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Sample records for extracellular bacterial pathogen

  1. Intracellular phase for an extracellular bacterial pathogen: MgtC shows the way

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Bernut

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an extracellular pathogen known to impair host phagocytic functions. However, our recent results identify MgtC as a novel actor in P. aeruginosa virulence, which plays a role in an intramacrophage phase of this pathogen. In agreement with its intracellular function, P. aeruginosa mgtC gene expression is strongly induced when the bacteria reside within macrophages. MgtC was previously known as a horizontally-acquired virulence factor important for multiplication inside macrophages in several intracellular bacterial pathogens. MgtC thus provides a singular example of a virulence determinant that subverts macrophages both in intracellular and extracellular pathogens. Moreover, we demonstrate that P. aeru-ginosa MgtC is required for optimal growth in Mg2+ deprived medium, a property shared by MgtC factors from intracellular pathogens and, under Mg2+ limitation, P. aeruginosaMgtC prevents biofilm formation. We propose that MgtC has a similar function in intracellular and extracellular pathogens, which contributes to macrophage resistance and fine-tune adaptation to the host in relation to the different bacterial lifestyles. MgtC thus appears as an attractive target for antivirulence strategies and our work provides a natural peptide as MgtC antagonist, which paves the way for the development of MgtC inhibitors.

  2. BACTERIAL WATERBORNE PATHOGENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial pathogens are examples of classical etiological agents of waterborne disease. While these agents no longer serve as major threats to U.S. water supplies, they are still important pathogens in areas with substandard sanitation and poor water treatment facilities. In th...

  3. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jaewook; Park, Jaesung; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-04-01

    Like mammalian cells, Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria release nano-sized membrane vesicles into the extracellular environment either in a constitutive manner or in a regulated manner. These bacterial extracellular vesicles are spherical bilayered proteolipids enriched with bioactive proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and virulence factors. Recent progress in this field supports the critical pathophysiological functions of these vesicles in both bacteria-bacteria and bacteria-host interactions. This review provides an overview of the current understanding on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial extracellular vesicles, especially regarding the biogenesis, components, and functions in poly-species communities. We hope that this review will stimulate additional research in this emerging field of bacterial extracellular vesicles and contribute to the development of extracellular vesicle-based diagnostic tools and effective vaccines against pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular detection of human bacterial pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Dongyou

    2011-01-01

    .... Molecular Detection of Human Bacterial Pathogens addresses this issue, with international scientists in respective bacterial pathogen research and diagnosis providing expert summaries on current...

  5. common bacterial pathogens seen.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial infections are important causes of morbidity in the neonatal period. Therefore identification of infecting organisms and the risk factors for possible bacterial infection in the newborn is of great importance. Institution early appropriate therapy is an important step in combating morbidity and mortality in this ...

  6. Exosomes and other extracellular vesicles in host–pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Yong; Singh, Prachi P; Smith, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    An effective immune response requires the engagement of host receptors by pathogen-derived molecules and the stimulation of an appropriate cellular response. Therefore, a crucial factor in our ability to control an infection is the accessibility of our immune cells to the foreign material. Exosomes—which are extracellular vesicles that function in intercellular communication—may play a key role in the dissemination of pathogen- as well as host-derived molecules during infection. In this review, we highlight the composition and function of exosomes and other extracellular vesicles produced during viral, parasitic, fungal and bacterial infections and describe how these vesicles could function to either promote or inhibit host immunity. PMID:25488940

  7. Novel anti-bacterial activities of β-defensin 1 in human platelets: suppression of pathogen growth and signaling of neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern F Kraemer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Human β-defensins (hBD are antimicrobial peptides that curb microbial activity. Although hBD's are primarily expressed by epithelial cells, we show that human platelets express hBD-1 that has both predicted and novel antibacterial activities. We observed that activated platelets surround Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, forcing the pathogens into clusters that have a reduced growth rate compared to S. aureus alone. Given the microbicidal activity of β-defensins, we determined whether hBD family members were present in platelets and found mRNA and protein for hBD-1. We also established that hBD-1 protein resided in extragranular cytoplasmic compartments of platelets. Consistent with this localization pattern, agonists that elicit granular secretion by platelets did not readily induce hBD-1 release. Nevertheless, platelets released hBD-1 when they were stimulated by α-toxin, a S. aureus product that permeabilizes target cells. Platelet-derived hBD-1 significantly impaired the growth of clinical strains of S. aureus. hBD-1 also induced robust neutrophil extracellular trap (NET formation by target polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs, which is a novel antimicrobial function of β-defensins that was not previously identified. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hBD-1 is a previously-unrecognized component of platelets that displays classic antimicrobial activity and, in addition, signals PMNs to extrude DNA lattices that capture and kill bacteria.

  8. Bacterial toxins as pathogen weapons against phagocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana edo Vale

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxins are virulence factors that manipulate host cell functions and take over the control of vital processes of living organisms to favour microbial infection. Some toxins directly target innate immune cells, thereby annihilating a major branch of the host immune response. In this review we will focus on bacterial toxins that act from the extracellular milieu and hinder the function of macrophages and neutrophils. In particular, we will concentrate on toxins from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria that manipulate cell signalling or induce cell death by either imposing direct damage to the host cells cytoplasmic membrane or enzymatically modifying key eukaryotic targets. Outcomes regarding pathogen dissemination, host damage and disease progression will be discussed.

  9. EXTRACELLULAR POLYSACCHARIDES OF POTATO RING ROT PATHOGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafikova Т.N.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria, including phytopathogenic ones produce extracellular polysaccharides or exopolysaccharides which are universal molecules. Causal agent of potato ring rot, Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus, secretes exopolysaccharides which role in pathogenesis is poorly investigated. The aim of our research is to ascertain the composition and structure of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides. Exopolysaccharides of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus are determined to consist of 4-6 anionic and neutral components which have molecular weights from 700 kDa. Glucose is a major monomer of polysaccharides and arabinose, rhamnose and mannose are minor monomers. Glucose is present in α-Dglucopyranose and β-D-glucopyranose configurations. Calcium is determined to be a component of exopolysaccharides. Components of exopolysaccharides of potato ring rot pathogen are probably capableto associate via calcium ions and other ionic interactions that may result in a change of their physiological activity. Further studies of Clavibacter michiganensis subspecies sepedonicus exopolysaccharides composition and structure can serve a base for the synthesis of their chemical analogues with elicitor action.

  10. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Thilo Martin

    Cautious optimism has arisen over recent decades with respect to the long struggle against bacteria, viruses, and parasites. This has been offset, however, by a fatal complacency stemming from previous successes such as the development of antimicrobial drugs, the eradication of smallpox, and global immunization programs. Infectious diseases nevertheless remain the world's leading cause of death, killing at least 17 million persons annually [61]. Diarrheal diseases caused by Vibrio cholerae or Shigella dysenteriae kill about 3 million persons every year, most of them young children: Another 4 million die of tuberculosis or tetanus. Outbreaks of diphtheria in Eastern Europe threatens the population with a disease that had previously seemed to be overcome. Efforts to control infectious diseases more comprehensively are undermined not only by socioeconomic conditions but also by the nature of the pathogenic organisms itself; some isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterobacter have become so resistant to drugs by horizontal gene transfer that they are almost untreatable. In addition, the mechanism of genetic variability helps pathogens to evade the human immune system, thus compromising the development of powerful vaccines. Therefore detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity is absolutely necessary to develop new strategies against infectious diseases and thus to lower their impact on human health and social development.

  12. Maintenance of Vacuole Integrity by Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Creasey, Elizabeth A.; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens reside within a membrane-bound compartment. The biogenesis of these vacuolar compartments is complex, involving subversion of host cell secretory pathways by bacterial proteins. In recent years it has become clear that disruption of vacuole biogenesis may result in membrane rupture and escape of bacteria into the host cell cytosol. Correct modulation of the host cell cytoskeleton, signalling molecules such as small GTPases and the lipids of the vacuole m...

  13. Microbial minimalism: genome reduction in bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy A

    2002-03-08

    When bacterial lineages make the transition from free-living or facultatively parasitic life cycles to permanent associations with hosts, they undergo a major loss of genes and DNA. Complete genome sequences are providing an understanding of how extreme genome reduction affects evolutionary directions and metabolic capabilities of obligate pathogens and symbionts.

  14. Incidence of Bacterial Pathogens following Biomechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A correlation exists between endodontic microflora in pulpal disease and endodontic treatment failure. This study presents data on the recoverable bacterial pathogens following biomechanical treatment of infected root canals. Standard endodontic procedure were used to access tooth pulp cavity, processed and fluid ...

  15. Insights from genomics into bacterial pathogen populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens impose a heavy burden of disease on human populations worldwide. The gravest threats are posed by highly virulent respiratory pathogens, enteric pathogens, and HIV-associated infections. Tuberculosis alone is responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people annually. Treatment options for bacterial pathogens are being steadily eroded by the evolution and spread of drug resistance. However, population-level whole genome sequencing offers new hope in the fight against pathogenic bacteria. By providing insights into bacterial evolution and disease etiology, these approaches pave the way for novel interventions and therapeutic targets. Sequencing populations of bacteria across the whole genome provides unprecedented resolution to investigate (i within-host evolution, (ii transmission history, and (iii population structure. Moreover, advances in rapid benchtop sequencing herald a new era of real-time genomics in which sequencing and analysis can be deployed within hours in response to rapidly changing public health emergencies. The purpose of this review is to highlight the transformative effect of population genomics on bacteriology, and to consider the prospects for answering abiding questions such as why bacteria cause disease.

  16. Clostridium difficile is an autotrophic bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Köpke

    Full Text Available During the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection showed a dramatic increase in incidence and virulence in the Northern hemisphere. This incessantly challenging disease is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated and nosocomial infectious diarrhea and became life-threatening especially among elderly people. It is generally assumed that all human bacterial pathogens are heterotrophic organisms, being either saccharolytic or proteolytic. So far, this has not been questioned as colonization of the human gut gives access to an environment, rich in organic nutrients. Here, we present data that C. difficile (both clinical and rumen isolates is also able to grow on CO2+H2 as sole carbon and energy source, thus representing the first identified autotrophic bacterial pathogen. Comparison of several different strains revealed high conservation of genes for autotrophic growth and showed that the ability to use gas mixtures for growth decreases or is lost upon prolonged culturing under heterotrophic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of C. difficile (heterotrophic growth on various substrates as well as autotrophy could allow the organism in the gut to avoid competition by niche differentiation and contribute to its survival when stressed or in unfavorable conditions that cause death to other bacteria. This may be an important trait for the pathogenicity of C. difficile.

  17. In vitro generation of polysialylated cervical mucins by bacterial polysialyltransferases to counteract cytotoxicity of extracellular histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, Sebastian P; Galuska, Christina E; Tharmalingam, Tharmala; Zlatina, Kristina; Prem, Gerlinde; Husejnov, Farzali C O; Rudd, Pauline M; Vann, Willie F; Reid, Colm; Vionnet, Justine; Gallagher, Mary E; Carrington, Faye A; Hassett, Sarah-Louise; Carrington, Stephen D

    2017-06-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NET) are formed against pathogens. However, various diseases are directly linked to this meshwork of DNA. The cytotoxic properties of extracellular histones especially seem to be an important trigger during these diseases. Furthermore, NET accumulation on implants is discussed to result in an impaired efficiency or failure, depending on the category of implant. Interestingly, mucins have been investigated as surface coatings potentially capable of reducing neutrophil adhesion. Similarly, polysialic acid was shown to inactivate the cytotoxic properties of extracellular histones. We wanted to combine the probability to decrease the adhesion of neutrophils using mucins with the capability of sialic acid polymers to counteract histone-mediated cytotoxicity. To this end, we elongate cervical mucins using bacterial polysialyltransferases. Subsequent cell-based experiments demonstrated the activity of elongated mucins against histone-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, polysialylated mucins may represent a novel component to coat implants or to combat diseases with exaggerated NET formation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Increased Extracellular ATP: An Omen of Bacterial RTX Toxin-Induced Hemolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection is a major threat to human health. Although pathogenic bacteria vary in their virulence, it has been recognized that many pathogenic bacteria share common mechanisms when attacking host cells and tissues. Some pathogenic bacteria synthesize and secrete polysaccharides to form an extracellular capsule. Capsules serve as virulence determinants by multiple mechanisms including facilitation of bacterial adherence, evasion of the immune response, and antibiotic resistance [1]. Moreover, to the exterior of bacterial plasma membranes are certain toxic components (e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS in Gram-negative bacteria, and peptidoglycan fragments and teichoic acids in Gram-positive bacteria that play key roles in causing bacterial septic shock or multiple organ dysfunction [2]. Significantly, bacteria may secrete proteinaceous or non-proteinaceous molecules, namely exotoxins, capable of directly destroying host cells. The Repeat-in-Toxin (RTX family is a group of virulence-associated exotoxins that are generated by Gram-negative bacteria and are noted for their ability to form pores on the membrane of host cells including leukocytes [3]. Despite the intense effort that has been input into investigating the interaction between RTX toxins and host cells during bacterial infection, our understanding of how RTX toxins insert into host cell membranes, and in turn, how host cells respond to the challenge of these toxins remains very limited. [...

  19. Maintenance of vacuole integrity by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasey, Elizabeth A; Isberg, Ralph R

    2014-02-01

    Many intracellular bacterial pathogens reside within a membrane-bound compartment. The biogenesis of these vacuolar compartments is complex, involving subversion of host cell secretory pathways by bacterial proteins. In recent years it has become clear that disruption of vacuole biogenesis may result in membrane rupture and escape of bacteria into the host cell cytosol. Correct modulation of the host cell cytoskeleton, signalling molecules such as small GTPases and the lipids of the vacuole membrane have all been shown to be critical in the maintenance of vacuole integrity. Increasing evidence suggests that vacuole rupture may result from aberrant mechanical forces exerted on the vacuole, possibly due to a defect in vacuole expansion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extracellular DNases of Ralstonia solanacearum modulate biofilms and facilitate bacterial wilt virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh Tran, Tuan; MacIntyre, April; Khokhani, Devanshi; Hawes, Martha; Allen, Caitilyn

    2016-11-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne vascular pathogen that colonizes plant xylem vessels, a flowing, low-nutrient habitat where biofilms could be adaptive. Ralstonia solanacearum forms biofilm in vitro, but it was not known if the pathogen benefits from biofilms during infection. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that during tomato infection, R. solanacearum forms biofilm-like masses in xylem vessels. These aggregates contain bacteria embedded in a matrix including chromatin-like fibres commonly observed in other bacterial biofilms. Chemical and enzymatic assays demonstrated that the bacterium releases extracellular DNA in culture and that DNA is an integral component of the biofilm matrix. An R. solanacearum mutant lacking the pathogen's two extracellular nucleases (exDNases) formed non-spreading colonies and abnormally thick biofilms in vitro. The biofilms formed by the exDNase mutant in planta contained more and thicker fibres. This mutant was also reduced in virulence on tomato plants and did not spread in tomato stems as well as the wild-type strain, suggesting that these exDNases facilitate biofilm maturation and bacterial dispersal. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that R. solanacearum forms biofilms in plant xylem vessels, and the first documentation that plant pathogens use DNases to modulate their biofilm structure for systemic spread and virulence. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. S. Cabral

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water—cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery—is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases’ characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers. Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters.

  2. Water Microbiology. Bacterial Pathogens and Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, João P. S.

    2010-01-01

    Water is essential to life, but many people do not have access to clean and safe drinking water and many die of waterborne bacterial infections. In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water—cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery—is presented, focusing on the biology and ecology of the causal agents and on the diseases’ characteristics and their life cycles in the environment. The importance of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and emerging pathogens in drinking water-transmitted diseases is also briefly discussed. Microbiological water analysis is mainly based on the concept of fecal indicator bacteria. The main bacteria present in human and animal feces (focusing on their behavior in their hosts and in the environment) and the most important fecal indicator bacteria are presented and discussed (focusing on the advantages and limitations of their use as markers). Important sources of bacterial fecal pollution of environmental waters are also briefly indicated. In the last topic it is discussed which indicators of fecal pollution should be used in current drinking water microbiological analysis. It was concluded that safe drinking water for all is one of the major challenges of the 21st century and that microbiological control of drinking water should be the norm everywhere. Routine basic microbiological analysis of drinking water should be carried out by assaying the presence of Escherichia coli by culture methods. Whenever financial resources are available, fecal coliform determinations should be complemented with the quantification of enterococci. More studies are needed in order to check if ammonia is reliable for a preliminary screening for emergency fecal pollution outbreaks. Financial resources should be devoted to a better understanding of the ecology and behavior of human and animal fecal bacteria in environmental waters. PMID:21139855

  3. Pathogenic bacterial contaminations in hospital cafeteria foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Somboonwatthanakul, Issaraporn

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to examine the pathogenic bacterial contaminations in foods sold in hospital cafeteria. A study was conducted between April and September of 2008 using cafeteria located in Mahasarakham provincial hospital, Thailand, as a study area. The cafeteria foods were evaluated for contaminations with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus faecalis, which have been earlier reported to cause nosocomial outbreaks. Of 33 different types of ready-to-eat foods, the majority (54.54%) were found to have bacteria >10(7) colony forming units per gram of food (cfu g(-1)), whereas 36.36% and only 9.10% of them were found to have bacteria at 10(6)-10(7) and foods were also shown to be contaminated with Escherichia coli (57.57%), followed by Streptococcus faecalis (51.51%), Staphylococcus aureus (48.48%) and Salmonella typhimurium (27.27%), respectively. In contrast, of 7 different types of freshly-made foods, the majority (71.42%) were found to have bacterial foods (42.85%), followed by Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis at equal percentages (14.28%). None of the freshly-made foods were found to be contaminated with Streptococcus typhimurium. The results concluded that a number of ready-to-eat foods sold in the Mahasarakham hospital cafeteria were contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria at unacceptable levels. Healthcare authorities should be more aware that ready-to-eat cafeteria foods that are heavily contaminated with pathogenic bacteria may be harmful to healthcare workers and visitors and may result in nosocomial infections of the patients.

  4. The neglected intrinsic resistome of bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bacteria with intrinsic resistance to antibiotics are a worrisome health problem. It is widely believed that intrinsic antibiotic resistance of bacterial pathogens is mainly the consequence of cellular impermeability and activity of efflux pumps. However, the analysis of transposon-tagged Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants presented in this article shows that this phenotype emerges from the action of numerous proteins from all functional categories. Mutations in some genes make P. aeruginosa more susceptible to antibiotics and thereby represent new targets. Mutations in other genes make P. aeruginosa more resistant and therefore define novel mechanisms for mutation-driven acquisition of antibiotic resistance, opening a new research field based in the prediction of resistance before it emerges in clinical environments. Antibiotics are not just weapons against bacterial competitors, but also natural signalling molecules. Our results demonstrate that antibiotic resistance genes are not merely protective shields and offer a more comprehensive view of the role of antibiotic resistance genes in the clinic and in nature.

  5. Extracellular peptidases of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan George Thomas Lowe

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum (Fgr creates economic and health risks in cereals agriculture. Fgr causes head blight (or scab of wheat and stalk rot of corn, reducing yield, degrading grain quality and polluting downstream food products with mycotoxins. Fungal plant pathogens must secrete proteases to access nutrition and to breakdown the structural protein component of the plant cell wall. Research into the proteolytic activity of Fgr is hindered by the complex nature of the suite of proteases secreted. We used a systems biology approach comprising genome analysis, transcriptomics and label-free quantitative proteomics to characterise the peptidases deployed by Fgr during growth. A combined analysis of published microarray transcriptome datasets revealed seven transcriptional groupings of peptidases based on in vitro growth, in planta growth, and sporulation behaviours. An orbitrap MS/MS proteomics technique defined the extracellular proteases secreted by Fusarium graminearum. A meta-classification based on sequence characters and transcriptional/translational activity in planta and in vitro provides a platform to develop control strategies that target Fgr peptidases.

  6. Evolutionary biology of bacterial and fungal pathogens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baquero, F

    2008-01-01

    ... and Evolutionary Dynamics of Pathogens * 21 Keith A. Crandall and Marcos Pérez-Losada II. Evolutionary Genetics of Microbial Pathogens 4. Environmental and Social Influences on Infectious Disea...

  7. Pathogenic Bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii Inhibits the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Suppressing Neutrophil Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Kamoshida

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Hospital-acquired infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii have become problematic because of high rates of drug resistance. A. baumannii is usually harmless, but it may cause infectious diseases in an immunocompromised host. Although neutrophils are the key players of the initial immune response against bacterial infection, their interactions with A. baumannii remain largely unknown. A new biological defense mechanism, termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, has been attracting attention. NETs play a critical role in bacterial killing by bacterial trapping and inactivation. Many pathogenic bacteria have been reported to induce NET formation, while an inhibitory effect on NET formation is rarely reported. In the present study, to assess the inhibition of NET formation by A. baumannii, bacteria and human neutrophils were cocultured in the presence of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, and NET formation was evaluated. NETs were rarely observed during the coculture despite neutrophil PMA stimulation. Furthermore, A. baumannii prolonged the lifespan of neutrophils by inhibiting NET formation. The inhibition of NET formation by other bacteria was also investigated. The inhibitory effect was only apparent with live A. baumannii cells. Finally, to elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, neutrophil adhesion was examined. A. baumannii suppressed the adhesion ability of neutrophils, thereby inhibiting PMA-induced NET formation. This suppression of cell adhesion was partly due to suppression of the surface expression of CD11a in neutrophils. The current study constitutes the first report on the inhibition of NET formation by a pathogenic bacterium, A. baumannii, and prolonging the neutrophil lifespan. This novel pathogenicity to inhibit NET formation, thereby escaping host immune responses might contribute to a development of new treatment strategies for A. baumannii infections.

  8. Characterization and isolation of an extracellular serine protease from the tomato pathogen Colletotrichum coccodes, and it's role in pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Regina S.; Rodriguez, Rusty J.

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular enzymes play an important role in the pathogenicity and virulence of phytopathogenic fungi. Several isolates of Colletotrichum coccodes causal agent of anthracnose on tomato, were screened to determine the relationship between protease activity and virulence. A direct relationship was observed between extracellular protease activity and the induction of disease symptoms of fruit and mortality in plants. Isolate Cc155 exhibited the highest protease activity after five days of growth in protease induction medium and produced an extracellular serine protease (sp78) that was 78 kDa, auto-degradative, glucose repressible, and non-glycosylated. To determine the role of sp78 in pathogenicity, a UV-induced extracellular protease deficient mutant (np155) was generated from the wildtype isolate Cc155. Np155 maintained growth rates comparable to Cc155 and produced wildtype levels of extracellular cellulase but did not produce extracellular protease. Unlike Cc155, np155 caused no disease symptoms on tomato fruit and 0% mortality on tomato seedlings. These results suggest that extracellular protease activity is required for pathogenicity and virulence of C. coccodes and that the elimination of protease activity transforms a virulent pathogen to a non-pathogenic endophyte.

  9. Models of Caenorhabditis elegans infection by bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jennifer R; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the relationship between the animal innate immune system and a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Extensive genetic and molecular tools are available in C. elegans, facilitating an in-depth analysis of host defense factors and pathogen virulence factors. Many of these factors are conserved in insects and mammals, indicating the relevance of the nematode model to the vertebrate innate immune response. Here, we describe pathogen assays for a selection of the most commonly studied bacterial and fungal pathogens using the C. elegans model system.

  10. Identifying Pathogenicity Islands in Bacterial Pathogenomics Using Computational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Che

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing technologies have made it possible to study bacteria through analyzing their genome sequences. For instance, comparative genome sequence analyses can reveal the phenomenon such as gene loss, gene gain, or gene exchange in a genome. By analyzing pathogenic bacterial genomes, we can discover that pathogenic genomic regions in many pathogenic bacteria are horizontally transferred from other bacteria, and these regions are also known as pathogenicity islands (PAIs. PAIs have some detectable properties, such as having different genomic signatures than the rest of the host genomes, and containing mobility genes so that they can be integrated into the host genome. In this review, we will discuss various pathogenicity island-associated features and current computational approaches for the identification of PAIs. Existing pathogenicity island databases and related computational resources will also be discussed, so that researchers may find it to be useful for the studies of bacterial evolution and pathogenicity mechanisms.

  11. Influenza and Bacterial Pathogen Coinfections in the 20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan-Yi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To help understand the potential impact of bacterial coinfection during pandemic influenza periods, we undertook a far-reaching review of the existing literature to gain insights into the interaction of influenza and bacterial pathogens. Reports published between 1950 and 2006 were identified from scientific citation databases using standardized search terms. Study outcomes related to coinfection were subjected to a pooled analysis. Coinfection with influenza and bacterial pathogens occurred more frequently in pandemic compared with seasonal influenza periods. The most common bacterial coinfections with influenza virus were due to S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, Staphylococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Of these, S. pneumoniae was the most common cause of bacterial coinfection with influenza and accounted for 40.8% and 16.6% of bacterial coinfections during pandemic and seasonal periods, respectively. These results suggest that bacterial pathogens will play a key role in many countries, as the H1N1(A influenza pandemic moves forward. Given the role of bacterial coinfections during influenza epidemics and pandemics, the conduct of well-designed field evaluations of public health measures to reduce the burden of these common bacterial pathogens and influenza in at-risk populations is warranted.

  12. Bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OSUTH) between August 1999 and July 2000 in the Orthopaedics, Obstetrics and Gynaecological units to identify the bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds as well as their antibiotic sensitivity profile. A total of 1670 patients were ...

  13. Water microbiology. Bacterial pathogens and water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cabral, João P S

    2010-01-01

    .... In this review a general characterization of the most important bacterial diseases transmitted through water-cholera, typhoid fever and bacillary dysentery-is presented, focusing on the biology...

  14. Interaction between extracellular matrix molecules and microbial pathogens: the missing link in autoimmunity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi eSofat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease characterised by inflammation, tissue rebuilding and fibrosis. Inability by the body to regulate inflammation effectively is one of the hallmarks of RA. Interactions between the external environment and the human host play an important role in the development of autoimmunity. In RA, the observation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA to autoantigens is well recognised. Citrullination is a post-translational modification mediated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PADs, which exist in both mammalian and bacterial forms. Previous studies have shown how proteins expressed in the human extracellular matrix (ECM acquire properties of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs in RA and include collagens, tenascin-C and fibronectin. ECM DAMPs can further potentiate tissue damage in RA. Recent work has shown that citrullination in RA occurs at mucosal sites, including the oral cavity and lung. Mucosal sites have been linked with bacterial infection e.g. periodontal disease, where exogenous pathogens are implicated in the development of autoimmunity via an infectious trigger. Here we explore how mucosal surfaces exposed to bacteria could trigger autoimmunity in RA.

  15. Extracellular Adenosine Generation in the Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Responses and Pathogen Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Samiul Alam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine, an immunomodulatory biomolecule, is produced by the ecto-enzymes CD39 (nucleoside triphosphate dephosphorylase and CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase by dephosphorylation of extracellular ATP. CD73 is expressed by many cell types during injury, infection and during steady-state conditions. Besides host cells, many bacteria also have CD39-CD73-like machinery, which helps the pathogen subvert the host inflammatory response. The major function for adenosine is anti-inflammatory, and most recent research has focused on adenosine’s control of inflammatory mechanisms underlying various autoimmune diseases (e.g., colitis, arthritis. Although adenosine generated through CD73 provides a feedback to control tissue damage mediated by a host immune response, it can also contribute to immunosuppression. Thus, inflammation can be a double-edged sword: it may harm the host but eventually helps by killing the invading pathogen. The role of adenosine in dampening inflammation has been an area of active research, but the relevance of the CD39/CD73-axis and adenosine receptor signaling in host defense against infection has received less attention. Here, we review our recent knowledge regarding CD73 expression during murine Salmonellosis and Helicobacter-induced gastric infection and its role in disease pathogenesis and bacterial persistence. We also explored a possible role for the CD73/adenosine pathway in regulating innate host defense function during infection.

  16. bacterial pathogens associated with secondary peritonitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Robertson's cooked meat medium was used for back-up ... being discarded as negative. Inoculum in cooked meat medium was observed for .... specimen of the 15 patients that died: Prevotella spp. 6, B. Fragilis 2, Yeast spp. 2, B. Thetaiotamicron l, and B. Ovatus 1. There was no bacterial growth in 04 patients. The bacteria ...

  17. Cytosolic Access of Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens: The Shigella Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk, Nora; Enninga, Jost

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen, which causes bacillary dysentery in humans. A crucial step of Shigella infection is its invasion of epithelial cells. Using a type III secretion system, Shigella injects several bacterial effectors ultimately leading to bacterial internalization within a vacuole. Then, Shigella escapes rapidly from the vacuole, it replicates within the cytosol and spreads from cell-to-cell. The molecular mechanism of vacuolar rupture used by Shigella has been studied in some detail during the recent years and new paradigms are emerging about the underlying molecular events. For decades, bacterial effector proteins were portrayed as main actors inducing vacuolar rupture. This includes the effector/translocators IpaB and IpaC. More recently, this has been challenged and an implication of the host cell in the process of vacuolar rupture has been put forward. This includes the bacterial subversion of host trafficking regulators, such as the Rab GTPase Rab11. The involvement of the host in determining bacterial vacuolar integrity has also been found for other bacterial pathogens, particularly for Salmonella. Here, we will discuss our current view of host factor and pathogen effector implications during Shigella vacuolar rupture and the steps leading to it.

  18. Autophagic clearance of bacterial pathogens: molecular recognition of intracellular microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Maria Eugenia Mansilla; Colombo, Maria I

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in several physiological and pathological processes. One of the key roles of the autophagic pathway is to participate in the first line of defense against the invasion of pathogens, as part of the innate immune response. Targeting of intracellular bacteria by the autophagic machinery, either in the cytoplasm or within vacuolar compartments, helps to control bacterial proliferation in the host cell, controlling also the spreading of the infection. In this review we will describe the means used by diverse bacterial pathogens to survive intracellularly and how they are recognized by the autophagic molecular machinery, as well as the mechanisms used to avoid autophagic clearance.

  19. Extracellular Proteome and Citrullinome of the Oral Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stobernack, Tim; Glasner, Corinna; Junker, Sabryna; Gabarrini, Giorgio; de Smit, Menke; de Jong, Anne; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Doerte; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is an oral pathogen associated with the inflammatory disease periodontitis. Periodontitis and P. gingivalis have been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. One of the hallmarks of rheumatoid arthritis is the loss of tolerance against citrullinated proteins. Citrullination is

  20. Kynetic resazurin assay (KRA) for bacterial quantification of foodborne pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Yaxal; Mandel, Arkady; Lilge, Lothar

    2012-03-01

    Fast detection of bacterial concentrations is important for the food industry and for healthcare. Early detection of infections and appropriate treatment is essential since, the delay of treatments for bacterial infections tends to be associated with higher mortality rates. In the food industry and in healthcare, standard procedures require the count of colony-forming units in order to quantify bacterial concentrations, however, this method is time consuming and reports require three days to be completed. An alternative is metabolic-colorimetric assays which provide time efficient in vitro bacterial concentrations. A colorimetric assay based on Resazurin was developed as a time kinetic assay (KRA) suitable for bacterial concentration measurements. An optimization was performed by finding excitation and emission wavelengths for fluorescent acquisition. A comparison of two non-related bacteria, foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, was performed in 96 well plates. A metabolic and clonogenic dependence was established for fluorescent kinetic signals.

  1. Bithionol blocks pathogenicity of bacterial toxins, ricin, and Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease pathways form overlapping networks, and hub proteins represent attractive targets for broad-spectrum drugs. Using bacterial toxins as a proof of concept, we describe a new approach of discovering broad-spectrum therapies capable of inhibiting host proteins that mediate multiple pathogenic pa...

  2. Profile of potentially pathogenic intestinal parasites and bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order determine the profile of potentially pathogenic enteric parasites and bacterial agents inmunicipal refuse dumps in Ibadan, 5 major market places in the city were randomly selected by balloting method. Refuse sludge were examined parasitologically and bacteriological using the method described. The data analysis ...

  3. Pattern and antimicrobial sensitivity of pathogens in acute bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern and antimicrobial sensitivity of pathogens in acute bacterial meningitis beyond neonatal period at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Shika, ... among children beyond neonatal period for prompt empirical treatment of this important cause of morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries.

  4. Bacterial pathogens associated with secondary peritonitis in Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary peritonitis is a common and serious form of intra-abdominal infection, often associated with high morbidity and mortality. The overall patient outcome has not markedly improved in spite of advances in patient management. There is therefore need to study the pattern of bacterial pathogens associated with ...

  5. Unraveling plant responses to bacterial pathogens through proteomics

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2011-11-03

    Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens. Copyright 2011 Tamara Zimaro et al.

  6. Methods to classify bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Johansen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria can be detected in CF sputum, pathogenic and commensal. Modified Koch's criteria for identification of established and emerging CF pathogens are therefore described. Methods are described to isolate bacteria and to detect bacterial biofilms in sputum or lung tissue from CF patients...... by means of conventional culturing and staining techniques and by the PNA FISH technique. Additionally, the confocal scanning laser microscopy technique is described for studying biofilms in vitro in a flow cell system. The recA-gene PCR and the RFLP-based identification methods are described...... for identification of isolates from the Burkholderia complex to the species level. DNA typing by PFGE, which can be used for any bacterial pathogen, is described as it is employed for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A commercially available ELISA method is described for measuring IgG antibodies against P. aeruginosa in CF...

  7. Unraveling Plant Responses to Bacterial Pathogens through Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Zimaro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogenic bacteria cause diseases in important crops and seriously and negatively impact agricultural production. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which plants resist bacterial infection at the stage of the basal immune response or mount a successful specific R-dependent defense response is crucial since a better understanding of the biochemical and cellular mechanisms underlying these interactions will enable molecular and transgenic approaches to crops with increased biotic resistance. In recent years, proteomics has been used to gain in-depth understanding of many aspects of the host defense against pathogens and has allowed monitoring differences in abundance of proteins as well as posttranscriptional and posttranslational processes, protein activation/inactivation, and turnover. Proteomics also offers a window to study protein trafficking and routes of communication between organelles. Here, we summarize and discuss current progress in proteomics of the basal and specific host defense responses elicited by bacterial pathogens.

  8. Sum of the parts: composition and architecture of the bacterial extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrate, Oscar A; Zhou, Xiaoxue; Reichhardt, Courtney; Cegelski, Lynette

    2013-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular assemblies that exhibit resistance to antibiotics and contribute to the pathogenesis of serious and chronic infectious diseases. New approaches and quantitative data are needed to define the molecular composition of bacterial biofilms. Escherichia coli biofilms are known to contain polysaccharides and functional amyloid fibers termed curli, yet accurate determinations of biofilm composition at the molecular level have been elusive. The ability to define the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for the elucidation of structure-function relationships that will aid the development of chemical strategies to disrupt biofilms. We have developed an approach that integrates non-perturbative preparation of the ECM with electron microscopy, biochemistry, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy to define the chemical composition of the intact and insoluble ECM of a clinically important pathogenic bacterium--uropathogenic E. coli. Our data permitted a sum-of-all-the-parts analysis. Electron microscopy revealed supramolecular shell-like structures that encapsulated single cells and enmeshed the bacterial community. Biochemical and solid-state NMR measurements of the matrix and constitutive parts established that the matrix is composed of two major components, curli and cellulose, each in a quantifiable amount. This approach to quantifying the matrix composition is widely applicable to other organisms and to examining the influence of biofilm inhibitors. Collectively, our NMR spectra and the electron micrographs of the purified ECM inspire us to consider the biofilm matrix not as an undefined slime, but as an assembly of polymers with a defined composition and architecture. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival of bacterial enteric pathogens in traditional fermented foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simango, C; Rukure, G

    1992-07-01

    The survival of strains of bacterial enteric pathogens was investigated in two traditional fermented foods (mahewu and sour porridge) and in unfermented porridge. The foods were inoculated with cell suspensions of Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas species and pathogenic Escherichia coli which had a final concentration of 10(6)-10(7) cfu/ml of food. None of the strains of Aeromonas and Campylobacter were detected in mahewu and sour porridge 20 min after inoculation. The salmonellas were not found 4 h after inoculation in either fermented foods but the shigellas and pathogenic E. coli strains were more tolerant to the low pH of the fermented foods. Some of the shigellas and pathogenic E. coli strains survived for 24 h after inoculation but showed a sharp decrease in numbers. All the strains of the enteric pathogens survived for 24 h in the unfermented porridge and increased in the numbers except for campylobacters, the numbers of which declined. These results suggest that the traditional fermented foods have bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties and are unlikely to play a major role in the transmission of bacterial enteric pathogens.

  10. Intra- and inter-species interactions within biofilms of important foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Heir, Even; Desvaux, Mickaël; Hébraud, Michel; Møretrø, Trond; Langsrud, Solveig; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John; Kačániová, Miroslava; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Ölmez, Hülya; Simões, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    A community-based sessile life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. Under such conditions, cell-to-cell interactions are inevitable and ultimately lead to the establishment of dense, complex and highly structured biofilm populations encapsulated in a self-produced extracellular matrix and capable of coordinated and collective behavior. Remarkably, in food processing environments, a variety of different bacteria may attach to surfaces, survive, grow, and form biofilms. Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus are important bacterial pathogens commonly implicated in outbreaks of foodborne diseases, while all are known to be able to create biofilms on both abiotic and biotic surfaces. Particularly challenging is the attempt to understand the complexity of inter-bacterial interactions that can be encountered in such unwanted consortia, such as competitive and cooperative ones, together with their impact on the final outcome of these communities (e.g., maturation, physiology, antimicrobial resistance, virulence, dispersal). In this review, up-to-date data on both the intra- and inter-species interactions encountered in biofilms of these pathogens are presented. A better understanding of these interactions, both at molecular and biophysical levels, could lead to novel intervention strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilm formation in food processing environments and thus improve food safety. PMID:26347727

  11. Bacterial pathogens of the bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dee; Chengappa, M M; Kuszak, Jennifer; McVey, D Scott

    2010-07-01

    Pneumonia caused by the bacterial pathogens discussed in this article is the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality of the BRDC. Most of these infectious bacteria are not capable of inducing significant disease without the presence of other predisposing environmental factors, physiologic stressors, or concurrent infections. Mannheimia haemolytica is the most common and serious of these bacterial agents and is therefore also the most highly characterized. There are other important bacterial pathogens of BRD, such as Pasteurella multocida, Histophulus somni, and Mycoplasma bovis. Mixed infections with these organisms do occur. These pathogens have unique and common virulence factors but the resulting pneumonic lesions may be similar. Although the amount and quality of research associated with BRD has increased, vaccination and therapeutic practices are not fully successful. A greater understanding of the virulence mechanisms of the infecting bacteria and pathogenesis of pneumonia, as well as the characteristics of the organisms that allow tissue persistence, may lead to improved management, therapeutics, and vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Temperature dependent bacteriophages of a tropical bacterial pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Rebecca Jane Clokie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing awareness of the multiple ways that bacteriophages (phages influence bacterial evolution, population dynamics, physiology and pathogenicity. By studying a novel group of phages infecting a soil borne pathogen, we revealed a paradigm shifting observation that the phages switch their lifestyle according to temperature. We sampled soil from an endemic area of the serious tropical pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei, and established that podoviruses infecting the pathogen are frequently present in soil, and many of them are naturally occurring variants of a common virus type. Experiments on one phage in the related model Burkholderia thailandensis demonstrated that temperature defines the outcome of phage-bacteria interactions. At higher temperatures (37°C, the phage predominantly goes through a lytic cycle, but at lower temperatures (25°C, the phage remains temperate. This is the first report of a naturally occurring phage that follows a lytic or temperate lifestyle according to temperature. These observations fundamentally alter the accepted views on the abundance, population biology and virulence of B. pseudomallei. Furthermore, when taken together with previous studies, our findings suggest that the phenomenon of temperature dependency in phages is widespread. Such phages are likely to have a profound effect on bacterial life, and on our ability to culture and correctly enumerate viable bacteria.

  13. Cutaneous bacterial species from Lithobates catesbeianus can inhibit pathogenic dermatophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Antje; Hernandez, Trang

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics are being successfully used to fight many infectious diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms. However, new infectious diseases are continuously being identified, and some known pathogens are becoming resistant against known antibiotics. Furthermore, many antifungals are causing serious side effects in long-term treatments of patients, and many skin infections caused by dermatophytes are difficult to cure. The beneficial roles of resident cutaneous microbiota to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms have been shown for many vertebrate species. Microbial symbionts on the amphibian skin for example can be a source of powerful antimicrobial metabolites that can protect amphibians against diseases, such as chytridiomycosis, caused by a fungal pathogen. In this research, we investigated whether cutaneous bacterial species isolated from Lithobates catesbeianus (North American bullfrog), an invasive amphibian species that is resistant to chytridiomycosis, produce secondary metabolites that can be used to inhibit the growth of three species of dermatophytes (Microsporum gypseum, Epidermophyton floccosum, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes) which are known to cause topical or subdermal skin infections in humans. Strongly anti-dermatophyte bacterial species that belonged to the Bacillaceae, Streptomycetaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Aeromonadaceae, and Enterobacteriaceae were identified. This research has provided evidence of the presence of cutaneous anti-dermatophyte bacteria from L. catesbeianus which might provide a basis for health care providers to experiment with new antifungals in the future.

  14. Genome Assembly and Computational Analysis Pipelines for Bacterial Pathogens

    KAUST Repository

    Rangkuti, Farania Gama Ardhina

    2011-06-01

    Pathogens lie behind the deadliest pandemics in history. To date, AIDS pandemic has resulted in more than 25 million fatal cases, while tuberculosis and malaria annually claim more than 2 million lives. Comparative genomic analyses are needed to gain insights into the molecular mechanisms of pathogens, but the abundance of biological data dictates that such studies cannot be performed without the assistance of computational approaches. This explains the significant need for computational pipelines for genome assembly and analyses. The aim of this research is to develop such pipelines. This work utilizes various bioinformatics approaches to analyze the high-­throughput genomic sequence data that has been obtained from several strains of bacterial pathogens. A pipeline has been compiled for quality control for sequencing and assembly, and several protocols have been developed to detect contaminations. Visualization has been generated of genomic data in various formats, in addition to alignment, homology detection and sequence variant detection. We have also implemented a metaheuristic algorithm that significantly improves bacterial genome assemblies compared to other known methods. Experiments on Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv data showed that our method resulted in improvement of N50 value of up to 9697% while consistently maintaining high accuracy, covering around 98% of the published reference genome. Other improvement efforts were also implemented, consisting of iterative local assemblies and iterative correction of contiguated bases. Our result expedites the genomic analysis of virulent genes up to single base pair resolution. It is also applicable to virtually every pathogenic microorganism, propelling further research in the control of and protection from pathogen-­associated diseases.

  15. Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Uncooked Foods in Thai Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria; Piyaphong; Bodhidatta; Hoge; Tungsen

    1994-06-01

    In developing countries, the morbidity and mortality rates of gastrointestinal tract infections from food borne bacteria have been difficult to establish. Most studies have only been able to gather data prospectively from isolated geographic sources, rather than from large point-source epidemics. This study investigates the types of bacterial enteric pathogens found in food that was collected in a community in Western Thailand, where sporadic cases of hemolytic uremia syndrome and cholera have been reported. Samples of six different uncooked foods were collected from markets in two villages and in the hills in an area near Bangkok and were tested at a district hospital laboratory within 2 hours of collection. From the 820 food samples collected, enteric pathogens were isolated from approximately 12%. These included nontyphoidal salmonella; Vibrio parahemolyticus; attaching and effacing Escherichia coli of nonenteropathogenic E. coli serogroups; Campylobacter jejuni; enterotoxigenic E. coli; Shigella; and V. cholerae. Travelers in developing countries should be made aware by diarrheal disease programs that food obtained in markets may contain bacterial enteric pathogens and, therefore, the hygienic preparation of such foods is important in the prevention of gastrointestinal disease.

  16. Bacterial Pathogen Occurrence and Persistence in Livestock Mortality Biopiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Michitsch

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Properly managed biopiles can be used for slaughterhouse-residual degradation and bacterial pathogen inactivation, which otherwise represent a major health risk in the environment. Biopiles were used to dispose of slaughterhouse-residuals and determine the occurrence and persistence patterns of indicators of pathogenic bacteria. The indicator bacteria included the family Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, Escherichia coli, nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli, and Streptococcus fecalis. The slaughterhouse-residual biopiles remained static for 164 d in 2006 and 141 d in 2007. In biopile effluent samples, exponentially decreasing populations of the indicator bacteria were observed. Indicator bacteria presence in biopile and soil samples suggested their retention and persistence in, but not migration from, the media. Though the family Enterobacteriaceae, total coliforms, and Escherichia coli shared behavioral correlations, they exhibited different fates in all media compared to S. fecalis, which was observed to persist and re-grow. The behavior of inoculated nalidixic acid-resistant E. coli suggested that inactivation was the primary process in the biopiles. However, the biopiles constituted continual sources of the indicator bacteria due to their persistence in isolated and protected locations, and changes in dominant species. While biopiling slaughterhouse-residuals was effective to inactivate >99% (log reductions of indicator bacteria, tertiary methods and biopiling phases should be employed to ensure inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in animal waste biopiles. The fate of bacterial indicators in this system exhibited trends not-as-yet observed for animal waste biopiling activities, which generates numerous questions for further research.

  17. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active againstStaphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at 90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  18. Bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity in temperate streambed sediment during drying and rewetting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Pohlon

    Full Text Available Droughts are among the most important disturbance events for stream ecosystems; they not only affect stream hydrology but also the stream biota. Although desiccation of streams is common in Mediterranean regions, phases of dryness in headwaters have been observed more often and for longer periods in extended temperate regions, including Central Europe, reflecting global climate change and enhanced water withdrawal. The effects of desiccation and rewetting on the bacterial community composition and extracellular enzyme activity, a key process in the carbon flow of streams and rivers, were investigated in a typical Central European stream, the Breitenbach (Hesse, Germany. Wet streambed sediment is an important habitat in streams. It was sampled and exposed in the laboratory to different drying scenarios (fast, intermediate, slow for 13 weeks, followed by rewetting of the sediment from the fast drying scenario via a sediment core perfusion technique for 2 weeks. Bacterial community structure was analyzed using CARD-FISH and TGGE, and extracellular enzyme activity was assessed using fluorogenic model substrates. During desiccation the bacterial community composition shifted toward composition in soil, exhibiting increasing proportions of Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria and decreasing proportions of Bacteroidetes and Betaproteobacteria. Simultaneously the activities of extracellular enzymes decreased, most pronounced with aminopeptidases and less pronounced with enzymes involved in the degradation of polymeric carbohydrates. After rewetting, the general ecosystem functioning, with respect to extracellular enzyme activity, recovered after 10 to 14 days. However, the bacterial community composition had not yet achieved its original composition as in unaffected sediments within this time. Thus, whether the bacterial community eventually recovers completely after these events remains unknown. Perhaps this community undergoes permanent changes

  19. Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Poultry Pathogens: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thi Nhung

    2017-08-01

    guidelines as well as to monitor the evolution of AMR in poultry bacterial pathogens.

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Poultry Pathogens: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Chansiripornchai, Niwat; Carrique-Mas, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    monitor the evolution of AMR in poultry bacterial pathogens.

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Poultry Pathogens: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Chansiripornchai, Niwat; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.

    2017-01-01

    monitor the evolution of AMR in poultry bacterial pathogens. PMID:28848739

  2. Quorum sensing and bacterial pathogenicity: From molecules to disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antariksh Deep

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing in prokaryotic biology refers to the ability of a bacterium to sense information from other cells in the population when they reach a critical concentration (i.e. a Quorum and communicate with them. The "language" used for this intercellular communication is based on small, self-generated signal molecules called as autoinducers. Quorum sensing is thought to afford pathogenic bacteria a mechanism to minimize host immune responses by delaying the production of tissue-damaging virulence factors until sufficient bacteria have amassed and are prepared to overwhelm host defense mechanisms and establish infection. Quorum sensing systems are studied in a large number of gram-negative bacterial species belonging to α, β, and γ subclasses of proteobacteria. Among the pathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is perhaps the best understood in terms of the virulence factors regulated and the role the Quorum sensing plays in pathogenicity. Presently, Quorum sensing is considered as a potential novel target for antimicrobial therapy to control multi/all drug-resistant infections. This paper reviews Quorum sensing in gram positive and gram negative bacteria and its role in biofilm formation.

  3. Flocculation behaviour of hematite-kaolinite suspensions in presence of extracellular bacterial proteins and polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorni, S; Natarajan, K A

    2014-02-01

    Cells of Bacillus subtilis exhibited higher affinity towards hematite than to kaolinite. Bacterial cells were grown and adapted in the presence of hematite and kaolinite. Higher amounts of mineral-specific proteinaceous compounds were secreted in the presence of kaolinite while hematite-grown cells produced higher amounts of exopolysaccharides. Extracellular proteins (EP) exhibited higher adsorption density on kaolinite which was rendered more hydrophobic. Hematite surfaces were rendered more hydrophilic due to increased adsorption of extracellular polysaccharides (ECP). Significant surface chemical changes were produced due to interaction between minerals and extracellular proteins and polysaccharides. Iron oxides such as hematite could be effectively removed from kaolinite clays using selective bioflocculation of hematite after interaction with EP and ECP extracted from mineral-grown cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nano-TiO2 affects Cu speciation, extracellular enzyme activity, and bacterial communities in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Liu, Tong; Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yilin

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) coexist with heavy metals and influence the existing forms and toxicities of the metal in water. However, limited information is available regarding the ecological risk of this coexistence in sediments. In this study, the effect of nano-TiO2 on Cu speciation in sediments was investigated using sequential extraction. The microcosm approach was also employed to analyze the effects of the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu on extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial communities in sediments. Results showed that nano-TiO2 decreased the organic matter-bound fraction of Cu and increased the corresponding residual fraction Cu. As a result, speciation of exogenous Cu in sediments changed. During the course of the 30-day experiment, the presence of nano-TiO2 did not affect Cu-induced changes in bacterial community structure. However, the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu restrained the activity of bacterial extracellular enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase. The degree of inhibition also varied because of the different properties of extracellular enzymes. This research highlighted the importance of understanding and predicting the effects of the coexistence of nanomaterials and other pollutants in sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  6. Low Concentrations of Vitamin C Reduce the Synthesis of Extracellular Polymers and Destabilize Bacterial Biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Pandit, Santosh

    2017-12-26

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced by bacteria form a matrix supporting the complex three-dimensional architecture of biofilms. This EPS matrix is primarily composed of polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA. In addition to supporting the community structure, the EPS matrix protects bacterial biofilms from the environment. Specifically, it shields the bacterial cells inside the biofilm, by preventing antimicrobial agents from getting in contact with them, thereby reducing their killing effect. New strategies for disrupting the formation of the EPS matrix can therefore lead to a more efficient use of existing antimicrobials. Here we examined the mechanism of the known effect of vitamin C (sodium ascorbate) on enhancing the activity of various antibacterial agents. Our quantitative proteomics analysis shows that non-lethal concentrations of vitamin C inhibit bacterial quorum sensing and other regulatory mechanisms underpinning biofilm development. As a result, the EPS biosynthesis in reduced, and especially the polysaccharide component of the matrix is depleted. Once the EPS content is reduced beyond a critical point, bacterial cells get fully exposed to the medium. At this stage, the cells are more susceptible to killing, either by vitamin C-induced oxidative stress as reported here, or by other antimicrobials or treatments.

  7. Advances in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eBeare

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Infections by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. These bacteria include Chlamydia spp., which causes millions of cases of sexually transmitted disease and blinding trachoma annually, and members of the α-proteobacterial genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Orientia and Rickettsia, agents of serious human illnesses including epidemic typhus. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of human Q fever, has also been considered a prototypical obligate intracellular bacterium, but recent host cell-free (axenic growth has rescued it from obligatism. The historic genetic intractability of obligate intracellular bacteria has severely limited molecular dissection of their unique lifestyles and virulence factors involved in pathogenesis. Host cell restricted growth is a significant barrier to genetic transformation that can make simple procedures for free-living bacteria, such as cloning, exceedingly difficult. Low transformation efficiency requiring long term culture in host cells to expand small transformant populations is another obstacle. Despite numerous technical limitations, the last decade has witnessed significant gains in genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria including allelic exchange. Continued development of genetic tools should soon enable routine mutation and complementation strategies for virulence factor discovery and stimulate renewed interest in these refractory pathogens. In this review, we discuss the technical challenges associated with genetic transformation of obligate intracellular bacteria and highlight advances made with individual genera.

  8. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Susan A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C and human (37°C temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect

  9. Photorhabdus adhesion modification protein (Pam) binds extracellular polysaccharide and alters bacterial attachment

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jones, Robert T

    2010-05-12

    Abstract Background Photorhabdus are Gram-negative nematode-symbiotic and insect-pathogenic bacteria. The species Photorhabdus asymbiotica is able to infect humans as well as insects. We investigated the secreted proteome of a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at different temperatures in order to identify proteins relevant to the infection of the two different hosts. Results A comparison of the proteins secreted by a clinical isolate of P. asymbiotica at simulated insect (28°C) and human (37°C) temperatures led to the identification of a small and highly abundant protein, designated Pam, that is only secreted at the lower temperature. The pam gene is present in all Photorhabdus strains tested and shows a high level of conservation across the whole genus, suggesting it is both ancestral to the genus and probably important to the biology of the bacterium. The Pam protein shows limited sequence similarity to the 13.6 kDa component of a binary toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis. Nevertheless, injection or feeding of heterologously produced Pam showed no insecticidal activity to either Galleria mellonella or Manduca sexta larvae. In bacterial colonies, Pam is associated with an extracellular polysaccharide (EPS)-like matrix, and modifies the ability of wild-type cells to attach to an artificial surface. Interestingly, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) binding studies revealed that the Pam protein itself has adhesive properties. Although Pam is produced throughout insect infection, genetic knockout does not affect either insect virulence or the ability of P. luminescens to form a symbiotic association with its host nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. Conclusions We studied a highly abundant protein, Pam, which is secreted in a temperature-dependent manner in P. asymbiotica. Our findings indicate that Pam plays an important role in enhancing surface attachment in insect blood. Its association with exopolysaccharide suggests it may exert its effect through mediation of

  10. Influence of calcium in extracellular DNA mediated bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Theerthankar; Sehar, Shama; Koop, Leena; Wong, Yie Kuan; Ahmed, Safia; Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has an important structural role in guaranteeing the integrity of the outer lipopolysaccharide layer and cell walls of bacterial cells. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) being part of the slimy matrix produced by bacteria promotes biofilm formation through enhanced structural integrity of the matrix. Here, the concurrent role of Ca(2+) and eDNA in mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation was studied for the first time using a variety of bacterial strains and the thermodynamics of DNA to Ca(2+) binding. It was found that the eDNA concentrations under both planktonic and biofilm growth conditions were different among bacterial strains. Whilst Ca(2+) had no influence on eDNA release, presence of eDNA by itself favours bacterial aggregation via attractive acid-base interactions in addition, its binding with Ca(2+) at biologically relevant concentrations was shown further increase in bacterial aggregation via cationic bridging. Negative Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values in iTC data confirmed that the interaction between DNA and Ca(2+) is thermodynamically favourable and that the binding process is spontaneous and exothermic owing to its highly negative enthalpy. Removal of eDNA through DNase I treatment revealed that Ca(2+) alone did not enhance cell aggregation and biofilm formation. This discovery signifies the importance of eDNA and concludes that existence of eDNA on bacterial cell surfaces is a key facilitator in binding of Ca(2+) to eDNA thereby mediating bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation.

  11. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri and non-pathogenic Naegleria lovaniensis exhibit differential adhesion to, and invasion of, extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Melissa; da Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno; Cabral, Guy A; Marciano-Cabral, Francine

    2012-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis are closely related free-living amoebae found in the environment. N. fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while N. lovaniensis is non-pathogenic. N. fowleri infection occurs when the amoebae access the nasal passages, attach to the nasal mucosa and its epithelial lining, and migrate to the brain. This process involves interaction with components of the host extracellular matrix (ECM). Since the ability to invade tissues can be a characteristic that distinguishes pathogenic from non-pathogenic amoebae, the objective of this study was to assess adhesion to, and invasion of, the ECM by these two related but distinct Naegleria species. N. fowleri exhibited a higher level of adhesion to the ECM components laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen I. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that N. fowleri attached on ECM substrata exhibited a spread-out appearance that included the presence of focal adhesion-like structures. Western immunoblotting revealed two integrin-like proteins for both species, but one of these, with a molecular mass of approximately 70 kDa, was detected at a higher level in N. fowleri. Confocal microscopy indicated that the integrin-like proteins co-localized to the focal adhesion-like structures. Furthermore, anti-integrin antibody decreased adhesion of N. fowleri to ECM components. Finally, N. fowleri disrupted 3D ECM scaffolds, while N. lovaniensis had a minimal effect. Collectively, these results indicate a distinction in adhesion to, and invasion of, ECM proteins between N. fowleri and N. lovaniensis.

  12. Optimising methodology for determining the effect of ocean acidification on bacterial extracellular enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, T. J.; Maas, E. W.; Teesdale-Spittle, P.; Law, C. S.

    2015-04-01

    To fully understand the impact of ocean acidification on biogeochemical cycles, the response of bacterial extracellular enzymes needs to be considered as they play a central role in the degradation and distribution of labile organic matter. This study investigates the methodology, and potential artefacts involved in determining the response of bacterial extracellular glucosidase and protease to ocean acidification. The effect of pH on artificial fluorophores and substrates was examined, as well as the impact of three different acidification methods. The results indicate that pH has a significant effect on the fluorescence of the artificial fluorophore 4-methylumbeliferone for glucosidase activity, and 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin for protease activity, while artificial aminopeptidase substrate alters the pH of seawater, confirming previous observations. Before use in ocean acidification research these enzyme assay components must be buffered in order to stabilise sample pH. Reduction of coastal seawater pH to 7.8 was shown to increase β-glucosidase activity rapidly (0.5 h), while no significant response was detected for leucine aminopeptidase, highlighting the need for short-term direct effects of pH on enzyme activities. Bubbling with CO2 gas resulted in higher β-glucosidase activity when compared to acidification using gas-permeable silicon tubing and acidification with HCl. Although bubbling showed variable effects between two experiments conducted at different times of the year. In addition, bacterial cell numbers were 15-40% higher with bubbling relative to seawater acidified with gas-permeable silicon tubing and HCl. Artefacts associated with bubbling may lead to the overestimation of extracellular enzyme activities, and interpretation of the impacts of ocean acidification on organic matter cycling.

  13. Site-specific incorporation of photo-cross-linker and bioorthogonal amino acids into enteric bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shixian; Zhang, Zhenrun; Xu, Hao; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Li, Jie; Hao, Ziyang; Chen, Peng R

    2011-12-21

    Enteric bacterial pathogens are known to effectively pass through the extremely acidic mammalian stomachs and cause infections in the small and/or large intestine of human hosts. However, their acid-survival strategy and pathogenesis mechanisms remain elusive, largely due to the lack of tools to directly monitor and manipulate essential components (e.g., defense proteins or invasive toxins) participating in these processes. Herein, we have extended the pyrrolysine-based genetic code expansion strategy for encoding unnatural amino acids in enteric bacterial species, including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli , Shigella , and Salmonella . Using this system, a photo-cross-linking amino acid was incorporated into a Shigella acid chaperone HdeA (shHdeA), which allowed the identification of a comprehensive list of in vivo client proteins that are protected by shHdeA upon acid stress. To further demonstrate the application of our strategy, an azide-bearing amino acid was introduced into a Shigella type 3 secretion effector, OspF, without interruption of its secretion efficiency. This site-specifically installed azide handle allowed the facile detection of OspF's secretion in bacterial extracellular space. Taken together, these bioorthogonal functionalities we incorporated into enteric pathogens were shown to facilitate the investigation of unique and important proteins involved in the pathogenesis and stress-defense mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria that remain exceedingly difficult to study using conventional methodologies. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Assessment of bacterial pathogens in fresh rainwater and airborne particulate matter using Real-Time PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Rajni; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens in airborne particulate matter (PM) and in rainwater (RW) were detected using a robust and sensitive Real-Time PCR method. Both RW and PM were collected simultaneously in the tropical atmosphere of Singapore, which were then subjected to analysis for the presence of selected bacterial pathogens and potential pathogen of health concern ( Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aeromonas hydrophila). These pathogens were found to be prevalent in both PM and RW samples with E. coli being the most prevalent potential pathogen in both types of samples. The temporal distribution of these pathogens in PM and RW was found to be similar to each other. Using the proposed microbiological technique, the atmospheric deposition (dry and wet deposition) of bacterial pathogens to lakes and reservoirs can be studied in view of growing concerns about the outbreak of waterborne diseases.

  15. USGS/EPA collection protocol for bacterial pathogens in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Shaefer, F.L.; Charlena Bowling,; Dino Mattorano,; Tonya Nichols,; Erin Silvestri,

    2014-01-01

    This Sample Collection Procedure (SCP) describes the activities and considerations for the collection of bacterial pathogens from representative surface soil samples (0-5 cm). This sampling depth can be reached without the use of a drill rig, direct-push technology, or other mechanized equipment. This procedure can be used in most soil types but is limited to sampling at or near the ground surface. This protocol has components for two different types of sampling applications: (1) typical sampling, when there is no suspicion of contamination (e.g., surveillance or background studies); and (2) in response to known or suspected accidental contamination (e.g., the presence of animal carcasses). This protocol does not cover sampling in response to a suspected bioterrorist or intentional release event. Surface material is removed to the required depth (0-5 cm) and clean trowel or 50 ml sample tube is used to collect the sample. Sample containers are sealed, bagged, and shipped to the laboratory for analysis. Associated documentation, including a Field Data Log and Chain-of-Custody are also included in this document.

  16. PathogenFinder - Distinguishing Friend from Foe Using Bacterial Whole Genome Sequence Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosentino, Salvatore; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2013-01-01

    approaches. We describe PathogenFinder (http://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/PathogenFinder/), a web-server for the prediction of bacterial pathogenicity by analysing the input proteome, genome, or raw reads provided by the user. The method relies on groups of proteins, created without regard to their annotated...

  17. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active against Staphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at ≤1 mg/L and all isolates at ≤2 mg/L (MIC5090, 0.25/2 mg/L. National MRSA rates ranged from a low of 28.8% in Colombia to a high of 68.1% in Chile. All Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC50/90 values were at ≤0.015/≤0.015 mg/L for both. All Streptococcus pneumoniae were susceptible to ceftaroline, linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone was at 88.4% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 73.9% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for all S. pneumoniae. Ceftriaxone susceptibility was only at 33.3% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 0.0% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for penicillin-intermediate (penicillin MIC, 4 mg/L strains. All Haemophilus influenzae (29.4% β-lactamase-positive isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline, amoxicillin–clavulanate, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin. For the Latin American region, the ESBL-phenotype rate was 37.6% for Escherichia coli and 53.3% for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Ceftaroline was not active against ESBL-phenotype strains but was active against >90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  18. Phage-host interplay: examples from tailed phages and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya eChaturongakul

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex interactions between bacteriophages and their bacterial hosts play significant roles in shaping the structure of environmental microbial communities, not only by genetic transduction but also by modification of bacterial gene expression patterns. Survival of phages solely depends on their ability to infect their bacterial hosts, most importantly during phage entry. Successful dynamic adaptation of bacteriophages when facing selective pressures, such as host adaptation and resistance, dictates their abundance and diversification. Co-evolution of the phage tail fibers and bacterial receptors determine bacterial host ranges, mechanisms of phage entry and other infection parameters. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the physical interactions between tailed bacteriophages and bacterial pathogens (e.g., Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the influences of the phage on host gene expression. Understanding these interactions can offer insights into phage-host dynamics and suggest novel strategies for the design of bacterial pathogen biological controls.

  19. High temperature and bacteriophages can indirectly select for bacterial pathogenicity in environmental reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville-Petri Friman

    Full Text Available The coincidental evolution hypothesis predicts that traits connected to bacterial pathogenicity could be indirectly selected outside the host as a correlated response to abiotic environmental conditions or different biotic species interactions. To investigate this, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, Serratia marcescens, was cultured in the absence and presence of the lytic bacteriophage PPV (Podoviridae at 25°C and 37°C for four weeks (N = 5. At the end, we measured changes in bacterial phage-resistance and potential virulence traits, and determined the pathogenicity of all bacterial selection lines in the Parasemia plantaginis insect model in vivo. Selection at 37°C increased bacterial motility and pathogenicity but only in the absence of phages. Exposure to phages increased the phage-resistance of bacteria, and this was costly in terms of decreased maximum population size in the absence of phages. However, this small-magnitude growth cost was not greater with bacteria that had evolved in high temperature regime, and no trade-off was found between phage-resistance and growth rate. As a result, phages constrained the evolution of a temperature-mediated increase in bacterial pathogenicity presumably by preferably infecting the highly motile and virulent bacteria. In more general perspective, our results suggest that the traits connected to bacterial pathogenicity could be indirectly selected as a correlated response by abiotic and biotic factors in environmental reservoirs.

  20. Effect of concentrating and exposing the bioluminescent bacteria to the non-luminescent allo-bacterial extracellular products on their luminescence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, J.; Priya, G.G.; Kannapiran, E.

    of the physical proximity while artificially concentrating the bioluminescence bacterial cultures and their luminescence in presence of non- luminescent bacterial extra-cellular product were investigated. 3 Materials and Methods Isolation of Bacteria...

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on Some Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated From Women With Bacterial Vaginosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis. Materials and Methods Ninety-six samples were obtained from vaginal discharge of women with bacterial vaginosis by a gynecologist with a Dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth. Then were immediately sent to the laboratory in cold chain for further assessment. Afterward, culture was transferred on blood agar, EMB, Palcam and differential diagnosis environments. Then cultures were incubated for 24 hours at 37 °C. Lactobacillus reuteri strains were cultured in MRS environment and transferred to laboratory. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus reuteri inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria was evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and antibiogram. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software v.16. Results The results of this study demonstrated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Enterococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E. coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of most Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use, contraceptive methods and douching were 61%, 55%, 42% and 13%, respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial. Conclusions Our findings indicated the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus reuteri on pathogenic bacteria that

  2. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futahashi, Ryo; Tanaka, Kohjiro; Tanahashi, Masahiko; Nikoh, Naruo; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Lee, Bok Luel; Fukatsu, Takema

    2013-01-01

    The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  3. Survey of bacterial pathogens on leaves and seeds of red mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial pathogens of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) were investigated. 50 samples each of leaves and seeds (healthy and diseased) were randomly collected and used for the analysis. Mean bacterial counts obtained were: healthy and diseased leaves; 8.26 x 103 and 5.9 l x l03 cfu/ml respectively; healthy seeds ...

  4. Costs and benefits of bacterial culturing and pathogen reduction in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.P.; van der Poel, C.L.; Buskens, E.; Bonneux, L.; Bonsel, G.J.; van Hout, B.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacterial contamination is a life-threatening risk of blood transfusion, especially with platelet (PLT) transfusions. Bacterial culturing (BCU) of PLTs as well as pathogen reduction (PRT) reduce the likelihood of such contamination. The cost-effectiveness (CE) of these interventions was

  5. Neutrophils and macrophages work in concert as inducers and effectors of adaptive immunity against extracellular and intracellular microbial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Manuel T

    2010-05-01

    Emerging data suggest new facets of the concerted participation of neutrophils and macrophages in antimicrobial immunity. The classical view is that DCs and macrophages are the inducers of adaptive antimicrobial immunity, but there is evidence for neutrophil participation in this task as cytokine and chemokine producers and APCs. On the other hand, the concept that the T(H)1 response is only associated with control of infections by intracellular pathogens through activation of macrophages by IFN-gamma, and the T(H)17/IL-17 axis is only involved in protection against extracellular pathogens through mobilization and activation of neutrophils is simplistic: There is evidence suggesting that T(H)1 and T(H)17 responses, separately or in parallel, may use macrophages and neutrophils against infections by extracellular and intracellular microbial pathogens. Opsonization by pathogen-specific Igs enhances the antimicrobial capabilities of neutrophils and macrophages in infections by extracellular and intracellular microbes. The functional partnership between macrophages and neutrophils as inducers and effectors of adaptive antimicrobial immunity conforms to their affiliation with the myeloid phagocyte system and reveals a strategy based on the concurrent use of the two professional phagocytes in the adaptive defense mechanisms. Starting from a common myeloid precursor in the bone marrow, macrophages and neutrophils split during differentiation but come together at the infectious foci for a cooperative strategy that uses modulator and effector activities to attack invading microbial pathogens.

  6. Bacterial ‘Cell’ Phones: Do cell phones carry potential pathogens?

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Chawla; Chiranjay Mukhopadhayay; Bimala Gurung; Priya Bhate; Indira Bairy

    2009-01-01

    Cell phones are important companions for professionals especially health care workers (HCWs) for better communication in hospital. The present study compared the nature of the growth of potentially pathogenic bacterial flora on cell phones in hospital and community. 75% cell phones from both the categories grew at least one potentially pathogenic organism. Cell phones from HCWs grew significantly more potential pathogens like MRSA (20%), Acinetobacter species (5%), Pseudomonas species (2.5%) ...

  7. Daily variations in pathogenic bacterial populations in a monsoon influenced tropical environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Naik, S.D.; Gaonkar, C.C.

    and an assessment of the health of such an ecosystem benefits from high resolution observations. Virulent pathogenic Vibrio species are expected more frequently in tropical marine environments, since the virulence gene expression seems to increase at elevated... contaminated water are serious threats for public health and coliform bacteria have been regarded as one of the most important indicators for monitoring pathogenic bacteria. To address potential pathogenic bacterial outbreaks, the distribution and diversity...

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  9. Nanotechnology to rescue bacterial bidirectional extracellular electron transfer in bioelectrochemical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Kalathil, Shafeer

    2016-03-17

    An electrically active bacterium transports its metabolically generated electrons to insoluble substrates such as electrodes via a process known as extracellular electron transport (EET). Bacterial EET is a crucial process in the geochemical cycling of metals, bioremediation and bioenergy devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Recently, it has been found that electroactive bacteria can reverse their respiratory pathways by accepting electrons from a negatively poised electrode to produce high-value chemicals such as ethanol in a process termed as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). A poor electrical connection between bacteria and the electrode hinders the EET and MES processes significantly. Also, the bidirectional EET process is sluggish and needs to be improved drastically to extend its practical applications. Several attempts have been undertaken to improve the bidirectional EET by employing various advanced nanostructured materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene. This review covers the recent progress in the bacterial bidirectional EET processes using advanced nanostructures in the light of current understandings of bacteria–nanomaterial interactions.

  10. Modulation of epithelial cell polarity by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Rocio; Kralicek, Sarah E; Hecht, Gail A

    2017-10-01

    Epithelial cells constitute a physical barrier that aids in protecting the host from microbial pathogens. Polarized epithelial cells contain distinct apical and basolateral membrane domains separated by intercellular junctions, including tight junctions (TJs), which contribute to the maintenance of apical-basal polarity. Polarity complexes also contribute to the establishment of TJ formation. Several pathogens perturb epithelial TJ barrier function and structure in addition to causing a loss of apical-basal polarity. Here, we review the impact of pathogenic bacteria on the disruption of cell-cell junctions and epithelial polarity. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Surveillance of bacterial pathogens of diarrhoea in two selected sub ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GAR) have witnessed several episodes of cholera outbreaks, with some deaths. Compared to previous epidemics, which usually followed heavy rains, recent outbreaks show no seasonality. Objectives: To investigate infective bacterial diseases ...

  12. Molecular assessment of bacterial pathogens - a contribution to drinking water safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2008-06-01

    Human bacterial pathogens are considered as an increasing threat to drinking water supplies worldwide because of the growing demand of high-quality drinking water and the decreasing quality and quantity of available raw water. Moreover, a negative impact of climate change on freshwater resources is expected. Recent advances in molecular detection technologies for bacterial pathogens in drinking water bear the promise in improving the safety of drinking water supplies by precise detection and identification of the pathogens. More importantly, the array of molecular approaches allows understanding details of infection routes of waterborne diseases, the effects of changes in drinking water treatment, and management of freshwater resources.

  13. Greater Species Richness of Bacterial Skin Symbionts Better Suppresses the Amphibian Fungal Pathogen Batrachochytrium Dendrobatidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovia-Scott, Jonah; Rejmanek, Daniel; Woodhams, Douglas C; Worth, S Joy; Kenny, Heather; McKenzie, Valerie; Lawler, Sharon P; Foley, Janet E

    2017-07-01

    The symbiotic microbes that grow in and on many organisms can play important roles in protecting their hosts from pathogen infection. While species diversity has been shown to influence community function in many other natural systems, the question of how species diversity of host-associated symbiotic microbes contributes to pathogen resistance is just beginning to be explored. Understanding diversity effects on pathogen resistance could be particularly helpful in combating the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) which has caused dramatic population declines in many amphibian species and is a major concern for amphibian conservation. Our study investigates the ability of host-associated bacteria to inhibit the proliferation of Bd when grown in experimentally assembled biofilm communities that differ in species number and composition. Six bacterial species isolated from the skin of Cascades frogs (Rana cascadae) were used to assemble bacterial biofilm communities containing 1, 2, 3, or all 6 bacterial species. Biofilm communities were grown with Bd for 7 days following inoculation. More speciose bacterial communities reduced Bd abundance more effectively. This relationship between bacterial species richness and Bd suppression appeared to be driven by dominance effects-the bacterial species that were most effective at inhibiting Bd dominated multi-species communities-and complementarity: multi-species communities inhibited Bd growth more than monocultures of constituent species. These results underscore the notion that pathogen resistance is an emergent property of microbial communities, a consideration that should be taken into account when designing probiotic treatments to reduce the impacts of infectious disease.

  14. Dancing with the Stars: How Choreographed Bacterial Interactions Dictate Nososymbiocity and Give Rise to Keystone Pathogens, Accessory Pathogens, and Pathobionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Lamont, Richard J

    2016-06-01

    Many diseases that originate on mucosal membranes ensue from the action of polymicrobial communities of indigenous organisms working in concert to disrupt homeostatic mechanisms. Multilevel physical and chemical communication systems among constituent organisms underlie polymicrobial synergy and dictate the community's pathogenic potential or nososymbiocity, that is, disease arising from living together with a susceptible host. Functional specialization of community participants, often originating from metabolic codependence, has given rise to several newly appreciated designations within the commensal-to-pathogen spectrum. Accessory pathogens, while inherently commensal in a particular microenvironment, nonetheless enhance the colonization or metabolic activity of pathogens. Keystone pathogens (bacterial drivers or alpha-bugs) exert their influence at low abundance by modulating both the composition and levels of community participants and by manipulating host responses. Pathobionts (or bacterial passengers) exploit disrupted host homeostasis to flourish and promote inflammatory disease. In this review we discuss how commensal or pathogenic properties of organisms are not intrinsic features, and have to be considered within the context of both the microbial community in which they reside and the host immune status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of mastitis pathogens by analysis of volatile bacterial metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, K.A.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to detect mastitis pathogens based on their volatile metabolites was studied. Milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis, caused by Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Escherichia coli were collected. In

  16. characterisation of bacterial brown spot pathogen from dry bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    2011 $ ... BROWN SPOT PATHOGEN FROM DRY BEAN. PRODUCTION AREAS OF SOUTH AFRICA. H.T.H. MUEDI, D. FOURIE and N.W. MCLAREN1. Agricultural Research Council - Grain Crops Institute, 114 Chris Hani Street, Potchefstroom,.

  17. Bacterial proteases and virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Brøndsted, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on proteolysis for variety of purposes during the infection process. In the cytosol, the main proteolytic players are the conserved Clp and Lon proteases that directly contribute to virulence through the timely degradation of virulence regulators and indirectly by providing....... These extracellular proteases are activated in complex cascades involving auto-processing and proteolytic maturation. Thus, proteolysis has been adopted by bacterial pathogens at multiple levels to ensure the success of the pathogen in contact with the human host....

  18. Extracellular vesicles from Paracoccidioides pathogenic species transport polysaccharide and expose ligands for DC-SIGN receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Roberta Peres; Heiss, Christian; Black, Ian; Azadi, Parastoo; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Puccia, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) mediate non-conventional transport of molecules across the fungal cell wall. We aimed at describing the carbohydrate composition and surface carbohydrate epitopes of EVs isolated from the pathogenic fungi Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii using standard procedures. Total EV carbohydrates were ethanol-precipitated from preparations depleted of lipids and proteins, then analyzed by chemical degradation, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and size-exclusion chromatography. EV glycosyl residues of Glc, Man, and Gal comprised most probably two major components: a high molecular mass 4,6-α-glucan and a galactofuranosylmannan, possibly an oligomer, bearing a 2-α-Manp main chain linked to β-Galf (1,3) and α-Manp (1,6) end units. The results also suggested the presence of small amounts of a (1→6)-Manp polymer, (1→3)-glucan and (1→6)-glucan. Glycan microarrays allowed identification of EV surface lectin(s), while plant lectin microarray profiling revealed terminal Man and GlcNAc residues exposed at the EVs surface. Mammalian lectin microarray profiling showed that DC-SIGN receptors recognized surface carbohydrate in Paracoccidioides EVs. Our results suggest that oligosaccharides, cytoplasmic storage, and cell wall polysaccharides can be exported in fungal EVs, which also expose surface PAMPs and lectins. The role of these newly identified components in the interaction with the host remains to be unraveled. PMID:26387503

  19. What Makes a Bacterial Species Pathogenic?:Comparative Genomic Analysis of the Genus Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouts, Derrick E; Matthias, Michael A; Adhikarla, Haritha; Adler, Ben; Amorim-Santos, Luciane; Berg, Douglas E; Bulach, Dieter; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Chang, Yung-Fu; Galloway, Renee L; Haake, David A; Haft, Daniel H; Hartskeerl, Rudy; Ko, Albert I; Levett, Paul N; Matsunaga, James; Mechaly, Ariel E; Monk, Jonathan M; Nascimento, Ana L T; Nelson, Karen E; Palsson, Bernhard; Peacock, Sharon J; Picardeau, Mathieu; Ricaldi, Jessica N; Thaipandungpanit, Janjira; Wunder, Elsio A; Yang, X Frank; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2016-02-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira, is a globally widespread, neglected and emerging zoonotic disease. While whole genome analysis of individual pathogenic, intermediately pathogenic and saprophytic Leptospira species has been reported, comprehensive cross-species genomic comparison of all known species of infectious and non-infectious Leptospira, with the goal of identifying genes related to pathogenesis and mammalian host adaptation, remains a key gap in the field. Infectious Leptospira, comprised of pathogenic and intermediately pathogenic Leptospira, evolutionarily diverged from non-infectious, saprophytic Leptospira, as demonstrated by the following computational biology analyses: 1) the definitive taxonomy and evolutionary relatedness among all known Leptospira species; 2) genomically-predicted metabolic reconstructions that indicate novel adaptation of infectious Leptospira to mammals, including sialic acid biosynthesis, pathogen-specific porphyrin metabolism and the first-time demonstration of cobalamin (B12) autotrophy as a bacterial virulence factor; 3) CRISPR/Cas systems demonstrated only to be present in pathogenic Leptospira, suggesting a potential mechanism for this clade's refractoriness to gene targeting; 4) finding Leptospira pathogen-specific specialized protein secretion systems; 5) novel virulence-related genes/gene families such as the Virulence Modifying (VM) (PF07598 paralogs) proteins and pathogen-specific adhesins; 6) discovery of novel, pathogen-specific protein modification and secretion mechanisms including unique lipoprotein signal peptide motifs, Sec-independent twin arginine protein secretion motifs, and the absence of certain canonical signal recognition particle proteins from all Leptospira; and 7) and demonstration of infectious Leptospira-specific signal-responsive gene expression, motility and chemotaxis systems. By identifying large scale changes in infectious (pathogenic and intermediately pathogenic

  20. Novel role of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in the protection of neutrophil extracellular Traps against degradation by bacterial nucleases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, A.; Völlger, L.; Berends, E.T.M.; Molhoek, E.M.; Stapels, D.A.C.; Midon, M.; Friães, A.; Pingoud, A.; Rooijakkers, S.H.M.; Gallo, R.L.; Mörgelin, M.; Nizet, V.; Naim, H.Y.; Köckritz-Blickwede, M. von

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have been described as a fundamental innate immune defence mechanism. They consist of a nuclear DNA backbone associated with different antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) which are able to engulf and kill pathogens. The AMP LL-37, a member of the cathelicidin family,

  1. Probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 biofilms on silicone substrates for bacterial interference against pathogen colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Zhu, Zhiling; Wang, Jun; Lopez, Analette I; Li, Siheng; Kumar, Amit; Yu, Fei; Chen, Haoqing; Cai, Chengzhi; Zhang, Lijuan

    2017-03-01

    Bacterial interference is an alternative strategy to fight against device-associated bacterial infections. Pursuing this strategy, a non-pathogenic bacterial biofilm is used as a live, protective barrier to fence off pathogen colonization. In this work, biofilms formed by probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) are investigated for their potential for long-term bacterial interference against infections associated with silicone-based urinary catheters and indwelling catheters used in the digestive system, such as feeding tubes and voice prostheses. We have shown that EcN can form stable biofilms on silicone substrates, particularly those modified with a biphenyl mannoside derivative. These biofilms greatly reduced the colonization by pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis in Lysogeny broth (LB) for 11days. Bacterial interference is an alternative strategy to fight against device-associated bacterial infections. Pursuing this strategy, we use non-pathogenic bacteria to form a biofilm that serves as a live, protective barrier against pathogen colonization. Herein, we report the first use of preformed probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917 biofilms on the mannoside-presenting silicone substrates to prevent pathogen colonization. The biofilms serve as a live, protective barrier to fence off the pathogens, whereas current antimicrobial/antifouling coatings are subjected to gradual coverage by the biomass from the rapidly growing pathogens in a high-nutrient environment. It should be noted that E. coli Nissle 1917 is commercially available and has been used in many clinical trials. We also demonstrated that this probiotic strain performed significantly better than the non-commercial, genetically modified E. coli strain that we previously reported. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel extracellular metallopeptidase domain shared by animal host-associated mutualistic and pathogenic microbes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirintra Nakjang

    Full Text Available The mucosal microbiota is recognised as an important factor for our health, with many disease states linked to imbalances in the normal community structure. Hence, there is considerable interest in identifying the molecular basis of human-microbe interactions. In this work we investigated the capacity of microbes to thrive on mucosal surfaces, either as mutualists, commensals or pathogens, using comparative genomics to identify co-occurring molecular traits. We identified a novel domain we named M60-like/PF13402 (new Pfam entry PF13402, which was detected mainly among proteins from animal host mucosa-associated prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes ranging from mutualists to pathogens. Lateral gene transfers between distantly related microbes explained their shared M60-like/PF13402 domain. The novel domain is characterised by a zinc-metallopeptidase-like motif and is distantly related to known viral enhancin zinc-metallopeptidases. Signal peptides and/or cell surface anchoring features were detected in most microbial M60-like/PF13402 domain-containing proteins, indicating that these proteins target an extracellular substrate. A significant subset of these putative peptidases was further characterised by the presence of associated domains belonging to carbohydrate-binding module family 5/12, 32 and 51 and other glycan-binding domains, suggesting that these novel proteases are targeted to complex glycoproteins such as mucins. An in vitro mucinase assay demonstrated degradation of mammalian mucins by a recombinant form of an M60-like/PF13402-containing protein from the gut mutualist Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. This study reveals that M60-like domains are peptidases targeting host glycoproteins. These peptidases likely play an important role in successful colonisation of both vertebrate mucosal surfaces and the invertebrate digestive tract by both mutualistic and pathogenic microbes. Moreover, 141 entries across various peptidase families described

  3. From cholera to corals: Viruses as drivers of virulence in a major coral bacterial pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Weynberg, Karen D.

    2015-12-08

    Disease is an increasing threat to reef-building corals. One of the few identified pathogens of coral disease is the bacterium Vibrio coralliilyticus. In Vibrio cholerae, infection by a bacterial virus (bacteriophage) results in the conversion of non-pathogenic strains to pathogenic strains and this can lead to cholera pandemics. Pathogenicity islands encoded in the V. cholerae genome play an important role in pathogenesis. Here we analyse five whole genome sequences of V. coralliilyticus to examine whether virulence is similarly driven by horizontally acquired elements. We demonstrate that bacteriophage genomes encoding toxin genes with homology to those found in pathogenic V. cholerae are integrated in V. coralliilyticus genomes. Virulence factors located on chromosomal pathogenicity islands also exist in some strains of V. coralliilyticus. The presence of these genetic signatures indicates virulence in V. coralliilyticus is driven by prophages and other horizontally acquired elements. Screening for pathogens of coral disease should target conserved regions in these elements.

  4. Antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens causing meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was total resistance to cotrimoxazole (100%) while 6 (40%) isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Conclusion: Sensitivity to penicillin was high and the high sensitivity of bacteria to ceftriaxone suggested that it can be recommended for treatment of bacterial meningitis in Zimbabwe. No major changes have taken place ...

  5. Bacterial Genome Engineering and Synthetic Biology: Combating Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    distribution is unlimited. UNCLASSIFIED 2 infections. Key advances in genetic engineering approaches can successfully aid in targeting and editing...engineering and SB methods such as recombineering , clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and bacterial cell-cell... recombineering , targetron. Background Recent advancements in synthetic biology (SB) have enabled the development of novel genome engineering tools for the

  6. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacterial Pathogens in Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and sensitivity trends of urinary tract bacterial isolates were determined through a cross sectional retrospective study at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. Four hundred specimens from 274 inpatients and 126 outpatients were studied and anti microbial sensitivity test was done by the disc diffusion ...

  7. Prevalence of acute respiratory bacterial pathogens in children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted in Gondar, North-Western Ethiopia, during 1997-1998 to determine the prevalence of bacterial etiologic agents of acute respiratory infection (ARI) in children. A total of 390 subjects were studied out of which 63% were cases from Gondar Hospital and Gondar Health Center and the rest (37%) were ...

  8. pathogenic intestinal parasites and bacterial agents in solid wastes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-03-01

    Mar 1, 2003 ... Results: Cases of multiple intestinal parasites and bacterial agents were commonly encountered in the sludge refuse samples. The commonly found parasitic agents were of both human and veterinary importance. These include Ascaris Lumbricoides (9.3 egp),. Entamoeba histolytica (8.07 cyst per gram), ...

  9. Camel Mastitis, associated Bacterial Pathogens and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted between September 2006 and April 2007 with the aim of assessing the occurrence of camel mastitis and bacterial causes associated with it and evaluating Fat and Protein content of camel milk in Gewane district, Afar Regional State, Northeastern Ethiopia. Lactating camels which are ...

  10. COMPARATIVE ACTIVITY OF CECROPIN A AND POLYMYXIN B AGAINST FROG BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermin Schadich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of two antimicrobial peptides, cecropin A and polymyxin B against different bacterial pathogens associated with bacterial dermatosepticemia, a fatal bacterial infectious disease of frogs was investigated. The peptides were tested in serial of concentrations (100-0.19 µg/ml for growth inhibition of seven pathogens: Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia liquefaciens. Their antimicrobial activity was compared with that of two antimicrobial peptides from frog skin, magainin 2 and aurein 2.1. Both cecropin A and polymyxin B, completely inhibited the growth of three pathogens: C. freundii, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa at a concentration some sixteen times less than two skin peptides. Furthermore, cecropin A inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the two skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and P. mirabilis. Polymyxin B also inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and S. liquefaciens. Cecropin A and polymyxin B have marked antibacterial activity against different frog bacterial pathogens indicating potential for therapeutic measures.Keywords: frogs, antimicrobial, bacteria, cecropin, polymyxin, resistance

  11. Hijacking host cell highways: manipulation of the host actin cytoskeleton by obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punsiri M Colonne

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, subversion of cell intrinsic immunity, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions.

  12. Occurrence Of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens In Smoked Fish At ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potential human pathogens were isolated from all the samples studied through culture, growth characteristics, morphological, physiological and biochemical reaction of substrates and enzyme activities. Organisms isolated include Staphylococcus aureus, 29 (44.6%), Listeria monocytogenes 6 (9.2%), Pseudomonas ...

  13. Bacterial cell surface properties: role of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Yang, Shanshan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) on the comprehensive surface properties of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida). The removal of LB-EPS from bacterial surfaces by high-speed centrifugation (12,000×g) was confirmed by SEM images. Viability tests showed that the percentages of viable cells ranged from 95.9% to 98.0%, and no significant difference was found after treatment (P>0.05). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of phosphodiester, carboxylic, phosphate, and amino functional groups on bacteria surfaces, and the removal of LB-EPS did not alter the types of cell surface functional groups. Potentiometric titration results suggested the total site concentrations on the intact bacteria were higher than those on LB-EPS free bacteria. Most of the acidity constants (pKa) were almost identical, except the increased pKa values of phosphodiester groups on LB-EPS free S. suis and E. coli surfaces. The electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic diameters of the intact and LB-EPS free bacteria were statistically unchanged (P>0.05), indicating LB-EPS had no influence on the net surface charges and size distribution of bacteria. However, LB-ESP could enhance cell aggregation processes. The four LB-EPS free bacteria all exhibited fewer hydrophobicity values (26.1-65.0%) as compared to the intact cells (47.4-69.3%), suggesting the removal of uncharged nonpolar compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) in LB-EPS. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in cell surface characterizations induced by LB-EPS, and have important implications for assessing the role of LB-EPS in bacterial adhesion and transport behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Importance of Soil Amendments: Survival of Bacterial Pathogens in Manure and Compost Used as Organic Fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manan; Reynnells, Russell

    2016-08-01

    Biological soil amendments (BSAs) such as manure and compost are frequently used as organic fertilizers to improve the physical and chemical properties of soils. However, BSAs have been known to be a reservoir for enteric bacterial pathogens such as enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), Salmonella spp., and Listeria spp. There are numerous mechanisms by which manure may transfer pathogens to growing fruits and vegetables, and several outbreaks of infections have been linked to manure-related contamination of leafy greens. In the United States several commodity-specific guidelines and current and proposed federal rules exist to provide guidance on the application of BSAs as fertilizers to soils, some of which require an interval between the application of manure to soils and the harvest of fruits and vegetables. This review examines the survival, persistence, and regrowth/resuscitation of bacterial pathogens in manure, biosolids, and composts. Moisture, along with climate and the physicochemical properties of soil, manure, or compost, plays a significant role in the ability of pathogens to persist and resuscitate in amended soils. Adaptation of enteric bacterial pathogens to the nonhost environment of soils may also extend their persistence in manure- or compost-amended soils. The presence of antibiotic-resistance genes in soils may also be increased by manure application. Overall, BSAs applied as fertilizers to soils can support the survival and regrowth of pathogens. BSAs should be handled and applied in a manner that reduces the prevalence of pathogens in soils and the likelihood of transfer of food-borne pathogens to fruits and vegetables. This review will focus on two BSAs-raw manure and composted manure (and other feedstocks)-and predominantly on the survival of enteric bacterial pathogens in BSAs as applied to soils as organic fertilizers.

  15. A Plant Bacterial Pathogen Manipulates Its Insect Vector's Energy Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj; Ebert, Timothy A; Rogers, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    Insect-transmitted plant-pathogenic bacteria may alter their vectors' fitness, survival, behavior, and metabolism. Because these pathogens interact with their vectors on the cellular and organismal levels, potential changes at the biochemical level might occur. "Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus" (CLas) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. The genome of CLas revealed the presence of an ATP translocase that mediates the uptake of ATP and other nucleotides from medium to achieve its biological processes, such as growth and multiplication. Here, we showed that the levels of ATP and many other nucleotides were significantly higher in CLas-infected than healthy psyllids. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation for ATP synthase subunits, while ATPase enzyme activity showed a decrease in ATPase activity. These results indicated that CLas stimulated Diaphorina citri to produce more ATP and many other energetic nucleotides, while it may inhibit their consumption by the insect. As a result of ATP accumulation, the adenylated energy charge (AEC) increased and the AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP ratios decreased in CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. Survival analysis confirmed a shorter life span for CLas-infected D. citri psyllids. In addition, electropenetrography showed a significant reduction in total nonprobing time, salivation time, and time from the last E2 (phloem ingestion) to the end of recording, indicating that CLas-infected psyllids were at a higher hunger level and they tended to forage more often. This increased feeding activity reflects the CLas-induced energetic stress. In conclusion, CLas alters the energy metabolism of its psyllid vector, D. citri, in order to secure its need for energetic nucleotides.IMPORTANCE Insect transmission of plant-pathogenic bacteria involves propagation and circulation of the bacteria within their vectors. The transmission process is complex and requires specific interactions at the molecular and biochemical

  16. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin(®). PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease.

  17. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) with bacterial extracellular proteins (ECPs) and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S Sudheer; Srivatsan, P; Vaishnavi, N; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N

    2011-08-15

    Indiscriminate and increased use of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) in consumer products leads to the release of it into the environment. The fate and transport of SNPs in environment remains unknown. We have studied the interaction of SNPs with extracellular protein (ECP) produced by two environmental bacterial species and the adsorption behavior in aqueous solutions. The effect of pH and salt concentrations on the adsorption was also investigated. The adsorption process was found to be dependent on surface charge (zeta potential). The capping of SNPs by ECP was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adsorption of ECP on SNPs was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models, suggesting that the equilibrium adsorption data fitted well with Freundlich model. The equilibrium adsorption data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The results indicated that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation would better describe the adsorption kinetics. The capping was stable at environmental pH and salt concentration. The destabilization of nanoparticles was observed at alkaline pH. The study suggests that the stabilization of nanoparticles in the environment might lead to the accumulation and transport of nanomaterials in the environment, and ultimately destabilizes the functioning of the ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of intestinal dysbiosis on gut colonization by bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    DJUKOVIC, ANA

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract of virtually any metazoan, including mammals, is colonized with a complex microbial community to which we refer as intestinal or gut microbiota. One of the roles of the healthy intestinal microbiota is to protect the host against gut colonization with pathogenic bacteria through a phenomenon known as colonization resistance (CR). Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, usually as a result of an antibiotic treatment, may lead to the disruption of the CR, and subsequent col...

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance in Bacterial Poultry Pathogens: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Thi Nhung; Niwat Chansiripornchai; Carrique-Mas, Juan J

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health threat, and antimicrobial usage and AMR in animal production is one of its contributing sources. Poultry is one of the most widespread types of meat consumed worldwide. Poultry flocks are often raised under intensive conditions using large amounts of antimicrobials to prevent and to treat disease, as well as for growth promotion. Antimicrobial resistant poultry pathogens may result in treatment failure, leading to economic losses, but also be ...

  1. Zoonotic bacterial pathogens and mixed crop-livestock farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaheen, S; Chowdhury, N; Hanning, I; Biswas, D

    2015-06-01

    Use of mixed crop-livestock farms (MCLFs) is one of the oldest and most traditional farming methods practiced all over the world, and MCLFs are still one of the major systems of food production, particularly for organic foods. On these typically small farms, livestock are reared primarily on grass and naturally grown crops, while composted animal wastes are used to fertilize the soil for growing crops. Specific to organic MCLFs, biosecurity challenges arise from the fact that animals are reared outdoors, which increases potential for contact with disease vectors including wild birds, rodents, and insects. Organic regulations do not allow the use of chemicals and antibiotics; therefore, alternative methods for control of disease and zoonotic pathogens must be used. Due to the biosecurity challenges and the complexity of the MCLF environment, methods for control of zoonotic pathogens need to be carefully considered in order to be effective and to abide by organic regulations if required. The objectives of this study are to define the complex routes of transmission, as well as the prevalence of potential zoonotic and possible interruption strategies of these pathogens among the food animals and crops produced on MCLFs.

  2. LAP, an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme in Listeria, promotes bacterial adhesion to enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells only in pathogenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Koo, Ok Kyung; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Burkholder, Kristin M; Mishra, Krishna K; Aroonnual, Amornrat; Bhunia, Arun K

    2010-09-01

    Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (lmo1634), interacts with host-cell receptor Hsp60 to promote bacterial adhesion during the intestinal phase of Listeria monocytogenes infection. The LAP homologue is present in pathogens (L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii) and non-pathogens (L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri); however, its role in non-pathogens is unknown. Sequence analysis revealed 98 % amino acid similarity in LAP from all Listeria species. The N-terminus contains acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and the C-terminus an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Recombinant LAP from L. monocytogenes, L. ivanovii, L. innocua and L. welshimeri exhibited ALDH and ADH activities, and displayed strong binding affinity (K(D) 2-31 nM) towards Hsp60. Flow cytometry, ELISA and immunoelectron microscopy revealed more surface-associated LAP in pathogens than non-pathogens. Pathogens exhibited significantly higher adhesion (Ppathogens; however, pretreatment of bacteria with Hsp60 caused 47-92 % reduction in adhesion only in pathogens. These data suggest that biochemical properties of LAP from pathogenic Listeria are similar to those of the protein from non-pathogens in many respects, such as substrate specificity, immunogenicity, and binding affinity to Hsp60. However, protein fractionation analysis of extracts from pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species revealed that LAP was greatly reduced in intracellular and cell-surface protein fractions, and undetectable in the extracellular milieu of non-pathogens even though the lap transcript levels were similar for both. Furthermore, a LAP preparation from L. monocytogenes restored adhesion in a lap mutant (KB208) of L. monocytogenes but not in L. innocua, indicating possible lack of surface reassociation of LAP molecules in this bacterium. Taken together, these data suggest that LAP expression level, cell-surface localization, secretion and reassociation are responsible for LAP

  3. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis

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    Gita Eslami

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the high prevalence of bacterial vaginosis and its association with urinary tract infection in women and treatment of gynecologic problems occur when a high recurrence of bacterial vaginosis is often treated with antibiotics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on pathogenic bacteria isolated from women with bacterial vaginosis, respectively.Materials and Methods: 96 samples from women with bacterial vaginosis discharge referred to health centers dependent Shahid Beheshti University in 91-92 were taken by a gynecologist with a dacron swab and put in sterile tubes containing TSB broth and Thioglycollate broth and were immediately sent to the lab location in cold chain for the next stages of investigation. From Thioglycollate and TSB medium was cultured on blood agar and EMB and Palkam and Differential diagnosis environments, and then incubated for 24 h at 37°C. Strains of Lactobacillus rhamnosus were cultured in MRSA environment and were transfered to the lab. After purification of pathogenic bacteria, MIC methods and antibiogram, Lactobacillus rhamnosus inhibitory effect on pathogenic bacteria is checked. Statistical analysis was done by SPSS software v.16.Results: The results of this study show the inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus on some pathogenic bacteria that cause bacterial vaginosis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Entrococcus, Listeria monocytogenes and E.Coli. Microscopic examination of stained smears of the large number of Lactobacillus and pathogenic bacteria showed reduced. The prevalence of abnormal vaginal discharge, history of drug use means of preventing pregnancy and douching, respectively, 61%, 55%, 42% and 13% respectively. Significant difference was observed between the use and non-use of IUD in women with bacterial vaginosis infection

  5. The human-bacterial pathogen protein interaction networks of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis.

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    Matthew D Dyer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis are bacterial pathogens that can cause anthrax, lethal acute pneumonic disease, and bubonic plague, respectively, and are listed as NIAID Category A priority pathogens for possible use as biological weapons. However, the interactions between human proteins and proteins in these bacteria remain poorly characterized leading to an incomplete understanding of their pathogenesis and mechanisms of immune evasion.In this study, we used a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid assay to identify physical interactions between human proteins and proteins from each of these three pathogens. From more than 250,000 screens performed, we identified 3,073 human-B. anthracis, 1,383 human-F. tularensis, and 4,059 human-Y. pestis protein-protein interactions including interactions involving 304 B. anthracis, 52 F. tularensis, and 330 Y. pestis proteins that are uncharacterized. Computational analysis revealed that pathogen proteins preferentially interact with human proteins that are hubs and bottlenecks in the human PPI network. In addition, we computed modules of human-pathogen PPIs that are conserved amongst the three networks. Functionally, such conserved modules reveal commonalities between how the different pathogens interact with crucial host pathways involved in inflammation and immunity.These data constitute the first extensive protein interaction networks constructed for bacterial pathogens and their human hosts. This study provides novel insights into host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Harnessing Bacterial Signals for Suppression of Biofilm Formation in the Nosocomial Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    Reen, F. Jerry; Phelan, John P.; Woods, David F.; Shanahan, Rachel; Cano, Rafael; Clarke, Sarah; McGlacken, Gerard P.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2016-01-01

    Faced with the continued emergence of antibiotic resistance to all known classes of antibiotics, a paradigm shift in approaches toward antifungal therapeutics is required. Well characterized in a broad spectrum of bacterial and fungal pathogens, biofilms are a key factor in limiting the effectiveness of conventional antibiotics. Therefore, therapeutics such as small molecules that prevent or disrupt biofilm formation would render pathogens susceptible to clearance by existing drugs. This is t...

  7. Viral and Bacterial Pathogens in Bovine Respiratory Disease in Finland

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    Soveri T

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens causing bovine respiratory tract disease in Finland were investigated. Eighteen cattle herds with bovine respiratory disease were included. Five diseased calves from each farm were chosen for closer examination and tracheobronchial lavage. Blood samples were taken from the calves at the time of the investigation and from 86 calves 3–4 weeks later. In addition, 6–10 blood samples from animals of different ages were collected from each herd, resulting in 169 samples. Serum samples were tested for antibodies to bovine parainfluenza virus-3 (PIV-3, bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, bovine coronavirus (BCV, bovine adenovirus-3 (BAV-3 and bovine adenovirus-7 (BAV-7. About one third of the samples were also tested for antibodies to bovine virus diarrhoea virus (BVDV with negative results. Bacteria were cultured from lavage fluid and in vitro susceptibility to selected antimicrobials was tested. According to serological findings, PIV-3, BAV-7, BAV-3, BCV and BRSV are common pathogens in Finnish cattle with respiratory problems. A titre rise especially for BAV-7 and BAV-3, the dual growth of Mycoplasma dispar and Pasteurella multocida, were typical findings in diseased calves. Pasteurella sp. strains showed no resistance to tested antimicrobials. Mycoplasma bovis and Mannheimia haemolytica were not found.

  8. Analysis of bacterial communities and bacterial pathogens in a biogas plant by the combination of ethidium monoazide, PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the changes of bacterial community composition including bacterial pathogens along a biogas plant, i.e. from the influent, to the biogas reactor and to the post-digester. The effects of post-digestion temperature and time on the changes of bacterial community composition and bacterial pathogens were also studied. Microbial analysis was made by Ion Torrent sequencing of the PCR amplicons from ethidium monoazide treated samples, and ethidium monoazide was used to cleave DNA from dead cells and exclude it from PCR amplification. Both similarity and taxonomic analysis showed that the bacterial community composition in the influent was changed after anaerobic digestion. Firmicutes were dominant in all the samples, while Proteobacteria decreased in the biogas reactor compared with the influent. Variations of bacterial community composition in the biogas reactor with time were also observed. This could be attributed to varying composition of the influent. Batch experiments showed that the methane recovery from the digested residues (obtained from biogas reactor) was mainly related with post-digestion temperature. However, post-digestion time rather than temperature had a significant effect on the changes of bacterial community composition. The changes of bacterial community composition were also reflected in the changes of relative abundance of bacterial pathogens. The richness and relative abundance of bacterial pathogens were reduced after anaerobic digestion in the biogas reactor. It was found in batch experiments that bacterial pathogens showed the highest relative abundance and richness after 30 days' post-digestion. Streptococcus bovis was found in all the samples. Our results showed that special attention should be paid to the post-digestion since the increase in relative abundance of bacterial pathogens after post-digestion might reflect regrowth of bacterial pathogens and limit biosolids disposal vectors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier

  9. Prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens in a population of zoo animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, J; Griffith, M; Blair, I; Cormican, M; Dooley, J S G; Goldsmith, C E; Glover, S G; Loughrey, A; Lowery, C J; Matsuda, M; McClurg, R; McCorry, K; McDowell, D; McMahon, A; Cherie Millar, B; Nagano, Y; Rao, J R; Rooney, P J; Smyth, M; Snelling, W J; Xu, J; Moore, J E

    2008-04-01

    Faecal prevalence of gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens, including Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, as well as Arcobacter, were examined in 317 faecal specimens from 44 animal species in Belfast Zoological Gardens, during July-September 2006. Thermophilic campylobacters including Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter lari, were the most frequently isolated pathogens, where members of this genus were isolated from 11 animal species (11 of 44; 25%). Yersinia spp. were isolated from seven animal species (seven of 44; 15.9%) and included, Yersinia enterocolitica (five of seven isolates; 71.4%) and one isolate each of Yersinia frederiksenii and Yersinia kristensenii. Only one isolate of Salmonella was obtained throughout the entire study, which was an isolate of Salmonella dublin (O 1,9,12: H g, p), originating from tiger faeces after enrichment. None of the animal species found in public contact areas of the zoo were positive for any gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Also, water from the lake in the centre of the grounds, was examined for the same bacterial pathogens and was found to contain C. jejuni. This study is the first report on the isolation of a number of important bacterial pathogens from a variety of novel host species, C. jejuni from the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus), C. lari from a maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), Y. kristensenii from a vicugna (Vicugna vicugna) and Y. enterocolitica from a maned wolf and red panda (Ailurus fulgens). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the faeces of animals in public contact areas of the zoo were not positive for the bacterial gastrointestinal pathogens examined. This is reassuring for the public health of visitors, particularly children, who enjoy this educational and recreational resource.

  10. Next generation sequencing uncovers unexpected bacterial pathogens in ticks in western Europe.

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    Muriel Vayssier-Taussat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Ticks are highly susceptible to global environmental and socio-economical changes. Several tick-borne pathogens have been reported in new geographical regions while new species, strains or genetic variants of tick-borne microorganisms are continually being detected. However, tick-borne pathogens are still poorly understood, and it is estimated that half of all human tick-borne disease has an unknown origin. Therefore in order to prevent these diseases, more effort is required to identify unknown or unexpected tick-borne pathogens. Ixodes ricinus is the vector for a broad range of bacterial pathogens and the most prevalent tick in Europe. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS to extend the inventory of pathogenic bacteria carried by this species of tick in France. METHODS: RNA and DNA were extracted from 1450 I. ricinus questing nymphs collected by flagging in Alsace, France. RNA was pooled and used for NGS. Following de novo assembly, bacterial contigs were assigned to the closest known taxonomy. DNA was used for real time PCR to confirm taxonomic species assignment of NGS-derived contigs for the doubtful cases, and for determination of prevalence. RESULTS: We have generated a global in-depth picture of tick-borne bacteria. We identified RNA from the main pathogenic bacterial species known to be transmitted by I. ricinus. In addition we also identified unanticipated bacterial species for which we have estimated the prevalence within those ticks inhabiting the studied areas. CONCLUSIONS: The data obtained from this study has proven that NGS has an enormous potential to detect the unexpected and provides the means to monitor pathogen occurrence.

  11. Next Generation Sequencing Uncovers Unexpected Bacterial Pathogens in Ticks in Western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Moutailler, Sara; Michelet, Lorraine; Devillers, Elodie; Bonnet, Sarah; Cheval, Justine; Hébert, Charles; Eloit, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Ticks are highly susceptible to global environmental and socio-economical changes. Several tick-borne pathogens have been reported in new geographical regions while new species, strains or genetic variants of tick-borne microorganisms are continually being detected. However, tick-borne pathogens are still poorly understood, and it is estimated that half of all human tick-borne disease has an unknown origin. Therefore in order to prevent these diseases, more effort is required to identify unknown or unexpected tick-borne pathogens. Ixodes ricinus is the vector for a broad range of bacterial pathogens and the most prevalent tick in Europe. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the capability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to extend the inventory of pathogenic bacteria carried by this species of tick in France. Methods RNA and DNA were extracted from 1450 I. ricinus questing nymphs collected by flagging in Alsace, France. RNA was pooled and used for NGS. Following de novo assembly, bacterial contigs were assigned to the closest known taxonomy. DNA was used for real time PCR to confirm taxonomic species assignment of NGS-derived contigs for the doubtful cases, and for determination of prevalence. Results We have generated a global in-depth picture of tick-borne bacteria. We identified RNA from the main pathogenic bacterial species known to be transmitted by I. ricinus. In addition we also identified unanticipated bacterial species for which we have estimated the prevalence within those ticks inhabiting the studied areas. Conclusions The data obtained from this study has proven that NGS has an enormous potential to detect the unexpected and provides the means to monitor pathogen occurrence. PMID:24312301

  12. Evaluation of PCR based assays for the improvement of proportion estimation of bacterial and viral pathogens in diarrheal surveillance

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    Hongxia eGuan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDiarrhea can be caused by a variety of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms. Laboratory diagnosis is essential in the pathogen-specific burden assessment. In the pathogen spectrum monitoring in the diarrheal surveillance, culture methods are commonly used for the bacterial pathogens’ detection whereas nucleic acid based amplification, the non-cultural methods are used for the viral pathogens. Different methodology may cause the inaccurate pathogen spectrum for the bacterial pathogens because of their different culture abilities with the different media, and for the comparison of bacterial vs. viral pathogens. The application of nucleic acid-based methods in the detection of viral and bacterial pathogens will likely increase the number of confirmed positive diagnoses, and will be comparable since all pathogens will be detected based on the same nucleic acid extracts from the same sample. In this study, bacterial pathogens, including diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae, were detected in 334 diarrheal samples by PCR-based methods using nucleic acid extracted from stool samples and associated enrichment cultures. A protocol was established to facilitate the consistent identification of bacterial pathogens in diarrheal patients. Five common enteric viruses were also detected by RT-PCR, including rotavirus, sapovirus, norovirus (I and II, human astrovirus, and enteric adenovirus. Higher positive rates were found for the bacterial pathogens, showing the lower proportion estimation if only using culture methods. This application will improve the quality of bacterial diarrheagenic pathogen survey, providing more accurate information pertaining to the pathogen spectrum associated with finding of food safety problems and disease burden evaluation.

  13. Antibacterial activity of plant extracts on foodborne bacterial pathogens and food spoilage bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial foodborne diseases are caused by consumption of foods contaminated with bacteria and/or their toxins. In this study, we evaluated antibacterial properties of twelve different extracts including turmeric, lemon and different kinds of teas against four major pathogenic foodborne bacteria inc...

  14. Genomic Epidemiology: Whole-Genome-Sequencing–Powered Surveillance and Outbreak Investigation of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Xiangyu; den Bakker, Henk C.; Hendriksen, Rene S.

    2016-01-01

    -called next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies that have made whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of foodborne bacterial pathogens a realistic and superior alternative to traditional subtyping methods. Routine, real-time, and widespread application of WGS in food safety and public health is on the horizon...

  15. Importance of soil amendments: survival of bacterial pathogens in manure and compost used as organic fertizliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological soil amendments (BSA’s) like manure and compost are frequently used as organic fertilizers to soils to improve its physical and chemical properties. However, BSAs have been known to be a reservoir for enteric bacterial pathogens like enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Salmonella spp, and Listeri...

  16. The effect of nitrogen on disease development and gene expression in bacterial and fungal plant pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeijers, S.S.; Pérez-García, A.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Wit, de P.J.G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Successful colonisation of plants by pathogens requires efficient utilisation of nutrient resources available in host tissues. Several bacterial and fungal genes are specifically induced during pathogenesis and under nitrogen-limiting conditions in vitro. This suggests that a nitrogen-limiting

  17. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Tissue Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Porcine Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    sequences within intact cells. FISH allows direct histological localization of the bacteria in the tissue and thereby a correlation between the infection and the histopathological changes present. This chapter presents protocols for FISH identification of bacterial pathogens in fixed deparaffinized tissue...

  18. Indirect immunofluorescence colony staining method for detecting bacterial pathogens of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veena, M.S.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.

    2002-01-01

    An indirect immunoflouorescence colony staining method was developed for the detection of important seed-borne bacterial pathogens of tomato. The method involves the use of specific antiserum for initial binding of target bacteria and visualization of positive colonies with a commercially available

  19. Shared and distinct mechanisms of iron acquisition by bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélissa eCaza

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body and its bioavailability is stringently controlled. In particular, iron is tightly bound to host proteins such as transferrin to maintain homeostasis, to limit potential damage caused by iron toxicity under physiological conditions and to restrict access by pathogens. Therefore, iron acquisition during infection of a human host is a challenge that must be surmounted by every successful pathogenic microorganism. Iron is essential for bacterial and fungal physiological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, metabolism and energy generation via respiration. Hence, pathogenic bacteria and fungi have developed sophisticated strategies to gain access to iron from host sources. Indeed, siderophore production and transport, iron acquisition from heme and host iron-containing proteins such as hemoglobin and transferrin, and reduction of ferric to ferrous iron with subsequent transport are all strategies found in bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans. This review focuses on a comparison of these strategies between bacterial and fungal pathogens in the context of virulence and the iron limitation that occurs in the human body as a mechanism of innate nutritional defence.

  20. Stealth proteins: in silico identification of a novel protein family rendering bacterial pathogens invisible to host immune defense.

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    Peter Sperisen

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  1. Stealth Proteins: In Silico Identification of a Novel Protein Family Rendering Bacterial Pathogens Invisible to Host Immune Defense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available There are a variety of bacterial defense strategies to survive in a hostile environment. Generation of extracellular polysaccharides has proved to be a simple but effective strategy against the host's innate immune system. A comparative genomics approach led us to identify a new protein family termed Stealth, most likely involved in the synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides. This protein family is characterized by a series of domains conserved across phylogeny from bacteria to eukaryotes. In bacteria, Stealth (previously characterized as SacB, XcbA, or WefC is encoded by subsets of strains mainly colonizing multicellular organisms, with evidence for a protective effect against the host innate immune defense. More specifically, integrating all the available information about Stealth proteins in bacteria, we propose that Stealth is a D-hexose-1-phosphoryl transferase involved in the synthesis of polysaccharides. In the animal kingdom, Stealth is strongly conserved across evolution from social amoebas to simple and complex multicellular organisms, such as Dictyostelium discoideum, hydra, and human. Based on the occurrence of Stealth in most Eukaryotes and a subset of Prokaryotes together with its potential role in extracellular polysaccharide synthesis, we propose that metazoan Stealth functions to regulate the innate immune system. Moreover, there is good reason to speculate that the acquisition and spread of Stealth could be responsible for future epidemic outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by a large variety of eubacterial pathogens. Our in silico identification of a homologous protein in the human host will help to elucidate the causes of Stealth-dependent virulence. At a more basic level, the characterization of the molecular and cellular function of Stealth proteins may shed light on fundamental mechanisms of innate immune defense against microbial invasion.

  2. The role and regulation of catalase in respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Mia M; Fan, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract bacterial pathogens are the etiologic agents of a variety of illnesses. The ability of these bacteria to cause disease is imparted through survival within the host and avoidance of pathogen clearance by the immune system. Respiratory tract pathogens are continually bombarded by reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be produced by competing bacteria, normal metabolic function, or host immunological responses. In order to survive and proliferate, bacteria have adapted defense mechanisms to circumvent the effects of ROS. Bacteria employ the use of anti-oxidant enzymes, catalases and catalase-peroxidases, to relieve the effects of the oxidative stressors to which they are continually exposed. The decomposition of ROS has been shown to provide favorable conditions in which respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Legionella pneumophila, and Neisseria meningitidis are able to withstand exposure to highly reactive molecules and yet survive. Bacteria possessing mutations in the catalase gene have a decreased survival rate, yet may be able to compensate for the lack of catalatic activity if peroxidatic activity is present. An incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms by which catalase and catalase-peroxidases are regulated still persists, however, in some bacterial species, a regulatory factor known as OxyR has been shown to either up-regulate or down-regulate catalase gene expression. Yet, more research is still needed to increase the knowledge base in relation to this enzyme class. As with this review, we focus on major respiratory tract opportunistic bacterial pathogens in order to elucidate the function and regulation of catalases. The importance of the research could lead to the development of novel treatments against respiratory bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia by multiplex Lightmix®RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karoline; Springer, Burkard; Imkamp, Frank; Opota, Onya; Greub, Gilbert; Keller, Peter M

    2018-01-31

    Pneumonia is a severe infectious disease. In addition to common viruses and bacterial pathogens (e.g. Streptococcus pneumoniae), fastidious respiratory pathogens like Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella spp. can cause severe atypical pneumonia. They do not respond to penicillin derivatives, which may cause failure of antibiotic empirical therapy. The same applies for infections with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the cause of pertussis disease, that may present atypically and need to be treated with macrolides. Moreover, these fastidious bacteria are difficult to identify by culture or serology, and therefore often remain undetected. Thus, rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia is crucial. We performed a retrospective method evaluation study to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the new, commercially available Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay that detects these fastidious bacterial pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In this retrospective study, 368 clinical respiratory specimens, obtained from patients suffering from atypical pneumonia that have been tested negative for the presence of common agents of pneumonia by culture and viral PCR, were investigated. These clinical specimens have been previously characterized by singleplex RT-PCR assays in our diagnostic laboratory and were used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the respiratory multiplex Lightmix ® RT-PCR. The multiplex RT-PCR displayed a limit of detection between 5 and 10 DNA copies for different in-panel organisms and showed identical performance characteristics with respect to specificity and sensitivity as in-house singleplex RT-PCRs for pathogen detection. The Lightmix ® multiplex RT-PCR assay represents a low-cost, time-saving and accurate diagnostic tool with high throughput potential. The time-to-result using an automated DNA extraction device for respiratory specimens followed by multiplex RT-PCR detection was

  4. Development of a Selective Medium for the Fungal Pathogen Fusarium graminearum Using Toxoflavin Produced by the Bacterial Pathogen Burkholderia glumae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boknam Jung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum is a major causal agent for Fusarium head blight in cereals and produces mycotoxins such as trichothecenes and zearalenone. Isolation of the fungal strains from air or cereals can be hampered by various other airborne fungal pathogens and saprophytic fungi. In this study, we developed a selective medium specific to F. graminearum using toxoflavin produced by the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia glumae. F. graminearum was resistant to toxoflavin, while other fungi were sensitive to this toxin. Supplementing toxoflavin into medium enhanced the isolation of F. graminearum from rice grains by suppressing the growth of saprophytic fungal species. In addition, a medium with or without toxoflavin exposed to wheat fields for 1 h had 84% or 25%, respectively, of colonies identified as F. graminearum. This selection medium provides an efficient tool for isolating F. graminearum, and can be adopted by research groups working on genetics and disease forecasting.

  5. Detection of bacterial pathogens including potential new species in human head lice from Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanzougaghene, Nadia; Fenollar, Florence; Sangaré, Abdoul Karim; Sissoko, Mahamadou S; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Raoult, Didier; Mediannikov, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    In poor African countries, where no medical and biological facilities are available, the identification of potential emerging pathogens of concern at an early stage is challenging. Head lice, Pediculus humanus capitis, have a short life, feed only on human blood and do not transmit pathogens to their progeny. They are, therefore, a perfect tool for the xenodiagnosis of current or recent human infection. This study assessed the occurrence of bacterial pathogens from head lice collected in two rural villages from Mali, where a high frequency of head lice infestation had previously been reported, using molecular methods. Results show that all 600 head lice, collected from 117 individuals, belonged to clade E, specific to West Africa. Bartonella quintana, the causative agent of trench fever, was identified in three of the 600 (0.5%) head lice studied. Our study also shows, for the first time, the presence of the DNA of two pathogenic bacteria, namely Coxiella burnetii (5.1%) and Rickettsia aeschlimannii (0.6%), detected in human head lice, as well as the DNA of potential new species from the Anaplasma and Ehrlichia genera of unknown pathogenicity. The finding of several Malian head lice infected with B. quintana, C. burnetii, R. aeschlimannii, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia is alarming and highlights the need for active survey programs to define the public health consequences of the detection of these emerging bacterial pathogens in human head lice.

  6. Bacterial genomics reveal the complex epidemiology of an emerging pathogen in arctic and boreal ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Taya L.; Orsel, Karin; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Biek, Roman; Adams, Layne G.; Checkley, Sylvia L.; Davison, Tracy; De Buck, Jeroen; Dumond, Mathieu; Elkin, Brett T.; Finnegan, Laura; Macbeth, Bryan J.; Nelson, Cait; Niptanatiak, Amanda; Sather, Shane; Schwantje, Helen M.; van der Meer, Frank; Kutz, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Northern ecosystems are currently experiencing unprecedented ecological change, largely driven by a rapidly changing climate. Pathogen range expansion, and emergence and altered patterns of infectious disease, are increasingly reported in wildlife at high latitudes. Understanding the causes and consequences of shifting pathogen diversity and host-pathogen interactions in these ecosystems is important for wildlife conservation, and for indigenous populations that depend on wildlife. Among the key questions are whether disease events are associated with endemic or recently introduced pathogens, and whether emerging strains are spreading throughout the region. In this study, we used a phylogenomic approach to address these questions of pathogen endemicity and spread for Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, an opportunistic multi-host bacterial pathogen associated with recent mortalities in arctic and boreal ungulate populations in North America. We isolated E. rhusiopathiae from carcasses associated with large-scale die-offs of muskoxen in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and from contemporaneous mortality events and/or population declines among muskoxen in northwestern Alaska and caribou and moose in western Canada. Bacterial genomic diversity differed markedly among these locations; minimal divergence was present among isolates from muskoxen in the Canadian Arctic, while in caribou and moose populations, strains from highly divergent clades were isolated from the same location, or even from within a single carcass. These results indicate that mortalities among northern ungulates are not associated with a single emerging strain of E. rhusiopathiae, and that alternate hypotheses need to be explored. Our study illustrates the value and limitations of bacterial genomic data for discriminating between ecological hypotheses of disease emergence, and highlights the importance of studying emerging pathogens within the broader context of environmental and host factors.

  7. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortega, Alvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J; Pucciarelli, M Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles

  8. Clinical and pathogenic analysis of 507 children with bacterial meningitis in Beijing, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zhi-Xiao; Wang, Xi; Zhang, Ping-Ping; Shi, Wei; Yao, Kai-Hu; Liu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Gang; Yang, Yong-Hong

    2016-09-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and analyze the pathogens of bacterial meningitis in children. Bacterial meningitis cases occurring from January 2010 through December 2014 at Beijing Children's Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The records of all patients, including data on clinical features and laboratory information, were obtained and analyzed. In total, the cases of 507 pediatric patients seen over a 5-year period were analyzed; 220 of these cases were etiologically confirmed. These patients were classified into four age groups: 29 days to 1 year (n=373, 73.6%), 1-3 years (n=61, 12.0%), 3-6 years (n=41, 8.1%), and >6 years (n=32, 6.3%). The main pathogens identified in this study were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=73, 33.2%), Escherichia coli (n=24, 10.9%), Enterococcus (n=22, 10.0%), and group B Streptococcus (n=18, 8.2%). All Gram-positive bacteria were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. All Gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to meropenem. The total non-susceptibility rate of S. pneumoniae to penicillin was 47.6% (20/42). The resistance rates to ceftriaxone, cefepime, and ceftazidime were 75% (9/12), 55.6% (5/9), and 40% (4/10), respectively. The main pathogen of bacterial meningitis in this study was S. pneumoniae. The antibiotic resistance rates among children with bacterial meningitis are of serious concern. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of nanoparticle-based optical sensors for pathogenic bacterial detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Teodora; Matea, Cristian T; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Buzoianu, Anca Dana; Puia, Cosmin; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2017-03-31

    Pathogenic bacteria contribute to various globally important diseases, killing millions of people each year. Various fields of medicine currently benefit from or may potentially benefit from the use of nanotechnology applications, in which there is growing interest. Disease-related biomarkers can be rapidly and directly detected by nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles, cantilevers, microarrays, and nanoarrays, as part of an accurate process characterized by lower sample consumption and considerably higher sensitivity. There is a need for accurate techniques for pathogenic bacteria identification and detection to allow the prevention and management of pathogenic diseases and to assure food safety. The focus of this review is on the current nanoparticle-based techniques for pathogenic bacterial identification and detection using these applications.

  10. Bottlenecks in the transmission of antibiotic resistance from natural ecosystems to human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that resistance genes acquired by human pathogens trough horizontal gene transfer have been originated in environmental, non pathogenic bacteria. As the consequence, there exists an increasing concern on the role that natural, non-clinical ecosystems, may play on the evolution of resistance. Recent studies have shown that the variability of determinants that can provide antibiotic resistance upon their expression in a heterologous host is much larger than what is actually found in human pathogens. Along the review, the role that different processes as founder effect, ecological connectivity, fitness costs or second-order selection may have on the establishment of a specific resistance determinant in the population of bacterial pathogens is analysed.

  11. The BER necessities: the repair of DNA damage in human-adapted bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veen, Stijn; Tang, Christoph M

    2015-02-01

    During colonization and disease, bacterial pathogens must survive the onslaught of the host immune system. A key component of the innate immune response is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by phagocytic cells, which target and disrupt pathogen molecules, particularly DNA, and the base excision repair (BER) pathway is the most important mechanism for the repair of such oxidative DNA damage. In this Review, we discuss how the human-specific pathogens Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria meningitidis have evolved specialized mechanisms of DNA repair, particularly their BER pathways, compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli. This specialization in DNA repair is likely to reflect the distinct niches occupied by these important human pathogens in the host.

  12. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries.

  13. Gnom(Cmp): a quantitative approach for comparative analysis of closely related genomes of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, GongXin

    2011-05-01

    Comparative genome analysis is a powerful approach to understanding the biology of infectious bacterial pathogens. In this study, a quantitative approach, referred to as Gnom(Cmp), was developed to study the microevolution of bacterial pathogens. Although much more time-consuming than existing tools, this procedure provides a much higher resolution. Gnom(Cmp) accomplishes this by establishing genome-wide heterogeneity genotypes, which are then quantified and comparatively analyzed. The heterogeneity genotypes are defined as chromosomal base positions that have multiple variants within particular genomes, resulted from DNA duplications and subsequent mutations. To prove the concept, the procedure was applied on the genomes of 15 Staphylococcus aureus strains, focusing extensively on two pairs of hVISA/VISA strains. hVISA refers to heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus strains and VISA is their VISA mutants. hVISA/VISA displays some remarkable properties. hVISA is susceptible to vancomycin, but VISA mutants emerge soon after a short period of vancomycin therapy, therefore making the pathogen a great model organism for fast-evolving bacterial pathogens. The analysis indicated that Gnom(Cmp) could reveal variants within the genomes, which can be analyzed within the global genome context. Gnom(Cmp) discovered evolutionary hotspots and their dynamics among many closely related, even isogenic genomes. The analysis thus allows the exploration of the molecular mechanisms behind hVISA/VISA evolution, providing a working hypotheses for experimental testing and validation.

  14. Bacterial osteomyelitis in major sickling haemoglobinopathies: geographic difference in pathogen prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanni, L O A

    2006-12-01

    Controversy exists about the bacterial pathogen that is most often associated with osteomyelitis in major sickling haemoglobinopathies, that is, HbSS, HbSC, and HbSthalassemia. To determine the existence of regional or continental differences in the prevalence of bacterial pathogens associated with osteomyelitis in sickling haemoglobinopathies. A meta-analysis is done of 11 year hospital data set and published studies in African Journals Online (Ajol) and Pubmed electronic databases on the subject. Fifteen studies including two hundred and eighty one bacterial pathogens from SubSaharan Africa, United States, Europe and the Middle East were analysed. There were 129 (45.9%) salmonellae, 82 (29.2%) Staphylococcus aureus, 55 (19.6%) other Gram negative bacilli (GNB) and 15 (5.3%) other Gram positive cocci (GPC). There were 117 isolates in the studies from Africa out of which salmonellae accounted for 21.4%, S. aureus 38.5%, other GNB 34.2% and other GPC 6%. In contrast, out of 110 isolates in the studies from the USA, salmonellae were 70%, S. aureus 16.4%, other GNB 9.1% and other GPC 4.5%. Salmonellae and S. aureus accounted for 37.9% and 62.1%; 64% and 4.9% in isolates from the Middle East and Europe respectively. Salmonellae are the most common bacterial pathogens of osteomyelitis in major sickling haemoglobinopathies in the USA and Europe whereas Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen in SubSaharan Africa and the Middle East. The worldwide prevalence of salmonella may be reducing while that of S. aureus may be increasing. Possible reasons for this observation are suggested.

  15. PATHOGEN IMPACT ON THE ACTIVITY DYNAMICS OF POTATO SUSPENSION CELLS EXTRA-CELLULAR PEROXIDASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graskova I.A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activity of extracellular peroxidases were measured in cell suspension cultures of potato infected by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Spieck. et Kotth. Skapt et Burkh. The total extracellular peroxidases activity of the resistant potato variety was higher than that of the sensitive variety both before and after infection. The enzyme of the resistant variety had a рН optimum of 6.2, while that of the sensitive variety was 5.4. Extracellular peroxidases of the sensitive potato variety were activated 10 minutes after infection, and displayed highest activity 1.5-2 hours later. In the resistant variety, peroxidase activity rose sharply in the first minutes of infection, and second peak of activity occurred 1.5-2 hours later. The increase of extracellular peroxidases activity of the sensitive potato variety under pathogenesis is connected with the change of genome expression and synthesis of proteins. The increase of enzyme activity of resistant potato variety in the first moments of infection is not related to proteins synthesis and is apparently conditioned by the change of kinetic parameters.

  16. Genomic Survey of Pathogenicity Determinants and VNTR Markers in the Cassava Bacterial Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. Manihotis Strain CIO151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta-Ortiz, Mario L.; Rodríguez-R, Luis M.; Pérez-Quintero, Álvaro L.; Poulin, Lucie; Díaz, Ana C.; Arias Rojas, Nathalia; Trujillo, Cesar; Restrepo Benavides, Mariana; Bart, Rebecca; Boch, Jens; Boureau, Tristan; Darrasse, Armelle; David, Perrine; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Fontanilla, Paula; Gagnevin, Lionel; Guérin, Fabien; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Medina, Cesar; Medina, Edgar; Montenegro, Nathaly; Muñoz Bodnar, Alejandra; Noël, Laurent D.; Ortiz Quiñones, Juan F.; Osorio, Daniela; Pardo, Carolina; Patil, Prabhu B.; Poussier, Stéphane; Pruvost, Olivier; Robène-Soustrade, Isabelle; Ryan, Robert P.; Tabima, Javier; Urrego Morales, Oscar G.; Vernière, Christian; Carrere, Sébastien; Verdier, Valérie; Szurek, Boris; Restrepo, Silvia; López, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam) is the causal agent of bacterial blight of cassava, which is among the main components of human diet in Africa and South America. Current information about the molecular pathogenicity factors involved in the infection process of this organism is limited. Previous studies in other bacteria in this genus suggest that advanced draft genome sequences are valuable resources for molecular studies on their interaction with plants and could provide valuable tools for diagnostics and detection. Here we have generated the first manually annotated high-quality draft genome sequence of Xam strain CIO151. Its genomic structure is similar to that of other xanthomonads, especially Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and Xanthomonas citri pv. citri species. Several putative pathogenicity factors were identified, including type III effectors, cell wall-degrading enzymes and clusters encoding protein secretion systems. Specific characteristics in this genome include changes in the xanthomonadin cluster that could explain the lack of typical yellow color in all strains of this pathovar and the presence of 50 regions in the genome with atypical nucleotide composition. The genome sequence was used to predict and evaluate 22 variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci that were subsequently demonstrated as polymorphic in representative Xam strains. Our results demonstrate that Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis strain CIO151 possesses ten clusters of pathogenicity factors conserved within the genus Xanthomonas. We report 126 genes that are potentially unique to Xam, as well as potential horizontal transfer events in the history of the genome. The relation of these regions with virulence and pathogenicity could explain several aspects of the biology of this pathogen, including its ability to colonize both vascular and non-vascular tissues of cassava plants. A set of 16 robust, polymorphic VNTR loci will be useful to develop a multi-locus VNTR analysis

  17. Crystal structures of Cif from bacterial pathogens Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Allister; Race, Paul R; Jubelin, Grégory; Varela Chavez, Carolina; Escoubas, Jean-Michel; Oswald, Eric; Banfield, Mark J

    2009-01-01

    A pre-requisite for bacterial pathogenesis is the successful interaction of a pathogen with a host. One mechanism used by a broad range of Gram negative bacterial pathogens is to deliver effector proteins directly into host cells through a dedicated type III secretion system where they modulate host cell function. The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) family of effector proteins, identified in a growing number of pathogens that harbour functional type III secretion systems and have a wide host range, arrest the eukaryotic cell cycle. Here, the crystal structures of Cifs from the insect pathogen/nematode symbiont Photorhabdus luminescens (a gamma-proteobacterium) and human pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei (a beta-proteobacterium) are presented. Both of these proteins adopt an overall fold similar to the papain sub-family of cysteine proteases, as originally identified in the structure of a truncated form of Cif from Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), despite sharing only limited sequence identity. The structure of an N-terminal region, referred to here as the 'tail-domain' (absent in the EPEC Cif structure), suggests a surface likely to be involved in host-cell substrate recognition. The conformation of the Cys-His-Gln catalytic triad is retained, and the essential cysteine is exposed to solvent and addressable by small molecule reagents. These structures and biochemical work contribute to the rapidly expanding literature on Cifs, and direct further studies to better understand the molecular details of the activity of these proteins.

  18. Detection of pathogenic biofilms with bacterial amyloid targeting fluorescent probe, CDy11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jun-Young; Sahu, Srikanta; Yau, Yin-Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are responsible for a wide range of persistent infections. In the clinic, diagnosis of biofilm-associated infections relies heavily on culturing methods, which fail to detect nonculturable bacteria. Identification of novel fluorescent probes for biofilm imaging will greatly...... facilitate diagnosis of pathogenic bacterial infection. Herein, we report a novel fluorescent probe, CDy11 (compound of designation yellow 11), which targets amyloid in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix through a diversity oriented fluorescent library approach (DOFLA). CDy11 was further demonstrated...... for in vivo imaging of P. aeruginosa in implant and corneal infection mice models....

  19. N-acetyl-L-cysteine affects growth, extracellular polysaccharide production, and bacterial biofilm formation on solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Ann-Cathrin; Hermansson, Malte; Elwing, Hans

    2003-08-01

    N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) is used in medical treatment of patients with chronic bronchitis. The positive effects of NAC treatment have primarily been attributed to the mucus-dissolving properties of NAC, as well as its ability to decrease biofilm formation, which reduces bacterial infections. Our results suggest that NAC also may be an interesting candidate for use as an agent to reduce and prevent biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces in environments typical of paper mill plants. Using 10 different bacterial strains isolated from a paper mill, we found that the mode of action of NAC is chemical, as well as biological, in the case of bacterial adhesion to stainless steel surfaces. The initial adhesion of bacteria is dependent on the wettability of the substratum. NAC was shown to bind to stainless steel, increasing the wettability of the surface. Moreover, NAC decreased bacterial adhesion and even detached bacteria that were adhering to stainless steel surfaces. Growth of various bacteria, as monocultures or in a multispecies community, was inhibited at different concentrations of NAC. We also found that there was no detectable degradation of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) by NAC, indicating that NAC reduced the production of EPS, in most bacteria tested, even at concentrations at which growth was not affected. Altogether, the presence of NAC changes the texture of the biofilm formed and makes NAC an interesting candidate for use as a general inhibitor of formation of bacterial biofilms on stainless steel surfaces.

  20. Antibacterial screening of traditional herbal plants and standard antibiotics against some human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Uzma Azeem; Andleeb, Saiqa; Kiyani, Ayesha; Zafar, Atiya; Shafique, Irsa; Riaz, Nazia; Azhar, Muhammad Tehseen; Uddin, Hafeez

    2013-11-01

    Chloroformic and isoamyl alcohol extracts of Cinnnamomum zylanicum, Cuminum cyminum, Curcuma long Linn, Trachyspermum ammi and selected standard antibiotics were investigated for their in vitro antibacterial activity against six human bacterial pathogens. The antibacterial activity was evaluated and based on the zone of inhibition using agar disc diffusion method. The tested bacterial strains were Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aurues, Serratia marcesnces, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin showed highly significant action against K. pneumonia and S. epidermidis while Ampicillin and Amoxicillin indicated lowest antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. Among the plants chloroform and isoamyl alcohol extracts of C. cyminum, S. aromaticum and C. long Linn had significant effect against P. aeruginosa, S. marcesnces and S. pyogenes. Comparison of antibacterial activity of medicinal herbs and standard antibiotics was also recorded via activity index. Used medicinal plants have various phytochemicals which reasonably justify their use as antibacterial agent.

  1. Nested PCR Assay for Eight Pathogens: A Rapid Tool for Diagnosis of Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagchandani, Sharda P; Kubade, Sushant; Nikhare, Priyanka P; Manke, Sonali; Chandak, Nitin H; Kabra, Dinesh; Baheti, Neeraj N; Agrawal, Vijay S; Sarda, Pankaj; Mahajan, Parikshit; Ganjre, Ashish; Purohit, Hemant J; Singh, Lokendra; Taori, Girdhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a dreadful infectious disease with a high mortality and morbidity if remained undiagnosed. Traditional diagnostic methods for bacterial meningitis pose a challenge in accurate identification of pathogen, making prognosis difficult. The present study is therefore aimed to design and evaluate a specific and sensitive nested 16S rDNA genus-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using clinical cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for rapid diagnosis of eight pathogens causing the disease. The present work was dedicated to development of an in-house genus specific 16S rDNA nested PCR covering pathogens of eight genera responsible for causing bacterial meningitis using newly designed as well as literature based primers for respective genus. A total 150 suspected meningitis CSF obtained from the patients admitted to Central India Institute of Medical Sciences (CIIMS), India during the period from August 2011 to May 2014, were used to evaluate clinical sensitivity and clinical specificity of optimized PCR assays. The analytical sensitivity and specificity of our newly designed genus-specific 16S rDNA PCR were found to be ≥92%. With such a high sensitivity and specificity, our in-house nested PCR was able to give 100% sensitivity in clinically confirmed positive cases and 100% specificity in clinically confirmed negative cases indicating its applicability in clinical diagnosis. Our in-house nested PCR system therefore can diagnose the accurate pathogen causing bacterial meningitis and therefore be useful in selecting a specific treatment line to minimize morbidity. Results are obtained within 24 h and high sensitivity makes this nested PCR assay a rapid and accurate diagnostic tool compared to traditional culture-based methods.

  2. Impact of transgenic potatoes expressing anti-bacterial agents on bacterial endophytes is comparable with the effects of plant genotype, soil type and pathogen infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasche, F.; Velvis, H.; Zachow, C.; Berg, G.; Elsas, van J.D.; Sessitsch, A.

    2006-01-01

    1. Blackleg and soft rot disease of potatoes Solanum tuberosum L., mainly caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia carotovora ssp. atrospetica (Eca), lead to enormous yield losses world-wide. Genetically modified (GM) potatoes producing anti-bacterial agents, such as cecropin/attacin and T4

  3. Impact of transgenic potatoes expressing anti-bacterial agents on bacterial endophytes is comparable with the effects of plant genotype, soil type and pathogen infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasche, F; Velvis, H; Zachow, C; Berg, G; Van Elsas, JD; Sessitsch, A

    1. Blackleg and soft rot disease of potatoes Solanum tuberosum L., mainly caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia carotovora ssp. atrospetica (Eca), lead to enormous yield losses world-wide. Genetically modified (GM) potatoes producing anti-bacterial agents, such as cecropin/attacin and T4

  4. Convergent use of RhoGAP toxins by eukaryotic parasites and bacterial pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Colinet

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Inactivation of host Rho GTPases is a widespread strategy employed by bacterial pathogens to manipulate mammalian cellular functions and avoid immune defenses. Some bacterial toxins mimic eukaryotic Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs to inactivate mammalian GTPases, probably as a result of evolutionary convergence. An intriguing question remains whether eukaryotic pathogens or parasites may use endogenous GAPs as immune-suppressive toxins to target the same key genes as bacterial pathogens. Interestingly, a RhoGAP domain-containing protein, LbGAP, was recently characterized from the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi, and shown to protect parasitoid eggs from the immune response of Drosophila host larvae. We demonstrate here that LbGAP has structural characteristics of eukaryotic RhoGAPs but that it acts similarly to bacterial RhoGAP toxins in mammals. First, we show by immunocytochemistry that LbGAP enters Drosophila immune cells, plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, and that morphological changes in lamellocytes are correlated with the quantity of LbGAP they contain. Demonstration that LbGAP displays a GAP activity and specifically interacts with the active, GTP-bound form of the two Drosophila Rho GTPases Rac1 and Rac2, both required for successful encapsulation of Leptopilina eggs, was then achieved using biochemical tests, yeast two-hybrid analysis, and GST pull-down assays. In addition, we show that the overall structure of LbGAP is similar to that of eukaryotic RhoGAP domains, and we identify distinct residues involved in its interaction with Rac GTPases. Altogether, these results show that eukaryotic parasites can use endogenous RhoGAPs as virulence factors and that despite their differences in sequence and structure, eukaryotic and bacterial RhoGAP toxins are similarly used to target the same immune pathways in insects and mammals.

  5. General and specialized media routinely employed for primary isolation of bacterial pathogens of fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    There are a number of significant diseases among cultured and free-ranging freshwater fishes that have a bacterial etiology; these represent a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive genera. Confirmatory diagnosis of these diseases involves primary isolation of the causative bacterium on bacteriologic media. Frequently used "general" bacteriologic media simply provide the essential nutrients for growth. For most of the major pathogens, however, there are differential and/or selective media that facilitate primary recovery. Some specialized media are available as "ready-to-use" from suppliers, while others must be prepared. Differential media employ various types of indicator systems, such as pH indicators, that allow diagnosticians to observe assimilation of selected substrates. An advantage to the use of differential media for primary isolation is that they hasten bacterial characterization by yielding the appropriate positive or negative result for a particular substrate, often leading to a presumptive identification. Selective media also incorporate agent(s) that inhibit the growth of contaminants typically encountered with samples from aquatic environments. Media that incorporate differential and/or selective components are ideally based on characters that are unique to the targeted bacterium, and their use can reduce the time associated with diagnosis and facilitate early intervention in affected fish populations. In this review, the concepts of general and differential/selective bacteriologic media and their use and development for fish pathogens are discussed. The media routinely employed for primary isolation of the significant bacterial pathogens of fishes are presented. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2008.

  6. Insights into the emergent bacterial pathogen Cronobacter spp., generated by multilocus sequence typing and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan eJoseph

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. (previously known as Enterobacter sakazakii is a bacterial pathogen affecting all age groups, with particularly severe clinical complications in neonates and infants. One recognised route of infection being the consumption of contaminated infant formula. As a recently recognised bacterial pathogen of considerable importance and regulatory control, appropriate detection and identification schemes are required. The application of multilocus sequence typing (MLST and analysis (MLSA of the seven alleles atpD, fusA, glnS, gltB, gyrB, infB and ppsA (concatenated length 3036 base pairs has led to considerable advances in our understanding of the genus. This approach is supported by both the reliability of DNA sequencing over subjective phenotyping and the establishment of a MLST database which has open access and is also curated; http://www.pubMLST.org/cronobacter. MLST has been used to describe the diversity of the newly recognised genus, instrumental in the formal recognition of new Cronobacter species (C. universalis and C. condimenti and revealed the high clonality of strains and the association of clonal complex 4 with neonatal meningitis cases. Clearly the MLST approach has considerable benefits over the use of non-DNA sequence based methods of analysis for newly emergent bacterial pathogens. The application of MLST and MLSA has dramatically enabled us to better understand this opportunistic bacterium which can cause irreparable damage to a newborn baby’s brain, and has contributed to improved control measures to protect neonatal health.

  7. The RpfB-Dependent Quorum Sensing Signal Turnover System Is Required for Adaptation and Virulence in Rice Bacterial Blight Pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing-Yu; Zhou, Lian; Yang, Jun; Ji, Guang-Hai; He, Ya-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the bacterial blight pathogen of rice, produces diffusible signal factor (DSF) family quorum sensing signals to regulate virulence. The biosynthesis and perception of DSF family signals require components of the rpf (regulation of pathogenicity factors) cluster. In this study, we report that RpfB plays an essential role in DSF family signal turnover in X. oryzae pv. oryzae PXO99A. The production of DSF family signals was boosted by deletion of the rpfB gene and was abolished by its overexpression. The RpfC/RpfG-mediated DSF signaling system negatively regulates rpfB expression via the global transcription regulator Clp, whose activity is reversible in the presence of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate. These findings indicate that the DSF family signal turnover system in PXO99A is generally consistent with that in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. Moreover, this study has revealed several specific roles of RpfB in PXO99A. First, the rpfB deletion mutant produced high levels of DSF family signals but reduced extracellular polysaccharide production, extracellular amylase activity, and attenuated pathogenicity. Second, the rpfB/rpfC double-deletion mutant was partially deficient in xanthomonadin production. Taken together, the RpfB-dependent DSF family signal turnover system is a conserved and naturally presenting signal turnover system in Xanthomonas spp., which plays unique roles in X. oryzae pv. oryzae adaptation and pathogenesis.

  8. Baby bottle steam sterilizers disinfect home nebulizers inoculated with bacterial respiratory pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Dana; Callan, Deborah A; Farrel, Patricia A; Egan, Marie E; Murray, Thomas S

    2013-09-01

    Contaminated nebulizers are a potential source of bacterial infection but no single method is universally accepted for disinfection. We hypothesized that baby-bottle steam sterilizers effectively disinfect home nebulizers. Home nebulizers were inoculated with the common CF respiratory pathogens methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia cepacia, Haemophilus influenzae, mucoid and non mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The nebulizers were swabbed for bacterial growth, treated with either the AVENT (Philips), the NUK Quick & Ready (Gerber) or DRY-POD (Camera Baby) baby bottle steam sterilizer and reswabbed for bacterial growth. All steam sterilizers were effective at disinfecting all home nebulizers. Viable bacteria were not recovered from any inoculated site after steam treatment, under any conditions tested. Steam treatment is an effective disinfection method. Additional studies are needed to confirm whether these results are applicable to the clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Microplastics as a vector for the transport of the bacterial fish pathogen species Aeromonas salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viršek, Manca Kovač; Lovšin, Marija Nika; Koren, Špela; Kržan, Andrej; Peterlin, Monika

    2017-12-15

    Microplastics is widespread in the marine environment where it can cause numerous negative effects. It can provide space for the growth of organisms and serves as a vector for the long distance transfer of marine microorganisms. In this study, we examined the sea surface concentrations of microplastics in the North Adriatic and characterized bacterial communities living on the microplastics. DNA from microplastics particles was isolated by three different methods, followed by PCR amplification of 16S rDNA, clone libraries preparation and phylogenetic analysis. 28 bacterial species were identified on the microplastics particles including Aeromonas spp. and hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial species. Based on the 16S rDNA sequences the pathogenic fish bacteria Aeromonas salmonicida was identified for the first time on microplastics. Because A. salmonicida is responsible for illnesses in fish, it is crucial to get answers if and how microplastics pollution is responsible for spreading of diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham G Willsey

    Full Text Available Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment.

  11. Diet and environment shape fecal bacterial microbiota composition and enteric pathogen load of grizzly bears.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diet and environment impact the composition of mammalian intestinal microbiota; dietary or health disturbances trigger alterations in intestinal microbiota composition and render the host susceptible to enteric pathogens. To date no long term monitoring data exist on the fecal microbiota and pathogen load of carnivores either in natural environments or in captivity. This study investigates fecal microbiota composition and the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and toxigenic clostridia in wild and captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos and relates these to food resources consumed by bears. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Feces were obtained from animals of two wild populations and from two captive animals during an active bear season. Wild animals consumed a diverse diet composed of plant material, animal prey and insects. Captive animals were fed a regular granulated diet with a supplement of fruits and vegetables. Bacterial populations were analyzed using quantitative PCR. Fecal microbiota composition fluctuated in wild and in captive animals. The abundance of Clostridium clusters I and XI, and of C. perfringens correlated to regular diet protein intake. Enteroaggregative E. coli were consistently present in all populations. The C. sordellii phospholipase C was identified in three samples of wild animals and for the first time in Ursids. CONCLUSION: This is the first longitudinal study monitoring the fecal microbiota of wild carnivores and comparing it to that of captive individuals of the same species. Location and diet affected fecal bacterial populations as well as the presence of enteric pathogens.

  12. Diet and environment shape fecal bacterial microbiota composition and enteric pathogen load of grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Cristescu, Bogdan; Northrup, Joseph M; Stenhouse, Gordon B; Gänzle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diet and environment impact the composition of mammalian intestinal microbiota; dietary or health disturbances trigger alterations in intestinal microbiota composition and render the host susceptible to enteric pathogens. To date no long term monitoring data exist on the fecal microbiota and pathogen load of carnivores either in natural environments or in captivity. This study investigates fecal microbiota composition and the presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli and toxigenic clostridia in wild and captive grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) and relates these to food resources consumed by bears. Feces were obtained from animals of two wild populations and from two captive animals during an active bear season. Wild animals consumed a diverse diet composed of plant material, animal prey and insects. Captive animals were fed a regular granulated diet with a supplement of fruits and vegetables. Bacterial populations were analyzed using quantitative PCR. Fecal microbiota composition fluctuated in wild and in captive animals. The abundance of Clostridium clusters I and XI, and of C. perfringens correlated to regular diet protein intake. Enteroaggregative E. coli were consistently present in all populations. The C. sordellii phospholipase C was identified in three samples of wild animals and for the first time in Ursids. This is the first longitudinal study monitoring the fecal microbiota of wild carnivores and comparing it to that of captive individuals of the same species. Location and diet affected fecal bacterial populations as well as the presence of enteric pathogens.

  13. Bacterial ‘Cell’ Phones: Do cell phones carry potential pathogens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell phones are important companions for professionals especially health care workers (HCWs for better communication in hospital. The present study compared the nature of the growth of potentially pathogenic bacterial flora on cell phones in hospital and community. 75% cell phones from both the categories grew at least one potentially pathogenic organism. Cell phones from HCWs grew significantly more potential pathogens like MRSA (20%, Acinetobacter species (5%, Pseudomonas species (2.5% as compared to the non HCWs. 97.5% HCWs use their cell phone in the hospital, 57.5% never cleaned their cell phone and 20% admitted that they did not wash their hands before or after attending patients, although majority (77.5% knows that cell phones can have harmful colonization and act as vector for nosocomial infections. It is recommended, therefore, that cell phones in the hospital should be regularly decontaminated. Moreover, utmost emphasis needs to be paid to hand washing practices among HCWs.

  14. Occurrence and antibacterial susceptibility pattern of bacterial pathogens isolated from diarrheal patients in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad H. Rasool

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the occurrence of bacterial pathogens responsible for diarrhea and to engender information regarding the effectiveness of commonly used antibiotic against diarrhea. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between April and July 2014. Samples were collected from the Divisional Headquarter and Allied Hospital, Faisalabad, Pakistan. The differential and selective media were used to isolate bacterial pathogens, which were identified through cultural characteristics, microscopy, and biochemical tests. Disc diffusion assay was carried out using Muller Hinton agar medium, and minimum inhibitory concentration was determined using broth dilution method against isolated pathogens. Results: One hundred and forty-one (100% samples were positive for some bacteria. Frequency of occurrence was Bacillus cereus (B. cereus (66%, Escherichia coli (E. coli (48.5%, Salmonella typhi (S. Typhi (27.7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa (8.5%, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus (4.3%. Single pathogen was detected in 20 (14.2% samples whereas combinations were found in 121 (85.8% samples. Bacillus cereus and E. coli were the most frequently detected pathogens followed by the S. Typhi, P. aeruginosa, and Staph. aureus. The percentage occurrence of isolated pathogens was 31% in B. cereus, 31% in E. coli, 18% in S. Typhi, 5% in P. aeruginosa, and 3% in Staph. aureus. Conclusion: Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed resistance against Amoxicillin and Cefotaxime, whereas S. aureus was found resistant against Cefotaxime. Statistical analysis using one way Analysis of Variance revealed that Ofloxacin and Gentamicin had significant (p<0.05 differences against all isolates as compared with other antibiotics used in this study.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations on interaction between bacterial proteins: Implication on pathogenic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Ghosh, Mahua

    2017-12-18

    We perform molecular dynamics simulation studies on interaction between bacterial proteins: an outer-membrane protein STY3179 and a yfdX protein STY3178 of Salmonella Typhi. STY3179 has been found to be involved in bacterial adhesion and invasion. STY3178 is recently biophysically characterized. It is a soluble protein having antibiotic binding and chaperon activity capabilities. These two proteins co-occur and are from neighboring gene in Salmonella Typhi-occurrence of homologs of both STY3178 and STY3179 are identified in many Gram-negative bacteria. We show using homology modeling, docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation that they can form a stable complex. STY3178 belongs to aqueous phase, while the beta barrel portion of STY3179 remains buried in DPPC bilayer with extra-cellular loops exposed to water. To understand the molecular basis of interaction between STY3178 and STY3179, we compute the conformational thermodynamics which indicate that these two proteins interact through polar and acidic residues belonging to their interfacial region. Conformational thermodynamics results further reveal instability of certain residues in extra-cellular loops of STY3179 upon complexation with STY3178 which is an indication for binding with host cell protein laminin. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural insight into effector proteins of Gram‐negative bacterial pathogens that modulate the phosphoproteome of their host

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grishin, Andrey M; Beyrakhova, Ksenia A; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-01-01

    ... and ∼130 phosphatases in the human genome. Pathogens affect the phosphoproteome either directly through the action of bacterial effectors, and/or indirectly through downstream effects of host proteins modified by the effectors...

  17. The flagellum in bacterial pathogens: For motility and a whole lot more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Bonnie; Hughes, H Velocity; Beeby, Morgan

    2015-10-01

    The bacterial flagellum is an amazingly complex molecular machine with a diversity of roles in pathogenesis including reaching the optimal host site, colonization or invasion, maintenance at the infection site, and post-infection dispersal. Multi-megadalton flagellar motors self-assemble across the cell wall to form a reversible rotary motor that spins a helical propeller - the flagellum itself - to drive the motility of diverse bacterial pathogens. The flagellar motor responds to the chemoreceptor system to redirect swimming toward beneficial environments, thus enabling flagellated pathogens to seek out their site of infection. At their target site, additional roles of surface swimming and mechanosensing are mediated by flagella to trigger pathogenesis. Yet while these motility-related functions have long been recognized as virulence factors in bacteria, many bacteria have capitalized upon flagellar structure and function by adapting it to roles in other stages of the infection process. Once at their target site, the flagellum can assist adherence to surfaces, differentiation into biofilms, secretion of effector molecules, further penetration through tissue structures, or in activating phagocytosis to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Next, upon onset of infection, flagellar expression must be adapted to deal with the host's immune system defenses, either by reduced or altered expression or by flagellar structural modification. Finally, after a successful growth phase on or inside a host, dispersal to new infection sites is often flagellar motility-mediated. Examining examples of all these processes from different bacterial pathogens, it quickly becomes clear that the flagellum is involved in bacterial pathogenesis for motility and a whole lot more. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections: Causative pathogens and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Nargis; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Satti, Luqman; Gardezi, Adeel; Ahmed, Abeera; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-10-01

    We sought to determine the incidence of bacterial biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections, identify variables affecting biofilm formation, and identify etiologic bacterial pathogens and antibiotic-resistance patterns associated with biofilm-based catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in our setup. Patients who developed at least 2 symptoms of urinary tract infection after at least 2 days of indwelling urinary catheters were included. Urine was collected aseptically from catheter tubing and processed per standard microbiologic practices. Bacterial pathogens were identified on the basis of gram staining, colony morphology, and biochemical reactions. The detection of the biofilm was done using the tube adherence method. Drug susceptibility testing was done using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Biofilm was detected in 73.4% isolates, whereas 26.6% of isolates were nonbiofilm producers. Mean duration of catheterization after which biofilm was detected was 5.01 ± 1.31 days. A latex catheter was used in 69.5% of patients, whereas a silicone catheter was used in 30.4% of patients. Escherichia coli was found to be the most common pathogen isolated (52.3%), whereas Enterobacter cloacae exhibited the highest biofilm production (87.5%) among isolated pathogens. Among biofilm producers, the highest resistance was observed with ampicillin (100%). Fosfomycin exhibited the lowest resistance (17.2%). Significant association with biofilm was detected for gender, duration of catheterization, and type of catheter. Biofilm-based CAUTI is an emerging problem. E coli was the most frequent isolate. High antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm-producing strains. Using the variables affecting biofilm formation, tailored intervention strategies can be implemented to reduce biofilm-based CAUTIs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A potential link between bacterial pathogens and allergic conjunctivitis by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruzhi; Su, Zhitao; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaobo; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan

    2014-03-01

    The association and mechanism of bacteria linking to the allergic inflammation have not been well elucidated. This study was to explore a potential link between bacterial pathogens and allergic conjunctivitis by dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs from BALB/c and MyD88 knockout mice were treated with or without bacterial pathogens or thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Two murine models of the topical challenge with LPS or flagellin and experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) were used for in vivo study. The mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription and real time PCR, and protein production was evaluated by ELISA, Western blotting, immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. TSLP mRNA and protein were found to be largely induced by DCs challenged with microbial pathogens, highly by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagellin. The expression of MyD88, NFκB1, NFκB2 and RelA accompanied by NFκB p65 nuclear translocation and TSLP induction were significantly stimulated by flagellin, but blocked by TLR5 antibody or NFκB inhibitor in DCs from MyD88(+/+) but not MyD88(-/-) mice. TSLP promoted the expression of CD40, CD80, OX40 ligand (OX40L), IL-13 and CCL17 by DCs. TSLP-producing DCs were identified in vivo in ocular surface conjunctiva and draining cervical lymph nodes from two murine models of topical challenge with LPS or flagellin, and EAC in BALB/c mice. TSLP/TSLPR/OX40L signaling was observed in DCs of EAC mice. Our findings demonstrate that DCs not only respond to TSLP, but also produce TSLP via TLR/MyD88/NFκB pathways in response to bacterial pathogens, suggesting a potential link between bacteria and allergic disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Potential link between Bacterial Pathogens and Allergic Conjunctivitis by Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ruzhi; Su, Zhitao; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lili; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaobo; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2014-01-01

    The association and mechanism of bacteria linking to the allergic inflammation have not been well elucidated. This study was to explore a potential link between bacterial pathogens and allergic conjunctivitis by dendritic cells (DCs). Bone marrow-derived DCs from BALB/c and MyD88 knockout mice were treated with or without bacterial pathogens or thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Two murine models of the topical challenge with LPS or flagellin and experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) were used for in vivo study. The mRNA expression was determined by reverse transcription and real time PCR, and protein production was evaluated by ELISA, Western blotting, immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. TSLP mRNA and protein were found to be largely induced by DCs challenged with microbial pathogens, highly by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagellin. The expression of MyD88, NFκB1, NFκB2 and RelA accompanied by NFκB p65 nuclear translocation and TSLP induction were significantly stimulated by flagellin, but blocked by TLR5 antibody or NFκB inhibitor in DCs from MyD88+/+ but not MyD88−/− mice. TSLP promoted the expression of CD40, CD80, OX40 ligand (OX40L), IL-13 and CCL17 by DCs. TSLP-producing DCs were identified in vivo in ocular surface conjunctiva and draining cervical lymph nodes from two murine models of topical challenge with LPS or flagellin, and EAC in BALB/c mice. TSLP/TSLPR/OX40L signaling was observed in DCs of EAC mice. Our findings demonstrate that DCs not only respond to TSLP, but also produce TSLP via TLR/MyD88/NFκB pathways in response to bacterial pathogens, suggesting a potential link between bacteria and allergic disease. PMID:24486456

  1. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N

    The ecological implications of metal binding properties of bacterial EPS and its possible role in the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the marine food-chain was investigated using a partially purified and chemically characterized microbial EPS...

  2. Isolation, pathogenicity and characterization of a novel bacterial pathogen Streptococcus uberis from diseased mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xia; Fu, Xiaozhe; Liao, Guoli; Chang, Ouqin; Huang, Zhibin; Li, Ningqiu

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, mandarin fish had a high mortality rate associated with abnormal swimming, exophthalmia, corneal opacity and eye hemorrhage on a fish farm located at Foshan city, Guangdong province, China. Three isolates of Gram-positive, chain-forming cocci were recovered from moribund fish, and designated as SS131025-1, SS131025-2, and SS131025-3. These isolates were identified as Streptococcus uberis according to their morphologic and physio-biochemical characteristics as well as phylogenetic analysis based on their 16S rRNA and GapC gene sequences. The pathogenicity of S. uberis to mandarin fish was determined by challenge experiments. Results of artificial challenge showed S. uberis infected healthy mandarin fish and lead to death by eyeball injection or immersion route, and the LD 50 of SS131025-1 with eyeball injection was 2.0 × 10 6.42  CFU per fish. Moreover extracellular product (ECP) of the isolated S.uberis induced CPB cell apoptosis and cause death of mandarin fish. In addition, these S. uberis strains could also infect tilapia, but not grass carp and crucian carp, and grew in brain-heart infusion broth with an optimal temperature of 37 °C, pH of 7.0, and salinity of 0%. Antibiotic sensitivity testing indicated that these isolates were susceptible to rifampicin and furazolidone but resistant to 20 kinds of antibiotics. Histopathologically, infection with S. uberis could cause serious pathological changes in brain tissues such as vacuoles in matrix, swollen mitochondria with lysis of cristae and disintegration, and lots of coccus was observed both under electron and light microscope. These results shed some light on the pathogenicity of the isolates and how to prevent and control S. uberis infection in mandarin fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  4. Rapid Methods for the Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens: Principles, Applications, Advantages and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law eJodi Woan-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR, multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases.

  5. Coexistence of emerging bacterial pathogens in Ixodes ricinus ticks in Serbia*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanović S.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The list of tick-borne pathogens is long, varied and includes viruses, bacteria, protozoa and nematodes. As all of these agents can exist in ticks, their co-infections have been previously reported. We studied co-infections of emerging bacterial pathogens (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Francisella tularensis in Ixodes ricinus ticks in Serbia. Using PCR technique, we detected species-specific sequences, rrf-rrl rDNA intergenic spacer for B. burgdorferi s.l., p44/msp2 paralogs for A. phagocytophilum, and the 17 kDa lipoprotein gene, TUL4, for F. tularensis, respectively, in total DNA extracted from the ticks. Common infections with more than one pathogen were detected in 42 (28.8 % of 146 infected I. ricinus ticks. Co-infections with two pathogens were present in 39 (26.7 % of infected ticks. Simultaneous presence of A. phagocytophilum and different genospecies of B. burgdorferi s.l. complex was recorded in 16 ticks, co-infection with different B. burgdorferi s. l. genospecies was found in 15 ticks and eight ticks harbored mixed infections with F. tularensis and B. burgdorferi s.l. genospecies. Less common were triple pathogen species infections, detected in three ticks, one infected with A. phagocytophilum / B. burgdorferi s.s. / B. lusitaniae and two infected with F. tularensis / B. burgdorferi s.s. / B. lusitaniae. No mixed infections of A. phagocytophilum and F. tularensis were detected.

  6. Higher resource level promotes virulence in an environmentally transmitted bacterial fish pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnula, Hanna; Mappes, Johanna; Valkonen, Janne K; Pulkkinen, Katja; Sundberg, Lotta-Riina

    2017-06-01

    Diseases have become a primary constraint to sustainable aquaculture, but remarkably little attention has been paid to a broad class of pathogens: the opportunists. Opportunists often persist in the environment outside the host, and their pathogenic features are influenced by changes in the environment. To test how environmental nutrient levels influence virulence, we used strains of Flavobacterium columnare, an environmentally transmitted fish pathogen, to infect rainbow trout and zebra fish in two different nutrient concentrations. To separate the effects of dose and nutrients, we used three infective doses and studied the growth of bacteria in vitro. High nutrient concentration promoted both the virulence and the outside-host growth of the pathogen, most notably in a low-virulence strain. The increase in virulence could not be exhaustively explained by the increased dose under higher nutrient supply, suggesting virulence factor activation. In aquaculture settings, accumulation of organic material in rearing units can locally increase water nutrient concentration and therefore increase disease risk as a response to elevated bacterial density and virulence factor activation. Our results highlight the role of increased nutrients in outside-host environment as a selective agent for higher virulence and faster evolutionary rate in opportunistic pathogens.

  7. Liquid based formulations of bacteriophages for the management of waterborne bacterial pathogens in water microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tagunde, Sujata; Khopkar, Sushama; Karni, Mrudula; Gajbhiye, Milind; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2013-11-01

    Water resources are contaminated by life-threatening multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria. Unfortunately, these pathogenic bacteria do not respond to the traditional water purification methods. Therefore, there is a need of environmentally friendly strategies to overcome the problems associated with the antimicrobial resistant bacterial pathogens. In the present study, highly potent lytic phages against multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from the Pavana river water. They belonged to the Podoviridae and Siphoviridae families. These phages were purified and enriched in the laboratory. Monovalent formulations of phiSPB, BVPaP-3 and KPP phages were prepared in three different liquids viz., phage broth, saline and distilled water. The phages were stable for almost 8-10 months in the phage broth at 4 degrees C. The stability of the phages in saline and distilled water was 5-6 months at 4 degrees C. All of the phages were stable only for 4-6 months in the phage broth at 30 degrees C. The monovalent phage formulation of psiSPB was applied at MOI < 1, as disinfectant against an exponential and stationary phase cells of Salmonella enterica serovar Paratyphi B in various water microcosms. The results indicated that there was almost 80 % reduction in the log phase cells of Salmonella serovar Paratyphi B in 24 h. In stationary phase cells, the reduction was comparatively less within same period. At the same time, there was concomitant increase in the phage population by 80% in all the microcosms indicating that psiSPB phage is highly potent in killing pathogen in water. Results strongly support that the formulation of psiSPB in the phage broth in monovalent form could be used as an effective biological disinfectant for preventing transmission of water-borne bacterial pathogens, including antimicrobial resistant ones.

  8. Structure of the extracellular portion of CD46 provides insights into its interactions with complement proteins and pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B David Persson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The human membrane cofactor protein (MCP, CD46 is a central component of the innate immune system. CD46 protects autologous cells from complement attack by binding to complement proteins C3b and C4b and serving as a cofactor for their cleavage. Recent data show that CD46 also plays a role in mediating acquired immune responses, and in triggering autophagy. In addition to these physiologic functions, a significant number of pathogens, including select adenoviruses, measles virus, human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6, Streptococci, and Neisseria, use CD46 as a cell attachment receptor. We have determined the crystal structure of the extracellular region of CD46 in complex with the human adenovirus type 11 fiber knob. Extracellular CD46 comprises four short consensus repeats (SCR1-SCR4 that form an elongated structure resembling a hockey stick, with a long shaft and a short blade. Domains SCR1, SCR2 and SCR3 are arranged in a nearly linear fashion. Unexpectedly, however, the structure reveals a profound bend between domains SCR3 and SCR4, which has implications for the interactions with ligands as well as the orientation of the protein at the cell surface. This bend can be attributed to an insertion of five hydrophobic residues in a SCR3 surface loop. Residues in this loop have been implicated in interactions with complement, indicating that the bend participates in binding to C3b and C4b. The structure provides an accurate framework for mapping all known ligand binding sites onto the surface of CD46, thereby advancing an understanding of how CD46 acts as a receptor for pathogens and physiologic ligands of the immune system.

  9. Spread of bacterial pathogens during preparation of freshly squeezed orange juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gonzales, N E; Hernández-Herrera, A; Martínez-Chávez, L; Rodríguez-García, M O; Torres-Vitela, M R; Mota de la Garza, L; Castillo, A

    2003-08-01

    To study the potential of three bacterial pathogens to cross-contaminate orange juice during extraction, normal operation conditions during juice preparation at food service establishments were simulated. The spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes from inoculated oranges to work surfaces and to the final product was determined. The transference of these three bacterial pathogens to orange juice made from uninoculated oranges with the use of contaminated utensils was also studied. Fresh oranges were inoculated with a marker strain of rifampicin-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium, E. coli O157:H7, or L. monocytogenes. Final pathogen levels in juice were compared as a function of the use of electric or mechanical juice extractors to squeeze orange juice from inoculated oranges. Pathogen populations on different contact surfaces during orange juice extraction were determined on sulfite-phenol red-rifampicin plates for Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with 0.1 g of rifampicin per liter for L. monocytogenes. After inoculation, the average pathogen counts for the orange rind surface were 2.3 log10 CFU/cm2 for Salmonella Typhimurium, 3.6 log10 CFU/cm2 for E. coli O157:H7, and 4.4 log10 CFU/cm2 for L. monocytogenes. This contamination was spread over all utensils used in orange juice squeezing. Mean pathogen counts for the cutting board, the knife, and the extractor ranged from -0.3 to 2.1 log10 CFU/cm2, and the juice contained 1.0 log10 CFU of Salmonella Typhimurium per ml, 2.3 log10 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 per ml, and 2.7 log10 CFU of L. monocytogenes per ml. Contact with contaminated surfaces resulted in the presence of all pathogens in orange juice made from uninoculated oranges. These results give emphasis to the importance of fresh oranges as a source of pathogens in orange juice.

  10. In vitro antibacterial potential of Eugenia jambolana seed extracts against multidrug-resistant human bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Anwesa; Bhattacharyya, Subir Kumar; Pal, Nishith Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Rabi Ranjan

    2012-06-20

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible in vitro antibacterial potential of extracts of Eugenia jambolana seeds against multidrug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. Agar well diffusion and microbroth dilution assay methods were used for antibacterial susceptibility testing. Kill-kinetics study was done to know the rate and extent of bacterial killing. Phytochemical analysis and TLC-bioautography were performed by colour tests to characterize the putative compounds responsible for this antibacterial activity. Cytotoxic potential was evaluated on human erythrocytes by haemolytic assay method and acute oral toxicity study was done in mice. The plant extracts demonstrated varying degrees of strain specific antibacterial activity against all the test isolates. Further, ethyl acetate fraction obtained from fractionation of most active ethanol extract showed maximum antibacterial effect against all the test isolates. Phytochemical analysis and TLC-bioautography of ethyl acetate fraction revealed that phenolics were the major active phytoconstituents. Ethyl acetate fraction also demonstrated no haemolytic activity on human erythrocytes and no gross behavioural changes as well as toxic symptoms were observed in mice at recommended dosage level. The results provide justification for the use of E. jambolana in folk medicine to treat various infectious diseases and may contribute to the development of novel antimicrobial agents for the treatment of infections caused by these drug-resistant bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Drivers of bacterial genomes plasticity and roles they play in pathogen virulence, persistence and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema

    2016-11-01

    Despite the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, sophisticated data analysis and drug development efforts, bacterial drug resistance persists and is escalating in magnitude. To better control the pathogens, a thorough understanding of their genomic architecture and dynamics is vital. Bacterial genome is extremely complex, a mosaic of numerous co-operating and antagonizing components, altruistic and self-interested entities, behavior of which are predictable and conserved to some extent, yet largely dictated by an array of variables. In this regard, mobile genetic elements (MGE), DNA repair systems, post-segregation killing systems, toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems, restriction-modification (RM) systems etc. are dominant agents and horizontal gene transfer (HGT), gene redundancy, epigenetics, phase and antigenic variation etc. processes shape the genome. By illegitimate recombinations, deletions, insertions, duplications, amplifications, inversions, conversions, translocations, modification of intergenic regions and other alterations, bacterial genome is modified to tackle stressors like drugs, and host immune effectors. Over the years, thousands of studies have investigated this aspect and mammoth amount of insights have been accumulated. This review strives to distillate the existing information, formulate hypotheses and to suggest directions, that might contribute towards improved mitigation of the vicious pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles enhance mortality of fish exposed to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Boris; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Kimura, Kayoko; Crumpton, Adam; Palić, Dušan

    2015-08-01

    Nano-TiO2 is immunotoxic to fish and reduces the bactericidal function of fish neutrophils. Here, fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to low and high environmentally relevant concentration of nano-TiO2 (2 ng g(-1) and 10 μg g(-1) body weight, respectively), and were challenged with common fish bacterial pathogens, Aeromonas hydrophila or Edwardsiella ictaluri. Pre-exposure to nano-TiO2 significantly increased fish mortality during bacterial challenge. Nano-TiO2 concentrated in the kidney and spleen. Phagocytosis assay demonstrated that nano-TiO2 has the ability to diminish neutrophil phagocytosis of A. hydrophila. Fish injected with TiO2 nanoparticles displayed significant histopathology when compared to control fish. The interplay between nanoparticle exposure, immune system, histopathology, and infectious disease pathogenesis in any animal model has not been described before. By modulating fish immune responses and interfering with resistance to bacterial pathogens, manufactured nano-TiO2 has the potential to affect fish survival in a disease outbreak. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The Sit-and-Wait Hypothesis in Bacterial Pathogens: A Theoretical Study of Durability and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Zhanzhong; Dai, Shiyun; Yan, Jiawei; Wise, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The intriguing sit-and-wait hypothesis predicts that bacterial durability in the external environment is positively correlated with their virulence. Since its first proposal in 1987, the hypothesis has been spurring debates in terms of its validity in the field of bacterial virulence. As a special case of the vector-borne transmission versus virulence tradeoff, where vector is now replaced by environmental longevity, there are only sporadic studies over the last three decades showing that environmental durability is possibly linked with virulence. However, no systematic study of these works is currently available and epidemiological analysis has not been updated for the sit-and-wait hypothesis since the publication of Walther and Ewald’s (2004) review. In this article, we put experimental evidence, epidemiological data and theoretical analysis together to support the sit-and-wait hypothesis. According to the epidemiological data in terms of gain and loss of virulence (+/-) and durability (+/-) phenotypes, we classify bacteria into four groups, which are: sit-and-wait pathogens (++), vector-borne pathogens (+-), obligate-intracellular bacteria (--), and free-living bacteria (-+). After that, we dive into the abundant bacterial proteomic data with the assistance of bioinformatics techniques in order to investigate the two factors at molecular level thanks to the fast development of high-throughput sequencing technology. Sequences of durability-related genes sourced from Gene Ontology and UniProt databases and virulence factors collected from Virulence Factor Database are used to search 20 corresponding bacterial proteomes in batch mode for homologous sequences via the HMMER software package. Statistical analysis only identified a modest, and not statistically significant correlation between mortality and survival time for eight non-vector-borne bacteria with sit-and-wait potentials. Meanwhile, through between-group comparisons, bacteria with higher host

  14. The Sit-and-Wait Hypothesis in Bacterial Pathogens: A Theoretical Study of Durability and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Zhanzhong; Dai, Shiyun; Yan, Jiawei; Wise, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    The intriguing sit-and-wait hypothesis predicts that bacterial durability in the external environment is positively correlated with their virulence. Since its first proposal in 1987, the hypothesis has been spurring debates in terms of its validity in the field of bacterial virulence. As a special case of the vector-borne transmission versus virulence tradeoff, where vector is now replaced by environmental longevity, there are only sporadic studies over the last three decades showing that environmental durability is possibly linked with virulence. However, no systematic study of these works is currently available and epidemiological analysis has not been updated for the sit-and-wait hypothesis since the publication of Walther and Ewald's (2004) review. In this article, we put experimental evidence, epidemiological data and theoretical analysis together to support the sit-and-wait hypothesis. According to the epidemiological data in terms of gain and loss of virulence (+/-) and durability (+/-) phenotypes, we classify bacteria into four groups, which are: sit-and-wait pathogens (++), vector-borne pathogens (+-), obligate-intracellular bacteria (--), and free-living bacteria (-+). After that, we dive into the abundant bacterial proteomic data with the assistance of bioinformatics techniques in order to investigate the two factors at molecular level thanks to the fast development of high-throughput sequencing technology. Sequences of durability-related genes sourced from Gene Ontology and UniProt databases and virulence factors collected from Virulence Factor Database are used to search 20 corresponding bacterial proteomes in batch mode for homologous sequences via the HMMER software package. Statistical analysis only identified a modest, and not statistically significant correlation between mortality and survival time for eight non-vector-borne bacteria with sit-and-wait potentials. Meanwhile, through between-group comparisons, bacteria with higher host-mortality are

  15. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife.

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    Maria Razzauti

    Full Text Available Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations.We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq. In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454. In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles.We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each individual reservoir, with subsequent derivation of

  16. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each individual reservoir, with subsequent derivation of bacterial prevalence

  17. The Sit-and-Wait Hypothesis in Bacterial Pathogens: A Theoretical Study of Durability and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The intriguing sit-and-wait hypothesis predicts that bacterial durability in the external environment is positively correlated with their virulence. Since its first proposal in 1987, the hypothesis has been spurring debates in terms of its validity in the field of bacterial virulence. As a special case of the vector-borne transmission versus virulence tradeoff, where vector is now replaced by environmental longevity, there are only sporadic studies over the last three decades showing that environmental durability is possibly linked with virulence. However, no systematic study of these works is currently available and epidemiological analysis has not been updated for the sit-and-wait hypothesis since the publication of Walther and Ewald’s (2004 review. In this article, we put experimental evidence, epidemiological data and theoretical analysis together to support the sit-and-wait hypothesis. According to the epidemiological data in terms of gain and loss of virulence (+/- and durability (+/- phenotypes, we classify bacteria into four groups, which are: sit-and-wait pathogens (++, vector-borne pathogens (+-, obligate-intracellular bacteria (--, and free-living bacteria (-+. After that, we dive into the abundant bacterial proteomic data with the assistance of bioinformatics techniques in order to investigate the two factors at molecular level thanks to the fast development of high-throughput sequencing technology. Sequences of durability-related genes sourced from Gene Ontology and UniProt databases and virulence factors collected from Virulence Factor Database are used to search 20 corresponding bacterial proteomes in batch mode for homologous sequences via the HMMER software package. Statistical analysis only identified a modest, and not statistically significant correlation between mortality and survival time for eight non-vector-borne bacteria with sit-and-wait potentials. Meanwhile, through between-group comparisons, bacteria with higher

  18. Antibacterial synergy between quercetin and polyphenolic acids against bacterial pathogens of fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinnakota Gangadhara Naga Vara Prasad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate combinations of quercetin with gallic acid, p-anisic acid and cinnamic acid in vitro for synergistic activity against common Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of fish viz., Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida and Edwardsiella tarda. Methods: Antibacterial activity of quercetin, gallic acid, p-anisic acid and cinnamic acid was determined against selected bacterial pathogens individually, followed by combination of quercetin with polyphenolic acids using serial microplate dilution method measuring minimum inhibitory concentrations. Fractional inhibitory concentration indices were calculated. Results: Quercetin and other polyphenolic compounds exhibited antibacterial action against the selected fish pathogens with mean minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.83 to 2.5 mg/mL. It was observed that fractional inhibitory concentration indices for combination of quercetin with gallic acid, p-anisic acid or cinnamic acid against Aeromonas salmonicida were less than 0.5, indicating synergistic interaction. However, the above combinations produced additive antimicrobial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila and Edwardsiella tarda. Conclusions: Positive antibacterial interaction was evident between quercetin and selected polyphenolic acids in vitro.

  19. Inactivation of Selected Bacterial Pathogens in Dairy Cattle Manure by Mesophilic Anaerobic Digestion (Balloon Type Digester)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Mamphweli, Sampson N.; Meyer, Edson L.; Okoh, Anthony I.; Makaka, Golden; Simon, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of animal manure in biogas digesters has shown promise as a technology in reducing the microbial load to safe and recommended levels. We sought to treat dairy manure obtained from the Fort Hare Dairy Farm by investigating the survival rates of bacterial pathogens, through a total viable plate count method, before, during and after mesophilic anaerobic digestion. Different microbiological media were inoculated with different serial dilutions of manure samples that were withdrawn from the biogas digester at 3, 7 and 14 day intervals to determine the viable cells. Data obtained indicated that the pathogens of public health importance were 90%–99% reduced in the order: Campylobacter sp. (18 days) digestion process. In addition, the highest p-value i.e., 0.957 for E. coli showed the statistical significance of its model and the strongest correlation between its reductions with days of digestion. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that the specific bacterial pathogens in manure can be considerably reduced through anaerobic digestion after 133 days. PMID:25026086

  20. An Overview of the Control of Bacterial Pathogens in Cattle Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy E. Manyi-Loh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cattle manure harbors microbial constituents that make it a potential source of pollution in the environment and infections in humans. Knowledge of, and microbial assessment of, manure is crucial in a bid to prevent public health and environmental hazards through the development of better management practices and policies that should govern manure handling. Physical, chemical and biological methods to reduce pathogen population in manure do exist, but are faced with challenges such as cost, odor pollution, green house gas emission, etc. Consequently, anaerobic digestion of animal manure is currently one of the most widely used treatment method that can help to salvage the above-mentioned adverse effects and in addition, produces biogas that can serve as an alternative/complementary source of energy. However, this method has to be monitored closely as it could be fraught with challenges during operation, caused by the inherent characteristics of the manure. In addition, to further reduce bacterial pathogens to a significant level, anaerobic digestion can be combined with other methods such as thermal, aerobic and physical methods. In this paper, we review the bacterial composition of cattle manure as well as methods engaged in the control of pathogenic microbes present in manure and recommendations that need to be respected and implemented in order to prevent microbial contamination of the environment, animals and humans.

  1. Vector-Borne Bacterial Plant Pathogens: Interactions with Hemipteran Insects and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilla-Henao, Laura M; Casteel, Clare L

    2016-01-01

    Hemipteran insects are devastating pests of crops due to their wide host range, rapid reproduction, and ability to transmit numerous plant-infecting pathogens as vectors. While the field of plant-virus-vector interactions has flourished in recent years, plant-bacteria-vector interactions remain poorly understood. Leafhoppers and psyllids are by far the most important vectors of bacterial pathogens, yet there are still significant gaps in our understanding of their feeding behavior, salivary secretions, and plant responses as compared to important viral vectors, such as whiteflies and aphids. Even with an incomplete understanding of plant-bacteria-vector interactions, some common themes have emerged: (1) all known vector-borne bacteria share the ability to propagate in the plant and insect host; (2) particular hemipteran families appear to be incapable of transmitting vector-borne bacteria; (3) all known vector-borne bacteria have highly reduced genomes and coding capacity, resulting in host-dependence; and (4) vector-borne bacteria encode proteins that are essential for colonization of specific hosts, though only a few types of proteins have been investigated. Here, we review the current knowledge on important vector-borne bacterial pathogens, including Xylella fastidiosa, Spiroplasma spp., Liberibacter spp., and 'Candidatus Phytoplasma spp.'. We then highlight recent approaches used in the study of vector-borne bacteria. Finally, we discuss the application of this knowledge for control and future directions that will need to be addressed in the field of vector-plant-bacteria interactions.

  2. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  3. Antibacterial effect of caprylic acid and monocaprylin on major bacterial mastitis pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M K M; Joy, J; Vasudevan, P; Hinckley, L; Hoagland, T A; Venkitanarayanan, K S

    2005-10-01

    Bovine mastitis is the most significant economic drain on the worldwide dairy industry. Concerns regarding poor cure rates, emergence of bacterial resistance, and residues in milk necessitate development of alternative therapeutic approaches to antibiotics for treatment of mastitis. A variety of free fatty acids and their monoglycerides have been reported to exert antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms. The objective of our study was to examine the efficacy of caprylic acid, a short-chain fatty acid, and its monoglyceride, monocaprylin, to inactivate common mastitis pathogens, including Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus uberis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Milk samples containing 50 mM or 100 mM caprylic acid, and 25 mM or 50 mM monocaprylin were inoculated separately with a 3-isolate mixture of each of the 5 pathogens, and incubated at 39 degrees C. Populations of surviving bacteria were determined at 0 min, 1 min, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h of incubation. Both caprylic acid and monocaprylin reduced all 5 pathogens by >5.0 log cfu/mL after 6 h of incubation. Among the bacterial species tested, Strep. agalactiae, Strep. dysgalactiae, and Strep. uberis were most sensitive, and E. coli was most tolerant to caprylic acid and monocaprylin. Results of this study indicate that caprylic acid and monocaprylin should be evaluated as alternatives or adjuncts to antibiotics as intra-mammary infusion to treat bovine mastitis.

  4. The autofluorescence characteristics of bacterial intracellular and extracellular substances during the operation of anammox reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Liu, Sitong; Feng, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Anammox is a cost-effective process to treat nitrogenous wastewater. In this work, excitation–emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the intracellular and extracellular substances of anammox sludge during reactor operation of 276 days. Four main fluorophores were identified from the intracellular substances. Two main protein-like fluorophores were identified from the extracellular substances. Correlation analysis revealed that intracellular 420 peak and humic-like peak had strong correlation with nitrogen removal rate. The two intracellular protein-like peaks had high correlation with MLVSS and MLVSS growth rate. Correlation analysis between different fluorophores discovered that the two peaks in each of these three groups—two intracellular protein-like peaks, two humic acid-like peaks and the two extracellular protein-like peaks had strong intercorrelation, which gave evidence of their homology. A specific method for fluorescence monitoring of anammox reactor were put forward, which included typical fluorescence indexes and their possible values for different operation phases. PMID:28091530

  5. Investigation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) properties of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis and their role in bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix in biofilm poses important functions such as a diffusion barrier to antimicrobial agents so that biofilm cells are more difficult to completely eliminate. Therefore, biofilm cells exhibit enhanced resilience unlike planktonic cells, and are more difficult to completely eliminate. In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of bacterial adhesion to surfaces, knowledge of the composition and conformational properties of EPS produced during growth and biofilm formation is required, since their adhesive and conformational properties remain poorly understood at molecular level. Present study has provided further insights into identifying compositional and conformational properties of EPS produced by planktonic and biofilm cells of B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa. Various spectroscopy analyses showed that EPS produced by the two different species were chemically dissimilar. More proteinaceous compounds were present in EPS from B. subtilis, while EPS from P. aeruginosa were characterized by greater carbohydrate components. However, relative proportions of polysaccharides and/or proteins constituents varied with the growth mode of the bacteria. AFM was then used to probe the adhesive nature of EPS produced by the bacteria by using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). Comparison of the two bacterial species indicated that the presence of polysaccharides promoted the adhesion strength of the EPS while proteins had lesser adherence effects. Comparison of the two growth modes for the same bacterial strain also indicated that greater EPS production and enhanced cellular adhesion are associated with biofilm growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  7. Factors related to occurrence and distribution of selected bacterial and protozoan pathogens in Pennsylvania streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph W.; Reif, Andrew G.; Donna A. Crouse,; Isaacs, Natasha M.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and bacterial and protozoan pathogens are controlled by diverse factors. To investigate these factors in Pennsylvania streams, 217 samples were collected quarterly from a 27-station water-quality monitoring network from July 2007 through August 2009. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Escherichia coli (EC) and enterococci (ENT) indicator bacteria, concentrations of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, and the presence of four genes related to pathogenic types of EC (eaeA, stx2, stx1, rfbO157) plus three microbial source tracking (MST) gene markers that are also associated with pathogenic ENT and EC (esp, LTIIa, STII). Water samples were concurrently analyzed for basic water chemistry, physical measures of water quality, nutrients, metals, and a suite of 79 organic compounds that included hormones, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotics. For each sample location, stream discharge was measured by using standardized methods at the time of sample collection, and ancillary sample site information, such as land use and geological characteristics, was compiled. Samples exceeding recreational water quality criteria were more likely to contain all measured pathogen genes but notCryptosporidium or Giardia (oo)cysts. FIB and Giardia density and frequency of eaeA gene occurrence were significantly related to season. When discharge at a sampling location was high (>75th percentile of daily mean discharge), there were greater densities of FIB and Giardia, and the stx2, rfbO157, STII, and esp genes were found more frequently than at other discharge conditions. Giardia occurrence was likely related to nonpoint sources, which are highly influential during seasonal overland transport resulting from snowmelt and elevated precipitation in late winter and spring in Pennsylvania. When MST markers of human, swine, or bovine origin were present, samples more frequently carried the eaeA, stx2

  8. Diagnostic clinical and laboratory findings in response to predetermining bacterial pathogen: data from the Meningitis Registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karanika

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Childhood meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality in many countries. The search for rapid diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis has lead to the further exploration of prognostic factors. This study was scheduled in an attempt to analyze various clinical symptoms as well as rapid laboratory results and provide an algorithm for the prediction of specific bacterial aetiology of childhood bacterial meningitis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the 32 year period, 2477 cases of probable bacterial meningitis (BM were collected from the Meningitis Registry (MR. Analysis was performed on a total of 1331 confirmed bacterial meningitis cases of patients aged 1 month to 14 years. Data was analysed using EPI INFO (version 3.4.3-CDC-Atlanta and SPSS (version 15.0-Chicago software. Statistically significant (p or = 15000/microL (OR 2.19 with a PPV of 77.8% (95%CI 40.0-97.2. For the diagnosis of Haemophilus influenzae, the most significant group of diagnostic criteria included, absence of haemorrhagic rash (OR 13.61, age > or = 1 year (OR 2.04, absence of headache (OR 3.01, CSF Glu < 40 mg/dL (OR 3.62 and peripheral WBC < 15,000/microL (OR 1.74 with a PPV of 58.5% (95%CI 42.1-73.7. CONCLUSIONS: The use of clinical and laboratory predictors for the assessment of the causative bacterial pathogen rather than just for predicting outcome of mortality seems to be a useful tool in the clinical management and specific treatment of BM. These findings should be further explored and studied.

  9. Identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens from positive blood culture bottles: a microarray-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Teresa; Powell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Rapid identification and characterization of bacterial and fungal pathogens present in the bloodstream are essential for optimal patient management and are associated with improved patient outcomes, improved antimicrobial stewardship, improved infection control, and reduced healthcare costs. Microarrays serve as reliable platforms for the identification of these bloodstream pathogens and their associated antimicrobial resistance genes, if present. Nanosphere's (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA) Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Nucleic-Acid Test (BC-GP) is one such microarray-based approach for the detection of bacteria that cause bloodstream infection. Here, we describe the design of the microarray-based Verigene BC-GP Test, the steps necessary for performing the test, and the different components of the test including nucleic acid extraction and hybridization of target nucleic acid to a microarray.

  10. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure and delays hypersensitive response cell death induced by nonhost bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is the most widespread bacterial pathogen in plants. Several strains of P. syringae produce a phytotoxin, coronatine (COR, which acts as a jasmonic acid mimic and inhibits plant defense responses and contributes to disease symptom development. In this study, we found that COR inhibits early defense responses during nonhost disease resistance. Stomatal closure induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tabaci, was disrupted by COR in tomato epidermal peels. In addition, nonhost HR cell death triggered by P. syringae pv. tabaci on tomato was remarkably delayed when COR was supplemented along with P. syringae pv. tabaci inoculation. Using isochorismate synthase (ICS-silenced tomato plants and transcript profiles of genes in SA- and JA-related defense pathways, we show that COR suppresses SA-mediated defense during nonhost resistance.

  11. COMPARATIVE RESISTANCE OF BACTERIAL FOODBORNE PATHOGENS TO NON-THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR FOOD PRESERVATION

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    Guillermo eCebrián

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to manosonication (MS, pulsed electric fields (PEF, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP and UV-light (UV is reviewed and compared. The influence of different factors on the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to these technologies is also compared and discussed. Only results obtained under harmonized experimental conditions have been considered. This has allowed us to establish meaningful comparisons and draw significant conclusions. Among the six microorganisms here considered, Staphyloccocus aureus is the most resistant foodborne pathogen to MS and HHP and Listeria monocytogenes to UV. The target microorganism of PEF would change depending on the treatment medium pH. Thus, L. monocytogenes is the most PEF resistant microorganism at neutral pH but Gram-negatives (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Cronobacter sakazakii, Campylobacter jejuni would display a similar or even higher resistance at acidic pH. It should be noted that, in acidic products, the baroresistance of some E. coli strains would be comparable to that of S. aureus. The factors affecting the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens, as well as the magnitude of the effect, varied depending on the technology considered. Inter- and intra-specific differences in microbial resistance to PEF and HHP are much greater than to MS and UV. Similarly, both the pH and aw of the treatment medium highly condition microbial resistance to PEF and HHP but no to MS or UV. Growth phase also drastically affected bacterial HHP resistance. Regarding UV, the optical properties of the medium are, by far, the most influential factor affecting its lethal efficacy. Finally, increasing treatment temperature leads to a significant increase in lethality of the four technologies, what opens the possibility of the development of combined processes including heat. The appearance of sublethally damaged cells following PEF and HHP treatments could

  12. Comparative Resistance of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens to Non-thermal Technologies for Food Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, Guillermo; Mañas, Pilar; Condón, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to manosonication (MS), pulsed electric fields (PEFs), high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), and UV-light (UV) is reviewed and compared. The influence of different factors on the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens to these technologies is also compared and discussed. Only results obtained under harmonized experimental conditions have been considered. This has allowed us to establish meaningful comparisons and draw significant conclusions. Among the six microorganisms here considered, Staphyloccocus aureus is the most resistant foodborne pathogen to MS and HHP and Listeria monocytogenes to UV. The target microorganism of PEF would change depending on the treatment medium pH. Thus, L. monocytogenes is the most PEF resistant microorganism at neutral pH but Gram-negatives (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., Cronobacter sakazakii, Campylobacter jejuni) would display a similar or even higher resistance at acidic pH. It should be noted that, in acidic products, the baroresistance of some E. coli strains would be comparable to that of S. aureus. The factors affecting the resistance of bacterial foodborne pathogens, as well as the magnitude of the effect, varied depending on the technology considered. Inter- and intra-specific differences in microbial resistance to PEF and HHP are much greater than to MS and UV. Similarly, both the pH and aw of the treatment medium highly condition microbial resistance to PEF and HHP but no to MS or UV. Growth phase also drastically affected bacterial HHP resistance. Regarding UV, the optical properties of the medium are, by far, the most influential factor affecting its lethal efficacy. Finally, increasing treatment temperature leads to a significant increase in lethality of the four technologies, what opens the possibility of the development of combined processes including heat. The appearance of sublethally damaged cells following PEF and HHP treatments could also be

  13. Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Increases Virulence of the Known Bacterial Pathogen S. Marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens-Grisham, Rachel Andrea; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Wade, William

    2016-01-01

    After spaceflight, the number of immune cells is reduced in humans. In other research models, including Drosophila, not only is there a reduction in the number of plasmatocytes, but expression of immune-related genes is also changed after spaceflight. These observations suggest that the immune system is compromised after exposure to microgravity. It has also been reported that there is a change in virulence of some bacterial pathogens after spaceflight. We recently observed that samples of gram-negative S. marcescens retrieved from spaceflight is more virulent than ground controls, as determined by reduced survival and increased bacterial growth in the host. We were able to repeat this finding of increased virulence after exposure to simulated microgravity using the rotating wall vessel, a ground based analog to microgravity. With the ground and spaceflight samples, we looked at involvement of the Toll and Imd pathways in the Drosophila host in fighting infection by ground and spaceflight samples. We observed that Imd-pathway mutants were more susceptible to infection by the ground bacterial samples, which aligns with the known role of this pathway in fighting infections by gram-negative bacteria. When the Imd-pathway mutants were infected with the spaceflight sample, however, they exhibited the same susceptibility as seen with the ground control bacteria. Interestingly, all mutant flies show the same susceptibility to the spaceflight bacterial sample as do wild type flies. This suggests that neither humoral immunity pathway is effectively able to counter the increased pathogenicity of the space-flown S. marcescens bacteria.

  14. New insight into bacterial zoonotic pathogens posing health hazards to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Ciszewski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the problem of evolutionary changes of zoonotic pathogens responsible for human diseases. Everyone is exposed to the risk of zoonotic infection, particularly employees having direct contact with animals, i.e. veterinarians, breeders, butchers and workers of animal products’ processing industry. The article focuses on pathogens monitored by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC, which has been collecting statistical data on zoonoses from all European Union countries for 19 years and publishing collected data in annual epidemiological reports. Currently, the most important 11 pathogens responsible for causing human zoonotic diseases are being monitored, of which seven are bacteria: Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium bovis, Brucella spp., Coxiella burnetti and Verotoxin- producing E. coli (VTEC / Shiga-like toxin producing E. coli (STEC. As particularly important are considered foodborne pathogens. The article also includes new emerging zoonotic bacteria, which are not currently monitored by ECDC but might pose a serious epidemiological problem in a foreseeable future: Streptococcus iniae, S. suis, S. dysgalactiae and staphylococci: Staphylococcus intermedius, S. pseudintermedius. Those species have just crossed the animal-human interspecies barrier. The exact mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown, it is connected, however, with genetic variability, capability to survive in changing environment. These abilities derive from DNA rearrangement and horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells. Substantial increase in the number of scientific publications on this subject, observed over the last few years, illustrates the importance of the problem. Med Pr 2014;65(6:819–829

  15. Transport of selected bacterial pathogens in agricultural soil and quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinner, Tim; Letzner, Adrian; Liedtke, Stefan; Castro, Felipe D; Eydelnant, Irwin A; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2010-02-01

    The protection of groundwater supplies from microbial contamination necessitates a solid understanding of the key factors controlling the migration and retention of pathogenic organisms through the subsurface environment. The transport behavior of five waterborne pathogens was examined using laboratory-scale columns packed with clean quartz at two solution ionic strengths (10 mM and 30 mM). Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica were selected as representative Gram-negative pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis was selected as a representative Gram-positive organism, and two cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa and Anabaena flos-aquae) were also studied. The five organisms exhibit differing attachment efficiencies to the quartz sand. The surface (zeta) potential of the microorganisms was characterized over a broad range of pH values (2-8) at two ionic strengths (10 mM and 30 mM). These measurements are used to evaluate the observed attachment behavior within the context of the DLVO theory of colloidal stability. To better understand the possible link between bacterial transport in model quartz sand systems and natural soil matrices, additional experiments were conducted with two of the selected organisms using columns packed with loamy sand obtained from an agricultural field. This investigation highlights the need for further characterization of waterborne pathogen surface properties and transport behavior over a broader range of environmentally relevant conditions. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous Detection of 13 Key Bacterial Respiratory Pathogens by Combination of Multiplex PCR and Capillary Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lu Xi; Ren, Hong Yu; Zhou, Hai Jian; Zhao, Si Hong; Hou, Bo Yan; Yan, Jian Ping; Qin, Tian; Chen, Yu

    2017-08-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections continue to pose a significant threat to human health. It is important to accurately and rapidly detect respiratory bacteria. To compensate for the limits of current respiratory bacteria detection methods, we developed a combination of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis (MPCE) assay to detect thirteen bacterial pathogens responsible for lower respiratory tract infections, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella spp., Bordetella pertussis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Three multiplex PCR reactions were built, and the products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis using the high-throughput DNA analyzer. The specificity of the MPCE assay was examined and the detection limit was evaluated using DNA samples from each bacterial strain and the simulative samples of each strain. This assay was further evaluated using 152 clinical specimens and compared with real-time PCR reactions. For this assay, three nested-multiplex-PCRs were used to detect these clinical specimens. The detection limits of the MPCE assay for the 13 pathogens were very low and ranged from 10-7 to 10-2 ng/μL. Furthermore, analysis of the 152 clinical specimens yielded a specificity ranging from 96.5%-100.0%, and a sensitivity of 100.0% for the 13 pathogens. This study revealed that the MPCE assay is a rapid, reliable, and high-throughput method with high specificity and sensitivity. This assay has great potential in the molecular epidemiological survey of respiratory pathogens. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel aptamer-linked nanoconjugate approach for detection of waterborne bacterial pathogens: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gulshan; Manohar, Murli; Adegoke, Anthony Ayodeji; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-01-01

    The lack of microbiologically safe water in underdeveloped nations is the prime cause of infectious disease outbreaks. The need for the specific identification and detection of microorganisms encourages the development of advanced, rapid, sensitive and highly specific methods for the monitoring of pathogens and management of potential risk to human health. The rapid molecular assays based on detection of specific molecular signatures offer advantages over conventional methods in terms of specificity and sensitivity but require complex instrumentation and skilled personnel. Nanotechnology is an emerging area and provides a robust approach for the identification of pathogenic microorganism utilizing the peculiar properties of nanomaterials, i.e. small size (1-100 nm) and large surface area. This emerging technology promises to fulfill the urgent need of a novel strategy to enhance the bacterial identification and quantitation in the environment. In this context, the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles, their plasmonic shifts, and changes in magnetic properties have been utilized for the simple and cost-effective detection of bacterial nucleic acids, antigens and toxins with quite improved sensitivity. One of the promising leads to develop an advance detection method might be the coupling of nucleic acid aptamers (capable of interacting specifically with bacteria, protozoa, and viruses) with nanomaterials. Such aptamer-nano conjugate can be used for the specific recognition of infectious agents in different environmental matrices. This review summarizes the application of nanotechnology in the area of pathogen detection and discusses the prospects of coupling nucleic acid aptamers with nanoparticles for the specific detection of targeted pathogens.

  18. Novel aptamer-linked nanoconjugate approach for detection of waterborne bacterial pathogens: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Gulshan, E-mail: gsingh.gulshan@gmail.com [Durban University of Technology, Institute for Water and Wastewater Technology (IWWT) (South Africa); Manohar, Murli [Jamia Hamdard (Hamdard University), Department of Biochemistry (India); Adegoke, Anthony Ayodeji; Stenström, Thor Axel [Durban University of Technology, Institute for Water and Wastewater Technology (IWWT) (South Africa); Shanker, Rishi [Ahmedabad University, Division of Biological & Life Sciences, School of Arts & Sciences (India)

    2017-01-15

    The lack of microbiologically safe water in underdeveloped nations is the prime cause of infectious disease outbreaks. The need for the specific identification and detection of microorganisms encourages the development of advanced, rapid, sensitive and highly specific methods for the monitoring of pathogens and management of potential risk to human health. The rapid molecular assays based on detection of specific molecular signatures offer advantages over conventional methods in terms of specificity and sensitivity but require complex instrumentation and skilled personnel. Nanotechnology is an emerging area and provides a robust approach for the identification of pathogenic microorganism utilizing the peculiar properties of nanomaterials, i.e. small size (1–100 nm) and large surface area. This emerging technology promises to fulfill the urgent need of a novel strategy to enhance the bacterial identification and quantitation in the environment. In this context, the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles, their plasmonic shifts, and changes in magnetic properties have been utilized for the simple and cost-effective detection of bacterial nucleic acids, antigens and toxins with quite improved sensitivity. One of the promising leads to develop an advance detection method might be the coupling of nucleic acid aptamers (capable of interacting specifically with bacteria, protozoa, and viruses) with nanomaterials. Such aptamer-nano conjugate can be used for the specific recognition of infectious agents in different environmental matrices. This review summarizes the application of nanotechnology in the area of pathogen detection and discusses the prospects of coupling nucleic acid aptamers with nanoparticles for the specific detection of targeted pathogens.

  19. The Opportunistic Pathogen Serratia marcescens Utilizes Type VI Secretion To Target Bacterial Competitors ▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Sarah L.; Trunk, Katharina; English, Grant; Fritsch, Maximilian J.; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2011-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is the most recently described and least understood of the protein secretion systems of Gram-negative bacteria. It is widely distributed and has been implicated in the virulence of various pathogens, but its mechanism and exact mode of action remain to be defined. Additionally there have been several very recent reports that some T6SSs can target bacteria rather than eukaryotic cells. Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic enteric pathogen, a class of bacteria responsible for a significant proportion of hospital-acquired infections. We describe the identification of a functional T6SS in S. marcescens strain Db10, the first report of type VI secretion by an opportunist enteric bacterium. The T6SS of S. marcescens Db10 is active, with secretion of Hcp to the culture medium readily detected, and is expressed constitutively under normal growth conditions from a large transcriptional unit. Expression of the T6SS genes did not appear to be dependent on the integrity of the T6SS. The S. marcescens Db10 T6SS is not required for virulence in three nonmammalian virulence models. It does, however, exhibit dramatic antibacterial killing activity against several other bacterial species and is required for S. marcescens to persist in a mixed culture with another opportunist pathogen, Enterobacter cloacae. Importantly, this antibacterial killing activity is highly strain specific, with the S. marcescens Db10 T6SS being highly effective against another strain of S. marcescens with a very similar and active T6SS. We conclude that type VI secretion plays a crucial role in the competitiveness, and thus indirectly the virulence, of S. marcescens and other opportunistic bacterial pathogens. PMID:21890705

  20. Analysis of extracellular alginate lyase and its gene from a marine bacterial strain, Pseudoalteromonas atlantica AR06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Ryoji; Danno, Hiroko; Uchida, Motoharu; Ishihara, Kenji; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Kaneniwa, Masaki; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2010-03-01

    Pseudoalteromonas atlantica AR06 is a marine bacterial strain that can utilize alginate as a sole source of carbon and energy. The extracellular protein fraction prepared from the AR06 cultivation media exhibited alginate lyase activity to depolymerize the alginate molecules having homopolymeric and heteropolymeric forms of mannuronate and guluronate so as to mainly convert into the dimer to tetramer. A DNA fragment encoding a portion of alginate lyase was amplified from AR06 genomic DNA by PCR using a set of degenerated primers, and then the whole alginate lyase gene, named alyA, and its flanking regions were obtained from a cosmid library of AR06 genomic DNA. The alyA mutant of AR06 showed (1) the loss of alginate depolymerization activity on alginate agar plate and (2) significant growth defects in alginate minimal medium; these defects were complemented by the introduction of the alyA gene. Furthermore, zymography and biochemical analyses revealed that three extracellular protein bands of AR06 had alginate lyase activities and that all three protein bands were derived from the nascent alyA gene product. These results clearly indicated that the alyA gene greatly contributes to the assimilation of alginate in AR06. The transcription of the alyA gene was induced by the presence of alginate in minimal medium, but its obvious induction was not observed in rich medium even in the presence of alginate.

  1. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealson, Kenneth [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  2. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns.

    OpenAIRE

    Vandevivere, P; Baveye, P.

    1992-01-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HCsat) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only o...

  3. Spatial and temporal occurrence of bacterial pathogens in rural water supplies, Southern Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, V.; Graham, T. A.; Read, S.; Ziebell, K.; Muckle, A.; Thomas, J.; Selinger, B.; Kienzle, S.; Lapp, S. L.; Townshend, I.; Byrne, J.

    2002-12-01

    Southern Alberta has the highest rate of gastrointestinal illness in the province, and some of the highest infection rates in Canada. The region has extensive field crop irrigation system supporting a rapidly expanding animal agriculture industry. Recently, there has been much public concern about the safety and quality of water in this region, particularly with respect to drinking water supplies for farm residences and rural communities, where water treatment may be less than optimal. We have tested raw river and irrigation water in the Oldman River Basin in southern Alberta for the presence of bacterial pathogens (E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp ) as well as made counts of total and faecal coliforms over the last two years (2000-2001). E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. isolations and coliform counts peak in raw water from this system during the summer months. E. coli O157:H7 was only isolated from 27/1624 (1.7%) and Salmonella was isolated from 158/1624 (9.7%) of raw water samples over the two year period. Certain sites had multiple pathogen isolations and high indicator bacteria counts in the same year and from year to year. Certain sites had multiple pathogen isolations and high indicator bacteria counts in the same year and from year to year. S. Rublislaw was the most common Salmonella serovar isolated in both years. While this serovar is rarely associated with human or animal disease in Alberta, other Salmonella serovars isolated, such as Typhimurium, are commonly disease-associated. This poster presents initial analyses of the spatial and temporal properties of pathogen occurrences in the Oldman Basin in 2000 and 2001. Seasonal variability in the occurrence of pathogens is particularly interesting and of concern. Early results demonstrate the pathogen occurrences peak during the height of the summer recreation season; posing a substantial infection risk for the public and tourism populations. Human consumption of inadequately treated water in this

  4. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lee Harris

    Full Text Available Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship.

  5. Population structure of the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa among street trees in Washington D.C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jordan Lee; Balci, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial leaf scorch, associated with the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, is a widely established and problematic disease of landscape ornamentals in Washington D.C. A multi-locus sequence typing analysis was performed using 10 housekeeping loci for X. fastidiosa strains in order to better understand the epidemiology of leaf scorch disease in this municipal environment. Samples were collected from 7 different tree species located throughout the District of Columbia, consisting of 101 samples of symptomatic and asymptomatic foliage from 84 different trees. Five strains of the bacteria were identified. Consistent with prior data, these strains were host specific, with only one strain associated with members of the red oak family, one strain associated with American elm, one strain associated with American sycamore, and two strains associated with mulberry. Strains found for asymptomatic foliage were the same as strains from the symptomatic foliage on individual trees. Cross transmission of the strains was not observed at sites with multiple species of infected trees within an approx. 25 m radius of one another. X. fastidiosa strain specificity observed for each genus of tree suggests a highly specialized host-pathogen relationship.

  6. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis of Pig Respiratory Bacterial Pathogens with Elevated Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations for Macrolides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayao, Denise Ann Estarez; Seddon, Jennifer M; Gibson, Justine S; Blackall, Patrick J; Turni, Conny

    2016-10-01

    Macrolides are often used to treat and control bacterial pathogens causing respiratory disease in pigs. This study analyzed the whole genome sequences of one clinical isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella multocida, and Bordetella bronchiseptica, all isolated from Australian pigs to identify the mechanism underlying the elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for erythromycin, tilmicosin, or tulathromycin. The H. parasuis assembled genome had a nucleotide transition at position 2059 (A to G) in the six copies of the 23S rRNA gene. This mutation has previously been associated with macrolide resistance but this is the first reported mechanism associated with elevated macrolide MICs in H. parasuis. There was no known macrolide resistance mechanism identified in the other three bacterial genomes. However, strA and sul2, aminoglycoside and sulfonamide resistance genes, respectively, were detected in one contiguous sequence (contig 1) of A. pleuropneumoniae assembled genome. This contig was identical to plasmids previously identified in Pasteurellaceae. This study has provided one possible explanation of elevated MICs to macrolides in H. parasuis. Further studies are necessary to clarify the mechanism causing the unexplained macrolide resistance in other Australian pig respiratory pathogens including the role of efflux systems, which were detected in all analyzed genomes.

  7. The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin schedules apoptosis of pathogen-engaged neutrophils during bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Florian; Sedlyarov, Vitaly; Tasciyan, Saren; Ivin, Masa; Kratochvill, Franz; Gratz, Nina; Kenner, Lukas; Villunger, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Kovarik, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Protective responses against pathogens require a rapid mobilization of resting neutrophils and the timely removal of activated ones. Neutrophils are exceptionally short-lived leukocytes, yet it remains unclear whether the lifespan of pathogen-engaged neutrophils is regulated differently from that in the circulating steady-state pool. Here, we have found that under homeostatic conditions, the mRNA-destabilizing protein tristetraprolin (TTP) regulates apoptosis and the numbers of activated infiltrating murine neutrophils but not neutrophil cellularity. Activated TTP-deficient neutrophils exhibited decreased apoptosis and enhanced accumulation at the infection site. In the context of myeloid-specific deletion of Ttp, the potentiation of neutrophil deployment protected mice against lethal soft tissue infection with Streptococcus pyogenes and prevented bacterial dissemination. Neutrophil transcriptome analysis revealed that decreased apoptosis of TTP-deficient neutrophils was specifically associated with elevated expression of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl1) but not other antiapoptotic B cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) family members. Higher Mcl1 expression resulted from stabilization of Mcl1 mRNA in the absence of TTP. The low apoptosis rate of infiltrating TTP-deficient neutrophils was comparable to that of transgenic Mcl1-overexpressing neutrophils. Our study demonstrates that posttranscriptional gene regulation by TTP schedules the termination of the antimicrobial engagement of neutrophils. The balancing role of TTP comes at the cost of an increased risk of bacterial infections.

  8. Stacking of antimicrobial genes in potato transgenic plants confers increased resistance to bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Mercedes; Furman, Nicolás; Mencacci, Nicolás; Picca, Pablo; Toum, Laila; Lentz, Ezequiel; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Mentaberry, Alejandro

    2012-01-20

    Solanum tuberosum plants were transformed with three genetic constructions expressing the Nicotiana tabacum AP24 osmotine, Phyllomedusa sauvagii dermaseptin and Gallus gallus lysozyme, and with a double-transgene construction expressing the AP24 and lysozyme sequences. Re-transformation of dermaseptin-transformed plants with the AP24/lysozyme construction allowed selection of plants simultaneously expressing the three transgenes. Potato lines expressing individual transgenes or double- and triple-transgene combinations were assayed for resistance to Erwinia carotovora using whole-plant and tuber infection assays. Resistance levels for both infection tests compared consistently for most potato lines and allowed selection of highly resistant phenotypes. Higher resistance levels were found in lines carrying the dermaseptin and lysozyme sequences, indicating that theses proteins are the major contributors to antibacterial activity. Similar results were obtained in tuber infection tests conducted with Streptomyces scabies. Plant lines showing the higher resistance to bacterial infections were challenged with Phytophthora infestans, Rhizoctonia solani and Fusarium solani. Considerable levels of resistance to each of these pathogens were evidenced employing semi-quantitative tests based in detached-leaf inoculation, fungal growth inhibition and in vitro plant inoculation. On the basis of these results, we propose that stacking of these transgenes is a promising approach to achieve resistance to both bacterial and fungal pathogens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibacterial Activity of Polyphenolic Fraction of Kombucha Against Enteric Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Patra, Madhu Manti; Chakravorty, Somnath; Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakraborty, Writachit; Koley, Hemanta; Gachhui, Ratan

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of multi-drug-resistant enteric pathogens has prompted the scientist community to explore the therapeutic potentials of traditional foods and beverages. The present study was undertaken to investigate the efficacy of Kombucha, a fermented beverage of sugared black tea, against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Shigella flexneri and Salmonella Typhimurium followed by the identification of the antibacterial components present in Kombucha. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by determining the inhibition zone diameter, minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration. Kombucha fermented for 14 days showed maximum activity against the bacterial strains. Its ethyl acetate extract was found to be the most effective upon sequential solvent extraction of the 14-day Kombucha. This potent ethyl acetate extract was then subjected to thin layer chromatography for further purification of antibacterial ingredients which led to the isolation of an active polyphenolic fraction. Catechin and isorhamnetin were detected as the major antibacterial compounds present in this polyphenolic fraction of Kombucha by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Catechin, one of the primary antibacterial polyphenols in tea was also found to be present in Kombucha. But isorhamnetin is not reported to be present in tea, which may thereby suggest the role of fermentation process of black tea for its production in Kombucha. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the presence of isorhamnetin in Kombucha. The overall study suggests that Kombucha can be used as a potent antibacterial agent against entero-pathogenic bacterial infections, which mainly is attributed to its polyphenolic content.

  10. Screening of Quercus infectoria gall extracts as anti-bacterial agents against dental pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermani Archa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A number of bacteria have now become antibiotic-resistant. This increases the importance of ayurvedic drugs. We report, here, the activity of different extracts (petroleum ether, chloroform, methanol and water of Quercus infectoria galls against dental pathogens - Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Staphylococcus aureus, Lactobacillus acidophilus (designated and Streptococcus sanguis (isolated. Materials and Methods: The cup-plate method was used in anti-bacterial activity of the extracts at concentration of 200 mg/ml against dental pathogens. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of most effective extracts against the most susceptible bacteria were determined using a two-fold serial micro dilution method. Results: Methanolic extract showed maximum anti-bacterial activity against all the bacteria. The most susceptible bacteria were S. sanguis followed by S. aureus, S. mutans, S. salivarius and L. acidophilus. The MIC values showed that methanolic extract was more effective than water extract. Conclusion: The plant has the potential to generate herbal metabolites. The crude extracts demonstrating anti-dental caries activity could result in the discovery of new chemical classes of antibiotics. These chemical classes of antibiotics could serve as selective agents for the maintenance of human health and provide bio-chemical tools for the study of infectious diseases.

  11. Inactivation of bacterial pathogenic load in compost against vermicompost of organic solid waste aiming to achieve sanitation goals: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobhany, Nuhaa; Mohee, Romeela; Garg, Vinod Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Waste management strategies for organic residues, such as composting and vermicomposting, have been implemented in some developed and developing countries to solve the problem of organic solid waste (OSW). Yet, these biological treatment technologies do not always result in good quality compost or vermicompost with regards to sanitation capacity owing to the presence of bacterial pathogenic substances in objectionable concentrations. The presence of pathogens in soil conditioners poses a potential health hazard and their occurrence is of particular significance in composts and/or vermicomposts produced from organic materials. Past and present researches demonstrated a high-degree of agreement that various pathogens survive after the composting of certain OSW but whether similar changes in bacterial pathogenic loads arise during vermitechnology has not been thoroughly elucidated. This review garners information regarding the status of various pathogenic bacteria which survived or diffused after the composting process compared to the status of these pathogens after the vermicomposting of OSW with the aim of achieving sanitation goals. This work is also indispensable for the specification of compost quality guidelines concerning pathogen loads which would be specific to treatment technology. It was hypothesized that vermicomposting process for OSW can be efficacious in sustaining the existence of pathogenic organisms most specifically; human pathogens under safety levels. In summary, earthworms can be regarded as a way of obliterating pathogenic bacteria from OSW in a manner equivalent to earthworm gut transit mechanism which classifies vermicomposting as a promising sanitation technique in comparison to composting processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  13. Influences of environmental factors on bacterial extracellular polymeric substances production in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lu; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Xin, Jia; Peng, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Bioclogging of natural porous media occurs frequently under a wide range of conditions. It may influence the performance of permeable reactive barrier and constructed wetland. It is also one of the factors that determine the effect of artificial groundwater recharge and in situ bioremediation process. In this study, a series of percolation column experiments were conducted to simulate bioclogging process in porous media. The predominant bacteria in porous media which induced clogging were identified to be Methylobacterium, Janthinobacterium, Yersinia, Staphylococcus and Acidovorax, most of which had been shown to effectively produce viscous extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The column in which EPS production was maximized also coincided with the largest reduction in saturated hydraulic conductivity of porous media. In addition, carbon concentration was the most significant factor to affect polysaccharide, protein and EPS secretion, followed by phosphorus concentration and temperature. The coupled effect of carbon and phosphorus concentration was also very important to stimulate polysaccharide and EPS production.

  14. Co-transcriptomic Analysis by RNA Sequencing to Simultaneously Measure Regulated Gene Expression in Host and Bacterial Pathogen

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-24

    Intramacrophage pathogens subvert antimicrobial defence pathways using various mechanisms, including the targeting of host TLR-mediated transcriptional responses. Conversely, TLR-inducible host defence mechanisms subject intramacrophage pathogens to stress, thus altering pathogen gene expression programs. Important biological insights can thus be gained through the analysis of gene expression changes in both the host and the pathogen during an infection. Traditionally, research methods have involved the use of qPCR, microarrays and/or RNA sequencing to identify transcriptional changes in either the host or the pathogen. Here we describe the application of RNA sequencing using samples obtained from in vitro infection assays to simultaneously quantify both host and bacterial pathogen gene expression changes, as well as general approaches that can be undertaken to interpret the RNA sequencing data that is generated. These methods can be used to provide insights into host TLR-regulated transcriptional responses to microbial challenge, as well as pathogen subversion mechanisms against such responses.

  15. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  16. [Endophytic bacterial community analysis of Catharanthus roseus and its association with huanglongbing pathogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Zhongkang; Xie, Pan; Wu, Dong; Yin, Youping

    2012-04-04

    To analyze the microbial diversity in healthy and HLB-affected Catharanthus roseus under manual-grafting conditions and to find the association between the endophytic bacteria and the HLB pathogen. The endophytic bacterial communities were delineated by using the traditional culturable approach and cultivation-independent techniques based on 16S rRNA gene. The endophytic bacteria were isolated from surface-sterilized C. roseus midribs of leaves and phloem of stems and roots by plating and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). By anaerobic culture, we obtained 67 strains that were identified 29 genus by GenBank. Curtobacterium sp. , Erwinia sp., Bacillus cereus and Brevundimonas sp. , Bacillus sp. were the dominant bacterial population in diseased and healthy C. roseus. However, Staphylococcus equorum was the common dominant isolate in both C. roseus. We picked 188 and 182 positive clones in 16S rDNA libraries of diseased and healthy C. roseus that were respectively restricted by the HaeIII, MspI, RsaI restriction endonuclease. Based on the similarity of the RFLP banding profiles in diseased and healthy C. roseus, we obtained 16, 23 OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, OTUs) respectively. In addition to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, Candidatus Liberibacter sp. was the dominant bacterial population only in diseased C. roseus. With the infection of 'Ca. L. asiaticus', the diversity in diseased C. roseus decreased. The endophytic bacteria isolated from diseased and healthy C. roseus are abundant and have remarkable differences in the composition and function, suggesting that its endophytic bacteria might be inhibited by the HLB pathogen.

  17. Treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia with an antibiotic lock protocol: effect of bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Christopher V; Carlton, Donna; Bimbo, Lisa; Allon, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The standard therapy of dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia involves both systemic antibiotics and catheter replacement. We reported recently that instillation of an antibiotic lock (highly concentrated antibiotic solution) into the catheter lumen after dialysis sessions, in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, can successfully treat many episodes of catheter-related bacteraemia without requiring catheter removal. The present study evaluated whether the likelihood of achieving a cure with this protocol depends on the type of pathogen. This was a historically controlled interventional study of an antibiotic lock protocol for the treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia. We analysed prospectively the likelihood of clinical cure (fever resolution and negative surveillance cultures) with an antibiotic lock protocol among patients with dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia. In addition, infection-free catheter survival was evaluated for up to 150 days, and compared with that observed among patients managed with routine catheter replacement. Overall, the antibiotic lock protocol was successful in 33 of 47 infected patients (70%) with catheter-related bacteraemia. The likelihood of a clinical cure was 87% for Gram-negative infections, 75% for Staphylococcus epidermidis infections, and only 40% for Staphylococcus aureus infections (P = 0.04). The median infection-free catheter survival with the antibiotic lock protocol was longer than that observed among patients with routine catheter replacement (154 vs 71 days, P = 0.02). The clinical success of an antibiotic lock protocol in eradicating catheter-related bacteraemia while salvaging the catheter is highly dependent on the bacterial pathogen. Thus, the overall success rate in an individual dialysis programme will depend on the relative frequencies of different bacterial pathogens.

  18. Using lytic bacteriophages to eliminate or significantly reduce contamination of food by foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriophages (also called 'phages') are viruses that kill bacteria. They are arguably the oldest (3 billion years old, by some estimates) and most ubiquitous (total number estimated to be 10(30) -10(32) ) known organisms on Earth. Phages play a key role in maintaining microbial balance in every ecosystem where bacteria exist, and they are part of the normal microflora of all fresh, unprocessed foods. Interest in various practical applications of bacteriophages has been gaining momentum recently, with perhaps the most attention focused on using them to improve food safety. That approach, called 'phage biocontrol', typically includes three main types of applications: (i) using phages to treat domesticated livestock in order to reduce their intestinal colonization with, and shedding of, specific bacterial pathogens; (ii) treatments for decontaminating inanimate surfaces in food-processing facilities and other food establishments, so that foods processed on those surfaces are not cross-contaminated with the targeted pathogens; and (iii) post-harvest treatments involving direct applications of phages onto the harvested foods. This mini-review primarily focuses on the last type of intervention, which has been gaining the most momentum recently. Indeed, the results of recent studies dealing with improving food safety, and several recent regulatory approvals of various commercial phage preparations developed for post-harvest food safety applications, strongly support the idea that lytic phages may provide a safe, environmentally-friendly, and effective approach for significantly reducing contamination of various foods with foodborne bacterial pathogens. However, some important technical and nontechnical problems may need to be addressed before phage biocontrol protocols can become an integral part of routine food safety intervention strategies implemented by food industries in the USA. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Effect of freezing goat milk samples on recovery of intramammary bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Contreras, A; Jiménez, J; Luengo, C; Corrales, J C; Fernández, C

    2003-06-24

    With the aim of evaluating the effect of freezing goat milk samples on recovery of intramammary pathogens, 1200 milk samples from udder halves with subclinical intramammary infection were studied. Samples (20 ml) were frozen at -20 and at -80 degrees C. Thawing was carried out at room temperature at 7, 14, 21, 28, 58, 118, 178, 236 and 730 days after collection and bacteriological analyses were carried out to determine the number of colony forming units/ml (CFU/ml). Mixed model statistical analysis showed that bacterial group, temperature of storage, interaction of bacterial group and temperature of storage and the interaction of bacterial group, time and temperature of storage were statistically significant effects. For coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS), least squares means of log CFU/ml recovered at -20 and -80 degrees C were not different. Nevertheless, for Gram negative bacilli (GNB) a significant decrease was detected in samples frozen at -20 vs. -80 degrees C. At both temperatures and at different times of storage, significant increases were detected between log CFU/ml of CNS and values on day zero. At -20 degrees C, a significant decrease in GNB recovery was detected between freezing days zero and 730. This difference was not detected when goat milk samples infected by GNB were frozen at -80 degrees C. The results show that frozen milk samples can be useful in goat subclinical mastitis control programs.

  20. Comparison of rinsing and sanitizing procedures for reducing bacterial pathogens on fresh cantaloupes and bell peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Casillas, S; Ibarra-Sánchez, S; Rodríguez-García, O; Martínez-Gonzáles, N; Castillo, A

    2007-03-01

    Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables is linked to health benefits but also to an increase in the number of outbreaks of foodborne illness. To determine the effectiveness of different sanitizing treatments for reducing bacterial pathogens on fresh produce, fresh cantaloupes and bell peppers were harvested and inoculated with suspensions of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7. The inoculated fruits were treated with water wash alone or were washed and then waxed or rinsed with 200 mg/liter hypochlorite, 10% Ca(OH)2, or 2% lactic acid solutions applied by dipping for 15 s or spraying for 15 s. Preliminary experiments with chlorine treatments indicated that spraying with a 200, 600, or 1,000 mg/liter hypochlorite solution reduced populations of both pathogens by 2.1 to 2.6 and 1.5 to 2.1 log CFU for Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. In general, no differences were observed between chlorine solutions without pH adjustment (pH 9.2) and those with pH adjusted to 6.0. When different wash regimes were applied to inoculated cantaloupes or bell peppers, water wash alone produced significantly lower counts of both pathogens on bell peppers in comparison to untreated controls. However, this reduction was not observed on cantaloupes, indicating a possible surface effect. Application of 2% L-lactic acid by spray was the treatment that resulted in the lowest bacterial counts on both cantaloupes and bell peppers. This treatment did not produce any deleterious change in the sensorial characteristics of the products tested. None of the pathogens studied was able to grow during refrigerated storage (5 degrees C for cantaloupes and 10 degrees C for bell peppers), although numbers close to the detection limit of the counting method were found in randomly tested individual samples at days 14 and 28 of storage, indicating that these pathogens can survive for long periods on the produce surface. These results indicate that selected produce

  1. Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Potent against Complicated Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Corey; O’Brien, William; Hackel, Meredith; Minyard, Mary Beth; Waites, Ken B.; Dubois, Jacques; Murphy, Timothy M.; Slee, Andrew M.; Weiss, William J.; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT TP-271 is a novel, fully synthetic fluorocycline antibiotic in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by susceptible and multidrug-resistant pathogens. TP-271 was active in MIC assays against key community respiratory Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; MIC90 = 0.25 µg/ml), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), and Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90 ≤0.016 µg/ml). TP-271 showed activity (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml) against community-acquired MRSA expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). MIC90 values against Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Chlamydia pneumoniae were 0.004, 1, and 4 µg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was efficacious in neutropenic and immunocompetent animal pneumonia models, generally showing, compared to the burden at the start of dosing, ~2 to 5 log10 CFU reductions against MRSA, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae infections when given intravenously (i.v.) and ~1 to 4 log10 CFU reductions when given orally (p.o.). TP-271 was potent against key community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) pathogens and was minimally affected, or unaffected, by tetracycline-specific resistance mechanisms and fluoroquinolone or macrolide drug resistance phenotypes. IMPORTANCE Rising resistance rates for macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in the most common pathogens associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) are of concern, especially for cases of moderate to severe infections in vulnerable populations such as the very young and the elderly. New antibiotics that are active against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are needed for use in the empirical treatment of the most severe forms of this disease. TP-271 is a promising

  2. The bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa affects the leaf ionome of plant hosts during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo De La Fuente

    Full Text Available Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen.

  3. The Bacterial Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa Affects the Leaf Ionome of Plant Hosts during Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Leonardo; Parker, Jennifer K.; Oliver, Jonathan E.; Granger, Shea; Brannen, Phillip M.; van Santen, Edzard; Cobine, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogenic bacterium that lives inside the host xylem vessels, where it forms biofilm believed to be responsible for disrupting the passage of water and nutrients. Here, Nicotiana tabacum was infected with X. fastidiosa, and the spatial and temporal changes in the whole-leaf ionome (i.e. the mineral and trace element composition) were measured as the host plant transitioned from healthy to diseased physiological status. The elemental composition of leaves was used as an indicator of the physiological changes in the host at a specific time and relative position during plant development. Bacterial infection was found to cause significant increases in concentrations of calcium prior to the appearance of symptoms and decreases in concentrations of phosphorous after symptoms appeared. Field-collected leaves from multiple varieties of grape, blueberry, and pecan plants grown in different locations over a four-year period in the Southeastern US showed the same alterations in Ca and P. This descriptive ionomics approach characterizes the existence of a mineral element-based response to X. fastidiosa using a model system suitable for further manipulation to uncover additional details of the role of mineral elements during plant-pathogen interactions. This is the first report on the dynamics of changes in the ionome of the host plant throughout the process of infection by a pathogen. PMID:23667547

  4. The Role of Thin Aggregative Fimbriae on Pathogenic Bacterial Transport Through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Fuka, D. R.; Marjerison, R. D.; Hay, A. G.; Zhang, W.; Caballero, L. A.; Zevi, Y.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella sp., are responsible for many deaths worldwide every year. Their survival in the natural environment is enhanced by the production of biofilms, which provide a resistance to environmental stresses. However, it remains unclear how these biofilms affect the bacterias' ability to move through the soil matrix and potentially contaminate groundwater or water from drainage systems. In this presentation, we discuss the role of thin aggregative fimbriae (curli), a key biofilm component, on transport through porous media. An experiment was performed consisting of 96 sand columns created using a deep-well microtiter plate. We used well-characterized strains of E. coli, one with the ability to form curli and one without. Pulsing the E. coli strains through the sand column, mimicking natural leaching processes, showed less transport, by greater retention, in the strains that produce curli versus those strains that do not. In addition, when cultured in conditions unfavorable to curli production, transport between strains did not differ significantly. These preliminary results indicate that curli, and to a larger extent biofilms, could be an important component influencing the transport of bacterial strains through the soil matrix. This determination of pathogens' ability to move through the environment, as related to how well they form biofilms, will facilitate a better understanding of the fate of pathogenic bacteria in the environment.

  5. Transmission of Bacterial Zoonotic Pathogens between Pets and Humans: The Role of Pet Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertini, Elisabetta; Buchanan, Robert L; Narrod, Clare; Pradhan, Abani K

    2016-01-01

    Recent Salmonella outbreaks associated with dry pet food and treats raised the level of concern for these products as vehicle of pathogen exposure for both pets and their owners. The need to characterize the microbiological and risk profiles of this class of products is currently not supported by sufficient specific data. This systematic review summarizes existing data on the main variables needed to support an ingredients-to-consumer quantitative risk model to (1) describe the microbial ecology of bacterial pathogens in the dry pet food production chain, (2) estimate pet exposure to pathogens through dry food consumption, and (3) assess human exposure and illness incidence due to contact with pet food and pets in the household. Risk models populated with the data here summarized will provide a tool to quantitatively address the emerging public health concerns associated with pet food and the effectiveness of mitigation measures. Results of such models can provide a basis for improvements in production processes, risk communication to consumers, and regulatory action.

  6. A novel bacterial pathogen of Biomphalaria glabrata: a potential weapon for schistosomiasis control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Duval

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is the second-most widespread tropical parasitic disease after malaria. Various research strategies and treatment programs for achieving the objective of eradicating schistosomiasis within a decade have been recommended and supported by the World Health Organization. One of these approaches is based on the control of snail vectors in endemic areas. Previous field studies have shown that competitor or predator introduction can reduce snail numbers, but no systematic investigation has ever been conducted to identify snail microbial pathogens and evaluate their molluscicidal effects.In populations of Biomphalaria glabrata snails experiencing high mortalities, white nodules were visible on snail bodies. Infectious agents were isolated from such nodules. Only one type of bacteria, identified as a new species of Paenibacillus named Candidatus Paenibacillus glabratella, was found, and was shown to be closely related to P. alvei through 16S and Rpob DNA analysis. Histopathological examination showed extensive bacterial infiltration leading to overall tissue disorganization. Exposure of healthy snails to Paenibacillus-infected snails caused massive mortality. Moreover, eggs laid by infected snails were also infected, decreasing hatching but without apparent effects on spawning. Embryonic lethality was correlated with the presence of pathogenic bacteria in eggs.This is the first account of a novel Paenibacillus strain, Ca. Paenibacillus glabratella, as a snail microbial pathogen. Since this strain affects both adult and embryonic stages and causes significant mortality, it may hold promise as a biocontrol agent to limit schistosomiasis transmission in the field.

  7. Analysis of bacterial communities and bacterial pathogens in a biogas plant by the combination of ethidium monoazide, PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the changes of bacterial community composition including bacterial pathogens along a biogas plant, i.e. from the influent, to the biogas reactor and to the post-digester. The effects of post-digestion temperature and time on the changes of bacterial community...... showed that the bacterial community composition in the influent was changed after anaerobic digestion. Firmicutes were dominant in all the samples, while Proteobacteria decreased in the biogas reactor compared with the influent. Variations of bacterial community composition in the biogas reactor...... with time were also observed. This could be attributed to varying composition of the influent. Batch experiments showed that the methane recovery from the digested residues (obtained from biogas reactor) was mainly related with post-digestion temperature. However, post-digestion time rather than temperature...

  8. Impact of certain household micropollutants on bacterial behavior. Toxicity tests/study of extracellular polymeric substances in sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquini, Laure, E-mail: laure.pasquini@univ-lorraine.fr [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Merlin, Christophe [Laboratoire de Chimie, Physique et Microbiologie pour l' Environnement-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Hassenboehler, Lucille [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France); Munoz, Jean-François [Laboratoire d' Hydrologie de Nancy, ANSES, 40 rue Lionnois, 54000 Nancy (France); Pons, Marie-Noëlle [Laboratoire Réactions et Génie des Procédés-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 1 Rue Grandville, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Görner, Tatiana [Laboratoire Environnement et Minéralurgie-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, 15 Avenue du Charmois, 54501 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex (France)

    2013-10-01

    The impact of eight household micropollutants (erythromycin, ofloxacin, ibuprofen, 4-nonylphenol, triclosan, sucralose, PFOA and PFOS (PFAAs)) on the laboratory bacterial strain Escherichia coli MG1655 and on activated sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant was studied. Growth-based toxicity tests on E. coli were performed for each micropollutants. The effect of micropollutants on activated sludge (at concentrations usually measured in wastewater up to concentrations disturbing the bacterial growth of E. coli) was examined in batch reactors and by comparison to a control reactor (without micropollutants). The bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted by the sludge were measured by size exclusion chromatography and their overexpression was considered as an indicator of bacteria sensitivity to environmental changes. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and the ammonium concentration were monitored to evaluate the biomass ability to remove the macropollution. Some micropollutants induced an increase of bound EPS in activated sludge flocs at concentrations depending on the micropollutant: erythromycin from 100 μg/L, ofloxacin from 10 μg/L, triclosan from 0.5 μg/L, 4-nonylphenol from 5000 μg/L and PFAAs from 0.1 μg/L. This suggests that the biomass had to cope with new conditions. Moreover, at high concentrations of erythromycin (10 mg/L) and ibuprofen (5 mg/L) bacterial populations were no longer able to carry out the removal of macropollution. Ibuprofen induced a decrease of bound EPS at all the studied concentrations, probably reflecting a decrease of general bacterial activity. The biomass was not sensitive to sucralose in terms of EPS production, however at very high concentration (1 g/L) it inhibited the COD decrease. Micropollution removal was also assessed. Ibuprofen, erythromycin, ofloxacin, 4-nonylphenol and triclosan were removed from wastewater, mainly by biodegradation. Sucralose and PFOA were not removed from wastewater at all, and

  9. Peptidomimetic Small Molecules Disrupt Type IV Secretion System Activity in Diverse Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Shaffer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria utilize complex type IV secretion systems (T4SSs to translocate diverse effector proteins or DNA into target cells. Despite the importance of T4SSs in bacterial pathogenesis, the mechanism by which these translocation machineries deliver cargo across the bacterial envelope remains poorly understood, and very few studies have investigated the use of synthetic molecules to disrupt T4SS-mediated transport. Here, we describe two synthetic small molecules (C10 and KSK85 that disrupt T4SS-dependent processes in multiple bacterial pathogens. Helicobacter pylori exploits a pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS to inject an oncogenic effector protein (CagA and peptidoglycan into gastric epithelial cells. In H. pylori, KSK85 impedes biogenesis of the pilus appendage associated with the cag T4SS, while C10 disrupts cag T4SS activity without perturbing pilus assembly. In addition to the effects in H. pylori, we demonstrate that these compounds disrupt interbacterial DNA transfer by conjugative T4SSs in Escherichia coli and impede vir T4SS-mediated DNA delivery by Agrobacterium tumefaciens in a plant model of infection. Of note, C10 effectively disarmed dissemination of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient bacterial population, thus demonstrating the potential of these compounds in mitigating the spread of antibiotic resistance determinants driven by conjugation. To our knowledge, this study is the first report of synthetic small molecules that impair delivery of both effector protein and DNA cargos by diverse T4SSs.

  10. Molecular viability testing of bacterial pathogens from a complex human sample matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris M Weigel

    Full Text Available Assays for bacterial ribosomal RNA precursors (pre-rRNA have been shown to distinguish viable from inactivated bacterial cells in drinking water samples. Because the synthesis of pre-rRNA is rapidly induced by nutritional stimulation, viable bacteria can be distinguished from inactivated cells and free nucleic acids by measuring the production of species-specific pre-rRNA in samples that have been briefly stimulated with nutrients. Here, pre-rRNA analysis was applied to bacteria from serum, a human sample matrix. In contrast to drinking water, serum is rich in nutrients that might be expected to mask the effects of nutritional stimulation. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR assays were used to detect pre-rRNA of four bacterial species: Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. These species were chosen for their clinical significance and phylogenetic diversity (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria. To maximize resolving power, pre-rRNA was normalized to genomic DNA of each pathogen. When viable cells were shifted from serum to bacteriological culture medium, rapid replenishment of pre-rRNA was always observed. Cells of P. aeruginosa that were inactivated in the presence of serum exhibited no pre-rRNA response to nutritional stimulation, despite strong genomic DNA signals in these samples. When semi-automated methods were used, pre-rRNA analysis detected viable A. baumannii cells in serum at densities of ≤100 CFU/mL in <5.5 hours. Originally developed for rapid microbiological analysis of drinking water, ratiometric pre-rRNA analysis can also assess the viability of bacterial cells derived from human specimens, without requiring bacteriological culture.

  11. Enteric bacterial pathogen detection in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) is associated with coastal urbanization and freshwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa A; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer S; Dodd, Erin M; Dorfmeier, Elene; Harris, Michael D; Ames, Jack; Paradies, David; Worcester, Karen; Jessup, David A; Miller, Woutrina A

    2010-01-01

    Although protected for nearly a century, California's sea otters have been slow to recover, in part due to exposure to fecally-associated protozoal pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona. However, potential impacts from exposure to fecal bacteria have not been systematically explored. Using selective media, we examined feces from live and dead sea otters from California for specific enteric bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and pathogens endemic to the marine environment (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and Plesiomonas shigelloides). We evaluated statistical associations between detection of these pathogens in otter feces and demographic or environmental risk factors for otter exposure, and found that dead otters were more likely to test positive for C. perfringens, Campylobacter and V. parahaemolyticus than were live otters. Otters from more urbanized coastlines and areas with high freshwater runoff (near outflows of rivers or streams) were more likely to test positive for one or more of these bacterial pathogens. Other risk factors for bacterial detection in otters included male gender and fecal samples collected during the rainy season when surface runoff is maximal. Similar risk factors were reported in prior studies of pathogen exposure for California otters and their invertebrate prey, suggesting that land-sea transfer and/or facilitation of pathogen survival in degraded coastal marine habitat may be impacting sea otter recovery. Because otters and humans share many of the same foods, our findings may also have implications for human health.

  12. A bacterial extracellular DNA inhibits settling of motile progeny cells within a biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Cécile; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V

    2010-08-01

    In natural systems, bacteria form complex, surface-attached communities known as biofilms. This lifestyle presents numerous advantages compared with unattached or planktonic life, such as exchange of nutrients, protection from environmental stresses and increased tolerance to biocides. Despite such benefits, dispersal also plays an important role in escaping deteriorating environments and in successfully colonizing favourable, unoccupied habitat patches. The α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus produces a motile swarmer cell and a sessile stalked cell at each cell division. We show here that C. crescentus extracellular DNA (eDNA) inhibits the ability of its motile cell type to settle in a biofilm. eDNA binds to the polar holdfast, an adhesive structure required for permanent surface attachment and biofilm formation, thereby inhibiting cell attachment. Because stalked cells associate tightly with the biofilm through their holdfast, we hypothesize that this novel mechanism acts on swarmer cells born in a biofilm, where eDNA can accumulate to a sufficient concentration to inhibit their ability to settle. By targeting a specific cell type in a biofilm, this mechanism modulates biofilm development and promotes dispersal without causing a potentially undesirable dissolution of the existing biofilm. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. A thermonuclease of Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances bacterial escape from killing by neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneau, Richard A; Stevens, Jacqueline S; Apicella, Michael A; Criss, Alison K

    2015-07-15

    Acute gonorrhea is characterized by neutrophilic inflammation that is insufficient to clear Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Activated neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs), which are composed of chromatin and decorated with antimicrobial proteins. The N. gonorrhoeae NG0969 open reading frame contains a gene (nuc) that encodes a putatively secreted thermonuclease (Nuc) that contributes to biofilm remodeling. Here, we report that Nuc degrades NETs to help N. gonorrhoeae resist killing by neutrophils. Primary human neutrophils released NETs after exposure to N. gonorrhoeae, but NET integrity declined over time with Nuc-containing bacteria. Recombinant Nuc and conditioned medium from Nuc-containing N. gonorrhoeae degraded human neutrophil DNA and NETs. NETs were found to have antimicrobial activity against N. gonorrhoeae, and Nuc expression enhanced N. gonorrhoeae survival in the presence of neutrophils that released NETs. We propose that Nuc enables N. gonorrhoeae to escape trapping and killing by NETs during symptomatic infection, highlighting Nuc as a multifunctional virulence factor for N. gonorrhoeae. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pathogen-specific risk of chronic gastrointestinal disorders following bacterial causes of foodborne illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Chad K; Choi, Daniel; Cash, Brooks; Pimentel, Mark; Murray, Joseph; May, Larissa; Riddle, Mark S

    2013-03-08

    The US CDC estimates over 2 million foodborne illnesses are annually caused by 4 major enteropathogens: non-typhoid Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp. and Yersinia enterocoltica. While data suggest a number of costly and morbid chronic sequelae associated with these infections, pathogen-specific risk estimates are lacking. We utilized a US Department of Defense medical encounter database to evaluate the risk of several gastrointestinal disorders following select foodborne infections. We identified subjects with acute gastroenteritis between 1998 to 2009 attributed to Salmonella (nontyphoidal) spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp. or Yersinia enterocolitica and matched each with up to 4 unexposed subjects. Medical history was analyzed for the duration of military service time (or a minimum of 1 year) to assess for incident chronic gastrointestinal disorders. Relative risks were calculated using modified Poisson regression while controlling for the effect of covariates. A total of 1,753 pathogen-specific gastroenteritis cases (Campylobacter: 738, Salmonella: 624, Shigella: 376, Yersinia: 17) were identified and followed for a median of 3.8 years. The incidence (per 100,000 person-years) of PI sequelae among exposed was as follows: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 3.0; dyspepsia, 1.8; constipation, 3.9; gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), 9.7. In multivariate analyses, we found pathogen-specific increased risk of IBS, dyspepsia, constipation and GERD. These data confirm previous studies demonstrating risk of chronic gastrointestinal sequelae following bacterial enteric infections and highlight additional preventable burden of disease which may inform better food security policies and practices, and prompt further research into pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Combining quantitative genetic footprinting and trait enrichment analysis to identify fitness determinants of a bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis J Wiles

    Full Text Available Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia c oli (ExPEC exhibit an array of virulence strategies and are a major cause of urinary tract infections, sepsis and meningitis. Efforts to understand ExPEC pathogenesis are challenged by the high degree of genetic and phenotypic variation that exists among isolates. Determining which virulence traits are widespread and which are strain-specific will greatly benefit the design of more effective therapies. Towards this goal, we utilized a quantitative genetic footprinting technique known as transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-seq in conjunction with comparative pathogenomics to functionally dissect the genetic repertoire of a reference ExPEC isolate. Using Tn-seq and high-throughput zebrafish infection models, we tracked changes in the abundance of ExPEC variants within saturated transposon mutant libraries following selection within distinct host niches. Nine hundred and seventy bacterial genes (18% of the genome were found to promote pathogen fitness in either a niche-dependent or independent manner. To identify genes with the highest therapeutic and diagnostic potential, a novel Trait Enrichment Analysis (TEA algorithm was developed to ascertain the phylogenetic distribution of candidate genes. TEA revealed that a significant portion of the 970 genes identified by Tn-seq have homologues more often contained within the genomes of ExPEC and other known pathogens, which, as suggested by the first axiom of molecular Koch's postulates, is considered to be a key feature of true virulence determinants. Three of these Tn-seq-derived pathogen-associated genes--a transcriptional repressor, a putative metalloendopeptidase toxin and a hypothetical DNA binding protein--were deleted and shown to independently affect ExPEC fitness in zebrafish and mouse models of infection. Together, the approaches and observations reported herein provide a resource for future pathogenomics-based research and highlight the

  16. Combining quantitative genetic footprinting and trait enrichment analysis to identify fitness determinants of a bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Travis J; Norton, J Paul; Russell, Colin W; Dalley, Brian K; Fischer, Kael F; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia c oli (ExPEC) exhibit an array of virulence strategies and are a major cause of urinary tract infections, sepsis and meningitis. Efforts to understand ExPEC pathogenesis are challenged by the high degree of genetic and phenotypic variation that exists among isolates. Determining which virulence traits are widespread and which are strain-specific will greatly benefit the design of more effective therapies. Towards this goal, we utilized a quantitative genetic footprinting technique known as transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-seq) in conjunction with comparative pathogenomics to functionally dissect the genetic repertoire of a reference ExPEC isolate. Using Tn-seq and high-throughput zebrafish infection models, we tracked changes in the abundance of ExPEC variants within saturated transposon mutant libraries following selection within distinct host niches. Nine hundred and seventy bacterial genes (18% of the genome) were found to promote pathogen fitness in either a niche-dependent or independent manner. To identify genes with the highest therapeutic and diagnostic potential, a novel Trait Enrichment Analysis (TEA) algorithm was developed to ascertain the phylogenetic distribution of candidate genes. TEA revealed that a significant portion of the 970 genes identified by Tn-seq have homologues more often contained within the genomes of ExPEC and other known pathogens, which, as suggested by the first axiom of molecular Koch's postulates, is considered to be a key feature of true virulence determinants. Three of these Tn-seq-derived pathogen-associated genes--a transcriptional repressor, a putative metalloendopeptidase toxin and a hypothetical DNA binding protein--were deleted and shown to independently affect ExPEC fitness in zebrafish and mouse models of infection. Together, the approaches and observations reported herein provide a resource for future pathogenomics-based research and highlight the diversity of

  17. Molecular evidence for bacterial and protozoan pathogens in hard ticks from Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Mariana; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Pfister, Kurt; Hamel, Dietmar; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a preliminary insight into the diversity of tick-borne pathogens circulating at the domestic host-tick interface in Romania. For this, feeding and questing ticks were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Anaplasma platys, Ehrlichia canis, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu latu, and by PCR and subsequent sequencing for Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. A total of 382 ticks, encompassing 5 species from 4 genera, were collected in April-July 2010 from different areas of Romania; of them, 40 were questing ticks and the remainder was collected from naturally infested cattle, sheep, goats, horses or dogs. Tick species analyzed included Ixodes ricinus, Dermacentor marginatus, Hyalomma marginatum, Rhipicephalus bursa, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus. Four rickettsiae of the spotted fever group of zoonotic concern were identified for the first time in Romania: Rickettsia monacensis and Rickettsia helvetica in I. ricinus, and Rickettsia slovaca and Rickettsia raoultii in D. marginatus. Other zoonotic pathogens such as A. phagocytophilum, Borrelia afzelii, and Babesia microti were found in I. ricinus. Pathogens of veterinary importance were also identified, including Theileria equi in H. marginatum, Babesia occultans in D. marginatus and H. marginatum, Theileria orientalis/sergenti/buffeli-group in I. ricinus and in H. marginatum and E. canis in R. sanguineus. These findings show a wide distribution of very diverse bacterial and protozoan pathogens at the domestic host-tick interface in Romania, with the potential of causing both animal and human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bacterial Type III Secretion System Effector Proteins are Distinct between Plant Symbiotic, Plant Pathogenic and Animal Pathogenic Bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakano, Yuuichi; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Umeyama, Hideaki; Taguchi, Y-h

    2014-01-01

    ... interesting. In this paper, we successfully discriminated T3SS effector proteins between plant pathogenic, animal pathogenic and plant symbiotic bacteria based on feature vectors inferred computationally by Yahara et al...

  19. Characterization of novel extracellular protease produced by marine bacterial isolate from the Indian Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulzele, Rachana; Desa, Elisha; Yadav, Amit; Shouche, Yogesh; Bhadekar, Rama

    2011-10-01

    Out of the vast pool of enzymes, proteolytic enzymes from microorganisms are the most widely used in different industries such as detergent, food, peptide production etc. Several marine microorganisms are known to produce proteases with commercially desirable characteristics. We have isolated nine different cultures from marine samples of the Indian Ocean. All of them were i) motile ii) rod shaped iii) non spore forming iv) catalase and amylase positive v) able to grow in presence of 10 % NaCl. They produced acid from glucose, fructose and maltose and grew optimally at 30 °C temperature and pH 7.0-8.0. None of them could grow above 45 °C and below 15 °C. Only one of them (MBRI 7) exhibited extracellular protease activity on skim milk agar plates. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing, it belonged to the genus Marinobacter (98% sequence similarity, 1201 bp). The cell free extract was used to study effects of temperature and pH on protease activity. The optimum temperature and pH for activity were found to be 40 °C and 7.0 respectively. The crude enzyme was stable at temperature range of 30-80 °C and pH 5.0-9.0. It retained 60 % activity at 80 °C after 4 h and more than 70 % activity at 70 °C after 1 h. D value was found to be 342 minutes and 78 minutes for 40 °C and 80 °C respectively. Interestingly the enzyme remained 50 % active at pH 9.0 after 1 h. Comparison with other proteases from different microbial sources indicated that the neutral protease from the halotolerant marine isolate MBRI 7 is a novel enzyme with high thermostability.

  20. Characterization of novel extracellular protease produced by marine bacterial isolate from the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Fulzele

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Out of the vast pool of enzymes, proteolytic enzymes from microorganisms are the most widely used in different industries such as detergent, food, peptide production etc. Several marine microorganisms are known to produce proteases with commercially desirable characteristics. We have isolated nine different cultures from marine samples of the Indian Ocean. All of them were i motile ii rod shaped iii non spore forming iv catalase and amylase positive v able to grow in presence of 10 % NaCl. They produced acid from glucose, fructose and maltose and grew optimally at 30 0C temperature and pH 7.0-8.0. None of them could grow above 45 0C and below 15 0C. Only one of them (MBRI 7 exhibited extracellular protease activity on skim milk agar plates. Based on 16S rDNA sequencing, it belonged to the genus Marinobacter (98% sequence similarity, 1201 bp. The cell free extract was used to study effects of temperature and pH on protease activity. The optimum temperature and pH for activity were found to be 40 0C and 7.0 respectively. The crude enzyme was stable at temperature range of 30-80 0C and pH 5.0-9.0. It retained 60 % activity at 80 0C after 4 h and more than 70 % activity at 70 0C after 1 h. D value was found to be 342 minutes and 78 minutes for 40 0C and 80 0C respectively. Interestingly the enzyme remained 50 % active at pH 9.0 after 1 h. Comparison with other proteases from different microbial sources indicated that the neutral protease from the halotolerant marine isolate MBRI 7 is a novel enzyme with high thermostability.

  1. Comparison of minimal inhibitory concentration and disk-diffusion antimicrobic sensitivity testing of bacterial pathogens isolated from food animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libal, M C

    1985-05-01

    Disk-diffusion sensitivity tests were conducted with the antimicrobics sulfathiazole, gentamicin, erythromycin, kanamycin, penicillin, ampicillin, and spectinomycin on 300 to 350 bacterial isolates of food animal origin. The minimal inhibitory concentration of each antimicrobic was also determined for each bacterial isolate, using a microdilution technique. Results indicated that inhibitory zone sizes should be larger for some antimicrobics when testing animal pathogens than those zone sizes recommended for testing human pathogens. In addition, zone interpretive data are reported for spectinomycin, a drug for which such data were previously lacking.

  2. Natural antigenic differences in the functionally equivalent extracellular DNABII proteins of bacterial biofilms provide a means for targeted biofilm therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, C J; Davey, M E; Bakaletz, L O; Goodman, S D

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria that persist in the oral cavity exist within complex biofilm communities. A hallmark of biofilms is the presence of an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which consists of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins, including the DNABII family of proteins. The removal of DNABII proteins from a biofilm results in the loss of structural integrity of the eDNA and the collapse of the biofilm structure. We examined the role of DNABII proteins in the biofilm structure of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Co-aggregation with oral streptococci is thought to facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis within the biofilm community. We demonstrate that DNABII proteins are present in the EPS of both S. gordonii and P. gingivalis biofilms, and that these biofilms can be disrupted through the addition of antisera derived against their respective DNABII proteins. We provide evidence that both eDNA and DNABII proteins are limiting in S. gordonii but not in P. gingivalis biofilms. In addition, these proteins are capable of complementing one another functionally. We also found that whereas antisera derived against most DNABII proteins are capable of binding a wide variety of DNABII proteins, the P. gingivalis DNABII proteins are antigenically distinct. The presence of DNABII proteins in the EPS of these biofilms and the antigenic uniqueness of the P. gingivalis proteins provide an opportunity to develop therapies that are targeted to remove P. gingivalis and biofilms that contain P. gingivalis from the oral cavity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta in the inflammatory response caused by bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés-Vieyra Ricarda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β plays a fundamental role during the inflammatory response induced by bacteria. Depending on the pathogen and its virulence factors, the type of cell and probably the context in which the interaction between host cells and bacteria takes place, GSK3β may promote or inhibit inflammation. The goal of this review is to discuss recent findings on the role of the inhibition or activation of GSK3β and its modulation of the inflammatory signaling in monocytes/macrophages and epithelial cells at the transcriptional level, mainly through the regulation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB activity. Also included is a brief overview on the importance of GSK3 in non-inflammatory processes during bacterial infection.

  4. Gold Nanoparticles: An Efficient Antimicrobial Agent against Enteric Bacterial Human Pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamaila, Shahzadi; Zafar, Noshin; Riaz, Saira; Sharif, Rehana; Nazir, Jawad; Naseem, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Enteric bacterial human pathogens, i.e., Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, are the major cause of diarrheal infections in children and adults. Their structure badly affects the human immune system. It is important to explore new antibacterial agents instead of antibiotics for treatment. This project is an attempt to explain how gold nanoparticles affect these bacteria. We investigated the important role of the mean particle size, and the inhibition of a bacterium is dose-dependent. Ultra Violet (UV)-visible spectroscopy revealed the size of chemically synthesized gold nanoparticle as 6–40 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed the size and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) analysis determined the polycrystalline nature of gold nanoparticles. The present findings explained how gold nanoparticles lyse Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28335198

  5. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandevivere, P.; Baveye, P. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HC[sub sat]) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HC[sub sat]. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HC[sub sat] reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HC[sub sat].

  6. Effect of bacterial extracellular polymers on the saturated hydraulic conductivity of sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevivere, P; Baveye, P

    1992-05-01

    Columns were packed with clean quartz sand, sterilized, and inoculated with different strains of bacteria, which multiplied within the sand at the expense of a continuous supply of fresh nutrient medium. The saturated hydraulic conductivity (HCsat) of the sand was monitored over time. Among the four bacterial strains tested, one formed a capsule, one produced slime layers, and two did not produce any detectable exopolymers. The last two strains were nonmucoid variants of the first two. Only one strain, the slime producer, had a large impact on the HCsat. The production of exopolymers had no effect on either cell multiplication within or movement through the sand columns. Therefore, the HCsat reduction observed with the slime producer was tentatively attributed to the obstruction of flow channels with slime. Compared with the results with Arthrobacter sp. strain AK19 used in a previous study, there was a 100-fold increase in detachment from the solid substratum and movement through the sand of the strains used in this study. All strains induced severe clogging when they colonized the inlet chamber of the columns. Under these conditions, the inlet end was covered by a confluent mat with an extremely low HCsat.

  7. Pioneering bacterial and algal communities and potential extracellular enzyme activities of stream biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlon, Elisabeth; Marxsen, Jürgen; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-03-01

    Microbial biofilms are important for the turnover of organic matter in small streams. A rapid colonization of the epilithic surface will become more important given the predicted increase of flood events. Here, we elucidated the pioneering community structure and activity of stream biofilms. Colonization of glass slides exposed in a small stream for 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h was compared with those exposed for 7 days or 5 months. Forty thousand microbial cells and 10 algae cm(-2) attached to the glass slides within 1 h of exposure. Catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH demonstrated that the pioneer community that settled within 12 h was dominated by Cytophago-Flavobacteria. Later stages were characterized by an enrichment of Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. However, a major fraction of the detected bacterial cells could not be identified beyond the domain level. Green algae dominated the pioneering algal groups, but were outnumbered by filamentous algae after the attachment period. Potential activity of alkaline phosphatase was already detected after 4 h, beta-glucosidase after 8 h, and beta-xylosidase only after 7 days of biofilm formation. Thus, biofilm formation occurred rapidly and the functionality of the assemblages was evident within a few hours. However, the ratios of beta-xylosidase : beta-glucosidase suggested that the initial biofilms relied more on autochthonous than on allochthonous carbon sources in contrast to mature biofilms.

  8. Detection of bacterial pathogens in surgical site infections and their antibiotic sensitivity profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaleb Adwan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections considered as a major problem in health care centers, resulting in extended length of stay, substantial associated morbidity and mortality, and high excess hospital cost. Thirty wound swabs were collected from patients who had developed postoperative wound infections at Rafidia Hospital-Nablus, Palestine. Bacterial isolates were identified according to standard microbiological methods. Antibiotics susceptibility test was applied for all isolated bacterial species. ERIC-PCR was carried out to determine the identity between isolated clones. The results of this research showed that the prevalence of pathogens among surgical site infections was 56.7%, 30%, 6.7%, 3.3% and 3.3% for E. coli, S. aureus, Klebsiella sp., Enterobacter sp., and Acinatobacter sp., respectively. E. coli isolates showed high resistance against Nalidixic acid (88.2%, Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole (76.5%, Tetracycline (70.6%, Norfloxacin (64.7% and Ciprofloxacin (58.5%. S. aureus showed high resistance against Nalidixic acid (88.9%, Norfloxacin (77.8%, Amoxycillin/clavulanic acid (77.8%, Kanamycin (66.7% and Ciprofloxacin (55.6%. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA accounted for 33.3% of a total of S. aureus isolates. Resistant to 3 or more antibiotics were detected in 94.1% (16/17 and 77.8% (7/9 of E. coli and S. aureus isolates, respectively. ERIC-PCR typing E. coli and S. aureus isolates showed that each was consisted of 4 ERIC-PCR clusters at a 50% similarity level. Indistinguishable and closely related strains were detected for both microorganisms. Results of this study might be important in provoking awareness to postoperative wound infections and further studies are needed to identify other pathogens responsible for SSIs and the source of infections. Using effective antibiotic policy will restrict further spread of postoperative wound infections.

  9. Isolation and characterization of bacteriophages with lytic activity against common bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Shende

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Present investigation was conducted to isolate and characterize bacteriophages with lytic activity against common bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 samples of animal waste disposal from cattle (42 and buffalo (18 farms were collected from three different strata, i.e., top, mid, and bottom of collection tank. Samples were primarily subjected to rapid detection methods, and then isolation of phage was done by double agar layer method using Bacillus subtilis (BsH and Escherichia coli (EH as host system. Phages were characterized on the basis of plaque morphology, temperature, pH susceptibility, and host range. Results: Recovery of phages was higher from dairy cattle farm waste (78.57% as compared to buffalo farm waste (72.22% and bottom layer of tank showed maximum recovery. Bacillus subtilis (91% supported the growth of more phages as compared to E. coli (9%. Three different phage morphotypes were observed each against Bacillus subtilis (BsHR1, BsHR2, and BsHR3 and E. coli (EHR1, EHR2, and EHR3. Mean phage titer of above six phage isolates ranged between 3x1010 and 5x1012 plaque forming units/ml. Viability of phages was by, and large unaffected at 70°C within 2-3 min, and phage isolates were completely inactivated below pH 3 and above 11. Coliphage EHR1 had widest host range followed by BsHR1 and BsHR2 while EHR2, EHR3, and BsHR3 had low lytic activity. Conclusion: It could be concluded from the present study that the Bacillus and Coli phage has wide host range and thus exhibits the potential to be used as drug substitute tool against common bacterial pathogens.

  10. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Javid

    Full Text Available Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted.

  11. Transcriptional responses of resistant and susceptible fish clones to the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Langevin

    Full Text Available Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a bacterial species that represents one of the most important pathogens for aquaculture worldwide, especially for salmonids. To gain insights into the genetic basis of the natural resistance to F. psychrophilum, we selected homozygous clones of rainbow trout with contrasted susceptibility to the infection. We compared the transcriptional response to the bacteria in the pronephros of a susceptible and a resistant line by micro-array analysis five days after infection. While the basal transcriptome of healthy fish was significantly different in the resistant and susceptible lines, the transcriptome modifications induced by the bacteria involved essentially the same genes and pathways. The response to F. psychrophilum involved antimicrobial peptides, complement, and a number of enzymes and chemokines. The matrix metalloproteases mmp9 and mmp13 were among the most highly induced genes in both genetic backgrounds. Key genes of both pro- and anti-inflammatory response such as IL1 and IL10, were up-regulated with a greater magnitude in susceptible animals where the bacterial load was also much higher. While higher resistance to F. psychrophilum does not seem to be based on extensive differences in the orientation of the immune response, several genes including complement C3 showed stronger induction in the resistant fish. They may be important for the variation of susceptibility to the infection.

  12. Different Types of Diatom-Derived Extracellular Polymeric Substances Drive Changes in Heterotrophic Bacterial Communities from Intertidal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez, Julio; McGenity, Terry J.; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; García-Robledo, Emilio; Corzo, Alfonso; Underwood, Graham J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Intertidal areas support extensive diatom-rich biofilms. Such microphytobenthic (MPB) diatoms exude large quantities of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) comprising polysaccharides, glycoproteins and other biopolymers, which represent a substantial carbon pool. However, degradation rates of different EPS components, and how they shape heterotrophic communities in sediments, are not well understood. An aerobic mudflat-sediment slurry experiment was performed in the dark with two different EPS carbon sources from a diatom-dominated biofilm: colloidal EPS (cEPS) and the more complex hot-bicarbonate-extracted EPS. Degradation rate constants determined over 9 days for three sediment fractions [dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total carbohydrates (TCHO), and (cEPS)] were generally higher in the colloidal-EPS slurries (0.105–0.123 d−1) compared with the hot-bicarbonate-extracted-EPS slurries (0.060–0.096 d−1). Addition of hot-bicarbonate-EPS resulted in large increases in dissolved nitrogen and phosphorous by the end of the experiment, indicating that the more complex EPS is an important source of regenerated inorganic nutrients. Microbial biomass increased ~4–6-fold over 9 days, and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the addition of both types of EPS greatly altered the bacterial community composition (from 0 to 9 days) compared to a control with no added EPS. Bacteroidetes (especially Tenacibaculum) and Verrucomicrobia increased significantly in relative abundance in both the hot-bicarbonate-EPS and colloidal-EPS treatments. These differential effects of EPS fractions on carbon-loss rates, nutrient regeneration and microbial community assembly improve our understanding of coastal-sediment carbon cycling and demonstrate the importance of diverse microbiota in processing this abundant pool of organic carbon. PMID:28289404

  13. Different Types of Diatom-Derived Extracellular Polymeric Substances Drive Changes in Heterotrophic Bacterial Communities from Intertidal Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez, Julio; McGenity, Terry J; Papaspyrou, Sokratis; García-Robledo, Emilio; Corzo, Alfonso; Underwood, Graham J C

    2017-01-01

    Intertidal areas support extensive diatom-rich biofilms. Such microphytobenthic (MPB) diatoms exude large quantities of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) comprising polysaccharides, glycoproteins and other biopolymers, which represent a substantial carbon pool. However, degradation rates of different EPS components, and how they shape heterotrophic communities in sediments, are not well understood. An aerobic mudflat-sediment slurry experiment was performed in the dark with two different EPS carbon sources from a diatom-dominated biofilm: colloidal EPS (cEPS) and the more complex hot-bicarbonate-extracted EPS. Degradation rate constants determined over 9 days for three sediment fractions [dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total carbohydrates (TCHO), and (cEPS)] were generally higher in the colloidal-EPS slurries (0.105-0.123 d(-1)) compared with the hot-bicarbonate-extracted-EPS slurries (0.060-0.096 d(-1)). Addition of hot-bicarbonate-EPS resulted in large increases in dissolved nitrogen and phosphorous by the end of the experiment, indicating that the more complex EPS is an important source of regenerated inorganic nutrients. Microbial biomass increased ~4-6-fold over 9 days, and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes revealed that the addition of both types of EPS greatly altered the bacterial community composition (from 0 to 9 days) compared to a control with no added EPS. Bacteroidetes (especially Tenacibaculum) and Verrucomicrobia increased significantly in relative abundance in both the hot-bicarbonate-EPS and colloidal-EPS treatments. These differential effects of EPS fractions on carbon-loss rates, nutrient regeneration and microbial community assembly improve our understanding of coastal-sediment carbon cycling and demonstrate the importance of diverse microbiota in processing this abundant pool of organic carbon.

  14. Analysis of pathogenic features of liver cirrhosis with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Juling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo analyze the pathogenic and drug resistance features, as well as laboratory indices, of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP and to provide a basis for the early warning, rapid diagnosis, and timely treatment of the disease. MethodsThe clinical data and laboratory indices of 1340 patients diagnosed with SBP in 302 Hospital of PLA from January 2011 to December 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. The pathogenic spectrum and laboratory characteristics of SBP caused by different pathogenic bacteria were compared and the drug resistance features of the bacteria were also determined. Drug sensitivity results were analyzed with WHONET5 software, and statistical analysis was carried out with CHISS software. Comparison of continuous data was made by t test, and comparison of categorical data was made by chi-square test. ResultsOf the 1340 liver cirrhosis patients with SBP, 591 cases (44.10% were infected with gram-negative bacilli (G-b, 746 (55.67% with gram-positive cocci (G+C, one (0.07% with fungi, and two (0.15% with gram-positive bacilli(G+b. Compared with G+C infection, G-b infection involving other body parts had a significantly higher abnormality rate of laboratory indices including neutrophil, ascites white blood count (WBC, polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, total bilirubin (TBil, exogenous prothrombin activity (PTA, and creatinine (Cr (P<0.05. The positive rates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL produced by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were 40.00% and 36.03%, respectively. The drug resistance rates of Acinetobacter baumannii to amikacin, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, and imipenem were 4242%, 5757%, and 5758%, respectively, while the drug resistance rates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to cefoperazone and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid were 4545% and 3636%, respectively. The composition ratios of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus

  15. Cladophora (Chlorophyta) spp. harbor human bacterial pathogens in nearshore water of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, S.; Yan, T.; Shively, D.A.; Byappanahalli, M.N.; Whitman, R.L.; Sadowsky, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cladophora glomerata, a macrophytic green alga, is commonly found in the Great Lakes, and significant accumulations occur along shorelines during the summer months. Recently, Cladophora has been shown to harbor high densities of the fecal indicator bacteria Escherichia coli and enterococci. Cladophora may also harbor human pathogens; however, until now, no studies to address this question have been performed. In the present study, we determined whether attachedCladophora, obtained from the Lake Michigan and Burns Ditch (Little Calumet River, Indiana) sides of a breakwater during the summers of 2004 and 2005, harbored the bacterial pathogens Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC),Salmonella, Shigella, and Campylobacter. The presence of potential pathogens and numbers of organisms were determined by using cultural methods and by using conventional PCR, most-probable-number PCR (MPN-PCR), and quantitative PCR (QPCR) performed with genus- and toxin-specific primers and probes. WhileShigella and STEC were detected in 100% and 25%, respectively, of the algal samples obtained near Burns Ditch in 2004, the same pathogens were not detected in samples collected in 2005. MPN-PCR and QPCR allowed enumeration of Salmonella in 40 to 80% of the ditch- and lakeside samples, respectively, and the densities were up to 1.6 × 103 cells per g Cladophora. Similarly, these PCR methods allowed enumeration of up to 5.4 × 102 Campylobacter cells/gCladophora in 60 to 100% of lake- and ditchside samples. The Campylobacterdensities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the lakeside Cladophora samples than in the ditchside Cladophora samples. DNA fingerprint analyses indicated that genotypically identical Salmonella isolates were associated with geographically and temporally distinct Cladophora samples. However, Campylobacter isolates were genetically diverse. Since animal hosts are thought to be the primary habitat for

  16. Selenazolinium Salts as “Small Molecule Catalysts” with High Potency against ESKAPE Bacterial Pathogens

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    Karolina Witek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In view of the pressing need to identify new antibacterial agents able to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria, we investigated a series of fused selenazolinium derivatives (1–8 regarding their in vitro antimicrobial activities against 25 ESKAPE-pathogen strains. Ebselen was used as reference compound. Most of the selenocompounds demonstrated an excellent in vitro activity against all S. aureus strains, with activities comparable to or even exceeding the one of ebselen. In contrast to ebselen, some selenazolinium derivatives (1, 3, and 7 even displayed significant actions against all Gram-negative pathogens tested. The 3-bromo-2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl[1,2]selenazolo[2,3-a]pyridinium chloride (1 was particularly active (minimum inhibitory concentrations, MICs: 0.31–1.24 µg/mL for MRSA, and 0.31–2.48 µg/mL for Gram-negative bacteria and devoid of any significant mutagenicity in the Ames assay. Our preliminary mechanistic studies in cell culture indicated that their mode of action is likely to be associated with an alteration of intracellular levels of glutathione and cysteine thiols of different proteins in the bacterial cells, hence supporting the idea that such compounds interact with the intracellular thiolstat. This alteration of pivotal cysteine residues is most likely the result of a direct or catalytic oxidative modification of such residues by the highly reactive selenium species (RSeS employed.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence and Immunoproteomic Analyses of the Bacterial Fish Pathogen Streptococcus parauberis▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, Seong Won; Hikima, Jun-ichi; Cha, In Seok; Park, Seong Bin; Jang, Ho Bin; del Castillo, Carmelo S.; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo; Aoki, Takashi; Jung, Tae Sung

    2011-01-01

    Although Streptococcus parauberis is known as a bacterial pathogen associated with bovine udder mastitis, it has recently become one of the major causative agents of olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) streptococcosis in northeast Asia, causing massive mortality resulting in severe economic losses. S. parauberis contains two serotypes, and it is likely that capsular polysaccharide antigens serve to differentiate the serotypes. In the present study, the complete genome sequence of S. parauberis (serotype I) was determined using the GS-FLX system to investigate its phylogeny, virulence factors, and antigenic proteins. S. parauberis possesses a single chromosome of 2,143,887 bp containing 1,868 predicted coding sequences (CDSs), with an average GC content of 35.6%. Whole-genome dot plot analysis and phylogenetic analysis of a 60-kDa chaperonin-encoding gene and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)-encoding gene showed that the strain was evolutionarily closely related to Streptococcus uberis. S. parauberis antigenic proteins were analyzed using an immunoproteomic technique. Twenty-one antigenic protein spots were identified in S. parauberis, by reaction with an antiserum obtained from S. parauberis-challenged olive flounder. This work provides the foundation needed to understand more clearly the relationship between pathogen and host and develops new approaches toward prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to deal with streptococcosis in fish. The work also provides a better understanding of the physiology and evolution of a significant representative of the Streptococcaceae. PMID:21531805

  18. Ticks and bacterial tick-borne pathogens in Piemonte region, Northwest Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Dario; Pajoro, Massimo; Novakova, Eva; Vicari, Nadia; Gaiardelli, Cesare; Viganò, Roberto; Luzzago, Camilla; Montagna, Matteo; Lanfranchi, Paolo

    2017-11-30

    A molecular screening for tick-borne pathogens was carried out in engorged and in questing ticks collected in Verbano Cusio Ossola county, Piemonte region, Italy. Engorged ticks were removed from wild and domestic animal hosts. The most abundant and common tick species in the area was Ixodes ricinus (192 adults, 907 nymphs). Few individuals of Ixodes hexagonus (15) and Rhipicephalus sanguineus (7) were found among the ticks removed from domestic animals (46 examined ticks). The presence of Rickettsia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu latu, Francisella tularensis and Coxiella burnetii was evaluated by PCR and sequencing in 392 individuals of I. ricinus (adult and nymphal stages) and 22 individuals of the two other tick species. Five Borrelia species (i.e. B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, B. afzelii, B. valaisiana and B. lusitaniae), proved or suspected to cause clinical manifestations of Lyme disease in humans, showed 10.5 and 2.2% combined prevalence in questing and engorged I. ricinus, respectively. In addition, two species of rickettsiae (R. helvetica and R. monacensis) were identified and reported with 14.5 and 24.8% overall prevalence in questing and in engorged ticks. The prevalence of F. tularensis in the ticks collected on two wild ungulate species (Capreolus capreolus and Cervus elaphus) was 5.7%. This work provided further data and broadened our knowledge on bacterial pathogens present in ticks in Northwest Italy.

  19. Viral and bacterial pathogens identification in children hospitalised for severe pneumonia and parapneumonic empyema

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    Jean-Noël Telles

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is caused by respiratory bacteria and/or viruses. Little is known if co-infections are an aggravating factor in hospitalised children with severe pneumonia. We studied the impact of respiratory pathogens on the severity of pneumonia. Between 2007 and 2009, 52 children hospitalised with a well-documented diagnosis of communityacquired pneumonia (CAP, with or without parapneumonic empyema (PPE, were enrolled in the study. The patients were classified into 2 groups: CAP + PPE (n = 28 and CAP (n = 24. The identification of respiratory viruses and bacteria in nasopharyngeal aspirates and pleural effusion samples were performed using conventional bacterial techniques and molecular assays. Using real-time multiplex PCR and antigen detection, Streptococcus pneumoniae was the main agent identified in 76% of the cases by molecular tests and BinaxNOW® in pleural fluid. A total of 8% of pleural fluid samples remained undiagnosed. In nasopharyngeal aspirates, rhinovirus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected in both CAP and CAP + PPE populations; however, the percentage of viral co-detection was significantly higher in nasopharyngeal aspirates from CAP + PPE patients (35% compared with CAP patients (5%. In conclusion, viral co-detection was observed mainly in patients with more severe pneumonia. Molecular biology assays improved the pathogens detection in pneumonia and confirmed the S. pneumoniae detection by BinaxNOW® in pleural effusion samples. Interestingly, the main S. pneumoniae serotypes found in PPE are not the ones targeted by the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

  20. Impacts of culture-independent diagnostic practices on public health surveillance for bacterial enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronquist, Alicia B; Mody, Rajal K; Atkinson, Robyn; Besser, John; Tobin D'Angelo, Melissa; Hurd, Sharon; Robinson, Trisha; Nicholson, Cynthia; Mahon, Barbara E

    2012-06-01

    For decades, culture has been the mainstay of diagnostic testing for bacterial enteric pathogens. This paradigm is changing as clinical laboratories adopt culture-independent methods, such as antigen-based tests and nucleic acid-based assays. Public health surveillance for enteric infections addresses 4 interrelated but distinct objectives: case investigation for localized disease control; assessment of disease burden and trends to prioritize and assess impact of population-based control measures; outbreak detection; and microbiologic characterization to improve understanding of pathogens, their virulence mechanisms, and epidemiology. We summarize the challenges and opportunities that culture-independent tests present and suggest strategies, such as validation studies and development of culture-independent tests compatible with subtyping, that could be adopted to ensure that surveillance remains robust. Many of these approaches will require time and resources to implement, but they will be necessary to maintain a strong surveillance system. Public health practitioners must clearly explain the value of surveillance, especially how outbreak detection benefits the public, and collaborate with all stakeholders to develop solutions.

  1. Terminal reassortment drives the quantum evolution of type III effectors in bacterial pathogens.

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    John Stavrinides

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial pathogens employ a type III secretion system to deliver type III secreted effectors (T3SEs into host cells, where they interact directly with host substrates to modulate defense pathways and promote disease. This interaction creates intense selective pressures on these secreted effectors, necessitating rapid evolution to overcome host surveillance systems and defenses. Using computational and evolutionary approaches, we have identified numerous mosaic and truncated T3SEs among animal and plant pathogens. We propose that these secreted virulence genes have evolved through a shuffling process we have called "terminal reassortment." In terminal reassortment, existing T3SE termini are mobilized within the genome, creating random genetic fusions that result in chimeric genes. Up to 32% of T3SE families in species with relatively large and well-characterized T3SE repertoires show evidence of terminal reassortment, as compared to only 7% of non-T3SE families. Terminal reassortment may permit the near instantaneous evolution of new T3SEs and appears responsible for major modifications to effector activity and function. Because this process plays a more significant role in the evolution of T3SEs than non-effectors, it provides insight into the evolutionary origins of T3SEs and may also help explain the rapid emergence of new infectious agents.

  2. Pathogenicity of a Very Virulent Strain of Marek's Disease Herpesvirus Cloned as Infectious Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

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    Lorraine P. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC vectors containing the full-length genomes of several herpesviruses have been used widely as tools to enable functional studies of viral genes. Marek's disease viruses (MDVs are highly oncogenic alphaherpesviruses that induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphomas in chickens. Oncogenic strains of MDV reconstituted from BAC clones have been used to examine the role of viral genes in inducing tumours. Past studies have demonstrated continuous increase in virulence of MDV strains. We have previously reported on the UK isolate C12/130 that showed increased virulence features including lymphoid organ atrophy and enhanced tropism for the central nervous system. Here we report the construction of the BAC clones (pC12/130 of this strain. Chickens were infected with viruses reconstituted from the pC12/130 clones along with the wild-type virus for the comparison of the pathogenic properties. Our studies show that BAC-derived viruses induced disease similar to the wild-type virus, though there were differences in the levels of pathogenicity between individual viruses. Generation of BAC clones that differ in the potential to induce cytolytic disease provide the opportunity to identify the molecular determinants of increased virulence by direct sequence analysis as well as by using reverse genetics approaches on the infectious BAC clones.

  3. Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens Isolated from Cow Dung Used to Fertilize Nigerian Fish Ponds

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    Funso S. OMOJOWO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to isolate and identify antibiotic resistant bacteria from cow dung used for pond fertilization. Cow dung from over 200 cows in NIFFR integrated farms, New-Bussa, Nigeria were collected. Six bacterial pathogens; Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Shigella dysentariae, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi, and Aeromonas hydrophila were isolated. Antibiotic susceptibility testing by the disk diffusion method was conducted using ofloxacin, amoxicillin, tetracycline, ampicillin, erythromycin, gentamicin, nalidixic acid and chloramphenicol. All the isolated organisms were 100% sensitive to ofloxacin. The multiple resistance patterns revealed that 100% were resistant to tetracycline, ampicillin (85.6%, amoxicillin (83.3%, chloramphenicol (66%, gentamicin (47.6%, erythromycin (44.4% and nalidixic acid (18.3%. The Public Health risks posed by the cow dung manure include proliferation of ponds with these organisms that are pathogenic to fish and man, contamination of the environment and the possible retention of these organisms in the table size fish.

  4. Proteome of cell wall-extracts from pathogenic Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: Comparison among morphological phases, isolates, and reported fungal extracellular vesicle proteins

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    Larissa V.G. Longo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We identified non-covalently linked cell wall proteins from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeasts and mycelia, with focus on the yeast pathogenic phase, and correlated them with reported fungal extracellular vesicle proteins. We studied isolates Pb3 and Pb18, which evoke distinct patterns of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis and represent two phylogenetic groups. Proteins were extracted mildly with dithiothreitol, trypsinized, and peptides analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Among 132 yeast-exclusive sequences, 92 were Pb18-exclusive. About 80% of total proteins were classified as secretory, mostly showing non-conventional signals. Extracellular vesicular transportation could be involved, since 60% had orthologs reported in fungal extracellular vesicles.

  5. Pathogens and diseases of freshwater mussels in the United States: Studies on bacterial transmission and depuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Cipriano, R.C.; Bruckner, A.W.; Shchelkunov, I.S.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are recognized as important contributors to healthy aquatic ecosystems, as well as bioindicators of environmental perturbations. Because they are sedentary, filter feeding animals and require hosts (i.e., fishes) to transform embryonic glochidia, mussels are susceptible to direct adverse environmental parameters, and indirect parameters that restrict the timely presence of the host(s). Their numbers have declined in recent decades to a point that this fauna is regarded as one of the most imperiled in North America. The most significant threat to populations of native unionids in recent years has been the introduction and spread of zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha. Many federal and state agencies, and private interests are now engaged in mussel conservation efforts, including collecting selected imperiled species from impacted rivers and lakes and propagating them at refuges for future population augmentations. One essential consideration with mussel propagation and their intensive culture at refugia is the prevention of pathogen introductions and control of diseases. Currently, there are few reports of etiological agents causing diseases among freshwater mussels; however, because of increased observations of mussel die-offs in conjunction with transfers of live animals between natural waters and refugia, disease problems can be anticipated to emerge. This review summarizes research to develop bacterial isolation techniques, study pathogen transmission between fish and mussels, identify causes of seasonal mussel die-offs, and develop non-destructive methods for pathogen detection. These efforts were done to develop disease preventative techniques for use by resource managers to avoid potential large-scale disease problems in restoration and population augmentation efforts among imperiled populations.

  6. Molecular evidence for bacterial pathogens in Ixodes ricinus ticks infesting Shetland ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotarczak, Bogumiła; Wodecka, Beata; Rymaszewska, Anna; Adamska, Małgorzata

    2016-06-01

    Ixodes ricinus has the potential to transmit zoonotic pathogens to humans and domestic animals. The feeding I. ricinus (n = 1737) collected from 49 Shetland ponies and questing ones from vegetation (n = 371) were tested for the presence and differentiation of the bacterial species. DNA of I. ricinus ticks was examined with PCR and sequencing analysis to identify species of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl), Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Rickettsia spp. Altogether, 24.3 % I. ricinus of the infested horses and 12.4 % ticks from vegetation carried at least one pathogen species. Horse-feeding ticks (19.2 %) were significantly more frequently infected with Borrelia spp. than questing ticks (4.8 %). Among Bbsl species, in I. ricinus infesting ponies, B. garinii, B. afzelii, B. burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. valaisiana and B. lusitanie and one species, B. miyamotoi related to relapsing fever group, were detected. The 73 flaB gene sequences of Borrelia obtained from feeding I. ricinus have been deposited in GenBank. Among Rickettsia species, two were identified: R. helvetica which was dominant and R. monacensis. Infections with more than one pathogenic species, involving mostly Bbsl and R. helvetica were detected in 6.3 % of infected ticks collected from horses. Shetland ponies may play an important role in the epidemiological cycle of Bbsl and probably could contribute to the natural cycle of A. phagocytophilum and R. helvetica as host for infected ticks. The awareness about these infectious agents in ticks from ponies might be an important criterion for the risk assessment of human diseases, especially as these animals are maintained for recreational purposes.

  7. Interactions of seedborne bacterial pathogens with host and non-host plants in relation to seed infestation and seedling transmission.

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    Bhabesh Dutta

    Full Text Available The ability of seed-borne bacterial pathogens (Acidovorax citrulli, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea to infest seeds of host and non-host plants (watermelon, tomato, pepper, and soybean and subsequent pathogen transmission to seedlings was investigated. A non-pathogenic, pigmented strain of Serratia marcescens was also included to assess a null-interacting situation with the same plant species. Flowers of host and non-host plants were inoculated with 1 × 10(6 colony forming units (CFUs/flower for each bacterial species and allowed to develop into fruits or umbels (in case of onion. Seeds harvested from each host/non-host bacterial species combination were assayed for respective bacteria by plating on semi-selective media. Additionally, seedlots for each host/non-host bacterial species combination were also assayed for pathogen transmission by seedling grow-out (SGO assays under greenhouse conditions. The mean percentage of seedlots infested with compatible and incompatible pathogens was 31.7 and 30.9% (by plating, respectively and they were not significantly different (P = 0.67. The percentage of seedlots infested with null-interacting bacterial species was 16.8% (by plating and it was significantly lower than the infested lots generated with compatible and incompatible bacterial pathogens (P = 0.03. None of the seedlots with incompatible/null-interacting bacteria developed symptoms on seedlings; however, when seedlings were assayed for epiphytic bacterial presence, 19.5 and 9.4% of the lots were positive, respectively. These results indicate that the seeds of non-host plants can become infested with incompatible and null-interacting bacterial species through flower colonization and they can be transmitted via epiphytic colonization of seedlings. In addition, it was also observed that flowers and seeds of non-host plants can be

  8. Function of bacterial cells and their exuded extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in virus removal by red soils.

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    Zhao, Bingzi; Jiang, Yan; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of autochthonous microorganisms on virus fate in soil is usually determined through extreme conditions of sterilization vs. nonsterilization; however, the relative importance of microbial cells and their exudates remains unclear. In this study, bacterial cells (cell) were harvested, and their exuded extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were extracted from three strains of bacteria, namely, Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. This study aimed to evaluate virus removal in solutions in the presence of cell, EPS, and their combination (cell/EPS), as well as to investigate how their presence affects virus removal efficiencies by four red soils based on batch experiments. Results showed that virus removal percentage in solutions ranged from 11 to 23 in the presence of cells only and from 12 to 15 in the presence of EPS only. The removal percentage in the combined cell/EPS treatment can be estimated by summing the results achieved by the cell and EPS treatments, separately. Meanwhile, cell presence had a negligible effect on virus removal by red soils. EPS and combined cell/EPS significantly reduced virus removal by 20 to 69% and 16 to 50%, respectively, which indicated that EPS served a dominant function in reducing virus removal. This study clearly demonstrated that the prediction of virus removal by red soils must consider the effect of bacteria, especially those producing large quantities of EPS, which can be responsible for the underestimation of viral load in certain studies.

  9. Application of a bacterial extracellular polymeric substance in heavy metal adsorption in a co-contaminated aqueous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Martins, Paula Salles; de Almeida, Narcisa Furtado; Leite, Selma Gomes Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    The application of a bacterial extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) in the bioremediation of heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Cu) by a microbial consortium in a hydrocarbon co-contaminated aqueous system was studied. At the low concentrations used in this work (1.00 ppm of each metal), it was not observed an inhibitory effect on the cellular growing. In the other hand, the application of the EPS lead to a lower concentration of the free heavy metals in solution, once a great part of them is adsorbed in the polymeric matrix (87.12% of Cd; 19.82% of Zn; and 37.64% of Cu), when compared to what is adsorbed or internalized by biomass (5.35% of Cd; 47.35% of Zn; and 24.93% of Cu). It was noted an increase of 24% in the consumption of ethylbenzene, among the gasoline components that were quantified, in the small interval of time evaluated (30 hours). Our results suggest that, if the experiments were conducted in a larger interval of time, it would possibly be noted a higher effect in the degradation of gasoline compounds. Still, considering the low concentrations that were evaluated, it is possible that a real system could be bioremediated by natural attenuation process, demonstrated by the low effect of those levels of contaminants and co-contaminants over the naturally present microbial consortium. PMID:24031307

  10. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure-Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green...

  11. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogen, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria, and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manre-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluore...

  12. In vitro assessment of antimicrobial effect of methanolic extract of Peganum harmala against some important foodborne bacterial pathogens

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    T zeinali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne bacterial pathogens play an important role in food infections/intoxications in human population. With ever increasing the number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, there is an attempt to use the antimicrobial properties of herbs. Peganum harmala is a medicinal plant of Iraniantraditional medicine which was used as an antiseptic in the past. Amongthe foodborne bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes are considered as the most important and hazardous pathogens. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial effect of methanolic extract of Peganum harmala against these bacteria in vitro. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC of methanolic extract of Peganum harmala was determined against three foodborne bacterial pathogens by micro-dilution method in Muller-Hinton broth. According to the results, MIC for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium was 1.56 mg/ml. In the case of L. monocytogenes, it was estimated at 0.78 mg/ml. Moreover, results revealed that MBC for these organisms was similar to MIC concentrations. Regarding the results, Peganum harmala can be used as an ingredient in the formula of the disinfectants applied in the food systems.

  13. A Bacterial Pathogen Displaying Temperature-Enhanced Virulence of the Microalga Emiliania huxleyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Teaghan J; Bramucci, Anna R; Yakimovich, Kurt M; Case, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    shown to have acquired resistance against EhVs at elevated temperature, bacterial pathogens with temperature-dependent virulence, such as R11, may become much more important in the ecology of E. huxleyi in a warming climate.

  14. Concurrent Detection of Human Norovirus and Bacterial Pathogens in Water Samples from an Agricultural Region in Central California Coast

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    Peng Tian

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and human norovirus (HuNoV are major cause for acute gastroenteritis caused by contaminated food and water. Public waterways can become contaminated from a variety of sources and flood after heavy rain events, leading to pathogen contamination of produce fields. We initiated a survey of several public watersheds in a major leafy green produce production region of the Central California Coast to determine the prevalence of HuNoV as well as bacterial pathogens. Moore swabs were used to collect environmental samples bi-monthly at over 30 sampling sites in the region. High prevalence of HuNoV and bacterial pathogens were detected in environmental water samples in the region. The overall detection rates of HuNoV, O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC, non-O157 STEC, Salmonella, and Listeria were 25.58, 7.91, 9.42, 59.65, and 44.30%, respectively. The detection rates of Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were significantly higher in the spring. Fall and spring had elevated detection rates of O157 STEC. The overall detection rates of non-O157 STEC in the fall were lower than the other seasons but not significant. The overall detection rates of HuNoV were highest in fall, followed by spring and winter, with summer being lowest and significantly lower than other seasons. This study presented the first study of evaluating the correlation between the detection rate of HuNoV and the detection rates of four bacterial pathogens from environmental water. Overall, there was no significant difference in HuNoV detection rates between samples testing positive or negative for the four bacterial pathogens tested. Pathogens in animal-impacted and human-impacted areas were investigated. There were significant higher detection rates in animal-impacted areas than that of human-impacted areas for bacterial pathogens. However, there was no difference in HuNoV detection rates between these two areas. The overall detection levels of generic E

  15. Genetic Modulation of c-di-GMP Turnover Affects Multiple Virulence Traits and Bacterial Virulence in Rice Pathogen Dickeya zeae.

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    Yufan Chen

    Full Text Available The frequent outbreaks of rice foot rot disease caused by Dickeya zeae have become a significant concern in rice planting regions and countries, but the regulatory mechanisms that govern the virulence of this important pathogen remain vague. Given that the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP is associated with modulation of various virulence-related traits in various microorganisms, here we set to investigate the role of the genes encoding c-di-GMP metabolism in the regulation of the bacterial physiology and virulence by construction all in-frame deletion mutants targeting the annotated c-di-GMP turnover genes in D. zeae strain EC1. Phenotype analyses identified individual mutants showing altered production of exoenzymes and phytotoxins, biofilm formation and bacterial motilities. The results provide useful clues and a valuable toolkit for further characterization and dissection of the regulatory complex that modulates the pathogenesis and persistence of this important bacterial pathogen.

  16. Genetic Modulation of c-di-GMP Turnover Affects Multiple Virulence Traits and Bacterial Virulence in Rice Pathogen Dickeya zeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yufan; Lv, Mingfa; Liao, Lisheng; Gu, Yanfang; Liang, Zhibin; Shi, Zurong; Liu, Shiyin; Zhou, Jianuan; Zhang, Lianhui

    2016-01-01

    The frequent outbreaks of rice foot rot disease caused by Dickeya zeae have become a significant concern in rice planting regions and countries, but the regulatory mechanisms that govern the virulence of this important pathogen remain vague. Given that the second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is associated with modulation of various virulence-related traits in various microorganisms, here we set to investigate the role of the genes encoding c-di-GMP metabolism in the regulation of the bacterial physiology and virulence by construction all in-frame deletion mutants targeting the annotated c-di-GMP turnover genes in D. zeae strain EC1. Phenotype analyses identified individual mutants showing altered production of exoenzymes and phytotoxins, biofilm formation and bacterial motilities. The results provide useful clues and a valuable toolkit for further characterization and dissection of the regulatory complex that modulates the pathogenesis and persistence of this important bacterial pathogen.

  17. Is your lunch salad safe to eat? Occurrence of bacterial pathogens and potential for pathogen growth in pre-packed ready-to-eat mixed-ingredient salads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderqvist, Karin

    2017-01-01

    As part of a trend toward healthy convenience foods, ready-to-eat (RTE) mixed-ingredient salads have become popular products among consumers. A mixed-ingredient salad contains combinations of raw (e.g. leafy vegetables and tomatoes) and processed (e.g. chicken, salmon, ham, pasta and couscous) ingredients. Contamination of leafy vegetables can occur during any step in the production chain and, since there is no step that kills pathogens, a completely safe final product can never be guaranteed. Meat ingredients, for example poultry meat and ham, are generally heat-treated before preparation, but may be contaminated after this treatment, e.g. when diced or sliced. When several ingredients are mixed together, cross-contamination may occur. Preparation of mixed-ingredient salads requires human handling, which presents an additional risk of bacterial contamination. With high-protein ingredients, e.g. cooked meat, the mixed-ingredient salad represents an excellent substrate for bacterial growth. This article reviews current knowledge regarding human bacterial pathogen prevalence in mixed-ingredient salads and the potential for pathogen growth in this product during storage.

  18. Community structure of actively growing bacterial populations in plant pathogen suppressive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hjort, K.; Lembke, A.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Smalla, K.; Jansson, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The bacterial community in soil was screened by using various molecular approaches for bacterial populations that were activated upon addition of different supplements. Plasmodiophora brassicae spores, chitin, sodium acetate, and cabbage plants were added to activate specific bacterial populations

  19. Neglected pathogens: bacterial infections in persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection. A review of the literature (1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D N; Danziger, L H

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial infections, including those that cause infection in the healthy host as well as those that are more opportunistic, occur very commonly among persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Bacterial infections are a direct result of the severe humoral and cellular immune defects found in these patients. Epidemiologic factors such as intravenous drug use and stage of HIV infection may also play important roles. Pulmonary, bloodstream, gastrointestinal, central nervous system, skin and soft tissue, and catheter-related infections are common, as are endocarditis, prostatitis, and others. Frequently reported pathogens are common organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and enteric gram-negative pathogens, as well as less typical ones such as Listeria monocytogenes and Nocardia sp. The frequency of infection is specific to organ system and pathogen, often being many times higher than in immunocompetent hosts. Prompt recognition and aggressive therapy are required to reduce morbidity and mortality due to these infections.

  20. Thienopyrimidine-type compounds protect Arabidopsis plants against the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum and bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusaka, Mari; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-04

    Plant activators activate systemic acquired resistance-like defense responses or induced systemic resistance, and thus protect plants from pathogens. We screened a chemical library composed of structurally diverse small molecules. We isolated six plant immune-inducing thienopyrimidine-type compounds and their analogous compounds. It was observed that the core structure of thienopyrimidine plays a role in induced resistance in plants. Furthermore, we highlight the protective effect of thienopyrimidine-type compounds against both hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, Colletotrichum higginsianum, and bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We suggest that thienopyrimidine-type compounds could be potential lead compounds as novel plant activators, and can be useful and effective agrochemicals against various plant diseases.

  1. Diversity of both the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the coastal sediments of King George Island, Antarctica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yang Zhou

    Full Text Available Protease-producing bacteria play a vital role in degrading sedimentary organic nitrogen. However, the diversity of these bacteria and their extracellular proteases in most regions remain unknown. In this paper, the diversity of the cultivable protease-producing bacteria and of bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of Maxwell Bay, King George Island, Antarctica was investigated. The cultivable protease-producing bacteria reached 10(5 cells/g in all 8 sediment samples. The cultivated protease-producing bacteria were mainly affiliated with the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria, and the predominant genera were Bacillus (22.9%, Flavobacterium (21.0% and Lacinutrix (16.2%. Among these strains, Pseudoalteromonas and Flavobacteria showed relatively high protease production. Inhibitor analysis showed that nearly all the extracellular proteases from the bacteria were serine proteases or metalloproteases. These results begin to address the diversity of protease-producing bacteria and bacterial extracellular proteases in the sediments of the Antarctic Sea.

  2. Diversity, Pathogenicity, and Current Occurrence of Bacterial Wilt BacteriumRalstonia solanacearumin Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutarra, Liliam; Herrera, Juan; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Kreuze, Jan; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele

    2017-01-01

    The current bacterial wilt infestation level in the potato fields in the Peruvian Andes was investigated by collecting stem samples from wilted plants and detecting Ralstonia solanacearum . In total 39 farmers' fields located in the central and northern Peru between the altitudes 2111 and 3742 m above sea level were sampled. R. solanacearum was detected in 19 fields, and in 153 out of the 358 samples analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis using the partial sequence of the endoglucanase gene on strains collected in Peru between 1966 and 2016 from potato, pepper, tomato, plantain or soil, divided the strains in phylotypes I, IIA, and IIB. The Phylotype IIB isolates formed seven sequevar groups including the previously identified sequevars 1, 2, 3, 4, and 25. In addition to this, three new sequevars of phylotype IIB were identified. Phylotype IIA isolates from Peru clustered together with reference strains previously assigned to sequevars 5, 39, 41, and 50, and additionally one new sequevar was identified. The Phylotype I strain was similar to the sequevar 18. Most of the Peruvian R. solanacearum isolates were IIB-1 strains. In the old collection sampled between 1966 and 2013, 72% were IIB-1 and in the new collection at 2016 no other strains were found. The pathogenicity of 25 isolates representing the IIA and IIB sequevar groups was tested on potato, tomato, eggplant and tobacco. All were highly aggressive on potato, but differed in pathogenicity on the other hosts, especially on tobacco. All IIA strains caused latent infection on tobacco and some strains also caused wilting, while IIB strains caused only few latent infections on this species. In conclusion, high molecular diversity was found among the R. solanacearum strains in Peru. Most of the variability was found in areas that are no longer used for potato cultivation and thus these strains do not pose a real threat for potato production in the country. Compared to the previous data from the 1990s, the incidence of

  3. Diversity, Pathogenicity, and Current Occurrence of Bacterial Wilt Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Gutarra

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The current bacterial wilt infestation level in the potato fields in the Peruvian Andes was investigated by collecting stem samples from wilted plants and detecting Ralstonia solanacearum. In total 39 farmers’ fields located in the central and northern Peru between the altitudes 2111 and 3742 m above sea level were sampled. R. solanacearum was detected in 19 fields, and in 153 out of the 358 samples analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis using the partial sequence of the endoglucanase gene on strains collected in Peru between 1966 and 2016 from potato, pepper, tomato, plantain or soil, divided the strains in phylotypes I, IIA, and IIB. The Phylotype IIB isolates formed seven sequevar groups including the previously identified sequevars 1, 2, 3, 4, and 25. In addition to this, three new sequevars of phylotype IIB were identified. Phylotype IIA isolates from Peru clustered together with reference strains previously assigned to sequevars 5, 39, 41, and 50, and additionally one new sequevar was identified. The Phylotype I strain was similar to the sequevar 18. Most of the Peruvian R. solanacearum isolates were IIB-1 strains. In the old collection sampled between 1966 and 2013, 72% were IIB-1 and in the new collection at 2016 no other strains were found. The pathogenicity of 25 isolates representing the IIA and IIB sequevar groups was tested on potato, tomato, eggplant and tobacco. All were highly aggressive on potato, but differed in pathogenicity on the other hosts, especially on tobacco. All IIA strains caused latent infection on tobacco and some strains also caused wilting, while IIB strains caused only few latent infections on this species. In conclusion, high molecular diversity was found among the R. solanacearum strains in Peru. Most of the variability was found in areas that are no longer used for potato cultivation and thus these strains do not pose a real threat for potato production in the country. Compared to the previous data from the 1990s

  4. Screening of Lactobacillus strains of domestic goose origin against bacterial poultry pathogens for use as probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, Marta; Puchalski, Andrzej; Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of human and animal mucous membranes, including the avian gastrointestinal tract. Recently, increasing attention has been given to their probiotic, health-promoting capacities, among which their antagonistic potential against pathogens plays a key role. A study was conducted to evaluate probiotic properties of Lactobacillus strains isolated from feces or cloacae of domestic geese. Among the 104 examined isolates, previously identified to the species level by whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and analysis of 16S-23S regions of rDNA, dominated Lactobacillus salivarius (35%), followed by Lactobacillus johnsonii (18%) and Lactobacillus ingluviei (11%). All lactobacilli were screened for antimicrobial activity toward Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, and Riemerella anatipestifer using the agar slab method and the well diffusion method. Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus plantarum exhibited particularly strong antagonism toward all of the indicator strains. In the agar slab method, the highest sensitivity to Lactobacillus was observed in R. anatipestifer and P. multocida, and the lowest in E. coli and S. aureus. The ability to produce H₂O₂was exhibited by 92% of isolates, but there was no correlation between the rate of production of this reactive oxygen species and the antimicrobial activity of Lactobacillus sp. All lactobacilli showed resistance to pH 3.0 and 3.5 and to 2% bile. The data demonstrate that Lactobacillus isolates from geese may have probiotic potential in reducing bacterial infections. The antibacterial activity of the selected lactobacilli is mainly due to lactic acid production by these bacteria. The selected Lactobacillus strains that strongly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria, and were also resistant to low pH and bile salts, can potentially restore the balance

  5. Bacterial pathogen gene abundance and relation to recreational water quality at seven Great Lakes beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Ryan J.; Wijesinghe, Rasanthi U.; Fogarty, Lisa Reynolds; Haack, Sheridan K.; Fogarty, Lisa R.; Tucker, Taaja R.; Riley, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of bacterial pathogens, their geographic variability, and distribution in various matrices at Great Lakes beaches are limited. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to test for genes from E. coli O157:H7 (eaeO157), shiga-toxin producing E. coli (stx2), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), Shigella spp. (ipaH), and a Salmonella enterica-specific (SE) DNA sequence at seven Great Lakes beaches, in algae, water, and sediment. Overall, detection frequencies were mapA>stx2>ipaH>SE>eaeO157. Results were highly variable among beaches and matrices; some correlations with environmental conditions were observed for mapA, stx2, and ipaH detections. Beach seasonal mean mapA abundance in water was correlated with beach seasonal mean log10E. coli concentration. At one beach, stx2 gene abundance was positively correlated with concurrent daily E. coli concentrations. Concentration distributions for stx2, ipaH, and mapA within algae, sediment, and water were statistically different (Non-Detect and Data Analysis in R). Assuming 10, 50, or 100% of gene copies represented viable and presumably infective cells, a quantitative microbial risk assessment tool developed by Michigan State University indicated a moderate probability of illness for Campylobacter jejuni at the study beaches, especially where recreational water quality criteria were exceeded. Pathogen gene quantification may be useful for beach water quality management.

  6. Identifying the components in eggshell membrane responsible for reducing the heat resistance of bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborn, Gene; Sheldon, Brian W

    2006-04-01

    The biological activity (D-value determination) of eggshell membrane (ESM) was examined to determine the membrane components and mechanisms responsible for antibacterial activity. Biological and enzymatic activities (i.e., beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase [beta-NAGase], lysozyme, and ovotransferrin) of ESM denatured with trypsin, lipases, or heat were compared with those of untreated ESM. Trypsin-treated ESM lost all biological activity (D-values at 54 degrees C were 5.12 and 5.38 min for immobilized and solubilized trypsin, respectively) but showed no significant loss of enzymatic activities. Treatments with porcine lipase and a lipase cocktail did not impact biological or enzymatic activities. Heat denaturation of ESM (at 80 and 100 degrees C for 15 min) resulted in significant decreases in biological activity (D-values of 3.99 and 4.43 min, respectively) and loss of beta-NAGase activity. Lysozyme and ovotransferrin activities remained but were significantly reduced. Purified ESM and hen egg white components (i.e., beta-NAGase, lysozyme, and ovotransferrin) were added to Salmonella Typhimurium suspensions (in 0.1% peptone water) at varying concentrations to evaluate their biological activity. D-values at 54 degrees C were 4.50 and 3.68 min for treatment with lysozyme or beta-NAGase alone, respectively, and 2.44 min for ovotransferrin but 1.47 min for a combination of all three components (similar to values for ESM). Exposure of Salmonella Typhimurium cells to a mixture of ovotransferrin, lysozyme, and beta-NAGase or ESM resulted in significant increases in extracellular concentrations of Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+. Transmission electron microscopic examination of Salmonella Typhimurium cells treated with a combination of ovotransferrin, lysozyme, and beta-NAGase revealed membrane disruption and cell lysis. The findings of this study demonstrate that ovotransferrin, lysozyme, and beta-NAGase are the primary components responsible for ESM antibacterial activity. The

  7. Extracellular biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using a novel and non-pathogenic fungus, Neurospora intermedia: controlled synthesis and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, Sepideh; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Shokrollahzadeh, Soheila; Hashemi-Najafabadi, Sameereh

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Neurospora intermedia, as a new non-pathogenic fungus was investigated. For determination of biomass harvesting time, the effect of fungal incubation period on nanoparticle formation was investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Then, AgNPs were synthesized using both culture supernatant and cell-free filtrate of the fungus. Two different volume ratios (1:100 and 1:1) of the culture supernatant to the silver nitrate were employed for AgNP synthesis. In addition, cell-free filtrate and silver nitrate were mixed in presence and absence of light. Smallest average size and highest productivity were obtained when using equal volumes of the culture supernatant and silver nitrate solution as confirmed by UV-visible spectra of colloidal AgNPs. Comparing the UV-visible spectra revealed that using cell-free filtrate for AgNP synthesis resulted in the formation of particles with higher stability and monodispersity than using culture supernatant. The absence of light in cell-free filtrate mediated synthesis led to the formation of nanoparticles with the lowest rate and the highest monodispersity. The presence of elemental silver in all prepared samples was confirmed using EDX, while the crystalline nature of synthesized particles was verified by XRD. FTIR results showed the presence of functional groups which reduce Ag(+) and stabilize AgNPs. The presence of nitrate reductase was confirmed in the cell-free filtrate of the fungus suggesting the potential role of this enzyme in AgNP synthesis. Synthesized particles showed significant antibacterial activity against E. coli as confirmed by examining the growth curve of bacterial cells exposed to AgNPs.

  8. Proteomic profiling of the outer membrane fraction of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Ehrlichia ruminantium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Moumène

    Full Text Available The outer membrane proteins (OMPs of Gram-negative bacteria play a crucial role in virulence and pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins represents an important goal for bacterial proteomics, because it aids in vaccine development. Here, we have developed such an approach for Ehrlichia ruminantium, the obligate intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater. A preliminary whole proteome analysis of elementary bodies, the extracellular infectious form of the bacterium, had been performed previously, but information is limited about OMPs in this organism and about their role in the protective immune response. Identification of OMPs is also essential for understanding Ehrlichia's OM architecture, and how the bacterium interacts with the host cell environment. First, we developed an OMP extraction method using the ionic detergent sarkosyl, which enriched the OM fraction. Second, proteins were separated via one-dimensional electrophoresis, and digested peptides were analyzed via nano-liquid chromatographic separation coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF. Of 46 unique proteins identified in the OM fraction, 18 (39% were OMPs, including 8 proteins involved in cell structure and biogenesis, 4 in transport/virulence, 1 porin, and 5 proteins of unknown function. These experimental data were compared to the predicted subcellular localization of the entire E. ruminantium proteome, using three different algorithms. This work represents the most complete proteome characterization of the OM fraction in Ehrlichia spp. The study indicates that suitable subcellular fractionation experiments combined with straightforward computational analysis approaches are powerful for determining the predominant subcellular localization of the experimentally observed proteins. We identified proteins potentially involved in E. ruminantium pathogenesis, which are good novel targets for candidate vaccines. Thus, combining bioinformatics and proteomics, we

  9. Proteomic Profiling of the Outer Membrane Fraction of the Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogen Ehrlichia ruminantium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumène, Amal; Marcelino, Isabel; Ventosa, Miguel; Gros, Olivier; Lefrançois, Thierry; Vachiéry, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria play a crucial role in virulence and pathogenesis. Identification of these proteins represents an important goal for bacterial proteomics, because it aids in vaccine development. Here, we have developed such an approach for Ehrlichia ruminantium, the obligate intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater. A preliminary whole proteome analysis of elementary bodies, the extracellular infectious form of the bacterium, had been performed previously, but information is limited about OMPs in this organism and about their role in the protective immune response. Identification of OMPs is also essential for understanding Ehrlichia’s OM architecture, and how the bacterium interacts with the host cell environment. First, we developed an OMP extraction method using the ionic detergent sarkosyl, which enriched the OM fraction. Second, proteins were separated via one-dimensional electrophoresis, and digested peptides were analyzed via nano-liquid chromatographic separation coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF). Of 46 unique proteins identified in the OM fraction, 18 (39%) were OMPs, including 8 proteins involved in cell structure and biogenesis, 4 in transport/virulence, 1 porin, and 5 proteins of unknown function. These experimental data were compared to the predicted subcellular localization of the entire E. ruminantium proteome, using three different algorithms. This work represents the most complete proteome characterization of the OM fraction in Ehrlichia spp. The study indicates that suitable subcellular fractionation experiments combined with straightforward computational analysis approaches are powerful for determining the predominant subcellular localization of the experimentally observed proteins. We identified proteins potentially involved in E. ruminantium pathogenesis, which are good novel targets for candidate vaccines. Thus, combining bioinformatics and proteomics, we discovered new OMPs

  10. Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H.

    2017-01-01

    for analyzing size and number of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected tissue culture cells. Cells are seeded in 48-well plates and infected with a GFP-expressing bacterial pathogen. Following gentamicin treatment to remove extracellular pathogens, cells are fixed and cell nuclei stained...... resistance, and the development of new therapeutics....

  11. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  12. Comparative Genomic and Phenotypic Characterization of Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Strains of Xanthomonas arboricola Reveals Insights into the Infection Process of Bacterial Spot Disease of Stone Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garita-Cambronero, Jerson; Palacio-Bielsa, Ana; López, María M; Cubero, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas arboricola pv. pruni is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease of stone fruits, a quarantinable pathogen in several areas worldwide, including the European Union. In order to develop efficient control methods for this disease, it is necessary to improve the understanding of the key determinants associated with host restriction, colonization and the development of pathogenesis. After an initial characterization, by multilocus sequence analysis, of 15 strains of X. arboricola isolated from Prunus, one strain did not group into the pathovar pruni or into other pathovars of this species and therefore it was identified and defined as a X. arboricola pv. pruni look-a-like. This non-pathogenic strain and two typical strains of X. arboricola pv. pruni were selected for a whole genome and phenotype comparative analysis in features associated with the pathogenesis process in Xanthomonas. Comparative analysis among these bacterial strains isolated from Prunus spp. and the inclusion of 15 publicly available genome sequences from other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of X. arboricola revealed variations in the phenotype associated with variations in the profiles of TonB-dependent transporters, sensors of the two-component regulatory system, methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins, components of the flagella and the type IV pilus, as well as in the repertoire of cell-wall degrading enzymes and the components of the type III secretion system and related effectors. These variations provide a global overview of those mechanisms that could be associated with the development of bacterial spot disease. Additionally, it pointed out some features that might influence the host specificity and the variable virulence observed in X. arboricola.

  13. Cyclophosphamide-induced bacterial translocation in Escherichia coli C25-monoassociated specific pathogen-free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, M; Itoh, K; Takahashi, E

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of bacterial translocation (BTL) from the intestine to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and the number of peripheral white blood cells (WBC), macrophages in Peyer's patches (PP) and M-cells on the surface of cecal PP after cyclophosphamide (CY) injection were examined in penicillin-G and streptomycin sulfate decontaminated and Escherichia coli C25-monoassociated specific pathogen-free mice. WBC are counted to confirm the immunological state of the mice. Until 8 days after CY injection, the number of WBC, bacteria in MLN and macrophages in PP decreased, but then significantly increased on day 14. The levels again decreased to the control levels on day 16. Although the number of M-cells decreased up to day 8, it did not return to the control level on day 16. These results indicate that BTL is stimulated in an immunopotentiated state after CY injection, and this phenomenon may be closely related to the number of macrophages in the blood and PP.

  14. Microfluidic system for the identification of bacterial pathogens causing urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Lind, Anders; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbi; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata; Goossens, Herman

    2015-03-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections and pose a significant healthcare burden. The growing trend in antibiotic resistance makes it mandatory to develop diagnostic kits which allow not only the determination of a pathogen but also the antibiotic resistances. We have developed a microfluidic cartridge which takes a direct urine sample, extracts the DNA, performs an amplification using batch-PCR and flows the sample over a microarray which is printed into a microchannel for fluorescence detection. The cartridge is injection-molded out of COP and contains a set of two-component injection-molded rotary valves to switch between input and to isolate the PCR chamber during thermocycling. The hybridization probes were spotted directly onto a functionalized section of the outlet microchannel. We have been able to successfully perform PCR of E.coli in urine in this chip and perform a fluorescence detection of PCR products. An upgraded design of the cartridge contains the buffers and reagents in blisters stored on the chip.

  15. Inhibition of Bacterial Pathogens in Medium and on Spinach Leaf Surfaces using Plant-Derived Antimicrobials Loaded in Surfactant Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruengvisesh, Songsirin; Loquercio, Andre; Castell-Perez, Elena; Taylor, T Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic plant essential oil components (EOC) into surfactant micelles can assist the decontamination of fresh produce surfaces from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Loading of eugenol and carvacrol into surfactant micelles of polysorbate 20 (Tween 20), Surfynol® 485W, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and CytoGuard® LA 20 (CG20) was determined by identification of the EOC/surfactant-specific maximum additive concentration (MAC). Rheological behavior of dilute EOC-containing micelles was then tested to determine micelle tolerance to shearing. Antimicrobial efficacy of EOC micelles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serotype Saintpaul was first evaluated by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Pathogen-inoculated spinach was treated with eugenol-containing micelles applied via spraying or immersion methods. SDS micelles produced the highest MACs for EOCs, while Tween 20 loaded the lowest amount of EOCs. Micelles demonstrated Newtonian behavior in response to shearing. SDS and CG20-derived micelles containing EOCs produced the lowest MICs and MBCs for pathogens. E. coli O157:H7 and S. Saintpaul were reduced on spinach surfaces by application of eugenol micelles, though no differences in numbers of surviving pathogens were observed when methods of antimicrobial micelle application (spraying, immersion) was compared (P ≥ 0.05). Data suggest eugenol in SDS and CG20 micelles may be useful for produce surface decontamination from bacterial pathogens during postharvest washing. Antimicrobial essential oil component (EOC)-containing micelles assist the delivery of natural food antimicrobials to food surfaces, including fresh produce, for decontamination of microbial foodborne pathogens. Antimicrobial EOC-loaded micelles were able to inhibit the enteric pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Saintpaul in liquid medium and on spinach surfaces. However

  16. Comparison of different washing treatments for reducing pathogens on orange surfaces and for preventing the transfer of bacterial pathogens to fresh-squeezed orange juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Martínez-Chávez, L; Martínez-Cárdenas, C; Castillo, A

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of various washing treatments for reducing Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella sp., and Listeria monocytogenes populations on orange surfaces and to measure the effect of some of these treatments in preventing the transfer of pathogens during juice extraction. Orange surfaces inoculated with L. monocytogenes or a mixture of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were washed by water spray and then sprayed with or dipped in water at 80°C for 1 min, 70% ethanol for 15, 30, or 45 s or 1, 2, or 4 min, 2 or 4% lactic acid solution at 55°C for 15, 30, or 45 s or 1, 2, or 4 min, or 200 mg/liter hypochlorite at pH 6.5 or 10 for 15 s. The surviving populations of these pathogens on the oranges were enumerated after each treatment. In a further stage, the ability of these pathogens to be transferred to the juice during extraction was tested. Juice was obtained from inoculated oranges that were subjected to selected treatments using chlorine, lactic acid, ethanol, and hot water as described above, and then bacterial counts in orange juice were determined. The application of these treatments reduced the populations of pathogens on orange surfaces by 1.9 to >4.9 log, 1.9 to >4.6 log, and 1.4 to 3.1 log cycles for E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. The treatments using hot water or lactic acid showed greater reductions than other treatments. The time, antimicrobial concentration, and form of application affected the bacterial reduction. All treatments resulted in undetectable counts in the juice. Nevertheless, pathogens were recovered by the enrichment-plating method. Treatment of oranges before juice extraction may reduce the risk associated with consuming orange juice.

  17. Development and application of a multiplex PCR assay for rapid detection of 4 major bacterial pathogens in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, B; Cha, S-Y; Kang, M; Park, I-J; Moon, O-K; Park, C-K; Jang, H-K

    2013-05-01

    Infections with Pasteurella multocida, Salmonella enterica, Riemerella anatipestifer, and Escherichia coli result in high morbidity and mortality, which cause significant economic loss in the poultry industry. It can be difficult to distinguish these pathogens based on clinical signs because these pathogens can cause similar clinical signs and coinfections can occur. Thus, rapid and sensitive detection of these 4 major bacterial pathogens are important in ducks. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) assay for simultaneously detecting and identifying these 4 pathogenic bacteria in a single tube reaction. The target genes used were KMT1 of P. multocida, the invasion protein gene of S. enterica, 16S rDNA of R. anatipestifer, and the alkaline phosphatase gene of E. coli. The detection limit of the assay for all bacterial DNA was 10 pg. The mPCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against other related pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Clostridium perfringens, Mycoplasma gallinarum, Mycoplasma synoviae, and Mycoplasma gallisepticum, which can also infect ducks. We applied mPCR to field samples, and the results were the same as the single PCR results. These results suggest that mPCR for the 4 bacteria is a useful and rapid technique to apply to field samples.

  18. Presence of pathogenic Escherichia coli is correlated with bacterial community diversity and composition on pre-harvest cattle hides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopyk, Jessica; Moore, Ryan M; DiSpirito, Zachary; Stromberg, Zachary R; Lewis, Gentry L; Renter, David G; Cernicchiaro, Natalia; Moxley, Rodney A; Wommack, K Eric

    2016-03-22

    Since 1982, specific serotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) have been recognized as significant foodborne pathogens acquired from contaminated beef and, more recently, other food products. Cattle are the major reservoir hosts of these organisms, and while there have been advancements in food safety practices and industry standards, STEC still remains prevalent within beef cattle operations with cattle hides implicated as major sources of carcass contamination. To investigate whether the composition of hide-specific microbial communities are associated with STEC prevalence, 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) bacterial community profiles were obtained from hide and fecal samples collected from a large commercial feedlot over a 3-month period. These community data were examined amidst an extensive collection of prevalence data on a subgroup of STEC that cause illness in humans, referred to as enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). Fecal 16S rRNA gene OTUs (operational taxonomic units) were subtracted from the OTUs found within each hide 16S rRNA amplicon library to identify hide-specific bacterial populations. Comparative analysis of alpha diversity revealed a significant correlation between low bacterial diversity and samples positive for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and/or the non-O157 groups: O26, O111, O103, O121, O45, and O145. This trend occurred regardless of diversity metric or fecal OTU presence. The number of EHEC serogroups present in the samples had a compounding effect on the inverse relationship between pathogen presence and bacterial diversity. Beta diversity data showed differences in bacterial community composition between samples containing O157 and non-O157 populations, with certain OTUs demonstrating significant changes in relative abundance. The cumulative prevalence of the targeted EHEC serogroups was correlated with low bacterial community diversity on pre-harvest cattle hides. Understanding the relationship between indigenous hide

  19. Nano-layered magnesium fluoride reservoirs on biomaterial surfaces strengthen polymorphonuclear leukocyte resistance to bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Geyong; Zhou, Huaijuan; Wang, Qiaojie; Wang, Jiaxing; Tan, Jiaqi; Li, Jinhua; Jin, Ping; Shen, Hao

    2017-01-05

    Biomaterial-related bacterial infections cause patient suffering, mortality and extended periods of hospitalization, imposing a substantial burden on medical systems. In this context, understanding of nanomaterials-bacteria-cells interactions is of both fundamental and clinical significance. Herein, nano-MgF2 films were deposited on titanium substrate via magnetron sputtering. Using this platform, the antibacterial behavior and mechanism of the nano-MgF2 films were investigated in vitro and in vivo. It was found that, for S. aureus (CA-MRSA, USA300) and S. epidermidis (RP62A), the nano-MgF2 films possessed excellent anti-biofilm activity, but poor anti-planktonic bacteria activity in vitro. Nevertheless, both the traditional SD rat osteomyelitis model and the novel stably luminescent mouse infection model demonstrated that nano-MgF2 films exerted superior anti-infection effect in vivo, which cannot be completely explained by the antibacterial activity of the nanomaterial itself. Further, using polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), the critical immune cells of innate immunity, a complementary investigation of MgF2-bacteria-PMNs co-culturing revealed that the nano-MgF2 films improved the antibacterial effect of PMNs through enhancing their phagocytosis and stability. To our knowledge, this is the first time of exploring the antimicrobial mechanism of nano-MgF2 from the perspective of innate immunity both in vitro and in vivo. Based on the research results, a plausible mechanism is put forward for the predominant antibacterial effect of nano-MgF2in vivo, which may originate from the indirect immune enhancement effect of nano-MgF2 films. In summary, this study of surface antibacterial design using MgF2 nanolayer is a meaningful attempt, which can promote the host innate immune response to bacterial pathogens. This may give us a new understanding towards the antibacterial behavior and mechanism of nano-MgF2 films and pave the way towards their clinical applications.

  20. Prevalence of MDR pathogens of bacterial meningitis in Egypt and new synergistic antibiotic combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Mona M; Aboshanab, Khaled M; El-Ashry, Marwa A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad M

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was identifying bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis, studying their antibiotic resistance profiles, investigating the antibiotic resistance genes as well as evaluating the use of various antibiotic combinations. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were evaluated according to CLSI guidelines. Antibiotic combinations were evaluated by calculating the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) index. A total of 71 bacterial isolates were recovered from 68 culture positive CSF specimens. Sixty five of these isolates (91.5%) were recovered from single infection specimens, while 6 isolates (8.4%) were recovered from mixed infection specimens. Out of the 71 recovered isolates, 48 (67.6%) were Gram-positive, and 23 (32.4%) were Gram-negative. Thirty one of the Gram positive isolates were S. pneumoniae (64.6%, n = 48). Out of the recovered 71 isolates; 26 (36.6%) were multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates of which, 18 (69.2%) were Gram-negative and 8 (30.8%) were Gram-positive. All MDR isolates (100%) showed resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, however, they showed lower resistance to meropenem (50%), levofloxacin (50%), amikacin (48%), pipercillin-tazobactam (45.8%). Most common antibiotic resistance genes were investigated including: tem (21.1%), shv (15.8%), ctx-m (15.8%) coding for TEM-, SHV, CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), respectively; aac(6')-I b(26.3%) coding for aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib ciprofloxacin resistant variant; and qnrA (5.3%) gene coding for quinolone resistance. The DNA sequences of the respective resistance genes of some selected isolates were PCR amplified, analyzed and submitted to the GenBank database under the accession numbers, KX214665, KX214664, KX214663, KX214662, respectively. The FIC values for ampicillin/sulbactam plus cefepime showed either additive or synergistic effect against ten tested Gram-negative MDR isolates, while doxycycline plus levofloxacin combination revealed

  1. Prevalence of MDR pathogens of bacterial meningitis in Egypt and new synergistic antibiotic combinations.

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    Mona M Abdelkader

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was identifying bacterial pathogens involved in meningitis, studying their antibiotic resistance profiles, investigating the antibiotic resistance genes as well as evaluating the use of various antibiotic combinations. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were evaluated according to CLSI guidelines. Antibiotic combinations were evaluated by calculating the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC index. A total of 71 bacterial isolates were recovered from 68 culture positive CSF specimens. Sixty five of these isolates (91.5% were recovered from single infection specimens, while 6 isolates (8.4% were recovered from mixed infection specimens. Out of the 71 recovered isolates, 48 (67.6% were Gram-positive, and 23 (32.4% were Gram-negative. Thirty one of the Gram positive isolates were S. pneumoniae (64.6%, n = 48. Out of the recovered 71 isolates; 26 (36.6% were multidrug-resistant (MDR isolates of which, 18 (69.2% were Gram-negative and 8 (30.8% were Gram-positive. All MDR isolates (100% showed resistance to penicillin and ampicillin, however, they showed lower resistance to meropenem (50%, levofloxacin (50%, amikacin (48%, pipercillin-tazobactam (45.8%. Most common antibiotic resistance genes were investigated including: tem (21.1%, shv (15.8%, ctx-m (15.8% coding for TEM-, SHV, CTX-M extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs, respectively; aac(6'-I b(26.3% coding for aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib ciprofloxacin resistant variant; and qnrA (5.3% gene coding for quinolone resistance. The DNA sequences of the respective resistance genes of some selected isolates were PCR amplified, analyzed and submitted to the GenBank database under the accession numbers, KX214665, KX214664, KX214663, KX214662, respectively. The FIC values for ampicillin/sulbactam plus cefepime showed either additive or synergistic effect against ten tested Gram-negative MDR isolates, while doxycycline plus levofloxacin combination revealed synergism

  2. Enteric bacterial pathogens in children with diarrhea in Niger: diversity and antimicrobial resistance.

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    Céline Langendorf

    Full Text Available Although rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea among children in sub-Saharan Africa, better knowledge of circulating enteric pathogenic bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance is crucial for prevention and treatment strategies.As a part of rotavirus gastroenteritis surveillance in Maradi, Niger, we performed stool culture on a sub-population of children under 5 with moderate-to-severe diarrhea between April 2010 and March 2012. Campylobacter, Shigella and Salmonella were sought with conventional culture and biochemical methods. Shigella and Salmonella were serotyped by slide agglutination. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC were screened by slide agglutination with EPEC O-typing antisera and confirmed by detection of virulence genes. Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion. We enrolled 4020 children, including 230 with bloody diarrhea. At least one pathogenic bacterium was found in 28.0% of children with watery diarrhea and 42.2% with bloody diarrhea. Mixed infections were found in 10.3% of children. EPEC, Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. were similarly frequent in children with watery diarrhea (11.1%, 9.2% and 11.4% respectively and Shigella spp. were the most frequent among children with bloody diarrhea (22.1%. The most frequent Shigella serogroup was S. flexneri (69/122, 56.5%. The most frequent Salmonella serotypes were Typhimurimum (71/355, 20.0%, Enteritidis (56/355, 15.8% and Corvallis (46/355, 13.0%. The majority of putative EPEC isolates was confirmed to be EPEC (90/111, 81.1%. More than half of all Enterobacteriaceae were resistant to amoxicillin and co-trimoxazole. Around 13% (46/360 Salmonella exhibited an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype.This study provides updated information on enteric bacteria diversity and antibiotic resistance in the Sahel region, where such data are scarce. Whether they are or not the causative agent of diarrhea, bacterial infections and their antibiotic

  3. Root-associated bacterial endophytes from Ralstonia solanacearum resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars and their pathogen antagonistic effects

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    Reshmi eUpreti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to assess if the root-associated native bacterial endophytes in tomato have any bearing in governing the host resistance to the wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Internal colonization of roots by bacterial endophytes was confirmed through confocal imaging after SYTO-9 staining. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized roots of 4-week old seedlings of known wilt resistant (R tomato cultivar Arka Abha and susceptible (S cv. Arka Vikas on nutrient agar after plating the tissue homogenate. Arka Abha displayed more diversity with nine distinct organisms while Arka Vikas showed five species with two common organisms (Pseudomonas oleovorans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Screening for general indicators of biocontrol potential showed more isolates from Arka Abha positive for siderophore, HCN and antibiotic biosynthesis than from Arka Vikas. Direct challenge against the pathogen indicated strong antagonism by three Arka Abha isolates (P. oleovorans, Pantoea ananatis and Enterobacter cloacae and moderate activity by three others, while just one isolate from Arka Vikas (P. oleovorans showed strong antagonism. Validation for the presence of bacterial endophytes on three R cultivars (Arka Alok, Arka Ananya, Arka Samrat showed 8-9 antagonistic bacteria in them in comparison with four species in the three S cultivars (Arka Ashish, Arka Meghali, Arka Saurabhav. Altogether 34 isolates belonging to five classes, 16 genera and 27 species with 23 of them exhibiting pathogen antagonism were isolated from the four R cultivars against 17 isolates under three classes, seven genera and 13 species from the four S cultivars with eight isolates displaying antagonistic effects. The prevalence of higher endophytic bacterial diversity and more antagonistic organisms associated with the seedling roots of resistant cultivars over susceptible genotypes suggest a possible role by the root-associated endophytes in natural defense against the

  4. [Evaluation of Seeplex Pneumobacter multiplex PCR kit for the detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joowon; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Rheem, Insoo; Kim, Jongwan

    2009-08-01

    Rapid identification of the causative agent among potential bacterial and viral pathogens is important for the management of acute respiratory disease. In this study, we evaluated the analytical performance and clinical usefulness of a recently-introduced multiplex PCR assay, Seeplex Pneumobacter detection kit (Seegene Inc., Korea) for the identification of respiratory bacterial pathogens. One hundred and eighty one nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from pediatric patients with respiratory symptoms and analysed by multiplex PCR for the detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae (S.P), Haemophilus influenzae (H.I), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M.P), Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C.P), Bordetella pertussis (B.P) and Legionella pneumophila (L.P). A comparison of multiplex PCR with conventional culture for the isolation of S.P and H.I was performed on 112 specimens. The cross reactivity of multiplex PCR was also evaluated. Of 181 cases, 81 cases were positive by multiplex PCR (44.8%): 52 cases for S.P (28.7%), 47 cases for H.I (26.0%), 9 cases for M.P (5.0%), 3 cases for B.P (1.7%) and 1 case for C.P (0.6%) including multiple infection cases. The agreement rates between multiplex PCR and culture for S.P and H.I were 92.9% (kappa index=0.84, P<0.001) and 91.1% (kappa index=0.75, P<0.001), respectively. There was no cross reactivity with common bacterial and viral pathogens. Seeplex Pneumobacter detection kit could be a useful screening tool for the rapid detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens. Further studies with lower respiratory tract specimens would be needed for the clinical evaluation of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae detected by multiplex PCR.

  5. Interaction of erythromycin ethylsuccinate and acetaminophen with protein fraction of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from various bacterial aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, Romain; Bourven, Isabelle; Labanowski, Jérome; Guibaud, Gilles

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are, along with microbial cells, the main components of the biological sludges used in wastewater treatment and natural biofilms. EPS play a major role in removing pollutants from water by means of sorption. The ability of soluble EPS (S-EPS) and bound EPS (B-EPS) derived from various bacterial aggregates (flocs, granules, biofilms) to bind at pH 7.0 ± 0.1 to two pharmaceutical substances, acetaminophen (ACE) and erythromycin ethylsuccinate (ERY), has been investigated using the fluorescence quenching method. Two intense fluorescence peaks, A (Ex/Em range, 200-250/275-380 nm) and B (Ex/Em range, 260-320/275-360 nm), corresponding respectively to the aromatic protein region and soluble microbial by-product-like region, were identified in a three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix of EPS samples. The fluorescence peak, which corresponds to humic-like substances, was also identified though at low intensity. The ability of EPS to bind ACE was found to exceed that for ERY. The aromatic protein fraction of EPS displays a slightly higher affinity for drugs than that shown by the soluble microbial by-product-like fraction. The S-EPS and B-EPS present the same affinity for ACE and ERY. The effective quenching constants (log K) derived from the Stern-Volmer Equation equaled at peak A (with S-EPS): 3.7 ± 0.2 to 4.0 ± 0.1 for ACE and 2.1 ± 0.3 to 2.7 ± 0.1 for ERY. With B-EPS, these values were 3.9 ± 0.1 to 4.0 ± 0.1 for ACE and 2.0 ± 0.2 to 2.6 ± 0.1 for ERY. Our results suggest that the weaker EPS affinity for ERY than for ACE serves to partially explain why only about 50-80 % of ERY is removed from wastewater at the treatment plant. Moreover, this work demonstrates that EPS from natural river biofilms are able to bind drugs, which in turn may limit the mobility of drugs in natural waters.

  6. Prophage-mediated dynamics of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' populations, the destructive bacterial pathogens of citrus huanglongbing.

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    Lijuan Zhou

    Full Text Available Prophages are highly dynamic components in the bacterial genome and play an important role in intraspecies variations. There are at least two prophages in the chromosomes of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las Floridian isolates. Las is both unculturable and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB, a worldwide destructive disease of citrus. In this study, seven new prophage variants resulting from two hyper-variable regions were identified by screening clone libraries of infected citrus, periwinkle and psyllids. Among them, Types A and B share highly conserved sequences and localize within the two prophages, FP1 and FP2, respectively. Although Types B and C were abundant in all three libraries, Type A was much more abundant in the libraries from the Las-infected psyllids than from the Las-infected plants, and Type D was only identified in libraries from the infected host plants but not from the infected psyllids. Sequence analysis of these variants revealed that the variations may result from recombination and rearrangement events. Conventional PCR results using type-specific molecular markers indicated that A, B, C and D are the four most abundant types in Las-infected citrus and periwinkle. However, only three types, A, B and C are abundant in Las-infected psyllids. Typing results for Las-infected citrus field samples indicated that mixed populations of Las bacteria present in Floridian isolates, but only the Type D population was correlated with the blotchy mottle symptom. Extended cloning and sequencing of the Type D region revealed a third prophage/phage in the Las genome, which may derive from the recombination of FP1 and FP2. Dramatic variations in these prophage regions were also found among the global Las isolates. These results are the first to demonstrate the prophage/phage-mediated dynamics of Las populations in plant and insect hosts, and their correlation with insect transmission and

  7. Comparing wastewater chemicals, indicator bacteria concentrations, and bacterial pathogen genes as fecal pollution indicators

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    Haack, S.K.; Duris, J.W.; Fogarty, L.R.; Kolpin, D.W.; Focazio, M.J.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) (fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli [EC], and enterococci [ENT]) concentrations with a wide array of typical organic wastewater chemicals and selected bacterial genes as indicators of fecal pollution in water samples collected at or near 18 surface water drinking water intakes. Genes tested included esp (indicating human-pathogenic ENT) and nine genes associated with various animal sources of shiga-toxin-producing EC (STEC). Fecal pollution was indicated by genes and/or chemicals for 14 of the 18 tested samples, with little relation to FIB standards. Of 13 samples with <50 EC 100 mL-1, human pharmaceuticals or chemical indicators of wastewater treatment plant effluent occurred in six, veterinary antibiotics were detected in three, and stx1 or stx2 genes (indicating varying animal sources of STEC) were detected in eight. Only the EC eaeA gene was positively correlated with FIB concentrations. Human-source fecal pollution was indicated by the esp gene and the human pharmaceutical carbamazepine in one of the nine samples that met all FIB recreational water quality standards. Escherichia coli rfbO157 and stx2c genes, which are typically associated with cattle sources and are of potential human health significance, were detected in one sample in the absence of tested chemicals. Chemical and gene-based indicators of fecal contamination may be present even when FIB standards are met, and some may, unlike FIB, indicate potential sources. Application of multiple water quality indicators with variable environmental persistence and fate may yield greater confidence in fecal pollution assessment and may inform remediation decisions. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  8. Endophytic Streptomyces spp. as Biocontrol Agents of Rice Bacterial Leaf Blight Pathogen (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

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    RATIH DEWI HASTUTI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, a causal agent of bacterial leaf blight (BLB, is one of the most important pathogens of rice. The effectiveness of ten Streptomyces spp. isolates in suppressing Xoo disease was assessed in planta and in vitro. In planta experiments were carried out in a greenhouse and arranged in a randomized completely block design (RCBD with three replications. Twenty treatments were tested which included plants inoculated with both Streptomyces spp. and Xoo, and plants inoculated with only Streptomyces spp. Plants inoculated with Xoo and sprayed with a chemical bactericide, and plants inoculated with only Xoo served as positive controls, whereas plants not inoculated with either Streptomyces spp. or Xoo were used as negative controls. The results showed that the effect of endophytic Streptomyces spp. on BLB disease expressed as area under disease progress curve (AUDPC was not significantly different to that on control plants (P > 0.05. However, plants inoculated with endophytic Streptomyces spp. were significantly taller and produced higher tiller number than control plants (P < 0.05. Streptomyces spp. isolate AB131-1 gave the highest plant height. In vitro studies on biocontrol mechanisms of selected Streptomyces spp. isolates showed that isolate LBR02 gave the highest inhibition activity on Xoo growth, followed by AB131-1 and AB131-2. Two isolates (AB131-1 and LBR02 were able to produce chitinase, phosphatase, and siderophore which included biocontrol characteristics. Morphological and colonization studies under SEM and light microscopy confirmed that the three isolates were endophytic Streptomyces spp. from different species. These studies found that the paddy plant which was inoculated with endophytic Streptomyces spp. AB131-1 and infected by Xoo could increase the height of plant and number of tillers.

  9. High Frequency of Enteric Protozoan, Viral, and Bacterial Potential Pathogens in Community-Acquired Acute Diarrheal Episodes: Evidence Based on Results of Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Hawash, Yousry A.; Ismail, Khadiga A.; Almehmadi, Mazen

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diarrhea is endemic in most developing countries. We aimed to investigate the protozoan, viral, and bacterial causes of acute diarrhea in Taif, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional prospective 1-year study was conducted on 163 diarrheal patients of various ages. Stool samples were collected, 1 per patient, and tested for 3 protozoa, 3 viruses, and 9 bacteria with the Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel. Overall, 53.4% (87/163) of samples were positives (20.8% protozoa, 19.6% viruses...

  10. In vitro antibacterial activity of venom protein isolated from sea snake Enhydrina schistosa against drugresistant human pathogenic bacterial strains

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    Palani Damotharan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial activity of sea snake (Enhydrina schistosa venom protein against drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains. Methods: The venom was collected by milking process from the live specimens of sea snake are using capillary tubes or glass plates. Venom was purified by ion exchange chromatography and it was tested for in-vitro antibacterial activity against 10 drug-resistant human pathogenic bacterial strains using the standard disc diffusion method. Results: The notable antibacterial activity was observed at 150 µg/mL concentration of purified venom and gave its minimum inhibitory concentrations values exhibited between 200-100 µg/mL against all the tested bacterial strains. The maximum zone of inhibition was observed at 16.4 mm against Salmonella boydii and the minimum activity was observed at 7.5 mm against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After the sodium-dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis there were a clear single band was detected in the gel that corresponding to purified venom protein molecular weight of 44 kDa. Conclusions: These results suggested that the sea snake venom might be a feasible source for searching potential antibiotics agents against human pathogenic diseases.

  11. Relationship between food safety and critical violations on restaurant inspections: an empirical investigation of bacterial pathogen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Valerie A; Menachemi, Nir; Braden, Bruce; Taylor, Devon M; Manzella, Bryn; Ouimet, Claude

    2013-01-01

    While various safety control measures exist within the U.S. food system, foodborne illness remains a costly and persistent problem. The purpose of the study described here was to examine the relationship between violations of critical restaurant inspection items ("critical items") and food safety as measured by the bacterial load of illness-causing pathogens. Specifically, the authors' study looked at bacterial pathogens present in foods of two groups of restaurants, those that consistently scored poorly on critical items as compared to restaurants that performed superiorly in the same types of evaluation in Jefferson County, Alabama. Laboratory analyses indicated that 35.7% of the foods tested had detectable levels of Staphylococcus aureus, but no difference occurred between the two groups of restaurants. No other bacterial pathogens were found in any of the tested samples. A total of 45.2% of the food samples were received outside of recommended temperatures. Findings draw attention to the ongoing need to improve temperature control and hygienic practices, specifically handwashing practices, in restaurants.

  12. Identification of Rare Bacterial Pathogens by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing and MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröttner, Percy; Gunzer, Florian; Schüppel, Jana; Rudolph, Wolfram W

    2016-07-11

    There are a number of rare and, therefore, insufficiently described bacterial pathogens which are reported to cause severe infections especially in immunocompromised patients. In most cases only few data, mostly published as case reports, are available which investigate the role of such pathogens as an infectious agent. Therefore, in order to clarify the pathogenic character of such microorganisms, it is necessary to conduct epidemiologic studies which include large numbers of these bacteria. The methods used in such a surveillance study have to meet the following criteria: the identification of the strains has to be accurate according to the valid nomenclature, they should be easy to handle (robustness), economical in routine diagnostics and they have to generate comparable results among different laboratories. Generally, there are three strategies for identifying bacterial strains in a routine setting: 1) phenotypic identification characterizing the biochemical and metabolic properties of the bacteria, 2) molecular techniques such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing and 3) mass spectrometry as a novel proteome based approach. Since mass spectrometry and molecular approaches are the most promising tools for identifying a large variety of bacterial species, these two methods are described. Advances, limitations and potential problems when using these techniques are discussed.

  13. Effects of climate variability on bacterial pathogen decay in spinach bed macrocosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: It is estimated that 47.8 million people contract foodborne pathogens each year. Understanding the risk of foodborne pathogens and their ability to survive on or near food crops is of great concern. Current pathogen decay rates are limited due to environmental variability. With a cha...

  14. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John A.; Kremer, Philip H. C.; Manso, Ana S.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R.; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood–brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness. PMID:28348877

  15. Large scale genomic analysis shows no evidence for pathogen adaptation between the blood and cerebrospinal fluid niches during bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, John A; Kremer, Philip H C; Manso, Ana S; Croucher, Nicholas J; Ferwerda, Bart; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Oggioni, Marco R; Parkhill, Julian; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik; Bentley, Stephen D

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for rapid pathogen genome diversification, some of which could potentially affect the course of disease. We have previously described such variation seen between isolates infecting the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a single patient during a case of bacterial meningitis. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing of paired isolates from the blood and CSF of 869 meningitis patients to determine whether such variation frequently occurs between these two niches in cases of bacterial meningitis. Using a combination of reference-free variant calling approaches, we show that no genetic adaptation occurs in either invaded niche during bacterial meningitis for two major pathogen species, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. This study therefore shows that the bacteria capable of causing meningitis are already able to do this upon entering the blood, and no further sequence change is necessary to cross the blood-brain barrier. Our findings place the focus back on bacterial evolution between nasopharyngeal carriage and invasion, or diversity of the host, as likely mechanisms for determining invasiveness.

  16. Galleria mellonella as an in vivo model for assessing the protective activity of probiotics against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfaro, Concetta; Iacobino, Angelo; Nardis, Chiara; Franciosa, Giovanna

    2017-04-01

    The antagonistic activity against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens is an important property of probiotic bacteria and a desirable feature for pre-selection of novel strains with probiotic potential. Pre-screening of candidate probiotics for antibacterial activity should be based on in vitro and in vivo tests. This study investigated whether the protective activity of probiotic bacteria against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens can be evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae as an in vivo model. Larvae were pre-inoculated with either of two widely used probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or Clostridium butyricum Miyairi 588, and then challenged with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli or Listeria monocytogenes. Survival rates increased in the probiotic pretreated larvae compared with control larvae inoculated with pathogens only. The hemocyte density increased as well in the probiotic pretreated larvae, indicating that both probiotics induce an immune response in the larvae. The antibacterial activity of probiotics against the pathogens was also assayed by an in vitro agar spot test: results were partially consistent with those obtained by the G. mellonella protection assay. The results obtained, as a whole, suggest that G. mellonella larvae are a potentially useful in vivo model that can complement in vitro assays for pre-screening of candidate probiotics. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Antibacterial efficacy of the seed extracts of Melia azedarach against some hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Viqar; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Mir, M Ramzan; Shukla, Indu; Khan, Athar Ali

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the antibacterial potential of the polar and non-polar extracts of the seeds of Melia azedarach (M. azedarach) L. (Meliaceae) against eighteen hospital isolated human pathogenic bacterial strains. Petrol, benzene, ethyl acetate, methanol, and aqueous extracts at five different concentrations (1, 2, 5, 10 and 15 mg/mL) were evaluated. Disk diffusion method was followed to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy. All extracts of the seeds demonstrated significant antibacterial activity against tested pathogens. Among all extracts, ethyl acetate extract revealed the highest inhibition comparatively. The present study also favored the traditional uses reported earlier. Results of this study strongly confirm that the seed extracts of M. azedarach could be effective antibiotics, both in controlling gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogenic infections.

  18. Antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens in Central Africa: a review of the published literature between 1955 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieghe, E; Phoba, M F; Tamfun, J J Muyembe; Jacobs, J

    2009-10-01

    A systematic review of the published literature on bacterial resistance in Central Africa between 1955 and 2008 was performed. Eighty-three publications from seven countries were retrieved, the majority presenting data on enteric and other gram-negative pathogens. Despite methodological limitations in many studies, alarming resistance rates are noted in nearly all pathogens. Of special concern are multidrug resistance in Shigella and Salmonella spp. and the emergence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, high-level penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among gram-negative pathogens. These findings make clear that the Central African region shares the worldwide trend of increasing antimicrobial resistance and is in urgent need of sound surveillance based on competent and affordable microbiology to provide clear data on antimicrobial resistance. These data could enable redaction of local treatment guidelines and fuel national and regional policies to contain antimicrobial resistance.

  19. Influence of phenolic compounds of Kangra tea [Camellia sinensis (L) O Kuntze] on bacterial pathogens and indigenous bacterial probiotics of Western Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourabh, Aditi; Kanwar, S S; Sud, R G; Ghabru, Arti; Sharma, O P

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds of nutraceutical importance viz., catechins (C), (-)-epicatechin (EC), (-)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) were estimated in fresh green tea shoots of Camellia sinensis (L) O Kuntze cultivar. The total polyphenols and total catechins were in the range of 219.90 to 317.81 and 140.83 to 271.39 g/kg, respectively in monthly samples of tea. The values of C, EC, EGC, EGCG and ECG in tea powders as analyzed through high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were in the range of 1.560 to 3.661, 13.338 to 27.766, 26.515 to 39.597, 62.903 to 102.168 and 18.969 to 39.469 mg/g, respectively. Effect of tea extracts and standard flavanols against five pathogenic bacteria viz., Listeria monocytogenes (MTCC-839), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC-741), Bacillus cereus (MTCC-1272), Staphylococcus aureus (MTCC-96) and Escherichia coli (MTCC-443), and eleven indigenous potential bacterial probiotics belonging to genera Enterococcus, Bacillus and Lactobacillus spp. obtained from fermented foods of Western Himalayas, was investigated. EGCG, ECG and EGC exhibited antibacterial activity but, C and EC did not show this activity. Tea extracts having high concentrations of EGCG and ECG were more potent in antibacterial action against bacterial pathogens. Tea extracts and standard flavan-3-ols augmented viability of potential probiotics in an order of EGCG > EGC > ECG > EC > C. Tea extracts and standard flavanols had no antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (MTCC-443) but, in combination with probiotic culture supernatants, this activity was seen. The Kangra tea thus, exerts antibacterial effect on bacterial pathogens through EGCG, ECG and EGC constituents while stimulatory effect on growth of indigenous potential probiotics.

  20. Profiling the extended phenotype of plant pathogens: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Gail M

    2017-04-01

    One of the most fundamental questions in plant pathology is what determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? This question is frequently studied in terms of the role of elicitors and pathogenicity factors in the triggering or overcoming of host defences. However, this focus fails to address the basic question of how the environment in host tissues acts to support or restrict pathogen growth. Efforts to understand this aspect of host-pathogen interactions are commonly confounded by several issues, including the complexity of the plant environment, the artificial nature of many experimental infection systems and the fact that the physiological properties of a pathogen growing in association with a plant can be very different from the properties of the pathogen in culture. It is also important to recognize that the phenotype and evolution of pathogen and host are inextricably linked through their interactions, such that the environment experienced by a pathogen within a host, and its phenotype within the host, is a product of both its interaction with its host and its evolutionary history, including its co-evolution with host plants. As the phenotypic properties of a pathogen within a host cannot be defined in isolation from the host, it may be appropriate to think of pathogens as having an 'extended phenotype' that is the product of their genotype, host interactions and population structure within the host environment. This article reflects on the challenge of defining and studying this extended phenotype, in relation to the questions posed below, and considers how knowledge of the phenotype of pathogens in the host environment could be used to improve disease control. What determines whether a pathogen grows within a plant? What aspects of pathogen biology should be considered in describing the extended phenotype of a pathogen within a host? How can we study the extended phenotype in ways that provide insights into the phenotypic properties of pathogens

  1. Induced release of a plant-defense volatile 'deceptively' attracts insect vectors to plants infected with a bacterial pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder S Mann

    Full Text Available Transmission of plant pathogens by insect vectors is a complex biological process involving interactions between the plant, insect, and pathogen. Pathogen-induced plant responses can include changes in volatile and nonvolatile secondary metabolites as well as major plant nutrients. Experiments were conducted to understand how a plant pathogenic bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las, affects host preference behavior of its psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama vector. D. citri were attracted to volatiles from pathogen-infected plants more than to those from non-infected counterparts. Las-infected plants were more attractive to D. citri adults than non-infected plants initially; however after feeding, psyllids subsequently dispersed to non-infected rather than infected plants as their preferred settling point. Experiments with Las-infected and non-infected plants under complete darkness yielded similar results to those recorded under light. The behavior of psyllids in response to infected versus non-infected plants was not influenced by whether or not they were carriers of the pathogen. Quantification of volatile release from non-infected and infected plants supported the hypothesis that odorants mediate psyllid preference. Significantly more methyl salicylate, yet less methyl anthranilate and D-limonene, was released by infected than non-infected plants. Methyl salicylate was attractive to psyllids, while methyl anthranilate did not affect their behavior. Feeding on citrus by D. citri adults also induced release of methyl salicylate, suggesting that it may be a cue revealing location of conspecifics on host plants. Infected plants were characterized by lower levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, zinc, and iron, as well as, higher levels of potassium and boron than non-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that host selection behavior of D. citri may be modified by bacterial infection of plants, which alters release of

  2. The Small GTPase MoSec4 Is Involved in Vegetative Development and Pathogenicity by Regulating the Extracellular Protein Secretion in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huakun Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Rab GTPase proteins play important roles in the membrane trafficking, and consequently protein secretion and development of eukaryotic organisms. However, little is known about the function of Rab GTPases in Magnaporthe oryzae. To further explore the function of Rab GTPases, we deleted the ortholog of the yeast Sec4p protein in M. oryzae, namely MoSEC4. The Mosec4 mutant is defective in polarized growth and conidiation, and it displays decreased appressorium turgor pressure and attenuated pathogenicity. Notably, the biotrophic invasive hyphae produced in rice cells are more bulbous and compressed in the Mosec4 mutant. Further studies showed that deletion of the MoSEC4 gene resulted in decreased secretion of extracellular enzymes and mislocalization of the cytoplasmic effector PWL2-mCherry-NLS. In accordance with its role in secretion, the GFP-MoSec4 fusion protein mainly accumulates at tips of growing vegetative hyphae. Our results suggest that the MoSec4 protein plays important roles in the secretion of extracellular proteins and consequently hyphal development and pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus.

  3. Frontiers for research on the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria: fundamentals for sustainability: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Barny, Marie-Anne; Berge, Odile; Kinkel, Linda L; Lacroix, Christelle

    2017-02-01

    Methods to ensure the health of crops owe their efficacy to the extent to which we understand the ecology and biology of environmental microorganisms and the conditions under which their interactions with plants lead to losses in crop quality or yield. However, in the pursuit of this knowledge, notions of the ecology of plant-pathogenic microorganisms have been reduced to a plant-centric and agro-centric focus. With increasing global change, i.e. changes that encompass not only climate, but also biodiversity, the geographical distribution of biomes, human demographic and socio-economic adaptations and land use, new plant health problems will emerge via a range of processes influenced by these changes. Hence, knowledge of the ecology of plant pathogens will play an increasingly important role in the anticipation and response to disease emergence. Here, we present our opinion on the major challenges facing the study of the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria. We argue that the discovery of markedly novel insights into the ecology of plant-pathogenic bacteria is most likely to happen within a framework of more extensive scales of space, time and biotic interactions than those that currently guide much of the research on these bacteria. This will set a context that is more propitious for the discovery of unsuspected drivers of the survival and diversification of plant-pathogenic bacteria and of the factors most critical for disease emergence, and will set the foundation for new approaches to the sustainable management of plant health. We describe the contextual background of, justification for and specific research questions with regard to the following challenges: Development of terminology to describe plant-bacterial relationships in terms of bacterial fitness. Definition of the full scope of the environments in which plant-pathogenic bacteria reside or survive. Delineation of pertinent phylogenetic contours of plant-pathogenic bacteria and naming of strains

  4. Role of the moth fly Clogmia albipunctata (Diptera: Psychodinae) as a mechanical vector of bacterial pathogens in German hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulde, M; Spiesberger, M

    2013-01-01

    The formerly Mediterranean moth fly species Clogmia albipunctata (Diptera: Psychodidae) is now present in Germany, where it has become a common, year-round pest in hospital buildings. To investigate the potential of C. albipunctata to transport and transmit bacterial pathogens in infested German hospitals. From June 2011 to May 2012, 271 adult C. albipunctata were collected from four infested hospitals and analysed qualitatively and, in part, quantitatively, for bacterial colonization. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed for selected nosocomial pathogens. Forty-five bacterial species representing 40 genera were found to be colonizing C. albipunctata. Among the bacteria isolated were Acinetobacter baumannii, Aeromonas hydrophila, Alcaligenes faecalis, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae ssp. pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, with colonization rates of 0-17.5%, 0-16.7%, 0-12.5%, 0-62.1%, 0-2.5%, 0-4.1%, 0-12.5%, 0-7.6% and 0-10%, respectively. Additionally, one strain of both Yersinia frederiksenii and Nocardia spp. was detected. Unlike 11 strains of multi-drug-resistant (MDR) S. maltophilia collected from one hospital, no MDR Enterobacteriaceae were isolated. Acinetobacter spp. colonized C. albipunctata at rates from 2.9% to 36.8%, and revealed a high affinity for the exoskeleton, with up to 2080 colony-forming units per moth fly for A. baumannii. C. albipunctata is a potential mechanical vector of bacterial pathogens associated with nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Antibiotic Exposure and Specimen Volume on the Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Children With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Amanda J; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Howie, Stephen R C; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; DeLuca, Andrea N; Ebruke, Bernard E; Gitahi, Caroline; Higdon, Melissa M; Kaewpan, Anek; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A; Mazumder, Razib; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Rhodes, Julia; Saifullah, Md; Seidenberg, Phil; Sow, Samba O; Tamboura, Boubou; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R

    2017-06-15

    Antibiotic exposure and specimen volume are known to affect pathogen detection by culture. Here we assess their effects on bacterial pathogen detection by both culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children. PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health) is a case-control study of pneumonia in children aged 1-59 months investigating pathogens in blood, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs, and induced sputum by culture and PCR. Antibiotic exposure was ascertained by serum bioassay, and for cases, by a record of antibiotic treatment prior to specimen collection. Inoculated blood culture bottles were weighed to estimate volume. Antibiotic exposure ranged by specimen type from 43.5% to 81.7% in 4223 cases and was detected in 2.3% of 4863 controls. Antibiotics were associated with a 45% reduction in blood culture yield and approximately 20% reduction in yield from induced sputum culture. Reduction in yield of Streptococcus pneumoniae from NP culture was approximately 30% in cases and approximately 32% in controls. Several bacteria had significant but marginal reductions (by 5%-7%) in detection by PCR in NP/OP swabs from both cases and controls, with the exception of S. pneumoniae in exposed controls, which was detected 25% less frequently compared to nonexposed controls. Bacterial detection in induced sputum by PCR decreased 7% for exposed compared to nonexposed cases. For every additional 1 mL of blood culture specimen collected, microbial yield increased 0.51% (95% confidence interval, 0.47%-0.54%), from 2% when volume was ≤1 mL to approximately 6% for ≥3 mL. Antibiotic exposure and blood culture volume affect detection of bacterial pathogens in children with pneumonia and should be accounted for in studies of etiology and in clinical management.

  6. The Effect of Antibiotic Exposure and Specimen Volume on the Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Children With Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Orin S.; Madhi, Shabir A.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Thea, Donald M.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Adrian, Peter V.; Ahmed, Dilruba; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Gitahi, Caroline; Higdon, Melissa M.; Kaewpan, Anek; Karani, Angela; Karron, Ruth A.; Mazumder, Razib; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P.; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Park, Daniel E.; Prosperi, Christine; Rhodes, Julia; Saifullah, Md.; Seidenberg, Phil; Sow, Samba O.; Tamboura, Boubou; Zeger, Scott L.; Murdoch, David R.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Levine, Orin S.; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Fancourt, Nicholas; Fu, Wei; Hammitt, Laura L.; Higdon, Melissa M.; Kagucia, E. Wangeci; Karron, Ruth A.; Li, Mengying; Park, Daniel E.; Prosperi, Christine; Wu, Zhenke; Zeger, Scott L.; Watson, Nora L.; Crawley, Jane; Murdoch, David R.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Endtz, Hubert P.; Zaman, Khalequ; Goswami, Doli; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Ashraf, Hasan; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ebruke, Bernard E.; Antonio, Martin; McLellan, Jessica; Machuka, Eunice; Shamsul, Arifin; Zaman, Syed M. A.; Mackenzie, Grant; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Awori, Juliet O.; Morpeth, Susan C.; Kamau, Alice; Kazungu, Sidi; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Kotloff, Karen L.; Tapia, Milagritos D.; Sow, Samba O.; Sylla, Mamadou; Tamboura, Boubou; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Kourouma, Nana; Toure, Aliou; Madhi, Shabir A.; Moore, David P.; Adrian, Peter V.; Baillie, Vicky L.; Kuwanda, Locadiah; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Groome, Michelle J.; Mahomed, Nasreen; Baggett, Henry C.; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Maloney, Susan A.; Bunthi, Charatdao; Rhodes, Julia; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Thea, Donald M.; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Chipeta, James; Seidenberg, Phil; Mwansa, James; wa Somwe, Somwe; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Anderson, Trevor P.; Mitchell, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Antibiotic exposure and specimen volume are known to affect pathogen detection by culture. Here we assess their effects on bacterial pathogen detection by both culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in children. Methods. PERCH (Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health) is a case-control study of pneumonia in children aged 1–59 months investigating pathogens in blood, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) swabs, and induced sputum by culture and PCR. Antibiotic exposure was ascertained by serum bioassay, and for cases, by a record of antibiotic treatment prior to specimen collection. Inoculated blood culture bottles were weighed to estimate volume. Results. Antibiotic exposure ranged by specimen type from 43.5% to 81.7% in 4223 cases and was detected in 2.3% of 4863 controls. Antibiotics were associated with a 45% reduction in blood culture yield and approximately 20% reduction in yield from induced sputum culture. Reduction in yield of Streptococcus pneumoniae from NP culture was approximately 30% in cases and approximately 32% in controls. Several bacteria had significant but marginal reductions (by 5%–7%) in detection by PCR in NP/OP swabs from both cases and controls, with the exception of S. pneumoniae in exposed controls, which was detected 25% less frequently compared to nonexposed controls. Bacterial detection in induced sputum by PCR decreased 7% for exposed compared to nonexposed cases. For every additional 1 mL of blood culture specimen collected, microbial yield increased 0.51% (95% confidence interval, 0.47%–0.54%), from 2% when volume was ≤1 mL to approximately 6% for ≥3 mL. Conclusions. Antibiotic exposure and blood culture volume affect detection of bacterial pathogens in children with pneumonia and should be accounted for in studies of etiology and in clinical management. PMID:28575366

  7. Sugar beet-associated bacterial and fungal communities show a high indigenous antagonistic potential against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachow, Christin; Tilcher, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze microbial communities in/on sugar beet with special focus on antagonists toward plant pathogens. For this purpose, the composition of microorganisms isolated from the rhizosphere, phyllosphere, endorhiza, and endosphere of field-grown sugar beet plants was analyzed by a multiphasic approach at three different plant development stages at six locations in Europe. The analysis of microbial communities by Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) of 16S/18S rRNA clearly revealed the existence of discrete microenvironment- and site-specific patterns. A total of 1952 bacterial and 1344 fungal isolates screened by dual testing for antagonism toward the pathogens Aphanomyces cochlioides, Phoma betae, Pythium ultimum, and Rhizoctonia solani resulted in 885 bacterial (=45%) and 437 fungal (=33%) antagonists. In general, the indigenous antagonistic potential was very high and influenced by (a) the location, (b) the plant developmental stage, and (3) the microenvironment. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that the antagonistic potential was highly specific for each target pathogen. The majority of antagonistic microorganisms suppressed only one pathogen (bacteria: 664 = 75%; fungi: 256 = 59%), whereas the minority showed a broad host range (bacteria: 4 = 0.5%; fungi: 7 = 1.6%). The bacterial communities harbored the highest antagonistic potential against P. ultimum, whereas the fungal communities contained more antagonists against A. cochlioides and R. solani. In contrast to their high proportion, only a low diversity of antagonists at genotypic and species level was found. Novel antagonistic species, e.g., Subtercola pratensis or Microbacterium testaceum were found in the internal part of the sugar beet body.

  8. Cultivation and qPCR Detection of Pathogenic and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterial Establishment in Naive Broiler Houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, J P; McLaughlin, M R; Adeli, A; Miles, D M

    2016-05-01

    Conventional commercial broiler production involves the rearing of more than 20,000 broilers in a single confined space for approximately 6.5 wk. This environment is known for harboring pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but studies have focused on previously established houses with mature litter microbial populations. In the current study, a set of three naive houses were followed from inception through 11 broiler flocks and monitored for ambient climatic conditions, bacterial pathogens, and antibiotic resistance. Within the first 3 wk of the first flock cycle, 100% of litter samples were positive for and , whereas was cultivation negative but PCR positive. Antibiotic resistance genes were ubiquitously distributed throughout the litter within the first flock, approaching 10 to 10 genomic units g. Preflock litter levels were approximately 10 CFU g for heterotrophic plate count bacteria, whereas midflock levels were >10 colony forming units (CFU) g; other indicators demonstrated similar increases. The influence of intrahouse sample location was minor. In all likelihood, given that preflock levels were negative for pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes and 4 to 5 Log lower than flock levels for indicators, incoming birds most likely provided the colonizing microbiome, although other sources were not ruled out. Most bacterial groups experienced a cyclical pattern of litter contamination seen in other studies, whereas microbial stabilization required approximately four flocks. This study represents a first-of-its-kind view into the time required for bacterial pathogens and antibiotic resistance to colonize and establish in naive broiler houses. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  9. Finding immune gene expression differences induced by marine bacterial pathogens in the Deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, E.; Queiroz, A.; Serrão Santos, R.; Bettencourt, R.

    2013-11-01

    The deep-sea hydrothermal vent mussel Bathymodiolus azoricus lives in a natural environment characterised by extreme conditions of hydrostatic pressure, temperature, pH, high concentrations of heavy metals, methane and hydrogen sulphide. The deep-sea vent biological systems represent thus the opportunity to study and provide new insights into the basic physiological principles that govern the defense mechanisms in vent animals and to understand how they cope with microbial infections. Hence, the importance of understanding this animal's innate defense mechanisms, by examining its differential immune gene expressions toward different pathogenic agents. In the present study, B. azoricus mussels were infected with single suspensions of marine bacterial pathogens, consisting of Vibrio splendidus, Vibrio alginolyticus, or Vibrio anguillarum, and a pool of these Vibrio bacteria. Flavobacterium suspensions were also used as a non-pathogenic bacterium. Gene expression analyses were carried out using gill samples from infected animals by means of quantitative-Polymerase Chain Reaction aimed at targeting several immune genes. We also performed SDS-PAGE protein analyses from the same gill tissues. We concluded that there are different levels of immune gene expression between the 12 h to 24 h exposure times to various bacterial suspensions. Our results from qPCR demonstrated a general pattern of gene expression, decreasing from 12 h over 24 h post-infection. Among the bacteria tested, Flavobacterium is the bacterium inducing the highest gene expression level in 12 h post-infections animals. The 24 h infected animals revealed, however, greater gene expression levels, using V. splendidus as the infectious agent. The SDS-PAGE analysis also pointed at protein profile differences between 12 h and 24 h, particularly evident for proteins of 18-20 KDa molecular mass, where most dissimilarity was found. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that immune genes, as well as experimental

  10. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  11. Histological changes in intestine of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) following in vitro exposure to pathogenic and probiotic bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringø, E; Salinas, I; Olsen, R E; Nyhaug, A; Myklebust, R; Mayhew, T M

    2007-04-01

    Furunculosis and vibriosis are diseases that cause severe economic losses in the fish-farming industry. The foregut of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) was exposed in vitro to two fish pathogens, Aeromonas salmonicida (causative agent of furunculosis) and Vibrio anguillarum (causative agent of vibriosis), and to one probiotic strain, Carnobacterium divergens, at 6 x 10(4) or 6 x 10(6) viable bacteria per milliliter. Histological changes following bacterial exposure were assessed by light and electron microscopy. Control samples (foregut exposed to Ringer's solution only) and samples exposed only to C. divergens had a similar appearance to intact intestinal mucosal epithelium, with no signs of damage. However, exposure of the foregut to the pathogenic bacteria resulted in damaged epithelial cells, cell debris in the lumen, and disorganization of the microvilli. Co-incubation of the foregut with a pathogen and C. divergens did not reverse the damaging effects caused by the pathogen, although these were alleviated when probiotic bacteria were used. Based on these results, we suggest that the probiotic bacterium, C. divergens, is able to prevent, to some extent, pathogen-induced damage in the Atlantic salmon foregut.

  12. Prevalence of swine viral and bacterial pathogens in rodents and stray cats captured around pig farms in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Quang Lam; Seo, Tae Won; Yoon, Byung-Il; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Han, Jeong Hee; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2013-12-30

    In 2008, 102 rodents and 24 stray cats from the areas around 9 pig farms in northeast South Korea were used to determine the prevalence of the following selected swine pathogens: ten viral pathogens [porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), rotavirus, classical swine fever virus (CSFV), porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), pseudorabies virus (PRV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV)] and four bacterial pathogens (Brucella, Leptospira, Salmonella and Lawsonia intracellularis). In total, 1,260 tissue samples from 102 rodents and 24 stray cats were examined by specific PCR and RT-PCR assays, including tissue samples of the brain, tonsils, lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, spleen, small intestine, large intestine and mesenteric lymph nodes. The percentages of PCR-positive rodents for the porcine pathogens were as follows: 63.7% for Leptospira, 39.2% for Brucella, 6.8% for Salmonella, 15.7% for L. intracellularis, 14.7% for PCV2 and 3.9% for EMCV. The percentages of PCR-positive stray cats for the swine pathogens were as follows: 62.5% for Leptospira, 25% for Brucella, 12.5% for Salmonella, 12.5% for L. intracellularis and 4.2% for PEDV. These results may be helpful for developing control measures to prevent the spread of infectious diseases of pigs.

  13. Open data on fungi and bacterial plant pathogens in New Zealand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnston, P. R; Weir, B. S; Cooper, J. A

    2017-01-01

    .... This article focuses on data provided for New Zealand's non-lichenised fungi and plant pathogenic bacteria, through the NZFungi nomenclatural and bibliographic database and the associated specimen...

  14. Structured literature review of responses of cattle to viral and bacterial pathogens causing bovine respiratory disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissett, G P; White, B J; Larson, R L

    2015-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is an economically important disease of cattle and continues to be an intensely studied topic. However, literature summarizing the time between pathogen exposure and clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion is minimal. A structured literature review of the published literature was performed to determine cattle responses (time from pathogen exposure to clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion) in challenge models using common BRD viral and bacterial pathogens. After review a descriptive analysis of published studies using common BRD pathogen challenge studies was performed. Inclusion criteria were single pathogen challenge studies with no treatment or vaccination evaluating outcomes of interest: clinical signs, shedding, and seroconversion. Pathogens of interest included: bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1), parainfluenza-3 virus, bovine respiratory syncytial virus, Mannheimia haemolytica, Mycoplasma bovis, Pastuerella multocida, and Histophilus somni. Thirty-five studies and 64 trials were included for analysis. The median days to the resolution of clinical signs after BVDV challenge was 15 and shedding was not detected on day 12 postchallenge. Resolution of BHV-1 shedding resolved on day 12 and clinical signs on day 12 postchallenge. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus ceased shedding on day 9 and median time to resolution of clinical signs was on day 12 postchallenge. M. haemolytica resolved clinical signs 8 days postchallenge. This literature review and descriptive analysis can serve as a resource to assist in designing challenge model studies and potentially aid in estimation of duration of clinical disease and shedding after natural pathogen exposure. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  15. Ligand-free palladium-mediated site-specific protein labeling inside gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Lin, Shixian; Wang, Jie; Jia, Shang; Yang, Maiyun; Hao, Ziyang; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Peng R

    2013-05-15

    Palladium, a key transition metal in advancing modern organic synthesis, mediates diverse chemical conversions including many carbon-carbon bond formation reactions between organic compounds. However, expanding palladium chemistry for conjugation of biomolecules such as proteins, particularly within their native cellular context, is still in its infancy. Here we report the site-specific protein labeling inside pathogenic Gram-negative bacterial cells via a ligand-free palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Two rationally designed pyrrolysine analogues bearing an aliphatic alkyne or an iodophenyl handle were first encoded in different enteric bacteria, which offered two facial handles for palladium-mediated Sonogashira coupling reaction on proteins within these pathogens. A GFP-based bioorthogonal reaction screening system was then developed, allowing evaluation of both the efficiency and the biocompatibilty of various palladium reagents in promoting protein-small molecule conjugation. The identified simple compound-Pd(NO3)2 exhibited high efficiency and biocompatibility for site-specific labeling of proteins in vitro and inside living E. coli cells. This Pd-mediated protein coupling method was further utilized to label and visualize a Type-III Secretion (T3S) toxin-OspF in Shigella cells. Our strategy may be generally applicable for imaging and tracking various virulence proteins within Gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  16. Identification and characterization of bacterial vaginosis-associated pathogens using a comprehensive cervical-vaginal epithelial coculture assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen R Eade

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is the most commonly treated female reproductive tract affliction, characterized by the displacement of healthy lactobacilli by an overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria. BV can contribute to pathogenic inflammation, preterm birth, and susceptibility to sexually transmitted infections. As the bacteria responsible for BV pathogenicity and their interactions with host immunity are not understood, we sought to evaluate the effects of BV-associated bacteria on reproductive epithelia. Here we have characterized the interaction between BV-associated bacteria and the female reproductive tract by measuring cytokine and defensin induction in three types of FRT epithelial cells following bacterial inoculation. Four BV-associated bacteria were evaluated alongside six lactobacilli for a comparative assessment. While responses differed between epithelial cell types, our model showed good agreement with clinical BV trends. We observed a distinct cytokine and human β-defensin 2 response to BV-associated bacteria, especially Atopobium vaginae, compared to most lactobacilli. One lactobacillus species, Lactobacillus vaginalis, induced an immune response similar to that elicited by BV-associated bacteria, stimulating significantly higher levels of cytokines and human β-defensin 2 than other lactobacilli. These data provide an important prioritization of BV-associated bacteria and support further characterization of reproductive bacteria and their interactions with host epithelia. Additionally, they demonstrate the distinct immune response potentials of epithelial cells from different locations along the female reproductive tract.

  17. The Prevalence of Potential Bacterial Pathogens on Inanimate Objects in a State School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandy, Tonja Denise

    2012-01-01

    Cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces can reduce the transmissibility of potential pathogens on school surfaces. Determining the number of bacteria and investigating the presence of pathogens on school surfaces are beginning steps in managing the well-being of students contacting those surfaces. This research study examines the…

  18. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-06-13

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D. zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Banana Pathogen Dickeya zeae Strain MS1, Which Causes Bacterial Soft Rot

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jing-Xin; Lin, Bi-Run; Shen, Hui-Fang; Pu, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    We report a draft genome sequence of Dickeya zeae strain MS1, which is the causative agent of banana soft rot in China, and we show several of its specific properties compared with those of other D.?zeae strains. Genome sequencing provides a tool for understanding the genomic determination of the pathogenicity and phylogeny placement of this pathogen.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Nocardia jinanensis, an Opportunistic Bacterial Pathogen That Causes Cellulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of?Nocardia jinanensis, an opportunistic pathogen that can cause skin infections, reveals genes that may contribute to the lifestyle and pathogenicity of N.?jinanensis. The genome also reveals the biosynthetic capacity of N.?jinanensis in producing mycolic acids, siderophores, and other polyketide and nonribosomal peptide-derived secondary metabolites.

  1. Mass spectrometry-based bacterial proteomics: focus on dermatological associated microbial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef eSoufi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The composition of human skin acts as a natural habitat for various bacterial species that function in a commensal and symbiotic fashion. In a healthy individual, bacterial flora serves to protect the host. Under certain conditions such as minor trauma, impaired host immunity, or environmental factors, the risk of developing skin infections is increased. Although a large majority of bacterial associated skin infections are common, a portion can potentially manifest into clinically significant morbidity. For example, Gram positive species that typically reside on the skin such as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus can cause numerous epidermal (impetigo, ecthyma and dermal (cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, erysipelas skin infections. Moreover, the increasing incidence of bacterial antibiotic resistance represents a serious challenge to modern medicine and threatens the health care system. Therefore, it is critical to develop tools and strategies that can allow us to better elucidate the nature and mechanism of bacterial virulence. To this end, mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomics has been revolutionizing biomedical research, and has positively impacted the microbiology field. Advances in MS technologies have paved the way for numerous bacterial proteomes and their respective post translational modifications (PTMs to be accurately identified and quantified in a high throughput and robust fashion. This technological platform offers critical information with regards to signal transduction, adherence, and microbial-host interactions associated with bacterial pathogenesis. This mini-review serves to highlight the current progress proteomics has contributed towards the understanding of bacteria that are associated with skin related diseases, infections, and antibiotic resistance.

  2. Mondini dysplasia with recurrent bacterial meningitis caused by three different pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Hiroaki; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Fukutomi, Hisashi; Ito, Kimiko; Morimoto, Masahiro; Teramoto, Takahide; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Nishihori, Takezumi; Akeda, Yukihiro; Oishi, Kazunori; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2015-12-01

    Mondini dysplasia is rare, but has an important association with recurrent bacterial meningitis. We herein describe the case of a 3-year-old girl with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss who presented with three independent episodes of bacterial meningitis within 8 months. Temporal bone computed tomography indicated the characteristic features of Mondini dysplasia in the right inner ear. This was treated by surgical closure of the inner ear defect via oval window and additional vaccination was administered. Appropriate vaccination might prevent the recurrent bacterial meningitis associated with Mondini dysplasia. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. Isolation and characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in inducing pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis toxin in cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visweshwar Regode

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation towards pro-Cry1Ac. Among twelve gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50- and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40 oC. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by PMSF followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65 and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity towards H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2 and IVS3 showed homology with Bacillus thuringiensis (CP003763.1, Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2 and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1, respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of Bt protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of Bt toxins in H. armigera.

  4. An extracellular antifungal chitinase from Lecanicillium lecanii: purification, properties, and application in biocontrol against plant pathogenic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN, Huu Quan; Quyen, Dinh Thi; Nguyen, Sy Le Thanh; Vu, Hanh

    2015-01-01

    An extracellular antifungal chitinase from L. lecanii strain 43H was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and DEAE-Sephadex A-50 ion exchange chromatography; it showed a molecular mass of approximately 33 kDa with a specific activity of 167.5 U/mg protein and purification factor of 2.5. Optimum temperature and pH were observed at 40 °C and pH 6.0, respectively. This enzyme was stable at up to 40 °C and at pH 5.0-6.0. The kinetic constants Km and Vmax determined for the chitinase with co...

  5. Parallel evolution of a type IV secretion system in radiating lineages of the host-restricted bacterial pathogen Bartonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Philipp; Salzburger, Walter; Liesch, Marius; Chang, Chao-Chin; Maruyama, Soichi; Lanz, Christa; Calteau, Alexandra; Lajus, Aurélie; Médigue, Claudine; Schuster, Stephan C; Dehio, Christoph

    2011-02-10

    Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS), and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps), evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial pathogens

  6. Parallel evolution of a type IV secretion system in radiating lineages of the host-restricted bacterial pathogen Bartonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Engel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS, and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps, evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial

  7. Cytotoxic Chromosomal Targeting by CRISPR/Cas Systems Can Reshape Bacterial Genomes and Expel or Remodel Pathogenicity Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoe, Reuben B.; Chang, James T.; Dy, Ron L.; Taylor, Corinda; Gristwood, Tamzin; Clulow, James S.; Richter, Corinna; Przybilski, Rita; Pitman, Andrew R.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and their associated (Cas) proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2) involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas–mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA–targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity. PMID:23637624

  8. Cytotoxic chromosomal targeting by CRISPR/Cas systems can reshape bacterial genomes and expel or remodel pathogenicity islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben B Vercoe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and their associated (Cas proteins constitute a defence system against bacteriophages and plasmids. CRISPR/Cas systems acquire short spacer sequences from foreign genetic elements and incorporate these into their CRISPR arrays, generating a memory of past invaders. Defence is provided by short non-coding RNAs that guide Cas proteins to cleave complementary nucleic acids. While most spacers are acquired from phages and plasmids, there are examples of spacers that match genes elsewhere in the host bacterial chromosome. In Pectobacterium atrosepticum the type I-F CRISPR/Cas system has acquired a self-complementary spacer that perfectly matches a protospacer target in a horizontally acquired island (HAI2 involved in plant pathogenicity. Given the paucity of experimental data about CRISPR/Cas-mediated chromosomal targeting, we examined this process by developing a tightly controlled system. Chromosomal targeting was highly toxic via targeting of DNA and resulted in growth inhibition and cellular filamentation. The toxic phenotype was avoided by mutations in the cas operon, the CRISPR repeats, the protospacer target, and protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM beside the target. Indeed, the natural self-targeting spacer was non-toxic due to a single nucleotide mutation adjacent to the target in the PAM sequence. Furthermore, we show that chromosomal targeting can result in large-scale genomic alterations, including the remodelling or deletion of entire pre-existing pathogenicity islands. These features can be engineered for the targeted deletion of large regions of bacterial chromosomes. In conclusion, in DNA-targeting CRISPR/Cas systems, chromosomal interference is deleterious by causing DNA damage and providing a strong selective pressure for genome alterations, which may have consequences for bacterial evolution and pathogenicity.

  9. Competitive adsorption of Reactive Orange 16 and Reactive Brilliant Blue R on polyaniline/bacterial extracellular polysaccharides composite-A novel eco-friendly polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janaki, V. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636011, Tamil Nadu (India); Vijayaraghavan, K. [Singapore-Delft Water Alliance, National University of Singapore, 117577 (Singapore); Ramasamy, A.K. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636011, Tamil Nadu (India); Lee, Kui-Jae [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Byung-Taek, E-mail: btoh@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of); Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan, E-mail: kannan@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Biotechnology, Advanced Institute of Environment and Bioscience, College of Environmental and Bioresource Sciences, Chonbuk National University, Iksan 570752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Competitive adsorption of reactive dyes onto polyaniline/bacterial extracellular polysaccharides composite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composite have functional groups of both polyaniline and bacterial extracellular polysaccharides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of Reactive Brilliant Blue R diminished the uptake of Reactive Orange 16. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrostatic interaction was identified as a major mechanism in adsorption process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactive Brilliant Blue R and Reactive Orange 16 adsorption was endothermic process. - Abstract: The performance of polyaniline/extracellular polymeric substances (Pn/EPS) composite as an adsorbent to remove the anionic reactive dyes, Reactive Brilliant Blue R (RBBR) and Reactive Orange 16 (RO), was investigated in single and binary systems. The pH{sub pzc} of Pn/EPS composite was calculated as 3.7 through potentiometric mass titration method. Electrostatic interaction between the dye anion and the nitrogen present in the polymer was identified as a major mechanism in adsorption process. Single component isotherms followed the Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 0.5775 mmol g{sup -1} for RBBR and 0.4748 mmol g{sup -1} for RO. In binary system, both the reactive dye anions compete with each other and resulted in lower uptake. Binary adsorption data were interpreted well by the Sheindorf-Rehbun-Sheintuch equation as compared to extended Langmuir model with constant interaction factor. Kinetic analysis of single solute followed pseudo-first order model. Thermodynamic studies computed that RBBR and RO adsorption was endothermic, spontaneous, and feasible process.

  10. Nanoparticle targeting of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria for magnetic-based separations of bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hoang D.; Yang, Shirley S.; Wilson, Brian K.; McManus, Simon A.; Chen, Christopher V. H.-H.; Prud'homme, Robert K.

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a healthcare problem of increasing significance, and there is increasing interest in developing new tools to address bacterial infections. Bacteria-targeting nanoparticles hold promise to improve drug efficacy, compliance, and safety. In addition, nanoparticles can also be used for novel applications, such as bacterial imaging or bioseperations. We here present the use of a scalable block-copolymer-directed self-assembly process, Flash NanoPrecipitation, to form zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) modified nanoparticles that bind to both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria with specificity. Particles have tunable surface ligand densities that change particle avidity and binding efficacy. A variety of materials can be encapsulated into the core of the particles, such as optical dyes or iron oxide colloids, to produce imageable and magnetically active bacterial targeting constructs. As a proof-of-concept, these particles are used to bind and separate bacteria from solution in a magnetic column. Magnetic manipulation and separation would translate to a platform for pathogen identification or removal. These magnetic and targeted nanoparticles enable new methods to address bacterial infections.

  11. Epidemiology and laboratory diagnosis of infection with viral and bacterial pathogens in infants hospitalized for suspected sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, R; Hall, C B; Powell, K R; Menegus, M A

    1989-09-01

    A prospective study was conducted to determine the frequency and distribution of bacterial and viral pathogens in infants hospitalized with suspected sepsis and to evaluate the potential of virus detection for improving patient management. A causative organism was detected in 157 (67%) of 233 previously healthy infants less than 3 months of age, who had been hospitalized for suspected sepsis: 19 (8%) had bacterial infections, 135 (58%) had viral infections, and 3 (1%) had mixed viral-bacterial infections. Viral infections occurred in a seasonal pattern: enteroviruses were responsible for most of the hospitalizations during summer and fall (65/110; 63%) and respiratory syncytial and influenza A viruses were responsible for most of the infections during winter (44/81; 55%). In contrast, bacterial infections were not seasonally distributed. Virus was detected in 33% of the 138 infected infants within 24 hours, and in 64% within 3 days. We conclude that viral infections are prevalent among infants hospitalized for suspected sepsis, and most can be detected early enough to influence patient management.

  12. Axially substituted silicon(IV) phthalocyanine and its quaternized derivative as photosensitizers towards tumor cells and bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ömeroğlu, İpek; Kaya, Esra Nur; Göksel, Meltem; Kussovski, Vesselin; Mantareva, Vanya; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2017-10-15

    Axially di-(alpha,alpha-diphenyl-4-pyridylmethoxy) silicon(IV) phthalocyanine (3) and its quaternized derivative (3Q) were synthesized and tested as photosensitizers against tumor and bacterial cells. These new phthalocyanines were characterized by elemental analysis, and different spectroscopic methods such as FT-IR, UV-Vis, MALDI-TOF and (1)H NMR. The photophysical properties such as absorption and fluorescence, and the photochemical properties such as singlet oxygen generation of both phthalocyanines were investigated in solutions. The obtained values were compared to the values obtained with unsubstituted silicon(IV) phthalocyanine dichloride (SiPcCl2). The addition of two di-(alpha,alpha-diphenyl-4-pyridylmethanol) groups as axial ligands showed an improvement of the photophysical and photochemical properties and an increasement of the singlet oxygen quantum yield (ΦΔ) from 0.15 to 0.33 was determined. The photodynamic efficacy of synthesized photosensitizers (3 and 3Q) were evaluated with promising photocytotoxicity (17% cell survival for 3 and 28% for 3Q) against the cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). The photodynamic inactivation of pathogenic bacterial strains Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggested a high susceptibility with quaternized derivative (3Q). The both Gram-positive bacterial strains were fully photoinactivated with 11μM 3Q and mild light dose 50J.cm(-2). In case of P. aeruginosa the effect was negligible for concentrations up to 22μM 3Q and light dose 100J.cm(-2). The results suggested that the novel axially substituted silicon(IV) phthalocyanines have promising characteristic as photosensitizer towards tumor cells. The quaternized derivative 3Q has high potential for photoinactivation of pathogenic bacterial species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) in food testing for bacterial pathogens and fungal contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Ludwig; Luo, Jie; Denschlag, Carla; Vogel, Rudi F

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens and toxicants, parasites as well as mycotoxin producing fungi are the major biotic factors influencing the safety of food. Moreover, viral infections and prions may be present as quasi biotic challenging factors. A vast array of culture dependent analytical methods and protocols for food safety testing has been developed during the past decades. Presently, protocols involving molecular biological techniques such as PCR-based nucleic acid amplification and hybridization have become available for many of the known pathogens with their major advantages being rapidness, high sensitivity and specificity. However, this type of assays is still quite labor- and cost intensive and mostly cannot be operated directly in the field. Recently, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of DNA has emerged as an alternative to the use of PCR-based methods not only in food safety testing but also in a wide array of application. Its advantages over PCR-based techniques are even shorter reaction time, no need for specific equipment, high sensitivity and specificity as well as comparably low susceptibility to inhibitors present in sample materials which enables detection of the pathogens in sample materials even without time consuming sample preparation. The present article presents a critical review of the application of LAMP-based methods and their usefulness in detecting and identifying food borne bacterial pathogens and toxicants as well as mycotoxin producing food borne fungi as compared to other methods. Moreover does it elaborate on new developments in the design and automation of LAMP-based assays and their implications for the future developments of food testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Activity of telithromycin and comparators against bacterial pathogens isolated from 1,336 patients with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Robert

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing antimicrobial resistance among the key pathogens responsible for community-acquired respiratory tract infections has the potential to limit the effectiveness of antibiotics available to treat these infections. Since there are regional differences in the susceptibility patterns observed and treatment is frequently empirical, the selection of antibiotic therapy may be challenging. PROTEKT, a global, longitudinal multicentre surveillance study, tracks the activity of telithromycin and comparator antibacterial agents against key respiratory tract pathogens. Methods In this analysis, we examine the prevalence of antibacterial resistance in 1,336 bacterial pathogens, isolated from adult and paediatric patients clinically diagnosed with acute bacterial sinusitis (ABS. Results and discussion In total, 58.0%, 66.1%, and 55.8% of S. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to penicillin, cefuroxime, and clarithromycin respectively. Combined macrolide resistance and reduced susceptibility to penicillin was present in 200/640 (31.3 % of S. pneumoniae isolates (128 isolates were resistant to penicillin [MIC >= 2 mg/L], 72 intermediate [MIC 0.12–1 mg/L] while 99.5% and 95.5% of isolates were susceptible to telithromycin and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively. In total, 88.2%, 87.5%, 99.4%, 100%, and 100% of H. influenzae isolates were susceptible to ampicillin, clarithromycin, cefuroxime, telithromycin, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively. In vitro, telithromycin demonstrated the highest activity against M. catarrhalis (MIC50 = 0.06 mg/L, MIC90 = 0.12 mg/L. Conclusion The high in vitro activity of against pathogens commonly isolated in ABS, together with a once daily dosing regimen and clinical efficacy with 5-day course of therapy, suggest that telithromycin may play a role in the empiric treatment of ABS.

  15. Effect of Season on the Persistence of Bacterial Pathogens in Runoff from Agricultural Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runoff from agricultural fields undergoing manure applications may carry a variety of chemical and microbial contaminants that compromise water quality and increase the possibility of human exposure to pathogenic microorganisms when recreational waters are impacted. A series of r...

  16. Anti-bacterial effects of the essential oil of Teucrium polium L. on human pathogenic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mohammad; Hassan Salari; Armita Farahmand

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pathogenic bacteria are important causes of disease in humans and agricultural products contamination. Side effects of chemical preservatives necessitate research on the use of a special blend of natural oils to prevent the growth of bacteria. The aim of this study was elucidating the antibacterial effect of the essential oil of Teucrium polium on human pathogenic bacteria in the Kerman province. Materials and Methods: In order to investigate the chemical composition and antiba...

  17. Dielectrophoretic separation of blood pathogens ou Bacterial extraction from biological samples using DEP forces

    OpenAIRE

    Bisceglia, Emilie; Cubizolles, Myriam; Mallard, Frédéric; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We report here a method based on DEP separation to concentrate pathogens out of a biological sample by combining positive and negative DEP to separate pathogens from the sample matrix. In this approach, we take advantage from the large tolerance of micro-organisms towards osmotic shock to perform dielectrophoretic separation in a low electric conductivity medium. This condition enables to collect micro-organisms by positive DEP, while lysed blood cells are repelled fro...

  18. Bacteriophage Resistance Mechanisms in the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum: Linking Genomic Mutations to Changes in Bacterial Virulence Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2015-01-01

    requires overcoming the selection for phage resistance in the bacterial populations. Here, we analyzed resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum after phage exposure using whole-genome sequencing of the ancestral phage-sensitive strain 950106-1/1 and six phage-resistant isolates. The phage...... resistance and the genetic modifications were supported by direct measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, biofilm formation, and secretion of extracellular enzymes, which were all impaired in the resistant strains, probably due to superficial structural changes. The clustered regularly interspaced...... short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) region was unaffected in the resistant isolates and thus did not play a role as a resistance mechanism for F. psychrophilum under the current conditions. All together, the results suggest that resistance in F. psychrophilum was driven by spontaneous mutations, which...

  19. Mechanism of Excretion of a Bacterial Proteinase: Factors Controlling Accumulation of the Extracellular Proteinase of a Sarcina Strain (Coccus P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BISSELL, MINA J.; TOSI, ROBERTO; GORINI, LUIGI

    1970-06-29

    It has been known that the extracellular proteinase of Coccus P is found only in cultures grown in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. It is now shown that this cation is required neither for synthesis, excretion, or activation of a zymogen nor as a prosthetic factor necessary for enzymatic activity. The only function of Ca{sup 2+} is to stabilize the active structure of the enzyme molecule, presumably by substituting for absence of S-S bridges. In the absence of Ca{sup 2+} , the excreted proteinase undergoes rapid autodigestion and, instead of the active protein, its hydrolytic products are accumulated in the culture fluid. In minimal medium and under conditions of enzyme stability [presence of Ca{sup 2+} and Ficoll (Pharmacia)], Coccus P accumulates the proteinase at a gradually reduced speed although the rate of cultural growth remains constant. It is shown that this decline in rate of accumulation is caused by the excreted proteinase itself, possibly acting on its own precursor emerging from the cell in a form susceptible to proteolytic attack and not amenable to Ca{sup 2+} protection. A proteinase precursor is actually demonstrable in a calciumless culture at the onset of the enzyme accumulation which follows Ca{sup 2+} addition. It is suggested that excreted proteins require an unfolded (or incompletely folded) structure to cross the cell envelope. The proteinase excreted by a Sarcina strain (Coccus P) is found only in cultures containing Ca{sup 2+} ions (1), a feature common to proteinases of other bacteria (4, 12, 18) and to other excreted enzymes (14). Among the nontoxic divalent cations, Ca{sup 2+} is rather specific in this effect. Other ions such as Mn{sup 2+} or Mg{sup 2+}, the latter being present in all media as an indispensible growth factor, are ineffective. Addition of Ca{sup 2+} to the proteolytically inactive supernatant fluid of a calcium- free culture does not result in the appearance of the missing enzyme activity. The early assumption that Ca{sup 2

  20. A study of bacterial pathogens and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofatteh, M R; Shahabian Moghaddam, F; Yousefi, M; Namaei, M H

    2018-01-01

    To assess the frequency of bacterial agents in chronic suppurative otitis media and the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of isolates among patients. A total of 185 patients clinically diagnosed with chronic suppurative otitis media were interviewed and middle-ear effusion samples were collected using sterile swabs. All bacterial isolates were identified by conventional microbiological methods. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion. Staphylococci spp. (64.9 per cent) were the most prevalent bacteria isolated, followed by Klebsiella spp. (12.9 per cent) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.3 per cent). The most effective antibiotic for treatment of bacterial chronic suppurative otitis media was ciprofloxacin. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference in bacterial infestations among chronic suppurative otitis media patients and the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the bacterial isolates based on gender and age (p > 0.05). Our findings highlight the importance of a continuous and periodic evaluation of the bacteriological profile and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in chronic suppurative otitis media patients for efficacious treatment of the infection.

  1. High Frequency of Enteric Protozoan, Viral, and Bacterial Potential Pathogens in Community-Acquired Acute Diarrheal Episodes: Evidence Based on Results of Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawash, Yousry A; Ismail, Khadiga A; Almehmadi, Mazen

    2017-10-01

    Infectious diarrhea is endemic in most developing countries. We aimed to investigate the protozoan, viral, and bacterial causes of acute diarrhea in Taif, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional prospective 1-year study was conducted on 163 diarrheal patients of various ages. Stool samples were collected, 1 per patient, and tested for 3 protozoa, 3 viruses, and 9 bacteria with the Luminex Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel. Overall, 53.4% (87/163) of samples were positives (20.8% protozoa, 19.6% viruses, 2.8% bacteria, and 9.8% mixed). Rotavirus (19.6%), Giardia duodenalis (16.5%), and Cryptosporidium spp. (8.5%) were the mostly detected pathogens. Adenovirus 40/41 (4.2%), Salmonella (3%), Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (3%), and Entamoeba histolytica (2.4%) were also detected. Norovirus GI/II, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Clostridium difficile toxin A/B were not detected in any patients. All pathogens were involved in coinfections except E. histolytica. Giardia (5.5%) and rotavirus (3%) were the most commonly detected in co-infections. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (2.4%), Campylobacter spp. (2.4%), E. coli 0157 (1.8%), and Shigella spp. (1.2%) were detected in patients only as co-infections. Infections were more in children 0-4 years, less in adults 40 years, with statistically significant differences in risk across age groups observed with rotavirus (P<0.001), Giardia (P=0.006), and Cryptosporidium (P=0.036) infections. Lastly, infections were not significantly more in the spring. This report demonstrates the high burden of various enteropathogens in the setting. Further studies are needed to define the impact of these findings on the clinical course of the disease.

  2. The adaptive response of bacterial food-borne pathogens in the environment, host and food: Implications for food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Broussolle, Véronique; Colin, Pierre; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Prieto, Miguel

    2015-11-20

    Bacteria are constantly faced to stress situations in their ecological niches, the food and the host gastrointestinal tract. The capacity to detect and respond to surrounding changes is crucial for bacterial pathogens to survive or grow in changing environments. To this purpose, cells have evolved various sophisticated networks designed to protect against stressors or repair damage caused by them. Challenges can occur during production of foods when subjected to processing, and after food ingestion when confronted with host defensive barriers. Some pathogenic bacteria have shown the capacity to develop stable resistance against extreme conditions within a defined genomic context and a limited number of generations. On the other hand, bacteria can also respond to adverse conditions in a transient manner, through the so-called stress tolerance responses. Bacterial stress tolerance responses include both structural and physiological modifications in the cell and are mediated by complex genetic regulatory machinery. Major aspects in the adaptive response are the sensing mechanisms, the characterization of cell defensive systems, such as the operation of regulatory proteins (e.g. RpoS), the induction of homeostatic and repair systems, the synthesis of shock response proteins, and the modifications of cell membranes, particularly in their fatty acid composition and physical properties. This article reviews certain strategies used by food-borne bacteria to respond to particular stresses (acid, cold stress, extreme pressure) in a permanent or transient manner and discusses the implications that such adaptive responses pose for food safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

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    Walelign Dessie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1% were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1% was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%. More than 58 (75% of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs. Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8% Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5% E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials.

  4. Evaluation of the multiplex PCR Allplex-GI assay in the detection of bacterial pathogens in diarrheic stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Ariadna; Pérez-Ayala, Ana; Chaves, Fernando; Lora, David; Orellana, M Ángeles

    2017-10-31

    Rapid and accurate detection of the pathogens that cause gastrointestinal infection is important for appropriate therapy and proper infection control. This study assesses the performance of a new molecular assay for simultaneous detection of 13 different gastrointestinal bacteria in stool specimens. Using the Allplex GI-Bacteria (AGI-BI/AGI-BII) assay, a total of 394 stool samples were tested and the results were compared with culturing on selective differential followed by identification by mass spectroscopy. Discordant results were analyzed by a different multiplex PCR method, the Fast-Track Diagnostics Bacterial gastroenteritis (FTD-BG). The routine method (RM) detected 109 (27.7%) positive samples and the Allplex-GI assay, 261 (66.2%). Analysis of discordant results revealed that the molecular assay detected 44 pathogens that were not detected by the RM, including 23 Campylobacter spp., 11 Salmonella spp, 3 Y. enterocolitica, 2 EIEC/Shigella spp, 2 E. coli 0157, 2 C. difficile and 1 Aeromonas spp. Five cases not detected by the molecular method were detected by the RM (3 Aeromonas spp, 1 Salmonella spp and 1 Y. enterocolitica). For all targets, the percentages of sensitivity and specificity were >95%, except for Aeromonas spp., which were 81% and 99% respectively. This study suggests that Allplex-GI multiplex PCR is a sensitive and specific assay that enables a rapid and accurate diagnosis of bacterial gastrointestinal infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacterial inclusion bodies as potential synthetic devices for pathogen recognition and a therapeutic substance release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talafová, Klaudia; Hrabárová, Eva; Chorvát, Dušan; Nahálka, Jozef

    2013-02-07

    Adhesins of pathogens recognise the glycans on the host cell and mediate adherence. They are also crucial for determining the tissue preferences of pathogens. Currently, glyco-nanomaterials provide potential tool for antimicrobial therapy. We demonstrate that properly glyco-tailored inclusion bodies can specifically bind pathogen adhesins and release therapeutic substances. In this paper, we describe the preparation of tailored inclusion bodies via the conjugation of indicator protein aggregated to form inclusion bodies with soluble proteins. Whereas the indicator protein represents a remedy, the soluble proteins play a role in pathogen recognition. For conjugation, glutaraldehyde was used as linker. The treatment of conjugates with polar lysine, which was used to inactivate the residual glutaraldehyde, inhibited unwanted hydrophobic interactions between inclusion bodies. The tailored inclusion bodies specifically interacted with the SabA adhesin from Helicobacter pylori aggregated to form inclusion bodies that were bound to the sialic acids decorating the surface of human erythrocytes. We also tested the release of indicator proteins from the inclusion bodies using sortase A and Ssp DNAB intein self-cleaving modules, respectively. Sortase A released proteins in a relatively short period of time, whereas the intein cleavage took several weeks. The tailored inclusion bodies are promising "nanopills" for biomedical applications. They are able to specifically target the pathogen, while a self-cleaving module releases a soluble remedy. Various self-cleaving modules can be enabled to achieve the diverse pace of remedy release.

  6. Antibacterial and Antioxidant Activities of Liquidambar Orientalis Mill. Various Extracts Against Bacterial Pathogens Causing Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülten Ökmen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is being constantly developed worldwide. Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CNS and Staphylococcus aureus are common causes of bovine subclinical mastitis. Bioactive compound of medicinal plants shows anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and anti-oxidant effects. The anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant activities of Liquidambar orientalis (L. orientalis extracts on subclinical mastitis causing bacteria in cows have not been reported to date. The aim of the present study was to examine anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant effects of L. orientalis leaf extracts on S. aureus and CNS isolated from cows with subclinical mastitis symptoms. In this study, 3.2 mg/mL minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of ethanol extracts of L. orientalis has shown to be a most potent anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant for all isolated bacterial species from mastitis cows. In this study, it was investigated anti-bacterial and anti-oxidant potentials of acetone, methanol and ethanol extracts of the L. orientalis. The acetone extract showed maximum inhibition zone against S. aureus numbered 17 (12 mm. In addition to anti-bacterial properties, anti-oxidant activity of L. orientalis extract was examined by ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid] free radical assay. Trolox was used as a positive control anti-oxidant. Ethanol extract exhibited a strong anti-oxidant activity like Trolox anti-oxidant which was effective at 2.58 mM concentration. Bioactive compounds of sweet gum may be useful to screening mastitis causing bacteria for clinical applications.

  7. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni. PMID:25715048

  8. A potent fish pathogenic bacterial killer Streptomyces sp. isolated from the soils of east coast region, South India

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    Durairaj Thirumurugan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the potentiality of the marine actinobacteria isolated from marine soil against fish pathogenic bacteria. Methods: In the present study, a total of 33 soil samples were collected from the Bay of Bengal, east coast region (ECR of Tamilnadu, South India. Then they were used for the isolation of actinobacteria by using conventional serial dilution technique on starch casein agar medium. The antibacterial activities of the actinobacteria were screened primarily by using cross streak plate method against fish pathogenic bacteria namely Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, Aeromonas sp. and Pseudomonas sp. The antimicrobial efficacy of the selected isolates was carried out with various organic solvents, and finally the active compound was subjected to chromatographic techniques including TLC and GC-MS. Results: Of the 82 actinobacteria isolated, 21 (26% isolates were possessed antibacterial activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Out of 21 antibacterial isolates, the isolate ECR77 was selected for further study based on its potential activity against fish pathogenic bacteria. Of the various solvents tested, the ethyl acetate extract had good antibacterial activity against the tested bacterial pathogens. The isolate ECR77 grew well on oat meal agar medium with 2% salt level at 35 °C. GC-MS study found that the presence of bioactive compounds namely tetradecanoic acid, n-hexadecanoic acid and octadecanoic acid. The morphological, physiological, biochemical and cultural characteristics of the potential isolate were supported the identity up to generic level as Streptomyces sp. ECR77. Conclusions: The results obtained from this study concludes that the ECR soils of South India is a hot spot of novel bioactive compound producing marine actinobacteria with great pharmaceutical values.

  9. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni.

  10. Broad-spectrum in vitro antibacterial activities of clay minerals against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAYDEL, SHELLEY E.; REMENIH, CHRISTINE M.; WILLIAMS, LYNDA B.

    2008-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Objectives The capacity to properly address the worldwide incidence of infectious diseases lies in the ability to detect, prevent, and effectively treat these infections. Therefore, identifying and analyzing inhibitory agents are worthwhile endeavors in an era when few new classes of effective antimicrobials have been developed. The use of geological nanomaterials to heal skin infections has been evident since the earliest recorded history, and specific clay minerals may prove valuable in the treatment of bacterial diseases, including infections for which there are no effective antibiotics, such as Buruli ulcer and multi-drug resistant infections. Methods We have subjected two iron-rich clay minerals, which have previously been used to treat Buruli ulcer patients, to broth culture testing of antibiotic-susceptible and -resistant pathogenic bacteria to assess the feasibility of using clay minerals as therapeutic agents. Results One specific mineral, CsAg02, demonstrated bactericidal activity against pathogenic Escherichia coli, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) E. coli, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Mycobacterium marinum and a combined bacteriostatic/bactericidal effect against Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant S. aureus (PRSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Mycobacterium smegmatis, while another mineral with similar structure and bulk crystal chemistry, CsAr02, had no effect on or enhanced bacterial growth. The <0.2 μm fraction of CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 200°C or 550°C retained bactericidal activity, while cation-exchanged CsAg02 and CsAg02 heated to 900°C no longer killed E. coli. Conclusions Our results indicate that specific mineral products have intrinsic, heat-stable antibacterial properties, which could provide an inexpensive treatment against numerous human bacterial infections. PMID:18070832

  11. Spontaneous bacterial and fungal infections in genetically engineered mice: Is Escherichia coli an emerging pathogen in laboratory mouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The impact of particular microbes on genetically engineered mice depends on the genotype and the environment. Infections resulting in clinical disease have an obvious impact on animal welfare and experimentation. In this study, we investigated the bacterial and fungal aetiology of spontaneous clinical disease of infectious origin among the genetically engineered mice from our institution in relation to their genotype. A total of 63 mice belonging to 33 different mice strains, from severe immunodeficient to wild-type, were found to display infections as the primary cause leading to their euthanasia. The necropsies revealed abscesses localized subcutaneously as well as in the kidney, preputial glands, seminal vesicles, in the uterus, umbilicus or in the lung. In addition, pneumonia, endometritis and septicaemia cases were recorded. Escherichia coli was involved in 21 of 44 (47.72%) of the lesions of bacterial origin, whereas [Pasteurella] pneumotropica was isolated from 19 of 44 (43.18%) cases. The infections with the two agents mentioned above included three cases of mixed infection with both pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus was considered responsible for five of 44 (11.36%) cases whereas Enterobacter cloacae was found to cause lesions in two of 44 (4.54%) mice. Overall, 16 of the 44 (36.36%) cases of bacterial aetiology affected genetically engineered mice without any explicit immunodeficiency or wild-type strains. The remaining 19 cases of interstitial pneumonia were caused by Pneumocystis murina. In conclusion, the susceptibility of genetically modified mice to opportunistic infections has to be regarded with precaution, regardless of the type of genetic modification performed. Beside the classical opportunists, such as [Pasteurella] pneumotropica and Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli should as well be closely monitored to evaluate whether it represents an emerging pathogen in the laboratory mouse.

  12. First characterization of bacterial pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus, for Porites andrewsi White syndrome in the South China Sea.

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    Xie Zhenyu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: White syndrome, a term for scleractinian coral disease with progressive tissue loss, is known to cause depressed growth and increased morality of coral reefs in the major oceans around the world, and the occurrence of this disease has been frequently reported in the past few decades. Investigations during April to September in both 2010 and 2011 identified widespread Porites andrewsi White syndrome (PAWS in Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea. However, the causes and etiology of PAWS have been unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A transmission experiment was performed on P. andrewsi in the Qilianyu Subgroup (QLY. The results showed that there was a significant (P ≤ 0.05 difference between test and control groups after 28 days if the invalid replicates were excluded. Rates of tissue loss ranged from 0.90-10.76 cm(2 d(-1 with a mean of 5.40 ± 3.34 cm(2 d(-1 (mean ± SD. Bacterial strains were isolated from the PAWS corals at the disease outbreak sites in QLY of the Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea, and included in laboratory-based infection trials to satisfy Koch's postulates for establishing causality. Following exposure to bacterial concentrations of 10(5 cells mL(-1, the infected colonies exhibited similar signs to those observed in the field. Using phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analysis, classical phenotypic trait comparison, Biolog automatic identification system, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MALDI Biotyper method, two pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio alginolyticus . CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of V. alginolyticus as a pathogenic agent of PAWS in the South China Sea. Our results point out an urgent need to develop sensitive detection methods for V. alginolyticus virulence strains and robust diagnostics for coral disease caused by this and Vibrio pathogenic bacterium in the South China Sea.

  13. First characterization of bacterial pathogen, Vibrio alginolyticus, for Porites andrewsi White syndrome in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenyu, Xie; Shaowen, Ke; Chaoqun, Hu; Zhixiong, Zhu; Shifeng, Wang; Yongcan, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    White syndrome, a term for scleractinian coral disease with progressive tissue loss, is known to cause depressed growth and increased morality of coral reefs in the major oceans around the world, and the occurrence of this disease has been frequently reported in the past few decades. Investigations during April to September in both 2010 and 2011 identified widespread Porites andrewsi White syndrome (PAWS) in Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea. However, the causes and etiology of PAWS have been unknown. A transmission experiment was performed on P. andrewsi in the Qilianyu Subgroup (QLY). The results showed that there was a significant (P ≤ 0.05) difference between test and control groups after 28 days if the invalid replicates were excluded. Rates of tissue loss ranged from 0.90-10.76 cm(2) d(-1) with a mean of 5.40 ± 3.34 cm(2) d(-1) (mean ± SD). Bacterial strains were isolated from the PAWS corals at the disease outbreak sites in QLY of the Xisha Archipelago, South China Sea, and included in laboratory-based infection trials to satisfy Koch's postulates for establishing causality. Following exposure to bacterial concentrations of 10(5) cells mL(-1), the infected colonies exhibited similar signs to those observed in the field. Using phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene analysis, classical phenotypic trait comparison, Biolog automatic identification system, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and MALDI Biotyper method, two pathogenic strains were identified as Vibrio alginolyticus . This is the first report of V. alginolyticus as a pathogenic agent of PAWS in the South China Sea. Our results point out an urgent need to develop sensitive detection methods for V. alginolyticus virulence strains and robust diagnostics for coral disease caused by this and Vibrio pathogenic bacterium in the South China Sea.

  14. Antibacterial activity of seneciolactone isolated from Senecio scandens against some common gastrointestinal tract disease causing bacterial pathogens

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    Yi Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to study the antibacterial effect of seneciolactone isolated from the methanolic extract of Senecio scandens against five bacterial pathogens which are known to cause several gastrointestinal tract diseases. Disc diffusion assay and agar well diffusion assays were used to examine the antibacterial efficacy of this compound by measuring zones of inhibition and MIC/MBC values. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was involved to study the effect of this compound on cellular morphology of Shigella dysenteriae. Results revealed that seneciolactone exhibited moderate to potent antibacterial activity against different bacterial strains. Zones of inhibition and MIC/MBC values indicated that seneciolactone was most potent against S. dysenteriae followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and E. coli. SEM results indicated that seneciolactone induced potent damage to the cell membrane of the tested bacteria. As compared to the untreated control which exhibited normal cellular morphology, the seneciolactone treated bacterial cells revealed severe damage to the cellular membrane particularly at the higher doses.

  15. Defensins from the tick Ixodes scapularis are effective against phytopathogenic fungi and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria grayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonk, Miray; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Rego, Ryan O M; Chrudimská, Tereza; Strnad, Martin; Šíma, Radek; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Franta, Zdeněk; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Grubhoffer, Libor; Rahnamaeian, Mohammad

    2014-12-03

    Ixodes scapularis is the most common tick species in North America and a vector of important pathogens that cause diseases in humans and animals including Lyme disease, anaplasmosis and babesiosis. Tick defensins have been identified as a new source of antimicrobial agents with putative medical applications due to their wide-ranging antimicrobial activities. Two multigene families of defensins were previously reported in I. scapularis. The objective of the present study was to characterise the potential antimicrobial activity of two defensins from I. scapularis with emphasis on human pathogenic bacterial strains and important phytopathogenic fungi. Scapularisin-3 and Scapularisin-6 mature peptides were chemically synthesised. In vitro antimicrobial assays were performed to test the activity of these two defensins against species of different bacterial genera including Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Listeria spp. as well as Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa along with two plant-pathogenic fungi from the genus Fusarium. In addition, the tissue-specific expression patterns of Scapularisin-3 and Scapularisin-6 in I. scapularis midgut, salivary glands and embryo-derived cell lines were determined using PCR. Finally, tertiary structures of the two defensins were predicted and structural analyses were conducted. Scapularisin-6 efficiently killed L. grayi, and both Scapularisin-3 and Scapularisin-6 caused strong inhibition (IC50 value: ~1 μM) of the germination of plant-pathogenic fungi Fusarium culmorum and Fusarium graminearum. Scapularisin-6 gene expression was observed in I. scapularis salivary glands and midgut. However, Scapularisin-3 gene expression was only detected in the salivary glands. Transcripts from the two defensins were not found in the I. scapularis tick cell lines ISE6 and ISE18. Our results have two main implications. Firstly, the anti-Listeria and antifungal activities of

  16. Development of non-pathogenic bacterial biofilms on the surface of stainless steel which are inhibitory to Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonbin; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2018-02-01

    Non-pathogenic bacterial biofilms were developed on the surface of stainless steel possessing desiccation tolerance and antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica. Three bacteria exhibiting strong antimicrobial activities against S. enterica were isolated from various soils, foods, and food-contact surfaces. Isolates were identified as Pseudomonas extremorientalis (strain Lettuce-28), Paenibacillus peoriae (strain Lettuce-7), and Streptomyces cirratus (strain Geumsan-207). These bacteria grew rapidly and formed biofilms within 24 h on the surface of stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in laboratory media (tryptic soy broth or Bennet's broth) at 25 °C. Cells in biofilms had enhanced tolerance to desiccation (exposure to 43% atmospheric relative humidity [RH]) and retained antimicrobial activity against S. enterica. Populations of S. enterica deposited on SSCs containing biofilm formed by Ps. extremorientalis strain Lettuce-28, for example, decreased by > 2.5 log CFU/coupon within 24 h at 25 °C and 43% RH, while the number of cells inoculated on SSCs lacking biofilm decreased by 1.5 log CFU/coupon. Antimicrobial activities of the three antagonistic bacteria against S. enterica persisted in desiccated biofilms. This study provides insights to developing strategies to inactivate Salmonella and perhaps other foodborne pathogens on abiotic surfaces using non-pathogenic antagonistic bacteria. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of climate change on the persistence and dispersal of foodborne bacterial pathogens in the outdoor environment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Chu, Eric

    2016-08-01

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), warming of the climate system is unequivocal. Over the coming century, warming trends such as increased duration and frequency of heat waves and hot extremes are expected in some areas, as well as increased intensity of some storm systems. Climate-induced trends will impact the persistence and dispersal of foodborne pathogens in myriad ways, especially for environmentally ubiquitous and/or zoonotic microorganisms. Animal hosts of foodborne pathogens are also expected to be impacted by climate change through the introduction of increased physiological stress and, in some cases, altered geographic ranges and seasonality. This review article examines the effects of climatic factors, such as temperature, rainfall, drought and wind, on the environmental dispersal and persistence of bacterial foodborne pathogens, namely, Bacillus cereus, Brucella, Campylobacter, Clostridium, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio and Yersinia enterocolitica. These relationships are then used to predict how future climatic changes will impact the activity of these microorganisms in the outdoor environment and associated food safety issues. The development of predictive models that quantify these complex relationships will also be discussed, as well as the potential impacts of climate change on transmission of foodborne disease from animal hosts.

  18. Quantifying School Officials' Exposure to Bacterial Pathogens at Graduation Ceremonies Using Repeated Observational Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishai, David; Liu, Liang; Shiau, Stephanie; Wang, Harrison; Tsai, Cindy; Liao, Margaret; Prakash, Shivaani; Howard, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the risk of acquiring pathogenic bacteria as a result of shaking hands at graduation ceremonies. School officials participating in graduation ceremonies at elementary, secondary, and postsecondary schools were recruited. Specimens were collected before and immediately following graduation. Cultures…

  19. Mild processing applied to the inactivation of the main foodborne bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barba Orellana, Francisco Jose; Koubaa, Mohamed; do Prado-Silva, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    such as high pressure processing, ultrasounds, pulsed electric fields, UV-light, and atmospheric cold plasma may serve, in some conditions, as useful alternatives to commercial sterilization and pasteurization aiming to destroy foodborne pathogens. Each of these mild technologies has a specific mode...

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum aqueous seed extracts against some pathogenic bacterial strains

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Ramesa Shafi; Al-daihan, Sooad

    2014-01-01

    Seeds aqueous extracts from Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum were investigated for antibacterial activity by disc diffusion method and protein profile. Both seed aqueous extracts show moderate inhibition against pathogenic bacteria, both gram positive including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacilllus subtillis and gram negative bacteria including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Overall analysis of the antibacterial activity of tested samples revealed ...

  1. A longitudinal study of lung bacterial pathogens in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Alanin, M.; G. Nielsen, K.; von Buchwald, C.

    2015-01-01

    from 107 patients with PCD (median age 17 years, range 0–74 years) (median age at diagnosis 7.8 years, range 0–63 years). Haemophilus influenzae was the most frequent microorganism. Other common pathogens were P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and Staphylococcus aureus...

  2. Distribution and types of water-borne bacterial pathogens in River ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 434 bacteria organisms were isolated comprising nineteen different species. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, which are human pathogenic organisms, had the highest percentage (11.98%) followed by Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae subspecies pneumonia. Pseudomonas ...

  3. The plant defense and pathogen counterdefense mediated by Hevea brasiliensis serine protease HbSPA and Phytophthora palmivora extracellular protease inhibitor PpEPI10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitiya Ekchaweng

    Full Text Available Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg is an important economic crop in Thailand. Leaf fall and black stripe diseases caused by the aggressive oomycete pathogen Phytophthora palmivora, cause deleterious damage on rubber tree growth leading to decrease of latex production. To gain insights into the molecular function of H. brasiliensis subtilisin-like serine proteases, the HbSPA, HbSPB, and HbSPC genes were transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana via agroinfiltration. A functional protease encoded by HbSPA was successfully expressed in the apoplast of N. benthamiana leaves. Transient expression of HbSPA in N. benthamiana leaves enhanced resistance to P. palmivora, suggesting that HbSPA plays an important role in plant defense. P. palmivora Kazal-like extracellular protease inhibitor 10 (PpEPI10, an apoplastic effector, has been implicated in pathogenicity through the suppression of H. brasiliensis protease. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the PpEPI10 gene was significantly up-regulated during colonization of rubber tree by P. palmivora. Concurrently, the HbSPA gene was highly expressed during infection. To investigate a possible interaction between HbSPA and PpEPI10, the recombinant PpEPI10 protein (rPpEPI10 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity chromatography. In-gel zymogram and co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP assays demonstrated that rPpEPI10 specifically inhibited and interacted with HbSPA. The targeting of HbSPA by PpEPI10 revealed a defense-counterdefense mechanism, which is mediated by plant protease and pathogen protease inhibitor, in H. brasiliensis-P. palmivora interactions.

  4. Evaluation of the line probe assay for the rapid detection of bacterial meningitis pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid samples from children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysal, Ahmet; Toprak, Demet Gedikbasi; Türkoğlu, Salih; Bakir, Mustafa

    2017-01-11

    The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance of the line probe assay (LPA) with conventional multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Streptococcus pneumoniae as well as real-time PCR for Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from children during the multicenter national surveillance of bacterial meningitis between the years 2006 and 2009 in Turkey. During the study period 1460 subjects were enrolled and among them 841 (57%) met the criteria for probable bacterial meningitis. The mean age of subjects was 51 ± 47 months (range, 1-212 months). We performed the line probe assay in 751 (89%) CSF samples of 841 probable bacterial meningitis cases, of whom 431 (57%) were negative, 127 (17%) were positive for S. pneumoniae, 53 (7%) were positive for H. influenzae type b, and 41 (5%) were positive for N. meningitidis. The LPA was positive in 19 of 23 (82%) S. pneumoniae samples, 4 of 6 (67%) N. meningitidis samples and 2 of 2 (100%) Hib samples in CSF culture-positive cases. The specificity of the LPA for all of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b, and N. meningitidis was 88% (95% CI: 85-91%), when using the standard PCR as a reference. The specificity of LPA for each of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b, and N. meningitidis was 93% (95% CI: 89-95%), 96% (95% CI: 94-98%), and 99% (95% CI: 97-99%), respectively. For all of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b and N. meningitidis the sensitivity of the LPA was 76% (95% CI: 70-82%) and for each of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b and N. meningitidis was 72% (95% CI:63-79%), 88% (95% CI: 73-95%), and 81% (95% CI:67-92%), respectively. The LPA assay can be used to detect common bacterial meningitis pathogens in CSF samples, but the assay requires further improvement.

  5. Discovery of a Unique Extracellular Polysaccharide in Members of the Pathogenic Bacillus That Can Co-form with Spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi; Hwang, Soyoun; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2016-09-02

    An exopolysaccharide, produced during the late stage of stationary growth phase, was discovered and purified from the culture medium of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, and Bacillus thuringiensis when strains were grown in a defined nutrient medium that induces biofilm. Two-dimensional NMR structural characterization of the polysaccharide, named pzX, revealed that it is composed of an unusual three amino-sugar sequence repeat of [-3)XylNAc4OAc(α1-3)GlcNAcA4OAc(α1-3)XylNAc(α1-]n The sugar residue XylNAc had never been described previously in any glycan structure. The XNAC operon that contains the genes for the assembly of pzX is also unique and so far has been identified only in members of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group. Microscopic and biochemical analyses indicate that pzX co-forms during sporulation, so that upon the release of the spore to the extracellular milieu it becomes surrounded by pzX. The relative amounts of pzX produced can be manipulated by specific nutrients in the medium, but rich medium appears to suppress pzX formation. pzX has the following unique characteristics: a surfactant property that lowers surface tension, a cell/spore antiaggregant, and an adherence property that increases spores binding to surfaces. pzX in Bacillus could represent a trait shared by many spore-producing microorganisms. It suggests pzX is an active player in spore physiology and may provide new insights to the successful survival of the B. cereus species in natural environments or in the hosts. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Molecular basis of in-vivo biofilm formation by bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Joo, Hwang-Soo; Otto, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are involved in a multitude of serious chronic infections. In recent years, modeling biofilm infection in vitro led to the identification of microbial determinants governing biofilm development. However, we lack information as to whether biofilm formation mechanisms identified in vitro have relevance for biofilm-associated infection. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of biofilm formation using staphylococci and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to illustrate key points, as their bi...

  7. In vitro screening of mucus and solvent extracts of Eisenia foetida against human bacterial and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andleeb, Saiqa; Ejaz, Mubashir; Awan, Uzma Azeem; Ali, Shaukat; Kiyani, Ayesha; Shafique, Irsa; Zafar, Atiya

    2016-05-01

    Earthworms are macro invertebrate and have been widely used as therapeutic drugs for thousands of years. In the current research, experiments viz., the antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activity of mucus and solvent extracts of Eisenia foetida were conducted to investigate for the first time in Pakistan against human infectious pathogens. Antimicrobial activity of E. foetida against human pathogens underwent investigation through an agar disc diffusion method while an ABTS(•+) free radical scavenging method assessed the antioxidant activity. The percentage of bacterial and fungal growth was analyzed statistically with One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Results showed that the mucus IV of E. foetida produced a strong potent antibacterial and antifungal activity. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited the highest inhibition zone (33.67±1.53 mm), followed by Klebsiella pneumonia (30.33±1.53mm), Penicillium notatum (30±0.051), Escherichia coli (29±1 mm), Candida albicans (28.33±0.54 mm), Staphylococcus aureus (27±1mm), Serratia marcescens (25.33±0.58 mm), Aspergillus flavus (25.33±0.58 mm), Staphylococcus epidermidis (24.33±0.58 mm), Streptococcus pyogenes (21.67±1.53 mm), and Aspergillus niger (20.67±0.53 mm). Mucus IV of E. foetida also showed the highest antioxidant activity (99%). The results clearly indicate that the mucus and solvent extracts contain effective antimicrobial properties and bioactive compounds to inhibit the growth of infectious pathogens. We conclude that mucus extracts of earthworm have significant level of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and in future could be potentially used against various infectious pathogens.

  8. Iron piracy: acquisition of transferrin-bound iron by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, C N; Sparling, P F

    1994-12-01

    The mechanism of iron utilization from transferrin has been most extensively characterized in the pathogenic Neisseria species and Haemophilus species. Two transferrin-binding proteins, Tbp1 and Tbp2, have been identified in these pathogens and are thought to be components of the transferrin receptor. Tbp1 appears to be an integral, TonB-dependent outer membrane protein while Tbp2, a lipoprotein, may be peripherally associated with the outer membrane. The relative contribution of each of these proteins to transferrin binding and utilization is discussed and a model of iron uptake from transferrin is presented. Sequence comparisons of the genes encoding neisserial transferrin-binding proteins suggest that they are probably under positive selection for variation and may have resulted from inter-species genetic exchange.

  9. Microbial Diagnostic Microarrays for the Detection and Typing of Food- and Water-Borne (Bacterial) Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Tanja; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive pathogen detection in clinical and environmental (including food and water) samples is of greatest importance for public health. Standard microbiological methods have several limitations and improved alternatives are needed. Most important requirements for reliable analysis include: (i) specificity; (ii) sensitivity; (iii) multiplexing potential; (iv) robustness; (v) speed; (vi) automation potential; and (vii) low cost. Microarray technology can, through its very nature, fulfill many of these requirements directly and the remaining challenges have been tackled. In this review, we attempt to compare performance characteristics of the microbial diagnostic microarrays developed for the detection and typing of food and water pathogens, and discuss limitations, points still to be addressed and issues specific for the analysis of food, water and environmental samples. PMID:27605332

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of Erwinia tracheiphila, an Economically Important Bacterial Pathogen of Cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Lori R; Scully, Erin D; Roberts, Dana; Straub, Timothy J; Geib, Scott M; Park, Jihye; Stephenson, Andrew G; Salaau Rojas, Erika; Liu, Quin; Beattie, Gwyn; Gleason, Mark; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Mescher, Mark C; Fleischer, Shelby G; Kolter, Roberto; Pierce, Naomi; Zhaxybayeva, Olga

    2015-06-04

    Erwinia tracheiphila is one of the most economically important pathogens of cucumbers, melons, squashes, pumpkins, and gourds in the northeastern and midwestern United States, yet its molecular pathology remains uninvestigated. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an E. tracheiphila strain isolated from an infected wild gourd (Cucurbita pepo subsp. texana) plant. The genome assembly consists of 7 contigs and includes a putative plasmid and at least 20 phage and prophage elements. Copyright © 2015 Shapiro et al.

  11. Bacterial and viral pathogens in live oysters: 2007 United States market survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaola, Angelo; Jones, Jessica L; Woods, Jacquelina; Burkhardt, William; Calci, Kevin R; Krantz, Jeffrey A; Bowers, John C; Kasturi, Kuppuswamy; Byars, Robin H; Jacobs, Emily; Williams-Hill, Donna; Nabe, Khamphet

    2010-05-01

    Two samples of market oysters, primarily from retail establishments, were collected twice each month in each of nine states during 2007. Samples were shipped refrigerated overnight to five U.S. Food and Drug Administration laboratories on a rotating basis and analyzed by most probable number (MPN) for total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus numbers and for the presence of toxigenic V. cholerae, Salmonella spp., norovirus (NoV), and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Levels of indicator organisms, including fecal coliforms (MPN), Escherichia coli (MPN), male-specific bacteriophage, and aerobic plate counts, were also determined. V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus levels were distributed seasonally and geographically by harvest region and were similar to levels observed in a previous study conducted in 1998-1999. Levels of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were typically several logs lower than total V. parahaemolyticus levels regardless of season or region. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels in the Gulf and Mid-Atlantic regions were about two logs greater than the levels observed in the Pacific and North Atlantic regions. Pathogens generally associated with fecal pollution were detected sporadically or not at all (toxigenic V. cholerae, 0%; Salmonella, 1.5%; NoV, 3.9%; HAV, 4.4%). While seasonal prevalences of NoV and HAV were generally greater in oysters harvested from December to March, the low detection frequency obscured any apparent seasonal effects. Overall, there was no relationship between the levels of indicator microorganisms and the presence of enteric viruses. These data provide a baseline that can be used to further validate risk assessment predictions, determine the effectiveness of new control measures, and compare the level of protection provided by the U.S. shellfish sanitation system to those in other countries.

  12. Bacterial and Viral Pathogens in Live Oysters: 2007 United States Market Survey ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaola, Angelo; Jones, Jessica L.; Woods, Jacquelina; Burkhardt, William; Calci, Kevin R.; Krantz, Jeffrey A.; Bowers, John C.; Kasturi, Kuppuswamy; Byars, Robin H.; Jacobs, Emily; Williams-Hill, Donna; Nabe, Khamphet

    2010-01-01

    Two samples of market oysters, primarily from retail establishments, were collected twice each month in each of nine states during 2007. Samples were shipped refrigerated overnight to five U.S. Food and Drug Administration laboratories on a rotating basis and analyzed by most probable number (MPN) for total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus numbers and for the presence of toxigenic V. cholerae, Salmonella spp., norovirus (NoV), and hepatitis A virus (HAV). Levels of indicator organisms, including fecal coliforms (MPN), Escherichia coli (MPN), male-specific bacteriophage, and aerobic plate counts, were also determined. V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus levels were distributed seasonally and geographically by harvest region and were similar to levels observed in a previous study conducted in 1998-1999. Levels of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were typically several logs lower than total V. parahaemolyticus levels regardless of season or region. Pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus levels in the Gulf and Mid-Atlantic regions were about two logs greater than the levels observed in the Pacific and North Atlantic regions. Pathogens generally associated with fecal pollution were detected sporadically or not at all (toxigenic V. cholerae, 0%; Salmonella, 1.5%; NoV, 3.9%; HAV, 4.4%). While seasonal prevalences of NoV and HAV were generally greater in oysters harvested from December to March, the low detection frequency obscured any apparent seasonal effects. Overall, there was no relationship between the levels of indicator microorganisms and the presence of enteric viruses. These data provide a baseline that can be used to further validate risk assessment predictions, determine the effectiveness of new control measures, and compare the level of protection provided by the U.S. shellfish sanitation system to those in other countries. PMID:20190085

  13. Bacterial Quality and Prevalence of Foodborne Pathogens in Edible Offal from Slaughterhouses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Min Chan; Seo, Kwang Won; Bae, Dong Hwa; Lee, Young Ju

    2016-01-01

    Edible offal meats have recently received significant attention worldwide. However, studies evaluating the microbial quality of diverse edible offal and specifically investigating contamination by pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses are rare. Our study was conducted to investigate the microbiological quality of six kinds of edible offal produced from 11 pigs and 8 cattle slaughterhouses in the Republic of Korea and the prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms such as Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in these products. The values for aerobic plate counts, coliform counts, and E. coli counts in red offal were 1.00 to 6.70, 0 (below 10 CFU) to 4.78, and 0 to 4.00 log CFU/g, respectively. For green offal, the values were 3.00 to 7.00, 1.48 to 6.30, and 0 to 6.00 log CFU/g, respectively. The most frequently detected foodborne pathogen was Salmonella (23.8% prevalence in pig offal and 7.1% prevalence in cattle offal), followed by C. perfringens (11.1 and 7.1%, respectively) and S. aureus (12.7 and 2.4%, respectively). None of the offal samples tested positive for E. coli O157:H7. Considering the microbial quality of offal from Korean slaughterhouses and the prevalence of foodborne pathogens in this material, more refined hygienic standards such as a hazard analysis critical control point system for processing, packing, and transporting edible offal are necessary for preventing further contamination.

  14. Bacterial genome sequencing in clinical microbiology: a pathogen-oriented review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagini, F; Greub, G

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been perceived as a technology with the potential to revolutionise clinical microbiology. Herein, we reviewed the literature on the use of WGS for the most commonly encountered pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories: Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, streptococci and enterococci, mycobacteria and Chlamydia trachomatis. For each pathogen group, we focused on five different aspects: the genome characteristics, the most common genomic approaches and the clinical uses of WGS for (i) typing and outbreak analysis, (ii) virulence investigation and (iii) in silico antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Of all the clinical usages, the most frequent and straightforward usage was to type bacteria and to trace outbreaks back. A next step toward standardisation was made thanks to the development of several new genome-wide multi-locus sequence typing systems based on WGS data. Although virulence characterisation could help in various particular clinical settings, it was done mainly to describe outbreak strains. An increasing number of studies compared genotypic to phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility testing, with mostly promising results. However, routine implementation will preferentially be done in the workflow of particular pathogens, such as mycobacteria, rather than as a broadly applicable generic tool. Overall, concrete uses of WGS in routine clinical microbiology or infection control laboratories were done, but the next big challenges will be the standardisation and validation of the procedures and bioinformatics pipelines in order to reach clinical standards.

  15. Antibacterial activity of different extracts of prawn shell (Macrobrachium nipponense against human bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Karimzadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Bioactive compounds existing in crustacean shells have the potential to inhibit the growth of some pathogenic microorganism. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antibacterial effects of different extracts of prawn shells (Macrobrachium nipponense on some human pathogenic bacteria. Materials and Methods: Sampling (prawn was conducted in summer 2014 from Anzali wetland in southern coast of Caspian Sea. Then, the hydroalcoholic, methanolic, and acetone extracts of prawn shells were applied for this purpose. Two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis Staphylococcus aureus and three Gram-negative (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Vibrio cholerae, and Escherichia coli were used as test organisms. The antibacterial activity was determined by paper disk diffusion. Results: The prawn shell extracts showed activity against pathogenic bacteria. The highest antibacterial activities were measured in B. subtilis, S. aureus, and V. cholerae with the zone of inhibition being 12.12 ± 0.32 mm, 12.51 ± 0.14 mm, and 12.35 ± 0.27 mm, respectively. Among all the strains, S. aureus exhibits a significant zone of inhibition against all extracts (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The findings of this research showed that different prawn shell extracts, particularly hydroalcoholic, have bactericidal effect on B. subtilis, S. aureus, and V. cholerae species.

  16. Temperature and Light Effects on Extracellular Superoxide Production by Algal and Bacterial Symbionts in Corals: Implications for Coral Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighi, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Apprill, A.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increased surface seawater temperature due to global warming is one of the main causes of coral bleaching, a phenomenon in which corals lose their photosynthetic algae. Light and temperature induced production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) by these symbiotic algae has been implicated in the breakdown of their symbiotic association with the coral host and subsequent coral bleaching. Nevertheless, a direct link between Symbiodinium ROS production and coral bleaching has not been demonstrated. In fact, given the abundance and diversity of microorganisms within the coral holobiont, the concentration and fluxes of ROS within corals may involve several microbial sources and sinks. Here, we explore the role of increased light and temperature on superoxide production by coral-derived cultures of Symbiodinium algae and Oceanospirillales bacteria of the genus Endozoicomonas, which are globally common and abundant associates of corals. Using a high sensitivity chemiluminescent technique, we find that heat stress (exposure to 34°C vs. 23°C for 2hr or 24hr) has no significant effect on extracellular superoxide production by Symbiodinium isolates within clades B and C, regardless of the level of light exposure. Exposure to high light, however, increased superoxide production by these organisms at both 34°C and 23°C. On the other hand, extracellular superoxide production by Endozoicomonas bacteria tested under the same conditions was stimulated by the combined effects of thermal and light stress. The results of this research suggest that the sources and physical triggers for biological superoxide production within corals are more complex than currently assumed. Thus, further investigations into the biological processes controlling ROS dynamics within corals are required to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning coral bleaching and to aid in the development of mitigation strategies.

  17. Effects of extracellular DNA from Candida albicans and pneumonia-related pathogens on Candida biofilm formation and hyphal transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapaar, B; Nur, A; Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Murakami, K; Amoh, T; Matsuo, T; Ichikawa, T; Miyake, Y

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of genomic DNA purified from Candida albicans and pneumonia-related pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, on in vitro biofilm formation and morphological change of 3 Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. tropicalis). Biofilm formation was evaluated by the crystal violet assay and colony-forming unit counts. Morphological characteristics of biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Addition of DNA at a low concentration (Candida species. In contrast, the addition of DNA at a high concentration (10 μg ml(-1)) decreased the biofilm mass. Interestingly, the formation of hyphae in a dense network of yeast cells was observed in C. albicans biofilms exposed to a low concentration of DNA (Candida biofilm formation and suggested that eDNA may induce the morphological transition from yeast to hyphal growth form during C. albicans biofilm development. A novel therapy targeting eDNA may be applicable for Candida infection to decrease biofilm formation and hyphal formation. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps and bacterial biofilms in middle ear effusion of children with recurrent acute otitis media--a potential treatment target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B Thornton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteria persist within biofilms on the middle ear mucosa of children with recurrent and chronic otitis media however the mechanisms by which these develop remain to be elucidated. Biopsies can be difficult to obtain from children and their small size limits analysis. METHODS: In this study we aimed to investigate biofilm presence in middle ear effusion (MEE from children with recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM and to determine if these may represent infectious reservoirs similarly to those on the mucosa. We examined this through culture, viability staining and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH to determine bacterial species present. Most MEEs had live bacteria present using viability staining (32/36 and all effusions had bacteria present using the universal FISH probe (26/26. Of these, 70% contained 2 or more otopathogenic species. Extensive DNA stranding was also present. This DNA was largely host derived, representing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs within which live bacteria in biofilm formations were present. When treated with the recombinant human deoxyribonuclease 1, Dornase alfa, these strands were observed to fragment. CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial biofilms, composed of multiple live otopathogenic species can be demonstrated in the MEEs of children with rAOM and that these contain extensive DNA stranding from NETs. The NETs contribute to the viscosity of the effusion, potentially contributing to its failure to clear as well as biofilm development. Our data indicates that Dornase alfa can fragment these strands and may play a role in future chronic OM treatment.

  19. Culture-dependent and culture-independent characterization of potentially functional biphenyl-degrading bacterial community in response to extracellular organic matter from Micrococcus luteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Yin-Dong; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Ding, Lin-Xian; Shen, Chao-Feng

    2015-05-01

    Biphenyl (BP)-degrading bacteria were identified to degrade various polychlorinated BP (PCB) congers in long-term PCB-contaminated sites. Exploring BP-degrading capability of potentially useful bacteria was performed for enhancing PCB bioremediation. In the present study, the bacterial composition of the PCB-contaminated sediment sample was first investigated. Then extracellular organic matter (EOM) from Micrococcus luteus was used to enhance BP biodegradation. The effect of the EOM on the composition of bacterial community was investigated by combining with culture-dependent and culture-independent methods. The obtained results indicate that Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were predominant community in the PCB-contaminated sediment. EOM from M. luteus could stimulate the activity of some potentially difficult-to-culture BP degraders, which contribute to significant enhancement of BP biodegradation. The potentially difficult-to-culture bacteria in response to EOM addition were mainly Rhodococcus and Pseudomonas belonging to Gammaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria respectively. This study provides new insights into exploration of functional difficult-to-culture bacteria with EOM addition and points out broader BP/PCB degrading, which could be employed for enhancing PCB-bioremediation processes. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral(®)), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed.

  2. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part II: Vaccines for Shigella, Salmonella, enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) enterohemorragic E. coli (EHEC) and Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Carlos Salazar, Juan; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    In Part II we discuss the following bacterial pathogens: Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic) and Campylobacter jejuni. In contrast to the enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae discussed in Part I of this series, for the bacterial pathogens described here there is only one licensed vaccine, developed primarily for Vibrio cholerae and which provides moderate protection against enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) (Dukoral®), as well as a few additional candidates in advanced stages of development for ETEC and one candidate for Shigella spp. Numerous vaccine candidates in earlier stages of development are discussed. PMID:25715096

  3. A disposable bacterial lysis cartridge (BLC) suitable for an in situ water-borne pathogen detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Lim, Hyun Jeong; Son, Ahjeong; Chua, Beelee

    2015-11-21

    We constructed a disposable bacterial lysis cartridge (BLC) suitable for an in situ pathogen detection system. It had an in-built micro corona discharge based ozone generator that provided ozone for cell lysis. Using a custom sample handling platform, its performance was evaluated with a Gram-positive bacterium of Bacillus subtilis. It was capable of achieving a similar degree of lysis as a commercial ultrasonic dismembrator with a P-1 microprobe in 10 min at an air pump flow rate of 29.4 ml min(-1) and an ozone generator operating voltage of 1600 V. The lysing duration could be significantly reduced to 5 min by increasing the air pump flow rate and the ozone generator operating voltage as well as by the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS).

  4. Nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis antibiotic treatment in the era of multi-drug resistance pathogens: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Marco; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Gentile, Ivan; Borgia, Guglielmo; Leone, Sebastiano; Sansone, Pasquale; Passavanti, Maria Beatrice; Aurilio, Caterina; Pace, Maria Caterina

    2017-07-07

    To systematically review literature upon aetiology of nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (N-SBP) given the rising importance of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. A literature search was performed on MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases from 2000 to 15th of November 2016, using the following search strategy: "spontaneous" AND "peritonitis". The initial search through electronic databases retrieved 2556 records. After removing duplicates, 1958 records remained. One thousand seven hundred and thirty-five of them were excluded on the basis of the screening of titles and abstract, and the ensuing number of remaining articles was 223. Of these records, after careful evaluation, only 9 were included in the qualitative analysis. The overall proportion of MDR bacteria turned out to be from 22% to 73% of cases across the studies. N-SBP is caused, in a remarkable proportion, by MDR pathogens. This should prompt a careful re-assessment of guidelines addressing the treatment of this clinical entity.

  5. Nanomaterial-based sensors for detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens and toxins as well as pork adulteration in meat products

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Inbaraj, B.; Chen, B. H.

    2016-01-01

    Food safety draws considerable attention in the modern pace of the world owing to rapid-changing food recipes and food habits. Foodborne illnesses associated with pathogens, toxins, and other contaminants pose serious threat to human health. Besides, a large amount of money is spent on both analyses and control measures, which causes significant loss to the food industry. Conventional detection methods for bacterial pathogens and toxins are time consuming and laborious, requiring certain soph...

  6. An operon for production of bioactive gibberellin A(4) phytohormone with wide distribution in the bacterial rice leaf streak pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, R.; Turrini, P. C. G.; Nett, R. S.; Leach, J. E.; Verdier, Valérie; Van Sluys, M. A.; Peters, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Phytopathogens have developed elaborate mechanisms to attenuate the defense response of their host plants, including convergent evolution of complex pathways for production of the GA phytohormones, which were actually first isolated from the rice fungal pathogen Gibberella fujikuroi. The rice bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) has been demonstrated to contain a biosynthetic operon with cyclases capable of producing the universal GA precursor ent-kaurene. Genetic (knock-...

  7. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Bacterial Pathogens: the Future of Nosocomial Outbreak Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quainoo, Scott; Coolen, Jordy P M; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Huynen, Martijn A; Melchers, Willem J G; van Schaik, Willem; Wertheim, Heiman F L

    2017-10-01

    Outbreaks of multidrug-resistant bacteria present a frequent threat to vulnerable patient populations in hospitals around the world. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients are particularly susceptible to nosocomial infections due to indwelling devices such as intravascular catheters, drains, and intratracheal tubes for mechanical ventilation. The increased vulnerability of infected ICU patients demonstrates the importance of effective outbreak management protocols to be in place. Understanding the transmission of pathogens via genotyping methods is an important tool for outbreak management. Recently, whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of pathogens has become more accessible and affordable as a tool for genotyping. Analysis of the entire pathogen genome via WGS could provide unprecedented resolution in discriminating even highly related lineages of bacteria and revolutionize outbreak analysis in hospitals. Nevertheless, clinicians have long been hesitant to implement WGS in outbreak analyses due to the expensive and cumbersome nature of early sequencing platforms. Recent improvements in sequencing technologies and analysis tools have rapidly increased the output and analysis speed as well as reduced the overall costs of WGS. In this review, we assess the feasibility of WGS technologies and bioinformatics analysis tools for nosocomial outbreak analyses and provide a comparison to conventional outbreak analysis workflows. Moreover, we review advantages and limitations of sequencing technologies and analysis tools and present a real-world example of the implementation of WGS for antimicrobial resistance analysis. We aimed to provide health care professionals with a guide to WGS outbreak analysis that highlights its benefits for hospitals and assists in the transition from conventional to WGS-based outbreak analysis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Being pathogenic, plastic, and sexual while living with a nearly minimal bacterial genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sirand-Pugnet

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are commonly described as the simplest self-replicating organisms, whose evolution was mainly characterized by genome downsizing with a proposed evolutionary scenario similar to that of obligate intracellular bacteria such as insect endosymbionts. Thus far, analysis of mycoplasma genomes indicates a low level of horizontal gene transfer (HGT implying that DNA acquisition is strongly limited in these minimal bacteria. In this study, the genome of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae was sequenced. Comparative genomic data and phylogenetic tree reconstruction revealed that approximately 18% of its small genome (877,438 bp has undergone HGT with the phylogenetically distinct mycoides cluster, which is composed of significant ruminant pathogens. HGT involves genes often found as clusters, several of which encode lipoproteins that usually play an important role in mycoplasma-host interaction. A decayed form of a conjugative element also described in a member of the mycoides cluster was found in the M. agalactiae genome, suggesting that HGT may have occurred by mobilizing a related genetic element. The possibility of HGT events among other mycoplasmas was evaluated with the available sequenced genomes. Our data indicate marginal levels of HGT among Mycoplasma species except for those described above and, to a lesser extent, for those observed in between the two bird pathogens, M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. This first description of large-scale HGT among mycoplasmas sharing the same ecological niche challenges the generally accepted evolutionary scenario in which gene loss is the main driving force of mycoplasma evolution. The latter clearly differs from that of other bacteria with small genomes, particularly obligate intracellular bacteria that are isolated within host cells. Consequently, mycoplasmas are not only able to subvert complex hosts but presumably have retained sexual competence, a trait that may prevent them from

  9. Being pathogenic, plastic, and sexual while living with a nearly minimal bacterial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Lartigue, Carole; Marenda, Marc; Jacob, Daniel; Barré, Aurélien; Barbe, Valérie; Schenowitz, Chantal; Mangenot, Sophie; Couloux, Arnaud; Segurens, Beatrice; de Daruvar, Antoine; Blanchard, Alain; Citti, Christine

    2007-05-18

    Mycoplasmas are commonly described as the simplest self-replicating organisms, whose evolution was mainly characterized by genome downsizing with a proposed evolutionary scenario similar to that of obligate intracellular bacteria such as insect endosymbionts. Thus far, analysis of mycoplasma genomes indicates a low level of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) implying that DNA acquisition is strongly limited in these minimal bacteria. In this study, the genome of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma agalactiae was sequenced. Comparative genomic data and phylogenetic tree reconstruction revealed that approximately 18% of its small genome (877,438 bp) has undergone HGT with the phylogenetically distinct mycoides cluster, which is composed of significant ruminant pathogens. HGT involves genes often found as clusters, several of which encode lipoproteins that usually play an important role in mycoplasma-host interaction. A decayed form of a conjugative element also described in a member of the mycoides cluster was found in the M. agalactiae genome, suggesting that HGT may have occurred by mobilizing a related genetic element. The possibility of HGT events among other mycoplasmas was evaluated with the available sequenced genomes. Our data indicate marginal levels of HGT among Mycoplasma species except for those described above and, to a lesser extent, for those observed in between the two bird pathogens, M. gallisepticum and M. synoviae. This first description of large-scale HGT among mycoplasmas sharing the same ecological niche challenges the generally accepted evolutionary scenario in which gene loss is the main driving force of mycoplasma evolution. The latter clearly differs from that of other bacteria with small genomes, particularly obligate intracellular bacteria that are isolated within host cells. Consequently, mycoplasmas are not only able to subvert complex hosts but presumably have retained sexual competence, a trait that may prevent them from genome stasis and

  10. Metabolic Effectors Secreted by Bacterial Pathogens: Essential Facilitators of Plastid Endosymbiosis?[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Steven G.; Subtil, Agathe; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Moustafa, Ahmed; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Gehre, Lena; Colleoni, Christophe; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Cenci, Ugo; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway. PMID:23371946

  11. Metabolic effectors secreted by bacterial pathogens: essential facilitators of plastid endosymbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Steven G; Subtil, Agathe; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Moustafa, Ahmed; Weber, Andreas P M; Gehre, Lena; Colleoni, Christophe; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Cenci, Ugo; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway.

  12. [Horizontal transfer of bacterial genes and its significance for antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, L C; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E

    2007-12-08

    * Sexual reproduction does not occur in bacteria. The point of departure in bacterial reproduction is always that one individual divides itself into two identical descendants. * In the bacterial world, however, there is certainly exchange of hereditary characteristics (DNA). This type of exchange is called horizontal gene transfer. * There are 3 basic ways for the exchange of DNA between bacteria: conjugation, transduction and natural transformation. Each of these has its specific impact on the species. * During conjugation, a piece of DNA is copied in one bacterium and transferred to another via a temporary connection, a conjugative pilus. In this way, for example, a particular gene that codes for resistance against antibiotics can be transmitted. * In transduction, the transfer of DNA takes place with the aid of bacteriophages. The gene that codes for the toxin produced by Vibrio cholerae is spread by transduction. * In transformation, DNA that is located outside the cell is fragmented and imported into the cell, after which, via recombination, the DNA replaces a piece of original DNA in the chromosome of the host. Transformation is responsible for, among other things, antigen variation in the pneumococcal capsule. Antigen variation helps the pneumococci to resist the immune response leading to the forming of antibodies and adequate opsonisation.

  13. Mass mortality in ornamental fish, Cyprinus carpio koi caused by a bacterial pathogen, Proteus hauseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raj; Swaminathan, T Raja; Kumar, Rahul G; Dharmaratnam, Arathi; Basheer, V S; Jena, J K

    2015-09-01

    Moribund koi carp, Cyprinus carpio koi, from a farm with 50% cumulative mortality were sampled with the aim of isolating and detecting the causative agent. Three bacterial species viz., Citrobacter freundii (NSCF-1), Klebsiella pneumoniae (NSKP-1) and Proteus hauseri [genomospecies 3 of Proteus vulgaris Bio group 3] (NSPH-1) were isolated, identified and characterized on the basis of biochemical tests and sequencing of the 16S rDNA gene using universal bacterial primers. Challenge experiments with these isolates using healthy koi carp showed that P. hauseri induced identical clinical and pathological states within 3 d of intramuscular injection. The results suggest P. hauseri (NSPH-1) was the causative agent. In phylogenetic analysis, strain NSPH-1 formed a distinct cluster with other P. hauseri reference strains with ≥99% sequence similarity. P. hauseri isolates were found sensitive to Ampicillin, Cefalexin, Ciprofloxacin and Cefixime and resistant to Gentamycin, Oxytetracycline, Chloramphenicol, and Kanamycin. The affected fish recovered from the infection after ciprofloxacin treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacterial diversity losses: A potential extracellular driving mechanism involving the molecular ecological function of hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Hu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The DNA transformation is vital to the horizontal gene transfer (HGT. The low-efficiency transformation of bare plasmid exposed to hydrophobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs decreases the gene transfer level, and is possibly related to the loss of bacterial diversity at present. PAHs have great affinity for bare DNA through dispersion force and π–π overlap between PAHs and bases. These noncovalent interactions between PAHs and bases reduced the transformational efficiency of plasmid into bacterial recipients. Meanwhile these low-efficiency transformations for plasmid are controlled by the ions like Ca2+ in environment, in turn, presence of 0.5 mmol L−1 Ca2+ recovered the efficiency from 3.2 (phenanthrene, 3.5 (pyrene to about 4.45 and 4.75, respectively. The combination of Ca2+ with the POO− groups in DNA forms strong electrovalent bonds, weakening the molecular effect of DNA on PAHs and in turn promoting the gene transfer exposed to PAHs.

  15. Prediction of extracellular proteases of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori reveals proteolytic activity of the Hp1018/19 protein HtrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Exported proteases of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are potentially involved in pathogen-associated disorders leading to gastric inflammation and neoplasia. By comprehensive sequence screening of the H. pylori proteome for predicted secreted proteases, we retrieved several candidate genes. We detected caseinolytic activities of several such proteases, which are released independently from the H. pylori type IV secretion system encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI. Among these, we found the predicted serine protease HtrA (Hp1019, which was previously identified in the bacterial secretome of H. pylori. Importantly, we further found that the H. pylori genes hp1018 and hp1019 represent a single gene likely coding for an exported protein. Here, we directly verified proteolytic activity of HtrA in vitro and identified the HtrA protease in zymograms by mass spectrometry. Overexpressed and purified HtrA exhibited pronounced proteolytic activity, which is inactivated after mutation of Ser205 to alanine in the predicted active center of HtrA. These data demonstrate that H. pylori secretes HtrA as an active protease, which might represent a novel candidate target for therapeutic intervention strategies.

  16. MALDI-TOF-MS with PLS Modeling Enables Strain Typing of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Nathan M.; Robison, Faith; Brick, Mark A.; Schwartz, Howard F.; Heuberger, Adam L.; Prenni, Jessica E.

    2017-11-01

    Matrix-assisted desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) is a fast and effective tool for microbial species identification. However, current approaches are limited to species-level identification even when genetic differences are known. Here, we present a novel workflow that applies the statistical method of partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to MALDI-TOF-MS protein fingerprint data of Xanthomonas axonopodis, an important bacterial plant pathogen of fruit and vegetable crops. Mass spectra of 32 X. axonopodis strains were used to create a mass spectral library and PLS-DA was employed to model the closely related strains. A robust workflow was designed to optimize the PLS-DA model by assessing the model performance over a range of signal-to-noise ratios (s/n) and mass filter (MF) thresholds. The optimized parameters were observed to be s/n = 3 and MF = 0.7. The model correctly classified 83% of spectra withheld from the model as a test set. A new decision rule was developed, termed the rolled-up Maximum Decision Rule (ruMDR), and this method improved identification rates to 92%. These results demonstrate that MALDI-TOF-MS protein fingerprints of bacterial isolates can be utilized to enable identification at the strain level. Furthermore, the open-source framework of this workflow allows for broad implementation across various instrument platforms as well as integration with alternative modeling and classification algorithms. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. A Two-Tube Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection of Viral and Bacterial Pathogens of Infectious Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea caused by viral and bacterial infections is a major health problem in developing countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a two-tube multiplex PCR assay using automatic electrophoresis for simultaneous detection of 13 diarrhea-causative viruses or bacteria, with an intended application in provincial Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention, China. The assay was designed to detect rotavirus A, norovirus genogroups GI and GII, human astrovirus, enteric adenoviruses, and human bocavirus (tube 1, and Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella, Yersinia, and Vibrio cholera (tube 2. The analytical specificity was examined with positive controls for each pathogen. The analytical sensitivity was evaluated by performing the assay on serial tenfold dilutions of in vitro transcribed RNA, recombinant plasmids, or bacterial culture. A total of 122 stool samples were tested by this two-tube assay and the results were compared with those obtained from reference methods. The two-tube assay achieved a sensitivity of 20–200 copies for a single virus and 102-103 CFU/mL for bacteria. The clinical performance demonstrated that the two-tube assay had comparable sensitivity and specificity to those of reference methods. In conclusion, the two-tube assay is a rapid, cost-effective, sensitive, specific, and high throughput method for the simultaneous detection of enteric bacteria and virus.

  18. Universal Probe Library based real-time PCR for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens from positive blood culture bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingxiang; Shen, Ding-Xia; Zhou, Qiming; Liu, Chao-Jun; Li, Zexia; Fang, Xiangdong; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2014-03-01

    A set of real-time PCR based assays using the locked nucleic acid probes from Roche Universal ProbeLibrary were developed for rapid detection of eight bacterial species from positive blood culture bottles. Four duplex real-time PCR reactions targeting to one Gram-positive bacterium and one Gram-negative bacterium were optimized for species identification according to Gram stain results. We also included mecA-specific primers and probes in the assays to indicate the presence of methicillin resistance in the bacterial species. The analytical sensitivity was in the range of 1-10 CFU per PCR reaction mixture. The specificity and cross reactivity of the assay was validated by 28 ATCC reference strains and 77 negative blood culture specimens. No cross-reactivity was observed in these samples thus demonstrating 100 % specificity. 72 previously characterized clinical isolates were tested by the real-time PCR assay and validated the accuracy and feasibility of the real-time PCR assay. Furthermore, 55 positive blood culture samples were tested using real-time PCR and 50 (90.9 %) of them were identified as the same species as judged by biochemical analysis. In total, real-time PCR showed 98.2 % consistent to that of traditional methods. Real-time PCR can be used as a supplement for early detection of the frequently-occurred pathogens from the positive blood cultures.

  19. The Water Cycle, a Potential Source of the Bacterial Pathogen Bacillus cereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillard, Julien; Dupont, Christian M. S.; Berge, Odile; Dargaignaratz, Claire; Oriol-Gagnier, Stéphanie; Doussan, Claude; Broussolle, Véronique; Gillon, Marina; Clavel, Thierry; Bérard, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of the sporulating soil-dwelling Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sl) which includes foodborne pathogenic strains has been extensively studied in relation to its various animal hosts. The aim of this environmental study was to investigate the water compartments (rain and soil water, as well as groundwater) closely linked to the primary B. cereus sl reservoir, for which available data are limited. B. cereus sl was present, primarily as spores, in all of the tested compartments of an agricultural site, including water from rain to groundwater through soil. During rain events, leachates collected after transfer through the soil eventually reached the groundwater and were loaded with B. cereus sl. In groundwater samples, newly introduced spores of a B. cereus model strain were able to germinate, and vegetative cells arising from this event were detected for up to 50 days. This first B. cereus sl investigation in the various types of interrelated environments suggests that the consideration of the aquatic compartment linked to soil and to climatic events should provide a better understanding of B. cereus sl ecology and thus be relevant for a more accurate risk assessment of food poisoning caused by B. cereus sl pathogenic strains. PMID:25918712

  20. Eutrophication and Bacterial Pathogens as Risk Factors for Avian Botulism Outbreaks in Wetlands Receiving Effluents from Urban Wastewater Treatment Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Dolors; Laguna, Celia; Díaz-Sánchez, Sandra; Sánchez, Sergio; Chicote, Álvaro; Florín, Máximo; Mateo, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Due to the scarcity of water resources in the “Mancha Húmeda” Biosphere Reserve, the use of treated wastewater has been proposed as a solution for the conservation of natural threatened floodplain wetlands. In addition, wastewater treatment plants of many villages pour their effluent into nearby natural lakes. We hypothesized that certain avian pathogens present in wastewater may cause avian mortalities which would trigger avian botulism outbreaks. With the aim of testing our hypothesis, 24 locations distributed in three wetlands, two that receive wastewater effluents and one serving as a control, were monitored during a year. Sediment, water, water bird feces, and invertebrates were collected for the detection of putative avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), Salmonella spp., Clostridium perfringens type A, and Clostridium botulinum type C/D. Also, water and sediment physicochemical properties were determined. Overall, APEC, C. perfringens, and C. botulinum were significantly more prevalent in samples belonging to the wetlands which receive wastewater. The occurrence of a botulism outbreak in one of the studied wetlands coincided with high water temperatures and sediment 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), a decrease in water redox potential, chlorophyll a, and sulfate levels, and an increase in water inorganic carbon levels. The presence of C. botulinum in bird feces before the onset of the outbreak indicates that carrier birds exist and highlights the risk of botulinum toxin production in their carcasses if they die by other causes such as bacterial diseases, which are more probable in wastewater wetlands. PMID:24795377

  1. The Genomic Sequence of the Oral Pathobiont Strain NI1060 Reveals Unique Strategies for Bacterial Competition and Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Darzi

    Full Text Available Strain NI1060 is an oral bacterium responsible for periodontitis in a murine ligature-induced disease model. To better understand its pathogenicity, we have determined the complete sequence of its 2,553,982 bp genome. Although closely related to Pasteurella pneumotropica, a pneumonia-associated rodent commensal based on its 16S rRNA, the NI1060 genomic content suggests that they are different species thriving on different energy sources via alternative metabolic pathways. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses showed that strain NI1060 is distinct from the genera currently described in the family Pasteurellaceae, and is likely to represent a novel species. In addition, we found putative virulence genes involved in lipooligosaccharide synthesis, adhesins and bacteriotoxic proteins. These genes are potentially important for host adaption and for the induction of dysbiosis through bacterial competition and pathogenicity. Importantly, strain NI1060 strongly stimulates Nod1, an innate immune receptor, but is defective in two peptidoglycan recycling genes due to a frameshift mutation. The in-depth analysis of its genome thus provides critical insights for the development of NI1060 as a prime model system for infectious disease.

  2. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortman, Guus AM; Mulder, Michelle LM; Richters, Thijs JW; Shanmugam, Nanda KN; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-01-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal-iron, or high-iron diets and after two weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron-deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high-iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26046550

  3. Antibiotic resistance genes and human bacterial pathogens: Co-occurrence, removal, and enrichment in municipal sewage sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Li, Bing; Ma, Liping; Wang, Yubo; Huang, Danping; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-15

    Understanding which/how antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) contribute to increased acquisition of resistance by pathogens in aquatic environments are challenges of profound significance. We explored the co-occurrence and removal versus enrichment of ARGs and human bacterial pathogens (HBPs) in municipal sewage sludge digesters. We combined metagenomic detection of a wide spectrum of 323 ARGs and 83 HBPs with a correlation-based statistical approach and charted a network of their co-occurrence relationships. The results indicate that most ARGs and a minor proportion of HBPs (mainly Collinsella aerofaciens, Streptococcus salivarius and Gordonia bronchialis) could not be removed by anaerobic digestion, revealing a biological risk of post-digestion sludge in disseminating antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity. Moreover, preferential co-occurrence patterns were evident within one ARG type (e.g., multidrug, beta-lactam, and aminoglycoside) and between two different ARG types (i.e., aminoglycoside and beta-lactam), possibly implicating co-effects of antibiotic selection pressure and co-resistance on shaping antibiotic resistome in sewage sludge. Unlike beta-lactam resistance genes, ARGs of multidrug and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin tended to co-occur more with HBPs. Strikingly, we presented evidence that the most straightforward biological origin of an ARG-species co-occurring event is a hosting relationship. Furthermore, a significant and robust HBP-species co-occurrence correlation provides a proper scenario for nominating HBP indicators (e.g., Bifidobacterium spp. are perfect indicators of C. aerofaciens; r = 0.92-0.99 and P-values < 0.01). Combined, this study demonstrates a creative and effective network-based metagenomic approach for exploring ARG hosts and HBP indicators and assessing ARGs acquisition by HBPs in human-impacted environments where ARGs and HBPs may co-thrive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploration and conservation of bacterial genetic resources as bacteriocin producing inhibitory microorganisms to pathogen bacteria in livestock

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    Chotiah S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exploration and conservation of microorganisms producing bacteriocin was done as the primary study towards the collection of potential bacteria and its application in improving livestock health condition and inhibit food borne pathogens. Diferent kinds of samples such as beef cattle rectal swab, rumen fluids, cow’s milk, chicken gut content, goat’s milk were collected at Bogor cattle slaughter houses, poultry slaughter houses, dairy cattle and goat farms. A total of 452 bacterial isolates consisted of 73 Gram negative bacteria and 379 Gram positive bacteria were isolated from samples collected and screened for bacteriocin activity. Determination of bacteriocin activity with bioassay using agar spot tests were carried out on liquid and semisolid medium assessing 8 kins of indicators of pathogenic bacteria and food borne pathogens. A total of 51 bacteriocin producing strains were collected and some of the strains had high inhibitory zone such as Lactobacillus casei SS14C (26 mm, Enterobacter cloacae SRUT (24mm, Enterococcus faecalis SK39 (21mm and Bifidobacterium dentium SS14T (20mm respectively, to Salmonella typhimurium BCC B0046/ATCC 13311, E. coli O157 hemolytic BCC B2717, Listeria monocytogenes BCC B2767/ATCC 7764 and Escherichia coli VTEC O157 BCC B2687. Evaluation after conservation ex situ to all bacterocin producing strain at 5oC for 1 year in freeze drying ampoules in vacuum and dry condition revealed the decreasing viability starting from log 0.8 CFU/ml for Lactococcus and Leuconostoc to log 2.2. CFU/ml for Streptococcus. Result of the study showed that the bacteriocin producing strains obtained were offered a potential resource for preventing disease of livestock and food borne diseases.

  5. Using weakly conserved motifs hidden in secretion signals to identify type-III effectors from bacterial pathogen genomes.

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    Xiaobao Dong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As one of the most important virulence factor types in gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, type-III effectors (TTEs play a crucial role in pathogen-host interactions by directly influencing immune signaling pathways within host cells. Based on the hypothesis that type-III secretion signals may be comprised of some weakly conserved sequence motifs, here we used profile-based amino acid pair information to develop an accurate TTE predictor. RESULTS: For a TTE or non-TTE, we first used a hidden Markov model-based sequence searching method (i.e., HHblits to detect its weakly homologous sequences and extracted the profile-based k-spaced amino acid pair composition (HH-CKSAAP from the N-terminal sequences. In the next step, the feature vector HH-CKSAAP was used to train a linear support vector machine model, which we designate as BEAN (Bacterial Effector ANalyzer. We compared our method with four existing TTE predictors through an independent test set, and our method revealed improved performance. Furthermore, we listed the most predictive amino acid pairs according to their weights in the established classification model. Evolutionary analysis shows that predictive amino acid pairs tend to be more conserved. Some predictive amino acid pairs also show significantly different position distributions between TTEs and non-TTEs. These analyses confirmed that some weakly conserved sequence motifs may play important roles in type-III secretion signals. Finally, we also used BEAN to scan one plant pathogen genome and showed that BEAN can be used for genome-wide TTE identification. The webserver and stand-alone version of BEAN are available at http://protein.cau.edu.cn:8080/bean/.

  6. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle in different European countries: 2002–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stärk Katharina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project "Antibiotic resistance in bacteria of animal origin – II" (ARBAO-II was funded by the European Union (FAIR5-QLK2-2002-01146 for the period 2003–2005, with the aim to establish a continuous monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility among veterinary laboratories in European countries based on validated and harmonised methodologies. Available summary data of the susceptibility testing of the bacterial pathogens from the different laboratories were collected. Method Antimicrobial susceptibility data for several bovine pathogens were obtained over a three year period (2002–2004. Each year the participating laboratories were requested to fill in excel-file templates with national summary data on the occurrence of antimicrobial resistance from different bacterial species. A proficiency test (EQAS – external quality assurance system for antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted each year to test the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing in the participating laboratories. The data from this testing demonstrated that for the species included in the EQAS the results are comparable between countries. Results Data from 25,241 isolates were collected from 13 European countries. For Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis major differences were apparent in the occurrence of resistance between countries and between the different antimicrobial agents tested. The highest frequency of resistance was observed for penicillin. For Mannheimia haemolytica resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphonamide were observed in France, the Netherlands and Portugal. All isolates of Pasteurella multocida isolated in Finland and most of those from Denmark, England (and Wales, Italy and Sweden were susceptible to the majority of the antimicrobials. Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus uberis isolates from Sweden were fully susceptible. For the other countries some resistance was observed to

  7. Antimicrobial Effect of aqueous extract of saffron petals on some of food-borne bacterial pathogen

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    L Azami

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ever-increasing public debates over the adverse effects that may result from exposure to the chemical preservatives have enhanced the interests for the consuming of preservative-free foods or at least the product containing natural preservatives. In this laboratory experiment, the antimicrobial effect of aqueous extracts of Saffron petals against Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated using the disk diffusion method. Moreover, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extract was assessed by agar dilution and broth microdilution method. According to the results, S. typhimurium was found asthe most sensitive, while, S. aureus and E. coli O157:H7asthe most resistant species. MICs of the extract by microdilution method were estimated at 40 mg/ml for all of the 4 bacterial species. The results also revealed that the extract of Saffron petals could be used as a natural preservative against the aforementioned bacteria.

  8. [Microbiological diagnosis of emerging bacterial pathogens: Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rickettsia, and Tropheryma whipplei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, José Ramón; Jado, Isabel; Marín, Mercedes; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Portillo, Aránzazu; Anda, Pedro; Pons, Immaculada; Oteo, José Antonio

    2008-11-01

    Ehrlichia/Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rickettsia and Tropheryma whipplei (formerly called whippelii) are fastidious bacterial organisms, considered the causative agents of potentially severe emerging and re-emerging diseases with repercussions on public health. The recent availability of advanced molecular biology and cell culture techniques has led to the implication of many of these species in human pathologies. These issues are extensively covered in number 27 of the SEIMC microbiological procedure: Diagnóstico microbiológico de las infecciones por patógenos bacterianos emergentes: Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rickettsia y Tropheryma whippelii (Microbiological diagnosis of Anaplasma, Bartonella, Rickettsia and Tropheryma whippelii infections) (2nd ed., 2007) (www.seimc.org/documentos/protocolos/microbiologia/).

  9. Low-fouling surface plasmon resonance biosensor for multi-step detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens in complex food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisocherová-Lísalová, Hana; Víšová, Ivana; Ermini, Maria Laura; Špringer, Tomáš; Song, Xue Chadtová; Mrázek, Jan; Lamačová, Josefína; Scott Lynn, N; Šedivák, Petr; Homola, Jiří

    2016-06-15

    Recent outbreaks of foodborne illnesses have shown that foodborne bacterial pathogens present a significant threat to public health, resulting in an increased need for technologies capable of fast and reliable screening of food commodities. The optimal method of pathogen detection in foods should: (i) be rapid, specific, and sensitive; (ii) require minimum sample preparation; and (iii) be robust and cost-effective, thus enabling use in the field. Here we report the use of a SPR biosensor based on ultra-low fouling and functionalizable poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA) brushes for the rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens in crude food samples utilizing a three-step detection assay. We studied both the surface resistance to fouling and the functional capabilities of these brushes with respect to each step of the assay, namely: (I) incubation of the sensor with crude food samples, resulting in the capture of bacteria by antibodies immobilized to the pCBAA coating, (II) binding of secondary biotinylated antibody (Ab2) to previously captured bacteria, and (III) binding of streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles to the biotinylated Ab2 in order to enhance the sensor response. We also investigated the effects of the brush thickness on the biorecognition capabilities of the gold-grafted functionalized pCBAA coatings. We demonstrate that pCBAA-compared to standard low-fouling OEG-based alkanethiolate self-assemabled monolayers-exhibits superior surface resistance regarding both fouling from complex food samples as well as the non-specific binding of S-AuNPs. We further demonstrate that a SPR biosensor based on a pCBAA brush with a thickness as low as 20 nm was capable of detecting E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella sp. in complex hamburger and cucumber samples with extraordinary sensitivity and specificity. The limits of detection for the two bacteria in cucumber and hamburger extracts were determined to be 57 CFU/mL and 17 CFU/mL for E. coli and 7.4 × 10

  10. The sensitivity of bacterial foodborne pathogens to Croton blanchetianus Baill essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geiseanny Fernandes do Amarante Melo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the activity of essential oil extracted from the leaves of C. blanchetianus Baill, popularly known as "marmeleiro", in inhibiting the growth and survival of pathogenic microorganisms in food by determining their survival in vitro and by observing the behaviour of Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into a food model (meat cubes that was stored at refrigeration temperature (7 ± 1 ºC for 4 days. The results indicated a bactericidal effect against Aeromonas hydrophila and Listeria monocytogenes and bacteriostatic action against Salmonella Enteritidis. A bacteriostatic effect on meat contaminated with L. monocytogenes was found for all concentrations of essential oils tested. These results showed that essential oil from the leaves of C. blanchetianus Baill represents an alternative source of potentially natural antimicrobial agents that may be used as a food preservative.

  11. Inhibition of food-borne bacterial pathogens by bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria isolated from meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewus, C B; Kaiser, A; Montville, T J

    1991-06-01

    Ten strains of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria were isolated from retail cuts of meat. These 10 strains along with 11 other bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria were tested for inhibitory activity against psychotrophic pathogens, including four strains of Listeria monocytogenes, two strains of Aeromonas hydrophila, and two strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibition due to acid, hydrogen peroxide, and lytic bacteriophage were excluded. The proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance was confirmed by demonstration of its sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes. Eight of the meat isolates had inhibitory activity against all four L. monocytogenes strains. Bacteriocin activity against L. monocytogenes was found in all of the strains obtained from other sources. Activity against A. hydrophila and S. aureus was also common.

  12. Probes and polymerase chain reaction for detection of food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, J E; Aabo, S; Hill, W; Notermans, S; Wernars, K; Granum, P E; Popovic, T; Rasmussen, H N; Olsvik, O

    1995-11-01

    DNA-hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are techniques commonly used to detect pathogenic bacteria. In this paper, the use of these techniques for detection of Salmonella, E. coli, V. cholerae, non-O1 Vibrio, Yersinia enterocolitica, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, and C. botulinum is reviewed with emphasis on application in food microbiology. In food control, DNA-techniques have most often been used in a 'culture confirmation' fashion, i.e. bacteria are enriched and sometimes even purified by traditional culture procedures and thereafter identified by the use of DNA-based methods. The most desirable approach is, however, to detect organisms directly in the food, but major problems remain to be solved before this can be routinely performed.

  13. Salvage microbiology: opportunities and challenges in the detection of bacterial pathogens following initiation of antimicrobial treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, John J.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing was originally employed by soil scientists and was subsequently adapted for clinical applications. PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has also progressed from initial applications in the detection of organisms from environmental samples into the clinical realm and has demonstrated promise in detection of pathogens in clinical specimens obtained from patients with suspected infection but negative cultures. We review studies of multiplex PCR, 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR and sequencing and PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for detection of bacteria in specimens that were obtained from patients during or after administration of antibiotic treatment, and examine the role of each for assisting in antimicrobial treatment and stewardship efforts. Following an exploration of the available data in this field we discuss the opportunities that the preliminary investigations reveal, as well as the challenges faced with implementation of these strategies in clinical practice. PMID:25523281

  14. Antimicrobial activity of Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum aqueous seed extracts against some pathogenic bacterial strains

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    Ramesa Shafi Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seeds aqueous extracts from Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum were investigated for antibacterial activity by disc diffusion method and protein profile. Both seed aqueous extracts show moderate inhibition against pathogenic bacteria, both gram positive including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Bacilllus subtillis and gram negative bacteria including Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Overall analysis of the antibacterial activity of tested samples revealed that the highest inhibitory activity was produced by Litchi chinensis (15 ± 0.55 mm against S. pyogenes. Tris glycine SDS PAGE revealed major protein band approximately 15.5 kDa and 22-kDa. Protein contents of Seeds of Litchi chinensis and Nephelium lappaceum were approximately 7.5 and 13.5 mg/g, respectively.

  15. Comparative whole genome sequence analysis of the carcinogenic bacterial model pathogen Helicobacter felis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Isabelle C; Zigova, Zuzana; Holden, Matthew; Lawley, Trevor D; Rad, Roland; Dougan, Gordon; Falkow, Stanley; Bentley, Stephen D; Müller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter felis naturally colonizes the gastric mucosa of dogs and cats. Due to its ability to persistently infect laboratory mice, H. felis has been used extensively to experimentally model gastric disorders induced in humans by H. pylori. We determined the 1.67 Mb genome sequence of H. felis using combined Solexa and 454 pyrosequencing, annotated the genome, and compared it with multiple previously published Helicobacter genomes. About 1,063 (63.6%) of the 1,671 genes identified in the H. felis genome have orthologues in H. pylori, its closest relative among the fully sequenced Helicobacter species. Many H. pylori virulence factors are shared by H. felis: these include the gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase GGT, the immunomodulator NapA, and the secreted enzymes collagenase and HtrA. Helicobacter felis lacks a Cag pathogenicity island and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA but possesses a complete comB system conferring natural competence. Remarkable features of the H. felis genome include its paucity of transcriptional regulators and an extraordinary abundance of chemotaxis sensors and restriction/modification systems. Helicobacter felis possesses an episomally replicating 6.7-kb plasmid and harbors three chromosomal regions with deviating GC content. These putative horizontally acquired regions show homology and synteny with the recently isolated H. pylori plasmid pHPPC4 and homology to Campylobacter bacteriophage genes (transposases, structural, and lytic genes), respectively. In summary, the H. felis genome harbors a variety of putative mobile elements that are unique among Helicobacter species and may contribute to this pathogen's carcinogenic properties.

  16. Dynamics of fecal indicator bacteria, bacterial pathogen genes, and organic wastewater contaminants in the Little Calumet River: Portage Burns Waterway, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on the co-occurrence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), bacterial pathogens, and organic wastewater-associated chemicals (OWCs) within Great Lakes tributaries. Fifteen watershed sites and one beach site adjacent to the Little Calumet River–Portage Burns Waterway (LCRPBW) on Lake Michigan were tested on four dates for pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, chloride, color, ammonia- and nitrate-nitrogen, soluble phosphorus, sulfate, turbidity, and atrazine; for concentrations of FIB; and for genes indicating the presence of human-pathogenic enterococci (ENT) and of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (EC) from various animal sources. Nineteen samples were also tested for 60 OWCs. Half of the watershed samples met EC recreational water quality standards; none met ENT standards. Human-wastewater-associated OWC detections were correlated with human-influence indicators such as population/km2, chloride concentrations, and the presence of WWTP effluents, but EC and ENT concentrations were not. Bacterial pathogen genes indicated rural human and several potential animal sources. OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern (musk fragrances AHTN and HHCB, alkylphenols, carbamazepine) and 3 bacterial pathogen genes were detected at the mouth of the LCRPBW, but no such OWCs and only 1 pathogen gene were detected at the beach. The LCRPBW has significant potential to deliver FIB, potential bacterial pathogens, and OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern to the nearshore of Lake Michigan, under conditions enhancing nearshore transport of the river plume. Nearshore mixing of lake and river water, and the lack of relationship between OWCs and FIB or pathogen genes, pose numerous challenges for watershed and nearshore assessment and remediation.

  17. Mycosynthesis, characterization and antibacterial properties of AgNPs against multidrug resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens of female infertility cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnusamy Manogaran Gopinath

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using bacteria, fungus and plants has emerged as a simple and viable alternative to more complex physical and chemical synthetic procedures. The present investigation explains rapid and extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles using fungus Fusarium oxysporum NGD and characterization of the synthesized silver nanoparticles using UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The size range of the synthesized silver nanoparticles was around 16.3–70 nm. The FTIR studies showed major peaks of proteins involved in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. Further, antibacterial effect of the silver nanoparticles against multidrug resistant pathogens Enterobacter sp. ANT 02 [HM803168], Pseudomonas aeruginosa ANT 04 [HM803170], Klebsiella pneumoniae ANT 03 [HM803169] and Escherichia coli ANT 01 [HM803167] was tested using turbidometric assay at 10, 20, 30, 40 μg AgNPs/ml alone and in combination with ampicillin using agar well diffusion assay. All the resistant bacteria were found to be susceptible to the antibiotic in the presence of the silver nanoparticles.

  18. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

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    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. Th