WorldWideScience

Sample records for extracellular cadherin repeat

  1. The unique prodomain of T-cadherin plays a key role in adiponectin binding with the essential extracellular cadherin repeats 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Shiro; Kita, Shunbun; Obata, Yoshinari; Fujishima, Yuya; Nagao, Hirofumi; Masuda, Shigeki; Tanaka, Yoshimitsu; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Tohru; Takagi, Junichi; Maeda, Norikazu; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-05-12

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived circulating protein, accumulates in the heart, vascular endothelium, and skeletal muscles through an interaction with T-cadherin (T-cad), a unique glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cadherin. Recent studies have suggested that this interaction is essential for adiponectin-mediated cardiovascular protection. However, the precise protein-protein interaction between adiponectin and T-cad remains poorly characterized. Using ELISA-based and surface plasmon analyses, we report here that T-cad fused with IgG Fc as a fusion tag by replacing its glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor specifically bound both hexameric and larger multimeric adiponectin with a dissociation constant of ∼1.0 nm and without any contribution from other cellular or serum factors. The extracellular T-cad repeats 1 and 2 were critical for the observed adiponectin binding, which is required for classical cadherin-mediated cell-to-cell adhesion. Moreover, the 130-kDa prodomain-bearing T-cad, uniquely expressed on the cell surface among members of the cadherin family and predominantly increased by adiponectin, contributed significantly to adiponectin binding. Inhibition of prodomain-processing by a prohormone convertase inhibitor increased 130-kDa T-cad levels and also enhanced adiponectin binding to endothelial cells both by more preferential cell-surface localization and by higher adiponectin-binding affinity of 130-kDa T-cad relative to 100-kDa T-cad. The preferential cell-surface localization of 130-kDa T-cad relative to 100-kDa T-cad was also observed in normal mice aorta in vivo In conclusion, our study shows that a unique key feature of the T-cad prodomain is its involvement in binding of the T-cad repeats 1 and 2 to adiponectin and also demonstrates that adiponectin positively regulates T-cad abundance. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    N-cadherin comprises five homologous extracellular domains, a transmembrane, and a cytoplasmic domain. The extracellular domains of N-cadherin play important roles in homophilic cell adhesion, but the contribution of each domain to this phenomenon has not been fully evaluated. In particular, the ...

  3. Cadherin-11 is a novel regulator of extracellular matrix synthesis and tissue mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Sindhu; Liu, Yayu; Alimperti, Stella; Agarwal, Sandeep K; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2016-08-01

    We discovered that Cadherin-11 (CDH11) regulates collagen and elastin synthesis, both affecting the mechanical properties and contractile function of animal tissues. Using a Cdh11-null mouse model, we observed a significant reduction in the mechanical properties [Youngs' modulus and ultimate tensile strength (UTS)] of Cdh11(-/-) as compared to wild-type (WT) mouse tissues, such as the aorta, bladder and skin. The deterioration of mechanical properties (Youngs' modulus and UTS) was accompanied by reduced collagen and elastin content in Cdh11(-/-) mouse tissues as well as in cells in culture. Similarly, knocking down CDH11 abolished collagen and elastin synthesis in human cells, and consequently reduced their ability to generate force. Conversely, engagement of CDH11 through homophilic interactions, led to swift activation of the TGF-β and ROCK pathways as evidenced by phosphorylation of downstream effectors. Subsequently, activation of the key transcription factors, MRTF-A (also known as MKL1) and MYOCD led to significant upregulation of collagen and elastin genes. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role of adherens junctions in regulating extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis with implications for many important biological processes, including maintenance of tissue integrity, wound healing and tissue regeneration. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Proteolytic cleavage of cadherins: Functional role of the cleaved extracellular and cytoplasmic domains

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion is crucial for morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Cadherin adhesive function can be regulated by distinct proteolytic cleavage events, resulting in release of either the ectodomain or cytoplasmic domain. However, it is unclear if the released fragments have biological activity by themselves. This thesis analyses the functional significance of the generated cadherin fragments. Using Xenopus laevis development as model system, it was...

  5. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  6. Thinking outside the cell: how cadherins drive adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasch, Julia; Harrison, Oliver J; Honig, Barry; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Cadherins are a superfamily of cell surface glycoproteins whose ectodomains contain multiple repeats of β-sandwich extracellular cadherin (EC) domains that adopt a similar fold to immunoglobulin domains. The best characterized cadherins are the vertebrate 'classical' cadherins, which mediate adhesion via trans homodimerization between their membrane-distal EC1 domains that extend from apposed cells, and assemble intercellular adherens junctions through cis clustering. To form mature trans adhesive dimers, cadherin domains from apposed cells dimerize in a 'strand-swapped' conformation. This occurs in a two-step binding process involving a fast-binding intermediate called the 'X-dimer'. Trans dimers are less flexible than cadherin monomers, a factor that drives junction assembly following cell-cell contact by reducing the entropic cost associated with the formation of lateral cis oligomers. Cadherins outside the classical subfamily appear to have evolved distinct adhesive mechanisms that are only now beginning to be understood.

  7. Structural Determinants of Cadherin-23 Function in Hearing and Deafness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotomayor, Marcos; Weihofen, Wilhelm A.; Gaudet, Rachelle; Corey, David P. (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2010-06-21

    The hair-cell tip link, a fine filament directly conveying force to mechanosensitive transduction channels, is composed of two proteins, protocadherin-15 and cadherin-23, whose mutation causes deafness. However, their molecular structure, elasticity, and deafness-related structural defects are unknown. We present crystal structures of the first and second extracellular cadherin repeats of cadherin-23. Overall, structures show typical cadherin folds, but reveal an elongated N terminus that precludes classical cadherin interactions and contributes to an N-terminal Ca{sup 2+}-binding site. The deafness mutation D101G, in the linker region between the repeats, causes a slight bend between repeats and decreases Ca{sup 2+} affinity. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that cadherin-23 repeats are stiff and that either removing Ca{sup 2+} or mutating Ca{sup 2+}-binding residues reduces rigidity and unfolding strength. The structures define an uncharacterized cadherin family and, with simulations, suggest mechanisms underlying inherited deafness and how cadherin-23 may bind with itself and with protocadherin-15 to form the tip link.

  8. [Cadherins: structure and signalisation protein of cell-cell junctions. Introduction and conclusions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinçon-Raymond, Martine

    2004-01-01

    Cadherin is a super family of genes, with at least 80 members. These members include classic cadherins, desmogleins, desmocollins, protocadherins, CNRs, Fats, seven-pass transmembrane cadherins and Ret tyrosine kinase. The repeated EC extracellular domains (N-terminal domain) are common to the family members and ensure cell adherence in a calcium dependant mechanism. The cadherins are expressed from amoebae to mammals. The biological complexity of cadherins is expressed at different levels, multigenic family and multiple functions in different tissues leading to use different methodological approaches. All the talks in this session broach in a promising aspect in the field of the basic comprehension of cell adhesion (R. M. Mège), at the molecular level (H. Feracci), physiological homeostasis of gut (S. Thenet), cell lineage (V. Delmas) or cancer transformation (L. Larue).

  9. Regulation of cadherin-mediated adhesion in morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumbiner, Barry M

    2005-08-01

    Cadherin cell-adhesion proteins mediate many facets of tissue morphogenesis. The dynamic regulation of cadherins in response to various extracellular signals controls cell sorting, cell rearrangements and cell movements. Cadherins are regulated at the cell surface by an inside-out signalling mechanism that is analogous to the integrins in platelets and leukocytes. Signal-transduction pathways impinge on the catenins (cytoplasmic cadherin-associated proteins), which transduce changes across the membrane to alter the state of the cadherin adhesive bond.

  10. Exposure to repeated immobilization stress inhibits cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in the rat ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomayor-Zárate, Ramón; Abarca, Jorge; Araya, Katherine A; Renard, Georgina M; Andrés, María E; Gysling, Katia

    2015-11-01

    A higher vulnerability to drug abuse has been observed in human studies of individuals exposed to chronic or persistent stress, as well as in animal models of drug abuse. Here, we explored the effect of repeated immobilization stress on cocaine-induced increase in dopamine extracellular levels in VTA and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and GABA systems. Cocaine (10mg/Kg i.p.) induced an increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in control rats. However, this effect was not observed in repeated stress rats. Considering the evidence relating stress with CRF, we decided to perfuse CRF and CP-154526 (selective antagonist of CRF1 receptor) in the VTA of control and repeated stress rats, respectively. We observed that perfusion of 20μM CRF inhibited the increase of VTA DA extracellular levels induced by cocaine in control rats. Interestingly, we observed that in the presence of 10μM CP-154526, cocaine induced a significant increase of VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats. Regarding the role of VTA GABA neurotransmission, cocaine administration induced a significant increase in VTA GABA extracellular levels only in repeated stress rats. Consistently, cocaine was able to increase VTA DA extracellular levels in repeated stress rats when 100μM bicuculline, an antagonist of GABAA receptor, was perfused intra VTA. Thus, both CRF and GABA systems are involved in the lack of response to cocaine in the VTA of repeated stress rats. It is tempting to suggest that the loss of response in VTA dopaminergic neurons to cocaine, after repeated stress, is due to an interaction between CRF and GABA systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the cadherin cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, C

    1992-04-17

    Differential adhesion between embryonic cells has been proposed to be mediated by a family of closely related glycoproteins called the cadherins. The cadherins mediate adhesion in part through an interaction between the cadherin cytoplasmic domain and intracellular proteins, called the catenins. To determine whether these interactions could regulate cadherin function in embryos, a form of N-cadherin was generated that lacks an extracellular domain. Expression of this mutant in Xenopus embryos causes a dramatic inhibition of cell adhesion. Analysis of the mutant phenotype shows that at least two regions of the N-cadherin cytoplasmic domain can inhibit adhesion and that the mutant cadherin can inhibit catenin binding to E-cadherin. These results suggest that cadherin-mediated adhesion can be regulated by cytoplasmic interactions and that this regulation may contribute to morphogenesis when emerging tissues coexpress several cadherin types.

  12. Location of the O-acetyl substituents on a nonasaccharide repeating unit of sycamore extracellular xyloglucan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, W S; Oates, J E; van Halbeek, H; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P; Tiller, P R; Dell, A

    1988-02-15

    The locations of the O-acetyl substituents on the major nonasaccharide repeating unit of the xyloglucan isolated from sycamore extracellular polysaccharides were determined by a combination of analytical methods, including f.a.b.-m.s. and 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy. The O-2-linked-beta-D-galactosyl residue of the nonasaccharide was found to be the dominant site of O-acetyl substitution. Both mono-O-acetylated and di-O-acetylated beta-D-galactosyl residues were detected. The degree of O-acetylation of the beta-D-galactosyl residue, was estimated by 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy to be 55-60% at O-6, 15-20% at O-4, and 20-25% at O-3. 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy also indicated that approximately 50% of the beta-D-galactosyl residues are mono-O-acetylated, 25-30% are di-O-acetylated, and 20% are not acetylated.

  13. Identification of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin domain II loop 1 as the binding site of Tenebrio molitor cadherin repeat CR12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Amaro, Itzel; Ortíz, Ernesto; Becerril, Baltazar; Ibarra, Jorge E; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins exert their toxic effect by specific recognition of larval midgut proteins leading to oligomerization of the toxin, membrane insertion and pore formation. The exposed domain II loop regions of Cry toxins have been shown to be involved in receptor binding. Insect cadherins have shown to be functionally involved in toxin binding facilitating toxin oligomerization. Here, we isolated a VHH (VHHA5) antibody by phage display that binds Cry3Aa loop 1 and competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to Tenebrio molitor brush border membranes. VHHA5 also competed with the binding of Cry3Aa to a cadherin fragment (CR12) that was previously shown to be involved in binding and toxicity of Cry3Aa, indicating that Cry3Aa binds CR12 through domain II loop 1. Moreover, we show that a loop 1 mutant, previously characterized to have increased toxicity to T. molitor, displayed a correlative enhanced binding affinity to T. molitor CR12 and to VHHA5. These results show that Cry3Aa domain II loop 1 is a binding site of CR12 T. molitor cadherin.

  14. Application of repeated aspartate tags to improving extracellular production of Escherichia coli L-asparaginase isozyme II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Ki; Min, Won-Ki; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Asparaginase isozyme II from Escherichia coli is a popular enzyme that has been used as a therapeutic agent against acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, fusion tag systems consisting of the pelB signal sequence and various lengths of repeated aspartate tags were devised to highly express and to release active asparaginase isozyme II extracellularly in E. coli. Among several constructs, recombinant asparaginase isozyme II fused with the pelB signal sequence and five aspartate tag was secreted efficiently into culture medium at 34.6 U/mg cell of specific activity. By batch fermentation, recombinant E. coli produced 40.8 U/ml asparaginase isozyme II in the medium. In addition, deletion of the gspDE gene reduced extracellular production of asparaginase isozyme II, indicating that secretion of recombinant asparaginase isozyme II was partially ascribed to the recognition by the general secretion machinery. This tag system composed of the pelB signal peptide, and repeated aspartates can be applied to extracellular production of other recombinant proteins.

  15. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  16. Ankyrin-G Inhibits Endocytosis of Cadherin Dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadwell, Chantel M; Jenkins, Paul M; Bennett, Vann; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-08

    Dynamic regulation of endothelial cell adhesion is central to vascular development and maintenance. Furthermore, altered endothelial adhesion is implicated in numerous diseases. Therefore, normal vascular patterning and maintenance require tight regulation of endothelial cell adhesion dynamics. However, the mechanisms that control junctional plasticity are not fully understood. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) is an adhesive protein found in adherens junctions of endothelial cells. VE-cadherin mediates adhesion through trans interactions formed by its extracellular domain. Trans binding is followed by cis interactions that laterally cluster the cadherin in junctions. VE-cadherin is linked to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic interactions with β- and α-catenin, which serve to increase adhesive strength. Furthermore, p120-catenin binds to the cytoplasmic tail of cadherin and stabilizes it at the plasma membrane. Here we report that induced cis dimerization of VE-cadherin inhibits endocytosis independent of both p120 binding and trans interactions. However, we find that ankyrin-G, a protein that links membrane proteins to the spectrin-actin cytoskeleton, associates with VE-cadherin and inhibits its endocytosis. Ankyrin-G inhibits VE-cadherin endocytosis independent of p120 binding. We propose a model in which ankyrin-G associates with and inhibits the endocytosis of VE-cadherin cis dimers. Our findings support a novel mechanism for regulation of VE-cadherin endocytosis through ankyrin association with cadherin engaged in lateral interactions.

  17. Recycling of E-cadherin: a potential mechanism for regulating cadherin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, T L; Yap, A S; Stow, J L

    1999-07-12

    E-Cadherin plays critical roles in many aspects of cell adhesion, epithelial development, and the establishment and maintenance of epithelial polarity. The fate of E-cadherin once it is delivered to the basolateral cell surface, and the mechanisms which govern its participation in adherens junctions, are not well understood. Using surface biotinylation and recycling assays, we observed that some of the cell surface E-cadherin is actively internalized and is then recycled back to the plasma membrane. The pool of E-cadherin undergoing endocytosis and recycling was markedly increased in cells without stable cell-cell contacts, i.e., in preconfluent cells and after cell contacts were disrupted by depletion of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that endocytic trafficking of E-cadherin is regulated by cell-cell contact. The reformation of cell junctions after replacement of Ca2+ was then found to be inhibited when recycling of endocytosed E-cadherin was disrupted by bafilomycin treatment. The endocytosis and recycling of E-cadherin and of the transferrin receptor were similarly inhibited by potassium depletion and by bafilomycin treatment, and both proteins were accumulated in intracellular compartments by an 18 degrees C temperature block, suggesting that endocytosis may occur via a clathrin-mediated pathway. We conclude that a pool of surface E-cadherin is constantly trafficked through an endocytic, recycling pathway and that this may provide a mechanism for regulating the availability of E-cadherin for junction formation in development, tissue remodeling, and tumorigenesis.

  18. Cry1A toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis bind specifically to a region adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of BT-R(1) in Manduca sexta: involvement of a cadherin in the entomopathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsch, J A; Candas, M; Griko, N B; Maaty, W S A; Midboe, E G; Vadlamudi, R K; Bulla, L A

    2002-09-01

    Many subspecies of the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis produce various parasporal crystal proteins, also known as Cry toxins, that exhibit insecticidal activity upon binding to specific receptors in the midgut of susceptible insects. One such receptor, BT-R(1) (210 kDa), is a cadherin located in the midgut epithelium of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. It has a high binding affinity (K(d) approximately 1nM) for the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis. Truncation analysis of BT-R(1) revealed that the only fragment capable of binding the Cry1A toxins of B. thuringiensis was a contiguous 169-amino acid sequence adjacent to the membrane-proximal extracellular domain. The purified toxin-binding fragment acted as an antagonist to Cry1Ab toxin by blocking the binding of toxin to the tobacco hornworm midgut and inhibiting insecticidal action. Exogenous Cry1Ab toxin bound to intact COS-7 cells expressing BT-R(1) cDNA, subsequently killing the cells. Recruitment of BT-R(1) by B. thuringiensis indicates that the bacterium interacts with a specific cell adhesion molecule during its pathogenesis. Apparently, Cry toxins, like other bacterial toxins, attack epithelial barriers by targeting cell adhesion molecules within susceptible insect hosts.

  19. Cadherins in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semb, H

    2004-01-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules has emerged as a key regulator of embryonic morphogenesis. Although we are beginning to learn more about the developmental functions of non-classic cadherins, most of our current knowledge of the involvement of cadherins in various cellular processes that guide morphogenesis, such as adhesion, migration, cell shape changes, proliferation, and survival are based on the analysis of classic cadherins. Key issues for future studies include deeper knowledge of how the regulation of cadherin activity contributes to specific aspects of morphogenesis, and whether all cadherin-mediated morphogenetic activities can be directly or indirectly attributed to its role in cell-cell adhesion or whether they are executed via adhesion-independent mechanisms.

  20. Structure of the N terminus of cadherin 23 reveals a new adhesion mechanism for a subset of cadherin superfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elledge, Heather M; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Clark, Peter; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Kolatkar, Anand; Kuhn, Peter; Müller, Ulrich

    2010-06-08

    The cadherin superfamily encodes more than 100 receptors with diverse functions in tissue development and homeostasis. Classical cadherins mediate adhesion by binding interactions that depend on their N-terminal extracellular cadherin (EC) domains, which swap N-terminal beta-strands. Sequence alignments suggest that the strand-swap binding mode is not commonly used by functionally divergent cadherins. Here, we have determined the structure of the EC1-EC2 domains of cadherin 23 (CDH23), which binds to protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) to form tip links of mechanosensory hair cells. Unlike classical cadherins, the CDH23 N terminus contains polar amino acids that bind Ca(2+). The N terminus of PCDH15 also contains polar amino acids. Mutations in polar amino acids within EC1 of CDH23 and PCDH15 abolish interaction between the two cadherins. PCDH21 and PCDH24 contain similarly charged N termini, suggesting that a subset of cadherins share a common interaction mechanism that differs from the strand-swap binding mode of classical cadherins.

  1. E-cadherin is required for cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaolie; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Wedlich, Doris; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-03-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile and multipotent embryonic cell population, which migrates directionally on defined routes throughout the embryo, contributing to facial structures including cartilage, bone and ganglia. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is known to play a crucial role in the directional migration of CNC cells. However, migrating CNC co-express different cadherin subtypes, and their individual roles have yet to be fully explored. In previous studies, the expression of individual cadherin subtypes has been analysed using different methods with varying sensitivities, preventing the direct comparison of expression levels. Here, we provide the first comprehensive and comparative analysis of the expression of six cadherin superfamily members during different phases of CNC cell migration in Xenopus. By applying a quantitative RT-qPCR approach, we can determine the copy number and abundance of each expressed cadherin through different phases of CNC migration. Using this approach, we show for the first time expression of E-cadherin and XB/C-cadherin in CNC cells, adding them as two new members of cadherins co-expressed during CNC migration. Cadherin co-expression during CNC migration in Xenopus, in particular the constant expression of E-cadherin, contradicts the classical epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) model postulating a switch in cadherin expression. Loss-of-function experiments further show that E-cadherin is required for proper CNC cell migration in vivo and also for cell protrusion formation in vitro. Knockdown of E-cadherin is not rescued by co-injection of other classical cadherins, pointing to a specific function of E-cadherin in mediating CNC cell migration. Finally, through reconstitution experiments with different E-cadherin deletion mutants in E-cadherin morphant embryos, we demonstrate that the extracellular domain, but not the cytoplasmic domain, of E-cadherin is sufficient to rescue CNC cell migration in vivo.

  2. Cadherins and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, Christoph; Hertel, Nicole; Hübner, Christian A

    2012-08-27

    Cadherins mediate cell-cell adhesion but are also involved in intracellular signaling pathways associated with neuropsychiatric disease. Most of the ∼100 cadherins that are expressed in the brain exhibit characteristic spatiotemporal expression profiles. Cadherins have been shown to regulate neural tube regionalization, neuronal migration, gray matter differentiation, neural circuit formation, spine morphology, synapse formation and synaptic remodeling. The dysfunction of the cadherin-based adhesive system may alter functional connectivity and coherent information processing in the human brain in neuropsychiatric disease. Several neuropsychiatric disorders, such as epilepsy/mental retardation, autism, bipolar disease and schizophrenia, have been associated with cadherins, mostly by genome-wide association studies. For example, CDH15 and PCDH19 are associated with cognitive impairment; CDH5, CDH8, CDH9, CDH10, CDH13, CDH15, PCDH10, PCDH19 and PCDHb4 with autism; CDH7, CDH12, CDH18, PCDH12 and FAT with bipolar disease and schizophrenia; and CDH11, CDH12 and CDH13 with methamphetamine and alcohol dependency. To date, disease-causing mutations are established for PCDH19 in patients with epilepsy, cognitive impairment and/or autistic features. In conclusion, genes encoding members of the cadherin superfamily are of special interest in the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disease because cadherins play a pivotal role in the development of the neural circuitry as well as in mature synaptic function.

  3. A single type of cadherin is involved in Bacillus thuringiensis toxicity in Plutella xylostella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y; Herrero, S; Kim, Y

    2015-12-01

    Cadherins have been described as one the main functional receptors for the toxins of the entomopathogenic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). With the availability of the whole genome of Plutella xylostella, different types of cadherins have been annotated. In this study we focused on determining those members of the cadherin-related proteins that potentially play a role in the mode of action of Bt toxins. For this, we mined the genome of P. xylostella to identify these putative cadherins. The genome screening revealed 52 genes that were annotated as cadherin or cadherin-like genes. Further analysis revealed that six of these putative cadherins had three motifs common to all Bt-related cadherins: a signal peptide, cadherin repeats and a transmembrane domain. From the six selected cadherins, only P. xylostella cadherin 1 (PxCad1) was expressed in the larval midgut and only the silencing of this gene by RNA interference (double-stranded RNA feeding) reduce toxicity and binding to the midgut of the Cry1Ac type toxin from Bt. These results indicate that from the whole set of cadherin-related genes identified in P. xylostella, only PxCad1 is associated with the Cry1Ac mode of action.

  4. Cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes cell–substrate adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhe, Rahul P.; Gudzenko, Tetyana; Bachmann, Michael; Becker, Sarah F.; Gonnermann, Carina; Winter, Claudia; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Alfandari, Dominique; Kratzer, Marie-Claire; Franz, Clemens M.; Kashef, Jubin

    2016-01-01

    Cadherin receptors have a well-established role in cell–cell adhesion, cell polarization and differentiation. However, some cadherins also promote cell and tissue movement during embryonic development and tumour progression. In particular, cadherin-11 is upregulated during tumour and inflammatory cell invasion, but the mechanisms underlying cadherin-11 stimulated cell migration are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that cadherin-11 localizes to focal adhesions and promotes adhesion to fibronectin in Xenopus neural crest, a highly migratory embryonic cell population. Transfected cadherin-11 also localizes to focal adhesions in different mammalian cell lines, while endogenous cadherin-11 shows focal adhesion localization in primary human fibroblasts. In focal adhesions, cadherin-11 co-localizes with β1-integrin and paxillin and physically interacts with the fibronectin-binding proteoglycan syndecan-4. Adhesion to fibronectin mediated by cadherin-11/syndecan-4 complexes requires both the extracellular domain of syndecan-4, and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of cadherin-11. These results reveal an unexpected role of a classical cadherin in cell–matrix adhesion during cell migration. PMID:26952325

  5. Potential Transfer of Polyglutamine and CAG-Repeat RNA in Extracellular Vesicles in Huntington's Disease: Background and Evaluation in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Abels, Erik R; Redzic, Jasmina S; Margulis, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steve; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD) the imperfect expanded CAG repeat in the first exon of the HTT gene leads to the generation of a polyglutamine (polyQ) protein, which has some neuronal toxicity, potentially mollified by formation of aggregates. Accumulated research, reviewed here, implicates both the polyQ protein and the expanded repeat RNA in causing toxicity leading to neurodegeneration in HD. Different theories have emerged as to how the neurodegeneration spreads throughout the brain, with one possibility being the transport of toxic protein and RNA in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Most cell types in the brain release EVs and these have been shown to contain neurodegenerative proteins in the case of prion protein and amyloid-beta peptide. In this study, we used a model culture system with an overexpression of HTT-exon 1 polyQ-GFP constructs in human 293T cells and found that the EVs did incorporate both the polyQ-GFP protein and expanded repeat RNA. Striatal mouse neural cells were able to take up these EVs with a consequent increase in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and polyQ-GFP RNAs, but with no evidence of uptake of polyQ-GFP protein or any apparent toxicity, at least over a relatively short period of exposure. A differentiated striatal cell line expressing endogenous levels of Hdh mRNA containing the expanded repeat incorporated more of this mRNA into EVs as compared to similar cells expressing this mRNA with a normal repeat length. These findings support the potential of EVs to deliver toxic expanded trinucleotide repeat RNAs from one cell to another, but further work will be needed to evaluate potential EV and cell-type specificity of transfer and effects of long-term exposure. It seems likely that expanded HD-associated repeat RNA may appear in biofluids and may have use as biomarkers of disease state and response to therapy.

  6. Deletion of the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin reduces, but does not eliminate, traction force-transmission.

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    Lee, Eliot; Ewald, Makena L; Sedarous, Mary; Kim, Timothy; Weyers, Brent W; Truong, Rose Hong; Yamada, Soichiro

    2016-09-30

    Collective migration of epithelial cells is an integral part of embryonic development, wound healing, tissue renewal and carcinoma invasion. While previous studies have focused on cell-extracellular matrix adhesion as a site of migration-driving, traction force-transmission, cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion is also capable of force-transmission. Using a soft elastomer coated with purified N-cadherin as a substrate and a Hepatocyte Growth Factor-treated, transformed MDCK epithelial cell line as a model system, we quantified traction transmitted by N-cadherin-mediated contacts. On a substrate coated with purified extracellular domain of N-cadherin, cell surface N-cadherin proteins arranged into puncta. N-cadherin mutants (either the cytoplasmic deletion or actin-binding domain chimera), however, failed to assemble into puncta, suggesting the assembly of focal adhesion like puncta requires the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domain deleted N-cadherin expressing cells exerted lower traction stress than the full-length or the actin binding domain chimeric N-cadherin. Our data demonstrate that N-cadherin junctions exert significant traction stress that requires the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin, but the loss of the cytoplasmic domain does not completely eliminate traction force transmission.

  7. Decreased extracellular adenosine levels lead to loss of hypoxia-induced neuroprotection after repeated episodes of exposure to hypoxia.

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    Mei Cui

    Full Text Available Achieving a prolonged neuroprotective state following transient ischemic attacks (TIAs is likely to effectively reduce the brain damage and neurological dysfunction associated with recurrent stroke. HPC is a phenomenon in which advanced exposure to mild hypoxia reduces the stroke volume produced by a subsequent TIA. However, this neuroprotection is not long-lasting, with the effects reaching a peak after 3 days. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the use of multiple episodes of hypoxic exposure at different time intervals to induce longer-term protection in a mouse stroke model. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to different hypoxic preconditioning protocols: a single episode of HPC or five identical episodes at intervals of 3 days (E3d HPC or 6 days (E6d HPC. Three days after the last hypoxic exposure, temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was induced. The effects of these HPC protocols on hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF regulated gene mRNA expression were measured by quantitative PCR. Changes in extracellular adenosine concentrations, known to exert neuroprotective effects, were also measured using in vivo microdialysis and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Neuroprotection was provided by E6d HPC but not E3d HPC. HIF-regulated target gene expression increased significantly following all HPC protocols. However, E3d HPC significantly decreased extracellular adenosine and reduced cerebral blood flow in the ischemic region with upregulated expression of the adenosine transporter, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1. An ENT1 inhibitor, propentofylline increased the cerebral blood flow and re-established neuroprotection in E3d HPC. Adenosine receptor specific antagonists showed that adenosine mainly through A1 receptor mediates HPC induced neuroprotection. Our data indicate that cooperation of HIF-regulated genes and extracellular adenosine is necessary for HPC-induced neuroprotection.

  8. Functional characterization of E- and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer cells

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    Cano Amparo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in the cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes are involved in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. However, the functional implication of distinct cadherin types in breast cancer biology is still poorly understood. Methods To compare the functional role of E-cadherin and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer, we stably transfected these molecules into the MDA-MB-231 cell line, and investigated their effects on motility, invasion and gene expression regulation. Results Expression of either E- and P-cadherin significantly increased cell aggregation and induced a switch from fibroblastic to epithelial morphology. Although expression of these cadherins did not completely reverse the mesenchymal phenotype of MDA-MB-231 cells, both E- and P-cadherin decreased fibroblast-like migration and invasion through extracellular matrix in a similar way. Moreover, microarray gene expression analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells after expression of E- and P-cadherins revealed that these molecules can activate signaling pathways leading to significant changes in gene expression. Although the expression patterns induced by E- and P-cadherin showed more similarities than differences, 40 genes were differentially modified by the expression of either cadherin type. Conclusion E- and P-cadherin have similar functional consequences on the phenotype and invasive behavior of MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that these cadherins can induce both common and specific gene expression programs on invasive breast cancer cells. Importantly, these identified genes are potential targets for future studies on the functional consequences of altered cadherin expression in human breast cancer.

  9. Normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene and abnormal incorporation of fibrillin into the extracellular matrix in Lujan Syndrome

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    Greenhaw, G.A.; Stone, C.; Milewicz, D. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Lujan syndrome is an X-linked condition that includes mild-to-moderate mental retardation, poor social integration, normal secondary sexual development with normal testicular size, generalized hypotonia, hypernasal voice and dolichostenomelia. Major cardiac complications and lens dislocation have not been reported although severe myopia may occur. All reported cases have had negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome but establishing this constellation of findings as a distinctive entity has been difficult. We report 4 males in two sibships with clinical findings consistent with Lujan syndrome, normal karyotypes, negative cytogenetic screening for fra(X) syndrome and a normal number of CGG repeats in the FMR-1 gene. Dermal fibroblasts explanted from one of the affected males were used to study fibrillin synthesis secretion and extracellular matrix incorporation into microfibrils. Cells from the affected individual showed normal synthesis and secretion of fibrillin when compared to control cells, but the fibrillin was not incorporated into the extracellular matrix. These results suggest the presence of a gene on the X chromosome which may play a role in microfibril assembly and when deficient may disrupt the incorporation of fibrillin into microfibrils. This may be important not only in normal body morphogenesis but also in the development/function of the brain. More affected individuals are needed to investigate these findings further.

  10. Immunocytochemical studies of the interactions of cadherins and catenins in the early Xenopus embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, T; Fesenko, I V; Schneider, S; Münchberg, F E; Joos, T O; Spieker, T P; Hausen, P

    1999-06-01

    Linkage of cadherins to the cytoskeleton is crucial for their adhesive function. Since alpha- and beta-catenin play a key role in this linkage, these proteins are possible targets for processes that control cell-cell adhesion. To achieve a better understanding of the regulation of cell-cell adhesion in embryonic morphogenesis, we used immunohistology to investigate how in Xenopus blastomeres catenins respond to disturbances in the expression of maternal cadherins. Overexpression of myc-tagged maternal cadherin leads to a proportionate increase of the level of beta-catenin. The two proteins colocalize in the endoplasmic reticulum, in cytoplasmic vesicles, and along the cell membrane, indicating that the beta-catenin binds to overexpressed cadherin early in its passage to the plasma membrane. Expression of cadherin is essential for the stable presence of beta-catenin, as depletion from maternal cadherin mRNA leads to a complete loss of beta-catenin from the blastomeres. alpha-Catenin behaves differently. Overexpression of cadherin leaves the amount and localization of alpha-catenin largely unaffected, and additional cadherin inserts itself into the membrane without a proportionate rise in the level of membrane-bound alpha-catenin. However, cadherin mRNA depletion leads to a redistribution of alpha-catenin from the membrane to the cytoplasm. Thus, cadherin is required to localize alpha-catenin to the membrane, but the amount of alpha-catenin along the membrane seems to be restricted to a certain level which cannot be exceeded. The relevance of these observations for the regulation of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in the Xenopus embryo is discussed. Additionally, we demonstrate that plakoglobin, like beta-catenin an armadillo repeat protein, shows neither accumulation after overexpression nor colocalization with the overexpressed cadherin.

  11. Cadherin-9 is a novel cell surface marker for the heterogeneous pool of renal fibroblasts.

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    Cornelia Thedieck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interstitial fibroblasts are a minor, but nevertheless very important, component of the kidney. They secrete and remodel extracellular matrix and they produce active compounds such as erythropoietin. However, studying human renal fibroblasts has been hampered by the lack of appropriate surface markers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The expression of cadherin-9 in various human renal cell lines and tissues was studied on the mRNA level by RT-PCR and on the protein level with the help of newly generated cadherin-9 antibodies. The classical type II cadherin-9, so far only described in the neural system, was identified as a reliable surface marker for renal fibroblasts. Compared to FSP1, a widely-used cytosolic renal fibroblast marker, cadherin-9 showed a more restricted expression pattern in human kidney. Under pathological conditions, cadherin-9 was expressed in the stroma of renal cell carcinoma, but not in the tumor cells themselves, and in renal fibrosis the percentage of cadherin-9-positive cells was clearly elevated 3 to 5 times compared to healthy kidney tissue. Induction of epithelial mesenchymal transition in renal epithelial cells with cyclosporin-A, which causes renal fibrosis as a side effect, induced cadherin-9 expression. Functional studies following siRNA-mediated knockdown of cadherin-9 revealed that it acts in the kidney like a typical classical cadherin. It was found to be associated with catenins and to mediate homophilic but not heterophilic cell interactions. CONCLUSIONS: Cadherin-9 represents a novel and reliable cell surface marker for fibroblasts in healthy and diseased kidneys. Together with the established marker molecules FSP1, CD45 and alpha smooth muscle actin, cadherin-9 can now be used to differentiate the heterogenic pool of renal fibroblasts into resident and activated fibroblasts, immigrated bone marrow derived fibroblast precursors and cells in different stages of epithelial mesenchymal transition.

  12. Differential Downregulation of E-Cadherin and Desmoglein by Epidermal Growth Factor

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    Miquella G. Chavez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of cell : cell junctions is a key event in cutaneous wound repair. In this study we report that activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor disrupts cel : cell adhesion, but with different kinetics and fates for the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein and for E-cadherin. Downregulation of desmoglein preceded that of E-cadherin in vivo and in an EGF-stimulated in vitro wound reepithelialization model. Dual immunofluorescence staining revealed that neither E-cadherin nor desmoglein-2 internalized with the EGF receptor, or with one another. In response to EGF, desmoglein-2 entered a recycling compartment based on predominant colocalization with the recycling marker Rab11. In contrast, E-cadherin downregulation was accompanied by cleavage of the extracellular domain. A broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor protected E-cadherin but not the desmosomal cadherin, desmoglein-2, from EGF-stimulated disruption. These findings demonstrate that although activation of the EGF receptor regulates adherens junction and desmosomal components, this stimulus downregulates associated cadherins through different mechanisms.

  13. Cadherin is involved in the action of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa in the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

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    Qiu, Lin; Hou, Leilei; Zhang, Boyao; Liu, Lang; Li, Bo; Deng, Pan; Ma, Weihua; Wang, Xiaoping; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Chen, Lizhen; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins are effective against some insect pests in sprays and transgenic crops, although the evolution of resistance could threaten the long-term efficacy of such Bt use. One strategy to delay resistance to Bt crops is to "pyramid" two or more Bt proteins that bind to distinct receptor proteins within the insect midgut. The most common Bt pyramid in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) employs Cry1Ac with Cry2Ab to target several key lepidopteran pests, including the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), which is a serious migratory pest of many vegetable crops and is increasingly important in cotton in China. While cadherin and aminopeptidase-N are key receptors of Cry1 toxins in many lepidopterans including S. exigua, the receptor for Cry2A toxins remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a heterologous expressed peptide corresponding to cadherin repeat 7 to the membrane proximal extracellular domain (CR7-MPED) in the S. exigua cadherin 1b (SeCad1b) binds Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa. Moreover, SeCad1b transcription was suppressed in S. exigua larvae by oral RNA interference and susceptibility to Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa was significantly reduced. These results indicate that SeCad1b plays important functional roles of both Cry1Ac and Cry2Aa, having major implications for resistance management for S. exigua in Bt crops.

  14. E-cadherin in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annie On On Chan

    2006-01-01

    Cadherin is an adhesion molecule and a superfamily of calcium-mediated membrane glycoproteins. E-cadherin is the prototype of the class E-cadherin that links to catenins to form the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence has shown that E-cadherin not only acts as an adhesive, but also plays important roles in growth development and carcinogenesis. It has been recently viewed as an invasion as well as a growth suppressor gene. This review summarizes the recent discoveries on E-cadherin and its role in gastric cancer. In particular, our work on E-cadherin in gastric cancer, including its relation with Helicobacter pylori and clinical applications, are described in detail.

  15. Syndecan-2 enhances E-cadherin shedding and fibroblast-like morphological changes by inducing MMP-7 expression in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bohee; Jung, Hyejung; Chung, Heesung; Moon, Byung-In; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2016-08-12

    E-cadherin plays a mechanical role in mediating cell-cell interactions and maintaining epithelial tissue integrity, and the loss of E-cadherin function has been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Syndecan-2, a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is upregulated during the development of colon cancer. Here, we assessed the functional relationship between E-cadherin and syndecan-2. We found that stable overexpression of syndecan-2 in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line (HT29) enhanced the proteolytic shedding of E-cadherin to conditioned-media. Either knockdown of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) or inhibition of MMP-7 activity using GM6001 significantly reduced the extracellular shedding of E-cadherin, suggesting that syndecan-2 mediates E-cadherin shedding via MMP-7. Consistent with this notion, enhancement of MMP-7 expression by interleukin-1α treatment increased the shedding of E-cadherin. Conversely, the specific reduction of either syndecan-2 or MMP-7 reduced the shedding of E-cadherin. HT29 cells overexpressing syndecan-2 showed significantly lower cell-surface expression of E-cadherin, decreased cell-cell contact, a more fibroblastic cell morphology, and increased expression levels of ZEB-1. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 induces extracellular shedding of E-cadherin and supports the acquisition of a fibroblast-like morphology by regulating MMP-7 expression in a colon cancer cell line.

  16. E-cadherin couples death receptors to the cytoskeleton to regulate apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Marsters, Scot; Ye, Xiaofen; Luis, Elizabeth; Gonzalez, Lino; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2014-06-19

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular process essential to the development and maintenance of solid tissues. In cancer, EMT suppresses apoptosis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. EMT selectively attenuated apoptosis signaling via the death receptors DR4 and DR5. Loss of the epithelial cell adhesion protein E-cadherin recapitulated this outcome, whereas homotypic E-cadherin engagement promoted apoptotic signaling via DR4/DR5, but not Fas. Depletion of α-catenin, which couples E-cadherin to the actin cytoskeleton, or actin polymerization inhibitors similarly attenuated DR4/DR5-induced apoptosis. E-cadherin bound specifically to ligated DR4/DR5, requiring extracellular cadherin domain 1 and calcium. E-cadherin augmented DR4/DR5 clustering and assembly of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), increasing caspase-8 activation in high molecular weight cell fractions. Conversely, EMT attenuated DR4/DR5-mediated DISC formation and caspase-8 stimulation. Consistent with these findings, epithelial cancer cell lines expressing higher E-cadherin levels displayed greater sensitivity to DR4/DR5-mediated apoptosis. These results have potential implications for tissue homeostasis as well as cancer therapy.

  17. Levels of soluble E-cadherin in breast, gastric, and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Ombretta; De Paoli, Paolo; De Re, Valli; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Cannizzaro, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Soluble E-cadherin is a 80 kDa protein fragment coming from the proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain of the full length epithelial cadherin, a molecule involved in cell adhesion/polarity and tissue morphogenesis. In comparison with normal epithelia, cancer cells show a decreased cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion, and sE-cad levels normally increase in body fluids (blood and urine). This review focuses on soluble E-cadherin in sera of patients affected by three solid cancers (breast, gastric, and colorectal cancers) and how its levels correlate or not with some cancer parameters (e.g., dimension, progression, and localisation). We will describe the main proteomics approaches adopted to measure sE-cad both in vivo and in vitro and the most important findings about its behaviour in cancer dynamics.

  18. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

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    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  19. SLIT2 attenuation during lung cancer progression deregulates beta-catenin and E-cadherin and associates with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ruo-Chia; Lee, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Han-Shui; Chen, Ben-Han; Tsai, Wan-Ching; Tzao, Ching; Wang, Yi-Ching

    2010-01-15

    Chromosome 4p15.3 is frequently deleted in late-stage lung cancer. We investigated the significance of the SLIT2 gene located in this region to lung cancer progression. SLIT2 encodes an extracellular glycoprotein that can suppress breast cancer by regulating beta-catenin. In this study, we examined alterations in the structure or expression of SLIT2, its receptor ROBO1, and beta-catenin, along with the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta)/beta-transducin repeat-containing protein (betaTrCP) pathway in lung cancer cell lines and patients. Low SLIT2 expression correlated with an upward trend of pathological stage and poorer survival in lung cancer patients. Importantly, SLIT2, betaTrCP, and beta-catenin expression levels predicted postoperative recurrence of lung cancer in patients. Stimulating SLIT2 expression by various methods increased the level of E-cadherin caused by attenuation of its transcriptional repressor SNAI1. Conversely, knocking down SLIT2 expression increased cell migration and reduced cell adhesion through coordinated deregulation of beta-catenin and E-cadherin/SNAI1 in the AKT/GSK3beta/betaTrCP pathway. Our findings indicate that SLIT2 suppresses lung cancer progression, defining it as a novel "theranostic" factor with potential as a therapeutic target and prognostic predictor in lung cancer. Cancer Res; 70(2); 543-51.

  20. Cadherins in neuronal morphogenesis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sachihiro C; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2008-06-01

    Classic cadherins represent a family of calcium-dependent homophilic cell-cell adhesion molecules. They confer strong adhesiveness to animal cells when they are anchored to the actin cytoskeleton via their cytoplasmic binding partners, catenins. The cadherin/catenin adhesion system plays key roles in the morphogenesis and function of the vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In early vertebrate development, cadherins are involved in multiple events of brain morphogenesis including the formation and maintenance of the neuroepithelium, neurite extension and migration of neuronal cells. In the invertebrate nervous system, classic cadherin-mediated cell-cell interaction plays important roles in wiring among neurons. For synaptogenesis, the cadherin/catenin system not only stabilizes cell-cell contacts at excitatory synapses but also assembles synaptic molecules at synaptic sites. Furthermore, this system is involved in synaptic plasticity. Recent studies on the role of individual cadherin subtypes at synapses indicate that individual cadherin subtypes play their own unique role to regulate synaptic activities.

  1. Soluble E-Cadherin: An Early Marker of Severity in Acute Pancreatitis

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    A. Sewpaul

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. At present, there is no simple test for predicting severity in acute pancreatitis. We investigated the use of an assay of soluble E-cadherin (sE-cadherin. Methods. Concentrations of sE-cadherin, from 19 patients with mild acute pancreatitis, 7 patients with severe acute pancreatitis, 11 patients with other acute gastrointestinal pathologies, and 12 healthy subjects were measured using a commercially available sandwich ELISA kit based on two monoclonal antibodies specific to the extracellular fragment of human E-cadherin. Measurements were made at 12 hours or less from onset of pain and also at 24 and 48 hours after onset of pain. Results. Mean (standard deviation concentration of sE-cadherin in patients with severe acute pancreatitis at <12 hours was 17780 ng/mL (7853, significantly higher than that of healthy volunteers 5180 ng/mL (1350, =.0039, patients with other gastrointestinal pathologies 7358 ng/mL (6655, =.0073, and also significantly higher than that of patients with mild pancreatitis, 7332 ng/mL (2843, =.0019. Discussion. Serum sE-cadherin could be an early (within 12 hours objective marker of severity in acute pancreatitis. This molecule warrants further investigation in the form of a large multicentre trial.

  2. E-cadherin can replace N-cadherin during secretory-stage enamel development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaomu; Bidlack, Felicitas B; Stokes, Nicole; Bartlett, John D

    2014-01-01

    N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT) and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO) mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is normally down-regulated. Notably, this is the first demonstration of a natural endogenous

  3. E-cadherin can replace N-cadherin during secretory-stage enamel development.

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    Xiaomu Guan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: N-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule and deletion of N-cadherin in mice is embryonic lethal. During the secretory stage of enamel development, E-cadherin is down-regulated and N-cadherin is specifically up-regulated in ameloblasts when groups of ameloblasts slide by one another to form the rodent decussating enamel rod pattern. Since N-cadherin promotes cell migration, we asked if N-cadherin is essential for ameloblast cell movement during enamel development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The enamel organ, including its ameloblasts, is an epithelial tissue and for this study a mouse strain with N-cadherin ablated from epithelium was generated. Enamel from wild-type (WT and N-cadherin conditional knockout (cKO mice was analyzed. μCT and scanning electron microscopy showed that thickness, surface structure, and prism pattern of the cKO enamel looked identical to WT. No significant difference in hardness was observed between WT and cKO enamel. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry revealed the WT and N-cadherin cKO secretory stage ameloblasts expressed approximately equal amounts of total cadherins. Strikingly, E-cadherin was not normally down-regulated during the secretory stage in the cKO mice suggesting that E-cadherin can compensate for the loss of N-cadherin. Previously it was demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2 induces E- and N-cadherin expression in human calvaria osteoblasts and we show that the N-cadherin cKO enamel organ expressed significantly more BMP2 and significantly less of the BMP antagonist Noggin than did WT enamel organ. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The E- to N-cadherin switch at the secretory stage is not essential for enamel development or for forming the decussating enamel rod pattern. E-cadherin can substitute for N-cadherin during these developmental processes. Bmp2 expression may compensate for the loss of N-cadherin by inducing or maintaining E-cadherin expression when E-cadherin is

  4. Differential regulation of growth-promoting signalling pathways by E-cadherin.

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    Nikolaos T Georgopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the well-documented association between loss of E-cadherin and carcinogenesis, as well as the link between restoration of its expression and suppression of proliferation in carcinoma cells, the ability of E-cadherin to modulate growth-promoting cell signalling in normal epithelial cells is less well understood and frequently contradictory. The potential for E-cadherin to co-ordinate different proliferation-associated signalling pathways has yet to be fully explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a normal human urothelial (NHU cell culture system and following a calcium-switch approach, we demonstrate that the stability of NHU cell-cell contacts differentially regulates the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3-K/AKT pathways. We show that stable cell contacts down-modulate the EGFR/ERK pathway, whilst inducing PI3-K/AKT activity, which transiently enhances cell growth at low density. Functional inactivation of E-cadherin interferes with the capacity of NHU cells to form stable calcium-mediated contacts, attenuates E-cadherin-mediated PI3-K/AKT induction and enhances NHU cell proliferation by allowing de-repression of the EGFR/ERK pathway and constitutive activation of β-catenin-TCF signalling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide evidence that E-cadherin can differentially and concurrently regulate specific growth-related signalling pathways in a context-specific fashion, with direct, functional consequences for cell proliferation and population growth. Our observations not only reveal a novel, complex role for E-cadherin in normal epithelial cell homeostasis and tissue regeneration, but also provide the basis for a more complete understanding of the consequences of E-cadherin loss on malignant transformation.

  5. VE-cadherin trans-interactions modulate Rac activation and enhancement of lung endothelial barrier by iloprost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birukova, Anna A; Tian, Yufeng; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Zebda, Noureddine; Sarich, Nicolene; Tian, Xinyong; Wang, Yingxiao; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2012-10-01

    Small GTPase Rac is important regulator of endothelial cell (EC) barrier enhancement by prostacyclin characterized by increased peripheral actin cytoskeleton and increased interactions between VE-cadherin and other adherens junction (AJ) proteins. This study utilized complementary approaches including siRNA knockdown, culturing in Ca(2+) -free medium, and VE-cadherin blocking antibody to alter VE-cadherin extracellular interactions to investigate the role of VE-cadherin outside-in signaling in modulation of Rac activation and EC barrier regulation by prostacyclin analog iloprost. Spatial analysis of Rac activation in pulmonary EC by FRET revealed additional spike in iloprost-induced Rac activity at the sites of newly formed cell-cell junctions. In contrast, disruption of VE-cadherin extracellular trans-interactions suppressed iloprost-activated Rac signaling and attenuated EC barrier enhancement and cytoskeletal remodeling. These inhibitory effects were associated with decreased membrane accumulation and activation of Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) Tiam1 and Vav2. Conversely, plating of pulmonary EC on surfaces coated with extracellular VE-cadherin domain further promoted iloprost-induced Rac signaling. In the model of thrombin-induced EC barrier recovery, blocking of VE-cadherin trans-interactions attenuated activation of Rac pathway during recovery phase and delayed suppression of Rho signaling and restoration of EC barrier properties. These results suggest that VE-cadherin outside-in signaling controls locally Rac activity stimulated by barrier protective agonists. This control is essential for maximal EC barrier enhancement and accelerated barrier recovery. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. E-cadherin-dependent stimulation of traction force at focal adhesions via the Src and PI3K signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Estevez, Maruxa; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Dufour, Sylvie

    2012-07-18

    The interplay between cadherin- and integrin-dependent signals controls cell behavior, but the precise mechanisms that regulate the strength of adhesion to the extracellular matrix remains poorly understood. We deposited cells expressing a defined repertoire of cadherins and integrins on fibronectin (FN)-coated polyacrylamide gels (FN-PAG) and on FN-coated pillars used as a micro-force sensor array (μFSA), and analyzed the functional relationship between these adhesion receptors to determine how it regulates cell traction force. We found that cadherin-mediated adhesion stimulated cell spreading on FN-PAG, and this was modulated by the substrate stiffness. We compared S180 cells with cells stably expressing different cadherins on μFSA and found that traction forces were stronger in cells expressing cadherins than in parental cells. E-cadherin-mediated contact and mechanical coupling between cells are required for this increase in cell-FN traction force, which was not observed in isolated cells, and required Src and PI3K activities. Traction forces were stronger in cells expressing type I cadherins than in cells expressing type II cadherins, which correlates with our previous observation of a higher intercellular adhesion strength developed by type I compared with type II cadherins. Our results reveal one of the mechanisms whereby molecular cross talk between cadherins and integrins upregulates traction forces at cell-FN adhesion sites, and thus provide additional insight into the molecular control of cell behavior. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Membrane-impermeable cross-linking provides evidence for homophilic, isoform-specific binding of desmosomal cadherins in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhuxiang; Merritt, Anita; Rouhi-Parkouhi, Mansour; Tabernero, Lydia; Garrod, David

    2011-01-21

    Desmosomes and adherens junctions are cadherin-based protein complexes responsible for cell-cell adhesion of epithelial cells. Type 1 cadherins of adherens junctions show specific homophilic adhesion that plays a major role in developmental tissue segregation. The desmosomal cadherins, desmocollin and desmoglein, occur as several different isoforms with overlapping expression in some tissues where different isoforms are located in the same desmosomes. Although adhesive binding of desmosomal cadherins has been investigated in a variety of ways, their interaction in desmosome-forming epithelial cells has not been studied. Here, using extracellular homobifunctional cross-linking, we provide evidence for homophilic and isoform-specific binding between the Dsc2, Dsc3, Dsg2, and Dsg3 isoforms in HaCaT keratinocytes and show that it represents trans interaction. Furthermore, the cross-linked adducts are present in the detergent-insoluble fraction, and electron microscopy shows that extracellular cross-linking probably occurs in desmosomes. We found no evidence for either heterophilic or cis interaction, but neither can be completely excluded by our data. Mutation of amino acid residues Trp-2 and Ala-80 that are important for trans interaction in classical cadherin adhesive binding abolished Dsc2 binding, indicating that these residues are also involved in desmosomal adhesion. These interactions of desmosomal cadherins may be of key importance for their ordered arrangement within desmosomes that we believe is essential for desmosomal adhesive strength and the maintenance of tissue integrity.

  8. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubina, Kseniya A., E-mail: rkseniya@mail.ru; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation); Poliakov, Alexei A. [Division of Developmental Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Treshalina, Helena M. [Federal State Budgetary Scietific Institution «N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center» (FSBSI “N.N.Blokhin RCRC”), Kashirskoe Shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tkachuk, Vsevolod A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-21

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  9. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, Kseniya A.; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I.; Poliakov, Alexei A.; Treshalina, Helena M.; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.

    2015-01-01

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells. PMID:26197340

  10. N-cadherin/FGFR promotes metastasis through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stem/progenitor cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Anzovino, A; Kim, S; Suyama, K; Yao, J; Hulit, J; Agiostratidou, G; Chandiramani, N; McDaid, H M; Nagi, C; Cohen, H W; Phillips, G R; Norton, L; Hazan, R B

    2014-06-26

    N-cadherin and HER2/neu were found to be co-expressed in invasive breast carcinomas. To test the contribution of N-cadherin and HER2 in mammary tumor metastasis, we targeted N-cadherin expression in the mammary epithelium of the MMTV-Neu mouse. In the context of ErbB2/Neu, N-cadherin stimulated carcinoma cell invasion, proliferation and metastasis. N-cadherin caused fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) upmodulation, resulting in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem/progenitor like properties, involving Snail and Slug upregulation, mammosphere formation and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. N-cadherin potentiation of the FGFR stimulated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation resulting in differential effects on metastasis. Although ERK inhibition suppressed cyclin D1 expression, cell proliferation and stem/progenitor cell properties, it did not affect invasion or EMT. Conversely, AKT inhibition suppressed invasion through Akt 2 attenuation, and EMT through Snail inhibition, but had no effect on cyclin D1 expression, cell proliferation or mammosphere formation. These findings suggest N-cadherin/FGFR has a pivotal role in promoting metastasis through differential regulation of ERK and AKT, and underscore the potential for targeting the FGFR in advanced ErbB2-amplified breast tumors.

  11. Synergisms of cadherin fragments to Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis%钙粘蛋白片段与苏云金杆菌晶体毒素协同作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔金杰; 李国清

    2011-01-01

    从钙粘蛋白介导苏云金杆菌晶体(Bt Cry)毒素对害虫的毒杀过程、钙粘蛋白重复区和近膜区与Bt Cry毒素的分子间作用涉及的结合位点及可能的互作机制等方面,综述了钙粘蛋白片段与Bt Cry毒素协同作用的最新研究进展.昆虫钙粘蛋白某些片段在非折叠状态时,可与Bt Cry毒素形成寡聚体,从而增加Bt Cry毒素对靶标害虫的毒杀活性.相关研究成果有助于提高Bt Cry毒素毒杀害虫的能力,克服害虫抗药性,具有一定的应用前景.%The recent advances in synergism of cadherin fragments to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins were reviewed. Cadherin receptors mediated virulence of the Cry toxins to insect pests. The molecular interaction between cadherin extracellular repeats or membrane proximal domain and Cry toxins involved in several active sites. Some unfolding fragments of cadherins could facilitate the formation of Bt Cry toxin oligomers, and consequently exhibited synergistic effects on Bt Cry toxins to target pests. This discovery provides novel strategies to enhance the insecticidal activity of Bt Cry toxins, and to overcome the resistance of insects to Bt toxin-based bio-pesticides or transgenic crops.

  12. Igf1r signaling is indispensable for preimplantation development and is activated via a novel function of E-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bedzhov

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (Igf1r signaling controls proliferation, differentiation, growth, and cell survival in many tissues; and its deregulated activity is involved in tumorigenesis. Although important during fetal growth and postnatal life, a function for the Igf pathway during preimplantation development has not been described. We show that abrogating Igf1r signaling with specific inhibitors blocks trophectoderm formation and compromises embryo survival during murine blastocyst formation. In normal embryos total Igf1r is present throughout the membrane, whereas the activated form is found exclusively at cell contact sites, colocalizing with E-cadherin. Using genetic domain switching, we show a requirement for E-cadherin to maintain proper activation of Igf1r. Embryos expressing exclusively a cadherin chimera with N-cadherin extracellular and E-cadherin intracellular domains (NcEc fail to form a trophectoderm and cells die by apoptosis. In contrast, homozygous mutant embryos expressing a reverse-structured chimera (EcNc show trophectoderm survival and blastocoel cavitation, indicating a crucial and non-substitutable role of the E-cadherin ectodomain for these processes. Strikingly, blastocyst formation can be rescued in homozygous NcEc embryos by restoring Igf1r signaling, which enhances cell survival. Hence, perturbation of E-cadherin extracellular integrity, independent of its cell-adhesion function, blocked Igf1r signaling and induced cell death in the trophectoderm. Our results reveal an important and yet undiscovered function of Igf1r during preimplantation development mediated by a unique physical interaction between Igf1r and E-cadherin indispensable for proper receptor activation and anti-apoptotic signaling. We provide novel insights into how ligand-dependent Igf1r activity is additionally gated to sense developmental potential in utero and into a bifunctional role of adhesion molecules in contact formation and signaling.

  13. Igf1r signaling is indispensable for preimplantation development and is activated via a novel function of E-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bedzhov

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I receptor (Igf1r signaling controls proliferation, differentiation, growth, and cell survival in many tissues; and its deregulated activity is involved in tumorigenesis. Although important during fetal growth and postnatal life, a function for the Igf pathway during preimplantation development has not been described. We show that abrogating Igf1r signaling with specific inhibitors blocks trophectoderm formation and compromises embryo survival during murine blastocyst formation. In normal embryos total Igf1r is present throughout the membrane, whereas the activated form is found exclusively at cell contact sites, colocalizing with E-cadherin. Using genetic domain switching, we show a requirement for E-cadherin to maintain proper activation of Igf1r. Embryos expressing exclusively a cadherin chimera with N-cadherin extracellular and E-cadherin intracellular domains (NcEc fail to form a trophectoderm and cells die by apoptosis. In contrast, homozygous mutant embryos expressing a reverse-structured chimera (EcNc show trophectoderm survival and blastocoel cavitation, indicating a crucial and non-substitutable role of the E-cadherin ectodomain for these processes. Strikingly, blastocyst formation can be rescued in homozygous NcEc embryos by restoring Igf1r signaling, which enhances cell survival. Hence, perturbation of E-cadherin extracellular integrity, independent of its cell-adhesion function, blocked Igf1r signaling and induced cell death in the trophectoderm. Our results reveal an important and yet undiscovered function of Igf1r during preimplantation development mediated by a unique physical interaction between Igf1r and E-cadherin indispensable for proper receptor activation and anti-apoptotic signaling. We provide novel insights into how ligand-dependent Igf1r activity is additionally gated to sense developmental potential in utero and into a bifunctional role of adhesion molecules in contact formation and signaling.

  14. ADAM13 cleavage of cadherin-11 promotes CNC migration independently of the homophilic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Becker, Sarah F; Kashef, Jubin; Alfandari, Dominique

    2016-07-15

    The cranial neural crest (CNC) is a highly motile population of cells that is responsible for forming the face and jaw in all vertebrates and perturbing their migration can lead to craniofacial birth defects. Cell motility requires a dynamic modification of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. In the CNC, cleavage of the cell adhesion molecule cadherin-11 by ADAM13 is essential for cell migration. This cleavage generates a shed extracellular fragment of cadherin-11 (EC1-3) that possesses pro-migratory activity via an unknown mechanism. Cadherin-11 plays an important role in modulating contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) in the CNC to regulate directional cell migration. Here, we show that while the integral cadherin-11 requires the homophilic binding site to promote CNC migration in vivo, the EC1-3 fragment does not. In addition, we show that increased ADAM13 activity or expression of the EC1-3 fragment increases CNC invasiveness in vitro and blocks the repulsive CIL response in colliding cells. This activity requires the presence of an intact homophilic binding site on the EC1-3 suggesting that the cleavage fragment may function as a competitive inhibitor of cadherin-11 adhesion in CIL but not to promote cell migration in vivo.

  15. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact with the surro...... interaction between NCAM and N-cadherin with a number of intracellular partners, as well as on their interaction with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)....

  16. Transcriptional regulation of cadherins during development and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The cadherin superfamily of Ca2+-dependent homophilic adhesion molecules plays a critical role in regulating cell-to-cell interactions. During development, the expression of different cadherins is highly dynamic, since they are associated with the morphogenesis, establishment and/or maintenance of different tissues. Alterations in cadherin expression or function occur frequently during carcinogenesis, such as the loss of the epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) and/or the aberrant expression of o...

  17. Three functions of cadherins in cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-07-22

    Cadherins are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell adhesion in animals. By regulating contact formation and stability, cadherins play a crucial role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Here, we review the three major functions of cadherins in cell-cell contact formation and stability. Two of those functions lead to a decrease in interfacial tension at the forming cell-cell contact, thereby promoting contact expansion--first, by providing adhesion tension that lowers interfacial tension at the cell-cell contact, and second, by signaling to the actomyosin cytoskeleton in order to reduce cortex tension and thus interfacial tension at the contact. The third function of cadherins in cell-cell contact formation is to stabilize the contact by resisting mechanical forces that pull on the contact.

  18. Evidence for post-translational processing of vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin in brain tumors: towards a candidate biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vilgrain

    Full Text Available Vessel abnormalities are among the most important features in malignant glioma. Vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin is of major importance for vascular integrity. Upon cytokine challenge, VE-cadherin structural modifications have been described including tyrosine phosphorylation and cleavage. The goal of this study was to examine whether these events occurred in human glioma vessels. We demonstrated that VE-cadherin is highly expressed in human glioma tissue and tyrosine phosphorylated at site Y(685, a site previously found phosphorylated upon VEGF challenge, via Src activation. In vitro experiments showed that VEGF-induced VE-cadherin phosphorylation, preceded the cleavage of its extracellular adhesive domain (sVE, 90 kDa. Interestingly, metalloproteases (MMPs secreted by glioma cell lines were responsible for sVE release. Because VEGF and MMPs are important components of tumor microenvironment, we hypothesized that VE-cadherin proteolysis might occur in human brain tumors. Analysis of glioma patient sera prior treatment confirmed the presence of sVE in bloodstream. Furthermore, sVE levels studied in a cohort of 53 glioma patients were significantly predictive of the overall survival at three years (HR 0.13 [0.04; 0.40] p ≤ 0.001, irrespective to histopathological grade of tumors. Altogether, these results suggest that VE-cadherin structural modifications should be examined as candidate biomarkers of tumor vessel abnormalities, with promising applications in oncology.

  19. Targeting N-cadherin through fibroblast growth factor receptor-4: distinct pathogenetic and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzat, Shereen; Zheng, Lei; Winer, Daniel; Asa, Sylvia L

    2006-11-01

    Several molecular aberrations have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pituitary tumors, but few have proven thus far to be of therapeutic value. Pituitary tumor-derived fibroblast growth factor receptor-4 (ptd-FGFR4) is an alternatively transcribed cytoplasmic isoform lacking most of the extracellular domain. This oncogene recapitulates the morphological features of human pituitary tumors in transgenic mice. To investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting ptd-FGFR4, we examined the impact of FGFR4 tyrosine kinase inhibition in xenografted mice. GH4 pituitary cells expressing ptd-FGFR4 develop into invasive tumors. Systemic treatment of mice bearing ptd-FGFR4 tumors with the FGFR-selective inhibitor PD173074 resulted in recovery of membranous N-cadherin staining and a significant reduction in tumor volume with less invasive growth behavior. Mutation of tyrosine Y754F in ptd-FGFR4 abrogated the effect of PD173074-mediated inhibition. The pivotal role of N-cadherin as a mediator of this pituitary cell growth was demonstrated by small interfering RNA mediated down-regulation, which promoted invasive growth in xenografted mice. To validate this model in primary human pituitary tumors, we examined the expression of ptd-FGFR4, N-cadherin, and clinical behavior. Loss of membranous N-cadherin correlated with cytoplasmic FGFR4 expression and with tumor invasiveness in surgically resected human pituitary tumors. Primary human pituitary tumor cells treated with PD173074 showed restoration of N-cadherin to the membrane with dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. These data highlight the pathogenetic significance of N-cadherin misexpression and emphasize the importance of FGFR partnership in mediating its functions.

  20. N-cadherin is required for cytodifferentiation during zebrafish odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, B; van Hengel, J; Sanders, E; Van Roy, F; Huysseune, A

    2013-04-01

    N-cadherin is a well-studied classic cadherin involved in multiple developmental processes and is also known to have a signaling function. Using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model, we tested the hypothesis that tooth morphogenesis is accompanied by dynamic changes in N-cadherin distribution and that absence of N-cadherin disturbs tooth development. N-cadherin, encoded by the gene cdh2, is absent during the initiation and morphogenesis stages of both primary (first-generation) and replacement teeth, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. However, N-cadherin is up-regulated at the onset of differentiation of cells of the inner dental epithelium and the dental papilla, i.e., the ameloblasts and odontoblasts, respectively. In the inner dental epithelium, N-cadherin is co-expressed with E-cadherin, excluding the occurrence of cadherin switching such as observed during human tooth development. While early lethality of N-cadherin knockout mice prevents any functional study of N-cadherin in mouse odontogenesis, zebrafish parachute (pac) mutants, deficient for N-cadherin, survive beyond the age when primary teeth normally start to form. In these mutants, the first tooth forms, but its development stops at the early cytodifferentiation stage. N-cadherin deficiency also completely inhibits the development of the other first-generation teeth, possibly due to the absence of N-cadherin signaling once the first tooth has differentiated.

  1. Cadherins: potential regulators in the faculty of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    The cadherin superfamily is a large (now more than 100 proteins) protein family originally identified as cell adhesion molecules. Each cadherin shows distinct expression patterns in the nervous system, and their expressions are both spatially and temporally regulated and diverse among different species. Mounting evidence has suggested that cadherins play multiple roles in neural development and functions. Recently, using songbirds and mice, the potential role of cadherins in vocal behavior has been demonstrated. Here, we will briefly introduce general function of cadherins, and analyze the potential involvement of cadherins in vocal behaviors and their evolution.

  2. The P2Y2 Receptor Interacts with VE-Cadherin and VEGF Receptor-2 to Regulate Rac1 Activity in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhongji; Cao, Chen; Wang, Jianjie; Huxley, Virginia H; Baker, Olga; Weisman, Gary A; Erb, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) mediates homophylic adhesion between endothelial cells and is an important regulator of angiogenesis, blood vessel permeability and leukocyte trafficking. Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, controls VE-cadherin adhesion by acting downstream of several growth factors, including angiopoietin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here we show that UTP-induced activation of the Gq protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) activated Rac1 and caused a transient complex to form between P2Y2R, VE-cadherin and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). Knockdown of VE-cadherin expression with siRNA did not affect UTP-induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) but led to a loss of UTP-induced Rac1 activation and tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin, a cytoplasmic protein known to interact with VE-cadherin. Activation of the P2Y2R by UTP also caused a prolonged interaction between p120 catenin and vav2 (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac) that correlated with the kinetics of UTP-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin. Inhibitors of VEGFR-2 (SU1498) or Src (PP2) significantly diminished UTP-induced Rac1 activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 catenin and VE-cadherin, and association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin and p120 catenin with vav2. These findings suggest that the P2Y2R uses Src and VEGFR-2 to mediate association of the P2Y2R with VE-cadherin complexes in endothelial adherens junctions to activate Rac1.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of cadherins during development and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Cano, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    The cadherin superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent homophilic adhesion molecules plays a critical role in regulating cell-to-cell interactions. During development, the expression of different cadherins is highly dynamic, since they are associated with the morphogenesis, establishment and/or maintenance of different tissues. Alterations in cadherin expression or function occur frequently during carcinogenesis, such as the loss of the epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) and/or the aberrant expression of other cadherins. Indeed, the aberrant expression of cadherins has been detected during carcinoma invasion, a process which is reminiscent of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) so important in many critical developmental processes. The functional regulation of cadherins can occur at many different levels, from transcriptional regulation to the control of the strength of the cadherin-mediated cell-cell interaction. In this review, we will focus on the transcriptional control of cadherin expression, both in development and carcinogenesis, paying particular attention to the regulation of E-cadherin given its proposed role as a suppressor of invasion. We will discuss the main genetic and epigenetic mechanisms involved in down-regulating E-cadherin expression, and we will analyse the mechanisms involved in regulating EMT, in an attempt to elucidate which elements are common to this process in both physiological and pathological situations.

  4. N-cadherin and integrin blockade inhibit arteriolar myogenic reactivity but not pressure-induced increases in intracellular Ca2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Y. Jackson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The vascular myogenic response is characterized by arterial constriction in response to an increase in intraluminal pressure and dilatation to a decrease in pressure. This mechanism is important for the regulation of blood flow, capillary pressure and arterial pressure. The identity of the mechanosensory mechanism(s for this response is incompletely understood but has been shown to include the integrins as cell-extracellular matrix receptors. The possibility that a cell-cell adhesion receptor is involved has not been studied. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that N-cadherin, a cell-cell adhesion molecule in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, was important for myogenic responsiveness. The purpose of this study was to investigate:
    1. whether cadherin inhibition blocks myogenic responses to increases in intraluminal pressure and 2. the effect of the cadherin or integrin blockade on pressure-induced changes in [Ca2+]i. Cadherin blockade was tested in isolated rat cremaster arterioles on myogenic responses to acute pressure steps from 60 – 100 mmHg and changes in VSMC Ca2+ were measured using fura-2. In the presence of a synthetic cadherin inhibitory peptide or a function blocking antibody, myogenic responses were inhibited. In contrast, during N-cadherin blockade, pressure-induced changes in [Ca2+]i were not altered. Similarly, vessels treated with function-blocking β1- or β3-integrin antibodies maintained pressure-induced [Ca2+]i responses despite inhibition of myogenic constriction. Collectively, these data suggest that both cadherins and integrins play a fundamental role in mediating myogenic constriction but argue against their direct involvement in mediating pressure-induced [Ca2+]i increases.

  5. E-cadherin promotes proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells in vitro via activating MEK/ERK pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-ling DONG; Lian LIU; Chun-hong MA; Ji-sheng LI; Chao DU; Shan XU; Li-hui HAN; Li LI; Xiu-wen WANG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:E-cadherin is unusually highly expressed in most ovarian cancers.This study was designed to investigate the roles of E-cadherin in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancers.Methods:Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell line SKOV-3 was examined.E-cadherin gene CDH1 in SKOV-3 cells was knocked down via RNA interference (RNAi),and the resultant variation of biological behavior was observed using CCK-8 and colony formation experiment.E-cadherin-mediated Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion was used to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of E-cadherin on the proliferation and survival of SKOV-3 cells.The expression levels of E-cadherin,extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK),phosphorylated ERK (P-ERK) were measured using Western blot assays.Results:Transfection with CDH1-siRNA for 24-96 h significantly suppressed the growth and proliferation of SKOV-3 cells.E-cadhednmediated calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion of SKOV-3 cells resulted in a rapid increase of P-ERK,but did not modify the expression of ERK protein.The phosphorylation of ERK in the cells was blocked by pretreatment with the MEK1 specific inhibitor PD98059 (50μmol/L),but not bythe PI3K inhibitor wortmannin (1μmol/L) or PKA inhibitor H89 (10 μmol/L).Conclusion:E-cadherin may function as a tumor proliferation enhancer via activating the MEK/ERK pathway in development of ovarian epithelial cancers.

  6. Liver protects metastatic prostate cancer from induced death by activating E-cadherin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bo; Wheeler, Sarah E; Clark, Amanda M; Whaley, Diana L; Yang, Min; Wells, Alan

    2016-11-01

    Liver is one of the most common sites of cancer metastasis. Once disseminated, the prognosis is poor as these tumors often display generalized chemoresistance, particularly for carcinomas that derive not from the aerodigestive tract. When these cancers seed the liver, the aggressive cells usually undergo a mesenchymal to epithelial reverting transition that both aids colonization and renders the tumor cells chemoresistant. In vitro studies demonstrate that hepatocytes drive this phenotypic shift. However, the in vivo evidence and the molecular signals that protect these cells from induced death are yet to be defined. Herein, we report that membrane surface E-cadherin-expressing prostate cancer cells were resistant to cell death by chemotherapeutic drugs but E-cadherin null cells or those expressing E-cadherin only in the cytoplasm were sensitive to death signals and chemotherapies both in vitro and in vivo. While cell-cell E-cadherin ligandation reduced mitogenesis, this chemoprotection was proliferation-independent as killing of both 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-positive (or Ki67(+) ) and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine-negative (Ki67(-) ) cells was inversely related to membrane-bound E-cadherin. Inhibiting the canonical survival kinases extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases, protein kinase B, and Janus kinase, which are activated by chemotherapeutics in epithelial cell-transitioned prostate cancer, abrogated the chemoresistance both in cell culture and in animal models of metastatic cancer. For disseminated tumors, protein kinase B disruption in itself had no effect on tumor survival but was synergistic with chemotherapy, leading to increased killing.

  7. Extracellular Hsp90 as a Novel Epigenetic of EMT and Metastatic Risk in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    cadherin can also stimulate Wnt activation, and lead to EMT events, we also utilized CRISPR technology to downregulate E-cadherin (Task 3b). Although this...studies also suggest that eHsp90 may enhance the stem-like cell diversity existing within populations, which would be predicted to further confound...reported that secreted extracellular Hsp90 (eHsp90) initiates EMT in prostate cancer cells, coincident with its enhanced expression in mesenchymal models

  8. Interaction of E-cadherin and PTEN regulates morphogenesis and growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, Marcia V.; Fata, Jimmie E.; Martin, Katherine J.; Yaswen, Paul; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    PTEN is a dual function phosphatase with tumor suppressor function compromised in a wide spectrum of cancers. Because tissue polarity and architecture are crucial modulators of normal and malignant behavior, we postulated that PTEN may play a role in maintenance of tissue integrity. We used two non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMECs) that form polarized, growth-arrested structures (acini) when cultured in 3-dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix gels (3D lrECM). As acini begin to form, PTEN accumulates in both the cytoplasm, and at cell-cell contacts where it colocalizes with E-cadherin/{beta}-catenin complex. Reduction of PTEN levels by shRNA in lrECM prevents formation of organized breast acini and disrupts growth arrest. Importantly, disruption of acinar polarity and cell-cell contact by E-cadherin function-blocking antibodies reduces endogenous PTEN protein levels and inhibits its accumulation at cell-cell contacts. Conversely, in SKBR3 breast cancer cells lacking endogenous E-cadherin expression, exogenous introduction of E-cadherin gene causes induction of PTEN expression and its accumulation at sites of cell interactions. These studies provide evidence that E-cadherin regulates both the PTEN protein levels and its recruitment to cell-cell junctions in 3D lrECM indicating a dynamic reciprocity between architectural integrity and the levels and localization of PTEN. This interaction thus appears to be a critical integrator of proliferative and morphogenetic signaling in breast epithelial cells.

  9. Cadherin Cell Adhesion System in Canine Mammary Cancer: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Gama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes play important roles by providing cell-cell adhesion and communication in different organ systems. Abnormal expression of cadherin adhesion molecules constitutes a common phenomenon in canine mammary cancer and has been frequently implicated in tumour progression. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on cadherin/catenin adhesion molecules (E-cadherin, β-catenin, and P-cadherin in canine mammary cancer, focusing on the putative biological functions and clinical significance of these molecules in this disease. This paper highlights the need for further research studies in this setting in order to elucidate the role of these adhesion molecules during tumour progression and metastasis.

  10. Expression of TGF-β1, Snail, E-cadherin and N-cadherin in Gastric Cancer and Its Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the expression of TGF-β1, Snail, E-cadherin and N-cadherin in gastric cancer (GC), and to examine its relationship to malignant features of the tumors.METHODS The expression of TGF-β1, Snail, E-cadherin and N-cadherin proteins was detected in GC and adjacent tissues by immunohistochemical staining, and compared with the clinico- pathological data.RESULTS Positive rates of expression for TGF-β1, Snail, E-cadherin and N-cadherin were 63.5%, 83.3%, 37.5% and 44.8% in GC, and 28.8%,41.3%, 100%, 11.3% in adjacent tissues, respectively. The expression of all four proteins showed a significant difference between the GCs and adjacent tissues (P<0.05). The positive rate of TGF-β1, Snail and N-cadherin, or the negative rate of E-cadherin expression was significantly related to the differentiated degree, histological type, invasion and metastasis of GC. In addition, the expression of N-cadherin was positively related to that of TGF-β1,but negatively related to that of E-cadherin. There was negative correlation between expression of E-cadherin and TGF-β1 and Snail in GC (P<0.05).CONCLUSION The over-expression of TGF-β1 and Snail and decreased expression of E-cadherin and the abnormal expression of N-cadherin were involved in the process of invasion and metastasis of GC. The data showed that E-cadherin might switch to N-cadherin. TGF-β1 and Snail might play a fundamental role in the process.

  11. Gastrulation EMT Is Independent of P-Cadherin Downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moly, Pricila K; Cooley, James R; Zeltzer, Sebastian L; Yatskievych, Tatiana A; Antin, Parker B

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an evolutionarily conserved process during which cells lose epithelial characteristics and gain a migratory phenotype. Although downregulation of epithelial cadherins by Snail and other transcriptional repressors is generally considered a prerequisite for EMT, recent studies have challenged this view. Here we investigate the relationship between E-cadherin and P-cadherin expression and localization, Snail function and EMT during gastrulation in chicken embryos. Expression analyses show that while E-cadherin transcripts are detected in the epiblast but not in the primitive streak or mesoderm, P-cadherin mRNA and protein are present in the epiblast, primitive and mesoderm. Antibodies that specifically recognize E-cadherin are not presently available. During EMT, P-cadherin relocalizes from the lateral surfaces of epithelial epiblast cells to a circumferential distribution in emerging mesodermal cells. Cells electroporated with an E-cadherin expression construct undergo EMT and migrate into the mesoderm. An examination of Snail function showed that reduction of Slug (SNAI2) protein levels using a morpholino fails to inhibit EMT, and expression of human or chicken Snail in epiblast cells fails to induce EMT. In contrast, cells expressing the Rho inhibitor peptide C3 rapidly exit the epiblast without activating Slug or the mesoderm marker N-cadherin. Together, these experiments show that epiblast cells undergo EMT while retaining P-cadherin, and raise questions about the mechanisms of EMT regulation during avian gastrulation.

  12. Relation among p130Cas, E-cadherin andβ-catenin expression, clinicopathologic signiifcance and prognosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Guo; Qing-Guang Liu; Wei Yang; Zheng-Liang Zhang; Ying-Min Yao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:p130Cas (p130Crk-associated substance) is a junction protein that is important to the adhesion between cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. Also, the adhesion molecules E-cadherin and β-catenin play important roles in the invasiveness of carcinoma. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of p130Cas, E-cadherin andβ-catenin on the invasion, metastasis and prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS:Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of p130Cas, E-cadherin, and β-catenin in 40 patients with HCC. All patients were followed up postoperatively, and the relationship between expression and clinicopathological prognostic parameters was analyzed. RESULTS: The positive expression rates of p130Cas and E-cadherin in HCC tissue (n=40) were 62.50%and 55.00%, but in normal liver tissue 10%, and 100%, respectively (P CONCLUSIONS:In HCC, there is a negative correlation between the positive expression of p130Cas and the normal expression of the adhesion molecules E-cadherin/β-catenin, and p130Cas plays important roles in the invasion, metastasis and prognosis of HCC. p130Cas may be involved in alterating the structure and function of E-cadherin/β-catenin, by regulating tyrosine phosphorylation via the p130Cas-Src signal pathway.

  13. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

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    Haonan Zhang

    Full Text Available Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  14. Non-recessive Bt toxin resistance conferred by an intracellular cadherin mutation in field-selected populations of cotton bollworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haonan; Wu, Shuwen; Yang, Yihua; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Wu, Yidong

    2012-01-01

    Transgenic crops producing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins have been planted widely to control insect pests, yet evolution of resistance by the pests can reduce the benefits of this approach. Recessive mutations in the extracellular domain of toxin-binding cadherin proteins that confer resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac by disrupting toxin binding have been reported previously in three major lepidopteran pests, including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Here we report a novel allele from cotton bollworm with a deletion in the intracellular domain of cadherin that is genetically linked with non-recessive resistance to Cry1Ac. We discovered this allele in each of three field-selected populations we screened from northern China where Bt cotton producing Cry1Ac has been grown intensively. We expressed four types of cadherin alleles in heterologous cell cultures: susceptible, resistant with the intracellular domain mutation, and two complementary chimeric alleles with and without the mutation. Cells transfected with each of the four cadherin alleles bound Cry1Ac and were killed by Cry1Ac. However, relative to cells transfected with either the susceptible allele or the chimeric allele lacking the intracellular domain mutation, cells transfected with the resistant allele or the chimeric allele containing the intracellular domain mutation were less susceptible to Cry1Ac. These results suggest that the intracellular domain of cadherin is involved in post-binding events that affect toxicity of Cry1Ac. This evidence is consistent with the vital role of the intracellular region of cadherin proposed by the cell signaling model of the mode of action of Bt toxins. Considered together with previously reported data, the results suggest that both pore formation and cell signaling pathways contribute to the efficacy of Bt toxins.

  15. E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and fusion of C2C12 myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Ozawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Myoblast fusion is a highly regulated process that is essential for skeletal muscle formation during muscle development and regeneration in mammals. Much remains to be elucidated about the molecular mechanism of myoblast fusion although cadherins, which are Ca2+-dependent cell–cell adhesion molecules, are thought to play a critical role in this process. Mouse myoblasts lacking either N-cadherin or M-cadherin can still fuse to form myotubes, indicating that they have no specific function in this process and may be functionally replaced by either M-cadherin or N-cadherin, respectively. In this study, we show that expressing the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain ectopically in C2C12 myoblasts inhibits cell surface localization of endogenous M-cadherin and N-cadherin, as well as cell–cell fusion. This domain, however, does not inhibit myoblast differentiation according to microarray-based gene expression analysis. In contrast, expressing a dominant-negative β-catenin mutant ectopically, which suppresses Wnt/β-catenin signaling, did not inhibit cell–cell fusion. Therefore, the E-cadherin cytoplasmic domain inhibits cell–cell fusion by inhibiting cell surface localization of endogenous cadherins and not by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  16. Regulation of cadherin expression in nervous system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Alicia F; Prasad, Maneeshi S; Thuringer, Amanda Henke; Manzerra, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    This review addresses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for classical cadherin expression during development of the vertebrate nervous system. The complexity of the spatial and temporal expression patterns is linked to morphogenic and functional roles in the developing nervous system. While the regulatory networks controlling cadherin expression are not well understood, it is likely that the multiple signaling pathways active in the development of particular domains also regulate the specific cadherins expressed at that time and location. With the growing understanding of the broader roles of cadherins in cell-cell adhesion and non-adhesion processes, it is important to understand both the upstream regulation of cadherin expression and the downstream effects of specific cadherins within their cellular context.

  17. The function of 7D-cadherins: a mathematical model predicts physiological importance for water transport through simple epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walcher Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 7D-cadherins like LI-cadherin are cell adhesion molecules and represent exceptional members of the cadherin superfamily. Although LI-cadherin was shown to act as a functional Ca2+-dependent adhesion molecule, linking neighboring cells together, and to be dysregulated in a variety of diseases, the physiological role is still enigmatic. Interestingly 7D-cadherins occur only in the lateral plasma membranes of cells from epithelia of water transporting tissues like the gut, the liver or the kidney. Furthermore LI-cadherin was shown to exhibit a highly cooperative Ca2+-dependency of the binding activity. Thus it is tempting to assume that LI-cadherin regulates the water transport through the epithelium in a passive fashion by changing its binding activity in dependence on the extracellular Ca2+. Results We developed a simple mathematical model describing the epithelial lining of a lumen with a content of variable osmolarity covering an interstitium of constant osmolarity. The width of the lateral intercellular cleft was found to influence the water transport significantly. In the case of hypertonic luminal content a narrow cleft is necessary to further increase concentration of the luminal content. If the cleft is too wide, the water flux will change direction and water is transported into the lumen. Electron microscopic images show that in fact areas of the gut can be found where the lateral intercellular cleft is narrow throughout the lateral cell border whereas in other areas the lateral intercellular cleft is widened. Conclusions Our simple model clearly predicts that changes of the width of the lateral intercellular cleft can regulate the direction and efficiency of water transport through a simple epithelium. In a narrow cleft the cells can increase the concentration of osmotic active substances easily by active transport whereas if the cleft is wide, friction is reduced but the cells can hardly build up high osmotic

  18. Dynamic expression of cadherins regulates vocal development in a songbird.

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    Eiji Matsunaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Since, similarly to humans, songbirds learn their vocalization through imitation during their juvenile stage, they have often been used as model animals to study the mechanisms of human verbal learning. Numerous anatomical and physiological studies have suggested that songbirds have a neural network called 'song system' specialized for vocal learning and production in their brain. However, it still remains unknown what molecular mechanisms regulate their vocal development. It has been suggested that type-II cadherins are involved in synapse formation and function. Previously, we found that type-II cadherin expressions are switched in the robust nucleus of arcopallium from cadherin-7-positive to cadherin-6B-positive during the phase from sensory to sensorimotor learning stage in a songbird, the Bengalese finch. Furthermore, in vitro analysis using cultured rat hippocampal neurons revealed that cadherin-6B enhanced and cadherin-7 suppressed the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents via regulating dendritic spine morphology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the role of cadherins in vocal development, we performed an in vivo behavioral analysis of cadherin function with lentiviral vectors. Overexpression of cadherin-7 in the juvenile and the adult stages resulted in severe defects in vocal production. In both cases, harmonic sounds typically seen in the adult Bengalese finch songs were particularly affected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that cadherins control vocal production, particularly harmonic sounds, probably by modulating neuronal morphology of the RA nucleus. It appears that the switching of cadherin expressions from sensory to sensorimotor learning stage enhances vocal production ability to make various types of vocalization that is essential for sensorimotor learning in a trial and error manner.

  19. N-cadherin adhesive interactions modulate matrix mechanosensing and fate commitment of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Brian D.; Mui, Keeley L.; Driscoll, Tristan P.; Caliari, Steven R.; Mehta, Kush D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2016-12-01

    During mesenchymal development, the microenvironment gradually transitions from one that is rich in cell-cell interactions to one that is dominated by cell-ECM (extracellular matrix) interactions. Because these cues cannot readily be decoupled in vitro or in vivo, how they converge to regulate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) mechanosensing is not fully understood. Here, we show that a hyaluronic acid hydrogel system enables, across a physiological range of ECM stiffness, the independent co-presentation of the HAVDI adhesive motif from the EC1 domain of N-cadherin and the RGD adhesive motif from fibronectin. Decoupled presentation of these cues revealed that HAVDI ligation (at constant RGD ligation) reduced the contractile state and thereby nuclear YAP/TAZ localization in MSCs, resulting in altered interpretation of ECM stiffness and subsequent changes in downstream cell proliferation and differentiation. Our findings reveal that, in an evolving developmental context, HAVDI/N-cadherin interactions can alter stem cell perception of the stiffening extracellular microenvironment.

  20. Exchange of catenins in cadherin-catenin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, Regina B; Laur, Oscar Y;

    2003-01-01

    transduction. To reveal the possible cross-talk between these two pools, we studied whether beta-catenin is exchanged between its free and cadherin-bound states. We found that pulse-labeled beta-catenin replaces the beta-catenin bound to the cell surface prebiotinylated E-cadherin immediately after synthesis...

  1. Aberrant E-cadherin staining patterns in invasive mammary carcinoma

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    Brogi Edi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background E-cadherin, a cell surface protein involved in cell adhesion, is present in normal breast epithelium, benign breast lesions, and in breast carcinoma. Alterations in the gene CDH1 on chromosome 16q22 are associated with changes in E-cadherin protein expression and function. Inactivation of E-cadherin in lobular carcinomas and certain diffuse gastric carcinomas may play a role in the dispersed, discohesive "single cell" growth patterns seen in these tumors. The molecular "signature" of mammary lobular carcinomas is the loss of E-cadherin protein expression as evidenced by immunohistochemistry, whereas ductal carcinomas are typically E-cadherin positive. Patients and methods We report on E-cadherin immunostaining patterns in five cases of invasive mammary carcinoma Results These were five exceptional instances in which the E-cadherin immunophenotype did not correspond to the apparent histologic classification of the lesion. These cases which are exceedingly rare in our experience are the subject of this report. Conclusion Findings such as those illustrated in this study occur in virtually all biologic phenomena and they do not invalidate the very high degree of correlation between the expression of E-cadherin and the classification of breast carcinomas as ductal or lobular type on the basis of conventional histologic criteria.

  2. Concomitant high expression of BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 is associated with High TNM stage and lymph node metastasis in conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Le; Jiang, Rong; Xu, Man; Zhu, Ping; Mo, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ni; Chen, George G; Liu, Zhi-Min

    2016-05-01

    BRAFV600E mutation is the most common activating mutation associated with aggressive behaviours in human tumours including conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma (cPTC). P-cadherin and cadherin 6 have been shown to be mesenchymal-associated cadherins and promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to examine BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 expressions in cPTC and to assess the association of their expression with clinicopathological indicators. BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 protein expressions in 80 cPTCs, 61 nodular hyperplasia and 76 normal thyroid tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of their protein expression with clinicopathological indicators of cPTC was statistically analysed. Protein expression of BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 was upregulated in cPTC. High protein expression of BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 was significantly correlated with high TNM stage and lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P TNM stage and LNM when compared with BRAFV600E high expression combined with either P-cadherin or cadherin-6 high expression (P = 0·042, 0·017 for TNM stage and P = 0·003, 0·006 for LNM, respectively) and only BRAFV600E high expression (P TNM stage and LNM). Concomitant high expression of BRAFV600E, P-cadherin and cadherin 6 is strongly associated with high TNM stage and LNM in cPTC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. EXPRESSION OF E-CADHERIN/CATENIN COMPLEX IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhen; CUI Dong-xu; LIU Bao-lin; ZHANG Xiao-bo; MA Wen-feng; ZHANG Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expressions of E-cadherin, (-catenin and (-catenin and analyze the relationship between E- cadherin-catenin adhesion complex and clinicopathological features in breast cancer. Methods: The expressions of E-cadherin, (-cadherin and (-catenin in specimens of 54 breast cancer, 21 normal breast tissues around tumor, 15 breast hyperplasia of usual type and 15 breast atypical hyperplasia were detected by immunohistochemical method. Results: In 21 normal breast tissues, E-cadherin and (-catenin were expressed on cell membrane of ductal and acinic cells, showing cellular contour and border among cells. The staining character of the three proteins in breast hyperplasia of usual type was the same as that in normal breast tissue. In breast atypical hyperplasia, the abnormal expression rates of E-cadherin, (-catenin and (-catenin were 6.7%, 13.3% and 26.7%, respectively. The total abnormal expression rate of E-cadherin-catenin complex was 33.3%. In breast cancer, the abnormal expression rates of E-cadherin, (-catenin and (-catenin were 51.9%, 63.0% and 61.1%, respectively. The total abnormal expression rate of E-cadherin-catenin complex was 88.9%. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin and (-catenin were significantly correlated with histological grade. Abnormal expressions of (-catenin and (-catenin were significantly correlated with TNM staging, axillary lymph nodes metastasis and postoperative distant metastasis. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin-catenin complex was correlated with TNM staging, histological grade and axillary lymph nodes. Abnormal expression of (-catenin was negatively correlated with expression of HER-2. COX multiple factor analysis showed that E-cadherin or (-catenin or (-catenin was not independent prognostic indicator. Conclusion: Abnormal expressions of E-cadherin, (-catenin and (-catenin frequently occur in breast cancer. Abnormal expression of E-cadherin-catenin complex is correlated with differentiation disturbance and metastasis

  4. SERUM SOLUBLE E CADHERIN LEVEL IN PATIENTS WITH ENDOMETRIOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅晨薇; 郎景和

    2002-01-01

    Objective.To investigate the serum sE cadherin level in patients with endometriosis and the alterations of that level in healthy control during the menstrual cycle.Methods.Thirty two patients with endometriosis and 30 healthy women were tested for serum sE cadherin levels by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.Results.The serum sE cadherin levels in healthy control did not vary throughout the menstrual cycle,which were lower than those in patients with endometriosis.Conclusions.E cadherin might be involved in endometrial shedding during menstruation in endometriosis patients.The serum sE cadherin assay might be helpful as a serum marker for the diagnosis and management of endometriosis.

  5. Self-assembled N-cadherin mimetic peptide hydrogels promote the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells through inhibition of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Dexter Siu Hong; Li, Jinming; Zhao, Pengchao; Bian, Liming

    2017-11-01

    N-cadherin, a transmembrane protein and major component of adherens junction, mediates cell-cell interactions and intracellular signaling that are important to the regulation of cell behaviors and organ development. Previous studies have identified mimetic peptides that possess similar bioactivity as that of N-cadherin, which promotes chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs); however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we combined the N-cadherin mimetic peptide (HAVDI) with the self-assembling KLD-12 peptide: the resultant peptide is capable of self-assembling into hydrogels functionalized with N-cadherin peptide in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 37 °C. Encapsulation of hMSCs in these hydrogels showed enhanced expression of chondrogenic marker genes and deposition of cartilage specific extracellular matrix rich in proteoglycan and Type II Collagen compared to control hydrogels, with a scrambled-sequence peptide after 14 days of chondrogenic culture. Furthermore, western blot showed a significantly higher expression of active glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), which phosphorylates β-catenin and facilitates ubiquitin-mediated degradation, as well as a lower expression of β-catenin and LEF1 in the N-cadherin peptide hydrogels versus controls. Immunofluorescence staining revealed significantly less nuclear localization of β-catenin in N-cadherin mimetic peptide hydrogels. Our findings suggest that N-cadherin peptide hydrogels suppress canonical Wnt signaling in hMSCs by reducing β-catenin nuclear translocation and the associated transcriptional activity of β-catenin/LEF-1/TCF complex, thereby enhancing the chondrogenesis of hMSCs. Our biomimetic self-assembled peptide hydrogels can serve as a tailorable and versatile three-dimensional culture platform to investigate the effect of biofunctionalization on stem cell behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Distinct mesenchymal alterations in N-cadherin and E-cadherin positive primary renal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal tubular epithelial cells of proximal and distal origin differ markedly in their physiological functions. Therefore, we hypothesized that they also differ in their capacity to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal alterations. RESULTS: We used cultures of freshly isolated primary human tubular cells. To distinguish cells of different tubular origin we took advantage of the fact that human proximal epithelial cells uniquely express N-cadherin instead of E-cadherin as major cell-cell adhesion molecule. To provoke mesenchymal alteration we treated these cocultures with TGF-β for up to 6 days. Within this time period, the morphology of distal tubular cells was barely altered. In contrast to tubular cell lines, E-cadherin was not down-regulated by TGF-β, even though TGF-β signal transduction was initiated as demonstrated by nuclear localization of Smad2/3. Analysis of transcription factors and miRNAs possibly involved in E-cadherin regulation revealed high levels of miRNAs of the miR200-family, which may contribute to the stability of E-cadherin expression in human distal tubular epithelial cells. By contrast, proximal tubular epithelial cells altered their phenotype when treated with TGF-β. They became elongated and formed three-dimensional structures. Rho-kinases were identified as modulators of TGF-β-induced morphological alterations. Non-specific inhibition of Rho-kinases resulted in stabilization of the epithelial phenotype, while partial effects were observed upon downregulation of Rho-kinase isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2. The distinct reactivity of proximal and distal cells was retained when the cells were cultured as polarized cells. CONCLUSIONS: Interference with Rho-kinase signaling provides a target to counteract TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal alterations of epithelial cells, particularly in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, primary distal tubular cells differed from cell lines by their high phenotypic stability

  7. Osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells from dental bud: Role of integrins and cadherins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Di Benedetto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported the beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in tissue repair and regeneration. New sources of stem cells in adult organisms are continuously emerging; dental tissues have been identified as a source of postnatal MSCs. Dental bud is the immature precursor of the tooth, is easy to access and we show in this study that it can yield a high number of cells with ≥95% expression of mesenchymal stemness makers and osteogenic capacity. Thus, these cells can be defined as Dental Bud Stem Cells (DBSCs representing a promising source for bone regeneration of stomatognathic as well as other systems. Cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM and neighboring cells are critical for tissue morphogenesis and architecture; such interactions are mediated by integrins and cadherins respectively. We characterized DBSCs for the expression of these adhesion receptors and examined their pattern during osteogenic differentiation. Our data indicate that N-cadherin and cadherin-11 were expressed in undifferentiated DBSCs and their expression underwent changes during the osteogenic process (decreasing and increasing respectively, while expression of E-cadherin and P-cadherin was very low in DBSCs and did not change during the differentiation steps. Such expression pattern reflected the mesenchymal origin of DBSCs and confirmed their osteoblast-like features. On the other hand, osteogenic stimulation induced the upregulation of single subunits, αV, β3, α5, and the formation of integrin receptors α5β1 and αVβ3. DBSCs differentiation toward osteoblastic lineage was enhanced when cells were grown on fibronectin (FN, vitronectin (VTN, and osteopontin (OPN, ECM glycoproteins which contain an integrin-binding sequence, the RGD motif. In addition we established that integrin αVβ3 plays a crucial role during the commitment of MSCs to osteoblast lineage, whereas integrin α5β1 seems to be dispensable. These data suggest

  8. Gene cloning and expression of cadherin in midgut of Helicoverpa armigera and its Cry1A binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guirong; WU Kongming; LIANG Gemei; GUO Yuyuan

    2005-01-01

    Cadherins belong to one of the families of animal glycoproteins responsible for calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion. Recent literatures showed that the cadherin-like in midgut of several insects served as the receptor of Bt toxin Cry1A and the variation of cadherin-like is related to insect's resistance to Cry1A. The full-length cDNA encoding cadherin-like of Helicoverpa armigera is cloned by degenerate PCR and RACE techniques and the gene was designated as BtR-harm, which is 5581 bp in full-length, encoding 1730 amino acid residues (BtR-harm was deposited in GenBank and the accession number is AF519180). Its predicted molecular weight and isoelectric point were 195.39 kDa and 4.23, respectively. The inferred amino acid sequence includes a signal sequence, 11 cadherin repeats, a membrane-proximal region, a transmembrane region and a cytoplasmic region. Sequence analysis indicated that the deduced protein sequence was most similar to the cadherin-like from Heliothis virescens with 84.2% identity and highly similar to three other lepidopteran cadherin from Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Pectinophora gossypiella, with the sequence identities of 60.3.6%, 57.5% and 51.0%, respectively. The cDNA encoding cadherin gene was expressed successfully in E. coli and the recombinant proteins can bind with Cry1Ac. Truncation analysis and binding experiment of BtR-harm revealed that the Cry1A binding region was a contiguous 244-amino acid sequence, which located between amino acid 1217 and 1461. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BtR-harm was highly expressed in midgut of H. armigera, very low expressed in foregut and hindgut and was not expressed in other tissues. After H. armigera producing resistance to Cry1Ac, the expression quantity of BtR-harm significantly decreased in midgut of H. armigera. It is the first confirmation that BtR-harm can function as receptor of Cry1Ac in H. armigera and the binding region was located on a contiguous 244 amino acid sequence

  9. Transforming Growth Factor β Induces Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration via Noncanonical Signals and N-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubon, Maria Jose; Yu, Jinyeong; Choi, Sanghyuk; Park, Ki-Sook

    2017-02-18

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) induces the migration and mobilization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to maintain bone homeostasis during bone remodeling and facilitate the repair of peripheral tissues. Although many studies have reported the mechanisms through which TGF-β mediates the migration of various types of cells, including cancer cells, the intrinsic cellular mechanisms underlying cellular migration and mobilization of BM-MSCs mediated by TGF-β are unclear. In this study, we showed that TGF-β activated noncanonical signaling molecules, such as Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and p38, via TGF-β type I receptor in human BM-MSCs and murine BM-MSC-like ST2 cells. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 and Src by PP2 resulted in impaired TGF-β-mediated migration. These results suggested that the Smad-independent, noncanonical signals activated by TGF-β were necessary for migration. We also showed that N-cadherin-dependent intercellular interactions were required for TGF-β-mediated migration using functional inhibition of N-cadherin with EDTA treatment and a neutralizing antibody (GC-4 antibody) or siRNA-mediated knockdown of N-cadherin. However, N-cadherin knockdown did not affect the global activation of noncanonical signals in response to TGF-β. Therefore, these results suggested that the migration of BM-MSCs in response to TGF-β was mediated through N-cadherin and noncanonical TGF-β signals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Force via integrins but not E-cadherin decreases Oct3/4 expression in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Yuhei [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki-aoba, Aoba-ward, Sendai City (Japan); Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Chowdhury, Farhan; Wu, Douglas C. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Tanaka, Tetsuya S. [Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sato, Masaaki [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01, Aramaki-aoba, Aoba-ward, Sendai City (Japan); Wang, Ning, E-mail: nwangrw@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins or cadherins induces similar cell stiffening responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces cell spreading. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Force via integrins but not cadherins induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical factors play a critical role in fate decisions of stem cells. Recently we have demonstrated that a local force applied via Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides coated magnetic beads to mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells increases cell spreading and cell stiffness and decreases Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) gene expression. However, it is not clear whether the effects of the applied stress on these functions of ES cells can be extended to natural extracellular matrix proteins or cell-cell adhesion molecules. Here we show that a local cyclic shear force applied via fibronectin or laminin to integrin receptors increased cell spreading and stiffness, downregulated Oct3/4 gene expression, and decreased cell proliferation rate. In contrast, the same cyclic force applied via cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (Cdh1) had no effects on cell spreading, Oct3/4 gene expression, and the self-renewal of mouse ES cells, but induced significant cell stiffening. Our findings demonstrate that biological responses of ES cells to force applied via integrins are different from those to force via E-cadherin, suggesting that mechanical forces might play different roles in different force transduction pathways to shape early embryogenesis.

  11. Real-time study of E-cadherin and membrane dynamics in living animals: implications for disease modeling and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrels, Alan; Timpson, Paul; Canel, Marta; Schwarz, Juliane P; Carragher, Neil O; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G; Anderson, Kurt I

    2009-04-01

    The ability of tumor cells to invade and metastasize requires deregulation of interactions with adjacent cells and the extracellular matrix. A major challenge of cancer biology is to observe the dynamics of the proteins involved in this process in their functional and physiologic context. Here, for the first time, we have used photobleaching and photoactivation to compare the mobility of cell adhesion and plasma membrane probes in vitro and in tumors grown in mice (in vivo). We find differences between in vitro and in vivo recovery dynamics of two key molecules, the tumor suppressor E-cadherin and the membrane-targeting sequence of H-Ras. Our data show that E-cadherin dynamics are significantly faster in vivo compared with cultured cells, that the ratio of E-cadherin stabilized in cell-cell junctions is significantly higher in vivo, and that E-cadherin mobility correlates with cell migration. Moreover, quantitative imaging has allowed us to assess the effects of therapeutic intervention on E-cadherin dynamics using dasatinib, a clinically approved Src inhibitor, and show clear differences in the efficacy of drug treatment in vivo. Our results show for the first time the utility of photobleaching and photoactivation in the analysis of dynamic biomarkers in living animals. Furthermore, this work highlights critical differences in molecular dynamics in vitro and in vivo, which have important implications for the use of cultured disease models as surrogates for living tissue.

  12. Epithelial requirement for in vitro proliferation and xenograft growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cells: oncogenic rather than tumor-suppressive role of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, H J; Gunasinghe, N P A D; Hollier, B G; Tanaka, T; Blick, T; Toh, A; Hill, P; Gilles, C; Waltham, M; Thompson, E W

    2017-07-27

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is associated with downregulated E-cadherin and frequently with decreased proliferation. Proliferation may be restored in secondary metastases by mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). We tested whether E-cadherin maintains epithelial proliferation in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells, facilitating metastatic colonization in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. EMT/MET markers were assessed in xenograft tumors by immunohistochemistry. Stable E-cadherin manipulation was effected by transfection and verified by Western blotting, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Effects of E-cadherin manipulation on proliferation and chemomigration were assessed in vitro by performing sulforhodamine B assays and Transwell assays, respectively. Invasion was assessed by Matrigel outgrowth; growth in vivo was assessed in SCID mice; and EMT status was assessed by qPCR. Hypoxic response of E-cadherin knockdown cell lines was assessed by qPCR after hypoxic culture. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), one- and two-way ANOVA with posttests, and paired Student's t tests were performed to determine significance (p MB-468 xenografts in regions of hypoxia. Extratumoral deposits (vascular and lymphatic inclusions, local and axillary nodes, and lung metastases) strongly expressed E-cadherin. MDA-MB-468 cells overexpressing E-cadherin were more proliferative and less migratory in vitro, whereas E-cadherin knockdown (short hairpin CDH1 [shCDH1]) cells were more migratory and invasive, less proliferative, and took longer to form tumors. shCDH1-MDA-MB-468 xenografts did not contain the hypoxia-induced necrotic areas observed in wild-type (WT) and shSCR-MDA-MB-468 tumors, but they did not exhibit an impaired hypoxic response in vitro. Although vimentin expression was not stimulated by E-cadherin knockdown in 2D or 3D cultures, xenografts of these cells were globally vimentin-positive rather than

  13. Expression and significance of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, transforming growth factor-β1 and Twist in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge-Liang Liu; Han-Jie Yang; Tian Liu; Yun-Zhao Lin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-1 and Twist protein and investigate its significance in the occurrence and development of prostate cancer. Methods:The expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-1 and Twist protein in 59 prostate cancer tissues and 21 adjacent tissues were detected by immunohistochemical SABC staining, and the correlation with clinicopathological features was analyzed. Results: Positive rates of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, TGF-1 and Twist were 32.2%, 54.2%, 71.2% and 74.6%, respectively, in prostate cancer tissues and 85.7%, 9.52%, 19.0% and 9.52%, respectively, in cancer-adjacent tissues, with significant differences between the two groups (P20g/L group, but the positive expression of Twist was not significant between groups. The expression of E-cadherin was highly negatively correlated with that of N-cadherin and also highly negatively correlated with that of Twist. The expression of TGF-1 was correlated with those of E-cadherin, N-cadherin and Twist. Conclusions: The reduced expression of E-cadherin, abnormal expression of N-cadherin, transformation form E-cadherin to N-cadherin and the increased expression of TGF-1 and Twist play an important role in the occurrence and development of prostate cancer.

  14. P-Cadherin Expression in Feline Mammary Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Catarina Figueira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for molecular markers in the feline mammary gland, namely, the adhesion molecules belonging to the cadherin family, is useful in the understanding of the development of mammary carcinomas in felines and humans. To study P-cadherin expression in the feline mammary gland, 61 samples of normal (n=4, hyperplastic (n=12, and neoplastic (n=45 feline mammary tissues were examined. In both normal and hyperplastic mammary tissues as well as in benign tumours, P-cadherin immunolabelling was restricted to myoepithelial cells. In malignant tumours, however, there was an aberrant epithelial P-cadherin immunoexpression in 64.1% (n=25 of cases, with a membranous and/or cytoplasmic pattern of distribution. A statistically significant relationship was seen between epithelial P-cadherin expression and malignant mammary lesions (P=0.0001. In malignant mammary tumours, there was likewise a statistically significant relationship between aberrant P-cadherin immunoexpression and histological grade (P=0.0132. Aberrant epithelial P-cadherin expression seems to be related to malignancy in the feline mammary gland. To confirm the results of this investigation, further studies with larger samples and follow-up studies are warranted.

  15. Analysis of C-cadherin Regulation during Tissue Morphogenesis with an Activating Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of cadherin-mediated adhesion at the cell surface underlies several morphogenetic processes. To investigate the role of cadherin regulation in morphogenesis and to begin to analyze the molecular mechanisms of cadherin regulation, we have screened for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that allow us to manipulate the adhesive state of the cadherin molecule. Xenopus C-cadherin is regulated during convergent extension movements of gastrulation. Treatment of animal pole tissue explants (...

  16. Knockdown of Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing 1 (CTHRC1) Inhibits Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Cellular Migration in Glioblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Shunshun; Zheng, Xu; Shi, Lin; Zhang, Weitao; Yang, Hongfa

    2017-01-26

    Collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1), an extracellular matrix-related protein, has been found to be upregulated in many solid tumors and contributes to tumorigenesis. We found that CTHRC1 is overexpressed in glioblastoma tissues and cells. By using the technique of RNA interference, the expression of CTHRC1 in the human glioblastoma U-87MG cell line was downregulated, and the proliferation and migration of U-87MG cells were examined. The results showed that the knockdown of CTHRC1 exerts inhibitory effects on the proliferation and migration ability of U-87MG cells. Knockdown of CTHRC1 expression in U-87MG cells resulted in upregulation in the expression of E-cadherin and downregulation in the expression of N-cadherin, SNAIL, and Slug, suggesting that CTHRC1 inhibits glioblastoma cell migration by suppressing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Knockdown of CTHRC1 led to remarkably decreased β-catenin protein levels in the nucleus. These results indicate that CTHRC1 might play an important role in the development of glioblastoma and offer a candidate molecular target for glioblastoma prevention and therapy.

  17. Cadherin-mediated adhesion regulates posterior body formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasanmi Oluwafoyinsa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anterior-posterior axis of the vertebrate embryo undergoes a dramatic elongation during early development. Convergence and extension of the mesoderm, occurring during gastrulation, initiates the narrowing and lengthening of the embryo. However the lengthening of the axis continues during post-gastrula stages in the tailbud region, and is thought to involve convergent extension movements as well as other cell behaviors specific to posterior regions. Results We demonstrate here, using a semi-dominant N-cadherin allele, that members of the classical cadherin subfamily of cell-cell adhesion molecules are required for tailbud elongation in the zebrafish. In vivo imaging of cell behaviors suggests that the extension of posterior axial mesodermal cells is impaired in embryos that carry the semi-dominant N-cadherin allele. This defect most likely results from a general loss of cell-cell adhesion in the tailbud region. Consistent with these observations, N-cadherin is expressed throughout the tailbud during post-gastrulation stages. In addition, we show that N-cadherin interacts synergistically with vang-like 2, a member of the non-canonical Wnt signaling/planar cell polarity pathway, to mediate tail morphogenesis. Conclusion We provide the first evidence here that N-cadherin and other members of the classical cadherin subfamily function in parallel with the planar cell polarity pathway to shape the posterior axis during post-gastrulation stages. These findings further highlight the central role that adhesion molecules play in the cellular rearrangements that drive morphogenesis in vertebrates and identify classical cadherins as major contributors to tail development.

  18. Guidance of Signaling Activations by Cadherins and Integrins in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Roggiani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is the deadliest tumor among gynecological cancer in the industrialized countries. The EOC incidence and mortality have remained unchanged over the last 30 years, despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment. In order to develop novel and more effective therapeutic approaches, the molecular mechanisms involved in EOC progression have been thoroughly investigated in the last few decades. At the late stage, peritoneal metastases originate from the attachment of small clusters of cancer cells that shed from the primary site and carried by the ascites adhere to the abdominal peritoneum or omentum. This behavior suggests that cell–cell or cell–matrix adhesion mechanisms regulate EOC growth and dissemination. Complex downstream signalings, which might be influenced by functional cross-talk between adhesion molecules and co-expressed and activated signaling proteins, can affect the proliferation/survival and the migration/invasion of EOC cells. This review aimed to define the impact of the mechanisms of cell–cell, through cadherins, and cell–extracellular matrix adhesion, through integrins, on the signaling cascades induced by membrane receptors and cytoplasmic proteins known to have a role in the proliferation, migration and invasion of EOC cells. Finally, some novel approaches using peptidomimetic ligands to cadherin and integrins are summarized.

  19. Protocadherin-19 and N-cadherin interact to control cell movements during anterior neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayantanee; Emond, Michelle R; Jontes, James D

    2010-11-29

    The protocadherins comprise the largest subgroup within the cadherin superfamily, yet their cellular and developmental functions are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that pcdh 19 (protocadherin 19) acts synergistically with n-cadherin (ncad) during anterior neurulation in zebrafish. In addition, Pcdh 19 and Ncad interact directly, forming a protein-protein complex both in vitro and in vivo. Although both molecules are required for calcium-dependent adhesion in a zebrafish cell line, the extracellular domain of Pcdh 19 does not exhibit adhesive activity, suggesting that the involvement of Pcdh 19 in cell adhesion is indirect. Quantitative analysis of in vivo two-photon time-lapse image sequences reveals that loss of either pcdh 19 or ncad impairs cell movements during neurulation, disrupting both the directedness of cell movements and the coherence of movements among neighboring cells. Our results suggest that Pcdh 19 and Ncad function together to regulate cell adhesion and to mediate morphogenetic movements during brain development.

  20. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2013-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) is crucial for differentiation of LCs. Monocytes differentiated into LC-like cells in presence of IL-4, GM-CSF, and TGF-β1. However, these LC-like cells expressed not only Langerin but also DC-SIGN. Notably, co-culturing of these LC-like cells with KCs expressing E-cadherin or recombinant E-cadherin strongly decreased expression of DC-SIGN and further induced a phenotype similar to purified epidermal LCs. Moreover, pretreatment of LC-like cells with anti-E-cadherin-specific antibody completely abolished their Langerin expression, indicating the requirement of E-cadherin–E-cadherin interactions for the differentiation into Langerin+ cells. These findings suggest that E-cadherin expressed by KCs provide environmental cues that induce differentiation of LCs in the epidermis. PMID:23135957

  1. T-cadherin Is Essential for Adiponectin-mediated Revascularization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Duffen, Jennifer L.; Nakamura, Kazuto; Silver, Marcy; Kikuchi, Ryosuke; Tigges, Ulrich; Yoshida, Sumiko; Denzel, Martin S.; Ranscht, Barbara; Walsh, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue secretes protein factors that have systemic actions on cardiovascular tissues. Previous studies have shown that ablation of the adipocyte-secreted protein adiponectin leads to endothelial dysfunction, whereas its overexpression promotes wound healing. However, the receptor(s) mediating the protective effects of adiponectin on the vasculature is not known. Here we examined the role of membrane protein T-cadherin, which localizes adiponectin to the vascular endothelium, in the revascularization response to chronic ischemia. T-cadherin-deficient mice were analyzed in a model of hind limb ischemia where blood flow is surgically disrupted in one limb and recovery is monitored over 28 days by laser Doppler perfusion imaging. In this model, T-cadherin-deficient mice phenocopy adiponectin-deficient mice such that both strains display an impaired blood flow recovery compared with wild-type controls. Delivery of exogenous adiponectin rescued the impaired revascularization phenotype in adiponectin-deficient mice but not in T-cadherin-deficient mice. In cultured endothelial cells, T-cadherin deficiency by siRNA knockdown prevented the ability of adiponectin to promote cellular migration and proliferation. These data highlight a previously unrecognized role for T-cadherin in limb revascularization and show that it is essential for mediating the vascular actions of adiponectin. PMID:23824191

  2. α-Catenin contributes to the strength of E-cadherin-p120 interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troyanovsky, Regina B; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, Sergey M

    2011-01-01

    Cadherin-catenin interactions play an important role in cadherin-mediated adhesion. Here we present strong evidence that in the cadherin-catenin complex α-catenin contributes to the binding strength of another catenin, p120, to the same complex. Specifically, we found that a β-catenin-uncoupled c......Cadherin-catenin interactions play an important role in cadherin-mediated adhesion. Here we present strong evidence that in the cadherin-catenin complex α-catenin contributes to the binding strength of another catenin, p120, to the same complex. Specifically, we found that a β...... domain of α-catenin. The six amino acid-long extension of this loop, caused by an alternative splicing, weakens p120 binding to cadherin. The data suggest that α-catenin-p120 contact within the cadherin-catenin complex can regulate cadherin trafficking....

  3. Cadherin-11 endocytosis through binding to clathrin promotes cadherin-11-mediated migration in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satcher, Robert L; Pan, Tianhong; Bilen, Mehmet A; Li, Xiaoxia; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ortiz, Angelica; Kowalczyk, Andrew P; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-12-15

    Cadherin-11 (Cad11) cell adhesion molecule plays a role in prostate cancer cell migration. Because disassembly of adhesion complexes through endocytosis of adhesion proteins has been shown to play a role in cell migration, we examined whether Cad11 endocytosis plays a role in Cad11-mediated migration. The mechanism by which Cad11 is internalized is unknown. Using a GST pulldown assay, we found that clathrin binds to the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain but not to that of E-cadherin. Using deletion analysis, we identified a unique sequence motif, VFEEE, in the Cad11 membrane proximal region (amino acid residues 11-15) that binds to clathrin. Endocytosis assays using K(+)-depletion buffer showed that Cad11 internalization is clathrin dependent. Proximity ligation assays showed that Cad11 colocalizes with clathrin, and immunofluorescence assays showed that Cad11 localizes in vesicles that stain for the early endosomal marker Rab5. Deletion of the VFEEE sequence from the Cad11 cytoplasmic domain (Cad11-cla-Δ5) leads to inhibition of Cad11 internalization and reduces Cad11-mediated cell migration in C4-2B and PC3-mm2 prostate cancer cells. These observations suggest that clathrin-mediated internalization of Cad11 regulates surface trafficking of Cad11 and that dynamic turnover of Cad11 regulates the migratory function of Cad11 in prostate cancer cells.

  4. Cadherin-11 in renal cell carcinoma bone metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Satcher

    Full Text Available Bone is one of the common sites of metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC, however the mechanism by which RCC preferentially metastasize to bone is poorly understood. Homing/retention of RCC cells to bone and subsequent proliferation are necessary steps for RCC cells to colonize bone. To explore possible mechanisms by which these processes occur, we used an in vivo metastasis model in which 786-O RCC cells were injected into SCID mice intracardially, and organotropic cell lines from bone, liver, and lymph node were selected. The expression of molecules affecting cell adhesion, angiogenesis, and osteolysis were then examined in these selected cells. Cadherin-11, a mesenchymal cadherin mainly expressed in osteoblasts, was significantly increased on the cell surface in bone metastasis-derived 786-O cells (Bo-786-O compared to parental, liver, or lymph node-derived cells. In contrast, the homing receptor CXCR4 was equivalently expressed in cells derived from all organs. No significant difference was observed in the expression of angiogenic factors, including HIF-1α, VEGF, angiopoeitin-1, Tie2, c-MET, and osteolytic factors, including PTHrP, IL-6 and RANKL. While the parental and Bo-786-O cells have similar proliferation rates, Bo-786-O cells showed an increase in migration compared to the parental 786-O cells. Knockdown of Cadherin-11 using shRNA reduced the rate of migration in Bo-786-O cells, suggesting that Cadherin-11 contributes to the increased migration observed in bone-derived cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of cadherin-11 expression in a human renal carcinoma tissue array showed that the number of human specimens with positive cadherin-11 activity was significantly higher in tumors that metastasized to bone than that in primary tumors. Together, these results suggest that Cadherin-11 may play a role in RCC bone metastasis.

  5. Expression of e-cadherin, n-cadherin and snail and their correlation with clinicopathological variants: an immunohistochemical study of 132 invasive ductal breast carcinomas in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Mohamed Abd ElMoneim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the expression of the cell adhesion molecules E-cadherin and N-cadherin and the transcription factor Snail in invasive ductal breast carcinomas and to determine their relationships with clinicopathological features. METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was used to examine E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Snail protein expression in 132 invasive breast carcinomas. RESULTS: The expression of E-cadherin was decreased (negative or weak in 37.1% of invasive carcinomas, while N-cadherin and Snail overexpression were detected in 51.9% and 40.9% of carcinomas, respectively. Low E-cadherin expression was significantly correlated with poorly differentiated carcinoma (53.1%, positive node status (80.9%, poor Nottingham Prognostic Index (64.7%, and the presence of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Overexpression of N-cadherin and Snail were also significantly correlated with poorly differentiated carcinoma, positive node status, and poor Nottingham Prognostic Index but were correlated with the absence of hormone receptors. Loss of E-cadherin immunoexpression was strongly associated with the presence of membranous N-cadherin (87.8% and nuclear Snail (69.4%. CONCLUSION: Loss of E-cadherin and overexpression of N-cadherin and Snail in breast carcinomas may play a central role in the development of invasive ductal breast carcinoma. These biomarkers may provide a valuable reference for the study of invasive ductal carcinoma progression and to characterize the biological behavior of the tumor. In the future, increased N-cadherin and decreased E-cadherin expression may be used as indicators of the progression and prognosis of invasive ductal carcinoma.

  6. T-Cadherin Expression in the Epidermis and Adnexal Structures of Normal Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechner, Stanislaw; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J.

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cadherin is an atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the cadherin superfamily of adhesion molecules. The role of T-cadherin in biology of the skin is poorly understood. Expression of T-cadherin in basal keratinocytes and dermal blood vessels of the healthy epidermis has been demonstrated, but studies on expression in skin appendages are rare. Methods We conducted an immunohistochemical analysis of T-cadherin expression in the epidermis and adnexal structures of normal skin. Results T-cadherin expression is restricted to basal keratinocytes of the epidermis. The basal cell layer of sebaceous glands was T-cadherin positive, whereas sebocytes were negative. Within apocrine glands, only myoepithelial cells were T-cadherin positive. In contrast, both the secretory coils and excretory ducts of eccrine glands were T-cadherin positive. In terminal hair follicles, the outer root sheath layers strongly expressed T-cadherin throughout different regions of the follicle, with the strongest immunoreactivity at the bulge and suprabulbar regions. T-cadherin and CK15 stem cell marker similarly localized within the bulge and suprabulbar region. T-cadherin and CD34 stem cell marker similarly localized at the suprabulbar level. Conclusion The specific patterns of T-cadherin expression in the epidermis and adnexal structures suggest an important guardian role in skin homeostasis. PMID:27904857

  7. Lateral self-assembly of E-cadherin directed by cooperative calcium binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alattia, J R; Ames, J B; Porumb, T; Tong, K I; Heng, Y M; Ottensmeyer, P; Kay, C M; Ikura, M

    1997-11-17

    We report the Ca2+ binding characteristics of recombinant Ecad12, a construct spanning the first two repeats of epithelial cadherin, and demonstrate the links between Ca2+ binding and dimer formation. Sedimentation equilibrium and dynamic light scattering experiments show that weak dimerization of Ecad12 occurs in the presence of 10 mM Ca2+ (KdP = 0.17 mM), while no appreciable dimer formation was detected in the absence of Ca2+. Ca2+-induced dimerization was also observed in electron microscopy images of Ecad12. We conclude from Ca2+ titration experiments monitored by tryptophan fluorescence and flow dialysis that dimerization does not affect the equilibrium binding constant for Ca2+. However, the value of the Hill coefficient for Ca2+ binding increases from 1.5 to 2.4 as the protein concentration increases, showing that dimer formation largely contributes to the cooperativity in Ca2+ binding. Based on these observations and previous crystallographic studies, we propose that calcium acts more likely as a geometrical aligner ensuring the proper assembly of cadherin molecules, rather than a simple adhesive.

  8. A Rhizobium leguminosarum CHDL- (Cadherin-Like-) Lectin Participates in Assembly and Remodeling of the Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozza, Nicolás F.; Abdian, Patricia L.; Russo, Daniela M.; Mongiardini, Elías J.; Lodeiro, Aníbal R.; Molin, Søren; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2016-01-01

    In natural environments most bacteria live in multicellular structures called biofilms. These cell aggregates are enclosed in a self-produced polymeric extracellular matrix, which protects the cells, provides mechanical stability and mediates cellular cohesion and adhesion to surfaces. Although important advances were made in the identification of the genetic and extracellular factors required for biofilm formation, the mechanisms leading to biofilm matrix assembly, and the roles of extracellular proteins in these processes are still poorly understood. The symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the synthesis of the acidic exopolysaccharide and the PrsDE secretion system to develop a mature biofilm. PrsDE is responsible for the secretion of the Rap family of proteins that share one or two Ra/CHDL (cadherin-like-) domains. RapA2 is a calcium-dependent lectin with a cadherin-like β sheet structure that specifically recognizes the exopolysaccharide, either as a capsular polysaccharide (CPS) or in its released form [extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)]. In this study, using gain and loss of function approaches combined with phenotypic and microscopic studies we demonstrated that RapA lectins are involved in biofilm matrix development and cellular cohesion. While the absence of any RapA protein increased the compactness of bacterial aggregates, high levels of RapA1 expanded distances between cells and favored the production of a dense matrix network. Whereas endogenous RapA(s) are predominantly located at one bacterial pole, we found that under overproduction conditions, RapA1 surrounded the cell in a way that was reminiscent of the capsule. Accordingly, polysaccharide analyses showed that the RapA lectins promote CPS formation at the expense of lower EPS production. Besides, polysaccharide analysis suggests that RapA modulates the EPS size profile. Collectively, these results show that the interaction of RapA lectins with the polysaccharide is involved in rhizobial

  9. Modulation of extracellular conditions prevents the multilayering of the simple epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Takeda, Kazuki; Haga, Hisashi; Todo, Mitsugu; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2014-05-01

    Simple epitheliums in normal glandular systems are regulated not to stratify even though the constituent cells proliferate and will rise from the epithelium. Since epithelial cells have the potential to establish cell-cell adhesions, the avoidance of stratification must be related to the intracellular signal cascades and the extracellular conditions. The contributions of the former are becoming clarified, but the influence of the latter is poorly understood. In the present study, we examined whether the frequency of cell-on-cell adhesion, which mimics the early stage of multilayering, is dependent on the type of the extracellular scaffold protein. Wild-type epithelial cells were cultured on E-cadherin-Fc (a cell-cell adhesion protein) or collagen (an extracellular matrix protein), and then, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive cells were seeded onto these wild-type cells. We observed that the cell-on-cell adhesion (adhesion of the GFP-positive cell to the wild-type cells) was more frequent in the E-cadherin-Fc treatment than the collagen treatment. The cell-on-cell adhesions that were observed in the E-cadherin treatment were transient and decreased in frequency to that of the collagen treatment after the 12 h of cell culture. We observed the disappearance of E-cadherin-Fc but not collagen during cell culture. These results suggest that transient multilayering in simple epithelium is possible, depending on the types of extracellular scaffold protein, and they imply that cells can modify the extracellular conditions to meet normal cellular conditions.

  10. N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreas development but required for β-cell granule turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny K; Voss, Ulrikke; Kesavan, Gokul; Kostetskii, Igor; Wierup, Nils; Radice, Glenn L.; Semb, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules mediates adhesive interactions that are required for the formation and maintenance of tissues. Previously, we demonstrated that N-cadherin, which is required for numerous morphogenetic processes, is expressed in the pancreatic epithelium at E9.5, but later becomes restricted to endocrine aggregates in mice. To study the role of N-cadherin during pancreas formation and function we generated a tissue specific knockout of N-cadherin in the early pancreatic epithelium by inter-crossing N-cadherin-floxed mice with Pdx1Cre mice. Analysis of pancreas-specific ablation of N-cadherin demonstrates that N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreatic development, but required for β-cell granule turnover. The number of insulin secretory granules is significantly reduced in N-cadherin-deficient β-cells, and as a consequence insulin secretion is decreased. PMID:20533404

  11. N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreas development but required for beta-cell granule turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Jenny K; Voss, Ulrikke; Kesavan, Gokul; Kostetskii, Igor; Wierup, Nils; Radice, Glenn L; Semb, Henrik

    2010-06-01

    The cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules mediates adhesive interactions that are required for the formation and maintenance of tissues. Previously, we demonstrated that N-cadherin, which is required for numerous morphogenetic processes, is expressed in the pancreatic epithelium at E9.5, but later becomes restricted to endocrine aggregates in mice. To study the role of N-cadherin during pancreas formation and function we generated a tissue-specific knockout of N-cadherin in the early pancreatic epithelium by inter-crossing N-cadherin-floxed mice with Pdx1Cre mice. Analysis of pancreas-specific ablation of N-cadherin demonstrates that N-cadherin is dispensable for pancreatic development, but required for beta-cell granule turnover. The number of insulin secretory granules is significantly reduced in N-cadherin-deficient beta-cells, and as a consequence insulin secretion is decreased.

  12. Amino-terminal domain of classic cadherins determines the specificity of the adhesive interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, R B; Laur, O Y

    2000-01-01

    Classic cadherins are transmembrane receptors involved in cell type-specific calcium-dependent intercellular adhesion. The specificity of adhesion is mediated by homophilic interactions between cadherins extending from opposing cell surfaces. In addition, classic cadherins can self......-associate forming lateral dimers. Whereas it is widely excepted that lateral dimerization of cadherins is critical for adhesion, details of this process are not known. Yet, no evidence for physical association between different classic cadherins in cells expressing complex cadherin patterns has been reported....... To study lateral and adhesive intercadherin interactions, we examined interactions between two classic cadherins, E- and P-cadherins, in epithelial A-431 cells co-producing both proteins. We showed that these cells exhibited heterocomplexes consisting of laterally assembled E- and P...

  13. Tissue organization by cadherin adhesion molecules: dynamic molecular and cellular mechanisms of morphogenetic regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Carien M.; Leckband, Deborah; Yap, Alpha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cadherin-based tissue morphogenesis. Tissue physiology is profoundly influenced by the distinctive organizations of cells in organs and tissues. In metazoa, adhesion receptors of the classical cadherin family play important roles in establishing and maintaining such tissue organization. Indeed, it is apparent that cadherins participate in a range of morphogenetic events that range from support of tissue integrity to dynamic cellular rearrangements. A comprehensive understanding of cadherin-based morphogenesis must then define the molecular and cellular mechanisms that support these distinct cadherin biologies. Here we focus on four key mechanistic elements: the molecular basis for adhesion through cadherin ectodomains; the regulation of cadherin expression at the cell surface; cooperation between cadherins and the actin cytoskeleton; and regulation by cell signaling. We discuss current progress and outline issues for further research in these fields. PMID:21527735

  14. N-cadherin knock-down decreases invasiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Li; Wei He; Na Lin; Xin Wang; Qing-Xia Fan

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expressions of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in specimens of 62 normal esophageal epithela, 31 adjacent atypical hyperplastic epithelia and 62 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), and to investigate the roles of N-cadherin in the invasiveness of ESCC cell line EC9706 transfected by N-cadherin shRNA. METHODS: PV immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression pattern of N-cadherin and E-cadherin in specimens of 62 normal esophageal epithelia, 31 adjacent atypical hyperplastic epithelia and 62 ESCCs. The invasiveness of ESCC line EC9706 was determined by transwell assay after EC9706 was transfected by N-cadherin shRNA. RESULTS: The positive rates of N-cadherin decreased in the carcinoma, adjacent atypical hyperplastic and normal esophageal tissues (75.8%, 61.3% and 29.0%, P < 0.05), respectively, while those of E-cadherin increased (40.3%, 71.0% and 95.2%, P < 0.05). The increased expression of N-cadherin and decreased expression of E-cadherin were related to invasion, differentiation, and lymph node metastasis ( P < 0.05). The expression level of N-cadherin decreased in the N-cadherin knocked down cells, and the invasiveness of those cells decreased significantly as well. The number of cells which crossed the basement membrane filter 0.05). CONCLUSION: E-cadherin and N-cadherin expression is correlated with the invasion and aggravation of ESCC. The down-regulation of N-cadherin lowers the invasiveness of EC9706 cell line.

  15. VE-cadherin cleavage by LasB protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa facilitates type III secretion system toxicity in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Golovkine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of the vascular system by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa occurs during bacterial dissemination in the body or in blood-borne infections. Type 3 secretion system (T3SS toxins from Pa induce a massive retraction when injected into endothelial cells. Here, we addressed the role of type 2 secretion system (T2SS effectors in this process. Mutants with an inactive T2SS were much less effective than wild-type strains at inducing cell retraction. Furthermore, secretomes from wild-types were sufficient to trigger cell-cell junction opening when applied to cells, while T2SS-inactivated mutants had minimal activity. Intoxication was associated with decreased levels of vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin, a homophilic adhesive protein located at endothelial cell-cell junctions. During the process, the protein was cleaved in the middle of its extracellular domain (positions 335 and 349. VE-cadherin attrition was T3SS-independent but T2SS-dependent. Interestingly, the epithelial (E-cadherin was unaffected by T2SS effectors, indicating that this mechanism is specific to endothelial cells. We showed that one of the T2SS effectors, the protease LasB, directly affected VE-cadherin proteolysis, hence promoting cell-cell junction disruption. Furthermore, mouse infection with Pa to induce acute pneumonia lead to significant decreases in lung VE-cadherin levels, whereas the decrease was minimal with T2SS-inactivated or LasB-deleted mutant strains. We conclude that the T2SS plays a pivotal role during Pa infection of the vascular system by breaching the endothelial barrier, and propose a model in which the T2SS and the T3SS cooperate to intoxicate endothelial cells.

  16. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  17. Dynamic interplay between adhesive and lateral E-cadherin dimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Laur, Oscar Y; Troyanovsky, Regina B;

    2002-01-01

    M. The disappearance of adhesive dimers was counterbalanced by an increase in Trp156-dependent lateral dimers. Increasing the calcium concentration to a normal level rapidly restored the original balance between adhesive and lateral dimers. We also present evidence that E-cadherin dimers in vivo have a short lifetime...

  18. Holding on and letting go: cadherin turnover in cell intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Hitoshi; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2013-03-25

    In zebrafish early development, blastoderm cells undergo extensive radial intercalations, triggering the spreading of the blastoderm over the yolk cell and thereby initiating embryonic body axis formation. Now reporting in Developmental Cell, Song et al. (2013) demonstrate a critical function for EGF-dependent E-cadherin endocytosis in promoting blastoderm cell intercalations.

  19. M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions activate satellite cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Merce; Montserrat, Núria; Pardo, Cristina; Mulero, Lola; Miquel-Serra, Laia; Rodrigues, Alexandre Miguel Cavaco; Andrés Vaquero, José; Kuebler, Bernd; Morera, Cristina; Barrero, María José; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-11-15

    Adult muscle stem cells and their committed myogenic precursors, commonly referred to as the satellite cell population, are involved in both muscle growth after birth and regeneration after damage. It has been previously proposed that, under these circumstances, satellite cells first become activated, divide and differentiate, and only later fuse to the existing myofiber through M-cadherin-mediated intercellular interactions. Our data show that satellite cells fuse with the myofiber concomitantly to cell division, and only when the nuclei of the daughter cells are inside the myofiber, do they complete the process of differentiation. Here we demonstrate that M-cadherin plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition and fusion, and is crucial for cell division activation. Treatment of satellite cells with M-cadherin in vitro stimulates cell division, whereas addition of anti-M-cadherin antibodies reduces the cell division rate. Our results suggest an alternative model for the contribution of satellite cells to muscle development, which might be useful in understanding muscle regeneration, as well as muscle-related dystrophies.

  20. Phosphoregulation of the C. elegans cadherin-catenin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaci, Sandhya; Morrison, Kylee; Shao, Xiangqiang; Schuh, Amber L; Wang, Yueju; Yates, John R; Hardin, Jeff; Audhya, Anjon

    2015-12-15

    Adherens junctions play key roles in mediating cell-cell contacts during tissue development. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, the cadherin-catenin complex (CCC), composed of the classical cadherin HMR-1 and members of three catenin families, HMP-1, HMP-2 and JAC-1, is necessary for normal blastomere adhesion, gastrulation, ventral enclosure of the epidermis and embryo elongation. Disruption of CCC assembly or function results in embryonic lethality. Previous work suggests that components of the CCC are subject to phosphorylation. However, the identity of phosphorylated residues in CCC components and their contributions to CCC stability and function in a living organism remain speculative. Using mass spectrometry, we systematically identify phosphorylated residues in the essential CCC subunits HMR-1, HMP-1 and HMP-2 in vivo. We demonstrate that HMR-1/cadherin phosphorylation occurs on three sites within its β-catenin binding domain that each contributes to CCC assembly on lipid bilayers. In contrast, phosphorylation of HMP-2/β-catenin inhibits its association with HMR-1/cadherin in vitro, suggesting a role in CCC disassembly. Although HMP-1/α-catenin is also phosphorylated in vivo, phosphomimetic mutations do not affect its ability to associate with other CCC components or interact with actin in vitro. Collectively, our findings support a model in which distinct phosphorylation events contribute to rapid CCC assembly and disassembly, both of which are essential for morphogenetic rearrangements during development.

  1. Regulation of C-cadherin function during activin induced morphogenesis of Xenopus animal caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieher, W M; Gumbiner, B M

    1994-07-01

    Treatment of Xenopus animal pole tissue with activin results in the induction of mesodermal cell types and a dramatic elongation of the tissue. The morphogenetic movements involved in the elongation appear similar to those in normal gastrulation, which is driven by cell rearrangement and cell intercalations. We have used this system to explore the potential regulation of cell-cell adhesion and cadherin function during morphogenesis. Quantitative blastomere aggregation assays revealed that activin induction reduced the calcium-dependent adhesion between blastomeres. Activin-induced blastomeres formed smaller aggregates, and a greater proportion of the population remained as single cells compared to uninduced blastomeres. The aggregation was mediated by C-cadherin because C-cadherin was present in the blastomeres during the aggregation assay, and monoclonal antibodies against C-cadherin inhibited the calcium-dependent aggregation of blastomeres. E-cadherin was not detectable until after the completion of the assay and, therefore, does not explain the adhesive differences between induced and uninduced blastomeres. L cells stably expressing C-cadherin (LC cells) were used to demonstrate that C-cadherin activity was specifically altered after activin induction. Blastomeres induced with activin bound fewer LC cells than uninduced blastomers. L cells not expressing C-cadherin did not adhere to blastomeres. The changes in C-cadherin-mediated adhesion occurred without detectable changes in the steady-state levels of C-cadherin or the amount of C-cadherin present on the surface of the cell. Immunoprecipitation of C-cadherin and its associated catenins revealed that the ratio of C-cadherin and the catenins was not altered by activin induction. These results demonstrate that activin decreases the adhesive function of existing C-cadherin molecules on the surface of blastomeres and suggest that decreased cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion is associated with increased

  2. Soluble N-cadherin: A novel inhibitor of VSMC proliferation and intimal thickening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Cressida A; Wadey, Kerry S; George, Sarah J

    2016-03-01

    Reoccurrence of symptoms occurs in 30-50% of coronary artery disease patients receiving vein grafts or bare-metal stents due to intimal thickening (restenosis). Restenosis is caused by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation. New therapeutic approaches that reduce VSMC migration and proliferation while promoting endothelial cell (EC) coverage are required. We assessed the effect of a soluble form of N-cadherin (SNC-Fc, a fusion of the extracellular portion of N-Cadherin to a mutated Fc fragment of IgG), a cell-cell junction molecule, on human saphenous VSMC proliferation and migration in vitro. We also assessed its effect on intimal thickening in a validated human ex vivo organ culture model. We observed that SNC-Fc significantly inhibited VSMC proliferation and to a lesser extent migration. The anti-proliferative effect of SNC-Fc was mediated by the interaction of SNC-Fc with the FGFR, rather than through inhibition of β-catenin signalling. SNC-Fc also significantly reduced intimal thickening by ~85% in the ex vivo organ culture model. SNC-Fc treatment inhibited proliferation of the intimal cells but did not affect migration. SNC-Fc reduced EC apoptosis, without detrimental effects on EC proliferation and migration in vitro. Importantly SNC-Fc increased EC coverage in the ex vivo model of intimal thickening. In conclusion, we suggest that SNC-Fc may have potential as an anti-proliferative therapeutic agent for reducing restenosis which has no detrimental effects on endothelial cells.

  3. EXPRESSION OF SURVIVIN AND E-CADHERIN IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Xiao-feng; LIU Ji-hong; WANG Li-fen; FENG XIAO-Mei; YAO Ji-hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, and is involved in the regulation of cell division. E-cadherin functionally belongs to transmembrane glycoproteins family, it is responsible for intercellular junction mechanism that is crucial for the mutual association of vertebrate cells. These genes are thought to be associated with cancer aggression. This study was to investigate the relationship between surviving gene, E-cadherin expression and invasion clinicopathological features of breast cancer. Methods: The expression of surviving gene and E-cadherin were detected by SP immunohistochemical technique in tissues of 66 breast cancer, 20 breast fibroadenoma and 20 adjacent breast tissue. Results: The positive rate of surviving gene expression in breast cancer was 42.2%, significantly higher (P=0.025) than those in breast fibroadenoma (35.0%), and adjacent breast tissue (10.0%). The positive rate of E-cadherin in the groups of adjacent breast tissue, breast fibroadenoma and breast cancer were 100%, 100% and 42.4%, there was significant difference between the group of benign and malignant tumor (P=0.005). The positive rate of surviving in breast cancer with local lymph node metastasis was significant higher than that in breast cancer without lymph node metastasis (P=0.01), and E-cadherin in breast cancer with local lymph node metastasis was significant lower than that without lymph node metastasis (P=o.o1). There was no significant difference among the groups of pathological types and TNM stages in the expression of surviving (P=0.966 & P=0.856), but there was significant difference in the expression of E-cadherin among these groups (P=0.01 & P=0.023). Conclusion: The loss or decrease of E-cadherin expression may promote the exfoliation of cancerous cells from original tissues, and surviving gene may promote the viability of the exfoliated cancer cells and the formation of new metastasis focus. These 2 factors cooperate with each other

  4. E-cadherin endocytosis regulates the activity of Rap1: a traffic light GTPase at the crossroads between cadherin and integrin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzac, Fiorella; Avolio, Maria; Degani, Simona; Kaverina, Irina; Torti, Mauro; Silengo, Lorenzo; Small, J Victor; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2005-10-15

    The coordinate modulation of cadherin and integrin functions plays an essential role in fundamental physiological and pathological processes, including morphogenesis and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional crosstalk between cadherins and integrins are still elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the small GTPase Rap1, a crucial regulator of the inside-out activation of integrins, is a target for E-cadherin-mediated outside-in signaling. In particular, we show that a strong activation of Rap1 occurs upon adherens junction disassembly that is triggered by E-cadherin internalization and trafficking along the endocytic pathway. By contrast, Rap1 activity is not influenced by integrin outside-in signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the E-cadherin endocytosis-dependent activation of Rap1 is associated with and controlled by an increased Src kinase activity, and is paralleled by the colocalization of Rap1 and E-cadherin at the perinuclear Rab11-positive recycling endosome compartment, and the association of Rap1 with a subset of E-cadherin-catenin complexes that does not contain p120ctn. Conversely, Rap1 activity is suppressed by the formation of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell junctions as well as by agents that inhibit either Src activity or E-cadherin internalization and intracellular trafficking. Finally, we demonstrate that the E-cadherin endocytosis-dependent activation of Rap1 is associated with and is required for the formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Our findings provide the first evidence of an E-cadherin-modulated endosomal signaling pathway involving Rap1, and suggest that cadherins may have a novel modulatory role in integrin adhesive functions by fine-tuning Rap1 activation.

  5. Spatiotemporal distribution and function of N-cadherin in postnatal Schwann cells: A matter of adhesion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Mikael; Wicher, Grzegorz; Limbach, Christoph;

    2010-01-01

    . In this study, we investigated the distribution of N-cadherin in the developing postnatal and adult rat peripheral nervous system. N-cadherin was found primarily in ensheathing glia throughout development, concentrated at neuron-glial or glial-glial contacts of the sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG......), and myenteric plexi. In the sciatic nerve, N-cadherin decreases with age and progress of myelination. In adult animals, N-cadherin was found exclusively in nonmyelinating Schwann cells. The distribution of N-cadherin in developing E17 DRG primary cultures is similar to what was observed in vivo. Functional...

  6. HAb18G/CD147 cell-cell contacts confer resistance of a HEK293 subpopulation to anoikis in an E-cadherin-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Ping

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acquisition of resistance to "anoikis" facilitates the survival of cells under independent matrix-deficient conditions, such as cells in tumor progression and the production of suspension culture cells for biomedical engineering. There is evidence suggesting that CD147, an adhesion molecule associated with survival of cells in tumor metastasis and cell-cell contacts, plays an important role in resistance to anoikis. However, information regarding the functions of CD147 in mediating cell-cell contacts and anoikis-resistance remains limited and even self-contradictory. Results An anoikis-resistant clone (HEK293ar, derived from anoikis-sensitive parental Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells, survived anoikis by the formation of cell-cell contacts. The expression of HAb18G/CD147 (a member of the CD147 family was upregulated and the protein was located at cell-cell junctions. Upregulation of HAb18G/CD147 in suspended HEK293ar cells suppressed anoikis by mediating the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Anoikis resistance in HEK293ar cells also required E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts. Knock-down of HAb18G/CD147 and E-cadherin inhibited cell-cell contacts formation and increased anoikis sensitivity respectively. When HAb18G/CD147 was downregulated, E-cadherin expression in HEK293ar cells was significantly suppressed; however, knockdown of E-cadherin by E-cadherin siRNA or blocking of E-cadherin binding activity with a specific antibody and EDTA had no significant effect on HAb18G/CD147 expression. Finally, pretreatment with LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/AKT inhibitor, disrupted cell-cell contacts and decreased cell number, but this was not the case in cells treated with the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusions Our results provide new evidence that HAb18G/CD147-mediated cell-cell contact confers anoikis resistance in an E-cadherin-dependent manner; and cell-cell contact mediated

  7. The Scribble polarity protein stabilizes E-cadherin/p120-catenin binding and blocks retrieval of E-cadherin to the Golgi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhura Lohia

    Full Text Available Several polarity proteins, including Scribble (Scrb have been implicated in control of vesicle traffic, and in particular the endocytosis of E-cadherin, but through unknown mechanisms. We now show that depletion of Scrb enhances endocytosis of E-cadherin by weakening the E-cadherin-p120catenin interaction. Unexpectedly, however, the internalized E-cadherin is not degraded but accumulates in the Golgi apparatus. Silencing p120-catenin causes degradation of E-cadherin in lysosomes, but degradation is blocked by the co-depletion of Scrb, which diverts the internalized E-cadherin to the Golgi. Loss of Scrb also enhances E-cadherin binding to retromer components, and retromer is required for Golgi accumulation of Scrb, and E-cadherin stability. These data identify a novel and unanticipated function for Scrb in blocking retromer-mediated diversion of E-cadherin to the Golgi. They provide evidence that polarity proteins can modify the intracellular itinerary for endocytosed membrane proteins.

  8. Alteration of cadherin isoform expression and inhibition of gap junctions in stomach carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore cell malignant phenotype correlated changes of cell surface adhesion molecules and cell-cell communication in carcinogenesis, human stomach transformed and cancer cell lines were investigated. Expressions of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, ?-catenin, ?-catenin as well as gap junction (GJ) protein Cx32 were studied by utilization of immunoblotting, immunocytochemical and fluorescent dye transfer methods. Mammalian normal stomach mucosal cells expressed E-cadherin but not N-cadherin. E-cadherin immunofluorescence was detected at cell membranous adherens junctions (AJ) where colocalization with immunofluorescent staining of inner surface adhesion plaque proteins ?- and ?-catenins was observed. The existence of E-cadherin/ catenin (?-, ?-) protein complexes as AJ was suggested. In transformed and stomach cancer cells E-cadherin was inhibited, instead, N-cadherin was expressed and localized at membranous AJ where co-staining with ?- and ?-catenin fluorescence was observed. Formation of N-cadherin/catenin (?-, ?-) protein complex at AJs of transformed and cancer cells was suggested. The above observations were further supported by immunoblotting results. Normal stomach muscosal and transformed cells expressed Cx32 at membranous GJ and were competent of gap junction communication (GJIC). In stomach cancer cells, Cx32 was inhibited and GJIC was defective. The results suggested that changes of signal pathways mediated by both cell adhesion and cell communication systems are associated intracellular events of stomach carcinogenesis. The alteration of cadherin isoform from E- to N-cadherin in transformed and stomach cancer cells is the first report.

  9. Complementary and dynamic type II cadherin expression associated with development of the primate visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    The middle temporal visual area (MT, also known as V5) is a visual association area that is particularly evolved in the primate brain. The MT receives input from the primary visual area (V1), constitutes part of the dorsal visual pathway, and plays an essential role in processing motion. Connections between the MT and V1 in the primate brain are formed after birth, and are related to the maturation of visual system. However, it remains to be determined what molecular mechanisms control the formation and maturation of the visual system. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins, originally isolated as cell adhesion molecules, which have multiple roles in synapse formation and function. To investigate potential involvement of cadherins in development of the primate visual system, we examined type II cadherin expression (cadherin-6, -8, -12) in cortical and thalamic visual areas of pre- and postnatal brains of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). In the prenatal brain, cadherin-6 was dominantly expressed in the pulvino-MT pathway whereas cadherin-8 was dominant in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)-V1 pathway. During postnatal development, there was a downregulation of cadherin-6 and upregulation of cadherin-8 expression in the MT. The timing of this cadherin exchange preceded the development of V1-MT connections. Our results suggest the possibility that changes in cadherin expression are involved in the development of the primate visual system, and that a switch in cadherin expression may be a general mechanism to control neural plasticity of highly cognitive abilities.

  10. Spatiotemporal distribution and function of N-cadherin in postnatal Schwann cells: A matter of adhesion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Mikael; Wicher, Grzegorz; Limbach, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    During embryonic development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the adhesion molecule neuronal cadherin (N-cadherin) is expressed by Schwann cell precursors and associated with axonal growth cones. N-cadherin expression levels decrease as precursors differentiate into Schwann cells....... In this study, we investigated the distribution of N-cadherin in the developing postnatal and adult rat peripheral nervous system. N-cadherin was found primarily in ensheathing glia throughout development, concentrated at neuron-glial or glial-glial contacts of the sciatic nerve, dorsal root ganglia (DRG...... studies of N-cadherin in these cultures, using the antagonist peptide INPISGQ, show a disruption of the attachment between Schwann cells, but no interference in the initial or long-term contact between Schwann cells and axons. We suggest that N-cadherin acts primarily in the adhesion between glial cells...

  11. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Bum; Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2015-06-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈16.7nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba, but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti.

  12. Expression and clinical significance of E-cadherin,β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex in breast cancer and precancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuofeng Zhang; Shuguang Yang; Gangping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to observe the expressions and clinical Significance of E-cadherin, β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex in breast cancer and precancerous lesions, and analyze the relationship between the ex-pressions and clinicopathological features in breast cancer. Methods: Immunhistochemical UltraSensitiveTM S-P method was employed to detect the expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex in 128 cases of invasive ductal carcinomas, 89 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ and 57 cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia, 53 cases of usual ductal hyper-plasia breast tissues were selected as a control group. The express of E-cadherin, β-catenin and their relationship with mult biological parameters including histological grade, region lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and recurrence on files were also assessed. Results: (1) The staining patterns character of E-cadherin, β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex:In UDH breast tissues, E-cadherin and a-catenin were expressed on cellmembrane of ductal and acinic cells, showing cellular contour and border among cells. The abnormal expression of the three proteins occurred in breast invasive ductal carcinomas, ductal carcinoma in situ and atypical ductal hyperplasia tissues, showing cytoplasmic or nuclear staining, decrease and loss of cytomembrane staining. (2) The abnormal expression rates of E-cadherin, β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex in invasive ductal carcinomas were 53.91%, 65.63% and 81.25%, which were significantly higher than that in ductal carcinoma in situ, atypical ductal hyperplasia, usual ductal hyperplasia tissues (P 0.05). (3) There was a significantly dif erence in the mean E-cadherin, β-catenin and E-cadherin-catenins complex frequency between estrogen receptor & progesterone receptor positive IDC group and negative group, epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2/neu) positive and negative groups, Ki-67 proliferation index ≤ 14

  13. Unconventional Cadherin Localization in Honey Bee Gonads Revealed Through Domain-Specific Apis mellifera E- and N-Cadherin Antibodies Indicates Alternative Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Hartfelder

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As key factors in intercellular adhesion processes, cadherins play important roles in a plethora of developmental processes, including gametogenesis. In a previous study on cadherin localization in the gonads of honey bees, performed with heterologous pan-cadherin antibodies, we detected these proteins as (i associated with cell membranes, (ii as homogeneously distributed throughout the cytoplasm, and (iii as nuclear foci in both somatic and germline cells, raising the possibility of alternative functions. To further investigate such unusual intracellular cadherin localization we produced specific antibodies against the N- and C-terminal domains of honey bee N- and E-cadherin. A 160 kDa protein was recognized by the E-cadherin antibodies as well as one of approximately 300 kDa from those raised against N-cadherin. In gonad preparations, both proteins were detected as dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and as nuclear foci in both germline and somatic cells of queen and worker ovarioles, as well as in the testioles of drones. This leads us to infer that cadherins may indeed be involved in certain signaling pathways and/or transcriptional regulation during gametogenesis. In late oogenesis stages, immunolabeling for both proteins was observed at the cell cortex, in conformity with a role in cell adhesion. In testioles, E-cadherin was seen in co-localization with fusomes, indicating a possible role in cyst organization. Taken together, the distribution of N- and E-cadherins in honey bee gonads is suggestive of alternative roles for cadherins in gametogenesis of both sexes.

  14. Evidence for a role of E-cadherin in suppressing liver carcinogenesis in mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marlon R; Hiltwein, Felix; Grill, Jessica; Blum, Helmut; Krebs, Stefan; Klanner, Andrea; Bauersachs, Stefan; Bruns, Christiane; Longerich, Thomas; Horst, David; Brandl, Lydia; de Toni, Enrico; Herbst, Andreas; Kolligs, Frank T

    2014-08-01

    The cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin has critical functions in development and carcinogenesis. Impaired expression of E-cadherin has been associated with disrupted tissue homeostasis, progression of cancer and a worse patient prognosis. So far, the role of E-cadherin in homeostasis and carcinogenesis of the liver is not well understood. By use of a mouse model with liver-specific deletion of E-cadherin and administration of the carcinogen diethylnitrosamine, we demonstrate that loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes results in acceleration of the growth of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In contrast, liver regeneration is not disturbed in mice lacking E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes. In human HCC, we observed four different expression patterns of E-cadherin. Notably, atypical cytosolic expression of E-cadherin was positively correlated with a poorer patient prognosis. The median overall survival of patients with HCC expressing E-cadherin on the membrane only was 221 weeks (95% confidence interval: 51-391) compared with 131 weeks in patients with cytosolic expression (95% confidence interval: 71-191 weeks; P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate that impaired expression of E-cadherin promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis and is associated with a worse prognosis in humans.

  15. Cadherin expression by embryonic divisions and derived gray matter structures in the telencephalon of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redies, C; Medina, L; Puelles, L

    2001-09-24

    The expression of three cadherins (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was studied by immunohistochemistry in the telencephalon of chicken embryos at intermediate stages of development (11 and 15 days of incubation). Expression patterns were related to cytoarchitecture and to previously published data on functional connections and on the expression of gene regulatory proteins. Our results indicate that, like in other regions of the embryonic chicken brain, the expression of each cadherin is restricted to parts of embryonic divisions as well as to particular nuclei, areas or their subdivisions. The expression patterns are largely complementary with partial overlap. The regional expression of the cadherins respects the boundary between the pallium and the subpallium as well as between various pallial and subpallial subdivisions. Novel subdivisions were found in several telencephalic areas. For example, subjacent to the hyperstriatum, the neostriatum contains multiple islands of cells with a profile of cadherin expression that differs from the surrounding matrix ("island fields"). Moreover, the expression of each cadherin is apparently associated with parts of intratelencephalic neural circuits and of thalamopallial and basal ganglia pathways. These results support a role for cadherins in the aggregation and differentiation of gray matter structures within embryonic brain divisions. The cadherin immunostaining patterns are interpreted in the context of a recently proposed divisional scheme of the avian pallium that postulates medial, dorsal, lateral, and ventral divisions as complete radial histogenetic units (Puelles et al. [2000]).

  16. Formation of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei in diencephalic alar plate divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, M S; Puelles, L; Redies, C

    2000-11-01

    During the formation of brain nuclei, the vertebrate neural tube is partitioned into distinct embryonic divisions. In this study, the expression of three members of the cadherin family of adhesion molecules (cadherin-6B, cadherin-7, and R-cadherin) was mapped to study the differentiation of gray matter in the division so that diencephalic alar plate of chicken embryos from embryonic day 3 (E3) to E10. At early stages of development (E3-E4), each cadherin is expressed in restricted regions of the diencephalic wall of the neural tube. The borders of some of the expression domains coincide with divisional boundaries. As the mantle layer is formed and increases in thickness from E4 to E8, morphologically discernible aggregates of cells appear that express the three cadherins differentially. These aggregates represent the anlagen of specific diencephalic brain nuclei, e.g., the lateroanterior nucleus, the ventral geniculate nucleus, the nucleus rotundus, the perirotundic area, the principal precommissural nucleus, and the lateral spiriform nucleus. Most of the cadherin-expressing diencephalic nuclei studied in this work apparently derive from a single embryonic division and remain there. The divisional boundaries are replaced gradually by the borders of cadherin-expressing brain nuclei. The current results support the idea that cadherins confer differential adhesiveness to developing structures of gray matter in the diencephalic alar plate. Moreover, they suggest that each cadherin plays a role in the formation of specific brain nuclei within the diencephalic divisions.

  17. E-cadherin interactions are required for Langerhans cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Mayumi, Nobuko; Watanabe, Eri; Norose, Yoshihiko; Watari, Eiji; Kawana, Seiji; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Human skin contains the following two distinct DC subsets: (i) Langerhans cells (LCs), expressing Langerin but not DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), are predominantly localized in the epidermis; and (ii) dermal DCs, expressing DC-SIGN but not Langerin, are observed mainly in the dermis. It is not known whether localization in the epidermis provides cues for LC differentiation. Here, we show that E-cadherin expressed by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) ...

  18. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Yuan MENG; Toshihiro AKAIKE

    2013-01-01

    Induced embryonic stem resources for the observation of the cell (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  19. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  20. Characterization of ascites-derived ovarian tumor cells from spontaneously occurring ovarian tumors of the chicken: evidence for E-cadherin upregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Tiwari

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer, a highly metastatic disease, is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Chickens are widely used as a model for human ovarian cancer as they spontaneously develop epithelial ovarian tumors similar to humans. The cellular and molecular biology of chicken ovarian cancer (COVCAR cells, however, have not been studied. Our objectives were to culture COVCAR cells and to characterize their invasiveness and expression of genes and proteins associated with ovarian cancer. COVCAR cell lines (n = 13 were successfully maintained in culture for up to19 passages, cryopreserved and found to be viable upon thawing and replating. E-cadherin, cytokeratin and α-smooth muscle actin were localized in COVCAR cells by immunostaining. COVCAR cells were found to be invasive in extracellular matrix and exhibited anchorage-independent growth forming colonies, acini and tube-like structures in soft agar. Using RT-PCR, COVCAR cells were found to express E-cadherin, N-cadherin, cytokeratin, vimentin, mesothelin, EpCAM, steroidogenic enzymes/proteins, inhibin subunits-α, βA, βB, anti-müllerian hormone, estrogen receptor [ER]-α, ER-β, progesterone receptor, androgen receptor, and activin receptors. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed greater N-cadherin, vimentin, and VEGF mRNA levels and lesser cytokeratin mRNA levels in COVCAR cells as compared with normal ovarian surface epithelial (NOSE cells, which was suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transformation. Western blotting analyses revealed significantly greater E-cadherin levels in COVCAR cell lines compared with NOSE cells. Furthermore, cancerous ovaries and COVCAR cell lines expressed higher levels of an E-cadherin cleavage product when compared to normal ovaries and NOSE cells, respectively. Cancerous ovaries were found to express significantly higher ovalbumin levels whereas COVCAR cell lines did not express ovalbumin thus suggesting that the latter did not originate from

  1. Involvement of M-cadherin in terminal differentiation of skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeschnigk, M; Kozian, D; Kuch, C; Schmoll, M; Starzinski-Powitz, A

    1995-09-01

    Cadherins are a gene family encoding calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins which are thought to act in the establishment and maintenance of tissue organization. M-cadherin, one member of the family, has been found in myogenic cells of somitic origin during embryogenesis and in the adult. These findings have suggested that M-cadherin is involved in the regulation of morphogenesis of skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, we investigated the function of M-cadherin in the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes (terminal differentiation) in cell culture. Furthermore, we tested whether M-cadherin might influence (a) the expression of troponin T, a typical marker of biochemical differentiation of skeletal muscle cells, and (b) withdrawal of myoblasts from the cell cycle (called terminal commitment). The studies were performed by using antagonistic peptides which correspond to sequences of the putative M-cadherin binding domain. Analogous peptides of N-cadherin have previously been shown to interfere functionally with the N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. In the presence of antagonistic M-cadherin peptides, the fusion of myoblasts into myotubes was inhibited. Analysis of troponin T revealed that it was downregulated at the protein level although its mRNA was still detectable. In addition, withdrawal from the cell cycle typical for terminal commitment of muscle cells was not complete in fusion-blocked myogenic cells. Finally, expression of M-cadherin antisense RNA reducing the expression of the endogenous M-cadherin protein interfered with the fusion process of myoblasts. Our data imply that M-cadherin-mediated myoblast interaction plays an important role in terminal differentiation of skeletal muscle cells.

  2. A Protocadherin-Cadherin-FLRT3 Complex Controls Cell Adhesion and Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) and fibronectin leucine-rich domain transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3) are induced by TGFbeta signaling in Xenopus embryos and both regulate morphogenesis by inhibiting C-cadherin mediated cell adhesion. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the functional and physical relationships between PAPC, FLRT3, and C-cadherin. Although neither PAPC nor FLRT3 are required for each other to regulate C-cadherin adhesion, they do interact functionally and physica...

  3. T-cadherin is associated with prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, De-Di; Wang, Mei-Hong; Yang, Jie; Li, Liang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Bing; Zhou, Yan-Zhen

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the prognostic impact of T-cadherin expression in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). On the basis of the results of immunohistochemical analysis, 106 patients with operable TNBC were divided into two groups, the T-cadherin-positive group and T-cadherin-negative group. Fisher's exact and χ(2) tests were employed to analyze clinical data, which included the association between T-cadherin expression and clinicopathological features and prognosis. The log-rank test was used to examine the impact of T-cadherin expression on the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and the 5-year overall survival (OS) of these patients. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were introduced to analyze DFS and OS. Compared with the T-cadherin-positive group (58.3, 52.8 and 47.2, respectively; P=0.018, P=0.017, and P=0.047), tumor size >2 cm, grade II and III (Elston-Ellis modification of Bloom-Richardson grading system), and positive lymph node status were significantly more common in the T-cadherin-negative group compared with the T-cadherin-positive group (80.0 vs. 58.3%, 75.7 vs. 52.8% and 67.1 vs. 47.2%, respectively) (P=0.018, P=0.017, and P=0.047). Compared with the T-cadherin-positive group, 5-year DFS and OS levels were significantly lower in the T-cadherin-negative group (Z=6.233, P=0.013; Z=5.366, P=0.021). Multivariate analysis revealed that negative T-cadherin expression was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (P=0.009) and OS (P=0.048). The results of the present study indicated that negative T-cadherin expression indicated a worse prognosis for patients with TNBC.

  4. Rapid paracellular transmigration of Campylobacter jejuni across polarized epithelial cells without affecting TER: role of proteolytic-active HtrA cleaving E-cadherin but not fibronectin

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boehm, Manja

    2012-04-25

    AbstractBackgroundCampylobacter jejuni is one of the most important bacterial pathogens causing food-borne illness worldwide. Crossing the intestinal epithelial barrier and host cell entry by C. jejuni is considered the primary reason of damage to the intestinal tissue, but the molecular mechanisms as well as major bacterial and host cell factors involved in this process are still widely unclear.ResultsIn the present study, we characterized the serine protease HtrA (high-temperature requirement A) of C. jejuni as a secreted virulence factor with important proteolytic functions. Infection studies and in vitro cleavage assays showed that C. jejuni’s HtrA triggers shedding of the extracellular E-cadherin NTF domain (90 kDa) of non-polarised INT-407 and polarized MKN-28 epithelial cells, but fibronectin was not cleaved as seen for H. pylori’s HtrA. Deletion of the htrA gene in C. jejuni or expression of a protease-deficient S197A point mutant did not lead to loss of flagella or reduced bacterial motility, but led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage and transmigration of the bacteria across polarized MKN-28 cell layers. Unlike other highly invasive pathogens, transmigration across polarized cells by wild-type C. jejuni is highly efficient and is achieved within a few minutes of infection. Interestingly, E-cadherin cleavage by C. jejuni occurs in a limited fashion and transmigration required the intact flagella as well as HtrA protease activity, but does not reduce transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) as seen with Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria or Neisseria.ConclusionThese results suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is involved in rapid crossing of the epithelial barrier by C. jejuni via a very specific mechanism using the paracellular route to reach basolateral surfaces, but does not cleave the fibronectin receptor which is necessary for cell entry.

  5. E-cadherin expression and its clinical significance in 41 cases of spinal plasma cell myeloma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liangzhe; Liu Huimin; He Jin; Li Yuli; Xu Yi; Chen Bing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression level of E-cadherin in spinal plasma cell myeloma and its relationship with the clinicopathological indexes of spinal plasma cell myeloma. Methods: The expression of E-cadherin was detected in 41 cases of spinal plasma cell myeloma and 14 cases of simple bone cysts by using S-P (streptavidin-perosidase) immunohistochemical staining. The relationship between E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features was analyzed. Results: In spinal plasma cell myelomas, the positive expression rate of E-cadherin (46.34 %) was higher than that in simple bone cyst tissues (all negative) (P0.05), but had relationship with the classification of light chain. The expression rate in lambda chain subgroup was lower than that in the others (P<0.05). We also found the E-cadherin negative patients had a higher overall survival rate than those who had strong E-cadherin expression (P<0.05). Conclusion: E-cadherin expressed higher in spinal plasma cell myelomas than in simple bone cyst tissues and its expression had relationship with the light chain classification in spinal plasma cell myeloma. The patients with no stain of E-cadherin may have a poor prognosis. Detecting the type of light chain associated with expression of E-cadherin might be helpful in evaluating the outcome of spinal PCM patients.

  6. N-cadherin expression in malignant germ cell tumours of the testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bremmer Felix

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs are the most common malignancy in young men aged 18–35 years. They are clinically and histologically subdivided into seminomas and non-seminomas. Cadherins are calcium-dependent transmembrane proteins of the group of adhesion proteins. They play a role in the stabilization of cell-cell contacts, the embryonic morphogenesis, in the maintenance of cell polarity and signal transduction. N-cadherin (CDH2, the neuronal cadherin, stimulates cell-cell contacts during migration and invasion of cells and is able to suppress tumour cell growth. Methods Tumour tissues were acquired from 113 male patients and investigated by immunohistochemistry, as were the three TGCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2 and Tcam2. A monoclonal antibody against N-cadherin was used. Results Tumour-free testis and intratubular germ cell neoplasias (unclassified (IGCNU strongly expressed N-cadherin within the cytoplasm. In all seminomas investigated, N-cadherin expression displayed a membrane-bound location. In addition, the teratomas and yolk sac tumours investigated also differentially expressed N-cadherin. In contrast, no N-cadherin could be detected in any of the embryonal carcinomas and chorionic carcinomas examined. This expression pattern was also seen in the investigated mixed tumours consisting of seminomas, teratomas, and embryonal carcinoma. Conclusions N-cadherin expression can be used to differentiate embryonal carcinomas and chorionic carcinomas from other histological subtypes of TGCT.

  7. Analysis of C-cadherin regulation during tissue morphogenesis with an activating antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y; Brieher, W M; Gumbiner, B M

    1999-01-25

    The regulation of cadherin-mediated adhesion at the cell surface underlies several morphogenetic processes. To investigate the role of cadherin regulation in morphogenesis and to begin to analyze the molecular mechanisms of cadherin regulation, we have screened for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that allow us to manipulate the adhesive state of the cadherin molecule. Xenopus C-cadherin is regulated during convergent extension movements of gastrulation. Treatment of animal pole tissue explants (animal caps) with the mesoderm-inducing factor activin induces tissue elongation and decreases the strength of C-cadherin-mediated adhesion between blastomeres (Brieher, W.M., and B.M. Gumbiner. 1994. J. Cell Biol. 126:519-527). We have generated a mAb to C-cadherin, AA5, that restores strong adhesion to activin-treated blastomeres. This C-cadherin activating antibody strongly inhibits the elongation of animal caps in response to activin without affecting mesodermal gene expression. Thus, the activin-induced decrease in C-cadherin adhesive activity appears to be required for animal cap elongation. Regulation of C-cadherin and its activation by mAb AA5 involve changes in the state of C-cadherin that encompass more than changes in its homophilic binding site. Although mAb AA5 elicited a small enhancement in the functional activity of the soluble C-cadherin ectodomain (CEC1-5), it was not able to restore cell adhesion activity to mutant C-cadherin lacking its cytoplasmic tail. Furthermore, activin treatment regulates the adhesion of Xenopus blastomeres to surfaces coated with two other anti-C-cadherin mAbs, even though these antibodies probably do not mediate adhesion through a normal homophilic binding mechanism. Moreover, mAb AA5 restores strong adhesion to these antibodies. mAb AA5 only activates adhesion of blastomeres to immobilized CEC1-5 when it binds to C-cadherin on the cell surface. It does not work when added to CEC1-5 on the substrate. Together these findings suggest

  8. Dysregulation of E-cadherin in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔维佳; 吴俊华; 王彦君; 乐建新; 张松; 俞艳萍

    2010-01-01

    E-cadherin is a key epithelial protein and adhesive molecule. This study detected the E-cadherin expression in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and controls, and analyzed its possible role in the pathogenesis of CRSwNP. The expression of E-cadherin was detected by using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry in controls and patients with CRSwNP. Computed tomography (CT) scan findings were scored. The results showed that the E-cadherin expression was up-regulated in patients...

  9. Construction and identification of recombination expression vector Ksp-Cadherin-Gpx1-Klk1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解立怡; 薛武军; 项和立; 麻孙凯

    2008-01-01

    Objective To construct and identify the Gpx1-Klk1 vector which contains kidney-specific promoter (Ksp-cadherin). Methods Through PCR amplification, the human Gpx1, Klk1, and Ksp-cadherin cDNA were obtained by taking Gpx1 cDNA, Klk1 cDNA, and Ksp-cadherin BAC as templates. After being testified, the PCR products were inserted into the expressive vector pIRES-EGFP step-by-step to produce a recombinant vector Ksp-cadherin-Gpx1-Klk1. This vector was examined by restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis...

  10. P120-Catenin Regulates Early Trafficking Stages of the N-Cadherin Precursor Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Wehrendt

    Full Text Available It is well established that binding of p120 catenin to the cytoplasmic domain of surface cadherin prevents cadherin endocytosis and degradation, contributing to cell-cell adhesion. In the present work we show that p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor, contributes to its anterograde movement from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to the Golgi complex. In HeLa cells, depletion of p120 expression, or blocking its binding to N-cadherin, increased the accumulation of the precursor in the ER, while it decreased the localization of mature N-cadherin at intercellular junctions. Reconstitution experiments in p120-deficient SW48 cells with all three major isoforms of p120 (1, 3 and 4 had similar capacity to promote the processing of the N-cadherin precursor to the mature form, and its localization at cell-cell junctions. P120 catenin and protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B facilitated the recruitment of the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF, an ATPase involved in vesicular trafficking, to the N-cadherin precursor complex. Dominant negative NSF E329Q impaired N-cadherin trafficking, maturation and localization at cell-cell junctions. Our results uncover a new role for p120 catenin bound to the N-cadherin precursor ensuring its trafficking through the biosynthetic pathway towards the cell surface.

  11. Reduced E-cadherin facilitates renal cell carcinoma progression by WNT/β-catenin signaling activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinqi; Yang, Mingxi; Shi, Hua; Hu, Jianxin; Wang, Yuanlin; Sun, Zhaolin; Xu, Shuxiong

    2017-02-15

    Reduced expression of E-cadherin was observed in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, its potential clinical value and correlation with WNT/β-catenin signaling in RCC progression was still unclear. Immunohistochemical staining was performed in RCC tissue microarray to examine the expression status and prognosis value of E-cadherin and β-catenin. The potential role of E-cadherin in β-catenin translocation was analyzed with immunobloting assays. A significant negative correlation was observed between E-cadherin and β-catenin expression in RCC tissues. E-cadherin inhibits β-catenin translocation from membrane to cytoplasm in RCC tissues, which was an important step for WNT/β-catenin signaling. Reduced E-cadherin expression was associated with poor prognosis. More importantly, E-cadherin-/β-catenin+ was an independent detrimental factor for survival estimation of RCC patients. Reduced E-cadherin expression in RCC promoted cancer progression via WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway activation. E-cadherin/β-catenin provides a valuable prognosis marker for RCC, which may be an effective target for RCC therapy.

  12. N-cadherin Expression in Testicular Germ Cell and Gonadal Stromal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Heidenberg, Joel H. Barton, Denise Young, Michael Grinkemeyer, Isabell A. Sesterhenn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural-cadherin is a member of the cadherin gene family encoding the N-cadherin protein that mediates cell adhesion. N-cadherin is a marker of Sertoli cells and is also expressed in germ cells of varying stages of maturation. The purpose of this study was to determine the presence and distribution of this protein by immunohistochemistry in 105 germ cell tumors of both single and mixed histological types and 12 gonadal stromal tumors. Twenty-four germ cell tumors consisted of one cell type and the remaining were mixed. Of the 23 seminomas in either pure or mixed tumors, 74% were positive. Two spermatocytic seminomas were positive. Of the 83 cases with yolk sac tumor, 99% were positive for N-cadherin. The teratomas were positive in 73% in neuroectodermal and / or glandular components. In contrast, 87% of embryonal carcinomas did not express N-cadherin. Only 17% of the syncytiotrophoblastic cells were positive for N-cadherin. In conclusion, N-cadherin expression is very helpful in the identification of yolk sac tumors. In addition to glypican-3 and Sal-like protein 4, N-cadherin can be beneficial for the diagnosis and classification of this subtype of testicular germ cell tumor. Nine of the 12 gonadal stromal tumors were positive to a variable extent.

  13. History and progression of Fat cadherins in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Xiaofeng Zhang,1,2,* Jinghua Liu,3,* Xiao Liang,1,2 Jiang Chen,1,2 Junjie Hong,1,2 Libo Li,1 Qiang He,3 Xiujun Cai1,2 1Department of General Surgery, 2Key Laboratory of Surgery of Zhejiang Province, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, 3Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Linyi People’s Hospital, Linyi, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contribute equally to this work Abstract: Intercellular adhesions are vital hubs for signaling pathways during multicellular development and animal morphogenesis. In eukaryotes, under aberrant intracellular conditions, cadherins are abnormally regulated, which can result in cellular pathologies such as carcinoma, kidney disease, and autoimmune diseases. As a member of the Ca2+-dependent adhesion superfamily, Fat proteins were first described in the 1920s as an inheritable lethal mutant phenotype in Drosophila, consisting of four member proteins, FAT1, FAT2, FAT3, and FAT4, all of which are highly conserved in structure. Functionally, FAT1 was found to regulate cell migration and growth control through specific protein–protein interactions of its cytoplasmic tail. FAT2 and FAT3 are relatively less studied and are thought to participate in the development of human cancer through a pathway similar to that of the Ena/VASP proteins. In contrast, FAT4 has been widely studied in the context of biological functions and tumor mechanisms and has been shown to regulate the planar cell polarity pathway, the Hippo signaling pathway, the canonical Wnt signaling cascade, and the expression of YAP1. Overall, Fat cadherins may be useful as emerging disease biomarkers and as novel therapeutic targets. Keywords: Fat cadherins, FAT1, FAT2, FAT3, FAT4, CpG island, Hippo pathway, WNT signaling

  14. Investigation of N-cadherin/β-catenin expression in adrenocortical tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Beatrice; Regazzo, Daniela; Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat, Carla; Citton, Marilisa; Iacobone, Maurizio; Scaroni, Carla; Betterle, Corrado; Mantero, Franco; Fassina, Ambrogio; Pezzani, Raffaele; Boscaro, Marco

    2016-10-01

    β-catenin is a multifunctional protein; it is a key component of the Wnt signaling, and it plays a central role in cadherin-based adhesions. Cadherin loss promotes tumorigenesis by releasing membrane-bound β-catenin, hence stimulating Wnt signaling. Cadherins seem to be involved in tumor development, but these findings are limited in adrenocortical tumors (ACTs). The objective of this study was to evaluate alterations in key components of cadherin/catenin adhesion system and of Wnt pathway. This study included eight normal adrenal samples (NA) and 95 ACT: 24 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs) and 71 adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs). β-catenin mutations were evaluated by sequencing, and β-catenin and cadherin (E-cadherin and N-cadherin) expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We identified 18 genetic alterations in β-catenin gene. qRT-PCR showed overexpression of β-catenin in 50 % of ACC (12/24) and in 48 % of ACA (21/44). IHC data were in accordance with qRT-PCR results: 47 % of ACC (7/15) and 33 % of ACA (11/33) showed increased cytoplasmic or nuclear β-catenin accumulation. N-cadherin downregulation has been found in 83 % of ACC (20/24) and in 59 % of ACA (26/44). Similar results were obtained by IHC: N-cadherin downregulation was observed in 100 % (15/15) of ACC and in 55 % (18/33) of ACA. β-catenin overexpression together with the aberrant expression of N-cadherin may play important role in ACT tumorigenesis. The study of differentially expressed genes (such as N-cadherin and β-catenin) may enhance our understanding of the biology of ACT and may contribute to the discovery of new diagnostic and prognostic tools.

  15. E-cadherin expression in obesity-associated, Kras-initiated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alexander P; Chang, Hui-Hua; Jung, Xiaoman; Moro, Aune; Hertzer, Kathleen; Xu, Mu; Schmidt, Andrea; Hines, O Joe; Eibl, Guido

    2015-12-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is critical in the development of invasive epithelial malignancies. EMT is accelerated by inflammation and results in decreased E-cadherin expression. Diet-induced obesity is an inflammatory state that accelerates pancreatic carcinogenesis; its effect on EMT and E-cadherin expression in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unclear. Conditional Kras(G12D) mice were fed a control diet or a high-fat, high-calorie diet for 3 or 9 months (n = 10 each). Immunohistochemistry with anti-E-cadherin antibody was performed. E-cadherin expression was characterized by staining intensity, location, and proportion of positive cells. In vitro expression of E-cadherin and Slug in primary pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and cancer cells was determined by Western blot. The HFCD led to increased weight gain in both 3- (15.8 vs 5.6 g, P cancer, E-cadherin expression was aberrant, with loss of membranous staining and prominent cytoplasmic staining, associated with strong, cytoplasmic expression of β-catenin. In vitro expression of E-cadherin was greatest in primary PanIN cells, accompanied by absent Slug expression. Cancer cell lines demonstrated significantly decreased E-cadherin expression in the presence of upregulated Slug. Despite increased pancreatic inflammation and accelerated carcinogenesis, the high-fat, high-calorie diet did not induce changes in E-cadherin expression in PanIN lesions of all stages. Invasive lesions demonstrated aberrant cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining. Loss of normal membranous localization may reflect a functional loss of E-cadherin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression and function of the atypical cadherin FAT1 in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valletta, Daniela; Czech, Barbara [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Thasler, Wolfgang E. [Grosshadern Tissue Bank and Center for Liver Cell Research, Department of Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (Germany); Mueller, Martina [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin [Institute of Pathology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany); Hellerbrand, Claus, E-mail: claus.hellerbrand@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg (Germany)

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of the atypical cadherin FAT1 is increased in chronic liver disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 expression goes up during the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 enhanced NFkB activity and resistance to apoptosis in activated HSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FAT1 is a new therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic fibrosis can be considered as wound healing process in response to hepatocellular injury. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a key event of hepatic fibrosis since activated HSCs are the cellular source of enhanced extracellular matrix deposition, and reversion of liver fibrosis is accompanied by clearance of activated HSCs by apoptosis. The atypical cadherin FAT1 has been shown to regulate diverse biological functions as cell proliferation and planar cell polarity, and also to affect wound healing. Here, we found increased FAT1 expression in different murine models of chronic liver injury and in cirrhotic livers of patients with different liver disease. Also in hepatic tissue of patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis FAT1 expression was significantly enhanced and correlated with collagen alpha I(1) expression. Immunohistochemistry revealed no significant differences in staining intensity between hepatocytes in normal and cirrhotic liver tissue but myofibroblast like cells in fibrotic septa of cirrhotic livers showed a prominent immunosignal. Furthermore, FAT1 mRNA and protein expression markedly increased during in vitro activation of primary human and murine HSCs. Together, these data indicated activated HSCs as cellular source of enhanced FAT1 expression in diseased livers. To gain insight into the functional role of FAT1 in activated HSCs we suppressed FAT1 in these

  17. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  18. Relationship between E-cadherin and diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜洪娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify novel biomarker for diabetic nephropathy(DN)by urinary proteomic methods,and to detect the expression of E-cadherin in urine and renal tissue of patients with DN.Methods Urine samples were collected from 12 cases of type 1 diabetic nephropathy patients(T1DN),12 cases of type 2 diabetic nephropathy patients(T2DN),12 cases of nephritic syndrome patients(NS),and 12 cases of healthy Controls.Comparative proteomic approach of two-dimensional gel electro-

  19. Transcriptomic profiling of urine extracellular vesicles reveals alterations of CDH3 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royo, Felix; Zuñiga-Garcia, Patricia; Torrano, Verónica; Loizaga, Ana; Sanchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Ugalde-Olano, Aitziber; González, Esperanza; Cortazar, Ana R; Palomo, Laura; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Lacasa-Viscasillas, Isabel; Berdasco, Maria; Sutherland, James D; Barrio, Rosa; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Martín-Martín, Natalia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Valcarcel-Jimenez, Lorea; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Gonzalez-Tampan, Jorge; Cachi-Fuentes, Guido; Esteller, Manel; Aransay, Ana M; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-02-09

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) are emerging structures with promising properties for intercellular communication. In addition, the characterization of EV in biofluids is an attractive source of non-invasive diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Here we show that urinary EV (uEV) from prostate cancer (PCa) patients exhibit genuine and differential physical and biological properties compared to benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). Importantly, transcriptomics characterization of uEVs led us to define the decreased abundance of Cadherin 3, type 1 (CDH3) transcript in uEV from PCa patients. Tissue and cell line analysis strongly suggested that the status of CDH3 in uEVs is a distal reflection of changes in the expression of this cadherin in the prostate tumor. CDH3 was negatively regulated at the genomic, transcriptional, and epigenetic level in PCa. Our results reveal that uEVs could represent a non-invasive tool to inform about the molecular alterations in PCa.

  20. A coleopteran cadherin fragment synergizes toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxins Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca against lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjin; Hua, Gang; Taylor, Milton D; Adang, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus, is a serious cosmopolitan pest of commercial poultry facilities because of its involvement in structural damage to poultry houses, reduction in feed conversion efficiency, and transfer of avian and human pathogens. Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca insecticidal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis are used to control coleopteran larvae. Cadherins localized in the midgut epithelium function as receptors for Cry toxins in lepidopteran, coleopteran, and dipteran insects. Previously, we demonstrated that the truncated cadherin (DvCad1) from Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, which consists of the C-terminal cadherin repeats (CR) 8-10 and expressed in Escherichia coli, enhanced Cry3Aa and Cry3Bb toxicity against several coleopteran species. Here we report that the DvCad1-CR8-10 enhances Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca toxicity to lesser mealworm. Previously, by an enzyme linked immunosorbent microplate assay, we demonstrated that the DvCad1-CR8-10 binds activated-Cry3Aa (11.8 nM), -Cry3Bb (1.4nM), and now report that CR8-10 binds activated-Cry8Ca (5.7 nM) toxin. The extent of Cry toxins enhancement by DvCad1-CR8-10, which ranged from 3.30- to 5.93-fold, may have practical application for lesser mealworm control in preventing avian and human pathogen transfer in poultry facilities.

  1. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  2. VE-cadherin interacts with cell polarity protein Pals1 to regulate vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Hartmann, Christian; Kummer, Daniel; Pajonczyk, Denise; Mirzapourshafiyi, Fatemeh; Nakayama, Masanori; Weide, Thomas; Gerke, Volker; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-09-15

    Blood vessel tubulogenesis requires the formation of stable cell-to-cell contacts and the establishment of apicobasal polarity of vascular endothelial cells. Cell polarity is regulated by highly conserved cell polarity protein complexes such as the Par3-aPKC-Par6 complex and the CRB3-Pals1-PATJ complex, which are expressed by many different cell types and regulate various aspects of cell polarity. Here we describe a functional interaction of VE-cadherin with the cell polarity protein Pals1. Pals1 directly interacts with VE-cadherin through a membrane-proximal motif in the cytoplasmic domain of VE-cadherin. VE-cadherin clusters Pals1 at cell-cell junctions. Mutating the Pals1-binding motif in VE-cadherin abrogates the ability of VE-cadherin to regulate apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. In a similar way, deletion of the Par3-binding motif at the C-terminus of VE-cadherin impairs apicobasal polarity and vascular lumen formation. Our findings indicate that the biological activity of VE-cadherin in regulating endothelial polarity and vascular lumen formation is mediated through its interaction with the two cell polarity proteins Pals1 and Par3.

  3. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND MOLECULAR DYNAMICS STUDIES OF EC1 DOMAIN OF VE-CADHERIN TO ELUCIDATE DOCKING INTERACTION WITH CADHERIN-DERIVED PEPTIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivitri Dewi Prasasty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VE-cadherin is a protein in the cadherin family that is found at the adherens junctions of the microvessel endothelial cells of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB. It is recognized as the homotypic cell adhesion molecules and there is limited structural information on how VE-cadherins mediate cell-cell adhesion. It has been shown that the EC1 domain of cadherins is important for the homophilic interactions for cell-cell adhesion. Therefore, the aims of this study are to model the structure of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin, study its molecular dynamics properties and evaluate its interactions with cadherin peptides. In this study, the sequence alignment between EC1 domain of VE-cadherin and the template protein were conducted by CLUSTALW2 platform. The SWISS-MODEL platform performed the homology modeling of the EC1 domain of VE-cadherin structure. Structural refinement was done by using KOBAMIN. Some validation analysis platforms also were conducted included PROCHECK, VERIFY3D, ERRAT and MOLPROBITY to check the allowed residues region in Ramachandran Plot (RP and the quality of the structure. The most favored region was found 95.5% in RP value and overall model structure quality is 71.34%. Molecular Dynamics (MD was run under CABS-FLEX to determine the flexibility of the residue index. The RMSD value of MD is 1.5Å per residue index. Eventually, molecular docking by AUTODOCK VINA was conducted to investigate protein-ligand interaction. From docking, it is found that the affinity energy is -4.8 kcal/mol which has the most favorable binding of EC1 domain with the peptide.

  4. History and progression of Fat cadherins in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jinghua; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Jiang; Hong, Junjie; Li, Libo; He, Qiang; Cai, Xiujun

    2016-01-01

    Intercellular adhesions are vital hubs for signaling pathways during multicellular development and animal morphogenesis. In eukaryotes, under aberrant intracellular conditions, cadherins are abnormally regulated, which can result in cellular pathologies such as carcinoma, kidney disease, and autoimmune diseases. As a member of the Ca2+-dependent adhesion super-family, Fat proteins were first described in the 1920s as an inheritable lethal mutant phenotype in Drosophila, consisting of four member proteins, FAT1, FAT2, FAT3, and FAT4, all of which are highly conserved in structure. Functionally, FAT1 was found to regulate cell migration and growth control through specific protein–protein interactions of its cytoplasmic tail. FAT2 and FAT3 are relatively less studied and are thought to participate in the development of human cancer through a pathway similar to that of the Ena/VASP proteins. In contrast, FAT4 has been widely studied in the context of biological functions and tumor mechanisms and has been shown to regulate the planar cell polarity pathway, the Hippo signaling pathway, the canonical Wnt signaling cascade, and the expression of YAP1. Overall, Fat cadherins may be useful as emerging disease biomarkers and as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27942226

  5. Aberrant E-cadherin and gamma-catenin expression in malignant mesothelioma and its diagnostic and biological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Sara; Schillaci, Francesca; Salvio, Michela; Libener, Roberta; Betta, Pier-Giacomo

    2004-08-01

    Cadherins and their associated cytoplasmic proteins, catenins, are critical to the maintenance of normal tissue integrity and the suppression of cancer invasion. The cadherin profile in malignant mesothelioma (MM) is not well defined and the role of the cadherin-catenin system in the pathogenesis of MM remains to be determined. By means of Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry the expression of E (epithelial)-, N (neural)-, P (placental)-cadherin, and alpha-, beta- and gamma-catenins was studied in nine human MM cell lines and five human mesothelial cell lines. Mesothelial cells consistently expressed only N-cadherin and alpha- and beta-catenins. All but one MM cell line were N-cadherin-positive and all of them were also positive for alpha- and beta-catenins. E-cadherin was found in six (66.7%) and gamma-catenin in seven (77.8%) MM cell lines. Five of these E-cadherin-positive lines co-expressed N-cadherin and the remaining one was also P-cadherin-positive. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed the plasma membrane co-localisation of both cadherin types in MM cell lines that co-expressed E- and N-cadherin or E- and P-cadherin, respectively. Immunoprecipitation showed complexes of beta-catenin with both cadherin types when co-expressed. The results point to upregulation of E-cadherin and gamma-catenin in most MM cases and demonstrate that cadherin expression is more heterogeneous and less mutually exclusive in MM compared with the mesothelium, although the biological significance of this finding remains unclear.

  6. Meta-analysis of downregulated E-cadherin as a poor prognostic biomarker for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jifeng; Qi, Shengnan; Wang, Ping; Li, Wanyu; Song, Lingxie; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-03-01

    This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic functions of E-cadherin expression in cervical cancer. PubMed and other databases were searched for articles associated with E-cadherin and cervical cancer. These articles were published before June 2015 and written in English or Chinese. Random-effects model was used to pool odds ratios on the heterogeneity test in the meta-analysis. All of 20 studies were analyzed, in which 522 (42.6%) subjects exhibited reduced E-cadherin expression. Evaluation of clinicopathologic features showed that the downregulation of E-cadherin was related to the overall survival, clinicopathological parameters and age. Downregulation of E-cadherin in cervical cancer patients showed poor overall survival. Therefore, E-cadherinmay be a metastasis-suppressor gene in cervical cancer.

  7. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Molecular design principles underlying β-strand swapping in the adhesive dimerization of cadherins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendome, Jeremie; Posy, Shoshana; Jin, Xiangshu; Bahna, Fabiana; Ahlsen, Goran; Shapiro, Lawrence; Honig, Barry

    2011-06-01

    Cell adhesion by classical cadherins is mediated by dimerization of their EC1 domains through the 'swapping' of N-terminal β-strands. We use molecular simulations, measurements of binding affinities and X-ray crystallography to provide a detailed picture of the structural and energetic factors that control the adhesive dimerization of cadherins. We show that strand swapping in EC1 is driven by conformational strain in cadherin monomers that arises from the anchoring of their short N-terminal strand at one end by the conserved Trp2 and at the other by ligation to Ca(2+) ions. We also demonstrate that a conserved proline-proline motif functions to avoid the formation of an overly tight interface where affinity differences between different cadherins, crucial at the cellular level, are lost. We use these findings to design site-directed mutations that transform a monomeric EC2-EC3 domain cadherin construct into a strand-swapped dimer.

  9. N-cadherin is overexpressed in Crohn's stricture fibroblasts and promotes intestinal fibroblast migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, John P

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Intestinal fibroblasts mediate stricture formation in Crohn\\'s disease (CD). Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is important in fibroblast activation, while cell attachment and migration is regulated by the adhesion molecule N-cadherin. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of N-cadherin in intestinal fibroblasts in patients with fibrostenosing CD. METHODS: Intestinal fibroblasts were cultured from seromuscular biopsies from patients undergoing resection for terminal ileal fibrostenosing CD (n = 14) or controls patients (n = 8). N-cadherin expression was assessed using Western blot and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Fibroblasts were stimulated with TGF-beta and selective pathway inhibitors Y27632, PD98050, and LY294002 were used to examine the Rho\\/ROCK, ERK-1\\/2, and Akt signaling pathways, respectively. Cell migration was assessed using a scratch wound assay. N-cadherin was selectively overexpressed using a plasmid. RESULTS: Fibroblasts from fibrostenosing CD express increased constitutive N-cadherin mRNA and protein and exhibit enhanced basal cell migration relative to those from directly adjacent normal bowel. Control fibroblasts treated with TGF-beta induced N-cadherin in a dose-dependent manner which was inhibited by Rho\\/ROCK and Akt pathway modulation. Control fibroblasts exhibited enhanced cell migration in response to treatment with TGF-beta or transfection with an N-cadherin plasmid. CONCLUSIONS: Fibroblasts from strictures in CD express increased constitutive N-cadherin and exhibit enhanced basal cell migration. TGF-beta is a potent inducer of N-cadherin in intestinal fibroblasts resulting in enhanced cell migration. The TGF-beta-mediated induction of N-cadherin may potentiate Crohn\\'s stricture formation.

  10. Heterogeneous Cadherin Expression and Multicellular Aggregate Dynamics in Ovarian Cancer Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Klymenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial ovarian carcinoma spreads via shedding of cells and multicellular aggregates (MCAs from the primary tumor into peritoneal cavity, with subsequent intraperitoneal tumor cell:mesothelial cell adhesion as a key early event in metastatic seeding. Evaluation of human tumor extracts and tissues confirms that well-differentiated ovarian tumors express abundant E-cadherin (Ecad, whereas advanced lesions exhibit upregulated N-cadherin (Ncad. Two expression patterns are observed: “mixed cadherin,” in which distinct cells within the same tumor express either E- or Ncad, and “hybrid cadherin,” wherein single tumor cell(s simultaneously expresses both cadherins. We demonstrate striking cadherin-dependent differences in cell-cell interactions, MCA formation, and aggregate ultrastructure. Mesenchymal-type Ncad+ cells formed stable, highly cohesive solid spheroids, whereas Ecad+ epithelial-type cells generated loosely adhesive cell clusters covered by uniform microvilli. Generation of “mixed cadherin” MCAs using fluorescently tagged cell populations revealed preferential sorting into cadherin-dependent clusters, whereas mixing of cell lines with common cadherin profiles generated homogeneous aggregates. Recapitulation of the “hybrid cadherin” Ecad+/Ncad+ phenotype, via insertion of the CDH2 gene into Ecad+ cells, resulted in the ability to form heterogeneous clusters with Ncad+ cells, significantly enhanced adhesion to organotypic mesomimetic cultures and peritoneal explants, and increased both migration and matrix invasion. Alternatively, insertion of CDH1 gene into Ncad+ cells greatly reduced cell-to-collagen, cell-to-mesothelium, and cell-to-peritoneum adhesion. Acquisition of the hybrid cadherin phenotype resulted in altered MCA surface morphology with increased surface projections and increased cell proliferation. Overall, these findings support the hypothesis that MCA cadherin composition impacts intraperitoneal cell and MCA

  11. Impact of Snail and E-cadherin expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemori, Keiichi; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Maemura, Kosei; Mataki, Yuko; Sakoda, Masahiko; Iino, Satoshi; Ueno, Shinichi; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are a rare type of malignancy with a prognosis that is relatively good, compared with that of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, a number of patients with PNETs have distant metastasis and a less favorable prognosis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is essential for tumor progression and metastasis. Snail and E-cadherin serve key roles in the process of EMT in numerous tumor types, including gastric and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. However, the role of EMT in PNETs remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the significance of Snail and E-cadherin expression in PNETs. Tissue samples were obtained from 40 resected PNETs. The expression of Snail and E-cadherin was evaluated in the primary tumors using immunohistochemical staining. The association between protein expression and patient clinicopathological features was then analyzed. High and low Snail expression levels were observed in 11 (27.5%) and 29 (72.5%) patients, respectively. Preserved and reduced E-cadherin expression was observed in 19 (47.5%) and 21 (52.5%) patients, respectively. Patients with low Snail expression and preserved E-cadherin expression had a significantly lower risk of vascular invasion, lymphatic invasion, lymph node metastasis and liver metastasis and a lower WHO classification, as compared with the group that included patients with high Snail and reduced E-cadherin, high Snail and preserved E-cadherin, and low Snail and reduced E-cadherin expression. In addition, the patients with low Snail expression levels and preserved E-cadherin expression had more a favorable prognosis compared with the other group. The present study indicates that EMT serves an important role in tumor progression in PNETs. Immunohistochemical evaluation of Snail and E-cadherin is useful for predicting the risk of vessel invasion and metastasis in PNETs.

  12. Cells involved in extracellular matrix remodeling after acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Larissa Ferraz [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Mataveli, Fábio D’Aguiar [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mader, Ana Maria Amaral Antônio; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell [Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Justo, Giselle Zenker; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida da Silva [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Evaluate the effects of VEGF{sub 165} gene transfer in the process of remodeling of the extracellular matrix after an acute myocardial infarct. Wistar rats were submitted to myocardial infarction, after the ligation of the left descending artery, and the left ventricle ejection fraction was used to classify the infarcts into large and small. The animals were divided into groups of ten, according to the size of infarcted area (large or small), and received or not VEGF{sub 165} treatment. Evaluation of different markers was performed using immunohistochemistry and digital quantification. The primary antibodies used in the analysis were anti-fibronectin, anti-vimentin, anti-CD44, anti-E-cadherin, anti-CD24, anti-alpha-1-actin, and anti-PCNA. The results were expressed as mean and standard error, and analyzed by ANOVA, considering statistically significant if p≤0.05. There was a significant increase in the expression of undifferentiated cell markers, such as fibronectin (protein present in the extracellular matrix) and CD44 (glycoprotein present in the endothelial cells). However, there was decreased expression of vimentin and PCNA, indicating a possible decrease in the process of cell proliferation after treatment with VEGF{sub 165}. Markers of differentiated cells, E-cadherin (adhesion protein between myocardial cells), CD24 (protein present in the blood vessels), and alpha-1-actin (specific myocyte marker), showed higher expression in the groups submitted to gene therapy, compared to non-treated group. The value obtained by the relation between alpha-1-actin and vimentin was approximately three times higher in the groups treated with VEGF{sub 165}, suggesting greater tissue differentiation. The results demonstrated the important role of myocytes in the process of tissue remodeling, confirming that VEGF{sub 165} seems to provide a protective effect in the treatment of acute myocardial infarct.

  13. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  14. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  15. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, M; Nakagawa, S; Aono, S; Usui, T; Uemura, T

    2000-07-29

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to another. Artificial perturbation of this switch results in blocking of their escape from the neural tube. Intracellular modulations of cadherin activity also seem to play a role in regulation of cell adhesion. We identified p120ctn as a regulator of cadherin function in carcinoma cells. With such regulators, cells may make a choice as to whether they should maintain stable cell contacts or disrupt their association. Finally, we found another type of cadherin-mediated cell patterning: Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity in Drosophila imaginal discs. Thus, the cadherin superfamily receptors control the patterning of cell assemblies through a variety of mechanisms.

  16. Arf6 regulates EGF-induced internalization of E-cadherin in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Yujie; Gu, Luo; Zheng, Jianchao; Cui, Jie; Dong, Jing; Du, Jun

    2015-01-01

    E-cadherin internalization facilitates dissolution of adherens junctions and promotes tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration. Our previous results have shown that Arf6 exerts pro-migratory action in breast cancer cells after EGF stimulation. Despite the fact that EGF signaling stimulates EMT of breast cancer cells, the effect of Arf6 on internalization of E-cadherin of breast cancer cells under EGF treatment remains to be determined. Here, we showed that EGF dose-dependently stimulated E-cadherin internalization by MCF-7 cells with the maximal effect at 50 ng/ml. Meanwhile, EGF treatment markedly increased Arf6 activation. Arf6 was involved in complexes of E-cadherin, and more E-cadherin was pulled down with Arf6 when the activity of the latter was increased. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays showed that transfection breast cancer cells with Arf6-T27N or Arf6 siRNA suppressed EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization. Taken together, our study demonstrated that Arf6 activation plays a potential role in EGF-induced E-cadherin internalization, providing new mechanism underlying the effect of Arf6 on promoting breast cancer cell metastasis.

  17. Fibroblast growth factor signaling potentiates VE-cadherin stability at adherens junctions by regulating SHP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Hatanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fibroblast growth factor (FGF system plays a critical role in the maintenance of vascular integrity via enhancing the stability of VE-cadherin at adherens junctions. However, the precise molecular mechanism is not well understood. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the detailed mechanism of FGF regulation of VE-cadherin function that leads to endothelial junction stabilization. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In vitro studies demonstrated that the loss of FGF signaling disrupts the VE-cadherin-catenin complex at adherens junctions by increasing tyrosine phosphorylation levels of VE-cadherin. Among protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs known to be involved in the maintenance of the VE-cadherin complex, suppression of FGF signaling reduces SHP2 expression levels and SHP2/VE-cadherin interaction due to accelerated SHP2 protein degradation. Increased endothelial permeability caused by FGF signaling inhibition was rescued by SHP2 overexpression, indicating the critical role of SHP2 in the maintenance of endothelial junction integrity. CONCLUSIONS: These results identify FGF-dependent maintenance of SHP2 as an important new mechanism controlling the extent of VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby regulating its presence in adherens junctions and endothelial permeability.

  18. A key role for E-cadherin in intestinal homeostasis and Paneth cell maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Marlon R; Dahlhoff, Maik; Horst, David; Hirschi, Benjamin; Trülzsch, Konrad; Müller-Höcker, Josef; Vogelmann, Roger; Allgäuer, Michael; Gerhard, Markus; Steininger, Sylvia; Wolf, Eckhard; Kolligs, Frank T

    2010-12-14

    E-cadherin is a major component of adherens junctions. Impaired expression of E-cadherin in the small intestine and colon has been linked to a disturbed intestinal homeostasis and barrier function. Down-regulation of E-cadherin is associated with the pathogenesis of infections with enteropathogenic bacteria and Crohn's disease. To genetically clarify the function of E-cadherin in intestinal homeostasis and maintenance of the epithelial defense line, the Cdh1 gene was conditionally inactivated in the mouse intestinal epithelium. Inactivation of the Cdh1 gene in the small intestine and colon resulted in bloody diarrhea associated with enhanced apoptosis and cell shedding, causing life-threatening disease within 6 days. Loss of E-cadherin led cells migrate faster along the crypt-villus axis and perturbed cellular differentiation. Maturation and positioning of goblet cells and Paneth cells, the main cell lineage of the intestinal innate immune system, was severely disturbed. The expression of anti-bacterial cryptidins was reduced and mice showed a deficiency in clearing enteropathogenic bacteria from the intestinal lumen. These results highlight the central function of E-cadherin in the maintenance of two components of the intestinal epithelial defense: E-cadherin is required for the proper function of the intestinal epithelial lining by providing mechanical integrity and is a prerequisite for the proper maturation of Paneth and goblet cells.

  19. A key role for E-cadherin in intestinal homeostasis and Paneth cell maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon R Schneider

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: E-cadherin is a major component of adherens junctions. Impaired expression of E-cadherin in the small intestine and colon has been linked to a disturbed intestinal homeostasis and barrier function. Down-regulation of E-cadherin is associated with the pathogenesis of infections with enteropathogenic bacteria and Crohn's disease. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To genetically clarify the function of E-cadherin in intestinal homeostasis and maintenance of the epithelial defense line, the Cdh1 gene was conditionally inactivated in the mouse intestinal epithelium. Inactivation of the Cdh1 gene in the small intestine and colon resulted in bloody diarrhea associated with enhanced apoptosis and cell shedding, causing life-threatening disease within 6 days. Loss of E-cadherin led cells migrate faster along the crypt-villus axis and perturbed cellular differentiation. Maturation and positioning of goblet cells and Paneth cells, the main cell lineage of the intestinal innate immune system, was severely disturbed. The expression of anti-bacterial cryptidins was reduced and mice showed a deficiency in clearing enteropathogenic bacteria from the intestinal lumen. CONCLUSION: These results highlight the central function of E-cadherin in the maintenance of two components of the intestinal epithelial defense: E-cadherin is required for the proper function of the intestinal epithelial lining by providing mechanical integrity and is a prerequisite for the proper maturation of Paneth and goblet cells.

  20. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  1. Should I stay or should I go? Cadherin function and regulation in the neural crest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneyhill, Lisa A; Schiffmacher, Andrew T

    2017-03-02

    Our increasing comprehension of neural crest cell development has reciprocally advanced our understanding of cadherin expression, regulation, and function. As a transient population of multipotent stem cells that significantly contribute to the vertebrate body plan, neural crest cells undergo a variety of transformative processes and exhibit many cellular behaviors, including epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), motility, collective cell migration, and differentiation. Multiple studies have elucidated regulatory and mechanistic details of specific cadherins during neural crest cell development in a highly contextual manner. Collectively, these results reveal that gradual changes within neural crest cells are accompanied by often times subtle, yet important, alterations in cadherin expression and function. The primary focus of this review is to coalesce recent data on cadherins in neural crest cells, from their specification to their emergence as motile cells soon after EMT, and to highlight the complexities of cadherin expression beyond our current perceptions, including the hypothesis that the neural crest EMT is a transition involving a predominantly singular cadherin switch. Further advancements in genetic approaches and molecular techniques will provide greater opportunities to integrate data from various model systems in order to distinguish unique or overlapping functions of cadherins expressed at any point throughout the ontogeny of the neural crest.

  2. N-cadherin promotes thyroid tumorigenesis through modulating major signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Chenxing; Wu, Kexia; Yue, Chenli; Bai, Peisong; Wang, Rong; Wang, Guanjie; Zhao, Man; Lv, Yanyan; Hou, Peng

    2017-01-31

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a crucial step in disease progression, plays a key role in tumor metastasis. N-cadherin, a well-known EMT marker, acts as a major oncogene in diverse cancers, whereas its functions in thyroid cancer remains largely unclear. This study was designed to explore the biological roles and related molecular mechanism of N-cadherin in thyroid tumorigenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry assays were used to evaluate N-cadherin expression. A series of in vitro studies such as cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, migration and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of N-cadherin on malignant behavior of thyroid cancer cells. Our results showed that N-cadherin was significantly upregulated in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs) as compared with non-cancerous thyroid tissues. N-cadherin knockdown markedly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration and invasion, and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. On the other hand, ectopic expression of N-cadherin promoted thyroid cancer cell growth and invasiveness. Mechanically, our data demonstrated that tumor-promoting role of N-cadherin in thyroid cancer was closely related to the activities of the MAPK/Erk, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and p16/Rb signaling pathways in addition to affecting the EMT process. Altogether, our findings suggest that N-cadherin promotes thyroid tumorigenesis by modulating the activities of major signaling pathways and EMT process, and may represent a potential therapeutic target for this cancer.

  3. E-cadherin destabilization accounts for the pathogenicity of missense mutations in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Simões-Correia

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is critical for the maintenance of tissue architecture due to its role in cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin mutations are the genetic cause of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC and missense mutations represent a clinical burden, due to the uncertainty of their pathogenic role. In vitro and in vivo, most mutations lead to loss-of-function, although the causal factor is unknown for the majority. We hypothesized that destabilization could account for the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense mutations in HDGC, and tested our hypothesis using in silico and in vitro tools. FoldX algorithm was used to calculate the impact of each mutation in E-cadherin native-state stability, and the analysis was complemented with evolutionary conservation, by SIFT. Interestingly, HDGC patients harbouring germline E-cadherin destabilizing mutants present a younger age at diagnosis or death, suggesting that the loss of native-state stability of E-cadherin accounts for the disease phenotype. To elucidate the biological relevance of E-cadherin destabilization in HDGC, we investigated a group of newly identified HDGC-associated mutations (E185V, S232C and L583R, of which L583R is predicted to be destabilizing. We show that this mutation is not functional in vitro, exhibits shorter half-life and is unable to mature, due to premature proteasome-dependent degradation, a phenotype reverted by stabilization with the artificial mutation L583I (structurally tolerated. Herein we report E-cadherin structural models suitable to predict the impact of the majority of cancer-associated missense mutations and we show that E-cadherin destabilization leads to loss-of-function in vitro and increased pathogenicity in vivo.

  4. Mucinous Colorectal Adenocarcinoma: Influence of EGFR and E-Cadherin Expression on Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Abd AlRahman M; AbdelAziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira K; Hosni, Ali; Zalata, Khalid R; Gado, Asmaa I

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown conflicting results on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and E-cadherin expression in colorectal carcinoma and their prognostic significance. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate EGFR and E-cadherin expression, interrelation and relation to clinicopathologic, histologic parameters, and survival in rare colorectal mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA). In this study, we studied tumor tissue specimens from 150 patients with colorectal MA and nonmucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA). High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tips technique, and immunohistochemistry for EGFR and E-cadherin was performed. All relations were analyzed using established statistical methodologies. NMA expressed EGFR and E-cadherin in significantly higher rates with significant heterogenous pattern than MA. EGFR and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in both NMA and MA groups. In the NMA group, high EGFR expression was associated with old age, male sex, multiplicity of tumors, lack of mucinous component, and association with schistosomiasis. However, in the MA group, high EGFR expression was associated only with old age and MA subtype rather than signet ring carcinoma subtype. Conversely, high E-cadherin expression in MA cases was associated with old age, fungating tumor configuration, MA subtype, and negative intratumoral lymphocytic response. However, in the NMA cases, none of these factors was statistically significant. In a univariate analysis, neither EGFR nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival. Targeted therapy against EGFR and E-cadherin may not be useful in patients with MA. Neither EGFR nor E-cadherin is an independent prognostic factor in NMA or MA.

  5. Molecular Crosstalk between Integrins and Cadherins: Do Reactive Oxygen Species Set the Talk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Goitre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinate modulation of the cellular functions of cadherins and integrins plays an essential role in fundamental physiological and pathological processes, including morphogenesis, tissue differentiation and renewal, wound healing, immune surveillance, inflammatory response, tumor progression, and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the fine-tuned functional communication between cadherins and integrins are still elusive. This paper focuses on recent findings towards the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the regulation of cell adhesion and signal transduction functions of integrins and cadherins, pointing to ROS as emerging strong candidates for modulating the molecular crosstalk between cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion receptors.

  6. E-Cadherin As A Chemotherapy Resistance Mechanism On Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    mediated junctions. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 2009; 296 (2): G235-44. 17. Pece S, Chiariello M, Murga C, et al. Activation of the...the E-cadherin adhesion complex. J Biol Chem 1999; 274 (27): 19347-51. 18. Pece S, Gutkind JS. Signaling from E-cadherins to the MAPK pathway by the...breast cancer metastasis. J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia 12(2-3): 153-62. 36. Pece , S and JS Gutkind (2000) Signaling from E-cadherins to the MAPK

  7. E- and N-Cadherin Distribution in Developing and Functional Human Teeth under Normal and Pathological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Robert; About, Imad; Lendahl, Urban; Franquin, Jean-Claude; Öbrink, Björn; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2002-01-01

    Cadherins are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as cell recognition, intercellular communication, cell fate, cell polarity, boundary formation, and morphogenesis. Although previous studies have shown E-cadherin expression during rodent or human odontogenesis, there is no equivalent study available on N-cadherin expression in dental tissues. Here we examined and compared the expression patterns of E- and N-cadherins in both embryonic and adult (healthy, injured, carious) human teeth. Both proteins were expressed in the developing teeth during the cap and bell stages. E-cadherin expression in dental epithelium followed an apical-coronal gradient that was opposite to that observed for N-cadherin. E-cadherin was distributed in proliferating cells of the inner and outer enamel epithelia but not in differentiated cells such as ameloblasts, whereas N-cadherin expression was up-regulated in differentiated epithelial cells. By contrast to E-cadherin, N-cadherin was also expressed in mesenchymal cells that differentiate into odontoblasts and produce the hard tissue matrix of dentin. Although N-cadherin was not detected in permanent intact teeth, it was re-expressed during dentin repair processes in odontoblasts surrounding carious or traumatic sites. Similarly, N-cadherin re-expression was seen in vitro, in cultured primary pulp cells that differentiate into odontoblast-like cells. Taken together these results suggest that E- and N-cadherins may play a role during human tooth development and, moreover, indicate that N-cadherin is important for odontoblast function in normal development and under pathological conditions. PMID:12057916

  8. Characterization of three novel human cadherin genes (CDH7, CDH19, and CDH20) clustered on chromosome 18q22-q23 and with high homology to chicken cadherin-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kools, P; Van Imschoot, G; van Roy, F

    2000-09-15

    Full-length coding sequences of two novel human cadherin cDNAs were obtained by sequence analysis of several EST clones and 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) products. Exons for a third cDNA sequence were identified in a public-domain human genomic sequence, and the coding sequence was completed by 3' RACE. One of the sequences (CDH7L1, HGMW-approved gene symbol CDH7) is so similar to chicken cadherin-7 gene that we consider it to be the human orthologue. In contrast, the published partial sequence of human cadherin-7 is identical to our second cadherin sequence (CDH7L2), for which we propose CDH19 as the new name. The third sequence (CDH7L3, HGMW-approved gene symbol CDH20) is almost identical to the mouse "cadherin-7" cDNA. According to phylogenetic analysis, this mouse cadherin-7 and its here presented human homologue are most likely the orthologues of Xenopus F-cadherin. These novel human genes, CDH7, CDH19, and CDH20, are localized on chromosome 18q22-q23, distal of both the gene CDH2 (18q11) encoding N-cadherin and the locus of the six desmosomal cadherin genes (18q12). Based on genetic linkage maps, this genomic region is close to the region to which Paget's disease was linked. Interestingly, the expression patterns of these three closely related cadherins are strikingly different. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Extracellular vesicles from women with breast cancer promote an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like process in mammary epithelial cells MCF10A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Hernandez, Octavio; Gonzales-Vazquez, Cristina; Cortes-Reynosa, Pedro; Reyes-Uribe, Emmanuel; Chavez-Ocaña, Sonia; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio; Sierra-Martinez, Mónica; Salazar, Eduardo Perez

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate many stages of tumor progression including angiogenesis, escape from immune surveillance, and extracellular matrix degradation. We studied whether EVs from plasma of women with breast cancer are able to induce an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process in mammary epithelial cells MCF10A. Our findings demonstrate that EVs from plasma of breast cancer patients induce a downregulation of E-cadherin expression and an increase of vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Moreover, EVs induce migration and invasion, as well as an increase of NFκB-DNA binding activity and MMP-2 and MMP-9 secretions. In summary, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that EVs from breast cancer patients induce an EMT-like process in human mammary non-tumorigenic epithelial cells MCF10A.

  10. Mast cells infiltration and decreased E-cadherin expression in ketamine-induced cystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengqiang Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Increased mast cells in bladder wall and downregulated expression of E-cadherin junction protein in epithelial cells were probably associated with interstitial inflammation and fissures in mucosa. It implied that ketamine induced an interstitial cystitis.

  11. N-Cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule involved in establishment of embryonic left-right asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castro, M I; Vielmetter, E; Bronner-Fraser, M

    2000-05-12

    Within the bilaterally symmetric vertebrate body plan, many organs develop asymmetrically. Here, it is demonstrated that a cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, is one of the earliest proteins to be asymmetrically expressed in the chicken embryo and that its activity is required during gastrulation for proper establishment of the left-right axis. Blocking N-cadherin function randomizes heart looping and alters the expression of Snail and Pitx2, later components of the molecular cascade that regulate left-right asymmetry. However, the expression of other components of this cascade (Nodal and Lefty) was unchanged after blocking N-cadherin function, suggesting the existence of parallel pathways in the establishment of left-right morphogenesis. Here, the results suggest that N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion events are required for establishment of left-right asymmetry.

  12. The role of E-cadherin - 160C/A polymorphism in breast cancer

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    Luo Gaojian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer in women worldwide. Numerous studies have suggested that the E-cadherin adhesion system is dysregulated in cancer cells. These impaired functions of E-cadherin contribute to releasing cancer cells from the primary lesion to cell dedifferentiation. Some studies have shown that polymorphism may affect E-cadherin expression, and then play a role in susceptibility to breast cancer. However, the results remained controversial. In this short review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates, and assess the association between CDH1 polymorphisms and breast cancer susceptibility. This study suggests that genetic variation in CDH1 and -160C/A polymorphism may have an association with breast cancer risk. The assessment of CDH1 polymorphisms may be used for the identification of patients suitable for anti- CDH1 therapy.

  13. Expression of E-Cadherin in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma is Associated with Clinical Prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianming Zhang; Wei Zhang; Ping Gao; Yanqiu Li; Changyi Li; Sakan Maeda

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the correlation of E-cadherin expression with clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.METHODS We examined the expression of the protein E-cadherin in 43 oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) surgical speciments by SABC immunohistochemistry.RESULTS There was a significant correlation between the level of Ecadherin expression and tumor stage (P=0.024), invasive pattern (P=0.009) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.023). No relation was found with age (P=0.084), sex (P=1.356) and differentiation (P=0.877). Using the Kaplan-Meier method we demonstrated that those cases which showed E-cadherin expression (-) or (+) had a significantly poorer prognosis compared those cases which showed expression (++) or (+++) (P= 0.0146).CONCLUSION E-cadherin, is an important indicator of clinical diagnoses and prognositic marker for oral SCC patients.

  14. Reduced expression of E-cadherin/catenin complex in hepatocellular carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhai; He-Xin Yan; Shu-Qin Wu; Lei Chen; Meng-Chao Wu; Hong-Yang Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the immunoreactivity of E-cadherin and four subtypes of catenin family in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and to investigate the correlation between expression of E-cadherin/catenin complex and clinicopathologic parameters of HCC patients.METHODS: An immunohistochemical study for E-cadherin and catenins was performed on 97 formalin-fixed,paraffin-embedded specimens of HCC.RESULTS: Reduced expression of E-cadherin,α-,β-,γ-catenin and p120 was observed in 69%,76%,63%,71% and 73%,respectively.Both expressions of E-cadhedn and catenin components were significantly correlated with tumor grade (P = 0.000).It showed significant difference between expression of catenin members and tumor stage (P = 0.003,P = 0.017,P = 0.007 and P = 0.000,respectively).The reduced expression of E-cadherin in HCCs was significantly correlated with intrahepatic metastasis (IM) and capsular invasion (P = 0.008,P = 0.03,respectively).A close correlation was also observed between the expression of catenins and the tumor size (P = 0.002,P = 0.034,P = 0.016 and P = 0.000,respectively).In addition,the expression of each catenin was found correlated with IM (P = 0.012,P = 0.049,P =0.026 and P = 0.014,respectively).No statistically significant difference was observed between the expression level of E-cadherin/catenin complex and lymph node permission,vascular invasion and satellite nodules.Interestingly,only expression of p120 showed correlation with AFP value (P = 0.035).The expression of E-cadherin was consistent with α-,β-,γ-catenin and p120 expression (P = 0.000).Finally,the abnormal expression of E-cadherin/catenin complex was significantly associated with patients' survival (P= 0.0253,P = 0.0052,P = 0.003,P = 0.0105 and P= 0.0016,respectively).Nevertheless,no component of E-cadherin/catenin complex was the independent prognostic factor of HCC patients.CONCLUSION: Down-regulated expressions of E-cadherin,catenins and p120 occur frequently in HCCs and contribute to the

  15. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to a...

  16. Disordered beta-catenin expression and E-cadherin/CDH1 promoter methylation in gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Fan Zhang; Ping-Ping Wu; Xu-Cheng Jiang; Lin Zheng; Ying-Yan Yu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the distribution of beta-catenin in nuclei or membrane/cytoplasm of gastric carcinoma cells,the relationship between E-cadherin gene methylation and its expression, and the role of beta-catenin and E-cadherin as potential molecular markers in predicting tumor infiltration.METHODS: Twenty-nine cases of gastric carcinoma,classified as diffuse and intestinal variants, were selected for study. Nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins were purified and beta-catenin content was detected by ELISA. DNA methylation of E-cadherin/CDH1 gene promoter was studied by methylation-specific PCR and compaired with E-cadherin expression detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: In 27 cases of gastric carcinoma, the ratio of beta-catenin content between nuclei and membrane/cytoplasm was correlated with the T-classification (r =0.392, P = 0.043). The significance was present between T2 and T3 groups. No correlation was detected between diffuse and intestinal variants in terms of their betacatenin distribution. In 21 cases of diffuse variants of gastric carcinoma, there was a difference in E-cadherin expression between CDH1 gene-methylated group and non-methylated group (29 % vs 71%, P = 0.027).No correlation between CDH1 gene methylation and T-classification was found, neither was the significance between E-cadherin expression and tumor infiltration grade.CONCLJSION: Comparative analysis of nuclear and membrane/cytoplasmic beta-catenin can predict local tumor infiltration. E-cadherin/CDH1 gene methylation is an important cause for its gene silence in diffuse variant gastric carcinoma. Methylation of CDH1 gene in the absence of E-cadherin is an early event in gastric carcinogenesis.

  17. α-Catenin and vinculin cooperate to promote high E-cadherin-based adhesion strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William A; Boscher, Cécile; Chu, Yeh-Shiu; Cuvelier, Damien; Martinez-Rico, Clara; Seddiki, Rima; Heysch, Julie; Ladoux, Benoit; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mege, René-Marc; Dufour, Sylvie

    2013-02-15

    Maintaining cell cohesiveness within tissues requires that intercellular adhesions develop sufficient strength to support traction forces applied by myosin motors and by neighboring cells. Cadherins are transmembrane receptors that mediate intercellular adhesion. The cadherin cytoplasmic domain recruits several partners, including catenins and vinculin, at sites of cell-cell adhesion. Our study used force measurements to address the role of αE-catenin and vinculin in the regulation of the strength of E-cadherin-based adhesion. αE-catenin-deficient cells display only weak aggregation and fail to strengthen intercellular adhesion over time, a process rescued by the expression of αE-catenin or chimeric E-cadherin·αE-catenins, including a chimera lacking the αE-catenin dimerization domain. Interestingly, an αE-catenin mutant lacking the modulation and actin-binding domains restores cadherin-dependent cell-cell contacts but cannot strengthen intercellular adhesion. The expression of αE-catenin mutated in its vinculin-binding site is defective in its ability to rescue cadherin-based adhesion strength in cells lacking αE-catenin. Vinculin depletion or the overexpression of the αE-catenin modulation domain strongly decreases E-cadherin-mediated adhesion strength. This supports the notion that both molecules are required for intercellular contact maturation. Furthermore, stretching of cell doublets increases vinculin recruitment and α18 anti-αE-catenin conformational epitope immunostaining at cell-cell contacts. Taken together, our results indicate that αE-catenin and vinculin cooperatively support intercellular adhesion strengthening, probably via a mechanoresponsive link between the E-cadherin·β-catenin complexes and the underlying actin cytoskeleton.

  18. Different glycosylation of cadherins from human bladder non-malignant and cancer cell lines

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    Lityńska Anna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether stage of invasiveness of bladder cancer cell lines contributes to alterations in glycan pattern of their cadherins. Results Human non-malignant epithelial cell of ureter HCV29, v-raf transfected HCV29 line (BC3726 and transitional cell cancers of urine bladder Hu456 and T24 were grown in cell culture. Equal amounts of protein from each cell extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and were blotted on an Immobilon P membrane. Cadherins were immunodetected using anti-pan cadherin mAb and lectin blotting assays were performed, in parallel. N-oligosaccharides were analysed by specific reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA, Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAA, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA. The cadherin from HCV29 cell line possessed bi- and/or 2,4-branched triantennary complex type glycans, some of which were α2,6-sialylated. The cadherin from BC3726 cell line exhibited exclusively high mannose type glycans. Cadherins from Hu456 and T24 cell lines expressed high mannose type glycans as well as β1,6-branched oligosaccharides with poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures and α2,3-linked sialic acid residues. Additionally, the presence of fucose and α2,6-sialic acid residues on the cadherin from T24 cell line was detected. Conclusions These results indicate that N-glycosylation pattern of cadherin from bladder cancer cell line undergoes modification during carcinogenesis.

  19. Adiponectin association with T-cadherin protects against neointima proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Yuya; Maeda, Norikazu; Matsuda, Keisuke; Masuda, Shigeki; Mori, Takuya; Fukuda, Shiro; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Yamaoka, Masaya; Obata, Yoshinari; Kita, Shunbun; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Funahashi, Tohru; Ranscht, Barbara; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2017-04-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein abundant in the circulation, is thought to be protective against atherosclerosis. However, it is not fully understood how the association of adiponectin with vascular cells and its antiatherogenic effect are connected. In this study, T-cadherin was essential for accumulation of adiponectin in the neointima and atherosclerotic plaque lesions, and the adiponectin-T-cadherin association protected against vascular injury. In the apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE-KO) mice, adiponectin and T-cadherin colocalized on endothelial cells and synthetic smooth muscle cells in the aortic intima. Notably, aortic adiponectin protein disappeared in T-cadherin/ApoE double-knockout (Tcad/ApoE-DKO) mice with significant elevation of blood adiponectin concentration. Furthermore, in Tcad/ApoE-DKO mice, carotid artery ligation resulted in a significant increase of neointimal thickness compared with ApoE-KO mice. Finally, on a high-cholesterol diet, Tcad/ApoE-DKO mice increased atherosclerotic plaque formation, despite a 5-fold increase in plasma adiponectin level compared with that in ApoE-KO mice. In vitro, knockdown of T-cadherin from human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) with synthetic phenotype significantly reduced adiponectin accumulation on HASMCs and negated the inhibitory effect of adiponectin on proinflammatory change. Collective evidence showed that adiponectin accumulates in the vasculature via T-cadherin, and the adiponectin-T-cadherin association plays a protective role against neointimal and atherosclerotic plaque formations.-Fujishima, Y., Maeda, N., Matsuda, K., Masuda, S., Mori, T., Fukuda, S., Sekimoto, R., Yamaoka, M., Obata, Y., Kita, S., Nishizawa, H., Funahashi, T., Ranscht, B., Shimomura, I. Adiponectin association with T-cadherin protects against neointima proliferation and atherosclerosis. © FASEB.

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of E-cadherin expression in basal cell carcinoma of the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Bartoš

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: E-cadherin is important cell-cell adhesion molecule, that plays a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue microarchitecture. In many human malignancies, reduced or loss of E-cadherin production in neoplastic cells correlates with tumor dedifferentiation and acquisition of the invasive and metastatic potential. In contrast to most other cancers, basal cell carcinoma (BCC of the skin possess some unique features, such as slow local growth, strong stroma-dependency, and virtual absence of metastases. Aim: In the present study, we immunohistochemically evaluated expression of E-cadherin in a set of cutaneous BCCs. Material and methods: Study group consisted of 41 primary BCCs cathegorized into non-infiltrative subroup (superfical and nodular subtypes and infiltrative subroup (nodular-infiltrative and infiltrative subtypes. Results: E-cadherin was expressed in all tumor specimens with variable quantitative range and intensity. There were 19 cases (46.3 % with preserved and 22 cases (53.7 % with reduced E-cadherin expression. In superficial, nodular, nodular-infiltrative and infiltrative BCC subtypes, reduced E-cadherin immunoreactivity was found in 40 % (2/5, 56.2 % (9/16, 54.5 % (6/11 and 55.5 % (5/9, respectively. We did not confirm a significant correlation between expression of E-cadherin and both given, non-infiltrative and infiltrative BCC subgroup. None of the tumors examined showed apparent decreasing immunostaining intensity in tumor tissue with increasing depth of invasion. There were not convincing differences either between the central and peripheral parts of tumor mass, or in the vertical dimension. Conclusions: Reduction of E-cadherin expression per se does not seem to directly contribute to the acqusition of more aggressive phenotype in cutaneous BCC. This may represent another peculiarity, by which BCC differs from the most other epithelial malignancies and reflect a distinct tumor biology.

  1. Relationship between expression of E-cadherin-catenin complex and clinicopathologic characteristics of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jun Li; Xiang-Rui Ji

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in pancreatic carcinoma and itsrelationship with the clinicopathologic characteristics, andclarify the mechanism of invasion and metastasis ofpancreatic cancer.METHODS: The expression of E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-catenin was examined in 47 cases of infiltrative ductaladenocarcinoma of pancreas and 12 adult normal pancreatictissues by immunohistochemical technique.RESULTS: The immunoreactivity of E-cadherin and alpha-,beta-catenin was expressed by normal ductal and acinarcells with strong membranous staining at the intercellularborder in 12 cases of adult normal pancreatic tissues. Abnormalexpression of E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-catenin in 47pancreatic carcinoma tissues was demonstrated in 53.2 %,61.7 % and 68.1%, respectively. Both abnormal expressionof E-cadherin and alpha-catenin significantly correlated withdifferentiation, lymph node and liver metastases (P<0.05,respectively), whereas aberrant beta-catenin expression onlycorrelated with lymph node and liver metastases (P<0.001).Abnormal E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-catenin expressionwas not associated with tumor size, invasion and survivaltime of patients (P>0.05, all).CONCLUSION: Pancreatic cancer likely occurs in case ofE-cadherin-catenin complex genes mutations or deletionsand abnormal expression of proteins, which significantlycorrelate with the biologic character of the tumor and lymphnode and liver metastases. It is suggested that the abnormalE-cadherin-catenin complex expression plays an importantrole in the development and progression of tumor, and thusmay become a new marker in pancreatic cancer metastasis.

  2. μ2-Dependent endocytosis of N-cadherin is regulated by β-catenin to facilitate neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Chin-Yin

    2017-02-22

    Circuit formation in the brain requires neurite outgrowth throughout development to establish synaptic contacts with target cells. Active endocytosis of several adhesion molecules facilitates the dynamic exchange of these molecules at the surface and promotes neurite outgrowth in developing neurons. The endocytosis of N-cadherin, a calcium-dependent adhesion molecule, has been implicated in the regulation of neurite outgrowth, but the mechanism remains unclear. Here, we identified that a fraction of N-cadherin internalizes through clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). Two tyrosine-based motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin recognized by the μ2 subunit of the AP-2 adaptor complex are responsible for CME of N-cadherin. Moreover, β-catenin, a core component of the N-cadherin adhesion complex, inhibits N-cadherin endocytosis by masking the 2 tyrosine-based motifs. Removal of β-catenin facilitates μ2 binding to N-cadherin, thereby increasing clathrin-mediated N-cadherin endocytosis and neurite outgrowth without affecting the steady-state level of surface N-cadherin. These results identify and characterize the mechanism controlling N-cadherin endocytosis through β-catenin-regulated μ2 binding to modulate neurite outgrowth.

  3. Role of the extracellular matrix in variations of invasive pathways in lung cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sá, V.K. de [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, L.; Gomes, A.; Alarcão, A.; Silva, M.R.; Couceiro, P.; Sousa, V. [Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Soares, F.A. [Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Capelozzi, V.L. [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-01-11

    Among the most common features of highly invasive tumors, such as lung adenocarcinomas (AD) and squamous cell carcinomas (SqCC), is the massive degradation of the extracellular matrix. The remarkable qualitative and quantitative modifications of hyaluronidases (HAases), hyaluronan synthases (HAS), E-cadherin adhesion molecules, and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) may favor invasion, cellular motility, and proliferation. We examined HAase proteins (Hyal), HAS, E-cadherin, and TGF-β profiles in lung AD subtypes and SqCC obtained from smokers and non-smokers. Fifty-six patients, median age 64 years, who underwent lobectomy for AD (N = 31) and SqCC (N = 25) were included in the study. HAS-1, -2 and -3, and Hyal-1 and -3 were significantly more expressed by tumor cells than normal and stroma cells (P < 0.01). When stratified according to histologic types, HAS-3 and Hyal-1 immunoreactivity was significantly increased in tumor cells of AD (P = 0.01) and stroma of SqCC (P = 0.002), respectively. Tobacco history in patients with AD was significantly associated with increased HAS-3 immunoreactivity in tumor cells (P < 0.01). Stroma cells of SqCC from non-smokers presented a significant association with HAS-3 (P < 0.01). Hyal, HAS, E-cadherin, and TGF-β modulate a different tumor-induced invasive pathway in lung AD subgroups and SqCC. HAases in resected AD and SqCC were strongly related to the prognosis. Therefore, our findings suggest that strategies aimed at preventing high HAS-3 and Hyal-1 synthesis, or local responses to low TGF-β and E-cadherin, may have a greater impact in lung cancer prognosis.

  4. N-cadherin is differentially expressed in histological subtypes of papillary renal cell carcinoma

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    Ludwig Behnes Carl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents a rare tumor, which is divided, based on histological criteria, into two subtypes. In contrast to type I papillary RCC type II papillary RCC shows a worse prognosis. So far, reliable immunohistochemical markers for the distinction of these subtypes are not available. Methods In the present study the expression of N(neural-, E(epithelial-, P(placental-, und KSP(kidney specific-cadherin was examined in 22 papillary RCC of histological type I and 18 papillary RCC of histological type II (n = 40. Results All papillary RCC type II displayed a membranous expression for N-cadherin, whereas type I did not show any membranous positivity for N-cadherin. E-cadherin exhibited a stronger, but not significant, membranous as well as cytoplasmic expression in type II than in type I papillary RCC. A diagnostic relevant expression of P- and KSP-cadherin could not be demonstrated in both tumor entities. Conclusion Thus N-cadherin represents the first immunhistochemical marker for a clear cut differentiation between papillary RCC type I and type II and could be a target for therapy and diagnostic in the future. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2011556982761733

  5. A protocadherin-cadherin-FLRT3 complex controls cell adhesion and morphogenesis.

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    Xuejun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC and fibronectin leucine-rich domain transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3 are induced by TGFbeta signaling in Xenopus embryos and both regulate morphogenesis by inhibiting C-cadherin mediated cell adhesion. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the functional and physical relationships between PAPC, FLRT3, and C-cadherin. Although neither PAPC nor FLRT3 are required for each other to regulate C-cadherin adhesion, they do interact functionally and physically, and they form a complex with cadherins. By itself PAPC reduces cell adhesion physiologically to induce cell sorting, while FLRT3 disrupts adhesion excessively to cause cell dissociation. However, when expressed together PAPC limits the cell dissociating and tissue disrupting activity of FLRT3 to make it effective in physiological cell sorting. PAPC counteracts FLRT3 function by inhibiting the recruitment of the GTPase RND1 to the FLRT3 cytoplasmic domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PAPC and FLRT3 form a functional complex with cadherins and PAPC functions as a molecular "governor" to maintain FLRT3 activity at the optimal level for physiological regulation of C-cadherin adhesion, cell sorting, and morphogenesis.

  6. Rab5-mediated VE-cadherin internalization regulates the barrier function of the lung microvascular endothelium.

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    Yang, Junjun; Yao, Wei; Qian, Guisheng; Wei, Zhenghua; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guansong

    2015-12-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 has been well defined to control the vesicle-mediated plasma membrane protein transport to the endosomal compartment. However, its function in the internalization of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an important component of adherens junctions, and as a result regulating the endothelial cell polarity and barrier function remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) simulation markedly enhanced the activation and expression of Rab5 in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs), which is accompanied by VE-cadherin internalization. In parallel, LPS challenge also induced abnormal cell polarity and dysfunction of the endothelial barrier in HPMECs. LPS stimulation promoted the translocation of VE-cadherin from the plasma membrane to intracellular compartments, and intracellularly expressed VE-cadherin was extensively colocalized with Rab5. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of Rab5a expression attenuated the disruption of LPS-induced internalization of VE-cadherin and the disorder of cell polarity. Furthermore, knockdown of Rab5 inhibited the vascular endothelial hyperpermeability and protected endothelial barrier function from LPS injury, both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Rab5 is a critical mediator of LPS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, which is likely mediated through regulating VE-cadherin internalization. These findings provide evidence, implicating that Rab5a is a potential therapeutic target for preventing endothelial barrier disruption and vascular inflammation.

  7. [Cadherins E and P expression in the molecular types of breast cancer].

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    Fernández, Ángel; Reigosa, Aldo; Caleiras, Eduardo; Saldivia, Felipe; Hardisson, David; Sanz, Francisco

    2015-06-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a process by which tumor cells lose their epithelial markers and migrate to distant organs. This process involves several cell adhesion proteins such as E-cadherin and P-cadherin. The present study was performed in 354 pacients diagnosed with breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the Oncology Institute "Dr. Miguel Perez Carreno", Valencia, Venezuela. The expression of 22 molecules was analyzed by tissue micro-arrays and the results were compared with the molecular clases established by immunohistochemistry, according to the'expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), and with the overall survival (OS). Based on the results of ER, PR and HER2 molecular classes according to the following per- centages were established: Luminal A 42.4%, Luminal B 20.3%, 9% HER2 and 28.2% triple negative (TN). E-cadherin expression was observed conserved in most of the tumors of this series, 92.5% of cases. TN phenotype tumors showed a high percentage (41.7%) with absent or reduced expression. The P-cadherin was expressed in 40.5% of cases, although expressed in all classes; the proportion was significantly higher in cases TN. No significant prognostic value was observed when analyzing the overall five-year survival of patients with tumors with absent or reduced expression of E-cadherin. The P-cadherin expression had a negative relationship with the OS.

  8. P-cadherin as myoepithelial cell marker for differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions

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    Yachika Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: P-cadherin is cell-cell adhesion glycoprotein which can be used as a myoepithelial cell (MEC marker in the breast lesions. MEC layer is retained in most benign lesions and loss of this outer layer is hallmark of infiltrating carcinomas in the breast. Aim: To evaluate the expression of P-cadherin as MEC marker in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant breast lesions. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was done using P-cadherin-specific antibody on formalin fixed paraffin-embedded sections of 25 benign and 15 malignant breast lumps. Results: All 25 cases of benign breast lesions showed positive P-cadherin immunostaining, while only 4 out of 15 cases of infiltrating ductal carcinoma showed positive immunostaining for P-cadherin. In the case of benign lesions, staining index varied from 4 to 6 or 7 to 9, while in case of malignant lesions, 11 cases showed staining index from 1 to 3. Only 4 out of 15 malignant cases had staining index from 4 to 6. None of them showed index from 7 to 9. Conclusions: P-cadherin as a MEC marker can be used in differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions.

  9. E-cadherin mediates adhesion and endocytosis of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in human epithelial cells

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    XU Xiao-yong; SHI Yi; ZHANG Peng-peng; ZHANG Feng; SHEN Yu-ying; SU Xin; ZHAO Bei-lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus (A.fumigatus) is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus responsible for the majority of invasive mold infections in patients undergoing chemotherapy,organ transplantation or with persistent neutropenia.This study aimed to determine the role of E-cadherin for adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores in the human epithelial cell line A549.Methods A.fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure.After establishing the adhesion model,the adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells were evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells using blocking antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA).Results E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A.fumigatus blastospore.Adhesion and endocytosis of the blastospores were reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells.Conclusions E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells.This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection.

  10. Patterned cortical tension mediated by N-cadherin controls cell geometric order in the Drosophila eye

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    Chan, Eunice HoYee; Chavadimane Shivakumar, Pruthvi; Clément, Raphaël; Laugier, Edith; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion molecules hold cells together but also couple cell membranes to a contractile actomyosin network, which limits the expansion of cell contacts. Despite their fundamental role in tissue morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, how adhesion molecules control cell shapes and cell patterns in tissues remains unclear. Here we address this question in vivo using the Drosophila eye. We show that cone cell shapes depend little on adhesion bonds and mostly on contractile forces. However, N-cadherin has an indirect control on cell shape. At homotypic contacts, junctional N-cadherin bonds downregulate Myosin-II contractility. At heterotypic contacts with E-cadherin, unbound N-cadherin induces an asymmetric accumulation of Myosin-II, which leads to a highly contractile cell interface. Such differential regulation of contractility is essential for morphogenesis as loss of N-cadherin disrupts cell rearrangements. Our results establish a quantitative link between adhesion and contractility and reveal an unprecedented role of N-cadherin on cell shapes and cell arrangements. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22796.001 PMID:28537220

  11. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

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    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  12. Pdx1 regulates pancreas tubulogenesis and E-cadherin expression.

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    Marty-Santos, Leilani; Cleaver, Ondine

    2016-01-01

    Current efforts in developing treatments for diabetes focus on in vitro generation of functional β-cells for cell replacement therapies; however, these attempts have only been partly successful because factors involved in islet formation remain incompletely understood. The embryonic pancreas, which gives rise to β-cells, undergoes early epithelial rearrangements, including transient stratification of an initially monolayered epithelium, followed by microlumen formation and later resolution into branches. Within the epithelium, a multipotent progenitor cell (MPC) population is specified, giving rise to three important lineages: acinar, ductal and endocrine. Pdx1 is a transcription factor required for pancreas development and lineage specification; however, few Pdx1 targets that regulate pancreatogenesis have been identified. We find that pancreatic defects in Pdx1(-/-) embryos initiate at the time when the progenitor pool is specified and the epithelium should resolve into branches. Pdx1(-/-) microlumen diameters expand aberrantly, resulting in failure of epithelial tubulogenesis and ductal plexus formation. Pdx1(-/-) epithelial cell proliferation is decreased and the MPC pool is rapidly lost. We identify two conserved Pdx1 binding sites in the epithelial cadherin (E-cad, Cdh1) promoter, and show that Pdx1 directly binds and activates E-cad transcription. In addition, Pdx1 is required in vivo for maintenance of E-cad expression, actomyosin complex activity and cell shape. These findings demonstrate a novel link between regulators of epithelial architecture, specification of pancreatic cell fate and organogenesis.

  13. Clinicopathological significance and potential drug target of T-cadherin in NSCLC

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    Wang Z

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zhidong Wang,1 Bin Wang,1 Huanchen Guo,2 Guoyu Shi,2 Xiuqin Hong3 1Oncology Department, Eighth Hospital of Changsha, Changsha, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shouguang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shouguang, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Gerontology, Hunan Geriatric Hospital, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Background: Previous studies demonstrate that T-cadherin is a candidate tumor suppressor in several types of human tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Lack of protein expression of T-cadherin by hypermethylation has been found to play an important role in lung alveolar differentiation regulation and epithelial tumorigenesis. However, the correlation between T-cadherin hypermethylation and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains unclear. Here we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of T-cadherin hypermethylation on the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics.Methods: A detailed literature search was carried out for related research publications. Analyses of pooled data were performed. Odds ratio (OR and hazard ratio (HR were calculated and summarized, respectively.Results: Final analysis of 1,172 NSCLC patients from 15 eligible studies was performed. T-cadherin hypermethylation was observed to be significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, based on the pooled OR from nine studies including 532 NSCLC and 372 normal lung tissue samples (OR=8.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]=5.41–12.39, P<0.00001. T-cadherin hypermethylation may also be associated with pathological types. The pooled OR was obtained from four studies including 111patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 106 with adenocarcinoma (OR=0.35, 95% CI=0.19–0.66, P=0.001, which indicated that T-cadherin hypermethylation plays a more important role in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma. We did not find

  14. ARF6-regulated endocytosis of growth factor receptors links cadherin-based adhesion to canonical Wnt signaling in epithelia.

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    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling.

  15. The role of E-cadherin down-regulation in oral cancer: CDH1 gene expression and epigenetic blockage.

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    Pannone, G; Santoro, A; Feola, A; Bufo, P; Papagerakis, P; Lo Muzio, L; Staibano, S; Ionna, F; Longo, F; Franco, R; Aquino, G; Contaldo, M; De Maria, S; Serpico, R; De Rosa, A; Rubini, C; Papagerakis, S; Giovane, A; Tombolini, V; Giordano, A; Caraglia, M; Di Domenico, M

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis of the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients remains very poor, mainly due to their high propensity to invade and metastasize. E-cadherin reduced expression occurs in the primary step of oral tumour progression and gene methylation is a mode by which the expression of this protein is regulated in cancers. In this perspective, we investigated E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter methylation status in OSCC and its correlation with Ecadherin protein expression, clinicopathological characteristics and patient outcome. Histologically proven OSCC and paired normal mucosa were analyzed for CDH1 promoter methylation status and E-cadherin protein expression by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Colocalization of E-cadherin with epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) was evidenced by confocal microscopy and by immunoprecipitation analyses. This study indicated E-cadherin protein down-regulation in OSCC associated with protein delocalization from membrane to cytoplasm. Low E-cadherin expression correlated to aggressive, poorly differentiated, high grade carcinomas and low patient survival. Moreover, protein down-regulation appeared to be due to E-cadherin mRNA downregulation and CDH1 promoter hypermethylation. In an in vitro model of OSCC the treatment with EGF caused internalization and co-localization of E-cadherin with EGFR and the addition of demethylating agents increased E-cadherin expression. Low E-Cadherin expression is a negative prognostic factor of OSCC and is likely due to the hypermethylation of CDH1 promoter. The delocalization of E-cadherin from membrane to cytoplasm could be also due to the increased expression of EGFR in OSCC and the consequent increase of E-cadherin co-internalization with EGFR.

  16. Extracellular matrix structure.

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    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  17. E-cadherin and calretinin as immunocytochemical markers to differentiate malignant from benign serous effusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Nan He; Hua-Sheng Zhu; Kun-He Zhang; Wen-Jian Jin; Wei-Ming Zhu; Ning Li; Jie-Shou Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expressions of E-cadherin and calretinin in exfoliated cells of serous effusions and evaluate their values in distinguishing malignant effusions from benign ones.METHODS: Fresh serous effusion specimens werecentrifuged and exfoliated cells were collected. Cells were then processed with a standardized procedure, including paraformaldehyde fixation, BSA-PBS solution washing and smears preparation. E-cadherin and calretinin were detected by immunocytochemistry (ICC).RESULTS: In the exfoliated cells of serous effusions, most of carcinoma cells only expressed E-cadherin, and most of mesothelial cells only expressed calretinin, and benign cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes) did not express either of them. For E-cadherin, 85.7% (30/35) of malignant effusions and 8.1% (3/37) of benign fluids were ICC-positive (P<0.001).The sensitivity of E-cadherin ICC in the diagnosis of malignant effusions was 85.7%, specificity 91.9%, and diagnostic rate 88.9%. For calretinin, 94.6% (35/37) of benign effusions and 11.4% (4/35) of malignant effusions were ICC-positive (P<0.001). The sensitivity of calretinin ICC in the diagnosis of benign effusions was 94.6%,specificity 88.6%, and diagnostic rate 91.7%. For diagnosis of benign and malignant effusions by combining E-cadherin ICC and calretinin ICC, the specificities were up to 100%and 97.1%, respectively.CONCLUSION: E-cadherin ICC and calretinin ICC are sensitive and specific in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant serous effusion specimens and specificities are evidently improved when both markers are combined.

  18. Zebrafish teeth as a model for repetitive epithelial morphogenesis: dynamics of E-cadherin expression

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    Sanders Ellen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of teeth is the result of interactions between competent mesenchyme and epithelium, both of which undergo extensive morphogenesis. The importance of cell adhesion molecules in morphogenesis has long been acknowledged but remarkably few studies have focused on the distribution and function of these molecules in tooth development. Results We analyzed the expression pattern of an important epithelial cadherin, E-cadherin, during the formation of first-generation teeth as well as replacement teeth in the zebrafish, using in situ hybridization and whole mount immunostaining to reveal mRNA expression and protein distribution. E-cadherin was detected in every layer of the enamel organ during the different stages of tooth development, but there were slight differences between first-generation and replacement teeth in the strength and distribution of the signal. The dental papilla, which is derived from the mesenchyme, did not show any expression. Remarkably, the crypts surrounding the functional teeth showed an uneven distribution of E-cadherin throughout the pharyngeal region. Conclusions The slight differences between E-cadherin expression in zebrafish teeth and developing mouse and human teeth are discussed in the light of fundamental differences in structural and developmental features of the dentition between zebrafish and mammals. Importantly, the uninterrupted expression of E-cadherin indicates that down-regulation of E-cadherin is not required for formation of an epithelial tooth bud. Further research is needed to understand the role of other cell adhesion systems during the development of teeth and the formation of replacement teeth.

  19. N-cadherin regulates signaling mechanisms required for lens fiber cell elongation and lens morphogenesis.

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    Logan, Caitlin M; Rajakaruna, Suren; Bowen, Caitlin; Radice, Glenn L; Robinson, Michael L; Menko, A Sue

    2017-08-01

    Tissue development and regeneration involve high-ordered morphogenetic processes that are governed by elements of the cytoskeleton in conjunction with cell adhesion molecules. Such processes are particularly important in the lens whose structure dictates its function. Studies of our lens-specific N-cadherin conditional knockout mouse (N-cadcKO) revealed an essential role for N-cadherin in the migration of the apical tips of differentiating lens fiber cells along the apical surfaces of the epithelium, a region termed the Epithelial Fiber Interface (EFI), that is necessary for normal fiber cell elongation and the morphogenesis. Studies of the N-cadcKO lens suggest that N-cadherin function in fiber cell morphogenesis is linked to the activation of Rac1 and myosin II, both signaling pathways central to the regulation of cell motility including determining the directionality of cellular movement. The absence of N-cadherin did not disrupt lateral contacts between fiber cells during development, and the maintenance of Aquaporin-0 and increased expression of EphA2 at cell-cell interfaces suggests that these molecules may function in this role. E-cadherin was maintained in newly differentiating fiber cells without interfering with expression of lens-specific differentiation proteins but was not able to replace N-cadherin function in these cells. The dependence of migration of the fiber cell apical domains along the EFI for lens morphogenesis on N-cadherin provides new insight into the process of tissue development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cadherins mediate sequential roles through a hierarchy of mechanisms in the developing mammillary body

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    Nora eSzabo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of intricate combinations of cadherins (a family of adhesive membrane proteins is common in the developing central nervous system. On this basis, a combinatorial cadherin code has long been proposed to underlie neuronal sorting and to be ultimately responsible for the layers, columns and nuclei of the brain. However, experimental proof of this particular function of cadherins has proven difficult to obtain and the question is still not clear. Alternatively, non-specific, non-combinatorial, purely quantitative adhesive differentials have been proposed to explain neuronal sorting in the brain. Do cadherin combinations underlie brain cytoarchitecture? We approached this question using as model a well-defined forebrain nucleus, the mammillary body (MBO, which shows strong, homogeneous expression of one single cadherin (Cdh11 and patterned, combinatorial expression of Cdh6, -8 and -10.We found that, besides the known combinatorial Cdh pattern, MBO cells are organized into a second, non-overlapping pattern grouping neurons with the same date of neurogenesis. Abolition of Cdh11 expression in the entire MBO during development disrupted the combination-based as well as the birthdate-based sorting. In utero RNAi experiments knocking down Cdh11 in MBO-fated migrating neurons at one specific age showed that Cdh11 expression is required for chronological entrance in the MBO.Our results suggest that neuronal sorting in the developing MBO is caused by adhesion-based, non-combinatorial mechanisms that keep neurons sorted according to birthdate information (possibly matching them to target neurons chronologically sorted in the same manner. Non-specific adhesion mechanisms would also prevent cadherin combinations from altering the birthdate-based sorting. Cadherin combinations would presumably act later to support specific synaptogenesis through specific axonal fasciculation and final target recognition.

  1. Microtubules Inhibit E-Cadherin Adhesive Activity by Maintaining Phosphorylated p120-Catenin in a Colon Carcinoma Cell Model.

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    Stephanie L Maiden

    Full Text Available Tight regulation of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesions is critical to both tissue morphogenesis during development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Cell surface expression of the cadherin-catenin complex is often directly correlated with the level of adhesion, however, examples exist where cadherin appears to be inactive and cells are completely non-adhesive. The state of p120-catenin phosphorylation has been implicated in regulating the adhesive activity of E-cadherin but the mechanism is currently unclear. We have found that destabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, independent of microtubule plus-end dynamics, dephosphorylates p120-catenin and activates E-cadherin adhesion in Colo 205 cells. Through chemical screening, we have also identified several kinases as potential regulators of E-cadherin adhesive activity. Analysis of several p120-catenin phosphomutants suggests that gross dephosphorylation of p120-catenin rather than that of specific amino acids may trigger E-cadherin adhesion. Uncoupling p120-catenin binding to E-cadherin at the membrane causes constitutive adhesion in Colo 205 cells, further supporting an inhibitory role of phosphorylated p120-catenin on E-cadherin activity.

  2. Microtubules Inhibit E-Cadherin Adhesive Activity by Maintaining Phosphorylated p120-Catenin in a Colon Carcinoma Cell Model.

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    Maiden, Stephanie L; Petrova, Yuliya I; Gumbiner, Barry M

    2016-01-01

    Tight regulation of cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesions is critical to both tissue morphogenesis during development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Cell surface expression of the cadherin-catenin complex is often directly correlated with the level of adhesion, however, examples exist where cadherin appears to be inactive and cells are completely non-adhesive. The state of p120-catenin phosphorylation has been implicated in regulating the adhesive activity of E-cadherin but the mechanism is currently unclear. We have found that destabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, independent of microtubule plus-end dynamics, dephosphorylates p120-catenin and activates E-cadherin adhesion in Colo 205 cells. Through chemical screening, we have also identified several kinases as potential regulators of E-cadherin adhesive activity. Analysis of several p120-catenin phosphomutants suggests that gross dephosphorylation of p120-catenin rather than that of specific amino acids may trigger E-cadherin adhesion. Uncoupling p120-catenin binding to E-cadherin at the membrane causes constitutive adhesion in Colo 205 cells, further supporting an inhibitory role of phosphorylated p120-catenin on E-cadherin activity.

  3. Expression of E-cadherin in primary oral squamous cell carcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes: An immunohistochemical study

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    Kaur Gurkiran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: E-cadherin plays an important role in cell-to-cell adhesion and cell motility and its loss is associated with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC progression. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of E-cadherin in various grades of OSCC and to correlate changes in the expression between these various grades and metastatic lymph nodes. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemistry (IHC was used to detect E-cadherin expression in normal oral mucosa, primary OSCC ( n = 37, and metastatic lymph nodes ( n = 10. E-cadherin immunoreactivity was correlated with grades of differentiation and with clinicopathological features. Results: E-cadherin immunoreactivity was found to inversely correlate with the loss of cell differentiation. The expression of E-cadherin decreased significantly in advanced cases of OSCC. However, increase in E-cadherin immunoreactivity was seen in early lesions, that is, in well differentiated ( n = 9 and moderately differentiated OSCC ( n = 13. Furthermore, E-cadherin was negative in majority of metastatic lymph nodes (7/10. Conclusions: Loss of the cell adhesion and E-cadherin plays an important role in progression of OSCC, that is, down regulation of its expression is associated with de-differentiation and metastasis.

  4. E-cadherin expression increases cell proliferation by regulating energy metabolism through nuclear factor-κB in AGS cells.

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    Park, Song Yi; Shin, Jee-Hye; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2017-09-01

    β-Catenin is a central player in Wnt signaling, and activation of Wnt signaling is associated with cancer development. E-cadherin in complex with β-catenin mediates cell-cell adhesion, which suppresses β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Recently, a tumor-suppressive role for E-cadherin has been reconsidered, as re-expression of E-cadherin was reported to enhance the metastatic potential of malignant tumors. To explore the role of E-cadherin, we established an E-cadherin-expressing cell line, EC96, from AGS cells that featured undetectable E-cadherin expression and a high level of Wnt signaling. In EC96 cells, E-cadherin re-expression enhanced cell proliferation, although Wnt signaling activity was reduced. Subsequent analysis revealed that nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and consequent c-myc expression might be involved in E-cadherin expression-mediated cell proliferation. To facilitate rapid proliferation, EC96 cells enhance glucose uptake and produce ATP using both mitochondria oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, whereas AGS cells use these mechanisms less efficiently. These events appeared to be mediated by NF-κB activation. Therefore, E-cadherin re-expression and subsequent induction of NF-κB signaling likely enhance energy production and cell proliferation. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Restoration of E-cadherin Cell-Cell Junctions Requires Both Expression of E-cadherin and Suppression of ERK MAP Kinase Activation in Ras-Transformed Breast Epithelial Cells

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    Quanwen Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin is a main component of the cell-cell adhesion junctions that play a principal role in maintaining normal breast epithelial cell morphology. Breast and other cancers that have up-regulated activity of Ras are often found to have down-regulated or mislocalized E-cadherin expression. Disruption of E-cadherin junctions and consequent gain of cell motility contribute to the process known as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Enforced expression of E-cadherin or inhibition of Ras-signal transduction pathway has been shown to be effective in causing reversion of EMT in several oncogene-transformed and cancer-derived cell lines. In this study, we investigated MCF10A human breast epithelial cells and derivatives that were transformed with either activated H-Ras or N-Ras to test for the reversion of EMT by inhibition of Ras-driven signaling pathways. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase, but not PI3-kinase, Rac, or myosin light chain kinase, was able to completely restore E-cadherin cell-cell junctions and epithelial morphology in cell lines with moderate H-Ras expression. In MCF10A cells transformed by a high-level expression of activated H-Ras or N-Ras, restoration of E-cadherin junction required both the enforced reexpression of E-cadherin and suppression of MAPK kinase. Enforced expression of E-cadherin alone did not induce reversion from the mesenchymal phenotype. Our results suggest that Ras transformation has at least two independent actions to disrupt E-cadherin junctions, with effects to cause both mislocalization of E-cadherin away from the cell surface and profound decrease in the expression of E-cadherin.

  6. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  7. MTA1-activated Epi-microRNA-22 regulates E-cadherin and prostate cancer invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Swati; Kumar, Avinash; Gomez, Christian R; Akhtar, Israh; Hancock, John C; Lage, Janice M; Pound, Charles R; Levenson, Anait S

    2017-03-01

    We have previously shown that metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a chromatin remodeler, plays an important role in prostate cancer invasiveness, likely through regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Here, we identified miR-22 as an epigenetic-microRNA (Epi-miR) directly induced by MTA1 and predicted to target E-cadherin. Loss-of-function and overexpression studies of MTA1 reinforced its regulatory role in miR-22 expression. MiR-22 directly targets the 3'-untranslated region of E-cadherin, and ectopic overexpression of miR-22 diminishes E-cadherin expression. Overexpression of miR-22 in prostate cancer cells promotes cell invasiveness and migration. Meta-analysis of patient tumor samples indicates a positive correlation between MTA1 and miR-22, supporting their inhibitory effect on E-cadherin expression. Our findings implicate the MTA1/Epi-miR-22/E-cadherin axis as a new epigenetic signaling pathway that promotes tumor invasion in prostate cancer. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. p63 and E-cadherin Expression in Canine Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrinho, L A; Pissarra, H; Faísca, P B; Bragança, M; Peleteiro, M C; Niza, M M R E

    2015-07-01

    The expression of p63 and E-cadherin was studied in 22 oral squamous cell carcinomas in the dog according to immunohistochemical techniques. The association between these markers and clinicopathologic parameters was assessed. All tumor cells studied showed enhanced p63 expression. Regarding E-cadherin expression, 17 of 22 cases (77.3%) showed decreased immunoreactivity, and in 13 of 22 cases (59.1%), its expression was cytoplasmic. Neither p63 nor E-cadherin expression patterns were associated with tumor size, bone invasion, or lymph node metastasis. p63 score was related to proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferative index (P = .020). A statistically significant correlation between the expression patterns of these 2 markers was noted (P = .026). Furthermore, they were related with tumor grade. An atypical p63 labeling and a cytoplasmic E-cadherin staining were statistically related with a higher tumor grade (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). These findings suggest that changes in p63 and E-cadherin expression are frequent events in oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

  9. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  10. Rab coupling protein mediated endosomal recycling of N-cadherin influences cell motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2016-07-09

    Rab coupling protein (RCP) is a Rab GTPase effector that functions in endosomal recycling. The RCP gene is frequently amplified in breast cancer, leading to increased cancer aggressiveness. Furthermore, RCP enhances the motility of ovarian cancer cells by coordinating the recycling of α5β1 integrin and EGF receptor to the leading edge of migrating cells. Here we report that RCP also influences the motility of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Knockdown of RCP inhibits the motility of A549 cells in 2D and 3D migration assays, while its overexpression enhances migration in these assays. Depletion of RCP leads to a reduction in N-cadherin protein levels, which could be restored with lysosomal inhibitors. Trafficking assays revealed that RCP knockdown inhibits the return of endocytosed N-cadherin to the cell surface. We propose that RCP regulates the endosomal recycling of N-cadherin, and in its absence N-cadherin is diverted to the degradative pathway. The increased aggressiveness of tumour cells that overexpress RCP may be due to biased recycling of N-cadherin in metastatic cancer cells.

  11. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  12. A role for N-cadherin in mesodermal morphogenesis during gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warga, Rachel M; Kane, Donald A

    2007-10-15

    Cell adhesion molecules mediate numerous developmental processes necessary for the segregation and organization of tissues. Here we show that the zebrafish biber (bib) mutant encodes a dominant allele at the N-cadherin locus. When knocked down with antisense oligonucleotides, bib mutants phenocopy parachute (pac) null alleles, demonstrating that bib is a gain-of-function mutation. The mutant phenotype disrupts normal cell-cell contacts throughout the mesoderm as well as the ectoderm. During gastrulation stages, cells of the mesodermal germ layer converge slowly; during segmentation stages, the borders between paraxial and axial tissues are irregular and somite borders do not form; later, myotomes are fused. During neurulation, the neural tube is disorganized. Although weaker, all traits present in bib mutants were found in pac mutants. When the distribution of N-cadherin mRNA was analyzed to distinguish mesodermal from neuroectodermal expression, we found that N-cadherin is strongly expressed in the yolk cell and hypoblast in the early gastrula, just preceding the appearance of the bib mesodermal defects. Only later is N-cadherin expressed in the anlage of the CNS, where it is found as a radial gradient in the forming neural plate. Hence, besides a well-established role in neural and somite morphogenesis, N-cadherin is essential for morphogenesis of the mesodermal germ layer during gastrulation.

  13. [Influencing of hep-2 cell function by RNAi silencing E-cadherin expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Li, Cheng-wen; Wu, Gui-qing; Sun, Jing; Chen, Qi

    2013-02-26

    To explore the function of human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cell after down-regulating the expression of E-cadherin gene to provide theoretical rationales for gene therapy of laryngeal cancer. According to the GenBank database, 3 pairs of shRNA sequences of E-cadherin gene were designed and synthesized. shRNAs were transfected into the cell line Hep-2 by liposome. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the silencing effect of E-cadherin expression. The changed capacity of cell proliferation were detected in vitro by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay in the transfected Hep-2 cells and the cell proliferation rate (survival rate) was calculated. And Transwell was used to detect the migratory capacity of Hep-2 cells after siRNA transfection. The E-cadherin gene expression of RNAi transfected Hep-2 cells significantly decreased in interference group. And the proliferation of interference group became markedly enhanced. In Transwell test, the migrated cell numbers in interference group were significant higher than those in negative control group (262 ± 15, 288 ± 12, 292 ± 6 vs 74 ± 8, all P Hep-2 cells. And E-cadherin may be considered as one of gene therapy targets for laryngeal cancer.

  14. Suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin induced apoptosis in Hep G2 hepatocelluar carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hee Jeong; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Ko, Hyunsuk; Kim, Bogeun; Jung, Kwon; Lew, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Though gallotannin was known to have anti-oxidant and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of gallotannin still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, antitumor mechanism of gallotannin was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Gallotannin significantly exerted cytotoxicity against Hep G2 and Chang hepatocellular carcinoma cells with the accumulation of the sub-G1 population and increase of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferasedUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells as an apoptotic feature. Also, gallotannin attenuated the expression of pro-caspase9, pro-caspase3, Bcl2 and integrin β1 and cleaved poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) in Hep G2 and Chang cancer cells. Furthermore, gallotannin suppressed cell repair motility by wound healing assay and also inhibited cell adhesion in Hep G2 cells. Of note, gallotannin attenuated the expression of epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin) to form cell-cell adhesion from the early stage, and also beta-catenin at late phase in Hep G2 cells. Consistently, Immunofluorescence assay showed that E-cadherin or β-catenin expression was suppressed in a time dependent manner by gallotannin. Furthermore, silencing of E-cadherin by siRNA transfection method enhanced PAPR cleavage, caspase 3 activation and sub G1 population and attenuated the cell adhesion induced by gallotannin in Hep G2 cells. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the disruption of cell adhesion junction by suppression of E-cadherin mediates gallotannin enhanced apoptosis in Hep G2 liver cancer cells.

  15. Analysis of metastasis suppressing function of E-cadherin in gastric cancer cells by RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Zheng; Xiu-Ju Sun; Hai-Tao Zhou; Chao Shang; Hong Ji; Kai-Lai Sun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of inhibited E-cadherin expression on invasion of cancer cells.METHODS: We designed the nucleotide sequence of siRNA corresponding to 5' non-coding and coding sequence of E-cadherin. 21-nucleotide dssiRNA was synthesized by in vitro transcription with Ambion Silencer TM siRNA Construction Kit. siRNA was transfected into gastric cancer MKN45 using TransMessenger transfection Kit. RT-PCR and immunofluorescent assay were used to investigate the inhibition of the expression of mutated Ecadherin. Invasive ability of cancer cells was determined by Transwell assay.RESULTS: The synthesis of E-cadherin mRNA rather than protein expression was suppressed dramatically 7 d after interference. Decreased protein expression was observed on d 10 after interference. On d 11, invasion ability was enhanced significantly.CONCLUSION: siRNA targeted at non-coding and coding sequence of E-cadherin showed significant inhibition on mRNA and protein expression. Inhibited E-cadherin expression results in increased invasion ability of cancer cells.

  16. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Daniel

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact.We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus.Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall.

  17. Expression of classical cadherins in the cerebellar anlage: quantitative and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliem, Michael; Weisheit, Gunnar; Mertz, Kirsten D; Endl, Elmar; Oberdick, John; Schilling, Karl

    2006-12-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development, cell migration precedes and is key to the integration of diverse sets of cells. Mechanistically, CNS histogenesis is realized through a balanced interplay of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules. Here, we summarize experiments that probe the developmental expression and potential significance of a set of cadherins, including M-, N- and R-cadherin, for patterning of the cerebellar cortex. We established a transgenic marker that allows cerebellar granule cells to be followed from the neuroblast stage to their final, postmitotic settlement. In conjunction with flow cytometry, this allowed us to derive a quantitative view of cadherin expression in differentiating granule cells and relate it to the expression of the same cadherins in cerebellar inhibitory interneuronal precursors. In vitro reaggregation analysis supports a role for cadherins in cell sorting and migration within the nascent cerebellar cortex that may be rationalized within the context of the differential adhesion hypothesis (Foty, R.A. and Steinberg, M.S., 2005. The differential adhesion hypothesis: a direct evaluation. Dev. Biol. 278, 255-263.).

  18. Functional validation of cadherin as a receptor of Bt toxin Cry1Ac in Helicoverpa armigera utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Haonan; Wang, Huidong; Zhao, Shan; Zuo, Yayun; Yang, Yihua; Wu, Yidong

    2016-09-01

    Cadherins have been identified as receptors of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1A toxins in several lepidopteran insects including the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Disruption of the cadherin gene HaCad has been genetically linked to resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in H. armigera. By using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9), HaCad from the Cry1Ac-susceptible SCD strain of H. armigera was successfully knocked out. A single positive CRISPR event with a frame shift deletion of 4 nucleotides was identified and made homozygous to create a knockout line named SCD-Cad. Western blotting confirmed that HaCad was no longer expressed in the SCD-Cad line while an intact HaCad of 210 kDa was present in the parental SCD strain. Insecticide bioassays were used to show that SCD-Cad exhibited 549-fold resistance to Cry1Ac compared with SCD, but no significant change in susceptibility to Cry2Ab. Our results not only provide strong reverse genetics evidence for HaCad as a functional receptor of Cry1Ac, but also demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 technique can act as a powerful and efficient genome editing tool to study gene function in a global agricultural pest, H. armigera.

  19. Repeated administration of adenosine increases its cardiovascular effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; García-Márquez, F; Magos, G A

    1987-01-20

    Hypotensive and negative chronotropic responses to adenosine in anesthetized rats increased after previous administration of the nucleoside. Bradycardia after adenosine in the isolated perfused rat heart was also potentiated after repeated administration at short intervals. This self-potentiation could be due to extracellular accumulation of adenosine and persistent stimulation of receptors caused by saturation or inhibition of cellular uptake of adenosine.

  20. The prognostic value of E-cadherin and the cadherin-associated molecules alpha-, beta-, gamma-catenin and p120ctn in prostate cancer specific survival: a long-term follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, I.M. van; Tomita, K.; Bokhoven, A. van; Bussemakers, M.J.G.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Karthaus, H.F.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Schalken, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the value of loss of expression of E-cadherin and cadherin associated molecules as prognostic markers for prostate cancer patients in a long-term follow-up study. METHODS: Sixty-five prostate cancer specimens, obtained from patients with different stages of prostate cancer w

  1. SMAD4 regulates cell motility through transcription of N-cadherin in human pancreatic ductal epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya'an Kang

    Full Text Available Expression of the cellular adhesion protein N-cadherin is a critical event during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. The SMAD4 protein has been identified as a mediator of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily signaling, which regulates EMT, but the mechanisms linking TGF-β signaling to N-cadherin expression remain unclear. When the TGF-β pathway is activated, SMAD proteins, including the common mediator SMAD4, are subsequently translocated into the nucleus, where they influence gene transcription via SMAD binding elements (SBEs. Here we describe a mechanism for control of CDH2, the gene encoding N-cadherin, through the canonical TGFβ-SMAD4 pathway. We first identified four previously undescribed SBEs within the CDH2 promoter. Using telomerase immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelium, we found that TGF-β stimulation prompted specific SMAD4 binding to all four SBEs. Luciferase reporter and SMAD4-knockdown experiments demonstrated that specific SMAD4 binding to the SBE located at -3790 bp to -3795 bp within the promoter region of CDH2 was necessary for TGF-β-stimulated transcription. Expression of N-cadherin on the surface of epithelial cells facilitates motility and invasion, and we demonstrated that knockdown of SMAD4 causes decreased N-cadherin expression, which results in diminished migration and invasion of human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Similar reduction of cell motility was produced after CDH2 knockdown. Together, these findings suggest that SMAD4 is critical for the TGF-β-driven upregulation of N-cadherin and the resultant invasive phenotype of human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells during EMT.

  2. Cadherin-13, a risk gene for ADHD and comorbid disorders, impacts GABAergic function in hippocampus and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivero, O; Selten, M M; Sich, S; Popp, S; Bacmeister, L; Amendola, E; Negwer, M; Schubert, D; Proft, F; Kiser, D; Schmitt, A G; Gross, C; Kolk, S M; Strekalova, T; van den Hove, D; Resink, T J; Nadif Kasri, N; Lesch, K P

    2015-01-01

    Cadherin-13 (CDH13), a unique glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored member of the cadherin family of cell adhesion molecules, has been identified as a risk gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and various comorbid neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, including depressio

  3. Interactions between E-Cadherin and MicroRNA Deregulation in Head and Neck Cancers: The Potential Interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thian-Sze Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin expression in the head and neck epithelium is essential for the morphogenesis and homeostasis of epithelial tissues. The cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts are required for the anchorage-dependent growth of epithelial cells. Further, survival and proliferation require physical tethering created by proper cell-cell adhesion. Otherwise, the squamous epithelial cells will undergo programmed cell death. Head and neck cancers can escape from anoikis and enter into the epithelial-mesenchymal transition stages via the modulation of E-cadherin expression with epigenetic mechanisms. At epigenetic level, gene expression control is not dependent on the DNA sequence. In the context of E-cadherin regulation in head and neck cancers, 2 major mechanisms including de novo promoter hypermethylation and microRNA dysregulation are most extensively studied. Both of them control E-cadherin expression at transcription level and subsequently hinder the overall E-cadherin protein level in the head and neck cancer cells. Increasing evidence suggested that microRNA mediated E-cadherin expression in the head and neck cancers by directly/indirectly targeting the transcription suppressors of E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2.

  4. Interactions between E-cadherin and microRNA deregulation in head and neck cancers: the potential interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thian-Sze; Gao, Wei; Chan, Jimmy Yu-Wai

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin expression in the head and neck epithelium is essential for the morphogenesis and homeostasis of epithelial tissues. The cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts are required for the anchorage-dependent growth of epithelial cells. Further, survival and proliferation require physical tethering created by proper cell-cell adhesion. Otherwise, the squamous epithelial cells will undergo programmed cell death. Head and neck cancers can escape from anoikis and enter into the epithelial-mesenchymal transition stages via the modulation of E-cadherin expression with epigenetic mechanisms. At epigenetic level, gene expression control is not dependent on the DNA sequence. In the context of E-cadherin regulation in head and neck cancers, 2 major mechanisms including de novo promoter hypermethylation and microRNA dysregulation are most extensively studied. Both of them control E-cadherin expression at transcription level and subsequently hinder the overall E-cadherin protein level in the head and neck cancer cells. Increasing evidence suggested that microRNA mediated E-cadherin expression in the head and neck cancers by directly/indirectly targeting the transcription suppressors of E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2.

  5. Both the dimerization and immunochemical properties of E-cadherin EC1 domain depend on Trp(156) residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laur, Oscar Y; Klingelhöfer, Jörg; Troyanovsky, Regina B;

    2002-01-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, we show in this paper that the adhesive interface detected in cadherin crystals is unlikely to mediate adhesive interaction between myc- and flag-tagged E-cadherin molecules in human A-431 cells. We also found that a critical residue within this interface, His(233...

  6. Cyclooxygenase-2 mediated regulation of E-cadherin occurs in conventional but not early-onset gastric cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Sitarz; R.J. Leguit; W.W.J. de Leng; F.H.M. Morsink; W.P. Polkowski; R. Maciejewski; G.J.A. Offerhaus; A.N. Milne

    2009-01-01

    Background: COX-2 and E-cadherin, involved in invasion and metastasis, are molecules critical for gastric carcinogenesis. A relationship between them is documented in non-small cell lung and prostate cancer. We present novel evidence of a relationship between COX-2 and E-cadherin expression in gastr

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediated Regulation of E-Cadherin Occurs in Conventional But Not Early-Onset Gastric Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sitarz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: COX-2 and E-cadherin, involved in invasion and metastasis, are molecules critical for gastric carcinogenesis. A relationship between them is documented in non-small cell lung and prostate cancer. We present novel evidence of a relationship between COX-2 and E-cadherin expression in gastric cancer.

  8. Identification of E-cadherin signature motifs functioning as cleavage sites for Helicobacter pylori HtrA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas P.; Perna, Anna M.; Fugmann, Tim; Böhm, Manja; Jan Hiss; Haller, Sarah; Götz, Camilla; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Hoy, Benjamin; Rau, Tilman T.; Neri, Dario; Backert, Steffen; Schneider, Gisbert; Wessler, Silja

    2016-03-01

    The cell adhesion protein and tumour suppressor E-cadherin exhibits important functions in the prevention of gastric cancer. As a class-I carcinogen, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has developed a unique strategy to interfere with E-cadherin functions. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that H. pylori secretes the protease high temperature requirement A (HtrA) which cleaves off the E-cadherin ectodomain (NTF) on epithelial cells. This opens cell-to-cell junctions, allowing bacterial transmigration across the polarised epithelium. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the HtrA-E-cadherin interaction and identified E-cadherin cleavage sites for HtrA. Mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and Edman degradation revealed three signature motifs containing the [VITA]-[VITA]-x-x-D-[DN] sequence pattern, which were preferentially cleaved by HtrA. Based on these sites, we developed a substrate-derived peptide inhibitor that selectively bound and inhibited HtrA, thereby blocking transmigration of H. pylori. The discovery of HtrA-targeted signature sites might further explain why we detected a stable 90 kDa NTF fragment during H. pylori infection, but also additional E-cadherin fragments ranging from 105 kDa to 48 kDa in in vitro cleavage experiments. In conclusion, HtrA targets E-cadherin signature sites that are accessible in in vitro reactions, but might be partially masked on epithelial cells through functional homophilic E-cadherin interactions.

  9. E-cadherin promotor methylation and mutation are inversely related to motility capacity of breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horssen, R. van; Hollestelle, A.; Rens, J.A.; Eggermont, A.M.; Schutte, M.; Ten Hagen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor E-cadherin is an important event during breast tumorigenesis, as its decreased expression is linked to aggressiveness and metastasis. However, the relationship between the different modes of E-cadherin inactivation (mutation versus promotor hypermethylation) and

  10. PRL-3 and E-cadherin show mutual interactions and participate in lymph node metastasis formation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryczynicz, Anna; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Niewiarowska, Katarzyna; Cepowicz, Dariusz; Kemona, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    E-cadherin, a transmembrane adhesion molecule, and phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) protein, a member of the family of tyrosine phosphatases, seem to be responsible for cancer cell migration. Therefore, the study objective was to determine a correlation between PRL-3 and E-cadherin, to assess their expression in neoplastic tissue and normal mucosa of the stomach, to analyze their effect on cancer advancement, and to evaluate their potential as prognostic markers in gastric cancer. The expressions of PRL-3 and E-cadherin were assessed immunohistochemically in 71 patients with gastric cancer. Positive expression of PRL-3 was observed in 42.2 % of gastric cancer cases, whereas E-cadherin expression was abnormal in 38 % of cases. The study revealed that the positive PRL-3 expression and abnormal E-cadherin expression were associated with mucinous gastric carcinoma and lymph node involvement. The former was also related to the infiltrating type of tumor and abnormal E-cadherin expression. The expression of PRL-3, but not of E-cadherin, was associated with shorter survival of patients. PRL-3 and E-cadherin exhibit interactions in gastric cancer and are involved in the formation of lymph node metastases. The PRL-3 protein can be an independent predictive factor of overall survival in gastric cancer patients.

  11. Extracellular Matrices (ECM) for Tissue Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Thais O; Xylas, Joanna; Lantis, John C

    2016-04-01

    Persistence of skin wounds due to underlying disease, bacterial contamination, and/or repeated trauma, causes a chronic condition where a functional extracellular matrix (ECM) cannot be established and the normal wound-healing cascade is unable to progress. These open chronic wounds leave the body susceptible to infection and present a major healthcare problem. To this end, a broad range of biologic ECM scaffolds have been developed that can provide other therapeutic options aside from traditional wound care approaches. These tissue engineered ECM scaffolds aim to facilitate the restoration of functional skin-like tissue by altering the chronic wound environment and facilitating cellular attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. This discussion will center on reviewing current ECM scaffolds and highlighting their properties and mechanism of action with respect to the clinical application in chronic, non-healing wounds.

  12. Nitric Oxide Increases Arterial Endotheial Permeability through Mediating VE-Cadherin Expression during Arteriogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baolin Yang

    Full Text Available Macrophage invasion is an important event during arteriogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is still only partially understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO and VE-cadherin, two key mediators for vascular permeability, contribute to this event in a rat ischemic hindlimb model. In addition, the effect of NO on expression of VE-caherin and endothelial permeability was also studied in cultured HUVECs. We found that: 1 in normal arteriolar vessels (NAV, eNOS was moderately expressed in endothelial cells (EC and iNOS was rarely detected. In contrast, in collateral vessels (CVs induced by simple femoral artery ligation, both eNOS and iNOS were significantly upregulated (P<0.05. Induced iNOS was found mainly in smooth muscle cells, but also in other vascular cells and macrophages; 2 in NAV VE-cadherin was strongly expressed in EC. In CVs, VE-cadherin was significantly downregulated, with a discontinuous and punctate pattern. Administration of nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate (NONOate further reduced the amounts of Ve-cadherin in CVs, whereas NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME inhibited downregulation of VE-cadherin in CVs; 3 in normal rats Evans blue extravasation (EBE was low in the musculus gracilis, FITC-dextron leakage was not detected in the vascular wall and few macrophages were observed in perivascular space. In contrast, EBE was significantly increased in femoral artery ligation rats, FITC-dextron leakage and increased amounts of macrophages were detected in CVs, which were further enhanced by administration of NONOate, but inhibited by L-NAME supplement; 4 in vitro experiments confirmed that an increase in NO production reduced VE-cadherin expression, correlated with increases in the permeability of HUVECs. In conclusion, our data for the first time reveal the expression profile of VE-cadherin and alterations of vascular permeability in CVs, suggesting that NO-mediated VE-cadherin pathway may be one important

  13. Expression of cadherin and NCAM in human small cell lung cancer cell lines and xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, K; Møller, C; Bock, E

    1992-01-01

    characterised, the cadherin family and the Ig superfamily member, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). We investigated expression of these two adhesion molecule families in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and xenografts by immunoblotting. Nineteen tumours established from 15 patients with SCLC were...... embryonic development, which may play a role in connection with tumour invasion and metastasis, was found in 14/18 NCAM expressing SCLC tumours. Individual tumours grown as cell lines and as nude mouse xenografts showed no qualitative differences in cadherin or NCAM expression....

  14. The E-cadherin repressor slug and progression of human extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin-sheng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study explored the expression and function of Slug in human extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma (EHC to identify its role in tumor progression. Methods The expression of Snail and Slug mRNA in 52 human tissue samples of EHC was investigated. The mRNA of Snail and Slug were quantified using reverse transcriptase-PCR, and correlations with E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological factors were investigated. We then investigated transfection of Slug cDNA in endogenous E-cadherin-positive human EHC FRH0201 cells, selectively induced the loss of E-cadherin protein expression, and then small interfering RNA (siRNA for inhibition of Slug expression in endogenous Slug-positive human EHC QBC939 cells, selectively induced the loss of Slug protein expression. A Boyden chamber transwell assay was used for invasion. Results Slug mRNA was overexpressed in 18 cases (34.6% of EHC compared with adjacent noncancerous tissue. E-Cadherin protein expression determined in the same 52 cases by immunohistochemistry was significantly down-regulated in those cases with Slug mRNA overexpression (P = 0.0001. The tumor and nontumor ratio of Slug mRNA was correlated with nodal metastasis(p = 0.0102, distant metastasis (p = 0.0001and Survival time(p = 0.0443. However, Snail mRNA correlated with neither E-cadherin expression nor tumor invasiveness. By inhibiting Slug expression by RNA interference, we found that reduced Slug levels upregulated E-cadherin and decreased invasion in QBC939 cell. When the QBC939 cells was infected with Slug cDNA,, significant E-cadherin was downregulated and increased invasion in QBC939 cell. Conclusions The results suggested that Slug expression plays an important role in both the regulation of E-cadherin expression and in the acquisition of invasive potential in human EHC. Slug is possibly a potential target for an antitumor therapy blocking the functions of invasion and metastasis in human EHCs.

  15. 'P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This article corrects: P-cadherin functional role is dependent on E-cadherin cellular context: a proof of concept using the breast cancer model Volume 229, Issue 5, 705–718, Article first published online: 24 January 2013. By Ana Sofia Ribeiro, Bárbara Sousa, Laura Carreto, Nuno Mendes, Ana Rita Nobre, Sara Ricardo, André Albergaria, Jorge F Cameselle-Teijeiro, Rene Gerhard, Ola Söderberg, Raquel Seruca, Manuel A Santos, Fernando Schmitt and Joana Paredes, J Pathol 2013; 229: 708–718. DOI: 10.1002/path.4143. The above article, published online on 24 January 2013 on Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). The funding information, “This work was also funded by FEDER funds through the Operational Programme for Competitiveness Factors - COMPETE (FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-021209).” was omitted from the Acknowledgements section. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  16. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  17. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  18. Relationship between the Expression of E-cadherin and Microvessel Density in Lung Cancer and Its Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGXinyun; YANGJuhong; MAYing; CHENGBo; ZHENGHongwei; ZHENGHaiyan; ZHUCongzhong; LIUTing; LIYan; WANGAixiang; SUNCuiyun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the expression of E-cadherin and microvessel density (MVD) in lung cancer. Methods: The expression of E-cadherin and factor Ⅷ was detected in 104 lung cancer tissues by an immunohistochemical method, and MVD was calculated by an imageanalysis system. Results: The expression of E-cadherin was significantly related to the differentiation of lung cancers (P<0.05). A negative correlation was found between E-cadherin expression and MVD in lung cancer tissues (P=0.047). Conclusion: Down-expression of E-cadherin and an increase of MVD may play an important role in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer, and may also be used as a useful marker for tumor prognosis.

  19. Association of E-cadherin and β-catenin with metastasis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李智; 任艺; 林素暇; 梁英杰; 梁惠珍

    2004-01-01

    Background This study was designed to detect methylation of E-cadherin gene promoter and gene mutation of β-catenin in exon 3 and their expression of protein and mRNA in primary tumor and lymph node metastatic tumor of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and investigate the mechanism of invasion and metastasis of neoplastic cells in NPC.Methods Fourty-two fresh biopsy samples were taken from untreated NPC patients at the Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen Medical College, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China during the period of 1999-2002. Among them 21 were taken from primary tumors and the other 21 from lymph node metastatic tumors. The gene promoter methylation of E-cadherin was detected by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The mutation in exon 3 of β-catenin was detected by direct sequencing analysis. RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemical staining were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression patterns in both primary and metastatic tumors of NPC. Results Down-regulated expression of E-cadherin in metastatic tumor was compared with that in primary tumor. Reduced expression of E-cadherin was found to be correlated with lymph node metastatic tumor of NPC (P=0.004); but there was no obvious correlation between primary and metastatic tumors in the expression of β-catenin (P=0.698). The mRNA expression level of E-cadherin in metastatic tumors decreased significantly compared with that in primary tumors. However, little change was observed in the mRNA level of β-catenin in different tumor tissues. Only 4 samples (19.1%) displayed gene promoter methylation of E-cadherin in primary tumor and 10 samples (47.6%) showed methylated form of E-cadherin. The gene promoter methylation of E-cadherin was more common in metastatic tumor than in primary tumor of NPC (P=0.024). Only 2 (4.76%) of the 42 samples showed mutations in exon 3 of β-catenin at 41 (T41A, ACCGCC) and codon 47 (S47T, AGTACT). The cytoplasmic and nuclear expression of β-catenin in tumor

  20. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  1. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  2. Cadherin mechanotransduction in morphogenesis: the importance of α-catenin and vinculin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, MKL

    2016-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile tension that is transmitted and regulated at cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions, greatly contributes to cell shape, cell migration, and coordinated tissue formation and organization. In a process termed mechanotransduction, the protein complexes in cell adhesions are able

  3. Loss of cadherin-based cell adhesion and the progression of Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Lobular breast cancer is a type of breast cancer that is histologically characterized by a noncohesive growth pattern of small regular cells, where single cells infiltrate as one-layered strands of cells. This noncohesive growth pattern is due to inactivation of the E-cadherin complex and a subseque

  4. Evaluation of methylation pattern in promoter region of E-cadherin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-03-07

    Mar 7, 2011 ... promoter methylation in CDH1 gene inactivation in breast cancer, the CpG methylation status of E- cadherin promoter ... The data indicate that CDH1 promoter methylation might be a potential ... Complex genetic and epigenetic alterations affect the ... DNA methylation is the covalent addition of a methyl.

  5. Abl tyrosine kinases modulate cadherin-dependent adhesion upstream and downstream of Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandy, Nicole L; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2008-02-15

    Formation and dissolution of intercellular adhesions are processes of paramount importance during tissue morphogenesis and for pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion requires dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The pathways that link cadherin signaling to cytoskeletal regulation remain poorly defined. We have recently uncovered a novel role for the Abl family of tyrosine kinases linking cadherin-mediated adhesion to actin dynamics via the regulation of Rho family GTPases. Abl kinases are activated by cadherin engagement, localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for the formation of adherens junctions. Notably, we showed that Abl kinases are required for Rac activation during formation of adherens junctions, and also regulate a Rho-ROCK-myosin signaling pathway that is required for the maintenance of intercellular adhesion. Here we show that Abl kinases regulate the formation and strengthening of adherens junctions downstream of active Rac, and that Abl tyrosine kinases are components of a positive feed-back loop that employs the Crk/CrkL adaptor proteins to promote the formation and maturation of adherens junctions.

  6. Nitric Oxide Increases Arterial Endotheial Permeability through Mediating VE-Cadherin Expression during Arteriogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqiong; Guan, Yinglu; Zhang, Bin; Cai, Weijun; Schaper, Jutta; Schaper, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage invasion is an important event during arteriogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is still only partially understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and VE-cadherin, two key mediators for vascular permeability, contribute to this event in a rat ischemic hindlimb model. In addition, the effect of NO on expression of VE-caherin and endothelial permeability was also studied in cultured HUVECs. We found that: 1) in normal arteriolar vessels (NAV), eNOS was moderately expressed in endothelial cells (EC) and iNOS was rarely detected. In contrast, in collateral vessels (CVs) induced by simple femoral artery ligation, both eNOS and iNOS were significantly upregulated (PEBE) was low in the musculus gracilis, FITC-dextron leakage was not detected in the vascular wall and few macrophages were observed in perivascular space. In contrast, EBE was significantly increased in femoral artery ligation rats, FITC-dextron leakage and increased amounts of macrophages were detected in CVs, which were further enhanced by administration of NONOate, but inhibited by L-NAME supplement; 4) in vitro experiments confirmed that an increase in NO production reduced VE-cadherin expression, correlated with increases in the permeability of HUVECs. In conclusion, our data for the first time reveal the expression profile of VE-cadherin and alterations of vascular permeability in CVs, suggesting that NO-mediated VE-cadherin pathway may be one important mechanism responsible, at least in part, for macrophage invasion during arteriogenesis. PMID:26133549

  7. Clinicopathologic Correlations of E-cadherin and Prrx-1 Expression Loss in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kijong Yi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Developing predictive markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is important, because many patients experience recurrence and metastasis. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a developmental process that plays an important role during embryogenesis and also during cancer metastasis. Paired-related homeobox protein 1 (Prrx-1 is an EMT inducer that has recently been introduced, and its prognostic significance in HCC is largely unknown. Methods Tissue microarray was constructed using surgically resected primary HCCs from 244 cases. Immunohistochemical staining of E-cadherin and Prrx-1 was performed. The correlation between E-cadherin loss and Prrx-1 expression, as well as other clinicopathologic factors, was evaluated. Results E-cadherin expression was decreased in 96 cases (39.4%. Loss of E-cadherin correlated with a higher recurrence rate (p 40% were independent prognostic factors for shorter overall survival. Conclusions Prrx-1 was expressed in small portions of HCCs but not in normal livers. Additional studies with a large number of Prrx-1-positive cases are required to confirm the results of this study.

  8. N-cadherin negatively regulates collective Drosophila glial migration through actin cytoskeleton remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Gupta, Tripti; Berzsenyi, Sara; Giangrande, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Cell migration is an essential and highly regulated process. During development, glia cells and neurons migrate over long distances - in most cases collectively - to reach their final destination and build the sophisticated architecture of the nervous system, the most complex tissue of the body. Collective migration is highly stereotyped and efficient, defects in the process leading to severe human diseases that include mental retardation. This dynamic process entails extensive cell communication and coordination, hence, the real challenge is to analyze it in the entire organism and at cellular resolution. We here investigate the impact of the N-cadherin adhesion molecule on collective glial migration, by using the Drosophila developing wing and cell-type specific manipulation of gene expression. We show that N-cadherin timely accumulates in glial cells and that its levels affect migration efficiency. N-cadherin works as a molecular brake in a dosage-dependent manner, by negatively controlling actin nucleation and cytoskeleton remodeling through α/β catenins. This is the first in vivo evidence for N-cadherin negatively and cell autonomously controlling collective migration.

  9. Cadherin-9 regulates synapse-specific differentiation in the developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Megan E; Wilke, Scott A; Daggett, Anthony; Davis, Elizabeth; Otto, Stefanie; Ravi, Deepak; Ripley, Beth; Bushong, Eric A; Ellisman, Mark H; Klein, Gerd; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2011-08-25

    Our understanding of mechanisms that regulate the differentiation of specific classes of synapses is limited. Here, we investigate the formation of synapses between hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) neurons and their target CA3 neurons and find that DG neurons preferentially form synapses with CA3 rather than DG or CA1 neurons in culture, suggesting that specific interactions between DG and CA3 neurons drive synapse formation. Cadherin-9 is expressed selectively in DG and CA3 neurons, and downregulation of cadherin-9 in CA3 neurons leads to a selective decrease in the number and size of DG synapses onto CA3 neurons. In addition, loss of cadherin-9 from DG or CA3 neurons in vivo leads to striking defects in the formation and differentiation of the DG-CA3 mossy fiber synapse. These observations indicate that cadherin-9 bidirectionally regulates DG-CA3 synapse development and highlight the critical role of differentially expressed molecular cues in establishing specific connections in the mammalian brain.

  10. Cadherin mechanotransduction in morphogenesis: the importance of α-catenin and vinculin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, MKL

    2016-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile tension that is transmitted and regulated at cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions, greatly contributes to cell shape, cell migration, and coordinated tissue formation and organization. In a process termed mechanotransduction, the protein complexes in cell adhesions are able

  11. α-catenin cytomechanics--role in cadherin-dependent adhesion and mechanotransduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barry, Adrienne K; Tabdili, Hamid; Muhamed, Ismaeel; Wu, Jun; Shashikanth, Nitesh; Gomez, Guillermo A; Yap, Alpha S; Gottardi, Cara J; de Rooij, Johan; Wang, Ning; Leckband, Deborah E

    2014-01-01

    The findings presented here demonstrate the role of α-catenin in cadherin-based adhesion and mechanotransduction in different mechanical contexts. Bead-twisting measurements in conjunction with imaging, and the use of different cell lines and α-catenin mutants reveal that the acute local mechanical

  12. Expressions of Beta-catenin,E-cadherin and MMP-7 in Ovarian Epithelial Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xiao; LI Yu; MI Can

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expressions of Beta-catenin,E-cadherin and MMP-7 and their implications in ovarian epithelial tumor.Methods:lmmunohistochemicai staining with SP method was conducted to identify the expressions of Beta-catenin,E-cadherin and MMP-7 in ovarian epithelial tumor in 66 cases.Results:The abnormal expression rate of Beta-catenin in malignant ovarian epithelial tumor was higher than those in borderline and benign epithelial tumors(P<0.05).The positive rates of E-cadherin in benign and borderline ovarian epithelial tumors were significantly greater than that in malignant epithelial tumor.The expression rates of MMP-7 in malignant and borderline ovarian epithelial tumors were higher than that in benign epithelial tumor(P<0.05).Conclusion:The abnormal expressions of Beta-catenin,E-cadherin and MMP-7 might be used to indicate the malignance transform of ovarian epithelial tumors,but they have no significant correlation with peritoneal dropsy invasion,caul invasion and appendant invasion in ovarian epithelial tumor.

  13. Expression and localization of N- and E-cadherin in the human testis and epididymis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, A M; Edvardsen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1994-01-01

    Cellular interactions in the testis and epididymis are an important prerequisite for spermatogenesis and sperm maturation, and involve a well-developed complex of intercellular junctions. Cadherins are cell surface proteins which mediate intercellular Ca(2+)-dependent adhesion and are believed...

  14. A novel Tenebrio molitor cadherin is a functional receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrick, Jeff; Oppert, Cris; Lorenzen, Marcé D; Morris, Kaley; Oppert, Brenda; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2009-07-03

    Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis are effective biological insecticides. Cadherin-like proteins have been reported as functional Cry1A toxin receptors in Lepidoptera. Here we present data that demonstrate that a coleopteran cadherin is a functional Cry3Aa toxin receptor. The Cry3Aa receptor cadherin was cloned from Tenebrio molitor larval midgut mRNA, and the predicted protein, TmCad1, has domain structure and a putative toxin binding region similar to those in lepidopteran cadherin B. thuringiensis receptors. A peptide containing the putative toxin binding region from TmCad1 bound specifically to Cry3Aa and promoted the formation of Cry3Aa toxin oligomers, proposed to be mediators of toxicity in lepidopterans. Injection of TmCad1-specific double-stranded RNA into T. molitor larvae resulted in knockdown of the TmCad1 transcript and conferred resistance to Cry3Aa toxicity. These data demonstrate the functional role of TmCad1 as a Cry3Aa receptor in T. molitor and reveal similarities between the mode of action of Cry toxins in Lepidoptera and Coleoptera.

  15. A Novel Tenebrio molitor Cadherin is a Functional Receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin Cry3Aa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are effective biological insecticides. Cadherin-like proteins have been reported as functional Cry1A toxin receptors in Lepidoptera. We present the first report demonstrating a functional interaction between the coleopteran-specific ...

  16. E-cadherin and c-Met expression in actinic cheilits and lip squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martínez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to assess epithelial expression of E-cadherin and c-Met in normal lip, in actinic cheilitis and lip squamous cell carcinoma. Study Design: Biopsies of normal lip vermillion (NL, n=18, actinic cheilitis (AC, n=37, and lip SCC (n=22 were processed for E-cadherin and c-Met immunodetection. Epithelial and tumor cell expression was scored for each sample considering staining intensity and percentage. Results: E-cadherin expression was significantly reduced in AC and lip SCC as compared to normal lip (P<0.05, with a significant reduction in lip SCC as compared to AC (P=0.003. Expression of c-Met was significantly higher in AC and lip SCC as compared to NL (P<0.05, with a significant increase in lip SCC as compared to AC (P<0.0001. Conclusion: The results showed that epithelial E-cadherin expression is reduced and c-Met expression is increased as lip carcinogenesis progresses, suggesting that these proteins may be useful markers of malignant transformation.

  17. Snail,E-cadherin 在胃癌中的表达及意义%Expression and Significance of Snail and E-cadherin in Gastric Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晓丽; 杜圣英; 李登欣; 张晴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of Snail and E-cadherin protein in gastric cancer and explore their significance.Methods The expression of Snail and E-cadherin protein was detected by immunohistochemi-cal SP method in 45 cases of gastric carcinoma tissue and 20 cases of para-cancerous normal gastric tissue.Results The positive rate of Snail immunostaining in gastric carcinoma was higher than that in adjacent normal gastric tissue (P<0. 05),the positive rate of E-cadherin immunostaining in gastric cancer was lower than that in adjacent normal gastric tissue (P<0.05).The expression of Snail and E-cadherin in gastric carcinoma tissue was closely related with the depth of tumor invasion,differentiatial degree,clinical stage,lymph node metastases and distant metastases (P<0.05).There was negative correlation between the expression of Snail and E-cadherin protein in gastric carcinoma(P<0.05).Conclusion The abnormal expression of Snail and E-cadherin might be important biological markers for malignant transformation , invasion and metastasis of gastric carcinoma .Co-detection of Snail and E-cadherin has significant effect on predicting the degree of malignancy and prognosis of gastric cancer .%  目的观察锌指结合蛋白(Snail)和上皮性钙粘附蛋白E-cadherin在胃癌组织中的表达,并探讨其意义.方法采用免疫组化SP法检测45例胃癌患者肿瘤组织和20例癌旁正常胃组织中Snail,E-cadherin蛋白的表达.结果胃癌组织中Snail阳性表达率明显高于癌旁正常胃组织(P<0.05),胃癌组织中E-cadherin阳性表达率显著低于癌旁正常胃组织(P<0.05);Snail和E-cad表达均与胃癌的分化程度、浸润深度、临床分期、淋巴结转移、是否有远处器官转移密切相关(P<0.05);Snail与E-cadherin在胃癌组织中的表达呈显著负相关(P<0.05).结论 Snail,E-cadherin的异常表达可能是胃黏膜发生恶性转变及胃癌发生侵袭转移的重要生物学标志,联合检测两

  18. Premature osteoblast clustering by enamel matrix proteins induces osteoblast differentiation through up-regulation of connexin 43 and N-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Miron

    Full Text Available In recent years, enamel matrix derivative (EMD has garnered much interest in the dental field for its apparent bioactivity that stimulates regeneration of periodontal tissues including periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone. Despite its widespread use, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear and an understanding of its biological interactions could identify new strategies for tissue engineering. Previous in vitro research has demonstrated that EMD promotes premature osteoblast clustering at early time points. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of cell clustering on vital osteoblast cell-cell communication and adhesion molecules, connexin 43 (cx43 and N-cadherin (N-cad as assessed by immunofluorescence imaging, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. In addition, differentiation markers of osteoblasts were quantified using alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and von Kossa staining. EMD significantly increased the expression of connexin 43 and N-cadherin at early time points ranging from 2 to 5 days. Protein expression was localized to cell membranes when compared to control groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity was also significantly increased on EMD-coated samples at 3, 5 and 7 days post seeding. Interestingly, higher activity was localized to cell cluster regions. There was a 3 fold increase in osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein mRNA levels for osteoblasts cultured on EMD-coated culture dishes. Moreover, EMD significantly increased extracellular mineral deposition in cell clusters as assessed through von Kossa staining at 5, 7, 10 and 14 days post seeding. We conclude that EMD up-regulates the expression of vital osteoblast cell-cell communication and adhesion molecules, which enhances the differentiation and mineralization activity of osteoblasts. These findings provide further support for the clinical evidence that EMD increases the speed and quality of new bone formation in vivo.

  19. Thermostable direct hemolysin downregulates human colon carcinoma cell proliferation with the involvement of E-cadherin, and β-catenin/Tcf-4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinki Chowdhury

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colon cancers are the frequent causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Recently bacterial toxins have received marked attention as promising approaches in the treatment of colon cancer. Thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH secreted by Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes influx of extracellular calcium with the subsequent rise in intracellular calcium level in intestinal epithelial cells and it is known that calcium has antiproliferative activity against colon cancer. KEY RESULTS: In the present study it has been shown that TDH, a well-known traditional virulent factor inhibits proliferation of human colon carcinoma cells through the involvement of CaSR in its mechanism. TDH treatment does not induce DNA fragmentation, nor causes the release of lactate dehydrogenase. Therefore, apoptosis and cytotoxicity are not contributing to the TDH-mediated reduction of proliferation rate, and hence the reduction appears to be caused by decrease in cell proliferation. The elevation of E-cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule and suppression of β-catenin, a proto-oncogene have been observed in presence of CaSR agonists whereas reverse effect has been seen in presence of CaSR antagonist as well as si-RNA in TDH treated cells. TDH also triggers a significant reduction of Cyclin-D and cdk2, two important cell cycle regulatory proteins along with an up regulation of cell cycle inhibitory protein p27(Kip1 in presence of CaSR agonists. CONCLUSION: Therefore TDH can downregulate colonic carcinoma cell proliferation and involves CaSR in its mechanism of action. The downregulation occurs mainly through the involvement of E-cadherin-β-catenin mediated pathway and the inhibition of cell cycle regulators as well as upregulation of cell cycle inhibitors.

  20. Acute and chronic cadmium exposure promotes E-cadherin degradation in MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Esmeralda; Louie, Maggie C; Sevigny, Mary B

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium is an environmental carcinogen that usually enters the body at minute concentrations through diet or cigarette smoke and bioaccumulates in soft tissues. In past studies, cadmium has been shown to contribute to the development of more aggressive cancer phenotypes including increased cell migration and invasion. This study aims to determine if cadmium exposure-both acute and chronic-contributes to breast cancer progression by interfering with the normal functional relationship between E-cadherin and β-catenin. An MCF7 breast cancer cell line (MCF7-Cd) chronically exposed to 10(-7)  M CdCl2 was previously developed and used as a model system to study chronic exposures, whereas parental MCF7 cells exposed to 10(-6)  M CdCl2 for short periods of time were used to study acute exposures. Cadmium exposure of MCF7 cells led to the degradation of the E-cadherin protein via the ubiquitination pathway. This resulted in fewer E-cadherin/β-catenin complexes and the relocation of active β-catenin to the nucleus, where it interacted with transcription factor TCF-4 to modulate gene expression. Interestingly, only cells chronically exposed to cadmium showed a significant decrease in the localization of β-catenin to the plasma membrane and an increased distance between cells. Our data suggest that cadmium exposure promotes breast cancer progression by (1) down-regulating E-cadherin, thus decreasing the number of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complexes, and (2) enhancing the nuclear translocation of β-catenin to increase expression of cancer-promoting proteins (i.e., c-Jun and cyclin D1).

  1. Preventing E-cadherin aberrant N-glycosylation at Asn-554 improves its critical function in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, S; Catarino, T A; Dias, A M; Kato, M; Almeida, A; Hessling, B; Figueiredo, J; Gärtner, F; Sanches, J M; Ruppert, T; Miyoshi, E; Pierce, M; Carneiro, F; Kolarich, D; Seruca, R; Yamaguchi, Y; Taniguchi, N; Reis, C A; Pinho, S S

    2016-03-31

    E-cadherin is a central molecule in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its posttranslational modifications by N-glycosylation have been described to induce a deleterious effect on cell adhesion associated with tumor cell invasion. However, the role that site-specific glycosylation of E-cadherin has in its defective function in gastric cancer cells needs to be determined. Using transgenic mice models and human clinical samples, we demonstrated that N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V)-mediated glycosylation causes an abnormal pattern of E-cadherin expression in the gastric mucosa. In vitro models further indicated that, among the four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin, Asn-554 is the key site that is selectively modified with β1,6 GlcNAc-branched N-glycans catalyzed by GnT-V. This aberrant glycan modification on this specific asparagine site of E-cadherin was demonstrated to affect its critical functions in gastric cancer cells by affecting E-cadherin cellular localization, cis-dimer formation, molecular assembly and stability of the adherens junctions and cell-cell aggregation, which was further observed in human gastric carcinomas. Interestingly, manipulating this site-specific glycosylation, by preventing Asn-554 from receiving the deleterious branched structures, either by a mutation or by silencing GnT-V, resulted in a protective effect on E-cadherin, precluding its functional dysregulation and contributing to tumor suppression.

  2. Prognostic role of expression of N-cadherin in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Moschini, Marco; Soria, Francesco; Gust, Kilian; Özsoy, Mehmet; Mathieu, Romain; Rouprêt, Morgan; Margulis, Vitaly; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher G; Briganti, Alberto; Bensalah, Karim; Haitel, Andrea; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2017-07-01

    To assess the role of N-cadherin as prognostic biomarker in patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) in a large multi-institutional cohort of patients. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the status of N-cadherin expression in 678 patients with unilateral sporadic UTUC treated with radical nephroureterectomy. N-cadherin was considered positive if any immunoreactivity with membranous staining was detected. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate recurrence-free survival, overall survival and cancer-specific survival. Disease recurrence, overall mortality and cancer-specific mortality probabilities were tested in Cox regression models. Expression of N-cadherin was observed in 292 (43.1%) of patients, and it was associated with advanced tumour stage (p N-cadherin expression was significantly associated with higher probability of recurrence (p = 0.01), but not overall (p = 0.9) or cancer-specific mortality (p = 0.06). When adjusted for the effects of all available confounders, N-cadherin was not associated with any of the survival outcomes. N-cadherin is expressed in approximately 2/5 of UTUs. It is associated with adverse pathologic factors but not with survival outcomes. Its clinical value remains limited.

  3. Caveolin-1, E-cadherin and β-catenin in Gastric Carcinoma, Precancerous Tissues and Chronic Non-atrophic Gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-yang Sun; Jun-xia Wu; Jian-sheng Wu; Yu-ting Pan; Rong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expressions of caveolin-1,E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric carcinoma,precancerous gastric and chronic non-atrophic gastritis tissues,and evaluate the correlation of these expressions with the development of gastric cancer.Methods:The expressions of caveolin-1,E-cadherin and β-catenin were detected by biotin-streptavidinperoxidase (SP) immunohistochemistry on 58 gastric cancer tissues,40 precancerous gastric tissues and 42 chronic non-atrophic gastritis tissues.The correlation between the expressions of caveolin-1,E-cadherin and β-catenin,and the clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer was analyzed retrospectively.Results:The positive rates of caveolin-1 and E-cadherin expressions in gastric carcinoma were significantly lower than precancerous gastric and chronic non-atrophic gastritis tissues (P<0.01).An abnormal rate of β-catenin expression in gastric carcinoma was higher than precancerous gastric and chronic non-atrophic gastritis tissues (P<0.01).Moreover,low expressions of caveolin-1,E-cadherin and β-catenin correlated with tumor size,depth of invasion,lymph node metastasis and TNM stage (P<0.05).The positive rates of caveolin-1 and E-cadherin expressions decreased (P<0.01),while an abnormal rate of β-catenin expression increased inversely,with the degree of atypical hyperplasia (P<0.01).Caveolin-1 expression correlated positively with E-cadherin (r=0.41,P<0.05).Caveolin-1 (r=-0.36,P<0.05) and E-cadherin (r=-0.45,P<0.05) expressions negatively correlated with abnormal β-catenin expression.Conclusion:These results suggested that dysregulated expressions of caveolin-1,E-cadherin and β-catenin correlated with the development of gastric cancer and its biological behavior.

  4. Cdc6 expression is induced by HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes and represses E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihloo, E; Sadeghizadeh, M; Shahmahmoodi, S; Mokhtari-Azad, T

    2016-11-11

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, and its development is related to two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papillomaviruses. Aberrant expression of E-cadherin is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and it is frequently seen in cervical cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in E-cadherin suppression in cervical cancer are not clear. We studied the effects of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 on E-cadherin and Cdc6 (cell division cycle 6) expression in the HCT-116 cell line. We also assessed the relationship between Cdc6 and E-cadherin expression in cells expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins. The results showed that HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins reduce E-cadherin expression, and HPV16 E6-expressing cells undergo a more profound suppression of E-cadherin compared with cells expressing HPV16 E7. Our results also revealed that HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins induce Cdc6 expression, whereas suppression of Cdc6 protein by short hairpin RNA restores E-cadherin expression. Induction of Cdc6 expression in HCT-116 cells was greater with E6 than with E7, a finding that was consistent with the corresponding changes in E-cadherin expression. These observations suggest that Cdc6 overexpression is an important factor for E-cadherin reduction in cells expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins and may have an important role in the metastasis of HPV-associated cancers.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 11 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.51.

  5. Modulation of N-glycosylation by mesalamine facilitates membranous E-cadherin expression in colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Vineeta; Lang, Michaela; Dammann, Kyle; Campregher, Christoph; Lyakhovich, Alex; Gasche, Christoph

    2014-01-15

    Genome wide association studies have implicated intestinal barrier function genes in the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis. One of such loci CDH1, encoding E-cadherin, a transmembrane glycoprotein with known tumor suppressor functions, is also linked to the susceptibility to colorectal cancer. Loss of membranous E-cadherin expression is common in both colitis and cancer. We have recently demonstrated that mesalamine (5-ASA); the anti-inflammatory drug used to treat ulcerative colitis, induces membranous expression of E-cadherin and increases intercellular adhesion. Using colorectal cancer epithelial cells with aberrant E-cadherin expression, we investigated the mechanism underlying such an effect of 5-ASA. Post-translational modification of E-cadherin glycosylation was analyzed by biotin/streptavidin detection of sialylated glycoproteins. GnT-III (N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase III) expression was assessed by qRT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. GnT-III activity was analyzed by reactivity with E-4/L-4-PHA. Expression, localization and interaction of E-cadherin and β-catenin were analyzed by Western blot, immunocytochemistry and RNA interference. 5-ASA activity modulated E-cadherin glycosylation and increased both mRNA and protein levels of GnT-III and its activity as detected by increased E4-lectin reactivity. Intestinal APC(Min) polyps in mice showed low expression of GnT-III and 5-ASA was effective in increasing its expression. The data demonstrated that remodeling of glycans by GnT-III mediated bisect glycosylation, contributes to the membranous retention of E-cadherin by 5-ASA; facilitating intercellular adhesion. Induction of membranous expression of E-cadherin by 5-ASA is a novel mechanism for mucosal healing in colitis that might impede tumor progression by modulation of GnT-III expression.

  6. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  7. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  8. The gene expression of human endothelial cells is modulated by subendothelial extracellular matrix proteins: short-term response to laminar shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlupac, Jaroslav; Filova, Elena; Havlikova, Jana; Matejka, Roman; Riedel, Tomas; Houska, Milan; Brynda, Eduard; Pamula, Elzbieta; Rémy, Murielle; Bareille, Reine; Fernandez, Philippe; Daculsi, Richard; Bourget, Chantal; Bacakova, Lucie; Bordenave, Laurence

    2014-08-01

    Vascular surgery for atherosclerosis is confronted by the lack of a suitable bypass material. Tissue engineering strives to produce bio-artificial conduits to provide resistance to thrombosis. The objectives of our study were to culture endothelial cells (EC) on composite assemblies of extracellular matrix proteins, and to evaluate the cellular phenotype under flow. Cell-adhesive assemblies were fabricated on glass slides as combinations of collagen (Co), laminin (LM), and fibronectin (FN), resulting in three samples: Co, Co/LM, and Co/FN. Surface topography, roughness, and wettability were determined. Human saphenous vein EC were harvested from cardiac patients, cultured on the assemblies and submitted to laminar shear stress (SS) of 12 dyn/cm(2) for 40, 80, and 120 min. Cell retention was assessed and qRT-PCR of adhesion genes (VE-cadherin, vinculin, KDR, CD-31 or PECAM-1, β1-integrins) and metabolic genes (t-PA, NF-κB, eNOS and MMP-1) was performed. Quantitative immunofluorescence of VE cadherin, vinculin, KDR, and vonWillebrand factor was performed after 2 and 6 h of flow. Static samples were excluded from shearing. The cells reached confluence with similar growth curves. The cells on Co/LM and Co/FN were resistant to flow up to 120 min but minor desquamation occurred on Co corresponding with temporary downregulation of VE cadherin and vinculin-mRNA and decreased fluorescence of vinculin. The cells seeded on Co/LM initially more upregulated vinculin-mRNA and also the inflammatory factor NF-κB, and the cells plated on Co/FN changed the expression profile minimally in comparison with the static control. Fluorescence of VE cadherin and vonWillebrand factor was enhanced on Co/FN. The cells cultured on Co/LM and Co/FN increased the vinculin fluorescence and expressed more VE cadherin and KDR-mRNA than the cells on Co. The cells plated on Co/FN upregulated the mRNA of VE cadherin, CD-31, and MMP 1 to a greater extent than the cells on Co/LM and they

  9. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  10. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  11. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  12. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  13. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  14. Clinicopathological significance of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin proteins in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao X

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Xiaofeng Yao,1,2 Shanshan Sun,1,2 Xuan Zhou,1,2 Qiang Zhang,1,2 Wenyu Guo,1,2 Lun Zhang1,2 1Department of Maxillofacial and Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, 2Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, National Clinical Research Center of Cancer, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Background: Zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB-1, a member of the ZFH family, plays a key role in epithelial–mesenchymal transition during tumor progression in various cancers. However, little information is available on ZEB-1 expression in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC.Methods: The expression levels of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin were assessed by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 120 patients with OSCC treated by curative operation, and then the correlations between ZEB-1 and E-cadherin expression and clinical factors were evaluated, including patient prognosis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assays were performed to assess mRNA levels of ZEB-1 and E-cadherin in 20 matched OSCC specimens.Results: Patients were followed up for a median period of 66 months (range 8-116 months, and 5-year overall survival was 68.3%. Positive ZEB-1 and E-cadherin immunostaining reactivity was detected in 64 (53.3% and 53 (44.2% patients, respectively. There was a negative correlation between ZEB-1 expression and E-cadherin expression. In addition, overexpression of ZEB-1 was significantly associated with recurrence, lymph node metastasis, and pathologic grading of patients, loss of E-cadherin was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis and pathologic grading of patients. Univariate analysis showed that increased ZEB-1 expression, loss of E-cadherin expression, lymph node metastasis, recurrence, and pathology grade were prognostic factors. In multivariate analysis, increased ZEB-1 expression and recurrence remained independent prognostic factors. In particular

  15. Interactions between E-Cadherin and MicroRNA Deregulation in Head and Neck Cancers: The Potential Interplay

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin expression in the head and neck epithelium is essential for the morphogenesis and homeostasis of epithelial tissues. The cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts are required for the anchorage-dependent growth of epithelial cells. Further, survival and proliferation require physical tethering created by proper cell-cell adhesion. Otherwise, the squamous epithelial cells will undergo programmed cell death. Head and neck cancers can escape from anoikis and enter into the epithelial-mesen...

  16. Cadherin-11 Regulation of Fibrosis through Modulation of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Implications for Pulmonary Fibrosis in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    12 Approved Through 8/31/2015) Page 9 Figure 13. Soluble Cad-11 ELISA detects human (blue) and mouse (red) Cad-11 Figure 14. Serum cadherin...Determine the circulating levels of cadherin-11 in scleroderma patients with interstitial lung disease . In the past year a lot of effort has been...lung disease . At the outset of these experiments, there was not a commercial Cad-11 ELISA. Therefore, we developed an ELISA and optimize our

  17. Methoxy-Poly(ethylene glycol Modified Poly(L-lactide Enhanced Cell Affinity of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells by the Upregulation of 1-Cadherin and Delta-2-catenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(l-lactide (PLLA, a versatile biodegradable polymer, is one of the most commonly-used materials for tissue engineering applications. To improve cell affinity for PLLA, poly(ethylene glycol (PEG was used to develop diblock copolymers. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs were cultured on MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer films to determine the effects of modification on the attachment and proliferation of hBMSC. The mRNA expression of 84 human extracellular matrix (ECM and adhesion molecules was analyzed using RT-qPCR to understand the underlying mechanisms. It was found that MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer films significantly improved cell adhesion, extension, and proliferation. This was found to be related to the significant upregulation of two adhesion genes, CDH1 and CTNND2, which encode 1-cadherin and delta-2-catenin, respectively, two key components for the cadherin-catenin complex. In summary, MPEG-b-PLLA copolymer surfaces improved initial cell adhesion by stimulation of adhesion molecule gene expression.

  18. Gain of oncogenic function of p53 mutants regulates E-cadherin expression uncoupled from cell invasion in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Lauréline; Jullien, Laurent; Gire, Véronique; Roux, Pierre

    2010-04-15

    Mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene are associated clinically with tumour progression and metastasis. Downregulation of the E-cadherin cell-cell adhesion molecule is a key event for epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumour progression. Here, we show that wild-type p53 induced to adopt a mutant conformation, and hot-spot p53 mutants, which are both transcriptionally inactive, downregulate E-cadherin expression in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116. Downregulation of E-cadherin occurred concomitantly with the upregulation of Slug and Zeb-1, transcriptional factors known to repress E-cadherin gene expression. In addition, knockdown of Slug and Zeb-1 expression diminished p53-mediated E-cadherin repression. Knocking down endogenous mutant p53 in MDA-MB-231 and SW620 cancer cell lines lacking E-cadherin protein restored the expression of E-cadherin. Complete loss of E-cadherin expression in HCT116 cells induced morphological alterations along with upregulation of vimentin, a mesenchymal marker. These changes characteristic of the EMT phenotype were, however, not sufficient to confer invasiveness in a three-dimensional matrix. Downregulation of E-cadherin by mutant p53 was not required to promote the invasive phenotype induced by inactivation of p53. These findings indicate that independent control of E-cadherin expression and cell motility could be essential molecular events in p53 mutant-induced invasive phenotypes.

  19. Interleukin-2 alters distribution of CD144 (VE-cadherin) in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Won; Zloza, Andrew; Broucek, Joseph; Schenkel, Jason M; Ruby, Carl; Samaha, Georges; Kaufman, Howard L

    2014-05-06

    High-dose IL-2 (HDIL2) is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma, but its use is limited in part by toxicity related to the development of vascular leak syndrome (VLS). Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of HDIL2-induced increases in endothelial cell (EC) permeability leading to VLS are of clinical importance. We established a novel ex vivo approach utilizing primary human pulmonary microvascular ECs to evaluate EC barrier dysfunction in response to IL-2. Complementary in vitro studies using exogenous IL-2 and ex vivo studies using serum from patients treated with IL-2 demonstrate that HDIL2 induces VLS through CD144 (vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin) redistribution. These findings provide new insight into how IL-2 induces VLS and identifies VE-cadherin as a potential target for preventing IL-2-related VLS.

  20. miR-151a induces partial EMT by regulating E-cadherin in NSCLC cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Iben; Sanders, K J; Idica, A

    2017-01-01

    mortality. Here, we demonstrate that miR-151a is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient specimens, as compared to healthy lung. In addition, miR-151a overexpression promotes proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces tumor cell migration and invasion of NSCLC......-cadherin in miR-151a NSCLC cell lines potently repressed miR-151a-induced partial EMT and cell migration of NSCLC cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-151a functions as an oncomiR in NSCLC by targeting E-cadherin mRNA and inducing proliferation, migration and partial EMT....

  1. Expression profile of E-cadherin, estrogen receptors, and P53 in early-onset gastric cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Xu, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jiong; Lan, Xing; Zou, Xiaoping; Wang, Lei; Huang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    Early-onset gastric cancer (EOGC) is predominant in females, diffuse histology, and hereditary pattern. Germline mutation of CDH1 and p53 has been reported previously and female dominance was speculated to be associated with estrogen and its receptors. Expression of E-cadherin, estrogen receptor α (ERα), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and p53 in EOGC remains unclear, which was the focus of this study, to assess clinical significance of their expression in EOGC. The expression of E-cadherin, ERα, ERβ, and p53 in tumors and normal tissues from surgically resected EOGCs was assessed by immunohistochemistry (n = 139) and Western blot (n = 7) methods, respectively. The expression in tumor tissues was significantly higher for ERα, ERβ, and p53, but lower for E-cadherin, compared to uninvolved mucosa. Positive staining of ERβ and p53 was more frequently observed in younger patients with advanced TNM stages. For E-cadherin, significant correlation was observed between the immunopositivity and TNM stages IA+IB. P53-negative patients had significantly better outcomes than p53-positive patients. Significant association between expression of E-cadherin and histologic types was found in familial, but not in sporadic, EOGC. In conclusion, our results demonstrated E-cadherin may have a role in initiation of EOGC and positive ERβ and p53 expression may partially explained early-onset and tumor progression of EOGC.

  2. Integrins stimulate E-cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion by regulating Src-kinase activation and actomyosin contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rico, Clara; Pincet, Frederic; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Dufour, Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Cadherins and integrins are major adhesion molecules regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the existence of crosstalk between integrins and cadherins in cell adhesion and motility. We used a dual pipette assay to measure the force required to separate E-cadherin-producing cell doublets and to investigate the role of integrin in regulating the strength of intercellular adhesion. A greater force was required to separate cell doublets bound to fibronectin or vitronectin-coated beads than for doublets bound to polylysine-coated beads. This effect depended on cell spreading and the duration of stimulation. Cells expressing type II cadherin-7 also responded to fibronectin stimulation to produce a higher intercellular adhesion. Establishment of cadherin-mediated adhesion needed ROCK, MLCK and myosin ATPase II activity. The regulation of intercellular adhesion strength by integrin stimulation required activation of Src family kinases, ROCK and actomyosin contractility. These findings highlight the importance and mechanisms of molecular crosstalk between cadherins and integrins in the control of cell plasticity during histogenesis and morphogenesis.

  3. An Engineered N-Cadherin Substrate for Differentiation, Survival, and Selection of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amranul Haque

    Full Text Available For stem cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases a better understanding of key developmental signaling pathways and robust techniques for producing neurons with highest homogeneity are required. In this study, we demonstrate a method using N-cadherin-based biomimetic substrate to promote the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC- and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs without exogenous neuro-inductive signals. We showed that substrate-dependent activation of N-cadherin reduces Rho/ROCK activation and β-catenin expression, leading to the stimulation of neurite outgrowth and conversion into cells expressing neural/glial markers. Besides, plating dissociated cells on N-cadherin substrate can significantly increase the differentiation yield via suppression of dissociation-induced Rho/ROCK-mediated apoptosis. Because undifferentiated ESCs and iPSCs have low affinity to N-cadherin, plating dissociated cells on N-cadherin-coated substrate increase the homogeneity of differentiation by purging ESCs and iPSCs (~30% from a mixture of undifferentiated cells with NPCs. Using this label-free cell selection approach we enriched differentiated NPCs plated as monolayer without ROCK inhibitor. Therefore, N-cadherin biomimetic substrate provide a powerful tool for basic study of cell-material interaction in a spatially defined and substrate-dependent manner. Collectively, our approach is efficient, robust and cost effective to produce large quantities of differentiated cells with highest homogeneity and applicable to use with other types of cells.

  4. Girdin-mediated interactions between cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton are required for epithelial morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssin, Elise; Tepass, Ulrich; Laprise, Patrick

    2015-05-15

    E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is fundamental for epithelial tissue morphogenesis, physiology and repair. E-cadherin is a core transmembrane constituent of the zonula adherens (ZA), a belt-like adherens junction located at the apicolateral border in epithelial cells. The anchorage of ZA components to cortical actin filaments strengthens cell-cell cohesion and allows for junction contractility, which shapes epithelial tissues during development. Here, we report that the cytoskeletal adaptor protein Girdin physically and functionally interacts with components of the cadherin-catenin complex during Drosophila embryogenesis. Fly Girdin is broadly expressed throughout embryonic development and enriched at the ZA in epithelial tissues. Girdin associates with the cytoskeleton and co-precipitates with the cadherin-catenin complex protein α-Catenin (α-Cat). Girdin mutations strongly enhance adhesion defects associated with reduced DE-cadherin (DE-Cad) expression. Moreover, the fraction of DE-Cad molecules associated with the cytoskeleton decreases in the absence of Girdin, thereby identifying Girdin as a positive regulator of adherens junction function. Girdin mutant embryos display isolated epithelial cell cysts and rupture of the ventral midline, consistent with defects in cell-cell cohesion. In addition, loss of Girdin impairs the collective migration of epithelial cells, resulting in dorsal closure defects. We propose that Girdin stabilizes epithelial cell adhesion and promotes morphogenesis by regulating the linkage of the cadherin-catenin complex to the cytoskeleton.

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans p120 catenin homologue, JAC-1, modulates cadherin-catenin function during epidermal morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Cox, Elisabeth A; Broadbent, Ian D; Flett, Aileen; Hardin, Jeff

    2003-07-07

    The cadherin-catenin complex is essential for tissue morphogenesis during animal development. In cultured mammalian cells, p120 catenin (p120ctn) is an important regulator of cadherin-catenin complex function. However, information on the role of p120ctn family members in cadherin-dependent events in vivo is limited. We have examined the role of the single Caenorhabditis elegans p120ctn homologue JAC-1 (juxtamembrane domain [JMD]-associated catenin) during epidermal morphogenesis. Similar to other p120ctn family members, JAC-1 binds the JMD of the classical cadherin HMR-1, and GFP-tagged JAC-1 localizes to adherens junctions in an HMR-1-dependent manner. Surprisingly, depleting JAC-1 expression using RNA interference (RNAi) does not result in any obvious defects in embryonic or postembryonic development. However, jac-1(RNAi) does increase the severity and penetrance of morphogenetic defects caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the hmp-1/alpha-catenin gene. In these hmp-1 mutants, jac-1 depletion causes failure of the embryo to elongate into a worm-like shape, a process that involves contraction of the epidermis. Associated with failed elongation is the detachment of actin bundles from epidermal adherens junctions and failure to maintain cadherin in adherens junctions. These results suggest that JAC-1 acts as a positive modulator of cadherin function in C. elegans.

  6. Role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in helicobacter pylori-induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongmei; Du, Jie; Liu, Fen; Wang, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiaohui; Li, Yuanjian

    2017-08-29

    This study was designed to investigate the role of caspase-3/E-cadherin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) -induced gastric epithelial apoptosis in cells, animal models and clinical gastritis patients. In cultured gastric mucosal epithelial cells, gastric glandular epithelial cells and C57BL/6 mice, H. pylori infection significantly induced apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells, down-regulated full-length E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression, and up-regulated cleaved-caspase-3, E-cadherin/carboxy-terminal fragment 3 and Bax expression. Z-DEVD-FMK, an inhibitor of caspase-3, attenuated the effect of H. pylori. E-cadherin overexpression significantly inhibited the apoptosis of GES-1 and SGC-7901 cells induced by the H. pylori. The results from clinical studies also showed down-regulation of E-cadherin, up-regulation of cleaved-caspase-3 expression and increased apoptosis in gastric tissues from gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. These results suggest that the caspase-3/E-cadherin pathway is involved in the apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells induced by H. pylori.

  7. Establishment of an ovarian metastasis model and possible involvement of E-cadherin down-regulation in the metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Yoshiko; Yamada, Taketo; Yamazaki, Ken; Du, Wen-Lin; Banno, Kouji; Aoki, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2008-10-01

    Clinical observations of cases of ovarian metastasis suggest that there may be a unique mechanism underlying ovarian-specific metastasis. This study was undertaken to establish an in vivo model of metastasis to the ovary, and to investigate the mechanism of ovarian-specific metastasis. We examined the capacity for ovarian metastasis in eight different human carcinoma cell lines by implantation in female NOD/SCID mice transvenously and intraperitoneally. By transvenous inoculation, only RERF-LC-AI, a poorly differentiated carcinoma cell line, frequently demonstrated ovarian metastasis. By intraperitoneal inoculation, four of the eight cell lines (HGC27, MKN-45, KATO-III, and RERF-LC-AI) metastasized to the ovary. We compared E-cadherin expression among ovarian metastatic cell lines and others. All of these four ovarian metastatic cell lines and HSKTC, a Krukenberg tumor cell line, showed E-cadherin down-regulation and others did not. E-cadherin was then forcibly expressed in RERF-LC-AI, and inhibited ovarian metastasis completely. The capacity for metastasizing to the other organs was not affected by E-cadherin expression. We also performed histological investigation of clinical ovarian-metastatic tumor cases. About half of all ovarian-metastatic tumor cases showed loss or reduction of E-cadherin expression. These data suggest that E-cadherin down-regulation may be involved in ovarian-specific metastasis.

  8. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  9. Regulation of C-cadherin function during activin induced morphogenesis of Xenopus animal caps

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Treatment of Xenopus animal pole tissue with activin results in the induction of mesodermal cell types and a dramatic elongation of the tissue. The morphogenetic movements involved in the elongation appear similar to those in normal gastrulation, which is driven by cell rearrangement and cell intercalations. We have used this system to explore the potential regulation of cell-cell adhesion and cadherin function during morphogenesis. Quantitative blastomere aggregation assays revealed that act...

  10. Interleukin-32α induces migration of human melanoma cells through downregulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Kyung Eun; Cheon, Soyoung; Song, Ju Han; Houh, Younkyung; Kim, Tae Sung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Daejin; Hur, Dae Young; Yang, Yoolhee; Bang, Sa Ik; Park, Hyun Jeong; Cho, Daeho

    2016-10-04

    Interleukin (IL)-32α, the shortest isoform of proinflammatory cytokine IL-32, is associated with various inflammatory diseases and cancers. However, its involvement in human melanoma is not understood. To determine the effect of IL-32α in melanoma, IL-32α levels were examined in human melanoma cell lines that exhibit different migratory abilities. IL-32α levels were higher in human melanoma cell lines with more migratory ability. An IL-32α-overexpressing G361 human melanoma cell line was generated to investigate the effect of IL-32α on melanoma migration. IL-32α-overexpressing G361 cells (G361-IL-32α) exhibit an increased migratory ability compared to vector control cells (G361-vector). To identify factors involved in IL-32α-induced migration, we compared expression of E-cadherin in G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells. We observed decreased levels of E-cadherin in G361-IL-32α cells, resulting in F-actin polymerization. To further investigate signaling pathways related to IL-32α-induced migration, we treated G361-vector and G361-IL-32α cells with PD98059, a selective MEK inhibitor. Inhibition of Erk1/2 by PD98059 restored E-cadherin expression and decreased IL-32α-induced migration. In addition, cell invasiveness of G361-IL-32α cells was tested using an in vivo lung metastasis model. As results, lung metastasis was significantly increased by IL-32α overexpression. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-32α induced human melanoma migration via Erk1/2 activation, which repressed E-cadherin expression. Our findings suggest that IL-32α is a novel regulator of migration in melanoma.

  11. Syndecan-1 and E-cadherin expression in differentiated type of early gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Fang Huang; You-Qing Zhu; Zhi-Fen Chen; Jun Xiao; Xin Huang; Yong-Yan Xiong; Gui-Fang Yang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the role and alterations of syndecan-1 and E-cadherin expression in different cellular phenotypes of differentiated-type gastric cancers (DGCs), METHODS: A total of 120 DGCs at an early stage, andtheir adjacent mucosa, were studied both by immunohistochemistry. Syndecan-1 and E-cadherin were assessed by immunohistochemical staining with anti-syndecan-1 and anti-E-cadherin antibodies, respectively. Based on immunohistochemistry, DGCs and their surrounding mucosa were divided into four types: gastric type (G-type),ordinary type (O-type), complete-intestinal type (CI-type),and null type (N-type).RESULTS: Syndecan-1 expression was significantly lower in G-type cancers (29.4%) than in O-type (79.6%) and CI-type cancers (90%) (P<0.05, respectively), but E-cadherin did not show this result. In addition, syndecan-1 expression was significantly reduced in DGCs comprised partly of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma or signet-ring cell carcinoma, compared to DGCs demonstrating papillary and/or tubular adenocarcinoma (P<0.05). G-type intestinal metaplasia (IM) surrounding the tumors was observed in 23.8% of G-type, 4.9% of O-type, and 6.7% of CI-type cancers (P<0.05; G-type vs O-type). Reduction of syndecan-1 expression was significant in G-type IM (25%) compared to non-G-type IM (75%; P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Loss of syndecan-1 plays a role in the growth of G-type cancers of DGCs at an early stage, and the reduction of syndecan-1 expression in IM surrounding the tumors may influence the growth of G-type cancer.

  12. Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Qi; Zhang, Wu; Lui, Eric L H; Zhu, Yongqiang; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiaoming; Sun, Jisan; Yang, Sitian; Poon, Ronnie T P; Fan, Sheung Tat

    2012-08-01

    Notch signaling, a critical pathway for tissue development, also contributes to tumorigenesis in many cancers, but its pathological function in liver cancer is not well defined. In our study, Notch1 expression and its clinicopathological parameters were evaluated in 82 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Plasmid-based siNotch1 shRNA was transiently or stably transfected into metastatic HCC cells and subsequently evaluated for the effects on orthotopic liver tumor metastasis in a mouse model as well as the effects on downstream pathways. Aberrant high expression of Notch1 was significantly associated with metastatic disease parameters in HCC patients, such as tumor-node-metastasis Stages III-IV and tumor venous invasion. Knocking-down Notch1 reduced cell motility in vitro and orthotopic tumor metastasis from the liver to the lung in vivo in a mouse model. In metastatic HCC cells, abnormal expression of Notch1 was associated with increased expression of Snail1 and repressed expression of E-cadherin; the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin association can also be found in HCC patient tumors. Inhibition of Notch1 by shRNA abolished Snail1 expression, which further resulted in the re-establishment of repressed E-cadherin in metastatic HCC cells. Thus, abnormal Notch1 expression was strongly associated with HCC metastatic disease, which might be mediated through the Notch1-Snail1-E-cadherin pathway. Knock-down of Notch1 reversed HCC tumor metastasis in a mouse model. Therefore, these data suggest that effective targeting of Notch signaling might also inhibit tumor metastasis.

  13. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion is critical for the closing of the mouse optic fissure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyi Chen

    Full Text Available Coloboma is a congenital disease that contributes significantly to childhood blindness. It results from the failure in closing the optic fissure, a transient opening on the ventral side of the developing eye. Although human and mouse genetic studies have identified a number of genes associated with coloboma, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying the optic fissure closure and coloboma formation remain largely undefined. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion has been shown to be important for the optic fissure closure in zebrafish, but it remains to be determined experimentally how cell-cell adhesions are involved in the mammalian optic fissure closing process. α-Catenin is required for cell adhesion mediated by all of the classic cadherin molecules, including N-cadherin. In this study, we used the Cre-mediated conditional knockout technique to specifically delete α-catenin from the developing mouse eye to show that it is required for the successful closing of the optic fissure. In α-catenin conditional mutant optic cups, the major cell fates, including the optic fissure margin, neural retina and retinal pigmented epithelium, are specified normally, and the retinal progenitor cells proliferate normally. However, adherens junctions components, including N-cadherin, β-catenin and filamentous actin, fail to accumulate on the apical side of α-catenin mutant retinal progenitor cells, where adherens junctions are normally abundant, and the organization of the neural retina and the optic fissure margin is disrupted. Finally, the α-catenin mutant retina gradually degenerates in the adult mouse eye. Therefore, our results show that α-catenin-mediated cell adhesion and cell organization are important for the fissure closure in mice, and further suggest that genes that regulate cell adhesion may underlie certain coloboma cases in humans.

  14. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  15. Three cadherin alleles associated with resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis in pink bollworm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Shai; Biggs, Robert W.; Sisterson, Mark S.; Shriver, Laura; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Higginson, Dawn; Holley, Daniel; Gahan, Linda J.; Heckel, David G.; Carrière, Yves; Dennehy, Timothy J.; Brown, Judith K.; Tabashnik, Bruce E.

    2003-01-01

    Evolution of resistance by pests is the main threat to long-term insect control by transgenic crops that produce Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Because inheritance of resistance to the Bt toxins in transgenic crops is typically recessive, DNA-based screening for resistance alleles in heterozygotes is potentially much more efficient than detection of resistant homozygotes with bioassays. Such screening, however, requires knowledge of the resistance alleles in field populations of pests that are associated with survival on Bt crops. Here we report that field populations of pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), a major cotton pest, harbored three mutant alleles of a cadherin-encoding gene linked with resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac and survival on transgenic Bt cotton. Each of the three resistance alleles has a deletion expected to eliminate at least eight amino acids upstream of the putative toxin-binding region of the cadherin protein. Larvae with two resistance alleles in any combination were resistant, whereas those with one or none were susceptible to Cry1Ac. Together with previous evidence, the results reported here identify the cadherin gene as a leading target for DNA-based screening of resistance to Bt crops in lepidopteran pests. PMID:12695565

  16. Msh homeobox genes regulate cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell-cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincecum, J M; Fannon, A; Song, K; Wang, Y; Sassoon, D A

    1998-07-01

    Msx-1 and Msx-2 are two closely related homeobox genes expressed in cephalic neural crest tooth buds, the optic cup endocardial cushions, and the developing limb [Hill and Davidson, 1991; Monaghan et al., 1991; Robert et al., 1991]. These sites correspond to regions of active cell segregation and proliferation under the influence of epithelial-mesenchymal cell interactions [Brown et al., 1993; Davidson et al., 1991], suggesting that Msx-1 and Msx-2 regulate cell-cell interactions. We have investigated the potential relationship between expression of the Msh homeobox genes (Msx-1 and Msx-2) and cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell sorting. We report that cell lines stably expressing Msx-1 or Msx-2 differentially sort on the basis of Msh gene expression. We demonstrate in vitro that initial cell aggregation involves calcium-dependent adhesion molecules (cadherins) and that Msh genes regulate cadherin-mediated adhesion. These results support the hypothesis that Msh genes play a role in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion and provide a link between the genetic phenomena of homeobox gene expression and cellular events involved in morphogenesis, including cell sorting and proliferation.

  17. Modulation of Intercellular Junction by Utilization of Cadherin Peptides as an Effort to Improve Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Sumo Friend Tambunan

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in combinatorial chemistry and molecular biology has influenced the discovery of many proteins, peptides and peptidomimetics as potential therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, the practical application of these potential drugs is often restricted by the difficulties of delivering them to target site(s due to the presence of biological barriers. Recently, a new method to improve the drug delivery, that is by modulating the intercellular junction, has been evaluated. Modulation of intercellular junction could be achieved by modulating the proteins which play important role in establishing the intercellular junction, one of which is cadherin. In the present work we have demonstrated the ability of several cadherin peptides, i.e. Ac-LFSHAVSSNG-NH2 (HAV-10, Ac-SHAVSS-NH2 (HAV-6, Ac-QGADTPPVGV-NH2 (ADT-10, and Ac-ADTPPV-NH2 (ADT-6 to modulate the intercellular junction of MDCK (Madin Darby Canine Kidney cells, this finding is a contribution to the establishment of a new method to improve the drug delivery by utilization of cadherin peptides by modulating the intercellular junction.

  18. The cadherin Fat2 is required for planar cell polarity in the Drosophila ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorinová, Ivana; König, Tina; Schlichting, Karin; Dahmann, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Planar cell polarity is an important characteristic of many epithelia. In the Drosophila wing, eye and abdomen, establishment of planar cell polarity requires the core planar cell polarity genes and two cadherins, Fat and Dachsous. Drosophila Fat2 is a cadherin related to Fat; however, its role during planar cell polarity has not been studied. Here, we have generated mutations in fat2 and show that Fat2 is required for the planar polarity of actin filament orientation at the basal side of ovarian follicle cells. Defects in actin filament orientation correlate with a failure of egg chambers to elongate during oogenesis. Using a functional fosmid-based fat2-GFP transgene, we show that the distribution of Fat2 protein in follicle cells is planar polarized and that Fat2 localizes where basal actin filaments terminate. Mosaic analysis demonstrates that Fat2 acts non-autonomously in follicle cells, indicating that Fat2 is required for the transmission of polarity information. Our results suggest a principal role for Fat-like cadherins during the establishment of planar cell polarity.

  19. Cdon promotes neural crest migration by regulating N-cadherin localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Davalyn R; Williams, Jason S; Hernandez-Lagunas, Laura; Salcedo, Ernesto; O'Brien, Jenean H; Artinger, Kristin Bruk

    2015-11-15

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are essential embryonic progenitor cells that are unique to vertebrates and form a remarkably complex and coordinated system of highly motile cells. Migration of NCCs occurs along specific pathways within the embryo in response to both environmental cues and cell-cell interactions within the neural crest population. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for the putative Sonic hedgehog (Shh) receptor and cell adhesion regulator, cdon, in zebrafish neural crest migration. cdon is expressed in developing premigratory NCCs but is downregulated once the cells become migratory. Knockdown of cdon results in aberrant migration of trunk NCCs: crestin positive cells can emigrate out of the neural tube but stall shortly after the initiation of migration. Live cell imaging analysis demonstrates reduced directedness of migration, increased velocity and mispositioned cell protrusions. In addition, transplantation analysis suggests that cdon is required cell-autonomously for directed NCC migration in the trunk. Interestingly, N-cadherin is mislocalized following cdon knockdown suggesting that the role of cdon in NCCs is to regulate N-cadherin localization. Our results reveal a novel role for cdon in zebrafish neural crest migration, and suggest a mechanism by which Cdon is required to localize N-cadherin to the cell membrane in migratory NCCs for directed migration.

  20. Reggies/flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell contact formation by affecting EGFR trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Schrock, Yvonne; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Wiechers, Marianne; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2012-05-01

    The reggie/flotillin proteins are implicated in membrane trafficking and, together with the cellular prion protein (PrP), in the recruitment of E-cadherin to cell contact sites. Here, we demonstrate that reggies, as well as PrP down-regulation, in epithelial A431 cells cause overlapping processes and abnormal formation of adherens junctions (AJs). This defect in cell adhesion results from reggie effects on Src tyrosine kinases and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): loss of reggies reduces Src activation and EGFR phosphorylation at residues targeted by Src and c-cbl and leads to increased surface exposure of EGFR by blocking its internalization. The prolonged EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane enhances cell motility and macropinocytosis, by which junction-associated E-cadherin is internalized and recycled back to AJs. Accordingly, blockage of EGFR signaling or macropinocytosis in reggie-deficient cells restores normal AJ formation. Thus, by promoting EGFR internalization, reggies restrict the EGFR signaling involved in E-cadherin macropinocytosis and recycling and regulate AJ formation and dynamics and thereby cell adhesion.

  1. Probing E-cadherin endocytosis by morpholino-mediated Rab5 knockdown in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Florian; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2008-01-01

    The controlled internalization of membrane receptors and lipids is crucial for cells to control signaling pathways and interact with their environment. During clathrin-mediated endocytosis, membrane constituents are transported via endocytic vesicles into early endosomes, from which they are further distributed within the cell. The small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rab5 is both required and sufficient for the formation of these early endosomes and can be used to experimentally address endocytic processes. Recent evidence shows that endocytic turnover of E-cadherin regulates the migration of mesendodermal cells during zebrafish gastrulation by modulating their adhesive interactions with neighboring cells. This in turn leads to effective and synchronized movement within the embryo. In this review, we discuss techniques to manipulate E-cadherin endocytosis by morpholino-mediated knockdown of rab5 during zebrafish gastrulation. We describe the use of antibodies specifically directed against zebrafish E-cadherin to detect its intracellular localization and of in situ hybridization and primary cell culture to reveal patterns of cell migration and adhesion, respectively.

  2. Desmoglein 3, via an interaction with E-cadherin, is associated with activation of Src.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu Man Tsang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3, a desmosomal adhesion protein, is expressed in basal and immediate suprabasal layers of skin and across the entire stratified squamous epithelium of oral mucosa. However, increasing evidence suggests that the role of Dsg3 may involve more than just cell-cell adhesion. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine possible additional roles of Dsg3 during epithelial cell adhesion we used overexpression of full-length human Dsg3 cDNA, and RNAi-mediated knockdown of this molecule in various epithelial cell types. Overexpression of Dsg3 resulted in a reduced level of E-cadherin but a colocalisation with the E-cadherin-catenin complex of the adherens junctions. Concomitantly these transfected cells exhibited marked migratory capacity and the formation of filopodial protrusions. These latter events are consistent with Src activation and, indeed, Src-specific inhibition reversed these phenotypes. Moreover Dsg3 knockdown, which also reversed the decreased level of E-cadherin, partially blocked Src phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data are consistent with the possibility that Dsg3, as an up-stream regulator of Src activity, helps regulate adherens junction formation.

  3. parachute/n-cadherin is required for morphogenesis and maintained integrity of the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Zsolt; Folchert, Anja; Concha, Miguel; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Geisler, Robert; Rosa, Frédéric; Wilson, Steve W; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2002-07-01

    N-cadherin (Ncad) is a classical cadherin that is implicated in several aspects of vertebrate embryonic development, including somitogenesis, heart morphogenesis, neural tube formation and establishment of left-right asymmetry. However, genetic in vivo analyses of its role during neural development have been rather limited. We report the isolation and characterization of the zebrafish parachute (pac) mutations. By mapping and candidate gene analysis, we demonstrate that pac corresponds to a zebrafish n-cadherin (ncad) homolog. Three mutant alleles were sequenced and each is likely to encode a non-functional Ncad protein. All result in a similar neural tube phenotype that is most prominent in the midbrain, hindbrain and the posterior spinal cord. Neuroectodermal cell adhesion is altered, and convergent cell movements during neurulation are severely compromised. In addition, many neurons become progressively displaced along the dorsoventral and the anteroposterior axes. At the cellular level, loss of Ncad affects beta-catenin stabilization/localization and causes mispositioned and increased mitoses in the dorsal midbrain and hindbrain, a phenotype later correlated with enhanced apoptosis and the appearance of ectopic neurons in these areas. Our results thus highlight novel and crucial in vivo roles for Ncad in the control of cell convergence, maintenance of neuronal positioning and dorsal cell proliferation during vertebrate neural tube development.

  4. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  5. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  6. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  7. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  9. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  10. The expression of E-cadherin-catenin complex in patients with advanced gastric cancer: role in formation of metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Ustymowicz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The E-cadherin-catenin complex plays an important role in the process of cell adhesion. Its dysfunction is associated with a decrease in cell differentiation and with increased invasiveness and metastasis. Our aim was to evaluate the expression of E-cadherin and B-catenin in advanced gastric cancer in relation to selected clinico-pathomorphological parameters. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens were immunohistochemically stained with monoclonal antibodies E-cadherin (NCL-E-Cad, Novocastra Laboratiries Ltd; dilution 1:50, beta-catenin (NCL-B-CAT, Novocastra Laboratories Ltd; dilution 1:100, alpha-catenin (alpha-E-caten, Santa Cruz Biotechnology; dilution 1:300 and gamma-catenin (gamma-catenin, Santa Cruz Biotechnology; dilution 1:100. The expressions of E-cadherin and alpha-, beta-, gamma-catenins in the main mass of tumor and lymph node metastasis were investigated in 91 patients with gastric cancer. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the expressions of E-cadherin, alpha-, beta-catenins and histological differentiation and between the expressions of E-cadherin, alpha-, gamma-catenins and location or depth of invasion. Moreover, the expression of alpha-, gamma-catenins in the main mass of tumor was not associated with lymph node metastasis. However, we found a relationship between the expression of beta-catenin in the main mass of tumor and lymph node metastasis and tumor location. The depth of invasion was correlated with positive expression of beta-catenin in the main mass of gastric cancer. A statistically significant association was observed between the expressions of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in the main mass of tumor and lymph node involvement. The expression of alpha-catenin in the main mass of tumor was also associated with histological differentiation and Lauren's classification. Statistical analysis showed an association between the expression of E-cadherin and postoperative survival time. No

  11. Extracellular DNA affects NO content in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efremova, L V; Alekseeva, A Yu; Konkova, M S; Kostyuk, S V; Ershova, E S; Smirnova, T D; Konorova, I L; Veiko, N N

    2010-08-01

    Fragments of extracellular DNA are permanently released into the blood flow due to cell apoptosis and possible de novo DNA synthesis. To find out whether extracellular DNA can affect the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), one of key vascular tone regulators, we studied in vitro effects of three artificial DNA probes with different sequences and 10 samples of extracellular DNA (obtained from healthy people and patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis) on NO synthesis in endothelial cell culture (HUVEC). For detection of NO in live cells and culture medium, we used a NO-specific agent CuFL penetrating into the cells and forming a fluorescent product FL-NO upon interaction with NO. Human genome DNA fragments affected the content of NO in endothelial cells; this effect depended on both the base sequence and concentration of DNA fragments. Addition of artificial DNA and extracellular DNA from healthy people into the cell culture in a low concentration (5 ng/ml) increased the detected NO concentration by 4-fold at most. Cytosine-guanine (CG)-rich fragment of the transcribed sequence of ribosomal repeat was the most powerful NO-inductor. The effect of DNA fragments on NO synthesis was comparable with that of low doses of oxidizing agents, H(2)O(2) and 17β-estradiol. Extracellular DNA samples obtained from patients with hypertension and atherosclerosis decreased NO content in cells and medium by 1.3-28 times compared to the control; the effect correlated with the content of CG-rich sequences.

  12. Expression of mucins and E-cadherin in gastric carcinoma and their clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Kai Zhang; Qiu-Min Zhang; Tie-Hua Zhao; Yuan-Yuan Li; Yong-Fen Yi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of three types of mucin (MUC1, MUC2, MUCSAC) and E-cadherin in human gastric carcinomas and their clinical significance.METHODS: Ninety-four gastric cancer specimens were classified according to WHO criteria and detected by immunohistochemical assay of expression of mucins and E-cadherin.RESULTS: The positive expression rates of MUC1, MUC2,MUC5AC and E-cadherin were 82% (77/94), 84% (79/94),40% (38/94) and 56% (53/94) respectively. MUC1 expression was significantly correlated with the types of cancer (the positive rates of MUC1 in well and moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma,signet-ring cell carcinoma and mucinous carcinoma were 91%, 87%, 71%, 71%, respectively, P<0.05), age of patients (the positive rates of it among the people who are younger than 40 years, between 40-60 years and over 60 year were 74%, 81%, 89%, P<0.05), lymph nodes involvement (the positive rates in the non-interfered group and the interfered group were 78%, 85%, P<0.05) and tumor size (the positive rates in the tumors with the size less than 3 cm, 3-6 cm and larger than 6 cm were 69%, 92%, 69%, P<0.05); MUC2expression was significantly associated with types of cancers and had the strongest expression in mucinous carcinomas (the positive rates of MUC2 in well and moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma,signet-ring cell carcinoma and mucinous carcinoma were 94%, 70%, 81%, 100%, P<0.05), but it had no obvious relation to age, gender, tumor location, lymph nodes involvement,depth of invasion and metastasis to extra-gastric organs (P>0.05); MUC5AC expression was not related to any of the characteristics investigated except that it had relation to gender, whereas MUC5AC showed the tendency to higher expression in less invasive lesions and lower expression in advanced stage cancers (P>0.05); No significant difference was found for E-cadherin expression

  13. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  14. N-cadherin is essential for retinoic acid-mediated cardiomyogenic differentiation in mouse embryonic stem cells

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    R Bugorsky

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Contraction forces developed by cardiomyocytes are transmitted across the plasma membrane through end-to-end connections between the myocytes, called intercalated disks, which enable the coordinated contraction of heart muscle. A component of the intercalated disk, the adherens junction, consists of the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin. Embryos lacking N-cadherin die at mid-gestation from cardiovascular abnormalities. We have evaluated the role of Ncadherin in cardiomyogenesis using N-cadherin-null mouse embryonic stem (ES cells grown as embryoid bodies (EBs in vitro. Myofibrillogenesis, the spatial orientation of myofibers, and intercellular contacts including desmosomes were normal in N-cadherin-null ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes. The effect of retinoic acid (RA, a stage and dosedependent cardiogenic factor, was assessed in differentiating ES cells. all-trans (at RA increased the number of ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes by »3-fold (at 3×10-9 M in wt EBs. However, this effect was lost in N-cadherin-null EBs. In the presence of supplemented at-RA, the emergence of spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes appeared to be delayed and slightly less efficient in N-cadherin-null compared with wt and heterozygous EBs (frequencies of EBs with beating activity at 5 days: 54±18% vs. 96±0.5%, and 93±7%, respectively; peak frequencies of EBs with beating activity: 83±8% vs. 96±0.5% and 100%, respectively. In conclusion, cardiomyoyctes differentiating from N-cadherinnull ES cells in vitro show normal myofibrillogenesis and intercellular contacts, but impaired responses to early cardiogenic effects mediated by at-RA. These results suggest that N-cadherin may be essential for RA-induced cardiomyogenesis in mouse ES cells in vitro.

  15. Aberrant distributions and relationships among E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin 26 and 43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Baltaziak, Marek; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Lesniewicz, Tomasz; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria; Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Mariola

    2010-07-01

    During carcinogenesis, loss of intracellular cohesion is observed among cancer cells with altered expression of such adhesion molecules as E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and aberrant expression and cellular location of intercellular gap junction proteins-connexins. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunohistochemically the expression and relationship between E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in 86 endometrioid adenocarcinomas. The aberrant cytoplasmic translocation of the studied proteins was a predominant finding, whereas only a minority of cases showed normal, nuclear beta-catenin labeling or membranous distribution of the remaining molecules. E-cadherin was positively and significantly associated with beta-catenin (P=0.001, r=0.366), as was Cx26 with Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.719), E-cadherin with Cx26 (P<0.001, r=0.413), and E-cadherin and Cx43 (P<0.001, r=0.434) in all cancers. A subgroup of endometrioid adenocarcinomas (FIGO IB+II) exclusively showed a positive significant association between the expression of beta-catenin and Cx26 (P=0.038, r=0.339). In addition, there were significantly more beta-catenin-positive carcinomas among superficially spreading cancers (FIGO IA) than among deeper invading neoplasms (FIGO IB+II) (P=0.056). The altered location of the studied proteins indicates impairment of their physiological functions. In particular, normal membranous distribution of E-cadherin and connexins is lost and replaced by abnormal cytoplasmic accumulation in most cancers, and thus intercellular ties are expected to be weakened and loosened as a consequence. In contrast, the lack of relationship between beta-catenin and connexins, E-cadherin seems to be closely associated with the expression of Cx26 and Cx43 in endometrioid adenocarcinomas.

  16. Cell adhesion molecules P-cadherin and CD24 are markers for carcinoma and dysplasia in the biliary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, Marc-Oliver; Vogetseder, Alexander; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kristiansen, Glen; Jochum, Wolfram

    2010-11-01

    P-cadherin (CDH3) and CD24 are cell adhesion molecules that control morphogenic processes, cell motility, and invasive growth of tumor cells. The aim of our study was to investigate P-cadherin and CD24 expression in carcinomas and dysplastic lesions of the biliary tract and to evaluate the potential diagnostic usefulness of these cell adhesion molecules. Using immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays, we analyzed P-cadherin, CD24, and p53 expression in 117 carcinomas of the biliary tract (19 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 59 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 39 gallbladder carcinomas) and correlated our findings with clinicopathologic parameters. We found P-cadherin positivity in 37% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 73% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 64% of gallbladder carcinomas, respectively. CD24 reactivity was observed in 21% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 58% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 42% of gallbladder carcinomas. Nuclear p53 expression was found in 37% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, 46% of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, and 45% of gallbladder carcinomas. We also studied P-cadherin, CD24, and p53 expression in normal (n = 30), inflamed (n = 22), and dysplastic (n = 21) biliary epithelium of extrahepatic bile ducts. Dysplastic biliary epithelium was positive for P-cadherin in 91%, for CD24 in 71%, and for p53 in 24% of lesions, respectively. In contrast, normal and inflamed epithelia were negative for all 3 proteins. We conclude that P-cadherin and CD24 are expressed in carcinomas of the biliary tract with high frequency and at an early stage of carcinogenesis. Therefore, they may be useful markers for early detection and as targets for therapy of cholangiocarcinoma.

  17. Extracellular matrix assembly and organization during zebrafish gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Andrew; Jessen, Jason R

    2010-03-01

    Zebrafish gastrulation entails morphogenetic cell movements that shape the body plan and give rise to an embryo with defined anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral axes. Regulating these cell movements are diverse signaling pathways and proteins including Wnts, Src-family tyrosine kinases, cadherins, and matrix metalloproteinases. While our knowledge of how these proteins impact cell polarity and migration has advanced considerably in the last decade, almost no data exist regarding the organization of extracellular matrix (ECM) during zebrafish gastrulation. Here, we describe for the first time the assembly of a fibronectin (FN) and laminin containing ECM in the early zebrafish embryo. This matrix was first detected at early gastrulation (65% epiboly) in the form of punctae that localize to tissue boundaries separating germ layers from each other and the underlying yolk cell. Fibrillogenesis increased after mid-gastrulation (80% epiboly) coinciding with the period of planar cell polarity pathway-dependent convergence and extension cell movements. We demonstrate that FN fibrils present beneath deep mesodermal cells are aligned in the direction of membrane protrusion formation. Utilizing antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we further show that knockdown of FN expression causes a convergence and extension defect. Taken together, our data show that similar to amphibian embryos, the formation of ECM in the zebrafish gastrula is a dynamic process that occurs in parallel to at least a portion of the polarized cell behaviors shaping the embryonic body plan. These results provide a framework for uncovering the interrelationship between ECM structure and cellular processes regulating convergence and extension such as directed migration and mediolateral/radial intercalation. 2009 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Erami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments.

  19. Intravital FRAP Imaging using an E-cadherin-GFP Mouse Reveals Disease- and Drug-Dependent Dynamic Regulation of Cell-Cell Junctions in Live Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erami, Zahra; Herrmann, David; Warren, Sean C.; Nobis, Max; McGhee, Ewan J.; Lucas, Morghan C.; Leung, Wilfred; Reischmann, Nadine; Mrowinska, Agata; Schwarz, Juliane P.; Kadir, Shereen; Conway, James R.W.; Vennin, Claire; Karim, Saadia A.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Gallego-Ortega, David; Magenau, Astrid; Murphy, Kendelle J.; Ridgway, Rachel A.; Law, Andrew M.; Walters, Stacey N.; Grey, Shane T.; Croucher, David R.; Zhang, Lei; Herzog, Herbert; Hardeman, Edna C.; Gunning, Peter W.; Ormandy, Christopher J.; Evans, T.R. Jeffry; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Morton, Jennifer P.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Summary E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions play a prominent role in maintaining the epithelial architecture. The disruption or deregulation of these adhesions in cancer can lead to the collapse of tumor epithelia that precedes invasion and subsequent metastasis. Here we generated an E-cadherin-GFP mouse that enables intravital photobleaching and quantification of E-cadherin mobility in live tissue without affecting normal biology. We demonstrate the broad applications of this mouse by examining E-cadherin regulation in multiple tissues, including mammary, brain, liver, and kidney tissue, while specifically monitoring E-cadherin mobility during disease progression in the pancreas. We assess E-cadherin stability in native pancreatic tissue upon genetic manipulation involving Kras and p53 or in response to anti-invasive drug treatment and gain insights into the dynamic remodeling of E-cadherin during in situ cancer progression. FRAP in the E-cadherin-GFP mouse, therefore, promises to be a valuable tool to fundamentally expand our understanding of E-cadherin-mediated events in native microenvironments. PMID:26725115

  20. Resistance of Trichoplusia ni to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac is independent of alteration of the cadherin-like receptor for Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Tiewsiri, Kasorn; Kain, Wendy; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Alteration of binding sites for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins in insect midgut is the major mechanism of high-level resistance to Bt toxins in insects. The midgut cadherin is known to be a major binding protein for Bt Cry1A toxins and linkage of Bt-resistance to cadherin gene mutations has been identified in lepidopterans. The resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac evolved in greenhouse populations of Trichoplusia ni has been identified to be associated with the down-regulation of an aminopeptidase N (APN1) gene by a trans-regulatory mechanism and the resistance gene has been mapped to the locus of an ABC transporter (ABCC2) gene. However, whether cadherin is also involved with Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni requires to be understood. Here we report that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is independent of alteration of the cadherin. The T. ni cadherin cDNA was cloned and the cadherin sequence showed characteristic features known to cadherins from Lepidoptera. Various T. ni cadherin gene alleles were identified and genetic linkage analysis of the cadherin alleles with Cry1Ac-resistance showed no association of the cadherin gene with the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni. Analysis of cadherin transcripts showed no quantitative difference between the susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant T. ni larvae. Quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut BBMV proteins by iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS determined that there was no quantitative difference in cadherin content between the susceptible and the resistant larvae and the cadherin only accounted for 0.0014% (mol%) of the midgut BBMV proteins, which is 1/300 of APN1 in molar ratio. The cadherin from both the susceptible and resistant larvae showed as a 200-kDa Cry1Ac-binding protein by toxin overlay binding analysis, and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis of the 200-kDa cadherin determined that there is no quantitative difference between the susceptible and resistant larvae. Results from this study indicate that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is independent of cadherin

  1. Resistance of Trichoplusia ni to Bacillus thuringiensis toxin Cry1Ac is independent of alteration of the cadherin-like receptor for Cry toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    Full Text Available Alteration of binding sites for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxins in insect midgut is the major mechanism of high-level resistance to Bt toxins in insects. The midgut cadherin is known to be a major binding protein for Bt Cry1A toxins and linkage of Bt-resistance to cadherin gene mutations has been identified in lepidopterans. The resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac evolved in greenhouse populations of Trichoplusia ni has been identified to be associated with the down-regulation of an aminopeptidase N (APN1 gene by a trans-regulatory mechanism and the resistance gene has been mapped to the locus of an ABC transporter (ABCC2 gene. However, whether cadherin is also involved with Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni requires to be understood. Here we report that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is independent of alteration of the cadherin. The T. ni cadherin cDNA was cloned and the cadherin sequence showed characteristic features known to cadherins from Lepidoptera. Various T. ni cadherin gene alleles were identified and genetic linkage analysis of the cadherin alleles with Cry1Ac-resistance showed no association of the cadherin gene with the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni. Analysis of cadherin transcripts showed no quantitative difference between the susceptible and Cry1Ac-resistant T. ni larvae. Quantitative proteomic analysis of midgut BBMV proteins by iTRAQ-2D-LC-MS/MS determined that there was no quantitative difference in cadherin content between the susceptible and the resistant larvae and the cadherin only accounted for 0.0014% (mol% of the midgut BBMV proteins, which is 1/300 of APN1 in molar ratio. The cadherin from both the susceptible and resistant larvae showed as a 200-kDa Cry1Ac-binding protein by toxin overlay binding analysis, and nano-LC-MS/MS analysis of the 200-kDa cadherin determined that there is no quantitative difference between the susceptible and resistant larvae. Results from this study indicate that the Cry1Ac-resistance in T. ni is

  2. Expression of E-cadherin and N-cadherin in perinatal hamster ovary: possible involvement in primordial follicle formation and regulation by follicle-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Roy, Shyamal K

    2010-05-01

    We examined the expression and hormonal regulation of E-cadherin (CDH1) and N-cadherin (CDH2) with respect to primordial follicle formation. Hamster Cdh1 and Cdh2 cDNA and amino acid sequences were more than 90% similar to those of the mouse, rat, and human. Although CDH1 expression remained exclusively in the oocytes during neonatal ovary development, CDH2 expression shifted from the oocytes to granulosa cells of primordial follicles on postnatal day (P)8. Subsequently, strong CDH2 expression was restricted to granulosa cells of growing follicles. Cdh2 mRNA levels in the ovary decreased from embryonic d 13 through P10 with a transient increase on P7, which was the day before the appearance of primordial follicles. Cdh1 mRNA levels decreased from embryonic d 13 through P3 and then showed a transient increase on P8, coinciding with the formation of primordial follicles. CDH1 and CDH2 expression were consistent with that of mRNA. Neutralization of FSH in utero impaired primordial follicle formation with an associated decrease in Cdh2 mRNA and CDH2, but an increase in Cdh1 mRNA and CDH1 expression. The altered expression was reversed by equine chorionic gonadotropin treatment on P1. Whereas a CDH2 antibody significantly reduced the formation of primordial and primary follicles in vitro, a CDH1 antibody had the opposite effect. This is the first evidence to suggest that primordial follicle formation requires a differential spatiotemporal expression and action of CDH1 and CDH2. Further, FSH regulation of primordial follicle formation may involve the action of CDH1 and CDH2.

  3. Cadherin-mediated cell adhesion and cell motility in Drosophila trachea regulated by the transcription factor Escargot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka-Matakatsu, M; Uemura, T; Oda, H; Takeichi, M; Hayashi, S

    1996-12-01

    Coordination of cell motility and adhesion is essential for concerted movement of tissues during animal morphogenesis. The Drosophila tracheal network is formed by branching, migration and fusion of tubular ectodermal epithelia. Tracheal tip cells, located at the end of each branch that is going to fuse, extend filopodia to search for targets and later change their cell shape to a seamless ring to allow passage of lumen. The cell adhesion molecule DE-cadherin accumulates at the site of contact to form a ring that marks the site of lumen entry and is essential for the fusion. DE-cadherin expression in tip cells of a subset of branches is dependent on escargot, a zinc finger gene expressed in all tip cells. Such escargot mutant tip cells failed to adhere to each other and continued to search for alternative targets by extending long filopodia. We present evidence indicating escargot positively regulates transcription of the DE-cadherin gene, shotgun. Overexpression of DE-cadherin rescued the defect in one of the fusion points in escargot mutants, demonstrating an essential role of DE-cadherin in target recognition and identifying escargot as a key regulator of cell adhesion and motility in tracheal morphogenesis.

  4. The Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity Pathway Component Vangl2 Induces Synapse Formation through Direct Control of N-Cadherin

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    Tadahiro Nagaoka

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although regulators of the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP pathway are widely expressed in vertebrate nervous systems, their roles at synapses are unknown. Here, we show that Vangl2 is a postsynaptic factor crucial for synaptogenesis and that it coprecipitates with N-cadherin and PSD-95 from synapse-rich brain extracts. Vangl2 directly binds N-cadherin and enhances its internalization in a Rab5-dependent manner. This physical and functional interaction is suppressed by β-catenin, which binds the same intracellular region of N-cadherin as Vangl2. In hippocampal neurons expressing reduced Vangl2 levels, dendritic spine formation as well as synaptic marker clustering is significantly impaired. Furthermore, Prickle2, another postsynaptic PCP component, inhibits the N-cadherin-Vangl2 interaction and is required for normal spine formation. These results demonstrate direct control of classic cadherin by PCP factors; this control may play a central role in the precise formation and maturation of cell-cell adhesions at the synapse.

  5. 钙黏蛋白与三阴乳腺癌%Cadherins and triple-negative breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施学兵; 王潞

    2012-01-01

    Cadherins that mediate the adhesion of the same type of cells by specific binding to calciumdependent adhesions of the same type with cadherins mainly consist of three subtypes including E-cadberin,P-cadherin and N-cadherin.In recent years,more and more studies have indicated that cadherins are closely related to triple-negative breast cancer(TNBC)and play an important role in prognosis and treatment of TNBC.%钙黏蛋白与自身同型的钙依赖性黏附素特异性结合从而介导同型细胞间的黏附作用,主要包括上皮型、胎盘型及神经型3种亚型.近年来,国内外越来越多的研究报道表明钙黏蛋白与三阴乳腺癌(TNBC)密切相关,钙黏蛋白对TNBC的预后判断及治疗具有重要的意义.

  6. Status of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin gene promoter methylation in Moroccan patients with cervical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaleb, Mohammed; El hamadani, Wail; Khyatti, Meriem; Benbacer, Laila; Benchekroun, Nadia; Benider, Abdellatif; Amrani, Mariam; El Mzibri, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor gene promoters has been extensively investigated in cervical cancer. Transcriptional silencing, as a main consequence of hypermethylation of CpG islands, is the predominant mechanism of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin gene inactivation in malignant epithelial tumors. This study was conducted to evaluate the promoter methylation status of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin genes in 22 specimens of cervical carcinomas, four cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, Caski, C33A), and 20 human papillomavirus negative specimens, obtained from normal cervical swabs, using the methylation-specific PCR approach. Hypermethylation of the 5' CpG island of the p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin genes were found in 13 (59.1%) and 10 (45.5%) of 22 cervical cancer samples, respectively. Furthermore, our findings did not show any correlation between promoter methylation of p16(INK4a) and E-cadherin genes and clinicopathological parameters, including HPV infection, phenotypic distribution, and stage of the disease. However, hypermethylation of E-cadherin gene promoter appears to be age related in cervical cancer, whereas the frequency of aberrant methylation of p16(INK4a) gene promoter is unchanged according to the age of patients. Thus, caution must be made to use these markers in the diagnosis of cervical cancer. However, dietary or pharmaceutical agents that can inhibit these epigenetic events may prevent or delay the development of cervical cancer.

  7. Genetic variation of the E-cadherin gene is associated with primary infertility in patients with ovarian endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shan; Li, Yan; Li, Bin; Wang, Na; Zhou, Rong-Miao; Zhao, Xi-Wa

    2014-10-01

    To explore the association between the genetic variant of E-cadherin gene and endometriosis-related infertility. Case-control study. University hospital. Five hundred eighty-nine women with ovarian endometriosis including 127 patients with primary infertility and 589 female controls in northern China. None. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region, exons, and the 3' untranslated region of the E-cadherin gene were identified by direct sequencing in patients with ovarian endometriosis and with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Six candidate SNPs (rs16260, rs28372783, rs1801552, rs1801026, rs8049282, and rs13689) were genotyped by PCR and ligase detection reaction. The results revealed a significant association of rs8049282 SNP on E-cadherin gene with endometriosis-related infertility. When compared with control women or endometriosis patients who had a history of successful fertility, the CC genotype of rs8049282 may significantly increase the risk of primary infertility in patients with ovarian endometriosis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-5.00; OR = 2.54, 95% CI 1.45-4.44, respectively). Our results suggested that genetic variants on the E-cadherin gene may be involved in endometriosis-related infertility. The rs8049282 SNP of the E-cadherin gene may be a potential molecular marker for the development of primary infertility in northern Chinese women with ovarian endometriosis. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. E-cadherin gene-engineered feeder systems for supporting undifferentiated growth of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masanobu; Ito, Akira; Kiyohara, Takehiko; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2010-11-01

    Conventionally, embryonic stem (ES) cells are cultured on a cell layer of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as feeder cells to support undifferentiated growth of ES cells. In this study, cell-cell interactions between mouse ES and feeder cells were artificially engineered via an epithelial cell adhesion molecule, E-cadherin, whose expression is considerable in ES cells. Mouse mesenchymal STO and NIH3T3 cells that were genetically engineered to express E-cadherin were used in ES cell cultures as feeder cells. ES cells cultured on the E-cadherin-expressing feeder cells maintained the expression of stem cell markers, alkaline phosphatase (AP), Oct3/4, Nanog and Sox2, and the efficiency of AP-positive colony formation was comparable to MEFs, and much better than parental STO and NIH3T3 cells. Furthermore, ES cells maintained on the E-cadherin-expressing feeder cells possessed the ability to differentiate into the three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. The results indicated that E-cadherin expression in feeder cells could improve the performance of feeder cells, which may be further applicable to create new artificial feeder cell lines.

  9. FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xu; Wang, Jun; Gu, Jia; Zhang, Weijian; Hu, Jinxia; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-01-01

    Fyn-related kinase (FRK), a member of Src-related tyrosine kinases, is recently reported to function as a potent tumor suppressor in several cancer types. Our previous study has also shown that FRK over-expression inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. However, the mechanism of FRK effect on glioma cell migration and invasion, a feature of human malignant gliomas, is still not clear. In this study, we found that FRK over-expression increased the protein level of N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin. Meanwhile, FRK over-expression promoted β-catenin translocation to the plasma membrane, where it formed complex with N-cadherin, while decreased β-catenin level in the nuclear fraction. In addition, down-regulation of N-cadherin by siRNA promoted the migration and invasion of glioma U251 and U87 cells and abolished the inhibitory effect of FRK on glioma cell migration and invasion. In summary, these results indicate that FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

  10. Lactobacilli inhibit cervical cancer cell migration in vitro and reduce tumor burden in vivo through upregulation of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Wang, Hong; Du, Xingxing; Yu, Wenna; Jiang, Jingwen; Geng, Yanhong; Guo, Xiaobing; Fan, Xiuhua; Ma, Cuiqing

    2017-09-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the antitumor effects of Lactobacillus and the potential mechanisms. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assays were carried out to determine suitable doses for investigating the inhibitory effect of lactobacilli on cell migration ability of HeLa and U14 cells in vitro. In addition, western blot assays were performed to investigate the possible mechanisms corresponding to its antitumor effects. Furthermore, a xenograft mouse model was established for investigating the E-cadherin expression in tumor tissues after treatment with lactobacilli. Our results showed that live lactobacilli [multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 1,000:1] significantly possessed inhibitory effects on cell migration ability of cervical cancer cells. Lactobacilli (MOI: 1,000:1) significantly upregulated E-cadherin expressions in HeLa and U14 cells (p<0.05). On the contrary, our results showed that inactivated lactobacilli could not affect the E-cadherin expression levels in HeLa and U14 cells. Similar to the western blot assay, immunohistochemistry results also indicated that lactobacilli treatment significantly upregulated E-cadherin in tumor tissues (p<0.05). In conclusion, our results above suggest that lactobacilli have the potential for inhibiting the migratory ability of cervical cancer cell lines, and the possible pharmacological mechanism may be closely related to the upregulation of E-cadherin.

  11. Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin Regulates Cytoskeletal Tension, Cell Spreading, and Focal Adhesions by Stimulating RhoAD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Pirone, Dana M.; Tan, John L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion and integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion coordinate to affect the physical and mechanical rearrangements of the endothelium, although the mechanisms for such cross talk remain undefined. Herein, we describe the regulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension by intercellular VE-cadherin engagement, and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Increasing the density of endothelial cells to increase cell-cell contact decreased focal adhesions by decreasing cell spreading. This contact inhibition of cell spreading was blocked by disrupting VE-cadherin engagement with an adenovirus encoding dominant negative VE-cadherin. When changes in cell spreading were prevented by culturing cells on a micropatterned substrate, VE-cadherin–mediated cell-cell contact paradoxically increased focal adhesion formation. We show that VE-cadherin engagement mediates each of these effects by inducing both a transient and sustained activation of RhoA. Both the increase and decrease in cell-matrix adhesion were blocked by disrupting intracellular tension and signaling through the Rho-ROCK pathway. In all, these findings demonstrate that VE-cadherin signals through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton to cross talk with cell-matrix adhesion and thereby define a novel pathway by which cell-cell contact alters the global mechanical and functional state of cells. PMID:15075376

  12. Cell adhesion and sorting in embryoid bodies derived from N- or E-cadherin deficient murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Moore

    2014-01-01

    The primitive endoderm epithelial structure in mouse blastocysts forms following cell differentiation and subsequent sorting, and this two-step process can be reproduced in vitro using an embryoid body model. We found that in the chimeric embryoid bodies consisting of paired wildtype and E-cadherin null ES cells, the wildtype sorted to the center and were enveloped by the less adhesive E-cadherin null cells, in accord with Steinberg's hypothesis. However, wildtype and N-cadherin null ES cells intermixed and did not segregate, a situation that may be explained by Albert Harris' modified principle, which incorporates the unique properties of living cells. Furthermore, in chimeric embryoid bodies composed of N-cadherin and E-cadherin null ES cells, the two weakly interacting cell types segregated but did not envelop one another. Lastly, the most consistent and striking observation was that differentiated cells sorted to the surface and formed an enveloping layer, regardless of the relative cell adhesive affinity of any cell combination, supporting the hypothesis that the ability of the differentiated cells to establish apical polarity is the determining factor in surface sorting and positioning.

  13. No association exists between E-cadherin gene polymorphism and tumor recurrence in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Li; Shu-Sen Zheng; Li-Ming Wu; Hai-Yang Xie; Xiao Xu; Lin Zhou; Ting-Bo Liang; Wei-Lin Wang; Yan Shen; Min Zhang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: E-cadherin is an epithelial cell adhesion molecule, and decreased E-cadherin expression in liver cancer is associated with poor prognosis. A -160 C→A polymorphism in the promoter region of E-cadherin has been reported to decrease gene transcription. This allelic variation may be a potential genetic marker for identifying those individuals at higher risk for invasive/metastatic disease. METHODS: The effect of E-cadherin gene polymorphism on risk of tumor recurrence was studied in 93 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after liver transplantation, and determined whether this polymorphism is a biomarker for the risk of tumor recurrence. RESULTS: The genotype frequencies in the patients with recurrence were C/C: 0.667, C/A: 0.311, and A/A:0.022, and in the patients without recurrence C/C:0.604, C/A: 0.271 and A/A: 0.125. No signiifcant difference was found between the two groups (P=0.171). Between -160 C→A polymorphism and the clinicopathological data, there were no statistically signiifcant differences in the distribution of the parameters as to age, gender, portal vein tumor thrombi, preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level, tumor size, or histopathological grading (P>0.05). CONCLUSION:The results of this study show no association exists between the E-cadherin genotype and the risk of tumor recurrence in Chinese patients with HCC.

  14. Myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23, three Usher I gene products that cooperate to shape the sensory hair cell bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boëda, Batiste; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Bahloul, Amel; Goodyear, Richard; Daviet, Laurent; Blanchard, Stéphane; Perfettini, Isabelle; Fath, Karl R; Shorte, Spencer; Reiners, Jan; Houdusse, Anne; Legrain, Pierre; Wolfrum, Uwe; Richardson, Guy; Petit, Christine

    2002-12-16

    Deaf-blindness in three distinct genetic forms of Usher type I syndrome (USH1) is caused by defects in myosin VIIa, harmonin and cadherin 23. Despite being critical for hearing, the functions of these proteins in the inner ear remain elusive. Here we show that harmonin, a PDZ domain-containing protein, and cadherin 23 are both present in the growing stereocilia and that they bind to each other. Moreover, we demonstrate that harmonin b is an F-actin-bundling protein, which is thus likely to anchor cadherin 23 to the stereocilia microfilaments, thereby identifying a novel anchorage mode of the cadherins to the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, harmonin b interacts directly with myosin VIIa, and is absent from the disorganized hair bundles of myosin VIIa mutant mice, suggesting that myosin VIIa conveys harmonin b along the actin core of the developing stereocilia. We propose that the shaping of the hair bundle relies on a functional unit composed of myosin VIIa, harmonin b and cadherin 23 that is essential to ensure the cohesion of the stereocilia.

  15. α-Catenin localization and sarcomere self-organization on N-cadherin adhesive patterns are myocyte contractility driven.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anant Chopra

    Full Text Available The N-cadherin (N-cad complex plays a crucial role in cardiac cell structure and function. Cadherins are adhesion proteins linking adjacent cardiac cells and, like integrin adhesions, are sensitive to force transmission. Forces through these adhesions are capable of eliciting structural and functional changes in myocytes. Compared to integrins, the mechanisms of force transduction through cadherins are less explored. α-catenin is a major component of the cadherin-catenin complex, thought to provide a link to the cell actin cytoskeleton. Using N-cad micropatterned substrates in an adhesion constrainment model, the results from this study show that α-catenin localizes to regions of highest internal stress in myocytes. This localization suggests that α-catenin acts as an adaptor protein associated with the cadherin mechanosensory apparatus, which is distinct from mechanosensing through integrins. Myosin inhibition in cells bound by integrins to fibronectin-coated patterns disrupts myofibiril organization, whereas on N-cad coated patterns, myosin inhibition leads to better organized myofibrils. This result indicates that the two adhesion systems provide independent mechanisms for regulating myocyte structural organization.

  16. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component: relation of MMP-13, EGFR, and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal; Aziz, Azza Abdel

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, ordinary adenocarcinoma (OA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma (MA) regarding clinicopathological parameters, survival, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin. We studied tumor tissue specimens from 28 patients with adenocarcinoma with mucinous component, 47 with OA, and 56 with MA, who underwent radical surgery from January 2007 to January 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. High density manual tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemistry for EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin was done. Colorectal adenocarcinoma with mucinous component (AWMC) was significantly associated with more perineural invasion, lower EGFR, and MMP-13 expressions than OA, with no difference in E-cadherin expression. Conversely, only microscopic abscess formation was significantly more with colorectal AWMC than MC with no difference in EGFR, MMP-13 and E-cadherin expression between both groups. Colorectal AWMC showed a better survival than MA with no difference with OA. In a univariate analysis, EGFR, MMP-13, and E-cadherin expressions did not show a significant impact on disease-free or overall survival in patients with colorectal AWMC. Colorectal AWMC remains a vague entity that resembles OA in some clinicopathological and molecular respects as well as MA. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin correlate with metastasis and poor prognosis of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Ding; Zhongmin, Zhang; Guoqing, Liao; Sheng, Liu; Yi, Zhang; Jing, Wen; Liang, Zeng

    2013-06-01

    The first identified lysine-specific demethylase, LSD1, plays an important role in the metastatic progression of several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin expression in colon cancer specimens and their clinical significance. The expression of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship between the expression of the respective molecules and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. The positive expression rates of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens were 66.7 % (72/108), 85.2 % (92/108), and 41.7 % (45/108), respectively. LSD1 was significantly more highly expressed in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed that LSD1 expression was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (r s = -0.318, P = 0.001), but not evidently correlated with N-cadherin expression (r s = 0.182, P = 0.06). Colon cancer specimens with positive LSD1 expression and negative E-cadherin expression were correlated with significantly lower overall survival. LSD1 showed a significantly higher expression, in contrast to the significantly lower expression of E-cadherin, in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin may be predictors of a worse colon cancer prognosis.

  18. Aberrant promoter methylation and gene expression of H-cadherin gene is associated with tumor progression and recurrence in epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhagat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Loss of expression of cadherins by promoter hypermethylation has been described in many epithelial cancers, and it may play a role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Previously, we reported that E-cadherin gene is frequently methylated in epithelial ovarian cancer. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the promoter hypermethylation of H-cadherin gene in ovarian epithelial neoplasms to better understand the role of epigenetic silencing in carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods: We examined the promoter methylation of the H-cadherin gene in 134 epithelial ovarian carcinomas (EOC, 23 low malignant potential (LMP tumors, 26 benign cystadenomas and 15 normal ovarian tissues. Methylation was investigated by methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP and the results confirmed by bisulfite DNA sequencing. Relative gene expression of H-cadherin was done using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR on 51 EOC cases, 9 LMP tumors, 7 benign cystadenomas with 5 normal ovarian tissues. Results: Aberrant methylation of H-cadherin was present in 20 of 134 (15% carcinoma cases, 2 of 23 (09% LMP tumors and 1 of 26 (4% benign cystadenomas. No methylation was observed in any of the normal ovarian tissues. The mRNA expression level of H-cadherin was significantly down-regulated in EOC and LMP tumors than the corresponding normal tissues, whereas the expression level was normal in benign cystadenomas. A significant correlation of H-cadherin promoter methylation was observed with reduced gene expression in EOC. The prevalence of H-cadherin methylation was associated significantly with stage, histopathological grade, and menopausal status of the patient. H-cadherin methylation also had significant association with recurrence and differentiation of tumor. Conclusion: Our findings suggest an association between H-cadherin methylation, tumor progression and recurrence in EOC.

  19. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  20. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Erika C; Quevedo, Francisco C

    2006-01-01

    prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. METHODS: The aim of our study was to assess...... was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. CONCLUSION: Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast...

  1. Expression of p27Kip1 and E-cadherin in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Indonesian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E I, Auerkari; V, Joewono; D R, Handjari; A T, Sarwono; A W, Suhartono; K, Eto; M A, Ikeda

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit characteristic damage of DNA and its expression. The expression of the tumor suppressors E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) has been tested on 57 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) of Indonesian subjects. HNSCC tumor samples including both primary and (unrelated) nodal cases were obtained from the archives of Indonesian hospitals, in accordance with acknowledged ethical requirements. Only modest correlation was found between reduced expression of E-cadherin or p27(Kip1) with increased malignancy of primary and nodal growth. The observed strong correlation regardless of malignancy between the expressed levels of E-cadherin and p27(Kip1) suggests that also in combination these would not help to better predict the outcome of HNSCC.

  2. Alterations of C-MYC, NKX3.1, and E-cadherin expression in canine prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca-Alves, Carlos E; Rodrigues, Marcela M P; de Moura, Veridiana M B D;

    2013-01-01

    therapies. In humans, the PCa frequently exhibits mutations in the C-MYC and a reduced expression of the E-cadherin and NKX3.1 proteins. This study's objective was to evaluate the NKX3.1, C-MYC, and E-cadherin expression in the canine normal prostate, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), proliferative......The dog (canis lupus familiaris) is the only other species besides humans that develop spontaneous prostatic carcinomas (PCa) at a high frequency. The canine model is primarily utilized for the study of the PCa molecular mechanisms and provides a natural animal model for the study of potential...... inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and PCa and to verify differences in expression and subcellular localization of these proteins in the prostatic carcinogenesis. A tissue microarray (TMA) slide was constructed, and immunohistochemistry with antibodies raised against C-MYC, NKX3.1, E-cadherin and p63 was performed...

  3. Rickettsiae induce microvascular hyperpermeability via phosphorylation of VE-cadherins: evidence from atomic force microscopy and biochemical studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gong

    Full Text Available The most prominent pathophysiological effect of spotted fever group (SFG rickettsial infection of microvascular endothelial cells (ECs is an enhanced vascular permeability, promoting vasogenic cerebral edema and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema, which are responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality in severe cases. To date, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which SFG Rickettsia increase EC permeability are largely unknown. In the present study we used atomic force microscopy (AFM to study the interactive forces between vascular endothelial (VE-cadherin and human cerebral microvascular EC infected with R. montanensis, which is genetically similar to R. rickettsii and R. conorii, and displays a similar ability to invade cells, but is non-pathogenic and can be experimentally manipulated under Biosafety Level 2 (BSL2 conditions. We found that infected ECs show a significant decrease in VE-cadherin-EC interactions. In addition, we applied immunofluorescent staining, immunoprecipitation phosphorylation assay, and an in vitro endothelial permeability assay to study the biochemical mechanisms that may participate in the enhanced vascular permeability as an underlying pathologic alteration of SFG rickettsial infection. A major finding is that infection of R. montanensis significantly activated tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin beginning at 48 hr and reaching a peak at 72 hr p.i. In vitro permeability assay showed an enhanced microvascular permeability at 72 hr p.i. On the other hand, AFM experiments showed a dramatic reduction in VE-cadherin-EC interactive forces at 48 hr p.i. We conclude that upon infection by SFG rickettsiae, phosphorylation of VE-cadherin directly attenuates homophilic protein-protein interactions at the endothelial adherens junctions, and may lead to endothelial paracellular barrier dysfunction causing microvascular hyperpermeability. These new approaches should prove useful in characterizing the antigenically

  4. Expression of E-cadherin and involucrin in leukoplakia and oral cancer: an immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alessandra Dutra da; Maraschin, Bruna Jalfim; Laureano, Natalia Koerich; Daroit, Natália; Brochier, Fernanda; Bündrich, Leonardo; Visioli, Fernanda; Rados, Pantelis Varvaki

    2017-03-06

    To assess the immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical correlation of adhesion (E-cadherin) and cell differentiation (involucrin) molecules in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytological samples and biopsies were obtained from male and female patients aged over 30 years with oral leukoplakia (n = 30) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (n = 22). Cell scrapings and the biopsy were performed at the site of the lesion and histological slides were prepared for the immunocytochemical analysis of exfoliated oral mucosal cells and for the immunohistochemical analysis of biopsy tissues using E-cadherin and involucrin. Spearman's correlation and kappa coefficients were used to assess the correlation and level of agreement between the techniques. Immunostaining for E-cadherin and involucrin by both techniques was similar in the superficial layers of the histological sections compared with cell scrapings. However, there was no statistical correlation and agreement regarding the immunocytochemical and immunohistochemical expression of E-cadherin and involucrin in oral leukoplakia (R = 0.01, p = 0.958) (Kappa = 0.017, p = 0.92) or in oral squamous cell carcinoma (R = 0.26, p = 0.206) (Kappa = 0.36, p = 0.07). The immunoexpression of E-cadherin and involucrin in tissues is consistent with the expression patterns observed in exfoliated oral mucosal cells, despite the lack of a statistically significant correlation. There is an association of the histopathological characteristics of leukoplakia with the expression E-cadherin and of the microscopic aspects of oral squamous cell carcinoma with immunohistochemical expression of involucrin.

  5. Vascular endothelial-cadherin downregulation as a feature of endothelial transdifferentiation in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Orfanos, Stylianos E; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Maltabe, Violetta; Manitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Karras, Panagiotis; Kouklis, Panos; Armaganidis, Apostolos; Maniatis, Nikolaos A

    2016-08-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary hypertension (PH) is caused by vasoconstriction and obstruction of small pulmonary arteries by proliferating vascular cells. In analogy to cancer, subsets of proliferating cells may be derived from endothelial cells transitioning into a mesenchymal phenotype. To understand phenotypic shifts transpiring within endothelial cells in PH, we injected rats with alkaloid monocrotaline to induce PH and measured lung tissue levels of endothelial-specific protein and critical differentiation marker vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. VE-cadherin expression by immonoblotting declined significantly 24 h and 15 days postinjection to rebound to baseline at 30 days. There was a concomitant increase in transcriptional repressors Snail and Slug, along with a reduction in VE-cadherin mRNA. Mesenchymal markers α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin were upregulated by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting, and α-smooth muscle actin was colocalized with endothelial marker platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 by confocal microscopy. Apoptosis was limited in this model, especially in the 24-h time point. In addition, monocrotaline resulted in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and increased lung tissue nitrotyrosine staining. To understand the etiological relationship between nitrosative stress and VE-cadherin suppression, we incubated cultured rat lung endothelial cells with endothelin-1, a vasoconstrictor and pro-proliferative agent in pulmonary arterial hypertension. This resulted in activation of eNOS, NF-κB, and Akt, in addition to induction of Snail, downregulation of VE-cadherin, and synthesis of vimentin. These effects were blocked by eNOS inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. We propose that transcriptional repression of VE-cadherin by nitrosative stress is involved in endothelial-mesenchymal transdifferentiation in experimental PH.

  6. Unique expression pattern of the EMT markers Snail, Twist and E-cadherin in benign and malignant parathyroid neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendrich, Volker; Waldmann, Jens; Feldmann, Georg; Schlosser, Katja; König, Alexander; Ramaswamy, Annette; Bartsch, Detlef K; Karakas, Elias

    2009-04-01

    Epithelial and mesenchymal transitions (EMT) are essential for embryonic development and progression of non-invasive tumor cells into malignant, metastatic carcinomas. During embryogenesis, the parathyroid glands develop from pharyngeal pouches and migrate to their final destinations, densely enclosed by mesenchymal neural crest cells. In this study, we examined the expression of the EMT markers Snail, Twist and E-cadherin in normal parathyroid glands and benign and malignant parathyroid diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared expression of E-cadherin, Snail and Twist in 25 patients with parathyroid adenoma, 25 patients with parathyroid hyperplasia, and nine patients with parathyroid cancer with normal parathyroid glands. Normal parathyroid glands, parathyroid adenomas, and parathyroid hyperplasias showed a typical membranous E-cadherin staining pattern. Expression of Snail was found in 22/25 parathyroid adenomas and in all parathyroid hyperplasias. Twist was expressed in 22/25 of parathyroid adenomas and in 20/25 parathyroid hyperplasias. Snail and Twist positive cells were homogeneously distributed throughout the gland. However, in all nine parathyroid carcinomas, membranous E-cadherin staining was lost. In addition, the expression pattern of Snail and Twist was changed and mostly limited to the invasive front of cancer tissue samples. Expression of Snail and Twist at the invasive front and consecutive loss of E-cadherin in parathyroid carcinomas suggests a key role of EMT in the tumorigenesis of this cancer. The unique expression pattern could help to distinguish between an adenoma and a non-metastatic carcinoma. Loss of E-cadherin and change of the expression pattern of Snail and Twist together should result in an en bloc resection or a close follow-up.

  7. Assessment of staging, prognosis and mortality of colorectal cancer by tumor markers: receptor erbB-2 and cadherins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eliane C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the prognostic significance and correlation with staging and degree of cell differentiation of the tumoral expression of the proteins c-erbB-2 and E-cadherin, in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: The study included 117 patients with an average age of 63.1 years and an average follow-up duration of 28.1 months. The disease-free interval, survival, incidence of recurrence and specific mortality were evaluated. c-erbB-2 anti-oncoprotein antibodies (Dako were utilized via the streptavidin-biotin technique. Samples were considered to be positive for c-erbB-2 if 10% or more of the tumor cell membranes were stained.The anti-E-cadherin antibodies (Dako, evaluated this protein and is considered positive, if 50% or more of the cell membranes were stained. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, Kaplan-Meier's estimator, the log-rank test and Wilcoxon's test (Breslow version, setting the level of statistical significance at 5% (p<0.05. RESULTS: 52 of 108 patients studied for c-erbB-2 were positive (48,1%, 47 of 93 patients studied for E-cadherin were negative (50,5%. These data do not express any correlation with TNM (tumor, node and metastasis staging and the degree of cell differentiation or with the tumor recurrence rate. The disease-free interval among patients who were positive for c-erbB-2 and negative for E-cadherin was 68.0 months and did not differ from those with c-erbB-2 negative and E-cadherin positive ( 55.0 months - p = 0.5510. The average survival among patients positive for c-erbB-2 and negative for E-cadherin was 75 months without statistical significance difference with the other group ( 61 months - p = 0.5256. Specific mortality occurred in 20.0% of the cases and did not correlate with the expression of c-erbB-2 (p=0,446, E-cadherin (p=0,883. CONCLUSION: The tumoral expression of c-erbB-2 and E-cadherin did not demonstrate a correlation with the

  8. Functional Assessment of αEβ7/E-cadherin Interactions in the Steady State Postnatal Thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Prockop

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available T cell differentiation in the thymus depends on sequential interactions between lymphoid progenitors and stromal cells in discrete regions of the cortex. Here, we show that despite αEβ7 expression by a subset of the earliest intrathymic precursors (and E-cadherin expression by thymic stroma, interaction of these elements is not required for proper localization of early progenitors into the cortex, or for successful steady state differentiation. These findings indicate that despite in vitro data demonstrating αEβ7 mediated adhesion and proliferation of intrathymic T cell precursor populations, T lymphocyte development can proceed independently of αEβ7/E-cadherin interactions.

  9. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  10. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  11. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  12. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  13. Multi-scale modelling of cancer cell intravasation: the role of cadherins in metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis-Conde, Ignacio; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2009-03-01

    Transendothelial migration is a crucial process of the metastatic cascade in which a malignant cell attaches itself to the endothelial layer forming the inner wall of a blood or lymph vessel and creates a gap through which it enters into the bloodstream (or lymphatic system) and then is transported to distant parts of the body. In this process both biological pathways involving cell adhesion molecules such as VE-cadherin and N-cadherin, and the biophysical properties of the cells play an important role. In this paper, we present one of the first mathematical models considering the problem of cancer cell intravasation. We use an individual force-based multi-scale approach which accounts for intra- and inter-cellular protein pathways and for the physical properties of the cells, and a modelling framework which accounts for the biological shape of the vessel. Using our model, we study the influence of different protein pathways in the achievement of transendothelial migration and give quantitative simulation results comparable with real experiments.

  14. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  15. Different roles of cadherins in the assembly and structural integrity of the desmosome complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowndes, M; Rakshit, S; Shafraz, O; Borghi, N; Harmon, R M; Green, K J; Sivasankar, S; Nelson, W J

    2014-05-15

    Adhesion between cells is established by the formation of specialized intercellular junctional complexes, such as desmosomes. Desmosomes comprise two members of the cadherin superfamily of cell adhesion proteins, desmocollin (Dsc) and desmoglein (Dsg), but their combinatorial roles in desmosome assembly is not understood. To uncouple desmosome assembly from other cell-cell adhesion complexes, we used micro-patterned substrates of Dsc2aFc and/or Dsg2Fc and collagen IV; we show that Dsc2aFc, but not Dsg2Fc, was necessary and sufficient to recruit desmosome-specific desmoplakin into desmosome puncta and produce strong adhesive binding. Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy showed that monomeric Dsc2a, but not Dsg2, formed Ca2+-dependent homophilic bonds, and that Dsg2 formed Ca2+-independent heterophilic bonds with Dsc2a. A W2A mutation in Dsc2a inhibited Ca2+-dependent homophilic binding, similar to classical cadherins, and Dsc2aW2A, but not Dsg2W2A, was excluded from desmosomes in MDCK cells. These results indicate that Dsc2a, not Dsg2, is required for desmosome assembly via homophilic Ca2+- and W2/strand swap-dependent binding, and that Dsg2 may be involved later in regulating a switch to Ca2+-independent adhesion in mature desmosomes.

  16. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Nishikawa-Torikai, Satomi; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  17. N-cadherin is required for the polarized cell behaviors that drive neurulation in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Elim; Brewster, Rachel

    2006-10-01

    Through the direct analysis of cell behaviors, we address the mechanisms underlying anterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish and the role of the cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin (N-cad) in this process. We demonstrate that although the mode of neurulation differs at the morphological level between amphibians and teleosts, the underlying cellular mechanisms are conserved. Contrary to previous reports, the zebrafish neural plate is a multi-layered structure, composed of deep and superficial cells that converge medially while undergoing radial intercalation, to form a single cell-layered neural tube. Time-lapse recording of individual cell behaviors reveals that cells are polarized along the mediolateral axis and exhibit protrusive activity. In N-cad mutants, both convergence and intercalation are blocked. Moreover, although N-cad-depleted cells are not defective in their ability to form protrusions, they are unable to maintain them stably. Taken together, these studies uncover key cellular mechanisms underlying neural tube morphogenesis in teleosts, and reveal a role for cadherins in promoting the polarized cell behaviors that underlie cellular rearrangements and shape the vertebrate embryo.

  18. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  19. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  20. Effects of Extracellular Calcium and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 on Sebaceous Gland Cells In vitro and In vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouboulis, Christos C; Seltmann, Holger; Abdel-Naser, M Badawy; Hossini, Amir M; Menon, Gopinathan K; Kubba, Raj

    2017-03-10

    Calcium and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) are promoters of epithelial cell functions; however their effects on sebaceous glands are unknown. In this study, morphology, ultrastructure, cell numbers, lipid synthesis and apoptosis of SZ95 sebocytes were assessed in vitro under different concentrations of extracellular calcium with or without 1,25(OH)2D3. Moreover, serum calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 levels were assessed in acne and non-acne patients (controls). Under conditions of low extracellular calcium, lipogenesis and cell detachment were observed. Increasing extracellular calcium enhanced sebocyte numbers, induced epithelial morphology and reduced lipogenesis. Moreover, a reduction in extracellular calcium reduced E-cadherin and enhanced caspase 3/7 activity (apoptosis), whereas calcium chelation by EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) resulted in enhanced lipogenesis. 1,25(OH)2D3 decreased sebaceous lipogenesis, but also induced signs of autophagy. In the clinical study, patients and controls exhibited normal serum calcium levels. Younger acne patients presented lower 1,25(OH)2D3 levels than did older ones. In conclusion, extracellular calcium and 1,25(OH)2D3 regulate sebocyte morphology, increase cell numbers, decrease sebaceous lipogenesis and induce cell autophagy in vitro. The increased ionized calcium and the reduced 1,25(OH)2D3 levels detected in the serum of younger patients with acne may contribute respectively to increased sebaceous gland volume and enhanced lipogenesis.

  1. Induction of E-cadherin+ human amniotic fluid cell differentiation into oocyte-like cells via culture in medium supplemented with follicular fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Te; Huang, Yongyi; Bu, Yanzhen; Zhao, Yanhui; Zou, Gang; Liu, Zhixue

    2014-07-01

    Pluripotent human amniotic fluid cells (HuAFCs) can differentiate into various types of somatic cell in vitro. However, their differentiation into oocyte-like cells has never been described to the best of our knowledge. In the present study, differentiation of E-cadherin+ and E-cadherin- HuAFC sub-populations into oocyte-like cells was induced via culture in medium containing bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. The E-cadherin+ HuAFCs expressed DAZL highly. Post-induction, cells with an oocyte-like phenotype were found among the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, expressing markers specific to germ cells and oocytes (VASA, ZP3 and GDF9) and meiosis (DMC1 and SCP3). When specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress E-cadherin in the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs, the levels of DAZL expression were reduced. Post-induction, the morphology of the siRNA‑E‑cadherin HuAFCs was poorer and the expression levels of germ cell-specific markers were lower compared with those of the siRNA-mock HuAFCs. Therefore, E-cadherin+ HuAFCs could be more easily induced to differentiate into oocyte-like cells by bovine follicular fluid and β-mercaptoethanol. In addition, the E-cadherin+ HuAFCs exhibited potential characteristics of DAZL protein expression, and thus it was conjectured that bovine follicular fluid acts on DAZL protein and promotes E-cadherin+ HuAFC differentiation into oocyte-like cells.

  2. Prognostic implications of epithelial to mesenchymal transition related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and hypoxia inducible factor 1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouhashem, Nehal S; Ibrahim, Doaa Abdelaziz; Mohamed, Abdel Motaleb

    2016-06-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important step in the invasion and metastasis of cancer. E-cadherin downregulation, which is essentially controlled by EMT-mediated proteins such as Snail, is a main molecular feature of this process. Tumor hypoxia is one of the essential biological phenomena that are associated with the development and progression of various solid tumors. Recently, hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway were identified to have an essential role in the regulation of EMT phenotype. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic impact of EMT-related proteins (E-cadherin, Snail) and HIF-1α in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC) among Egyptian women. Immunohistochemical evaluation of E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α expression was performed using 50 cases of EEC. The relationship between protein expression and clinicopathological features was investigated. The frequency of immunopositivity for E-cadherin, Snail, and HIF-1α in our cases of EEC was 82%, 28%, and 66%, respectively. Reduced E-cadherin and increased nuclear expression of Snail as well as HIF-1α were significantly associated with histopathologic grade, clinical stage myometrial invasion, and lymph node involvement. Statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between HIF-1α overexpression and Snail upregulation (τ= +0.252, P= .025); however, E-cadherin expression level was inversely correlated with enhanced Snail expression (τ= -0.450, PSnail immunoreactivity and positively related to E-cadherin expression. E-cadherin and Snail have a predictive value in EEC. In conclusion, the current study reveals that both Snail and HIF-1α expressions are significantly associated with poor prognosis in EEC; however, E-cadherin expression is considered a marker of good prognosis. E-cadherin and Snail expression has a predictive value in EEC management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relation of glypican-3 and E-cadherin expressions to clinicopathological features and prognosis of mucinous and non-mucinous colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Abd Al-Rahman Mohammad; Mohammad, Mie Ali; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; El-Hawary, Amira Kamal

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a member of the membrane-bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans. E-cadherin is an adhesive receptor that is believed to act as a tumor suppressor gene. Many studies had investigated E-cadherin expressions in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) while only one study had investigated GPC3 expression in CRC. This study aims to investigate expression of GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal mucinous carcinoma (MA) and non-mucinous adenocarcinoma (NMA) using manual tissue microarray technique. Tumor tissue specimens are collected from 75 cases of MC and 75 cases of NMA who underwent radical surgery from Jan 2007 to Jan 2012 at the Gastroenterology Centre, Mansoura University, Egypt. Their clinicopathological parameters and survival data were revised and analyzed using established statistical methodologies. High-density manual tissue microarrays were constructed using modified mechanical pencil tip technique and immunohistochemistry for GPC3 and E-cadherin was done. NMA showed higher expression of GPC3 than MA with no statistically significant relation. NMA showed a significantly higher E-cadherin expression than MA. GPC3 and E-cadherin positivity rates were significantly interrelated in NMA, but not in MA, group. In NMA group, there was no significant relation between either GPC3 or E-cadherin expression and the clinicopathological features. In a univariate analysis, neither GPC3 nor E-cadherin expression showed a significant impact on disease-free survival (DFS) or overall survival (OS). GPC3 and E-cadherin expressions are not independent prognostic factors in CRC. However, expressions of both are significantly interrelated in NMA patients, suggesting an excellent interplay between both, in contrast to MA. Further molecular studies are needed to further explore the relationship between GCP3 and E-cadherin in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection Is Associated with E-Cadherin Promoter Methylation, Downregulation of E-Cadherin Expression, and Increased Expression of Fibronectin and α-SMA—Implications for Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Rajić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct can induce scarring disease of the ocular mucosa, known as trachoma, the most common infectious cause of blindness worldwide. We hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT contributes to the fibrotic process in trachomatous scarring. Infection of human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCjE with Ct activated signaling pathways involved in EMT induction, which was correlated with decreased expression of E-cadherin, guardian of the epithelial phenotype. In addition, Ct infection was associated with increased expression of two mesenchymal cell markers: fibronectin and α-SMA. The DNA methylation statuses of selected regions of E-cadherin, fibronectin, and α-SMA genes revealed that Ct infection was accompanied with changes in DNA methylation of the E-cadherin promoter, while the expression of the two mesenchymal markers was not related with this epigenetic event. Our data suggest that Ct infection of conjunctival epithelial cells induces EMT-like changes that go along with modification of the methylation profile of the E-cadherin promoter and could, as one of the earliest events, contribute to processes triggering conjunctival scarring.

  5. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  6. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  7. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  8. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  9. A NOVEL CADHERIN-LIKE GENE FROM WESTERN CORN ROOTWORM, DIABROTICA VIRGIFERA VIRGIFERA (COLEOPTERA: CHRYSOMELIDAE), LARVAL MIDGUT TISSUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cadherin-like gene and its mRNA were cloned from western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Coleoptera), an economically important agricultural pest in North America and Europe. The full length cDNA (5371 bp in length) encodes an open reading frame for a 1688 amino ...

  10. JNK signaling regulates E-cadherin junctions in germline cysts and determines primordial follicle formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wanbao; Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhengpin; Xin, Qiliang; Wang, Yijing; Feng, Lizhao; Zhao, Lihua; Wen, Jia; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chao; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-05-15

    Physiologically, the size of the primordial follicle pool determines the reproductive lifespan of female mammals, while its establishment largely depends on a process of germline cyst breakdown during the perinatal period. The mechanisms regulating this process are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is crucial for germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation. JNK was specifically localized in oocytes and its activity increased as germline cyst breakdown progressed. Importantly, disruption of JNK signaling with a specific inhibitor (SP600125) or knockdown technology (Lenti-JNK-shRNAs) resulted in significantly suppressed cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation in cultured mouse ovaries. Our results show that E-cadherin is intensely expressed in germline cysts, and that its decline is necessary for oocyte release from the cyst. However, inhibition of JNK signaling leads to aberrantly enhanced localization of E-cadherin at oocyte-oocyte contact sites. WNT4 expression is upregulated after SP600125 treatment. Additionally, similar to the effect of SP600125 treatment, WNT4 overexpression delays cyst breakdown and is accompanied by abnormal E-cadherin expression patterns. In conclusion, our results suggest that JNK signaling, which is inversely correlated with WNT4, plays an important role in perinatal germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation by regulating E-cadherin junctions between oocytes in mouse ovaries. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. N-Cadherin in Prostate Cancer: Downstream Pathways and Their Translational Application for Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    inhibition of downstream signaling pathways especially NF-κB and the PI3K/AKT pathways may serve as complementary therapies to N-cadherin targeting...N-cadherin–positive cells from LAPC9-CR tumors are also more tum- origenic than N-cadherin–negative cells (E.K. and R.E.R., unpublished data). A

  12. Role Of Adhesion Molecules Vcam-1 And Ve-Cadherin In Endothelium Dysfunction Development At Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Baygildina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the changes in concentration of both sVCAM-1 and VE-cadherin in blood serum of patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. 87 patients aged 15-65 were examined. Concentrations of both sVCAM-1 and VE- cadherin in blood serum by means of "Bender MedSystems" (Austria ELISA test were determined. It was shown that in both medium severe and severe forms of HFRS statistically the significant rise of sVCAM-1 concentration in blood with high indices in oliguric period took place. Complicated form was characterized by high indices of sVCAM-1 level in fever period, extremely decreasing in concentration in oliguric period and tendency to normalizing in clinical convalescence period. VE-cadherin level in blood was predominantly lower than control in all the observed groups with the exception of fever period in group with medium severe disease form. Negative correlation of normal intensity between adhesion molecules levels in blood was revealed. In conclusion it is necessary to point out that high VCAM-1 expression by endotheliocytes evidences the development of an adhesion form of endothelial dysfunction, low VE-cadherin production in a base for development of angiogenic form of endothelial dysfunction and changes in expression of these adhesion molecules that have adaptive metabolic response to macroorganism of HFRS pathogenic action

  13. Aberrant Methylation of the E-Cadherin Gene Promoter Region in the Endometrium of Women With Uterine Fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Ran, Ran; Guan, Yingxia; Zhu, Xiaoxiong; Kang, Shan

    2016-08-01

    A uterine fibroid is a leiomyoma that originates from the smooth muscle layer of the uterus. A variety of endometrial abnormalities are associated with uterine fibroids. This study aims to investigate the methylation status of the E-cadherin gene (CDH1) promoter region in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids. The methylation of CDH1 was studied using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction in the endometrial tissue of 102 patients with uterine fibroids and 50 control patients. The E-cadherin expression was examined by flow cytometry. The methylation rate of CDH1 promoter region was 33.3% in the endometrium of patients with uterine fibroids and 8% in the endometrium of women without fibroids. The frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation in the endometrium of patients with fibroids was significantly higher than that in the endometrium of women without fibroids (P = .001). Furthermore, the E-cadherin expression level in methylation-positive tissues was significantly lower than that in methylation-negative tissues (P = .017). These results suggest that epigenetic aberration of CDH1 may occur in the endometrium of patients with fibroids, which may be associated with E-cadherin protein expression in endometrial tissue.

  14. Differential protection of Cry1Fa toxin against Spodoptera frugiperda larval gut proteases by cadherin orthologs correlates with increased synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Khalidur; Abdullah, Mohd Amir F; Ambati, Suresh; Taylor, Milton D; Adang, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    The Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are the most widely used biopesticides effective against a range of crop pests and disease vectors. Like chemical pesticides, development of resistance is the primary threat to the long-term efficacy of Bt toxins. Recently discovered cadherin-based Bt Cry synergists showed the potential to augment resistance management by improving efficacy of Cry toxins. However, the mode of action of Bt Cry synergists is thus far unclear. Here we elucidate the mechanism of cadherin-based Cry toxin synergism utilizing two cadherin peptides, Spodoptera frugiperda Cad (SfCad) and Manduca sexta Cad (MsCad), which differentially enhance Cry1Fa toxicity to Spodoptera frugiperda neonates. We show that differential SfCad- and MsCad-mediated protection of Cry1Fa toxin in the Spodoptera frugiperda midgut correlates with differential Cry1Fa toxicity enhancement. Both peptides exhibited high affinity for Cry1Fa toxin and an increased rate of Cry1Fa-induced pore formation in S. frugiperda. However, only SfCad bound the S. frugiperda brush border membrane vesicle and more effectively prolonged the stability of Cry1Fa toxin in the gut, explaining higher Cry1Fa enhancement by this peptide. This study shows that cadherin fragments may enhance B. thuringiensis toxicity by at least two different mechanisms or a combination thereof: (i) protection of Cry toxin from protease degradation in the insect midgut and (ii) enhancement of pore-forming ability of Cry toxin.

  15. An instructive role for C. elegans E-cadherin in translating cell contact cues into cortical polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompstra, Diana; Anderson, Dorian C; Yeh, Justin Y; Zilberman, Yuliya; Nance, Jeremy

    2015-06-01

    Cell contacts provide spatial cues that polarize early embryos and epithelial cells. The homophilic adhesion protein E-cadherin is required for contact-induced polarity in many cells. However, it is debated whether E-cadherin functions instructively as a spatial cue, or permissively by ensuring adequate adhesion so that cells can sense other contact signals. In Caenorhabditis elegans, contacts polarize early embryonic cells by recruiting the RhoGAP PAC-1 to the adjacent cortex, inducing PAR protein asymmetry. Here we show that the E-cadherin HMR-1, which is dispensable for adhesion, functions together with the α-catenin HMP-1, the p120 catenin JAC-1, and the previously uncharacterized linker PICC-1 (human CCDC85A-C) to bind PAC-1 and recruit it to contacts. Mislocalizing the HMR-1 intracellular domain to contact-free surfaces draws PAC-1 to these sites and depolarizes cells, demonstrating an instructive role for HMR-1 in polarization. Our findings identify an E-cadherin-mediated pathway that translates cell contacts into cortical polarity by directly recruiting a symmetry-breaking factor to the adjacent cortex.

  16. Functional dissection of the Clostridium botulinum type B hemagglutinin complex: identification of the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yo Sugawara

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT inhibits neurotransmitter release in motor nerve endings, causing botulism, a condition often resulting from ingestion of the toxin or toxin-producing bacteria. BoNTs are always produced as large protein complexes by associating with a non-toxic protein, non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and some toxin complexes contain another non-toxic protein, hemagglutinin (HA, in addition to NTNH. These accessory proteins are known to increase the oral toxicity of the toxin dramatically. NTNH has a protective role against the harsh conditions in the digestive tract, while HA is considered to facilitate intestinal absorption of the toxin by intestinal binding and disruption of the epithelial barrier. Two specific activities of HA, carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding, appear to be involved in these processes; however, the exact roles of these activities in the pathogenesis of botulism remain unclear. The toxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A through G. In this study, we identified the amino acid residues critical for carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding in serotype B HA. We constructed mutants defective in each of these two activities and examined the relationship of these activities using an in vitro intestinal cell culture model. Our results show that the carbohydrate and E-cadherin binding activities are functionally and structurally independent. Carbohydrate binding potentiates the epithelial barrier-disrupting activity by enhancing cell surface binding, while E-cadherin binding is essential for the barrier disruption.

  17. Differential expression of the epithelial mesenchymal transition factors Snail, Slug, Twist, TGF-β, and E-cadherin in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Kagami; Wato, Masahiro; Iseki, Tomio; Tanaka, Akio; Morita, Shosuke

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), the transition of epithelial cells into motile mesenchymal cells, plays an important role in embryogenesis, cancer invasion, and metastasis. Ameloblastomas are common epithelial odontogenic tumors, occurring exclusively in the mandible with locally invasive growth. Thirty-seven ameloblastoma cases were evaluated for the involvement of EMT by immunohistochemical staining and western blotting using antibodies against Slug, Snail, Twist, TGF-β, and E-cadherin. Double immunostaining was also performed. Slug and TGF-β were expressed in the nuclei of peripheral and stellate reticulum cells of ameloblastoma nests. Twenty cases of Snail, 36 of Slug, 8 of Twist, and 19 of TGF-β showed strong expression in tumor cells in follicular and plexiform patterns. Expression of Slug and TGF-β increased in regions where the expression of E-cadherin was reduced. EMT was found to be associated with the local invasive growth of ameloblastoma. These data suggest that reduced expression of E-cadherin and over-expression of Slug, Snail, and TGF-β induce EMT. Given that ameloblastomas are characterized by local invasiveness, EMT might be related to their development. Thus, strong expression of Slug and TGF-β and reduced expression of E-cadherin might be related to the local invasiveness of ameloblastoma.

  18. Cell division orientation is coupled to cell-cell adhesion by the E-cadherin/LGN complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gloerich, Martijn; Bianchini, Julie M.; Siemers, Kathleen A.; Cohen, Daniel J.; Nelson, W. James

    2017-01-01

    Both cell-cell adhesion and oriented cell division play prominent roles in establishing tissue architecture, but it is unclear how they might be coordinated. Here, we demonstrate that the cell-cell adhesion protein E-cadherin functions as an instructive cue for cell division orientation. This is

  19. New insights into the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion by free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doro, Fabio; Saladino, Giorgio; Belvisi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    simulations, we reconstruct its conformational free energy landscape, obtaining the free energy profile connecting the inactive and active form. Our simulations predict that the E-cadherin monomer populates the open and closed forms almost equally, which is in agreement with the proposed "selected fit...

  20. An Elmo-Dock complex locally controls Rho GTPases and actin remodeling during cadherin-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P; Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2014-12-08

    Cell-cell contact formation is a dynamic process requiring the coordination of cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and integrin-based cell migration. A genome-wide RNA interference screen for proteins required specifically for cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion identified an Elmo-Dock complex. This was unexpected as Elmo-Dock complexes act downstream of integrin signaling as Rac guanine-nucleotide exchange factors. In this paper, we show that Elmo2 recruits Dock1 to initial cell-cell contacts in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. At cell-cell contacts, both Elmo2 and Dock1 are essential for the rapid recruitment and spreading of E-cadherin, actin reorganization, localized Rac and Rho GTPase activities, and the development of strong cell-cell adhesion. Upon completion of cell-cell adhesion, Elmo2 and Dock1 no longer localize to cell-cell contacts and are not required subsequently for the maintenance of cell-cell adhesion. These studies show that Elmo-Dock complexes are involved in both integrin- and cadherin-based adhesions, which may help to coordinate the transition of cells from migration to strong cell-cell adhesion. © 2014 Toret et al.

  1. Analysis of Snail-1, E-Cadherin and Claudin-1 Expression in Colorectal Adenomas and Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Belej

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the expression of Snail-1, E-cadherin and claudin-1 by indirect immunohistochemistry in colonic neoplasia. Snail-1 is a zinc finger transcription factor expressed in cells that already have undergone almost complete epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and have already evaded from the tumor. The main mechanism by which Snail induces EMT is downregulation of E-cadherin, of which expression was shown to be frequently downregulated in many different types of tumors, where it accompanies the invasiveness and metastatic behavior of malignant cells. Moreover, Snail-1 may downregulate the expression of claudin-1, a cell-cell adhesion protein which plays a likely role in progression and dissemination during tumorigenesis. Snail-1 was expressed in both carcinoma and adenoma cells with histologically normal epithelium in the mucosa, adjacent to the tumors, without significant differences, and predominant strong intensity of staining. Statistically significant differences were revealed between normal and tumorous epithelium (p = 0.003 at the subcellular level, where the shift of the protein to the cytoplasm with combined cytoplasmic/nuclear or pure cytoplasmic expression was observed. E-cadherin expression was present in 100% of cases of both adenocarcinomas and adenomas, with prevailing strong membranous immunoreactivity and no differences between protein expression in tumors and normal mucosa. Predominating strong positivity of claudin-1 was detected in tumor cells of adenocarcinomas and adenomas. Marked differences were seen in protein localization, where membranous staining, typical for nontumorous epithelium, changed to combined membranous/cytoplasmic expression in adenocarcinomas (p = 0.0001 and adenomas (0.0002, in which cytoplasmic shift was associated with a higher degree of dysplasia. Furthermore, membranous/cytoplasmic localization was more frequent in the carcinoma group (87% in comparison with adenomas (51% (p = 0.0001. We conclude

  2. Inverse correlation between CD8(+) inflammatory cells and E-cadherin expression in gallbladder cancer: Tissue microarray and imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Keita; Masuda, Masanori; Aishima, Shinichi

    2017-01-16

    To investigated the association between the tumor cells' expression of E-cadherin and the numbers of several types of inflammatory cells infiltrating into the invasive portion of gallbladder cancer (GBC). We analyzed 50 GBC cases for which a sufficient amount of tumor tissues for tissue microarray (TMA) had been saved. Three tissue cores (3.0 mm) of invasive lesion from each case were used for the TMA. The 4-μm cut sections on slides were immunostained using primary antibodies including E-cadherin for cancer cells, leukocyte common antigen for leukocyte, myeloperoxidase for neutrophils, CD3 for T cells, CD4 for helper T cells, CD8 for killer T cells, CD20 for B cells and CD68 for macrophages. The immunostained slides were digitally analyzed by imaging analysis software. A significant inverse correlation between the number of infiltrating CD8(+) cells at invasive areas and the expression of E-cadherin by cancer cells was observed (P = 0.0001), although the degree of this correlation was relatively weak (R = 0.32). The number of CD8(+) cells and the cancer cells' E-cadherin expression were also significantly correlated with tumor differentiation (well-differentiated vs poorly differentiated) (P = 0.0467 and P = 0.0294, respectively). Inverse correlation of T-stage and the number of CD8(+) cell infiltration was observed with statistical significance in comparison of T2 and T3 cases (P = 0.0324). Our findings indicate an inverse correlation of CD8(+) T cell infiltration and cancer cells' E-cadherin expression at invasive areas of GBC. Further analyses are essential to test these findings.

  3. Distinct interactions with cellular E-cadherin of the two virulent metalloproteinases encoded by a Bacteroides fragilis pathogenicity island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, Albert G; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Strongin, Alex Y

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis causes the majority of Gram-negative anaerobic infections in the humans. The presence of a short, 6-kb, pathogenicity island in the genome is linked to enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF). The role of the enterotoxin in B. fragilis virulence, however, remains to be determined, as the majority of clinical isolates lack ETBF genes and healthy individuals carry enterotoxin-positive B. fragilis. The island encodes secretory metalloproteinase II (MPII) and one of three homologous enterotoxigenic fragilysin isoenzymes (FRA; also termed B. fragilis toxin or BFT). The secretory metalloproteinases expressed from the genes on the B. fragilis pathogenicity island may have pathological importance within the gut, not linked to diarrhea. MPII and FRA are counter-transcribed in the bacterial genome, implying that regardless of their structural similarity and overlapping cleavage preferences these proteases perform distinct and highly specialized functions in the course of B. fragilis infection. The earlier data by us and others have demonstrated that FRA cleaves cellular E-cadherin, an important adherens junction protein, and weakens cell-to-cell contacts. Using E-cadherin-positive and E-cadherin-deficient cancer cells, and the immunostaining, direct cell binding and pull-down approaches, we, however, demonstrated that MPII via its catalytic domain efficiently binds, rather than cleaves, E-cadherin. According to our results, E-cadherin is an adherens junction cellular receptor, rather than a proteolytic target, of the B. fragilis secretory MPII enzyme. As a result of the combined FRA and MPII proteolysis, cell-to-cell contacts and adherens junctions are likely to weaken further.

  4. Distinct interactions with cellular E-cadherin of the two virulent metalloproteinases encoded by a Bacteroides fragilis pathogenicity island.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert G Remacle

    Full Text Available Bacteroides fragilis causes the majority of Gram-negative anaerobic infections in the humans. The presence of a short, 6-kb, pathogenicity island in the genome is linked to enterotoxigenic B. fragilis (ETBF. The role of the enterotoxin in B. fragilis virulence, however, remains to be determined, as the majority of clinical isolates lack ETBF genes and healthy individuals carry enterotoxin-positive B. fragilis. The island encodes secretory metalloproteinase II (MPII and one of three homologous enterotoxigenic fragilysin isoenzymes (FRA; also termed B. fragilis toxin or BFT. The secretory metalloproteinases expressed from the genes on the B. fragilis pathogenicity island may have pathological importance within the gut, not linked to diarrhea. MPII and FRA are counter-transcribed in the bacterial genome, implying that regardless of their structural similarity and overlapping cleavage preferences these proteases perform distinct and highly specialized functions in the course of B. fragilis infection. The earlier data by us and others have demonstrated that FRA cleaves cellular E-cadherin, an important adherens junction protein, and weakens cell-to-cell contacts. Using E-cadherin-positive and E-cadherin-deficient cancer cells, and the immunostaining, direct cell binding and pull-down approaches, we, however, demonstrated that MPII via its catalytic domain efficiently binds, rather than cleaves, E-cadherin. According to our results, E-cadherin is an adherens junction cellular receptor, rather than a proteolytic target, of the B. fragilis secretory MPII enzyme. As a result of the combined FRA and MPII proteolysis, cell-to-cell contacts and adherens junctions are likely to weaken further.

  5. Presence and distribution of E-cadherin in the 4-cell golden hamster embryo. Effect of maternal age and parity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo, A; Ambriz, D; Navarro-Maldonado, M C; Mercado, E; Rosado, A

    2008-08-01

    Maternal age dependency of gestation time in hamster and in other mammals is a well demonstrated fact. We have recently shown that adult nulliparous and multiparous hamster females show significant asynchrony and retard on early embryo development (from two blastomeres to morula stages) when compared with nulliparous young females. The number of cell-cell adhesions between blastomeres in early embryo development has been reported to be a good indication of the ability of embryos to cleave and develop. In this work we studied, by indirect immunofluorescence, the presence and distribution of E-cadherin in 4-cell embryos obtained from nulliparous young (NYF), nulliparous adult (NAF) and multiparous adult (MAF) hamster females. Distribution and intensity of fluorescence was observed and registered using confocal microscopy. Staining intensities for E-cadherin were quantified by computed densitometry in the free membrane regions, in the cytoplasm region and in the cell-cell adhesion zones of each embryo. E-Cadherin in all the studied zones was significantly higher (p<0.01) in NYF. Cadherin concentration in the intercellular membranes was always statistically higher (p<0.05) than in the free membrane regions. An appreciable concentration of E-cadherin was found in the cytoplasm of the 4-cell embryos obtained from the three groups of females, but was significantly higher in NYF. No statistical differences were observed in any of the parameters studied between NAF and MAF. Our results seem to indicate that changes in the reproductive behavior related to age and/or multiparity may be correlated with changes in the processes related to intercellular adhesions during early cleavage.

  6. Down-regulated E-cadherin expression is associated with poor five-year overall survival in bone and soft tissue sarcoma: results of a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    Full Text Available To conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of E-cadherin expression in bone and soft tissue sarcomas.The PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases were searched using terms related to E-cadherin, sarcoma, and prognosis for all articles published in English before March 2014. Pooled effect was calculated from the available data to evaluate the association between negative E-cadherin expression and 5-year overall survival and tumor clinicopathological features in sarcoma patients. Pooled odds ratios (OR and risk ratios (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using a fixed-effects model.Eight studies met the selection criteria and reported on 812 subjects. A total of 496 subjects showed positive E-cadherin expression (59.9%. Negative E-cadherin expression in bone and soft tissue sarcomas was correlated with lower 5-year overall survival (OR = 3.831; 95% CI: 2.246-6.534, and was associated with higher clinical stage (RR = 1.446; 95% CI: 1.030-2.028 and with male sex (RR = 0.678; 95% CI: 0.493-0.933.In the E-cadherin negative group, 5-year overall survival was significantly worse than in the E-cadherin positive group. However, further studies are required to confirm these results.

  7. Removal of sialic acid from the surface of human MCF-7 mammary cancer cells abolishes E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion in an aggregation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deman, J J; Van Larebeke, N A; Bruyneel, E A; Bracke, M E; Vermeulen, S J; Vennekens, K M; Mareel, M M

    1995-09-01

    MCF-7 human breast cancer cells express E-cadherin and show, at least in some circumstances, E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion (Bracke et al., 1993). The MCF-7/AZ variant spontaneously displays E-cadherin-dependent fast aggregation; in the MCF-7/6 variant, E-cadherin appeared not to be spontaneously functional in the conditions of the fast aggregation assay, but function could be induced by incubation of the suspended cells in the presence of insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) (Bracke et al., 1993). E-cadherin from MCF-7 cells was shown to contain sialic acid. Treatment with neuraminidase was shown to remove this sialic acid, as well as most of the sialic acid present at the cell surface. Applied to MCF-7/AZ, and MCF-7/6 cells, pretreatment with neuraminidase abolished spontaneous as well as IGF-I induced, E-cadherin-dependent fast cell-cell adhesion of cells in suspension, as measured in the fast aggregation assay. Treatment with neuraminidase did not, however, inhibit the possibly different, but equally E-cadherin-mediated, process of cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 cells on a flat plastic substrate as assessed by determining the percentage of cells remaining isolated (without contact with other cells) 24 h after plating.

  8. Clinico-pathological correlation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front of Indian oral squamous cell carcinomas: An immunohistochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehendiratta, Monica; Solomon, Monica Charlotte; Boaz, Karen; Guddattu, Vasudeva; Mohindra, Aashima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have indicated that although malignant cells at the invasive tumor front, bare morphological resemblance to the cells at central portion of the tumor, their molecular character differs significantly. E-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule that connects epithelial cells. This study attempts to correlate the E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front with tumor differentiation along with its clinico-pathological parameters. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining with E-cadherin was carried out on archival cases of primary oral squamous cell carcinomas (n = 30). The E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front was analyzed and was linked to clinico-pathological parameters including patient prognosis. Results: The downregulation of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor edge when compared with patient's prognosis yielded a significant correlation (P = 0.041) but its correlation with the degree of differentiation determined was not significant (P = 0.27). Also, its association with tumor size and lymph node status was negative. Conclusions: Loss of E-cadherin expression at the invasive tumor front is an important event in the progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Tumors with a loss of expression of E-cadherin are those which had a poor prognosis PMID:25328302

  9. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  10. Histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat reverses epithelial to mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells by reversing the repression of E-cadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Preeti; Gau, Yael; Sabnis, Gauri

    2014-01-01

    Loss of ERα in breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis, increased recurrence rates, and higher incidence of metastasis. Epigenetic silencing of E-cadherin (loss of which is associated with more invasive phenotype) is observed in metastatic cell lines and invasive breast cancers. Here, we are showing that entinostat (ENT) can reverse epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is considered to be a first step in the process of metastases formation. Triple-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T show a basal phenotype characterized by loss of E-cadherin expression and higher expression of mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin and vimentin along with transcriptional repressors such as twist and snail. When MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells or tumors were treated with ENT, E-cadherin transcription was increased along with reduction in N-cadherin mRNA expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that treatment of MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cells increased the activation of E-cadherin promoter by reducing the association of twist and snail with the E-cadherin (CDH1) promoter and downregulated both the snail and twist. ENT also inhibited cell migration in vitro. In addition, phosphorylation of vimentin was increased, as well as remodeling of vimentin filaments. ENT treatment also reduced formation of tubulin-based microtentacles, which help floating cells attach to other surfaces. These findings suggest that ENT can reverse EMT and may reduce the formation of metastasis.

  11. O-mannosylation and N-glycosylation: two coordinated mechanisms regulating the tumour suppressor functions of E-cadherin in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Sandra; Oliveira, Tiago; Bartels, Markus F; Miyoshi, Eiji; Pierce, Michael; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Carneiro, Fátima; Seruca, Raquel; Reis, Celso A; Strahl, Sabine; Pinho, Salomé S

    2016-10-04

    Dysregulation of tumor suppressor protein E-cadherin is an early molecular event in cancer. O-mannosylation profile of E-cadherin is a newly-described post-translational modification crucial for its adhesive functions in homeostasis. However, the role of O-mannosyl glycans in E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion in cancer and their interplay with N-glycans remains largely unknown. We herein demonstrated that human gastric carcinomas exhibiting a non-functional E-cadherin display a reduced expression of O-mannosyl glycans concomitantly with increased modification with branched complex N-glycans. Accordingly, overexpression of MGAT5-mediated branched N-glycans both in gastric cancer cells and transgenic mice models led to a significant decrease of O-mannosyl glycans attached to E-cadherin that was associated with impairment of its tumour suppressive functions. Importantly, overexpression of protein O-mannosyltransferase 2 (POMT2) induced a reduced expression of branched N-glycans which led to a protective effect of E-cadherin biological functions. Overall, our results reveal a newly identified mechanism of (dys)regulation of E-cadherin that occur through the interplay between O-mannosylation and N-glycosylation pathway.

  12. TAL-1/SCL and its partners E47 and LMO2 up-regulate VE-cadherin expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuze, Virginie; Chalhoub, Elias; El-Hajj, Rawan; Dohet, Christiane; Le Clech, Mikaël; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Huber, Philippe; Mathieu, Danièle

    2007-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix TAL-1/SCL essential for hematopoietic development is also required during vascular development for embryonic angiogenesis. We reported that TAL-1 acts positively on postnatal angiogenesis by stimulating endothelial morphogenesis. Here, we investigated the functional consequences of TAL-1 silencing in human primary endothelial cells. We found that TAL-1 knockdown caused the inhibition of in vitro tubulomorphogenesis, which was associated with a dramatic reduction in vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) at intercellular junctions. Consistently, silencing of TAL-1 as well as of its cofactors E47 and LMO2 down-regulated VE-cadherin at both the mRNA and the protein level. Endogenous VE-cadherin transcription could be activated in nonendothelial HEK-293 cells by the sole concomitant ectopic expression of TAL-1, E47, and LMO2. Transient transfections in human primary endothelial cells derived from umbilical vein (HUVECs) demonstrated that VE-cadherin promoter activity was dependent on the integrity of a specialized E-box associated with a GATA motif and was maximal with the coexpression of the different components of the TAL-1 complex. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that TAL-1 and its cofactors occupied the VE-cadherin promoter in HUVECs. Together, these data identify VE-cadherin as a bona fide target gene of the TAL-1 complex in the endothelial lineage, providing a first clue to TAL-1 function in angiogenesis.

  13. The Drosophila Cadherin Fat regulates tissue size and planar cell polarity through different domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Zhao

    Full Text Available The Drosophila Cadherin Fat (Ft has been identified as a crucial regulator of tissue size and Planar Cell Polarity (PCP. However, the precise mechanism by which Ft regulates these processes remains unclear. In order to advance our understanding of the action of Ft, we have sought to identify the crucial Ft effector domains. Here we report that a small region of the Ft cytoplasmic domain (H2 region is both necessary and sufficient, when membrane localized, to support viability and prevent tissue overgrowth. Interestingly, the H2 region is dispensable for regulating PCP signaling, whereas the mutant Ft lacking the H2 region is fully capable of directing PCP. This result suggests that Ft's roles in PCP signaling and tissue size control are separable, and each can be carried out independently. Surprisingly, the crucial regions of Ft identified in our structure-function study do not overlap with the previously reported interaction regions with Atrophin, Dco, or Lowfat.

  14. Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity under the control of Frizzled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, T; Shima, Y; Shimada, Y; Hirano, S; Burgess, R W; Schwarz, T L; Takeichi, M; Uemura, T

    1999-09-03

    We identified a seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily, designated Flamingo (Fmi), localized at cell-cell boundaries in the Drosophila wing. In the absence of Fmi, planar polarity was distorted. Before morphological polarization of wing cells along the proximal-distal (P-D) axis, Fmi was redistributed predominantly to proximal and distal cell edges. This biased localization of Fmi appears to be driven by an imbalance of the activity of Frizzled (Fz) across the proximal/distal cell boundary. These results, together with phenotypes caused by ectopic expression of fz and fmi, suggest that cells acquire the P-D polarity by way of the Fz-dependent boundary localization of Fmi.

  15. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Extract on E-cadherin Expression in Cultured Airway Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xi; WU Renling; CHEN Fang; HAO Tianling

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether the change of E-cadherin (ECD) expression plays a role in the injury and repair of airway epithelial cells (AEC) caused by smoking, porcine AECs were cultured by using an enzyme-dispersed method. After exposure of the AECs to cigarette smoke extract(CSE), the ECD expression in the cells was detected by using immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization. The results showed that ECD was distributed on the plasma membrane at the cell junctions of AECs. After exposure to 20% CSE, the membranous ECD expression was decreased, the cytoplasmic ECD expression was increased (P<0.01) as the exposure time went on.But the content of ECD mRNA in the AECs did not chang. It suggests that the change of ECD expression is regulated at the posttranslational level and plays a role in the injury and repair of AEC caused by smoking.

  16. HYPERMETHYLATION STATUS OF E-CADHERIN AND p16INK4a IN GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jian-fang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the methylation status of CpG island in E-cadherin(CDH1), P16INK4a(P16)promoter region ,and to analyze their role in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs). Methods: A total of 56 surgically resected GISTs were obtained from January 2003 to December 2005. The routine H&E-stained sections and CD117, CD34-immunoreactions were reviewed to verify the morphologic diagnosis. Methylation status of the CDH1, P16INK4a promoter region was analyzed by methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) from chemically modified DNA after Na-bisulfite treatment. Results: The frequency of CDH1gene methylation was 32% (18 of 56) in GISTs. The rate was 9% (1 of 11), 21% (4 of 19), 41.6% (5 of 12), and 57% (8 of 14) for very low risk, low risk, intermediate risk, and high risk GISTs; P16INK4a methylation was found in 19 of 56(34%) cases. The rate was 0% (0 of 11), 16% (3 of 19), 50% (6 of 12), and 71% (10 of 14) for very low risk, low risk, intermediate risk, and high risk GISTs. Statistical analysis indicated that of the 56 cases, there was significant association of CDH1 and/or P16INK4a methylation status with tumor malignant behavior (methylation rate 23/56, 41%, P<0.01) and site (P<0.05). Conclusion: E-cadherin (CDH1) and/or P16INK4a promoter hypermethylation is strongly associated with risk grade, may be a useful biomarker for GISTs risk assessment, and may shed light on new therapeutic options to treat GISTs

  17. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  18. Slit-2 facilitates interaction of P-cadherin with Robo-3 and inhibits cell migration in an oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Karin; Dowejko, Albert; Bosserhoff, A-K; Reichert, T E; Bauer, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Slits are a group of secreted glycoproteins that act as molecular guidance cues in cellular migration. Recently, several studies demonstrated that Slit-2 can operate as candidate tumour suppressor protein in various tissues. In this study, we show Slit-2 expression in basal cell layers of normal oral mucosa colocalized with P-cadherin expression. In contrast, there is a loss of Slit-2 and P-cadherin expression in mucosa of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our in vitro investigations reveal a correlation of P-cadherin and Slit-2 expression: OSCC cells with induced P-cadherin expression (PCI52_PC) display an increased Slit-2 expression. However, abrogating P-cadherin function with a function-blocking antibody decreases Slit-2 secretion confirming a direct link between P-cadherin and Slit-2. Moreover, experiments with OSCC cells show that Slit-2 interferes with a Wnt related signalling pathway, which in turn affects Slit-2 expression in a feedback loop. Functionally, transwell migration assays demonstrate a Slit-2 dose-dependent decrease of PCI52_PC cell migration. However, there is no influence on migration in mock control cells. Responsible for this migration block might be an interaction of P-cadherin with Roundabout (Robo)-3, a high affinity receptor of Slit-2. Indeed, proximity ligation assays exhibit P-cadherin/Robo-3 interactions on PCI52_PC cells. Additionally, we detect a modulation of this interaction by addition of recombinant Slit-2. Down-regulation of Robo-3 expression via small interfering RNA neutralizes Slit-2 induced migration block in PCI52_PC cells. In summary, our experiments show antitumorigenic effects of Slit-2 on P-cadherin expressing OSCC cells supposedly via modulation of Robo-3 interaction.

  19. Hepatitis C virus depends on E-cadherin as an entry factor and regulates its expression in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qisheng; Sodroski, Catherine; Lowey, Brianna; Schweitzer, Cameron J; Cha, Helen; Zhang, Fang; Liang, T Jake

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters the host cell through interactions with a cascade of cellular factors. Although significant progress has been made in understanding HCV entry, the precise mechanisms by which HCV exploits the receptor complex and host machinery to enter the cell remain unclear. This intricate process of viral entry likely depends on additional yet-to-be-defined cellular molecules. Recently, by applying integrative functional genomics approaches, we identified and interrogated distinct sets of host dependencies in the complete HCV life cycle. Viral entry assays using HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps) of various genotypes uncovered multiple previously unappreciated host factors, including E-cadherin, that mediate HCV entry. E-cadherin silencing significantly inhibited HCV infection in Huh7.5.1 cells, HepG2/miR122/CD81 cells, and primary human hepatocytes at a postbinding entry step. Knockdown of E-cadherin, however, had no effect on HCV RNA replication or internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. In addition, an E-cadherin monoclonal antibody effectively blocked HCV entry and infection in hepatocytes. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that E-cadherin is closely associated with claudin-1 (CLDN1) and occludin (OCLN) on the cell membrane. Depletion of E-cadherin drastically diminished the cell-surface distribution of these two tight junction proteins in various hepatic cell lines, indicating that E-cadherin plays an important regulatory role in CLDN1/OCLN localization on the cell surface. Furthermore, loss of E-cadherin expression in hepatocytes is associated with HCV-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), providing an important link between HCV infection and liver cancer. Our data indicate that a dynamic interplay among E-cadherin, tight junctions, and EMT exists and mediates an important function in HCV entry.

  20. N-cadherin{sup +} HSCs in fetal liver exhibit higher long-term bone marrow reconstitution activity than N-cadherin{sup -} HSCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Hirofumi; Arai, Fumio; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Ikushima, Yoshiko Matsumoto [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Suda, Toshio, E-mail: sudato@z3.keio.jp [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory of Developmental Biology, School of Medicine, Keio University, 35 Shinano-machi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High N-cad expression was detected in E12.5 mouse FL LT-HSCs (EPCR{sup +} LSK cells). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immunohistochemically, N-cad{sup +} HSCs co-localized with sinusoidal ECs (Lyve-1{sup +} cells) in E12.5 FL, but these gradually detached in E15.5 and E18.5 FL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-cad{sup +} LSK cells in E12.5 FL exhibited higher LTR activity versus N-cad{sup -} LSK cells, which decreased in E15.5 and E18.5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-cad expression may confer high LTR activity to HSCs by facilitating interactions with the perisinusoidal niche in FL. -- Abstract: Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a microenvironment known as the stem cell niche. The regulation of HSCs in fetal liver (FL) and their niche, however, remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of N-cadherin (N-cad) in the maintenance of HSCs during FL hematopoiesis. By using anti-N-cad antibodies (Abs) produced by our laboratory, we detected high N-cad expression in embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) mouse FL HSCs, but not in E15.5 and E18.5 FL. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that N-cad{sup +}c-Kit{sup +} and N-cad{sup +} endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR){sup +} HSCs co-localized with Lyve-1{sup +} sinusoidal endothelial cells (ECs) in E12.5 FL and that some of these cells also expressed N-cad. However, N-cad{sup +} HSCs were also observed to detach from the perisinusoidal niche at E15.5 and E18.5, concomitant with a down-regulation of N-cad and an up-regulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) in hepatic cells. Moreover, EPCR{sup +} long-term (LT)-HSCs were enriched in the N-cad{sup +}Lin{sup -}Sca-1{sup +}c-Kit{sup +} (LSK) fraction in E12.5 FL, but not in E15.5 or E18.5 FL. In a long-term reconstitution (LTR) activity assay, higher engraftment associated with N-cad{sup +} LSK cells versus N-cad{sup -} LSK cells in E12.5 FL when transplanted into lethally irradiated recipient mice. However, the

  1. Structure of an Extracellular Polysaccharide from a Strain of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾笑梅; 马桂荣; 吴厚铭

    2003-01-01

    A new extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-I) isolated and purified from Z222, a strain of Lactic acid bacteria has been investigated. Sugar composition analysis, methylation analysis and 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy reveal that the EPS-I is composed of a pentasaccharide repeating unit. The sequence of sugar residue was determined by using two-dlmensional NMR spectroscopy, including heteronudear multiple-bond correlation(HMBC) and nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY).

  2. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  3. Distribution of E-cadherin and ß-catenin in relation to cell maturation and cell extrusion in rat and mouse small intestines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2006-01-01

    -cadherin. Thus, all extruded cells as well as all cells in the process of extrusion lacked staining for ß-catenin. Moreover, almost 80% of all cells undergoing programmed cell death, as detected by the TUNEL reaction, lacked ß-catenin whereas over 70% of such cells were positive for E-cadherin. However, most...... ells lacking ß-catenin did not display signs of PCD as detected by the TUNEL method or by staining for active caspase-3. Therefore, these results suggest that loss of ß-catenin precedes the onset of programmed cell death, loss of E-cadherin and extrusion from the villi....

  4. Impact of p120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A on epithelial mesenchymal transition of lung cancer cells expressing E-cadherin in different subcellular locations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Zhang

    Full Text Available The epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT is an important process in tumor development. Despite previous investigations, it remains unclear how p120-catenin (p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A affect the EMT of tumor cells. Here we investigated expression of p120ctn, E-cadherin and vimentin in 78 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC samples by immunohistochemistry and found that p120ctn membrane expression positively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001 and negatively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05. Meanwhile, p120ctn cytoplasmic expression negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (P<0.001 and positively correlated with vimentin expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05. Cells expressing high (H460 and SPC and low (H1299 and LK2 levels of p120ctn were screen to investigate its impact on EMT. E-cadherin was restricted to the cell membrane in H460 and H1299 cells, whereas it was expressed in the cytoplasm of SPC and LK2 cells. Ablation of endogenous p120ctn isoform 1A in cells expressing high levels of the protein resulted in decreased E-cadherin expression, increased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and enhanced invasiveness in H460 cells. Meanwhile, completely opposite results were observed in SPC cells. Furthermore, transfection of in H1299 cells expressing low p120ctn levels with the p120ctn isoform 1A plasmid resulted in increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness, while LK2 cells showed completely opposite results. Both cell lines expressing low p120ctn levels and transfected with the p120ctn isoform 3A plasmid appeared to have increased E-cadherin expression, decreased N-cadherin, vimentin and snail expression and weakened invasiveness. In conclusion, in cells with membrane E-cadherin, both p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A inhibited EMT and decreased cell invasiveness. In cells with cytoplasmic E-cadherin, p120ctn

  5. Mechanical model for a collagen fibril pair in extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yue; Cox, Grant M; Haverkamp, Richard G; Hill, James M

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we model the mechanics of a collagen pair in the connective tissue extracellular matrix that exists in abundance throughout animals, including the human body. This connective tissue comprises repeated units of two main structures, namely collagens as well as axial, parallel and regular anionic glycosaminoglycan between collagens. The collagen fibril can be modeled by Hooke's law whereas anionic glycosaminoglycan behaves more like a rubber-band rod and as such can be better modeled by the worm-like chain model. While both computer simulations and continuum mechanics models have been investigated for the behavior of this connective tissue typically, authors either assume a simple form of the molecular potential energy or entirely ignore the microscopic structure of the connective tissue. Here, we apply basic physical methodologies and simple applied mathematical modeling techniques to describe the collagen pair quantitatively. We found that the growth of fibrils was intimately related to the maximum length of the anionic glycosaminoglycan and the relative displacement of two adjacent fibrils, which in return was closely related to the effectiveness of anionic glycosaminoglycan in transmitting forces between fibrils. These reveal the importance of the anionic glycosaminoglycan in maintaining the structural shape of the connective tissue extracellular matrix and eventually the shape modulus of human tissues. We also found that some macroscopic properties, like the maximum molecular energy and the breaking fraction of the collagen, were also related to the microscopic characteristics of the anionic glycosaminoglycan.

  6. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  7. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  8. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  9. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  10. Receptor-like activity evoked by extracellular ADP in Arabidopsis root epidermal plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidchik, Vadim; Shang, Zhonglin; Shin, Ryoung; Colaço, Renato; Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M

    2011-07-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides are implicated in the control of plant development and stress responses. While extracellular ATP is known to activate transcriptional pathways via plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase and calcium channel activation, very little is known about signal transduction by extracellular ADP. Here, extracellular ADP was found to activate net Ca(2+) influx in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and transiently elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) in root epidermal protoplasts. An inward Ca(2+)-permeable conductance in root epidermal PM was activated within 1 s of ADP application and repeated application evoked a smaller current. Such response speed and densitization are consistent with operation of equivalents to animal ionotropic purine receptors, although to date no equivalent genes for such receptors have been identified in higher plants. In contrast to ATP, extracellular ADP did not evoke accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. While high concentrations of ATP caused net Ca(2+) efflux from roots, equivalent concentrations of ADP caused net influx. Overall the results point to a discrete ADP signaling pathway, reliant on receptor-like activity at the PM.

  11. Receptor-Like Activity Evoked by Extracellular ADP in Arabidopsis Root Epidermal Plasma Membrane1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidchik, Vadim; Shang, Zhonglin; Shin, Ryoung; Colaço, Renato; Laohavisit, Anuphon; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides are implicated in the control of plant development and stress responses. While extracellular ATP is known to activate transcriptional pathways via plasma membrane (PM) NADPH oxidase and calcium channel activation, very little is known about signal transduction by extracellular ADP. Here, extracellular ADP was found to activate net Ca2+ influx in roots of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and transiently elevate cytosolic free Ca2+ in root epidermal protoplasts. An inward Ca2+-permeable conductance in root epidermal PM was activated within 1 s of ADP application and repeated application evoked a smaller current. Such response speed and densitization are consistent with operation of equivalents to animal ionotropic purine receptors, although to date no equivalent genes for such receptors have been identified in higher plants. In contrast to ATP, extracellular ADP did not evoke accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species. While high concentrations of ATP caused net Ca2+ efflux from roots, equivalent concentrations of ADP caused net influx. Overall the results point to a discrete ADP signaling pathway, reliant on receptor-like activity at the PM. PMID:21562328

  12. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  13. Comparative gene expression analysis among vocal learners (Bengalese finch and budgerigar and non-learners (quail and ring dove reveals variable cadherin expressions in the vocal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji eMatsunaga

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Birds use various vocalizations to communicate with one another, and some are acquired through learning. So far, three families of birds (songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds have been identified as having vocal learning ability. Previously, we found that cadherins, a large family of cell-adhesion molecules, show vocal control-area-related expression in a songbird, the Bengalese finch. To investigate the molecular basis of evolution in avian species, we conducted comparative analysis of cadherin expressions in the vocal and other neural systems among vocal learners (Bengalese finch and budgerigar and a non-learner (quail and ring dove. The gene expression analysis revealed that cadherin expressions were more variable in vocal and auditory areas compared to vocally unrelated areas such as the visual areas among these species. Thus, it appears that such diverse cadherin expressions might have been related to generating species diversity in vocal behavior during the evolution of avian vocal learning. 

  14. Inhibition of Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cell Migration by Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 1-small Hairpin RNA Through Inhibiting Epithelial-mesenchymal Transition,Extracellular Matrix Degradation, and Src Phosphorylation In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Zhang; Ge Cui; Yun-Liang Yao; Yue Guo; Qi-Chun Wang; Xi-Ning Li; Wen-Ming Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background:Protein arginine methyltransferases 1 (PRMT1) is over-expressed in a variety of cancers,including lung cancer,and is correlated with a poor prognosis of tumor development.This study aimed to investigate the role of PRMT1 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) migration in vitro.Methods:In this study,PRMT1 expression in the NSCLC cell line A549 was silenced using lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin RNAs.Cell migration was measured using both scratch wound healing and transwell cell migration assays.The mRNA expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor ofmetalloproteinase 1,2 (TIMP l,2) were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.The expression levels of protein markers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) (E-cadherin,N-cadherin),focal adhesion kinase (FAK),Src,AKT,and their corresponding phosphorylated states were detected by Western blot.Results:Cell migration was significantly inhibited in the PRMT1 silenced group compared to the control group.The mRNA expression of MMP-2 decreased while TIMP 1 and TIMP2 increased significantly.E-cadherin mRNA expression also increased while N-cadherin decreased.Only phosphorylated Src levels decreased in the silenced group while FAK or AKT remained unchanged.Conclusions:PRMT1-small hairpin RNA inhibits the migration abilities of NSCLC A549 cells by inhibiting EMT,extracellular matrix degradation,and Src phosphorylation in vitro.

  15. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Bruce S; Wong, Kelvin K L; Joldes, Grand R; Rich, Addison J; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W; Smith, David W

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an 'agent', meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory.

  16. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Gardiner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties. Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings. Each particle is in effect an 'agent', meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory.

  17. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  18. Collagens and proteoglycans of the corneal extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.M. Michelacci

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is a curved and transparent structure that provides the initial focusing of a light image into the eye. It consists of a central stroma that constitutes 90% of the corneal depth, covered anteriorly with epithelium and posteriorly with endothelium. Its transparency is the result of the regular spacing of collagen fibers with remarkably uniform diameter and interfibrillar space. Corneal collagen is composed of heterotypic fibrils consisting of type I and type V collagen molecules. The cornea also contains unusually high amounts of type VI collagen, which form microfibrillar structures, FACIT collagens (XII and XIV, and other nonfibrillar collagens (XIII and XVIII. FACIT collagens and other molecules, such as leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, play important roles in modifying the structure and function of collagen fibrils.Proteoglycans are macromolecules composed of a protein core with covalently linked glycosaminoglycan side chains. Four leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans are present in the extracellular matrix of corneal stroma: decorin, lumican, mimecan and keratocan. The first is a dermatan sulfate proteoglycan, and the other three are keratan sulfate proteoglycans. Experimental evidence indicates that the keratan sulfate proteoglycans are involved in the regulation of collagen fibril diameter, and dermatan sulfate proteoglycan participates in the control of interfibrillar spacing and in the lamellar adhesion properties of corneal collagens. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are minor components of the cornea, and are synthesized mainly by epithelial cells. The effect of injuries on proteoglycan synthesis is discussed.

  19. E-cadherin downregulation at the infiltrating tumour front is associated with histological grade and stage in colorectal carcinoma of Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Serena Diane; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Ong, Diana Bee-Lan; Teoh, Kean-Hooi; Looi, Lai-Meng

    2015-04-01

    Loss of E-cadherin, a 120 kDA transmembrane glycoprotein responsible for cell-cell adhesion, is one of the hallmarks of epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT). E-cadherin expression was immunohistochemically studied in 94 histopathologically re-confirmed colorectal carcinomas (CRC) using a monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin (Dako: Clone NCH-38) on a Ventana Benchmark XT automated system. Each case was assessed for E-cadherin immunopositivity at two separate locations viz the tumour centre (TC) as well as the infiltrating front (IF). Expression was semiquantitated for proportion of immunopositive malignant cells as 0 (negative), 1 (1-25% staining), 2 (26-50% staining), 3 (51-75% staining) and 4 (>75% staining) and staining intensity: 0 (negative), 1 (weak), 2 (moderate) and 3 (strong). The final histoscore of E-cadherin immunopositivity was arbitrarily computed as proportion of immunopositivity multiplied by staining intensity of the malignant cells. E-cadherin histoscores were significantly lower at the IF (4.5±2.5) compared with TC (10.7±2.4). Furthermore, the histoscores were significantly reduced at the IF of 49 TNM III+IV tumours (3.6±2.5) compared with 45 II+III CRC (5.4±2.2). Reduction of E-cadherin expression was also noted in the 23 high grade (TC=8.6±3.2; IF=2.6±2.3) compared with 71 low grade tumours (TC=11.4±1.5; IF=5.1±2.3). E-cadherin is downregulated at the infiltrating front of CRC, possibly marking for EMT at this location. The downregulation is further enhanced amongst late stage and high grade tumours compared with earlier stage and low grade tumours; findings which are similar to that noted in CRC of other populations.

  20. Wingless signalling alters the levels, subcellular distribution and dynamics of Armadillo and E-cadherin in third instar larval wing imaginal discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildiko M L Somorjai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Armadillo, the Drosophila orthologue of vertebrate ss-catenin, plays a dual role as the key effector of Wingless/Wnt1 signalling, and as a bridge between E-Cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of ligand, Armadillo is phosphorylated and targeted to the proteasome. Upon binding of Wg to its receptors, the "degradation complex" is inhibited; Armadillo is stabilised and enters the nucleus to transcribe targets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Although the relationship between signalling and adhesion has been extensively studied, few in vivo data exist concerning how the "transcriptional" and "adhesive" pools of Armadillo are regulated to orchestrate development. We have therefore addressed how the subcellular distribution of Armadillo and its association with E-Cadherin change in larval wing imaginal discs, under wild type conditions and upon signalling. Using confocal microscopy, we show that Armadillo and E-Cadherin are spatio-temporally regulated during development, and that a punctate species becomes concentrated in a subapical compartment in response to Wingless. In order to further dissect this phenomenon, we overexpressed Armadillo mutants exhibiting different levels of activity and stability, but retaining E-Cadherin binding. Arm(S10 displaces endogenous Armadillo from the AJ and the basolateral membrane, while leaving E-Cadherin relatively undisturbed. Surprisingly, DeltaNArm(1-155 caused displacement of both Armadillo and E-Cadherin, results supported by our novel method of quantification. However, only membrane-targeted Myr-DeltaNArm(1-155 produced comparable nuclear accumulation of Armadillo and signalling to Arm(S10. These experiments also highlighted a row of cells at the A/P boundary depleted of E-Cadherin at the AJ, but containing actin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence for a complex non-linear relationship between Armadillo levels, subcellular distribution and

  1. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Steiner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET transcription in Hirschsprung’s disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC (n = 26 or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4. Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p < 0.005; RET-mutated, r = 0.81, p < 0.01. E-cadherin showed weak correlation, whereas EGFR and TTF-1 showed no significant correlation with tumor proliferation. EGFR, E-cadherin, and TTF-1 showed weak correlation with proliferation of RET-mutated tumors. Correlation between TTF-1 and tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = −0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  2. The Postnatal Accumulation of Junctional E-cadherin Is Inversely Correlated with the Capacity for Supporting Cells to Convert Directly into Sensory Hair Cells in Mammalian Balance Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R.; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M.; Corwin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species’ capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases >6-fold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration. PMID:21849546

  3. The postnatal accumulation of junctional E-cadherin is inversely correlated with the capacity for supporting cells to convert directly into sensory hair cells in mammalian balance organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Maria Sol; Thiede, Benjamin R; Baker, Wendy; Askew, Charles; Igbani, Lisa M; Corwin, Jeffrey T

    2011-08-17

    Mammals experience permanent impairments from hair cell (HC) losses, but birds and other non-mammals quickly recover hearing and balance senses after supporting cells (SCs) give rise to replacement HCs. Avian HC epithelia express little or no E-cadherin, and differences in the thickness of F-actin belts at SC junctions strongly correlate with different species' capacities for HC replacement, so we investigated junctional cadherins in human and murine ears. We found strong E-cadherin expression at SC-SC junctions that increases more than sixfold postnatally in mice. When we cultured utricles from young mice with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), striolar SCs completely internalized their E-cadherin, without affecting N-cadherin. Hes and Hey expression also decreased and the SCs began to express Atoh1. After 48 h, those SCs expressed myosins VI and VIIA, and by 72 h, they developed hair bundles. However, some scattered striolar SCs retained E-cadherin and the SC phenotype. In extrastriolar regions, the vast majority of SCs also retained E-cadherin and failed to convert into HCs even after long GSI treatments. Microscopic measurements revealed that the junctions between extrastriolar SCs were more developed than those between striolar SCs. In GSI-treated utricles as old as P12, differentiated striolar SCs converted into HCs, but such responses declined with age and ceased by P16. Thus, temporal and spatial differences in postnatal SC-to-HC phenotype conversion capacity are linked to the structural attributes of E-cadherin containing SC junctions in mammals, which differ substantially from their counterparts in non-mammalian vertebrates that readily recover from hearing and balance deficits through hair cell regeneration.

  4. Clinical value of detection on serum monocyte chemotactant protein-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin levels in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Zhou; Cheng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation of serum monocyte chemotactant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelia cadherin (VE-cadherin) levels in patients with acute cerebral infarction, and nerve injury molecules, interleukins and matrix metalloproteinases. Methods: A total of 86 patients with acute cerebral infarction treated in our hospital from April 2012 to October 2015 were selected as the observation group and 50 healthy subjects in the same period treated in our hospital were selected as the control group. The serums were collected and the contents of MCP-1, VE-cadherin, heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), interleukin-lb (IL-1b), IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2), MMP3 and MMP9 were measured. Results: The serum contents of MCP-1, VE-cadherin, H-FABP, S100B, NSE, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in observation group were significantly higher than those of control group. Carotid artery plaque formation and unstable plaque properties will increase the serum contents of MCP-1, VE-cadherin, H-FABP, S100B, NSE, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in patients with cerebral infarction. The serum levels of MCP-1, VE-cadherin and the contents of H-FABP, S100B, NSE, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-17, IL-18, MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 were positively correlated. Conclusions: The serum levels of VE-cadherin and MCP-1 were significantly increased in patients with acute cerebral infarction. MCP-1 and VE-cadherin can increase the secretion of interleukins and matrix metalloproteinases, which can result in the carotid artery plaque formation, unstable plaque properties and the injury of nerve function.

  5. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  6. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  7. Inhibition of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity in palate mesenchyme cells attenuates Wnt signaling via aberrant E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Dennis R; Smith, Scott C; Smolenkova, Irina A; Pisano, M Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    p300 is a multifunctional transcriptional coactivator that interacts with numerous transcription factors and exhibits protein/histone acetyltransferase activity. Loss of p300 function in humans and in mice leads to craniofacial defects. In this study, we demonstrated that inhibition of p300 histone acetyltransferase activity with the compound, C646, altered the expression of several genes, including Cdh1 (E-cadherin) in mouse maxillary mesenchyme cells, which are the cells that give rise to the secondary palate. The increased expression of plasma membrane-bound E-cadherin was associated with reduced cytosolic β-catenin, that led to attenuated signaling through the canonical Wnt pathway. Furthermore, C646 reduced both cell proliferation and the migratory ability of these cells. These results suggest that p300 histone acetyltransferase activity is critical for Wnt-dependent palate mesenchymal cell proliferation and migration, both processes that play a significant role in morphogenesis of the palate.

  8. RNA sequencing of creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficient fibroblasts reveals impairment of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nota, Benjamin; Ndika, Joseph D T; van de Kamp, Jiddeke M; Kanhai, Warsha A; van Dooren, Silvy J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Pals, Gerard; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-09-01

    Creatine transporter (SLC6A8) deficiency is the most common cause of cerebral creatine syndromes, and is characterized by depletion of creatine in the brain. Manifestations of this X-linked disorder include intellectual disability, speech/language impairment, behavior abnormalities, and seizures. At the moment, no effective treatment is available. In order to investigate the molecular pathophysiology of this disorder, we performed RNA sequencing on fibroblasts derived from patients. The transcriptomes of fibroblast cells from eight unrelated individuals with SLC6A8 deficiency and three wild-type controls were sequenced. SLC6A8 mutations with different effects on the protein product resulted in different gene expression profiles. Differential gene expression analysis followed by gene ontology term enrichment analysis revealed that especially the expression of genes encoding components of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton are altered in SLC6A8 deficiency, such as collagens, keratins, integrins, and cadherins. This suggests an important novel role for creatine in the structural development and maintenance of cells. It is likely that the (extracellular) structure of brain cells is also impaired in SLC6A8-deficient patients, and future studies are necessary to confirm this and to reveal the true functions of creatine in the brain. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. Fractional Excretion of Survivin, Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer, and Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Bargenda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT is defined as a transformation of tubular epithelial cells into mesenchymal ones. These cells migrate through the extracellular matrix and change into active myofibroblasts, which are responsible for excessive matrix deposition. Such changes may lead to tubular dysfunction and fibrosis of the renal parenchyma, characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are no data on potential EMT markers in children with CKD. The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of fractional excretion (FE of survivin, E-cadherin, extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP7, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1 as potential markers of CKD-related complications such as tubular damage and fibrosis. Methods: Forty-one pre-dialysis children with CKD Stages 3–5 and 23 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The serum and urine concentrations of analysed parameters were assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. Results: Tubular reabsorption of all analysed parameters was >99% in the control group. All FE values rose significantly in children with CKD, yet they remained 1%. Conclusions: FE of the examined markers may become a useful tool in the assessment of tubular dysfunction during the course of CKD. The FE of survivin, EMMPRIN, and MMP7 warrant further research as potential independent markers of kidney-specific EMT.

  10. Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and E-Cadherin Expression in the Endometrium During the Implantation Window of Infertile Women Before In Vitro Fertilization Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Andre M.; Ferreira, Fernando P.; Bonetti, Tatiana C. S.; Serafini, Paulo; Motta, Eduardo L. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of endometrial matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 and E-cadherin in peri-implantation phase of infertile women who have undergone in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycles. Methods: This prospective study included 51 patients who underwent endometrial biopsy during the receptive phase in a menstrual cycle prior to IVF treatment. The samples were evaluated by tissue microarray for immunohistochemical study. Results: The expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and E-cadherin in the endometrium prior to IVF treatment was not associated with pregnancy. There was a decrease in E-cadherin immunodetection, the higher the age of the patients, a negative relationship between E-cadherin and MMP-2, and a positive association between MMP-9 and E-cadherin. Conclusions: The MMP-2, MMP-9, and E-cadherin are expressed in the endometrium of infertile patients during the receptive phase of the natural menstrual cycle. However, there is no correlation between the expression of these molecules and the clinical IVF outcomes. PMID:24700054

  11. ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells through upregulation of E-cadherin in a Id1-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yan [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Ming, Jia [Department of Breast, Thyroid and Pancreas Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xu, Yan [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Institute of Surgery Research, Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: zy53810@163.com [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: Jcbd@medmail.com.cn [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • Expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin in breast cancer cell. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. • ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. - Abstract: ERβ1 is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-regulated transcription factors. It plays an important role in regulating the progression of breast cancer. However, the mechanisms of ERβ1 in tumorigenesis, metastasis and prognosis are still not fully clear. In this study, we showed that the expression of ERβ1 was positively correlated with E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. In addition, we found that ERβ1 upregulates E-cadherin expression in breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we also found that ERβ1 inhibits the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells and upregulated E-cadherin expression in a Id1-dependent manner. Taken together, our study provides further understanding of the molecular mechanism of ERβ1 in tumor metastasis and suggests the feasibility of developing novel therapeutic approaches to target Id1 to inhibit breast cancer metastasis.

  12. Expression of Tenascin C, EGFR, E-Cadherin, and TTF-1 in Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma and the Correlation with RET Mutation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rendl, Gundula; Rodrigues, Margarida; Pirich, Christian

    2016-07-09

    Tenascin C expression correlates with tumor grade and indicates worse prognosis in several tumors. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in driving proliferation in many tumors. Loss of E-cadherin function is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) is involved in rearranged during transfection (RET) transcription in Hirschsprung's disease. Tenascin C, EGFR, E-cadherin, TTF-1-expression, and their correlations with RET mutation status were investigated in 30 patients with medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) (n = 26) or C-cell hyperplasia (n = 4). Tenascin C was found in all, EGFR in 4/26, E-cadherin in 23/26, and TTF-1 in 25/26 MTC. Tenascin C correlated significantly with tumor proliferation (overall, r = 0.61, p C, E-cadherin, and EGFR was r = -0.10, 0.37, and 0.21, respectively. In conclusion, MTC express tenascin C, E-cadherin, and TTF-1. Tenascin C correlates significantly with tumor proliferation, especially in RET-mutated tumors. EGFR is low, and tumors expressing EGFR do not exhibit higher proliferation. TTF-1 does not correlate with RET mutation status and has a weak correlation with tenascin C, E-cadherin, and EGFR expression.

  13. Influence of E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion on mouse embryonic stem cells derivation from isolated blastomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sheyla; Ibáñez, Elena; Santaló, Josep

    2011-09-01

    Efforts to efficiently derive embryonic stem cells (ESC) from isolated blastomeres have been done to minimize ethical concerns about human embryo destruction. Previous studies in our laboratory indicated a poor derivation efficiency of mouse ESC lines from isolated blastomeres at the 8-cell stage (1/8 blastomeres) due, in part, to a low division rate of the single blastomeres in comparison to their counterparts with a higher number of blastomeres (2/8, 3/8 and 4/8 blastomeres). Communication and adhesion between blastomeres from which the derivation process begins could be important aspects to efficiently derive ESC lines. In the present study, an approach consisting in the adhesion of a chimeric E-cadherin (E-cad-Fc) to the blastomere surface was devised to recreate the signaling produced by native E-cadherin between neighboring blastomeres inside the embryo. By this approach, the division rate of 1/8 blastomeres increased from 44.6% to 88.8% and a short exposure of 24 h to the E-cad-Fc produced an ESC derivation efficiency of 33.6%, significantly higher than the 2.2% obtained from the control group without E-cad-Fc. By contrast, a longer exposure to the same chimeric protein resulted in higher proportions of trophoblastic vesicles. Thus, we establish an important role of E-cadherin-mediated adherens junctions in promoting both the division of single 1/8 blastomeres and the efficiency of the ESC derivation process.

  14. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A. [Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Dept. of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Nusrat, Asma, E-mail: anusrat@emory.edu [Epithelial Pathobiology Research Unit, Dept. of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States)

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  15. Binding specificity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Aa for purified, native Bombyx mori aminopeptidase N and cadherin-like receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenkins Jeremy L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the molecular interactions of Bt toxins with non-target insects, we have examined the real-time binding specificity and affinity of Cry1 toxins to native silkworm (Bombyx mori midgut receptors. Previous studies on B. mori receptors utilized brush border membrane vesicles or purifed receptors in blot-type assays. Results The Bombyx mori (silkworm aminopeptidase N (APN and cadherin-like receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal Cry1Aa toxin were purified and their real-time binding affinities for Cry toxins were examined by surface plasmon resonance. Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins did not bind to the immobilized native receptors, correlating with their low toxicities. Cry1Aa displayed moderate affinity for B. mori APN (75 nM, and unusually tight binding to the cadherin-like receptor (2.6 nM, which results from slow dissociation rates. The binding of a hybrid toxin (Aa/Aa/Ac was identical to Cry1Aa. Conclusions These results indicate domain II of Cry1Aa is essential for binding to native B. mori receptors and for toxicity. Moreover, the high-affinity binding of Cry1Aa to native cadherin-like receptor emphasizes the importance of this receptor class for Bt toxin research.

  16. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  17. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  18. Effects of Arg-Gly-Asp-modified elastin-like polypeptide on pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of cell adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Jung, Gwon-Soo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Seong-Kyoon; Jeon, Won Bae

    2013-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in controlling the β-cell morphology, survival and insulin secretary functions. An RGD-modified elastin-like polypeptide (RGD-ELP), TGPG[VGRGD(VGVPG)(6)](20)WPC, has been reported previously as a bioactive matrix. In this study, to investigate whether RGD-ELP affects β-cell growth characteristics and insulin secretion, β-TC6 cells were cultured on the RGD-ELP coatings prepared via thermally induced phase transition. On RGD-ELP, β-TC6 cells clustered into an islet-like architecture with high cell viability. Throughout 7days' culture, the proliferation rate of the cells within a pseudoislet was similar to that of monolayer culture. Under high glucose (25mM), β-TC6 pseudoislets showed up-regulated insulin gene expression and exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Importantly, the mRNA and protein abundances of cell adhesion molecules (CAM) E-cadherin and connexin-36 were much higher in pseudoislets than in monolayer cells. The siRNA-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin or connexin-36 expression severely limited pseudoislet formation. In addition, the mRNA levels of collagen types I and IV, fibronectin and laminin were significantly elevated in pseudoislets. The results suggest that RGD-ELP promotes pseudoislet formation via up-regulation of the CAM and ECM components. The functional roles of RGD-ELP are discussed in respect of its molecular composition.

  19. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  20. Cadherin 11 Involved in Basement Membrane Damage and Dermal Changes in Melasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nan-Hyung; Choi, Soo-Hyun; Lee, Tae Ryong; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Ai-Young

    2016-06-15

    Basement membrane (BM) disruption and dermal changes (elastosis, collagenolysis, vascular ectasia) have been reported in melasma. Although ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can induce these changes, UV is not always necessary for melasma development. Cadherin 11 (CDH11), which is upregulated in some melasma patients, has previously been shown to stimulate melanogenesis. Because CDH11 action requires cell-cell adhesion between fibroblasts and melanocytes, BM disruption in vivo should facilitate this. The aim of this study was to examine whether CDH11 overexpression leads to BM disruption and dermal changes, independent of UV irradiation. Immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence, real-time PCR, Western blotting, and zymography suggested that BM disruption/dermal changes and related factors were present in the hyperpigmented skin of CDH11-upregulated melasma patients and in CDH11-overexpressing fibroblasts/keratinocytes. The opposite was seen in CDH11-knockdown cells. UV irradiation of the cultured cells did not increase CDH11 expression. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CDH11 overexpression could induce BM disruption and dermal changes in melasma, regardless of UV exposure.

  1. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Snail1 is a repressor of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) expression essential for triggering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snail1 represses CDH1 directly binding its promoter and inducing the synthesis of Zeb1 repressor. In this article we show that repression of CDH1...... by Snail1, but not by Zeb1, is dependent on the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). ES cells null for Suz12, one of the components of PRC2, show higher levels of Cdh1 mRNA than control ES cells. In tumour cells, interference of PRC2 activity prevents the ability of Snail1 to down......-regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments...

  2. E-CADHERIN AND CD44V6 EXPRESION IN HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑建明; 郑唯强; 龚志锦; 朱明华; 戴益民; 张照环

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the significance of E- cadherin (E-cad) and CD44v6 expression in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Methods: An immunohistochemical method was used to detect E-cad and CD44v6 expression in 66 cases of HCCs. Results: The positive rates of E-cad and CD44v6 expression in human HCCs were 42.4%(28/66) and 39.4%(26/66), respectively. There was an inverse correlation between E-cad expression and invasive and metastatic potential of HCCs (P<0.01), and a positive correlation between the CD44v6 expression and invasive and metastatic potential of HCCs (P<0.01). Moreover, the 5-year survival rate in the E-cad-positive group was higher than in E-cad-negative group (P<0.01), and that in the CD44v6-positive group was lower than in the CD44v6-negative expression group (P<0.05). Conclusion: these data show a possible association between E-cad and CD44v6 expression and the potential of invasion and metastasis in HCCs. E-cad and CD44v6 expression may be used as an auxiliary prognostic indicator in HCCs.

  3. Hypermethylation Status of E-Cadherin Gene in Gastric Cancer Patients in a High Incidence Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Alam, Khursheed; Afroze, Dil; Yousuf, Adfar; Banday, Manzoor; Kawoosa, Fizalah

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most prevalant cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. As in other cancers gastric carcinogenesis is multifactorial involving environmental, genetic and epigenetic components. Epigenetic silencing due to hypermethylation of tumour suppressor genes is one of the key events in gastric carcinogenesis. This study was aimed to analyse the hypermethylation status of the E-Cadherin (CDH1) gene promoter in GCs in the ethnic Kashmiri population. In this study a total of 80 GC patients were recruited. Hypermethylation in tumour tissue was detected by methylation specific PCR (MS-PCR). Hypermethylation of CDH1 promoter was observed in 52 (65%) of gastric carcinoma cases which was significantly much higher than adjacent normal tissue [p≤0.0001]. Further the frequency of CDH1 promoter methylation was significantly different with intestinal and diffuse types of gastric cancer [55.7% vs 82.1%; CDH1 hypermethylation [P≤0.05]. Thus the current data indicate a vital role of epigenetic alteration of CDH1 in the causation and development of gastric cancer, particularly of diffuse type, in our population.

  4. Anti-cadherin-17 antibody modulates beta-catenin signaling and tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Wang

    Full Text Available Cadherin-17 (CDH17 is an oncofetal molecule associated with poor prognostic outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, for which the treatment options are very limited. The present study investigates the therapeutic potential of a monoclonal antibody (Lic5 that targets the CDH17 antigen in HCC. In vitro experiments showed Lic5 could markedly reduce CDH17 expression in a dose-dependent manner, suppress β-catenin signaling, and induce cleavages of apoptotic enzymes caspase-8 and -9 in HCC cells. Treatment of animals in subcutaneous HCC xenograft model similarly demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition (TGI using Lic5 antibody alone (5 mg/kg, i.p., t.i.w.; ca.60-65% TGI vs. vehicle at day 28, or in combination with conventional chemotherapy regimen (cisplatin 1 mg/kg; ca. 85-90% TGI. Strikingly, lung metastasis was markedly suppressed by Lic5 treatments. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses of xenograft explants revealed inactivation of the Wnt pathway and suppression of Wnt signaling components in HCC tissues. Collectively, anti-CDH17 antibody promises as an effective biologic agent for treating malignant HCC.

  5. Altered E-Cadherin Levels and Distribution in Melanocytes Precede Clinical Manifestations of Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Roselyne Y; Luciani, Flavie; Cario-André, Muriel; Rubod, Alain; Petit, Valérie; Benzekri, Laila; Ezzedine, Khaled; Lepreux, Sébastien; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Taieb, A; Gauthier, Yvon; Larue, Lionel; Delmas, Véronique

    2015-07-01

    Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting disorder resulting from the loss of melanocytes from the basal epidermal layer. The pathogenesis of the disease is likely multifactorial and involves autoimmune causes, as well as oxidative and mechanical stress. It is important to identify early events in vitiligo to clarify pathogenesis, improve diagnosis, and inform therapy. Here, we show that E-cadherin (Ecad), which mediates the adhesion between melanocytes and keratinocytes in the epidermis, is absent from or discontinuously distributed across melanocyte membranes of vitiligo patients long before clinical lesions appear. This abnormality is associated with the detachment of the melanocytes from the basal to the suprabasal layers in the epidermis. Using human epidermal reconstructed skin and mouse models with normal or defective Ecad expression in melanocytes, we demonstrated that Ecad is required for melanocyte adhesiveness to the basal layer under oxidative and mechanical stress, establishing a link between silent/preclinical, cell-autonomous defects in vitiligo melanocytes and known environmental stressors accelerating disease expression. Our results implicate a primary predisposing skin defect affecting melanocyte adhesiveness that, under stress conditions, leads to disappearance of melanocytes and clinical vitiligo. Melanocyte adhesiveness is thus a potential target for therapy aiming at disease stabilization.

  6. OF MICE AND MEN: DISSECTING THE INTERACTION BETWEEN LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES INTERNALIN A AND E-CADHERIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Genheden

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a study of the interaction between internalin A (inlA and human or murine E-cadherin (Ecad. inlA is used by Listeria monocytogenes to internalize itself into host cell, but the bacterium is unable to invade murine cells, which has been attributed to the difference in sequence between hEcad and mEcad. Using molecular dynamics simulations, MM/GBSA free energy calculations, hydrogen bond analysis, water characterization and umbrella sampling, we provide a complete atomistic picture of the binding between inlA and Ecad. We dissect key residues in the protein–protein interface and analyze the energetics using MM/GBSA.'From this analysis it is clear that the binding of inlA–mEcad is weaker than inlA–hEcad, on par with the experimentally observed inability of inlA to bind to mEcad.'However, extended MD simulations of 200 ns in length show no destabilization of the inlA–mEcad complex and the estimation of the potential of mean force (PMF using umbrella sampling corroborates this conclusion. The binding strength computed from the PMFs show no significant difference between the two protein complexes. Hence, our study suggests that the inability of L. monocytogenes to invade murine cells cannot be explained by processes at the nanosecond to sub-microsecond time scale probed by the simulations performed here.

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  8. E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression in breast medullary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpin, C; Bonnier, P; Garcia, S; Andrac, L; Crebassa, B; Dorel, M; Lavaut, M N; Allasia, C

    1999-08-01

    The initial step of cancer invasion and metastasis is the escape of tumour cells from the primary site, involving disruption of normal cell-cell adhesion and E-cadherin (E-cad) and beta-catenin (beta-cat) down-regulation, as shown in various types of human malignancies including breast carcinomas. Medullary carcinomas are high grade and poorly differentiated tumours with syncytial typical pattern, and prognosis unexpectedly better than that in high grade breast carcinomas. In a series of 55 breast typical medullary carcinomas diagnosed according to the strict use of Ridolfi et al (Cancer 40: 1365-1385, 1977) criteria, E-cad and beta-cat were investigated using quantitative (SAMBA 2005 system) immunocytochemical assays on frozen sections. Results were compared to that obtained on paraffin sections and in a series (n=55) of grade 3 ductal carcinomas. It was shown that medullary carcinomas significantly (p<0.001) expressed more E-cad and beta-cat than grade 3 ductal carcinomas. E-cad and beta-cat correlated with high expression of P53, of c-erbB, and of Ki-67 antigens, and with lack of hormone receptors antigenic sites (p<0.001). It was concluded that favourable prognosis and syncytial pattern of typical breast medullary carcinomas likely results, at least partly, from a particular expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules, significantly limiting tumour growth and efficiently mastering the tumour cell dissemination, opposing to high proliferative activity (grade 3).

  9. Cadherin-23 may be dynamic in hair bundles of the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

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