine and the 1-adrenergic antagonist, prazosin or the US -adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. They conclude that the cardiomyocyte 1 receptor is coupled to a guanine nucleotide-binding protein, that 1-receptors are functionally linked to decreased intracellular cAMP content, and that this change in cellular cAMP is expressed as described activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  6. Intrusion Detection amp Prevention Systems - Sourcefire Snort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vuppala

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Information security is a challenging issue for all business organizations today amidst increasing cyber threats. While there are many alternative intrusion detection amp prevention systems available to choose from selecting the best solution to implement to detect amp prevent cyber-attacks is a difficult task. The best solution is of the one that gets the best reviews and suits the organizations needs amp budget. In this review paper we summarize various classes of intrusion detection and prevention systems compare features of alternative solutions and make recommendation for implementation of one as the best solution for business organization in Fiji.

  7. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-04

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  9. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  10. Cyclic mononucleotide- and Clr-dependent gene regulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Elizaveta; Klaner, Christina; Gnau, Petra; Kaever, Volkhard; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Becker, Anke

    2016-10-01

    To identify physiological processes affected by cAMP in the plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti Rm2011, cAMP levels were artificially increased by overexpression of its cognate adenylate/guanylate cyclase gene cyaJ. This resulted in high accumulation of cAMP in the culture supernatant, decreased swimming motility and increased production of succinoglycan, an exopolysaccharide involved in host invasion. Weaker, similar phenotypic changes were induced by overexpression of cyaB and cyaG1. Effects on swimming motility and succinoglycan production were partially dependent on clr encoding a cyclic AMP receptor-like protein. Transcriptome profiling of an cyaJ-overexpressing strain identified 72 upregulated and 82 downregulated genes. A considerable number of upregulated genes are related to polysaccharide biosynthesis and osmotic stress response. These included succinoglycan biosynthesis genes, genes of the putative polysaccharide synthesis nodP2-exoF3 cluster and feuN, the first gene of the operon encoding the FeuNPQ regulatory system. Downregulated genes were mostly related to respiration, central metabolism and swimming motility. Promoter-probe studies in the presence of externally added cAMP revealed 18 novel Clr-cAMP-regulated genes. Moreover, the addition of cGMP into the growth medium also promoted clr-dependent gene regulation. In vitro binding of Clr-cAMP and Clr-cGMP to the promoter regions of SMc02178, SMb20906,SMc04190, SMc00925, SMc01136 and cyaF2 required the DNA motif (A/C/T)GT(T/C)(T/C/A)C (N4) G(G/A)(T/A)ACA. Furthermore, SMc02178, SMb20906,SMc04190and SMc00653 promoters were activated by Clr-cAMP/cGMP in Escherichia coli as heterologous host. These findings suggest direct activation of these 7 genes by Clr-cAMP/cGMP.

  11. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  12. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Cyclic Voltammograms from First Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Gustav; Jaramillo, Thomas; Skulason, Egill

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a fundamental experimental tool for characterizing electrochemical surfaces. Whereas cyclic voltammetry is widely used within the field of electrochemistry, a way to quantitatively and directly relate the cyclic voltammogram to ab initio calculations has been lacking, even f...

  14. Plasma levels of cAMP, cGMP and CGRP in sildenafil-induced headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Frandsen, E; Schifter, S;

    2004-01-01

    Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determin...... an important role of these signalling molecules, the present study questions whether cAMP and cGMP in peripheral blood can be used for monitoring pathophysiological events in headache and migraine mechanisms.......Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determine...... whether the pain-inducing effects of sildenafil would be reflected in plasma levels of important signalling molecules in migraine: cGMP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Ten healthy subjects (four women, six men) and 12 patients (12 women) suffering from...

  15. Urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate changes in spontaneous and induced onset active labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Chung; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Su, Her-Young; Lo, Shin-Chieh; Ren, Shin-Sia; Wu, Gwo-Jang

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to investigate the changes in urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) between the latent and the active phases of spontaneous and prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1))-induced labor. Seventy singleton pregnant women at 36-41(+) weeks' gestation without signs of fetal distress were enrolled. The first group consisted of 35 pregnant women in whom labor was induced by PGE(1) applied intravaginally. The second group consisted of 35 women who had spontaneous active labor. Clinical data of the two groups were assessed as labor progressed. After the onset of active labor, urinary cGMP/creatinine (U cGMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 35.2 and 9.7, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.033). After the onset of active labor, urinary cAMP/creatinine (U cAMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 36.5 and 15.6, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.001). The duration of the latent phase was significantly shortened in the PGE(1)-induced group compared with the spontaneous labor group (Plabor. Our results suggest that U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr can serve as easily obtained secondary messenger markers of myometrial contractility and cervical ripening at the onset of active labor. The NO-cGMP system and the G-protein alpha-cAMP system in the human uterus may concomitantly contribute to uterine quiescence during pregnancy and show downregulation in U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr at the initiation of active labor.

  16. Glutathione upregulates cAMP signalling via G protein alpha 2 during the development of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Mi; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-12-01

    Despite the importance of glutathione in Dictyostelium, the role of glutathione synthetase (gshB/GSS) has not been clearly investigated. In this study, we observed that increasing glutathione content by constitutive expression of gshB leads to mound-arrest and defects in 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated aggregation and developmental gene expression. The overexpression of gpaB encoding G protein alpha 2 (Gα2), an essential component of the cAMP signalling pathway, results in a phenotype similar to that caused by gshB overexpression, whereas gpaB knockdown in gshB-overexpressing cells partially rescues the above-mentioned phenotypic defects. Furthermore, Gα2 is highly enriched at the plasma membrane of gshB-overexpressing cells compared to wild-type cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that glutathione upregulates cAMP signalling via Gα2 modulation during Dictyostelium development. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  18. S-AMP for non-linear observation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we presented the S-AMP approach, an extension of approximate message passing (AMP), to be able to handle general invariant matrix ensembles. In this contribution we extend S-AMP to non-linear observation models. We obtain generalized AMP (GAMP) as the special case when the measurement...

  19. Dynamics of cyclic machines

    CERN Document Server

    Vulfson, Iosif

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on modern methods of oscillation analysis in machines, including cyclic action mechanisms (linkages, cams, steppers, etc.). It presents schematization techniques and mathematical descriptions of oscillating systems, taking into account the variability of the parameters and nonlinearities, engineering evaluations of dynamic errors, and oscillation suppression methods. The majority of the book is devoted to the development of new methods of dynamic analysis and synthesis for cyclic machines that form regular oscillatory systems with multiple duplicate modules.  There are also sections examining aspects of general engineering interest (nonlinear dissipative forces, systems with non-stationary constraints, impacts and pseudo-impacts in clearances, etc.)  The examples in the book are based on the widely used results of theoretical and experimental studies as well as engineering calculations carried out in relation to machines used in the textile, light, polygraphic and other industries. Particu...

  20. The Cyclic Model Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhardt, P J; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turok, Neil

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclic Model attempts to resolve the homogeneity, isotropy, and flatness problems and generate a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations during a period of slow contraction that precedes a bounce to an expanding phase. Here we describe at a conceptual level the recent developments that have greatly simplified our understanding of the contraction phase and the Cyclic Model overall. The answers to many past questions and criticisms are now understood. In particular, we show that the contraction phase has equation of state w>1 and that contraction with w>1 has a surprisingly similar properties to inflation with w < -1/3. At one stroke, this shows how the model is different from inflation and why it may work just as well as inflation in resolving cosmological problems.

  1. Enhanced tumor necrosis factor suppression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation by combination of phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostanoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Semmler, J; Eisenhut, T; Eigler, A; Endres, S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated cooperative effects of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and prostanoids on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PDE inhibitors alone induced only a small increase in cA

  2. Optogenetic Modulation of an Adenylate Cyclase in Toxoplasma gondii Demonstrates a Requirement of the Parasite cAMP for Host-Cell Invasion and Stage Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anne; Arroyo-Olarte, Ruben Dario; Imkeller, Katharina; Hegemann, Peter; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection and transmission of the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii depends on its ability to switch between fast-replicating tachyzoite (acute) and quiescent bradyzoite (chronic) stages. Induction of cAMP in the parasitized host cells has been proposed to influence parasite differentiation. It is not known whether the parasite or host cAMP is required to drive this phenomenon. Other putative roles of cAMP for the parasite biology also remain to be identified. Unequivocal research on cAMP-mediated signaling in such intertwined systems also requires a method for an efficient and spatial control of the cAMP pool in the pathogen or in the enclosing host cell. We have resolved these critical concerns by expressing a photoactivated adenylate cyclase that allows light-sensitive control of the parasite or host-cell cAMP. Using this method, we reveal multiple roles of the parasite-derived cAMP in host-cell invasion, stage-specific expression, and asexual differentiation. An optogenetic method provides many desired advantages such as: (i) rapid, transient, and efficient cAMP induction in extracellular/intracellular and acute/chronic stages; (ii) circumvention of the difficulties often faced in cultures, i.e. poor diffusion, premature degradation, steady activation, and/or pleiotropic effects of cAMP agonists and antagonists; (iii) genetically encoded enzyme expression, thus inheritable to the cell progeny; and (iv) conditional and spatiotemporal control of cAMP levels. Importantly, a successful optogenetic application in Toxoplasma also illustrates its wider utility to study cAMP-mediated signaling in other genetically amenable two-organism systems such as in symbiotic and pathogen-host models. PMID:23525100

  3. cAMP/PKA信号通路在肾上腺肿瘤中的作用%Effect of cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathways on Adrenal Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张科; 刘昌荣

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase a ( cAMP/PKA) signaling pathways on adrenal tumors. Methods Human H295R cells of adrenal tumor cells were randomly divided into control group, group A and B. Control group did not undergo any treatment;group A was incubated with cAMP deriva-tives db-cAMP;group B was incubated with db-cAMP and inhibitor of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway H-89. In three groups, PKA activities were detected, and phosphorylation levels of CREB protein were also detected by Western Blot method;72 h cell proliferation levels were detected by CCK8 assay, and capacities of hormone secretion were detected by glucocorticoid secretion experiment. Results Levels of PKA activity, CREB protein phosphorylation, cell proliferation and glucocorticoid secretion were significantly higher in group A than those in control group and group B (P0. 05). Conclusion The ab-normal activation of cAMP/PKA signaling pathways can promote formation and functional effect of adrenal tumors.%目的:探讨cAMP/PKA信号通路在肾上腺肿瘤中的作用。方法将人肾上腺肿瘤H295R细胞随机分为对照组、实验组A及实验组B,对照组不进行处理,实验组A加入cAMP衍生物db-cAMP,实验组B加入db-cAMP及cAMP/PKA信号通路抑制剂H-89,分别检测细胞PKA活性;应用Western Blot方法检测cAMP/PKA信号通路下游CREB蛋白的磷酸化水平;CCK8实验检测细胞72 h的增殖水平;糖皮质激素分泌实验检测3组H295R的激素分泌能力。结果实验组A的PKA活性水平、CREB蛋白的磷酸化水平、细胞增殖水平、糖皮质激素分泌水平均较对照组和实验组B显著升高(P<0.05);而实验组B与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 cAMP/PKA信号通路的异常活化能够促进肾上腺肿瘤的形成与功能的发挥。

  4. Diagnosis of Cyclic Vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In a study at Children’s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, and Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, designed primarily to compare cost-effectiveness of three methods of management of cyclic vomiting cases, one group of patients received an extensive diagnostic evaluation, a second was treated with empiric antimigraine drugs for 2 months, and a third an upper GI series with small-bowel follow-through (UGI-SBFT plus empiric therapy.

  5. Geometry of Cyclic Pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-18

    analysis of the equilibria based on linearization of the shape dynamics. In [10], the authors extend their analysis to incorporate feedback control...differentiable curves in R2, deriving our dynamics from the natural Frenet frame equations (see, e.g., [5] for details). (A three- dimensional analysis of...cyclic pursuit formulated in terms of the natural Frenet frame equations is a topic of ongoing work.) As is depicted in figure 1, we let ri denote the

  6. Lipolymphedema Associated with Idiopathic Cyclic Edema: A Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Pereira de Godoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic cyclic edema is a type of generalized edema that mainly affects women. Diagnosis is made by the patient’s clinical history and an evaluation of the accumulation of weight during the day. The objective of this study is to report the clinical control of lymphedema associated with idiopathic cyclic edema using calcium dobesilate. A 55-year-old female patient reported generalized edema for years in that she woke up in the morning with her legs swollen and the edema worsened during the day. The physical examination revealed generalized edema. After four days of treatment with calcium dobesilate, the patient returned to the Clínica Godoy, Brazil, with less edema and reductions in body weight and the amount of extracellular and intracellular fluid. With further treatment, there was a total reduction of the edema. It is concluded that calcium dobesilate helps to control lymphedema secondary to idiopathic cyclic edema.

  7. Protective Effect of a cAMP Analogue on Behavioral Deficits and Neuropathological Changes in Cuprizone Model of Demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakilzadeh, Gelareh; Khodagholi, Fariba; Ghadiri, Tahereh; Darvishi, Marzieh; Ghaemi, Amir; Noorbakhsh, Farshid; Gorji, Ali; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that leads to neuronal cell loss. Cyclic AMP and its analogs are well known to decrease inflammation and apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the effects of bucladesine, a cell-permeable analogue of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on myelin proteins (PLP, PMP-22), inflammation, and apoptotic, as well as anti-apoptotic factors in cuprizone model of demyelination. C57BL/6J mice were fed with chow containing 0.2% copper chelator cuprizone or vehicle by daily oral gavage for 5 weeks to induce reversible demyelination predominantly of the corpus callosum. Bucladesine was administered intraperitoneally at different doses (0.24, 0.48, or 0.7 μg/kg body weight) during the last 7 days of 5-week cuprizone treatment. Bucladesine exhibited a protective effect on myelination. Furthermore, bucladesine significantly decreased the production of interleukin-6 pro-inflammatory mediator as well as nuclear factor-κB activation and reduced the mean number of apoptotic cells compared to cuprizone-treated mice. Bucladesine also decreased production of caspase-3 as well as Bax and increased Bcl-2 levels. Our data revealed that enhancement of intracellular cAMP prevents demyelination and plays anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties in mice cuprizone model of demyelination. This suggests the modulation of intracellular cAMP as a potential target for treatment of MS.

  8. Effects of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) on mitochondrial skeletal muscle functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetsi, Liliane; Charles, Anne-Laure; Paradis, Stéphanie; Lejay, Anne; Talha, Samy; Geny, Bernard; Lugnier, Claire

    2017-05-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in skeletal muscle metabolism and function, notably at the level of tissue respiration, which conduct muscle strength as well as muscle survival. Pathological conditions induce mitochondria dysfunctions notably characterized by free oxygen radical production disturbing intracellular signaling. In that way, the second messengers, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP, control intracellular signaling at the physiological and transcription levels by governing phosphorylation cascades. Both nucleotides are specifically and selectively hydrolyzed in their respective 5'-nucleotide by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which constitute a multi-genic family differently tissue distributed and subcellularly compartmentalized. These PDEs are presently recognized as therapeutic targets for cardiovascular, pulmonary, and neurologic diseases. However, very few data concerning cyclic nucleotides and PDEs in skeletal muscle, specifically in mitochondria, are reported in the literature. The knowledge of PDE implication in mitochondrial signaling would be helpful for resolving critical mitochondrial dysfunctions in skeletal muscle.

  9. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  10. Ca2+ participates in α1B-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP response in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao SONG; Yun-fang LI; Er-dan DONG; Qi-de HAN; You-yi ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the α1B-adrenoceptor (α1B-AR)-mediated cAMP response and underlying mechanisms in HEK293 cells. Methods: Full-length cDNA encoding α1B-AR was transfected into HEK293 cells using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and α1B-AR expression and cAMP accumulation were determined by using the saturation radioligand binding assay and ion-exchange chromatography, respectively. Results: Under agonist stimulation, α1B-AR mediated cAMP synthesis in HEK293 cells, and blockade by PLC-PKC or tyrosine kinase did not reduce cAMP accumulation induced by NE. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin(PTX) had little effect on basal cAMP accumulation as well as norepinephrine(NE)-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In addition, pretreatment with cholera toxin(CTX) neither mimicked nor blocked the effect induced by NE. The extracellular Ca2+ chelator egtazic acid (EGTA), nonselective Ca2+ channel blocker CdC12 and calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor W-7 significantly reduced NE-induced cAMP accumulation from 1.59%±0.47% to 1.00%±0.31%, 0.78%±0.23%, and 0.90%±0.40%,respectively. Conclusion: By coupling with a PTX-insensitive G protein, α1B-AR promotes Ca2+ influx via receptor-dependent Ca2+ channels, then Ca2+ is linked to CaM to form a Ca2+-CaM complex, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase (AC),thereby increasing the cAMP production in HEK293 cell lines.

  11. A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum based on differential chemotactic sensitivity to cAMP and differential sensitivity to suppression of chemotaxis by ammonia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ira N Feit; Jeffrey Pawlikowski; Caroline Zawilski

    2007-03-01

    The three basic cell types in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum show differential chemotactic response to cyclic AMP (cAMP) and differential sensitivity to suppression of the chemotaxis by ammonia. The values of these parameters indicate a progressive maturation of chemotactic properties during the transdifferentiation of slug cell types. We present a model that explains the localization of the three cell types within the slug based on these chemotactic differences and on the maturation of their chemotactic properties.

  12. 2-substituted derivatives of adenosine and inosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate. Synthesis, enzymic activity, and analysis of the structural requirements of the binding locale of the 2-substituent on bovine brain protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R B; Uno, H; Robins, R K; Simon, L N; Miller, J P

    1975-07-29

    A number of 2-substituted cyclic nucleotide derivatives were synthesized and investigated as activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and as substrates for and inhibitors of cAMP phosphodiesterase. Ring closure of 5-amino-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylimidazol-4-carboxamide cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (1) with various aldehydes according to a new procedure (Meyer, R. B., Jr., Shuman, D.A., and Robins, R. K. (1974), J. Am. Chem. Soc. 96, 4962) gave new derivatives of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate with the following 2-substituents: n-propyl, n-hexl, n-octyl, n-decyl, styryl, o-methoxyphenyl, and 2-thienyl. Alkylation of 2-mercaptoadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate (20, Meyer et al., 1974) gave new cAMP derivatives with the following 2-substituent: ethylthio, n-propylthio, isopropylthio, allylthio, n-decylthio, and benzylthio. Deamination of 2-methyl-,2-n-butyl-, and 2-ethylthioadenosine cyclic 3',5'-phosphate. Using multiple regression analysis, a striking relationship was found between the relative potency of the compounds as activators of bovine brain cAMP-dependent protein kinase and parameters describing the hydrophobic, steric, and electronic character of the substituents on these compounds. All compounds were substrates for a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase preparation from rabbit kidney. Additionally, the compounds were as a group, good inhibitors of the hydrolysis of cAMP by phosphodiesterase preparations from rabbit lung, beef heart, and dog heart.

  13. Rolipram stimulates angiogenesis and attenuates neuronal apoptosis through the cAMP/cAMP-responsive element binding protein pathway following ischemic stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shouye; Cao, Qingwen; Xu, Peng; Ji, Wenchen; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-03-01

    Rolipram, a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, can activate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway to facilitate functional recovery following ischemic stroke. However, to date, the effects of rolipram on angiogenesis and cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis are yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the aim was to reveal the effect of rolipram on the angiogenesis and neuronal apoptosis following brain cerebral ischemia. Rat models of ischemic stroke were established following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and rolipram was administered for three, seven and 14 days. The results were examined using behavioral tests, triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining, immunostaining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) to evaluate the effects of rolipram therapy on functional outcome, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Western blot analysis was used to show the phosphorylated- (p-)CREB protein level in the ischemic hemisphere. The rolipram treatment group exhibited a marked reduction in infarct size and modified neurological severity score compared with the vehicle group, and rolipram treatment significantly promoted the microvessel density in the ischemic boundary region and increased p-CREB protein levels in the ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells was observed in the rolipram group compared with the vehicle group. These findings suggest that rolipram has the ability to attenuate cerebral ischemic injury, stimulate angiogenesis and reduce neuronal apoptosis though the cAMP/CREB pathway.

  14. Suppression of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production by plasma membrane associated cytoskeletal protein 4.1G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Ayano; Sukegawa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Saito, Masaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2013-03-01

    It has been shown lately that activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is regulated by an array of proteins binding to carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. Proteins of 4.1 family are subsets of subcortical cytoskeletal proteins and are known to stabilize cellular structures and proteins at the plasma membrane. One of the 4.1 family proteins, 4.1G has been shown to interact with the C-terminus of GPCRs and regulate intracellular distribution of the receptors, including parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR). PTHR is coupled to trimeric G proteins G(s) and G(q), which activate the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and phospholipase C pathway, respectively. During the course of investigation of the role of 4.1G on adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signaling pathway, we found that 4.1G suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP production in cells. The cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin was decreased in HEK293 cells overexpressing 4.1G or increased in 4.1G-knockdown cells. Furthermore, PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was also suppressed in the presence of exogenously expressed 4.1G despite its activity to increase the distribution of PTHR to the cell surface. In cells overexpressing FERM domain-deleted 4.1G, a mutant form of the protein deficient in plasma membrane distribution, neither forskolin-induced nor PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was not altered. The suppression of the forskolin-induced cAMP production was observed even in membrane preparations of 4.1G-overexpressing cells. In 4.1G-knockdown HEK293 cells, plasma membrane distribution of adenylyl cyclase 6, one of the major subtypes of the enzyme in the cells, showed a slight decrease, in spite of the increased production of cAMP in those cells when stimulated by forskolin. Also, cytochalasin D treatment did not cause any influence on forskolin-induced cAMP production in HEK293 cells. These data indicate that plasma membrane-associated 4.1G regulates GPCR-mediated G(s) signaling

  15. Development and application of an LC-MS/MS method for measuring the effect of (partial) agonists on cAMP accumulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutier, W; Spaans, P A; van der Neut, M A W; McCreary, A C; Reinders, J H

    2010-04-30

    Cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays an important role in cell signalling and is widely used as a marker for receptor activation and as a target for treating various diseases. In this paper we present the development and validation of a new method for the determination of cAMP and ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and other nucleotides in a biological system by combining zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The HILIC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous quantitative analysis of cAMP and ATP, and was validated by assessment of linearity (over a range from 0.5 to 100nM for cAMP and 50 nM to 50 microM for ATP (r(2)>0.999)), resolution, limit of detection (0.5 and 50 nM for cAMP and ATP, respectively) and reproducibility. Furthermore, the method was validated and applied in vitro to determine cAMP accumulation in biological samples. The effect of several dopamine D(2) (partial) agonists and antagonists on cAMP accumulation was assessed by determination of the cAMP/ATP ratio in cells transfected with the human dopamine D(2L) receptor. Quinpirole, dopamine and ropinirole produced agonist effects on cAMP accumulation, with a potency of quinpirole>ropinirole>dopamine. Lisuride, terguride and bifeprunox were found to be partial agonists with efficacies of lisuride>terguride>bifeprunox. As expected, haloperidol, (-)-sulpiride and LY-741626 were antagonists. These results demonstrate that the present analytical method was robust, fast, sensitive, and selective. Moreover, it showed utility in determining cAMP/ATP in biological systems and the ability to study the effect of (partial) agonists and antagonists which makes it a useful tool for drug discovery.

  16. Properties of a cyclic 3'5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase from Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C H; Abidin, U Z

    1989-10-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) partially purified from roots of Vigna mungo exhibited optimum activity at pH 5.5 to 6.0 and maximum enzyme activity at 50 degrees C. Levels of PDE activity in roots remained relatively constant from the first to the eleventh day after germination; on the twelfth day there was a 400% increase in PDE activity. The enzyme was stable for at least 48 hours at 28 degrees C, retaining 92% of its original activity. Plant growth hormones including gibberellic acid, indoleacetic acid and kinetin at 1.0 and 10.0 microM concentrations did not have any significant effect on enzyme activity. Nucleotides tested including cyclic 2'3' AMP, cyclic 2'3' GMP completely abolished enzyme activity at 1.0mM while cyclic 3'5' GMP, cyclic 3'5' GMP, 2'deoxy 5' ATP, 2'deoxy 5'GTP and 5'ADP were also inhibitory to the enzyme. The enzyme was stimulated by Mg2+, Fe2+ and NH4+ while Cu2+ and Fe3+ were inhibitory. Theophylline, caffeine, phosphate, pyrophosphate and EDTA were inhibitory to the enzyme.

  17. FimL regulates cAMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki F Inclan

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacteria found in diverse ecological niches, is an important cause of acute infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic infections in patients with Cystic Fibrosis. One signaling molecule required for the coordinate regulation of virulence factors associated with acute infections is 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, (cAMP, which binds to and activates a catabolite repressor homolog, Vfr. Vfr controls the transcription of many virulence factors, including those associated with Type IV pili (TFP, the Type III secretion system (T3SS, the Type II secretion system, flagellar-mediated motility, and quorum sensing systems. We previously identified FimL, a protein with histidine phosphotransfer-like domains, as a regulator of Vfr-dependent processes, including TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function. In this study, we carried out genetic and physiologic studies to further define the mechanism of action of FimL. Through a genetic screen designed to identify suppressors of FimL, we found a putative cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (CpdA, suggesting that FimL regulates cAMP levels. Inactivation of CpdA increases cAMP levels and restores TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function to fimL mutants, consistent with in vivo phosphodiesterase activity. By constructing combinations of double and triple mutants in the two adenylate cyclase genes (cyaA and cyaB, fimL, and cpdA, we show that ΔfimL mutants resemble ΔcyaB mutants in TM defects, decreased T3SS transcription, and decreased cAMP levels. Similar to some of the virulence factors that they regulate, we demonstrate that CyaB and FimL are polarly localized. These results reveal new complexities in the regulation of diverse virulence pathways associated with acute P. aeruginosa infections.

  18. Regulation of melanogenesis: the role of cAMP and MITF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Otręba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the melanogenesis pathway and the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF in regulation of this process. Products of melanogenesis are eu- and/or pheomelanins synthesized in a multistage process of tyrosine oxidation and polymerization. The conversions require the presence of tyrosinase (TYR, key enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase isoform I (THI and tyrosinase related proteins (TRP1 and TRP2. Many types of signal molecules and transcription factors participate in regulation of melanin synthesis, but the most important are cAMP and MITF. cAMP is the second messenger in the intracellular signal cascade, which is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP by adenylyl cyclase, activated among others by the melanocortin receptor and the αS subunit of G protein. The signal molecule cAMP regulates MITF, TYR, THI, GTP-cyclohydroxylase I (GTP-CHI transcription and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH phosphorylation at Ser16 by protein kinase A (PKA. Mutations of genes encoding proteins belonging to the cAMP signal cascade may lead to McCune-Albright and Carney syndromes. MITF is one of the most important nuclear transcription factors regulating melanogenesis. Currently 10 isoforms of human MITF are known, but in melanocytes only MITF-M, MITF-Mdel, MITF-A and MITF-H occur. MITF transcription factor regulates melanogenesis by activation of tyrosinase, TRP1 and TRP2 transcription. It also affects expression of other factors regulating melanosome maturation, biogenesis and transport. Moreover, it regulates melanocyte proliferation and protection against apoptosis. Mutations of the MITF gene may lead to hereditary diseases: Waardenburg type II and Tietz syndromes.

  19. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of antimicrobial peptides, Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, from the Cycad (Cycas revoluta) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Seiya; Kato, Kouji; Koba, Atsuko; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Yagi, Fumio

    2008-12-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Cy-AMP1, Cy-AMP2, and Cy-AMP3, were purified from seeds of the cycad (Cycas revoluta) by a CM cellulofine column, ion-exchange HPLC on SP COSMOGEL, and reverse-phase HPLC. They had molecular masses of 4583.2 Da, 4568.9 Da and 9275.8 Da, respectively, by MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Half of the amino acid residues of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 were cysteine, glycine and proline, and their sequences were similar. The sequence of Cy-AMP3 showed high homology to various lipid transfer proteins. For Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2, the concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were 7.0-8.9 microg/ml. The Cy-AMP3 had weak antimicrobial activity. The structural and antimicrobial characteristics of Cy-AMP1 and Cy-AMP2 indicated that they are a novel type of antimicrobial peptide belonging to a plant defensin family.

  20. Measuring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in living cells induced by low-level laser irradiation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Zheng, Liqin; Yang, Hongqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Several studies demonstrated that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an important second messenger, is involved in the mechanism of low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) treatment. However, most of these studies obtained the cAMP level in cell culture extracts or supernatant. In this study, the cAMP level in living cells was measured with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The effect of LLLI on cAMP level in living cells with adenosine receptors blocked was explored to identify the role of adenosine receptors in LLLI. The results showed that LLLI increased the cAMP level. Moreover, the rise of cAMP level was light dose dependent but wavelength independent for 658-, 785-, and 830-nm laser light. The results also exhibited that the adenosine receptors, a class of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), modulated the increase of cAMP level induced by LLLI. The cAMP level increased more significantly when the A3 adenosine receptors (A3R) were blocked by A3R antagonist compared with A1 adenosine receptor or A2a adenosine receptor blocked in HEK293T cells after LLLI, which was in good agreement with the adenosine receptors' expressions. All these results suggested that measuring the cAMP level with BRET could be a useful technique to study the role of GPCRs in living cells under LLLI.

  1. Increases in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep: implications for REM sleep and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G; Storm, Daniel R

    2013-04-10

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Because mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with awake mice but are not elevated in non-REM sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation.

  2. The cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic effect of CRH in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The primary action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is stimulation of the synthesis and release of adrenocorticotropic hormone and β-endorphin from the pituitary in response to stress. In addition, a number of studies indicate that CRH exerts other physiological actions within the central nervous system which are independent of the pituitary. These include increased body temperature and thermogenesis. However, the intracellular mechanism responsible for pyrogenic action of CRH is still unclear. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether or not cAMP was involved in the pyrogenic action of CRH in the rat. Intracerebroventricular (icv) microinjection of CRH (2.5 μg, 5.0 μg, 10 μg) caused increases in colonic temperature and hypothalamus cAMP level in conscious rats. The pyrogenic effects of CRH were abolished or markedly inhibited by prior injection (icv) of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2,,3,-dideoxyadenosine (DDA, 30 μg) or an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, adenosine-3,,5,-(cyclic) monophosphorothionate (Rp-cAMPs, 15 μg). This is the first report demonstrating the pyrogenic effcet of centrally administration of CRH on the rat via the cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

  3. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  4. c-di-AMP binds the ydaO riboswitch in two pseudo-symmetry-related pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aiming; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2014-09-01

    The ydaO riboswitch, involved in sporulation, osmotic stress responses and cell wall metabolism, targets the second messenger cyclic-di-AMP with subnanomolar affinity. We have solved the structure of c-di-AMP bound to the Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis ydaO riboswitch, thereby identifying a five-helical scaffold containing a zippered-up bubble, a pseudoknot and long-range tertiary base pairs. Highlights include the identification of two c-di-AMP binding pockets on the same face of the riboswitch, related by pseudo-two-fold symmetry, with potential for cross-talk between sites mediated by adjacently positioned base-stacking alignments connecting pockets. The adenine rings of bound c-di-AMP molecules are wedged between bases and stabilized by stacking, base-sugar and sugar-sugar intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions. The structural studies are complemented by isothermal titration calorimetry-based binding studies of mutants mediating key tertiary intermolecular contacts. The T. tengcongensis ydaO riboswitch, like its Bacillus subtilis counterpart, most likely functions through a transcription termination mechanism, with the c-di-AMP bound state representing an 'off' switch.

  5. EPAC1 activation by cAMP stabilizes CFTR at the membrane by promoting its interaction with NHERF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Miguel J; Amaral, Margarida D; Zaccolo, Manuela; Farinha, Carlos M

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) activates protein kinase A (PKA) but also the guanine nucleotide exchange factor 'exchange protein directly activated by cAMP' (EPAC1; also known as RAPGEF3). Although phosphorylation by PKA is known to regulate CFTR channel gating - the protein defective in cystic fibrosis - the contribution of EPAC1 to CFTR regulation remains largely undefined. Here, we demonstrate that in human airway epithelial cells, cAMP signaling through EPAC1 promotes CFTR stabilization at the plasma membrane by attenuating its endocytosis, independently of PKA activation. EPAC1 and CFTR colocalize and interact through protein adaptor NHERF1 (also known as SLC9A3R1). This interaction is promoted by EPAC1 activation, triggering its translocation to the plasma membrane and binding to NHERF1. Our findings identify a new CFTR-interacting protein and demonstrate that cAMP activates CFTR through two different but complementary pathways - the well-known PKA-dependent channel gating pathway and a new mechanism regulating endocytosis that involves EPAC1. The latter might constitute a novel therapeutic target for treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  6. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  7. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  8. p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K mediates cAMP-PKA and estrogens biological effects on growth and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, C; Di Domenico, M; Porcellini, A; Cuozzo, C; De Gregorio, G; Santillo, M R; Agnese, S; Di Stasio, R; Feliciello, A; Migliaccio, A; Avvedimento, E V

    2007-03-29

    Cyclic adenosine 3'5' monophosphate (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA) cooperate with phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K) signals in the control of growth and survival. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) involved, we identified and mutagenized a specific serine (residue 83) in p85alpha(PI3K), which is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by PKA. Expression of p85alpha(PI3K) mutants (alanine or aspartic substitutions) significantly altered the biological responses of the cells to cAMP. cAMP protection from anoikis was reduced in cells expressing the alanine version p85alpha(PI3K). These cells did not arrest in G1 in the presence of cAMP, whereas cells expressing the aspartic mutant p85D accumulated in G1 even in the absence of cAMP. S phase was still efficiently inhibited by cAMP in cells expressing both mutants. The binding of PI3K to Ras p21 was greatly reduced in cells expressing p85A in the presence or absence of cAMP. Conversely, expression of the aspartic mutant stimulated robustly the binding of PI3K to p21 Ras in the presence of cAMP. Mutation in the Ser 83 inhibited cAMP, but not PDGF stimulation of PI3K. Conversely, the p85D aspartic mutant amplified cAMP stimulation of PI3K activity. Phosphorylation of Ser 83 by cAMP-PKA in p85alpha(PI3K) was also necessary for estrogen signaling as expression of p85A or p85D mutants inhibited or amplified, respectively, the binding of estrogen receptor to p85alpha and AKT phosphorylation induced by estrogens. The data presented indicate that: (1) phosphorylation of Ser 83 in p85alpha(PI3K) is critical for cAMP-PKA induced G1 arrest and survival in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts; (2) this site is necessary for amplification of estrogen signals by cAMP-PKA and related receptors. Finally, these data suggest a general mechanism of PI3K regulation by cAMP, operating in various cell types and under different conditions.

  9. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate and N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate as regulatory signals in catabolite repression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenbaum, P E; Broman, R L; Dobrogosz, W J

    1970-09-01

    When an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the enzyme N-acetyl-glucosamine-6-phosphate (AcGN6P) deacetylase is grown in a succinate-mineral salts medium and exposed to an exogenous source of N-acetylglucosamine, approximately 20 to 30 pmoles of AcGN6P per mug of cell dry weight will accumulate in these cells. This accumulation occurs within 2 to 4 min after the addition of N-acetylglucosamine and is coincident with the production of a severe permanent catabolite repression of beta-galactosidase synthesis. This repression does not occur if adenosine 3',5'-cyclic phosphate (cyclic AMP) is added to the cells before AcGN6P accumulates. An immediate derepression occurs when cyclic AMP is added to cells that have already accumulated a large AcGN6P pool. These findings are consistent with the view that low-molecular-weight carbohydrate metabolites and cyclic AMP play key roles in the catabolite repression phenomenon, and that metabolites such as AcGN6P may participate in the represion mechanism by influencing either the formation or degradation of cyclic AMP in E. coli.

  10. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+-K(+ ATPases and Na(+-K(+-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+ channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+-activated basolateral K(+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  11. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  12. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl− secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl− secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl− current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl− channel activity (IC50∼10 µM) via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na+-K+ ATPases and Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channels with IC50 of ∼3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, inwardly rectifying Cl− channels, and Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment) had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT)-induced Cl− secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg) reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  13. Ekpyrotic and Cyclic Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lehners, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies provide theories of the very early and of the very late universe. In these models, the big bang is described as a collision of branes - and thus the big bang is not the beginning of time. Before the big bang, there is an ekpyrotic phase with equation of state w=P/rho >> 1 (where P is the average pressure and rho the average energy density) during which the universe slowly contracts. This phase resolves the standard cosmological puzzles and generates a nearly scale-invariant spectrum of cosmological perturbations containing a significant non-gaussian component. At the same time it produces small-amplitude gravitational waves with a blue spectrum. The dark energy dominating the present-day cosmological evolution is reinterpreted as a small attractive force between our brane and a parallel one. This force eventually induces a new ekpyrotic phase and a new brane collision, leading to the idea of a cyclic universe. This review discusses the detailed properties of these models, thei...

  14. Ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehners, Jean-Luc [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: jlehners@princeton.edu

    2008-09-15

    Ekpyrotic and