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Sample records for extracellular alkaline serine

  1. Effect of pH and temperature on stability and kinetics of novel extracellular serine alkaline protease (70 kDa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Biswanath; Basak, Bikram; Mandal, Tamal; Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Dey, Apurba

    2013-03-01

    A novel extracellular serine protease (70 kDa by SDS-PAGE) was purified and characterized. This enzyme retained more than 93% of its initial activity after preincubation for 30 min at 37 °C in the presence of 25% (v/v) tested organic solvents and showed feather degradation activity. The purified enzyme was deactivated at various combinations of pH and temperature to examine the interactive effect of them on enzyme activity. The deactivation process was modeled as first-order kinetics and the deactivation rate constant (k(d)) was found to be minimum at pH 9 and 37 °C. The kinetic analysis of enzyme over a range of pH values indicated two pK values at 6.21 and at 10.92. The lower pK value was likely due to the catalytic histidine in the free enzyme and higher pK value likely reflected deprotonation of the proline moiety of the substrate but ionization of the active site serine is another possibility. Inhibition kinetic showed that enzyme is serine protease because enzyme was competitively inhibited by antipain and aprotinin as these compounds are known to be competitive inhibitors of serine protease. The organic solvent, thermal and pH tolerances of enzyme suggested that it may have potential for use as a biocatalyst in industry.

  2. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-de...

  3. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EXTRACELLULAR ALKALINE PROTEASE PRODUCED FROM AN ISOLATED BACILLUS SUBTILIS

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    Vijaya Bundela

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the studies on the purification and partial characterization of serine alkaline protease produced through submerged fermentation process from a locally isolated Bacillus subtilis. This strain, grown in a highly alkaline medium (pH 10, produces an extracellular proteolytic enzyme. The alkaline protease was purified in a simple two-step procedure involving ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE analysis of the purified alkaline protease indicated an estimated molecular mass of 30KDa. It was more active in the range of 20-60ºC and had an optimum activity at 55ºC with optimum pH of 10.5. Characterization of the protease showed that it required certain cations such as Mg++, Mn++ and Ca++ for maximal activity. The serine nature of the alkaline protease was confirmed by PMSF inhibition. The temperature and pH stability of this Alkaline Protease from Bacillus Subtilismakes it potentially useful forindustrial applications.

  4. A review on production of serine alkaline protease by Bacillus spp

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    Biswanath Bhunia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 In recent times, protease has gained considerable importance in the world market. Proteases are groups of proteins included in the subclass hydrolases, within the main class enzymes. Serine alkaline proteases (SAP are one of the most important groups of industrial enzymes. They account for approximately 35% of the total microbial enzyme sales. Serine protease is produced by various types of fermentation techniques using microorganism. Among the proteases, bacterial proteases are more significant than animal and fungal proteases. Bacillus is the most invigorated species producing extracellular proteases among many bacterial species that have found tremendous application in pharmaceutical, leather, laundry and food processing industry. Mathematical modeling of fermentation process helps understand the relationship between protease production and bacterial growth to provide quantitative information on the behavior of the system. Therefore, high level production of protease in industrial scale should be made feasible. The focus of the present review is to provide an updated overview of fermentative production and the factors that influence production, growth kinetics and downstream processing of serine alkaline protease. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  5. Expression and characterization of Coprothermobacter proteolyticus alkaline serine protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    TECHNICAL ABSTRACT A putative protease gene (aprE) from the thermophilic bacterium Coprothermobacter proteolyticus was cloned and expressed in Bacillus subtilis. The enzyme was determined to be a serine protease based on inhibition by PMSF. Biochemical characterization demonstrated the enzyme had...

  6. Localization and accessibility of antigenic sites of the extracellular serine proteinase of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, Harm; Kok, Jan; Haandrikman, Alfred J.; Venema, Gerhardus; Konings, Wilhelmus

    1992-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis strains produce an extracellular subtilisin-related serine proteinase in which immunologically different components can be distinguished. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the different proteinase components have been raised and their epitopes were identified. By Western-blot ana

  7. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  8. Alkaline serine protease AprE plays an essential role in poly-γ-glutamate production during natto fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kada, Shigeki; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ohshima, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Natto is a traditional Japanese food made from soybeans fermented by natto starter strains of Bacillus subtilis natto. It has been suggested that extracellular protease activity released by the bacteria are involved in the production of poly-γ-glutamate (γ-PGA) during natto fermentation. One of the natto starters, strain r22, possesses at least seven genes, each of which encoded an extracellular protease orthologous to its counterpart in B. subtilis 168, aprE, bpr, epr, mpr, nprE, vpr, and wprA, but it was found to lack nprB. Inactivating the aprE ortholog alone resulted in a severe decrease in γ-PGA production and in the total extracellular protease activity. The defect in γ-PGA production of the mutant lacking the aprE ortholog was complemented when the medium was supplemented with sufficient glutamate. These results suggest that the alkaline serine protease encoded by aprE plays an indispensable role in supplying materials to produce γ-PGA. On the other hand, simultaneous inactivation of all the protease genes except for aprE did not significantly affect either γ-PGA production or total protease activity.

  9. Purification and characterization of a novel extracellular alkaline protease from Cellulomonas bogoriensis.

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    Li, Fan; Yang, Liyuan; Lv, Xue; Liu, Dongbo; Xia, Hongmei; Chen, Shan

    2016-05-01

    An extracellular alkaline protease produced by the alkali-tolerant Cellulomonas bogoriensis was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and cation exchange chromatography. The purity of the protease was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was confirmed to be 18.3 kDa. The enzyme showed optimum activity at 60 °C and pH 11. The stability of the protease was maintained at a wide temperature range of 4-60 °C and pH range of 3-12. Irreversible inhibition of the enzyme activity by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone demonstrated that the purified enzyme is a chymotrypsin of the serine protease family. The Km and Vmax of the protease activity on casein were 19.2 mg/mL and 25000 μg/min/mg, respectively. The broad substrate specificity and remarkable stability in the presence of organic solvents, salt, and commercial detergents, as well as its excellent stain removal and dehairing capability, make the purified alkaline protease a promising candidate for industrial applications.

  10. Growth energetics of an alkaline serine protease-producing strain of Bacillus clausii during continuous cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Torben; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    the theoretical co-factor and building block requirements needed for biomass formation were calculated. Using the stoichiometric models and data for growth on glucose and citrate the amount of ATP needed for biomass synthesis was estimated to 42.0 mmol ATP/gDW, the P/O ratio to 0.68 and the ATP maintenance to 2......Glucose-limited chemostats were used to determine the growth yields of biomass of Bacillus clausii PP 473-8 producing an alkaline serine protease Savinase (Novozymes A/S, Bagsvaerd, Denmark) and a low yield of biomass on oxygen was observed. The energy metabolism was investigated further by setting...... up simple stoichiometric models for growth on glucose and citrate. In order to determine the parameters in the models, a macromolecular biomass composition was determined based on measured values of protein and RNA combined with literature data. From the macromolecular composition of the biomass...

  11. Purification and characterization of manganese-dependent alkaline serine protease from Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

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    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Karutha Pandian, Shunmugiah

    2011-01-01

    The purification and characterization of a Mn2+-dependent alkaline serine protease produced by Bacillus pumilus TMS55 were investigated. The enzyme was purified in three steps: concentrating the crude enzyme using ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography. The purified protease had a molecular mass of approximately 35 kDa, was highly active over a broad pH range of 7.0 to 12.0, and remained stable over a pH range of 7.5 to 11.5. The optimum temperature for the enzyme activity was found to be 60 degreesC. PMSF and AEBSF (1 mM) significantly inhibited the protease activity, indicating that the protease is a serine protease. Mn2+ ions enhanced the activity and stability of the enzyme. In addition, the purified protease remained stable with oxidants (H2O2, 2%) and organic solvents (25%), such as benzene, hexane, and toluene. Therefore, these characteristics of the protease and its dehairing ability indicate its potential for a wide range of commercial applications.

  12. Purification and characterization of thiol dependent, oxidation-stable serine alkaline protease from thermophilic Bacillus sp.

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    Aysha Kamran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline serine protease was purified to homogeneity from culture supernatant of a thermophilic, alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. by 80% ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by CM-cellulose and DEAE-cellulose ion exchange column chromatography. The enzyme was purified up to 16.5-fold with 6900 U/mg activity. The protease exhibited maximum activity towards casein at pH 8.0 and at 80 °C. The enzyme was stable at pH 8.0 and 80 °C temperature up to 2 h. The Ca2+ and Mn2+ enhanced the proteolytic activity up to 44% and 36% as compared to control, respectively. However, Zn2+, K+, Ba2+, Co2+, Hg2+ and Cu2+ significantly reduced the enzyme activity. PMSF (phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride completely inhibited the protease activity, whereas the activity of protease was stimulated up to two folds in the presence of 5 mM 2-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also stable in surfactant (Tween-80 and other commercial detergents (SDS, Triton X-100.

  13. Extracellular proteolysis of apolipoprotein E (apoE by secreted serine neuronal protease.

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    Irfan Y Tamboli

    Full Text Available Under normal conditions, brain apolipoprotein E (apoE is secreted and lipidated by astrocytes, then taken up by neurons via receptor mediated endocytosis. Free apoE is either degraded in intraneuronal lysosomal compartments or released. Here we identified a novel way by which apoE undergoes proteolysis in the extracellular space via a secreted neuronal protease. We show that apoE is cleaved in neuronal conditioned media by a secreted serine protease. This apoE cleavage was inhibited by PMSF and α1-antichymotrypsin, but not neuroserpin-1 or inhibitors of thrombin and cathepsin G, supporting its identity as a chymotrypsin like protease. In addition, apoE incubation with purified chymotrypsin produced a similar pattern of apoE fragments. Analysis of apoE fragments by mass spectrometry showed cleavages occurring at the C-terminal side of apoE tryptophan residues, further supporting our identification of cleavage by chymotrypsin like protease. Hippocampal neurons were more efficient in mediating this apoE cleavage than cortical neurons. Proteolysis of apoE4 generated higher levels of low molecular weight fragments compared to apoE3. Primary glial cultures released an inhibitor of this proteolytic activity. Together, these studies reveal novel mechanism by which apoE can be regulated and therefore could be useful in designing apoE directed AD therapeutic approaches.

  14. Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02, a Novel Nematicidal Bacterium with an Extracellular Serine Protease Virulence Factor.

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    Ju, Shouyong; Lin, Jian; Zheng, Jinshui; Wang, Shaoying; Zhou, Hongying; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-29

    Root knot nematodes (RKNs) are the world's most damaging plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), and they can infect almost all crops. At present, harmful chemical nematicides are applied to control RKNs. Using microbial nematicides has been proposed as a better management strategy than chemical control. In this study, we describe a novel nematicidal bacterium named Alcaligenes faecalis ZD02. A. faecalis ZD02 was isolated from Caenorhabditis elegans cadavers and has nematostatic and nematicidal activity, as confirmed by C. elegans growth assay and life span assay. In addition, A. faecalis ZD02 fermentation broth showed toxicity against C. elegans and Meloidogyne incognita. To identify the nematicidal virulence factor, the genome of strain ZD02 was sequenced. By comparing all of the predicted proteins of strain ZD02 to reported nematicidal virulence factors, we determined that an extracellular serine protease (Esp) has potential to be a nematicidal virulence factor, which was confirmed by bioassay on C. elegans and M. incognita. Using C. elegans as the target model, we found that both A. faecalis ZD02 and the virulence factor Esp can damage the intestines of C. elegans. The discovery that A. faecalis ZD02 has nematicidal activity provides a novel bacterial resource for the control of RKNs.

  15. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

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    Shuping Qin

    Full Text Available Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80% of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  16. Differentiating intracellular from extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity in soil by sonication.

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    Qin, Shuping; Hu, Chunsheng; Oenema, Oene

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio  =  1/8 (w/v) and power density  =  15 watt ml(-1)], the activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (phosphatase) in a Haplic Cambisol soil increased with sonication time in two distinct steps. A first plateau of enzyme activity was reached between 60 and 100 s, and a second higher plateau after 300 s. We also found that sonication for 100 s under optimal conditions activated most (about 80%) of the alkaline phosphatase that was added to an autoclaved soil, while total bacteria number was not affected. Sonication for 300 s reduced the total bacteria number by three orders of magnitude but had no further effects on enzyme activity. Our results indicate that the first plateau of alkaline phosphatase activity was derived from extracellular enzymes attached to soil particles, and the second plateau to the combination of extracellular and intracellular enzymes after cell lysis. We conclude that our adjusted sonication method may be an alternative to the currently used physiological and chloroform-fumigation methods for differentiating intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Further testing is needed to find out whether this holds for other soil types.

  17. Crystal structure of the high-alkaline serine protease PB92 from Bacillus alcalophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, J.M.; Teplyakov, A.V.; Kelders, H.; Kalk, K.H.; Misset, O.; Mulleners, L.J.S.M.; Dijkstra, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    The crystal structure of a serine protease from the alkalophilic strain Bacillus alcalophilus PB92 has been determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.75 Å resolution. The structure has been solved by molecular replacement using the atomic model of subtilisin Carlsberg. The model of the PB92 protease has

  18. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel thermostable serine alkaline protease from Aeribacillus pallidus C10: a potential additive for detergents.

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    Yildirim, Vildan; Baltaci, Mustafa Ozkan; Ozgencli, Ilknur; Sisecioglu, Melda; Adiguzel, Ahmet; Adiguzel, Gulsah

    2017-12-01

    An extracellular thermostable alkaline serine protease enzyme from Aeribacillus pallidus C10 (GenBank No: KC333049), was purified 4.85 and 17. 32-fold with a yield of 26.9 and 19.56%, respectively, through DE52 anion exchange and Probond affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), with approximately 38.35 kDa. The enzyme exhibited optimum activity at pH 9 and at temperature 60 °C. It was determined that the enzyme had remained stable at the range of pH 7.0-10.0, and that it had preserved more than 80% of its activity at a broad temperature range (20-80 °C). The enzyme activity was found to retain more than 70% and 55% in the presence of organic solvents and commercial detergents, respectively. In addition, it was observed that the enzyme activity had increased in the presence of 5% SDS. KM and Vmax values were calculated as 0.197 mg/mL and 7.29 μmol.mL(-)(1).min(-)(1), respectively.

  19. Isolation and identification of an extracellular subtilisin-like serine protease secreted by the bat pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans.

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    Evan L Pannkuk

    Full Text Available White nose syndrome (WNS is a cutaneous fungal disease of bats. WNS is responsible for unprecedented mortalities in North American cave bat populations. There have been few descriptions of enzyme activities that may function in WNS host/pathogen interactions, while no study has isolated and described secreted proteases. To address the hypothesis that Pseudogymnoascus destructans secretes extracellular proteases that function in wing necrosis during WNS infection, the object of this study was to culture P. destructans on various media, then isolate and structurally identify those proteases accumulated stably in the culture medium. We found a single dominant protease activity on minimal nutrient broth enriched with protein substrates, which was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. This P. destructans serine protease (PdSP1 was isolated by preparative isoelectric focusing and concanavalin A lectin affinity chromatography. PdSP1 showed a molecular weight 27,900 (estimated by SDS-PAGE, broad pH optimum 6-8, and temperature optimum 60°C. Structural characterization of PdSP1 by MALDI-TOF MS, Orbitrap MS/MS, and Edman amino-terminal peptide sequencing matched it directly to a hypothetical protein accession from the sequenced P. destructans genome that is further identified as a MEROPS family S8A subtilisin-like serine peptidase. Two additional isoforms, PdSP2 and PdSP3, were identified in the P. destructans genome with 90% and 53% homology, respectively. P. destructans S8A serine proteases showed closer sequence conservation to P. pannorum and plant pathogenic fungi than to human pathogenic dermatophytes. Peptide-specific polyclonal antibodies developed from the PdSP1 sequence detected the protein in western blots. These subtilisin-like serine proteases are candidates for further functional studies in WNS host-pathogen interaction.

  20. NtSCP1 from tobacco is an extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III that has an impact on cell elongation.

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    Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Delannoy, Mélanie; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2012-03-01

    The leaf extracellular space contains several peptidases, most of which are of unknown function. We isolated cDNAs for two extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III genes from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtSCP1 and NtSCP2, belonging to a phylogenetic clade not yet functionally characterized in plants. NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are orthologs derived from the two ancestors of tobacco. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are expressed in root, stem, leaf, and flower tissues. Expression analysis of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene fused to the NtSCP1 transcription promoter region confirmed this expression profile. Western blotting of NtSCP1 and expression of an NtSCP1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that the protein is located in the extracellular space of tobacco leaves and culture cells. Purified His-tagged NtSCP1 had carboxypeptidase activity in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing NtSCP1 showed a reduced flower length due to a decrease in cell size. Etiolated seedlings of these transgenic plants had shorter hypocotyls. These data provide support for a role of an extracellular type III carboxypeptidase in the control of cell elongation.

  1. Extracellular expression of alkaline phytase in Pichia pastoris: Influence of signal peptides, promoters and growth medium

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    Mimi Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline phytase isolated from pollen grains of Lilium longiflorum (LlALP possesses unique catalytic and thermal stability properties that suggest it has the potential to be used as a feed supplement. However, substantial amounts of active enzymes are needed for animal feed studies and endogenous levels of LlALP in lily pollen are too low to provide the required amounts. Active rLlALP2 (coded by LlAlp2, one of two isoforms of alkaline phytase cDNA identified in lily pollen has been successfully expressed in intracellular compartments of Pichia pastoris, however enzyme yields have been modest (25–30 mg/L and purification of the enzyme has been challenging. Expression of foreign proteins to the extracellular medium of P. pastoris greatly simplifies protein purification because low levels of endogenous proteins are secreted by the yeast. In this paper, we first describe the generation of P. pastoris strains that will secrete rLlALP2 to the extracellular medium. Data presented here indicates that deletion of native signal peptides at the N- and C-termini of rLlALP2 enhanced α-mating factor (α-MF-driven secretion by four-fold; chicken egg white lysozyme signal peptide was ineffective in the extracellular secretion of rLlALP2. Second, we describe our efforts to increase expression levels by employing a constitutive promoter from the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (PGAP in place of the strong, tightly controlled promoter of alcohol oxidase 1 gene (PAOX1. PGAP enhanced the extracellular expression levels of rLlALP2 compared to PAOX1. Finally, we report on the optimization of the culture medium to enhance yields of rLlALP2. The strength of PGAP varies depending on the carbon source available for cell growth; secreted expression of rLlALP2 was highest when glycerol was the carbon source. The addition of histidine and Triton X-100 also enhanced extracellular expression. Taken together, the employment of PGAP under optimized culture

  2. Molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of dehairing Mn(2+) dependent alkaline serine protease (MASPT) of Bacillus pumilus TMS55.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Kalibulla Syed; Muniyandi, Jeyaraj; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2011-10-01

    Leather industries release a large amount of pollution-causing chemicals which creates one of the major industrial pollutions. The development of enzyme based processes as a potent alternative to pollution-causing chemicals is useful to overcome this issue. Proteases are enzymes which have extensive applications in leather processing and in several bioremediation processes due to their high alkaline protease activity and dehairing efficacy. In the present study, we report cloning, characterization of a Mn2+ dependent alkaline serine protease gene (MASPT) of Bacillus pumilus TMS55. The gene encoding the protease from B. pumilus TMS55 was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. This gene has an open reading frame (ORF) of 1,149 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 383 amino acid residues. Our analysis showed that this polypeptide is composed of 29 residues N-terminal signal peptide, a propeptide of 79 residues and a mature protein of 275 amino acids. We performed bioinformatics analysis to compare MASPT enzyme with other proteases. Homology modeling was employed to model three dimensional structure for MASPT. Structural analysis showed that MASPT structure is composed of nine α-helices and nine β-strands. It has 3 catalytic residues and 14 metal binding residues. Docking analysis showed that residues S223, A260, N263, T328 and S329 interact with Mn2+. This study allows initial inferences about the structure of the protease and will allow the rational design of its derivatives for structure-function studies and also for further improvement of the enzyme.

  3. Effect of oligogalacturonides on root length, extracellular alkalinization and O₂⁻-accumulation in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camejo, Daymi; Martí, María C; Jiménez, Ana; Cabrera, Juan C; Olmos, Enrique; Sevilla, Francisca

    2011-04-15

    The effects of an oligogalacturonic acid (OGA) pool on root length of intact alfalfa seedlings (Medicago sativa L.), on extracellular pH and on both extracellular and intracellular O₂⁻ dynamics were examined in this study. Lower OGA concentrations (25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹)promoted root length, but 50 μg mL⁻¹ had a stronger effect in promoting growth, while the higher OGA concentration (100 μg mL⁻¹)had no significant effect. Extracellular alkalinization was tested only at concentrations higher than 50 μg mL⁻¹ OGA, showing that the response is determined not only by the specific size of OGA, but also by the concentration of OGA. The promoting effect of OGA on root growth at 25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹ OGA concentrations in alfalfa root appeared to be unrelated to extracellular alkalinization. A possible explanation could be the induction of an O₂⁻ burst at non-toxic levels, which could drive directly or indirectly several processes associated with root elongation in 25, 50 and 75 μg mL⁻¹ OGA-treated seedlings. Analyses using confocal microscopy showed that the increase in the O₂⁻ generation, mainly in the epidermal cells, induced by 50 μg mL⁻¹ OGA could be related to the promoting effect on root growth. The combination of OGA with DPI allowed us to demonstrate that there are different O₂⁻-generating sources in the epidermal cells of the meristematic zone, likely NADPH oxidase and oxidases or oxido-reductase enzymes, insensitive to DPI, that maintain detectable O₂⁻ accumulation at 60 and 120 min of treatment. These results suggest that OGA induce an oxidative burst by several O₂⁻-generating sources in the active growth zones.

  4. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the Staphylococcus epidermidis extracellular serine protease Esp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengadesan, Krishnan; Macon, Kevin; Sugumoto, Shinya; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Iwase, Tadayuki; Narayana, Sthanam V L

    2013-01-01

    Esp, an extracellular serine protease from Staphylococcus epidermidis, has been shown to inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation and nasal colonization. The full-length 27 kDa pro-Esp was purified and digested with thermolysin to obtain mature Esp. The mature Esp containing 216 residues crystallized in space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 61.2, c = 42.5 Å, β = 98.2° and one molecule in the asymmetric unit, with an estimated solvent content of 42%. A diffraction data set has been collected to 1.8 Å resolution on a rotating-anode home-source facility.

  5. Extracellular serine-proteinases isolated from Streptomyces alboniger: Partial characterization and effect of aprotinin on cellular structure

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    Lopes Andréa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptomyces alboniger ATCC 12461 grown in brain heart infusion (BHI medium produced two extracellular serine-proteinases, denoted SP I and SP II, which were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and aprotinin-agarose affinity chromatography. SP I was purified 88,9-fold and SP II 66,7- fold, with 33.4% and 10.4% yield, respectively. The optimum pH for the proteinases activity, using a-N-p-tosyl-L-arginine-methyl ester (TAME as substrate, was 9-10 and the optimum temperature was 37ºC. The proteolytic activity of SP I and SP II was inhibited by aprotinin and SP I was partially inhibited by leupeptin, both serine-proteinase inhibitors. S. alboniger growth in BHI-liquid medium decreased when 5 mg/ml, 10 mg/ml of aprotinin was used, being completely inhibited with 20 mg/ml and 40 mg/ml. At the ultrastructural level, aprotinin-treated S. alboniger cells showed swelling of the bacterial body and condensation of the genetic material, probably related to the inhibition of its growth.

  6. Enhanced Productivity of Serine Alkaline Protease by Bacillus sp. Using Soybean as Substrate

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    Saurabh, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth and protease production by Bacillus sp. (SBP-29 was examined for poultry processing industries. The maximum protease activity was 3028 U/mL using 1.5% (w/v of soybean meal as substrate. Soybean meal is an inexpensive and readily available, thus it can be used as the cost effective crude material for the production of an extracellular protease. Inorganic nitrogen sources proved to be less favorable, for protease production as strong catabolic repression was observed with ammonium ions. A maximum of 3208 U/mL of protease was produced in 18 h in a 10L bioreactor. The enzyme has temperature and pH optima of 60°C and 9.5 respectively. However, the temperature stability range is from 20-90 °C and pH stability range is from 6.0–12.0. The protease was completely inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF and diodopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP, with little increase (10-15% in the production of upon addition of Ca++ and Mg++.

  7. Production of extracellular alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis RSKK96 with solid state fermentation

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    Nurullah Akcan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular alkaline protease by producing Bacillus subtilis RSKK96 was studied with solid state fermentation (SSF. Different agro residues as substrate were studied for enzyme production. The highest enzyme production was expressed with lentil husk as units per mass of dry substrate (3937.0 U/mg. Production parameters were optimized as incubation time 120 h, extraction medium Triton-X100 1%, initial moisture content 30%, initial pH 9.0. The high level of alkaline protease was obtained in the medium containing arabinose followed by lactose, galactose, and fructose. Among various nitrogen sources, beef extract was found to be the best inducer of alkaline protease, while other nitrogen sources repressed enzyme production. Among metal salts FeSO4.7H2O and MgSO4.7H2O was found to increase protease production. The maximum enzyme production (5759.2 U/mg was observed with lentil husk in 1000 mL of fermentation medium volume.

  8. Evidence for Tonic Control by the GABAA Receptor of Extracellular D-Serine Concentrations in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Rodents

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    Asami Umino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous D-serine is a putative dominant co-agonist for the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR in the mammalian forebrain. Although the NMDAR regulates the higher order brain functions by interacting with various neurotransmitter systems, the possible interactions between D-serine and an extra-glutamatergic system largely remain elusive. For the first time, we show in the rat and mouse using an in vivo microdialysis technique that the extracellular D-serine concentrations are under tonic increasing control by a major inhibitory transmitter, GABA, via the GABAA (GABAAR in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. Thus, an intra-mPFC infusion of a selective GABAAR antagonist, bicuculline (BIC, caused a concentration-dependent and reversible decrease in the extracellular levels of D-serine in the rat mPFC without affecting those of another intrinsic NMDAR coagonist, glycine and an NMDAR agonist, L-glutamate. The decreasing effects of BIC were eliminated by co-infusion of a selective GABAA agonist, muscimol (MUS and were mimicked by a GABAA antagonist, gabazine (GBZ. In contrast, selective blockade of the GABAB or homomeric ρGABAA (formerly GABAC receptor by saclofen or (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl-methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA, respectively, failed to downregulate the prefrontal extracellular D-serine levels. Moreover, the local BIC application attenuated the ability of NMDA given to the mPFC to increase the cortical extracellular concentrations of taurine, indicating the hypofunction of the NMDAR. Finally, in the mouse mPFC, the reduction of the extracellular D-serine levels by a local injection of BIC into the prefrontal portion was replicated, and was precluded by inhibition of the neuronal or glial activity by co-local injection with tetrodotoxin (TTX or fluorocitrate (Fluo, respectively. These findings suggest that the GABAAR-mediated regulation of the D-serine signaling may exert fine-tuning of the NMDAR function and require both

  9. Purification and properties of detergent-compatible extracellular alkaline protease from Scopulariopsis spp.

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    Niyonzima, Francois Niyongabo; More, Sunil

    2014-10-03

    A fungal alkaline protease of Scopulariopsis spp. was purified to homogeneity with a recovery of 32.2% and 138.1 U/mg specific activity on lectin-agarose column. The apparent molecular mass was 15 ± 1 kD by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacryalamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). It was a homogenous monomeric glycoprotein as shown by a single band and confirmed by native PAGE and gelatin zymography. The enzyme was active and stable over pH range 8.0-12.0 with optimum activity at pH 9.0. The maximum activity was recorded at 50°C and remained unaltered at 50°C for 24 hr. The enzyme was stimulated by Co(2+) and Mn(2+) at 10 mM but was unaffected by Ba(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Fe(2+). Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) moderately reduced the activity (∼18%); however, a reduction of about 40% was seen for Zn(2+) and Hg(2+). The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by 5 mM phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and partially by N-bromosuccinimide (NBS) and tocylchloride methylketone (TLCK). The serine, tryptophan, and histidine may therefore be at or near the active site of the enzyme. The protease was more active against gelatin compared to casein, fibrinogen, egg albumin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). With casein as substrate, Km and Vmax were 4.3 mg/mL and 15.9 U/mL, respectively. An activation was observed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween-80, and Triton X-100 at 2% (v/v); however, H2O2 and NaClO did not affect the protease activity. Storage stability was better for all the temperatures tested (-20, 4, and 28 ± 2°C) with a retention of more than 85% of initial activity after 40 days. The protease retained more than 50% activity after 24 hr of incubation at 28, 60, and 90°C in the presence (0.7%, w/v) of commercial enzymatic and nonenzymatic detergents. The Super Wheel-enzyme solution was able to completely remove blood staining, differing from the detergent solution alone. The stability at alkaline pH and high temperatures, broad substrate specificity

  10. X-ray structural studies of the entire extracellular region of the serine/threonine kinase PrkC from Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Marasco, Daniela; Marchetti, Roberta; Molinaro, Antonio; Berisio, Rita

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial serine/threonine kinases modulate a wide number of cellular processes. The serine/threonine kinase PrkC from the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus was also shown to induce germination of Bacillus subtilis spores, in response to cell wall muropeptides. The presence of muropeptides in the bacterial extracellular milieu is a strong signal that the growing conditions are promising. In the present paper, we report the X-ray structure of the entire extracellular region of PrkC from S. aureus. This structure reveals that the extracellular region of PrkC, EC-PrkC, is a linear modular structure composed of three PASTA (penicillin binding-associated and serine/threonine kinase-associated) domains and an unpredicted C-terminal domain, which presents the typical features of adhesive proteins. Using several solution techniques, we also found that EC-PrkC shows no tendency to dimerize even in the presence of high concentrations of muropeptides. X-ray structural results obtained in the present study provide molecular clues into the mechanism of muropeptide-induced PrkC activation.

  11. Extracellular alkaline pH leads to increased metastatic potential of estrogen receptor silenced endocrine resistant breast cancer cells.

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    Maitham A Khajah

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Endocrine resistance in breast cancer is associated with enhanced metastatic potential and poor clinical outcome, presenting a significant therapeutic challenge. We have established several endocrine insensitive breast cancer lines by shRNA induced depletion of estrogen receptor (ER by transfection of MCF-7 cells which all exhibit enhanced expression profile of mesenchymal markers with reduction of epithelial markers, indicating an epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In this study we describe their behaviour in response to change in extracellular pH, an important factor controlling cell motility and metastasis. METHODS: Morphological changes associated with cell exposure to extracellular alkaline pH were assessed by live cell microscopy and the effect of various ion pumps on this behavior was investigated by pretreatment with chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules was assessed by western blotting. Cell motility and invasion were examined by scratch and under-agarose assays respectively. Total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity and specifically of MMP2/9 was assessed in conditioned medium in response to brief alkaline pH exposure. RESULTS: Exposure of ER -ve but not ER +ve breast cancer cells to extracellular alkaline pH resulted in cell shrinkage and spherical appearance (termed contractolation; this was reversed by returning the pH back to 7.4. Contractolation was blocked by targeting the Na(+/K(+ and Na(+/H(+ pumps with specific chemical inhibitors. The activity and expression profile of key signaling molecules critical for cell adhesion were modulated by the exposure to alkaline pH. Brief exposure to alkaline pH enhanced MMP2/9 activity and the invasive potential of ER -ve cells in response to serum components and epithelial growth factor stimulation without affecting unhindered motility. CONCLUSIONS: Endocrine resistant breast cancer cells behave very differently to estrogen

  12. Trichoderma harzianum transformant has high extracellular alkaline proteinase expression during specific mycoparasitic interactions

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    Goldman Maria Helena S.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The mycoparasite Trichoderma harzianum produces an alkaline proteinase that may be specifically involved in mycoparasitism. We have constructed transformant strains of this fungus that overexpress this alkaline proteinase. Some of the transformants were assessed for alkaline proteinase activity, and those with higher activity than the wild type were selected for further studies. One of these transformant strains produced an elevated and constitutive pbr1 mRNA level during mycoparasitic interactions with Rhizoctonia solani.

  13. The roles of serine protease, intracellular and extracellular phenoloxidase in activation of prophenoloxidase system, and characterization of phenoloxidase from shrimp haemocytes induced by lipopolysaccharide or dopamine

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    Xie, Peng; Pan, Luqing; Xu, Wujie; Yue, Feng

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dopamine (DA) on the activation of the prophenoloxidase (proPO) system of Litopenaeus vannamei. LPS and DA were shown with a negative dose-dependent effect on hyalne cells (HC), semi-granular cells (SGC), large granular cells (LGC), and total haemocyte count (THC). When haemocytes were treated with LPS or DA, serine proteinase activity and intracellular phenoloxidase (PO) activity were significantly reduced, but extracellular PO activity increased significantly. These findings indicated that the reduction in haemocyte counts was mainly because of the degranulation and activation of the proPO system from semi-granule and large granule cells. The PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine, and the TPK inhibitor, genistein, had an inhibitory effect on extracellular PO activity, while serine proteinase and intracellular PO activity increased. This suggests that the LPS and DA induce the activation of proPO in haemocytes via PKC and TPK-related signaling pathways, but serine proteinase may be activated only by PKC, as the genistein effects were not statistically significant. Electrophoresis analysis revealed that POs induced by LPS or DA have the same molecular mass and high diphenolase activity. Two PO bands at 526 kDa and 272 kDa were observed in PAGE, while in the haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), only a 272-kDa band was observed. This band was resolved after SDS-PAGE under non-reducing and reducing conditions into two groups of POs, 166 kDa and 126 kDa, and 78.1 kDa and 73.6 kDa, respectively, suggesting that PO in L. vannamei is an oligomer, which may have different compositions intra- and extracellularly.

  14. Purification and characterization of an extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase produced by psychrotrophic bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1.

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    Ji, Xiuling; Chen, Guiyuan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Wei, Yunlin

    2015-06-01

    An extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase from the psychrotrophic Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1 was purified 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme was active over a broad range spanning 0-60 °C with an optimum activity at 37 °C, and it was found to be alkaline-preferring with an optimum activity at pH 9.0. The molecular weight was estimated to be 34.3 KDa and monomeric. The lipase could be activated by Ca(2+) and low concentration (10%) of ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, and acetonitrile, whereas it was strongly inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, EDTA, and PMSF. Using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as a substrate at 37 °C, the Km and Vmax of the enzyme were found to be 16.58 mM and 5.24 × 10(5)  μM · min(-1), respectively. This extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase may be a good candidate for detergents and biocatalysts at low temperature.

  15. Differentiating Intracellular from Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Soil by Sonication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.P.; Hu, C.S.; Oenema, O.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiating intracellular from extracellular enzyme activity is important in soil enzymology, but not easy. Here, we report on an adjusted sonication method for the separation of intracellular from extracellular phosphatase activity in soil. Under optimal sonication conditions [soil:water ratio

  16. NtSCP1 from Tobacco Is an Extracellular Serine Carboxypeptidase III That Has an Impact on Cell Elongation1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Manuela Désirée; Delannoy, Mélanie; Navarre, Catherine; Boutry, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The leaf extracellular space contains several peptidases, most of which are of unknown function. We isolated cDNAs for two extracellular serine carboxypeptidase III genes from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), NtSCP1 and NtSCP2, belonging to a phylogenetic clade not yet functionally characterized in plants. NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are orthologs derived from the two ancestors of tobacco. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that NtSCP1 and NtSCP2 are expressed in root, stem, leaf, and flower tissues. Expression analysis of the β-glucuronidase reporter gene fused to the NtSCP1 transcription promoter region confirmed this expression profile. Western blotting of NtSCP1 and expression of an NtSCP1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that the protein is located in the extracellular space of tobacco leaves and culture cells. Purified His-tagged NtSCP1 had carboxypeptidase activity in vitro. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing NtSCP1 showed a reduced flower length due to a decrease in cell size. Etiolated seedlings of these transgenic plants had shorter hypocotyls. These data provide support for a role of an extracellular type III carboxypeptidase in the control of cell elongation. PMID:22214816

  17. The AprV5 subtilase is required for the optimal processing of all three extracellular serine proteases from Dichelobacter nodosus.

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    Xiaoyan Han

    Full Text Available Dichelobacter nodosus is the principal causative agent of ovine footrot and its extracellular proteases are major virulence factors. Virulent isolates of D. nodosus secrete three subtilisin-like serine proteases: AprV2, AprV5 and BprV. These enzymes are each synthesized as precursor molecules that include a signal (pre- peptide, a pro-peptide and a C-terminal extension, which are processed to produce the mature active forms. The function of the C-terminal regions of these proteases and the mechanism of protease processing and secretion are unknown. AprV5 contributes to most of the protease activity secreted by D. nodosus. To understand the role of the C-terminal extension of AprV5, we constructed a series of C-terminal-deletion mutants in D. nodosus by allelic exchange. The proteases present in the resultant mutants and their complemented derivatives were examined by protease zymogram analysis, western blotting and mass spectrometry. The results showed that the C-terminal region of AprV5 is required for the normal expression of protease activity, deletion of this region led to a delay in the processing of these enzymes. D. nodosus is an unusual bacterium in that it produces three closely related extracellular serine proteases. We have now shown that one of these enzymes, AprV5, is responsible for its own maturation, and for the optimal cleavage of AprV2 and BprV, to their mature active forms. These studies have increased our understanding of how this important pathogen processes these virulence-associated extracellular proteases and secretes them into its external environment.

  18. Production of extracellular alkaline protease by new halotolerant alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 isolated from hyper saline soda lakes

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    Abdelnasser S.S. Ibrahim

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: A new halotolerant alkaliphilic alkaline protease producing Bacillus sp. NPST-AK15 was isolated from soda lakes. Optimization of various fermentation parameters resulted in an increase of enzyme yield by 22.8 fold, indicating the significance of optimization of the fermentation parameters to obtain commercial yield of the enzyme. NPST-AK15 and its extracellular alkaline protease with salt tolerance signify their potential applicability in the laundry industry and other applications.

  19. Screening Brazilian Macrophomina phaseolina isolates for alkaline lipases and other extracellular hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinke, Claudia; Germani, José C

    2012-03-01

    Macrophomina phaseolina, phylum Ascomycota, is a phytopathogenic fungus distributed worldwide in hot dry areas. There are few studies on its secreted lipases and none on its colony radial growth rate, an indicator of fungal ability to use nutrients for growth, on media other than potato-dextrose agar. In this study, 13 M. phaseolina isolates collected in different Brazilian regions were screened for fast-growth and the production of hydrolases of industrial interest, especially alkaline lipases. Hydrolase detection and growth rate determination were done on citric pectin, gelatin, casein, soluble starch, and olive oil as substrates. Ten isolates were found to be active on all substrates tested. The most commonly detected enzymes were pectinases, amylases, and lipases. The growth rate on pectin was significantly higher (P < 0.05), while the growth rates on the different media identified CMM 2105, CMM 1091, and PEL as the fastest-growing isolates. The lipase activity of four isolates grown on olive oil was followed for 4 days by measuring the activity in the cultivation broth. The specific lipolytic activity of isolate PEL was significantly higher at 96 h (130 mU mg protein(-1)). The broth was active at 37 °C, pH 8, indicating the potential utility of the lipases of this isolate in mild alkaline detergents. There was a strong and positive correlation (0.86) between radial growth rate and specific lipolytic activity.

  20. Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Alkaline Phosphatase and Pyrophosphate as Molecular Determinants of Bone, Tooth, Kidney and Vascular Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D.

    2008-09-01

    Progress in biomineralization research in recent years has identified, characterized and described functions for key noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins regulating crystal growth in the skeleton and dentition. Some of these same proteins expressed in soft tissues undergoing pathologic calcification also inhibit ectopic crystal growth. In addition to extracellular matrix proteins regulating matrix mineralization, the enzyme tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase—which is highly expressed by cells in mineralized tissues—cleaves pyrophosphate, an anionic small-molecule inhibitor of mineralization. Together with the required mineral ion availability necessary for crystal growth, these molecular determinants appear to function in limiting the spread of pathologic calcification seen in soft tissues such as blood vessels and kidneys. Osteopontin, in particular, is a potent calcification inhibitor that accumulates in mineralized tissues and in calcified deposits during vascular calcification and nephrolithiasis/urolithiasis. Additional research is required to establish the exact temporal sequence in which the molecular determinants of pathologic calcification appear relative to mineral crystal growth in different tissues, and to establish their relationship (if any) to the activation of osteogenic differentiation programs.

  1. Serine protease inhibitor kazal-type 6 inhibits tumorigenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells via its extracellular action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Gu, Meigang; Dai, Xinchuan; Xu, Yuqiang; Wu, Hongyu; Li, Guodong; Lu, Hairong; Zhong, Jiang; Huang, Qingshan

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) causes significant medical burdens worldwide. Diagnosis, especially in the early stages, is still challenging. Therapeutic options are limited and often ineffective. Although several risk factors have been known important for development of HCC, the molecular basis of the process is rather complex and has not been fully understood. We have found that a subpopulation of HCC cells which are resistant to oncolytic parvovirus H1 superinfection highly express serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6). This protein is specifically reduced in all HCC cell lines and tissues we analyzed. When upregulated, SPINK6 could suppress the malignant phenotypes of the HCC cells in several in vitro models. The putative tumor suppression role of SPINK6 is, however, independent of its protease inhibitory activity. To suppress the malignancy of HCC cells, SPINK6 has to be secreted to trigger signals which regulate an intracellular signaling molecule, ERK1/2, as well as a series of downstream factors involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and migration. Our study supports that SPINK6 is an important tumor suppressor in liver, and further investigations may help develop more effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27999203

  2. Effects of Dihydroartemisinin and Artemether on the Growth, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, and Extracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shoubing; Xu, Ziran

    2016-01-01

    Increased eutrophication in the recent years has resulted in considerable research focus on identification of methods for preventing cyanobacterial blooms that are rapid and efficient. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of dihydroartemisinin and artemether on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa and to elucidate its mode of action. Variations in cell density, chlorophyll a, soluble protein, malondialdehyde, extracellular alkaline phosphatase activity (APA), and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR, rapid light curves, fast chlorophyll fluorescence curves on fluorescence intensity, and relative variable fluorescence) were evaluated by lab-cultured experiments. Our results demonstrated that both dihydroartemisinin and artemether inhibited the growth of M.aeruginosa by impairing the photosynthetic center in photosystem II and reducing extracellular APA, with a higher sensitivity exhibited toward artemether. The inhibitory effects of dihydroartemisinin on M.aeruginosa increased with concentration, and the maximum growth inhibitory rate was 42.17% at 24 mg·L-1 after 120h exposure, whereas it was 55.72% at 6 mg·L-1 artemetherafter 120h exposure. Moreover, the chlorophyll fluorescence was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) after 120h exposure to 12 and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin. Furthermore, after 120h exposure to 6 mg·L-1 artemether, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, ETR and rETRmax showed a significant decrease (p<0.01) from initial values of 0.490, 0.516, 17.333, and 104.800, respectively, to 0. One-way analysis of variance showed that 6 mg·L-1 artemether and 24 mg·L-1 dihydroartemisinin had significant inhibitory effects on extracellular APA (p<0.01). The results of this study would be useful to further studies to validate the feasibility of dihydroartemisinin and artemether treatment to inhibit overall cyanobacterial growth in water bodies, before this can be put into practice. PMID:27755566

  3. Degradation of extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin, vitronectin and laminin) by serine-proteinases isolated from Lonomia achelous caterpillar hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Sara; Guerrero, Belsy; Salazar, Ana M; Gil, Amparo; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L

    2006-09-01

    Lonomia achelous is a caterpillar distributed in southern Venezuela and in northern Brazil that causes an acute hemorrhagic syndrome in people who have contact with its bristles. The effect of the crude hemolymph and its chromatographic fractions (FDII, Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2) on extracellular matrix proteins was studied. The chromatographic fractions show activities similar to plasmin and urokinase. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, both lonomins appear as a protein band of 25 kDa under reduced conditions. By exclusion chromatography, the molecular weights of Lonomin V and Lonomin V-2 were 26.5 and 24.5 kDa, respectively. Fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin were degraded by all venom components. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, under reduced conditions, shows that lonomins degrade fibronectin in four main fragments of 116, 60, 50 and 30 kDa. Molecular exclusion chromatography in native conditions shows that the molecular masses of these fragments are > or = 300, 62 and 27 kDa. The proteolytic effect of lonomins was abolished by benzamidine/HCl, iodoacetic acid and aprotinin. The extracellular matrix protein degradation together with the fibrino(geno)lytic activity of hemolymph and its fractions could explain, in part, the hemorrhagic syndrome, and the wound dehiscence in persons who have had contact with the L. achelous caterpillar.

  4. Urease-induced alkalinization of extracellular pH and its antitumor activity in human breast and lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wah Yau; DeLuca, Carl I; Tian, Baomin; Wilson, Iain; Molund, Sharon; Warriar, Nalini; Govindan, Manjapra V; Segal, Donald; Chao, Heman

    2005-01-01

    Jack bean urease catalyzes the decomposition of urea into ammonia, which in turn increases the pH of the surrounding medium. Based on these two properties, we have investigated the antitumor effects of urease in vitro and in vivo on human lung and breast cancer cell lines either by the enzyme itself or in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs. First, through the generation of toxic ammonia, urease exerted direct cytotoxicity on A549 and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with LC50 of 0.22 and 0.45 U/ml, respectively. The cytotoxic effects could effectively be blocked using the reversible urease inhibitor acetohydroxamic acid. Complete protection was observed at dose > or = 2 mM. In addition, nude mouse xenograft models demonstrated that intratumoral urease injections (1 - 10 U/dose) inhibited A549 and MCF-7 tumor growth in vivo. Second, when combined with weak-base anticancer drugs, urease provided indirect antitumor effects via pH augmentation. Alkalinization of extracellular pH by urease (2 U/ml) and urea (> or = 2 mM) was found to enhance the antitumor efficacy of doxorubicin (50 microM) and vinblastine (100 microM) significantly.

  5. The effect of extracellular alkalinization on lactate metabolism of breast cancer stem cells: Overview of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1 and MCT4 gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neolaka, G. M. G.; Yustisia, I.; Sadikin, M.; Wanandi, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Changes in the metabolic status of cancer cells are presumed to be correlated with the adjustment of these cells to extracellular changes. Cell glycolysis increases the production of intracellular lactate catalyzed by the lactate dehydrogenases, both LDH-A and LDH-B. An increase in intracellular lactate can affect extracellular pH balance through monocarboxylate transporters, particularly MCT1 and MCT4. This study aimed to analyze the effects of extracellular alkalinization on the lactate metabolism of human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs). In this study, human primary BCSCs (CD24-/CD44+ cells) were treated with 100 mM sodium bicarbonate for 0.5, 24, and 48 h in DMEM F12/HEPES. After incubation, extracellular pH was measured and cells were harvested to extract the total RNA and protein. The expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 mRNA genes were analyzed using qRT-PCR method. Our study shows that administration of sodium bicarbonate in the BCSC culture medium could increase extracellular pH. To balance the increase of extracellular pH, BCSCs regulated the expression of LDH-A, LDH-B, MCT1, and MCT4 genes. As the extracellular pH increases, the expression of LDH-A that converts pyruvate to lactate increased along with the increase of MCT 4 and MCT 1 expression, which act as lactate transporters. As the incubation time increases, the pH decreases, leading to the suppression of LDH-A and increase of LDH-B expression that converts lactate into pyruvate. Therefore, we suggest that the extracellular alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate in BCSCs affected the genes that regulate lactate metabolism.

  6. Enhanced Production of Extracellular Alkaline Lipase by an Improved Strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055

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    Deepali Bisht

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Lipases are industrially important enzymes having applications in numerous industries. For easy commercialization it is necessary to produce lipases at industrial level which could be achieved by strain improvement and medium formulation. Approach: In the present study strain improvement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MTCC 10,055 was done by chemical mutagenesis using mutagen 4-nitroquinoline1-oxide for alkaline lipase production. Different fermentation parameters affecting lipase production were optimized using one-variable-at-a-time approach. Results: The selected mutant (M-05 exhibited 3.6-fold higher productivity over wild type. Maximum alkaline lipase was produced when culture was incubated at 35°C with initial medium pH 9.0 in 28 h with inoculum density 0.5% (v/v (Abs610-1.0. Supplementation of production medium with combination of castor oil and starch as carbon source and Triton-X-100 as surfactant significantly influenced the alkaline lipase production. The composition of fully optimized medium was determined to be (g L-1: (NH42SO4, 1.0; KH2PO4, 0.6; MgSO4, 0.4; yeast extract, 0.2; castor oil, 2.0; starch 20.0; gum arabic, 5.0; Triton-X-100, 1.0. An overall 14-fold enhanced production was achieved after complete medium optimization. Conclusion/Recommendations: The improved strain was capable to produce high titer of alkaline lipase at flask level, which can be examined at fermentor level to obtain sufficient enzyme yield to meet the world wide industrial demand.

  7. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications.

  8. Production, properties and application to biocatalysis of a novel extracellular alkaline phenol oxidase from the thermophilic fungus Scytalidium thermophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogel, Z B; Yüzügüllü, Y; Mete, S; Bakir, U; Kaptan, Y; Sutay, D; Demir, A S

    2006-08-01

    Scytalidium thermophilum produces an extracellular phenol oxidase on glucose-containing medium. Certain phenolic acids, specifically gallic acid and tannic acid, induce the expression of the enzyme. Production at 45 degrees C in batch cultures is growth-associated and is enhanced in the presence of 160 microM CuSO4 x 5 H2O and 3 mM gallic acid. The highest enzyme activity is observed at pH 7.5 and 65 degrees C, on catechol. When incubated for 1 h at pH 7 and pH 8, 95% and 86% of the activity is retained. Thermostability decreases gradually from 40 degrees C to 80 degrees C. Estimated molecular mass is c. 83 kDa, and pI is acidic at c. 5.4. Substrate specificity and inhibition analysis in culture supernatants suggest that the enzyme has unique properties showing activity towards catechol; 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA); 4-amino-N, N-diethylaniline (ADA); p-hydroquinone; gallic acid; tannic acid and caffeic acid, and no activity towards L-tyrosine, guaiacol, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) and syringaldazine. Inhibition is observed in the presence of salicyl hydroxamic acid (SHAM) and p-coumaric acid. Enzyme activity is enhanced by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and the organic solvents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol. No inhibition is observed in the presence of carbon monoxide. Benzoin, benzoyl benzoin and hydrobenzoin are converted into benzil, and stereoselective oxidation is observed on hydrobenzoin. The reported enzyme is novel due to its catalytic properties resembling mainly catechol oxidases, but displaying some features of laccases at the same time.

  9. Intracellular transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor by α1A-adrenoceptor is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase independently of activation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, Nadir; Henning, Robert H; Guner, Sahika; Zoto, Teuta; Duman-Dalkilic, Basak; Duin, Marry; Gurdal, Hakan

    2013-10-01

    Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by α1-adrenoceptor (α1-AR) is implicated in contraction and hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle (VSM). We examine whether all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR and explore the mechanism of transactivation. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing one subtype of α1-AR were transiently transfected with EGFR. The transactivation mechanism was examined both by coexpression of a chimeric erythropoietin (EPO)-EGFR with an extracellular EPO and intracellular EGFR domain, and by pharmacologic inhibition of external and internal signaling routes. All three α1-AR subtypes transactivated EGFR, which was dependent on the increase in intracellular calcium. The EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 [4-(3'-chloroanilino)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline] abrogated α1A-AR and α1D-AR induced phosphorylation of EGFR, but both the inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases by GM6001 [(R)-N4-hydroxy-N(1)-[(S)-2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-1-methylcarbamoyl-ethyl]-2-isobutyl-succinamide] or blockade of EGFR by cetuximab did not. Stimulation of α1A-AR and α1D-AR also induced phosphorylation of EPO-EGFR chimeric receptors. Moreover, α1A-AR stimulation enhanced phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and serine-threonine kinases (Akt), which were both unaffected by AG1478, indicating that ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation is independent of EGFR transactivation. Accordingly, inhibitors of ERK1/2 or Akt did not influence the α1A-AR-mediated EGFR transactivation. Inhibition of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Src, however, did block EGFR transactivation by α1A-AR and α1D-AR. These findings demonstrate that all α1-AR subtypes transactivate EGFR, which is dependent on an intracellular signaling route involving an increase in calcium and activation of CaMKII, PI3K, and Src, but not the of ERK1/2 and Akt pathways.

  10. A serine hydroxymethyltransferase from marine bacterium Shewanella algae: Isolation, purification, characterization and l-serine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Bingzhao; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-10-01

    Currently, l-serine is mainly produced by enzymatic conversion, in which serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is the key enzyme, suggesting the importance of searching for a SHMT with high activity. Shewanella algae, a methanol-utilizing marine bacterium showing high SHMT activity, was selected based on screening bacterial strains and comparison of the activities of SHMTs. A glyA was isolated from the S. algae through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and it encoded a 417 amino acid polypeptide. The SaSHMT, encoded by the glyA, showed the optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and retained over 45% of its maximal activity after incubation at 40°C for 3h. The enzyme showed better stability under alkaline environment (pH 6.5-9.0) than Hyphomicrobium methylovorum GM2's SHMT (pH 6.0-7.5). The SaSHMT can produce 77.76mM of l-serine by enzymatic conversion, with the molecular conversion rate in catalyzing glycine to l-serine being 1.41-fold higher than that of Escherichia coli. Therefore, the SaSHMT has the potential for industrial applications due to its tolerance of alkaline environment and a relatively high enzymatic conversion rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Production and Characterization of Alkaline Protease from a High Yielding and Moderately Halophilic Strain of SD11 Marine Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A marine bacterium SD11, which was isolated from sea muds (Geziwo Qinhuangdao Sea area, China, was used to produce thermostable alkaline serine nonmetal protease in the skim milk agar plate medium with 10% NaCl. The optimal temperature about the manufacture of the extracellular protease was ~60°C. The crude enzyme was stable at 20–50°C. The activity was retained to 60% and 45% after heating for 1 h at 60 and 70°C, respectively. The protease was highly active in a wide pH scope (8.0–10.0 and maximum protease activity exhibited at pH 10.0. The activity was restrained by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF but mildly increased (~107% in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, indicating that the production contains serine-protease(s and nonmetal protease(s. Moreover, the crude alkaline protease was active with the 5 mM Ca2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Na+, and K+ that existed separately. In addition, the protease showed superduper stability when exposed to an anionic surfactant (5 mM SDS, an oxidizing agent (1% H2O2, and several organic solvents (methanol, isopropanol, and acetone. These results suggest that the marine bacterium SD11 is significant in the industry from the prospects of its ability to produce thermally stable alkaline protease.

  12. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs: Biogenesis and Function

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    Nathalie Dautin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins.

  13. Purification and characterization of alkaline protease from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangam, E Berla; Rajkumar, G Suseela

    2002-04-01

    Extracellular alkaline protease from the alkalophilic bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis was purified by a combination of ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatographic methods, and its properties were examined. The purified enzyme had a specific activity of 563.8 micromol of tyrosine/min per mg of protein and gave a single band on native PAGE and SDS/PAGE with a molecular mass of 67 kDa. Gelatin zymogram also revealed one clear zone of proteolytic activity which corresponded to the band obtained with native PAGE and SDS/PAGE. The enzyme had an optimal pH of 9.0 and exhibited its highest activity at 55 degrees C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting the presence of serine residues at the active site. The enzyme had a K(m) of 1.66 mg/ml and a V(max) of 526 units/min per mg of protein with casein as the substrate.

  14. Effects of alkaline earth metal ion complexation on amino acid zwitterion stability: Results from infrared action spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bush, M. F.; Oomens, J.; Saykally, R. J.; Williams, E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The structures of isolated alkaline earth metal cationized amino acids are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and theory. These results indicate that arginine, glutamine, proline, serine, and valine all adopt zwitterionic structures when complexed with diva

  15. Cell-type specific mechanisms of D-serine uptake and release in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magalie eMartineau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence during the last decade established that D-serine is a key signaling molecule utilized by neurons and astroglia in the mammalian central nervous system. D-serine is increasingly appreciated as the main physiological endogenous coagonist for synaptic NMDA receptors at central excitatory synapses; it is mandatory for long-term changes in synaptic strength, memory, learning, and social interactions. Alterations in the extracellular levels of D-serine leading to disrupted cell-cell signaling are a trademark of many chronic or acute neurological (i.e. Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, stroke and psychiatric (i.e. schizophrenia disorders, and are associated with addictive behavior (i.e. cocaine addiction. Indeed, fine tuning of the extracellular levels of D-serine, achieved by various molecular machineries and signaling pathways, is necessary for maintenance of accurate NMDA receptor functions. Here, we review the experimental data supporting the notion that astroglia and neurons use different pathways to regulate levels of extracellular D-serine.

  16. Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 promotes Lovo cells invasion by inducing serine protease inhibitor E3 through extracellular signal-regulated kinase%肝再生磷酸酶-3通过细胞外调节蛋白激酶上调丝氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂E3促进Lovo细胞侵袭

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许鹤洋; 林显敢; 罗兴喜; 张旸; 蓝球生; 褚忠华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence and mechanisms of phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) on serine protease inhibitor E3 (serpinE3),and their effects on Lovo cells invasion.Methods Western blotting was used to detect the serpinE3 of Lovo-P and Lovo-C cells.Transwell chamber was used to detect the invasion of Lovo-P and Lovo-C cells.The Lovo-P cells were treated with the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126 (10 μmol/L) for 6 h,and the expression of serpinE3 and invasion of Lovo-P cells were examined.Results The expression of serpinE3 was increased in the Lovo-P cells transfected with human PRL-3.Lovo-P cells exhibited stronger invasion ability than Lovo-Ccells (378 ± 13 vs.269 ± 15,P < 0.05).SerpinE3 was abrogated when Lovo-P treated with U0126 and the invasion ability of the cells was decreased either (211-±9 vs.358 ± 19,P <0.05).Conclusion PRL-3 could induce serpinE3 expression by ERK,and then promotes Lovo cells invasion.%目的 探讨肝再生磷酸酶-3(PRL-3)对丝氨酸蛋白酶抑制剂E3(serpinE3)的影响及机制,以及PRL-3和serpinF3对结肠癌Lovo细胞侵袭性的影响.方法 通过Western blot方法,分别检测已经稳转入PRL-3载体的Lovo-P细胞和对照组Lovo-C细胞中serpinE3的表达水平,Transwell小室检测Lovo细胞侵袭性.再给予细胞外调节蛋白激酶(ERK)特异性抑制剂U0126(10 μmol/L)预处理Lovo-P细胞6h,观察serpinE3表达的变化,检测Lovo-P细胞侵袭性的改变.结果 Western blot检测结果显示在转染人PRL-3的Lovo-P细胞中,serpinE3表达明显上调,Lovo-P细胞侵袭性增强[(378±13)个比(269±15)个,P<0.05];而当特异性阻断ERK后,Lovo-P细胞中的serpinE3表达下调,并且细胞侵袭性也降低[(21l±9)个比(358±19)个,P<0.05].结论 PRL-3能够通过ERK诱导serpinE3表达上调的方式,增加Lovo细胞的侵袭性.

  17. An update on serine deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, S. N.; Verhoeven-Duif, N. M.; Brilstra, E. H.; Van Maldergem, L.; Coskun, T.; Rubio-Gozalbo, E.; Berger, R.; de Koning, T. J.

    Serine deficiency disorders are caused by a defect in one of the three synthesising enzymes of the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. Serine deficiency disorders give rise to a neurological phenotype with psychomotor retardation, microcephaly and seizures in newborns and children or progressive

  18. [Serine proteinases of lower vertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodzeĭskaia, M V

    1986-01-01

    Recent data on the effect of serine proteinases of lower vertebrates are generalized. Hydrolysis specificity and kinetics of different synthetic substrates, dependence of the activity of enzymes on pH, their irreversible inhibition by chloromethyl ketones of amino acids and peptides as well as high-molecular proteinase inhibitors are considered in detail. The data testify to the fact that chymotrypsins and trypsins of higher vertebrates and serine proteinases of lower vertebrates act as an acid-base catalysis. Enzymes in the pyloric cacca of fishes are in the state of proenzymes and are transformed into an active form with the aid of their own proteolytic factors. The esterase and proteolytic activity of fish proteinases is concentrated in the same active site and reaches the highest values at pH 7,8. New data are presented on particularities of the lower vertebrate proteinases, on the similarity and differences in their specificity. A distinct difference is shown in the nature of the binding site of the active centre in a number of serine proteinases of fishes as compared to chymotrypsin and trypsin of higher vertebrates.

  19. Deep-sea fungi as a source of alkaline and cold-tolerant proteases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Damare, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Muraleedharan, U.; Raghukumar, S.

    and Chang CS. Bleach resistant alkaline protease produced by a Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Korean polychaete, Periserrula leucophryna. Proc Biochem 2004;39:1441-7. [12] Turkiewicz M, Gromek E, Kalinowska H and Zielinska M, Biosynthesis and properties... o C Serine protease [33] Paecilomyces lilacinus Biocontrol agent Azocasein [34] Bacillus sp Korean polychaete Casein 1?g tyrosine min -1 10.0 45-50 o C Serine protease [11] Aspergillus ustus NIOCC #20 Deep-sea sediment Azocasein 1639 ACU m...

  20. Serine recombinases as tools for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William R A; Lee, Nicholas C O; Xu, Zhengyao; Smith, Margaret C M

    2011-04-01

    The serine recombinases differ mechanistically from the tyrosine recombinases and include proteins such as ϕC31 integrase which, unlike Cre and Flp, promote unidirectional reactions. The serine recombinase family is large and includes many other proteins besides ϕC31 integrase with the potential to be widely used in genome engineering. Here we review the details of the mechanism of the reactions promoted by the serine recombinases and discuss how these not only limit the utility of this class of recombinase but also creates opportunities for the engineering of new enzymes. We discuss the unanswered questions posed by genome engineering experiments in a variety of systems in which the serine recombinases have been used and finally describe more recently discovered serine recombinases that have the potential to be used in genome engineering.

  1. l-Serine Production by a Mutant of Sarcina albida Defective in l-Serine Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Kenji; Kakimoto, Toshio; Chibata, Ichiro

    1983-01-01

    For improved l-serine production, an l-serine dehydratase-defective mutant of Sarcina albida IAM 1012 was obtained. In the mutant, the activities of the enzymes responsible for l-serine production were as high as those in the parent strain, and, at a low glycine concentration, the mutant accumulated l-serine more efficiently than the parent. Under optimum conditions, 21 mg of l-serine per ml accumulated from 100 mg of glycine per ml. l-Serine was isolated from a reaction mixture as l-serine m-xylene-4-sulfonate, and free amino acid was obtained in high yields by use of an ion-exchange resin. Residual glycine was recovered at a yield of 61%. PMID:16346305

  2. Enzymatic dehairing of goat skins using alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. SB12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briki, Selmen; Hamdi, Olfa; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2016-05-01

    The present paper reports the production, purification and biochemical characterization of an extracellular alkaline protease from Bacillus sp. SB12. The enzyme has been used as an alternative to conventional chemicals treatment for dehairing of goat skins. The protease was optimally active at 37 °C and pH 9. Starch at 2% (w/v) was used as the best carbon source and the addition of yeast extract and peptone at 1% each supported the maximum level of protease production in the presence of 5 mM Ca(2+). Protease purification was performed with ammonium sulphate precipitation at 70% saturated fraction followed by dialysis and gel filtration chromatography using Sephadex G-100. The purified enzyme was homogeneous on non-denaturing PAGE and appeared as a single band with an apparent molecular weight of 41 kDa. This enzyme was moderately thermostable and has a wide pH stability range extending from pH 7 to 11. It showed high tolerance toward surfactants agents and organic solvents while it was completely inhibited by PMSF indicating the serine protease type. Purified protease was used to remove hair from goat skin proving its potential application in leather processing industry. The results revealed that the protease has enhanced the quality and physico-chemical properties of the skins while reducing the pollution.

  3. Serine protease inhibitor 6-deficient mice have increased neutrophil immunity to Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manling; Liu, Ni; Park, Sun-Mi; Wang, Yue; Byrne, Susan; Murmann, Andrea E; Bahr, Scott; Peter, Marcus E; Olson, Steven T; Belaaouaj, Abderrazzaq; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G

    2007-10-01

    Inflammation is a localized, protective response to trauma or microbial invasion that destroys the injurious agent and the injured tissue. Neutrophil elastase (NE), a serine protease stored in the azurophil granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, digests microbes after phagocytosis. NE can also digest microbes extracellularly but is associated with tissue damage and inflammatory disease. In this study, we show that polymorphonuclear neutrophils from mice deficient in serine protease inhibitor 6, a weak intracellular NE inhibitor, had increased susceptibility to self-inflicted lysis because of increased NE activity. The resulting transient increase in local extracellular NE activity was within a narrow range that resulted in the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa but did not damage the lung. Therefore, deficiency in a weak intracellular inhibitor of NE results in an acute inflammatory response that protects from P. aeruginosa but does not cause lung disease.

  4. D-serine and serine racemase are associated with PSD-95 and glutamatergic synapse stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eLin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available D-serine is an endogenous coagonist at the glycine site of synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs, synthesized by serine racemase (SR through conversion of L-serine. It is crucial for synaptic plasticity and is implicated in schizophrenia. Our previous studies demonstrated specific loss of SR, D-serine-responsive synaptic NMDARs, and glutamatergic synapses in cortical neurons lacking alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, which promotes glutamatergic synapse formation and maturation during development. We thus hypothesize that D-serine and SR (D-serine/SR are associated with glutamatergic synaptic development. Using morphological and molecular studies in cortical neuronal cultures, we demonstrate that D-serine/SR are associated with PSD-95 and NMDARs in postsynaptic neurons and with glutamatergic synapse stability during synaptic development. Endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95, but not presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1, in glutamatergic synapses of cultured cortical neurons. Low-density astrocytes in cortical neuronal cultures lack SR expression but contain enriched D-serine in large vesicle-like structures, suggesting possible synthesis of D-serine in postsynaptic neurons and storage in astrocytes. More interestingly, endogenous D-serine and SR colocalize with PSD-95 in the postsynaptic terminals of glutamatergic synapses during early and late synaptic development, implicating involvement of D-serine/SR in glutamatergic synaptic development. Exogenous application of D-serine enhances the interactions of SR with PSD-95 and NR1, and increases the number of VGLUT1- and PSD-95-positive glutamatergic synapses, suggesting that exogenous D-serine enhances postsynaptic SR/PSD-95 signaling and stabilizes glutamatergic synapses during cortical synaptic development. This is blocked by NMDAR antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5 and 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-CK, a specific antagonist at the glycine site of NMDARs

  5. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  7. The vacuolar serine protease, a cross-reactive allergen from Cladosporium herbarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöll, Verena; Denk, Ursula; Shen, Horng-Der; Panzani, Raphael C; Dissertori, Oliver; Lackner, Peter; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mari, Adriano; Crameri, Reto; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Rid, Raphaela; Richter, Klaus; Breitenbach, Michael; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit

    2009-04-01

    Subtilisin-like serine proteases make up one of the most important allergen-families regarding the number of individual allergens. Previously, fungal subtilisin-like serine proteases have been identified from Aspergillus-, Penicillium-, and Trichophyton-species having a prevalence of IgE-reactivity between 33% and 80%. Since IgE-cross-reactivity is a common phenomenon within fungal species we wanted to know whether this protein also represents an allergen in Cladosporium herbarum. Hence, a screening of a C. herbarum cDNA library was performed using the coding sequence of the Penicillium oxalicum vacuolar serine protease (Pen o 18) as hybridization probe, ending up with a full-length clone. Biochemical and immunological characterization of this clone revealed that C. herbarum vacuolar serine protease most likely is synthesized as a precursor with an N-terminal pro-enzyme sequence and represents a minor allergen (Cla h 9) with a prevalence of IgE-reactivity of 15.5%. Furthermore Cla h 9 specifically reacted with the two monoclonal antibodies FUM20 and PCM39, as do the vacuolar serine proteases from Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium species. Investigation of IgE-cross-reactivity between Cla h 9 and other fungal serine proteases revealed that cross-reactivity is higher between vacuolar than alkaline serine proteases. IgE-epitope mapping of Cla h 9 was done in order to test whether four Cla h 9-peptides having a high sequence homology to previously determined Pen ch 18-IgE-epitopes also harbour IgE-epitopes. Three-dimensional models of the vacuolar serine proteases from C. herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum were generated for the three-dimensional localization of the Cla h 9- and Pen ch 18- IgE-reactive and -non-reactive peptides. Taken together a new C. herbarum allergen has been identified, which may be useful in a molecule-based approach of C. herbarum allergy-diagnosis and -therapy. Moreover, Cla h 9 represents a further member of the subtilisin-like serine

  8. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  9. Serine deprivation enhances antineoplastic activity of biguanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Simon-Pierre; Hulea, Laura; Toban, Nader; Birman, Elena; Blouin, Marie-José; Zakikhani, Mahvash; Zhao, Yunhua; Topisirovic, Ivan; St-Pierre, Julie; Pollak, Michael

    2014-12-15

    Metformin, a biguanide widely used in the treatment of type II diabetes, clearly exhibits antineoplastic activity in experimental models and has been reported to reduce cancer incidence in diabetics. There are ongoing clinical trials to evaluate its antitumor properties, which may relate to its fundamental activity as an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we show that serine withdrawal increases the antineoplastic effects of phenformin (a potent biguanide structurally related to metformin). Serine synthesis was not inhibited by biguanides. Instead, metabolic studies indicated a requirement for serine to allow cells to compensate for biguanide-induced decrease in oxidative phosphorylation by upregulating glycolysis. Furthermore, serine deprivation modified the impact of metformin on the relative abundance of metabolites within the citric acid cycle. In mice, a serine-deficient diet reduced serine levels in tumors and significantly enhanced the tumor growth-inhibitory actions of biguanide treatment. Our results define a dietary manipulation that can enhance the efficacy of biguanides as antineoplastic agents that target cancer cell energy metabolism.

  10. Endogenous D-serine contributes to NMDA-receptor-mediated light-evoked responses in the vertebrate retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Eric C; Stevens, Eric R; Wolosker, Herman; Miller, Robert F

    2007-07-01

    We have combined electrophysiology and chemical separation and measurement techniques with capillary electrophoresis (CE) to evaluate the role of endogenous d-serine as an NMDA receptor (NMDAR) coagonist in the salamander retina. Electrophysiological experiments were carried out using whole cell recordings from retinal ganglion cells and extracellular recordings of the proximal negative response (PNR), while bath applying two D-serine degrading enzymes, including d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) and D-serine deaminase (DsdA). The addition of either enzyme resulted in a significant and rapid decline in the light-evoked responses observed in ganglion cell and PNR recordings. The addition of exogenous D-serine in the presence of the enzymes restored the light-evoked responses to the control or supracontrol amplitudes. Heat-inactivated enzymes had no effect on the light responses and blocking NMDARs with AP7 eliminated the suppressive influence of the enzymes as well as the response enhancement normally associated with exogenous d-serine application. CE was used to separate amino acid racemates and to study the selectivity of DAAO and DsdA against D-serine and glycine. Both enzymes showed high selectivity for D-serine without significant effects on glycine. Our results strongly support the concept that endogenous D-serine plays an essential role as a coagonist for NMDARs, allowing them to contribute to the light-evoked responses of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore under our experimental conditions, these coagonist sites are not saturated so that modulation of NMDAR sensitivity can be achieved with further modulaton of d-serine.

  11. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Anderson F.; Valle, Roberta S.; Pacheco, Clarissa A.; Alvarez, Vanessa M.; Seldin, Lucy; Santos, André L.S.

    2013-01-01

    Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9), a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i) molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii) better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii) expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv) susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v) specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi) enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl) and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane). The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties. PMID:24688526

  12. Extracellular proteases of Halobacillus blutaparonensis strain M9, a new moderately halophilic bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson F. Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Halophilic microorganisms are source of potential hydrolytic enzymes to be used in industrial and/or biotechnological processes. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of the moderately halophilic bacterium Halobacillus blutaparonensis (strain M9, a novel species described by our group, to release proteolytic enzymes. This bacterial strain abundantly proliferated in Luria-Bertani broth supplemented with 2.5% NaCl as well as secreted proteases to the extracellular environment. The production of proteases occurred in bacterial cells grown under different concentration of salt, ranging from 0.5% to 10% NaCl, in a similar way. The proteases secreted by H. blutaparonensis presented the following properties: (i molecular masses ranging from 30 to 80 kDa, (ii better hydrolytic activities under neutral-alkaline pH range, (iii expression modulated according to the culture age, (iv susceptibility to phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride, classifying them as serine-type proteases, (v specific cleavage over the chymotrypsin substrate, and (vi enzymatic stability in the presence of salt (up to 20% NaCl and organic solvents (e.g., ether, isooctane and cyclohexane. The proteases described herein are promising for industrial practices due to its haloalkaline properties.

  13. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  14. The role of Serine Proteases and Serine Protease Inhibitors in the migration of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman Ann-Judith

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms regulating neuronal migration during development remain largely undefined. Extracellular matrix cues, target site released factors, and components of the migratory neurons themselves are likely all coordinated in time and space directing neurons to their appropriate locations. We have studied the effects of proteases and their inhibitors on the extracellular matrix and the consequences to the migration of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH neurons in the embryonic chick. Chick GnRH neurons differentiate in the olfactory epithelium, migrate along the olfactory nerve and enter the forebrain. The accessibility of this coherent cell group make it amenable for studying protease/inhibitor roles in migratory processes. Results Affigel blue beads were used to deliver a serine protease inhibitor, protease nexin-1 (PN-1, and a target protease, trypsin, to the olfactory epithelium coincident with initiation of GnRH neuronal migration. PN-1 inhibited neuronal migration while trypsin accelerated their transit into the CNS. Prior to initiation of migration, neither PN-1 nor trypsin altered the timing of neuronal exit. Trypsin did, however, accelerate the timing of neuronal crossing into the nerve-forebrain junction. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that protease activity modulates neuronal movements across barriers. Moreover, the data suggest, for the first time, that aspects of GnRH neuronal migration may be cell autonomous but modulated by ECM alterations.

  15. Role of eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuse, Sylvie; Fleurie, Aurore; Zucchini, Laure; Lesterlin, Christian; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria possess a repertoire of versatile protein kinases modulating diverse aspects of their physiology by phosphorylating proteins on various amino acids including histidine, cysteine, aspartic acid, arginine, serine, threonine and tyrosine. One class of membrane serine/threonine protein kinases possesses a catalytic domain sharing a common fold with eukaryotic protein kinases and an extracellular mosaic domain found in bacteria only, named PASTA for 'Penicillin binding proteins And Serine/Threonine kinase Associated'. Over the last decade, evidence has been accumulating that these protein kinases are involved in cell division, morphogenesis and developmental processes in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. However, observations differ from one species to another suggesting that a general mechanism of activation of their kinase activity is unlikely and that species-specific regulation of cell division is at play. In this review, we survey the latest research on the structural aspects and the cellular functions of bacterial serine/threonine kinases with PASTA motifs to illustrate the diversity of the regulatory mechanisms controlling bacterial cell division and morphogenesis.

  16. Alkaline earth metal thioindates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov-Ehmin, B.N.; Ivlieva, V.I.; Filatenko, L.A.; Zajtsev, B.E.; Kaziev, G.Z.; Sarabiya, M.G.

    1984-08-01

    Alkaline earth metal thioindates of MIn/sub 2/S/sub 4/ composition were synthesized by interaction of alkaline earth metal oxoindates with hydrogen sulfide during heating. Investigation into the compounds by X-ray analysis showed that calcium compound crystallizes in cubic crystal system and strontium and barium compounds in rhombic crystal system. Lattice parameters and the number of formula units were determined. Thioindates of M/sub 3/In/sub 2/S/sub 6/ composition were synthesized, their individuality was shown.

  17. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection.

  18. [Advances of alkaline amylase production and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiquan; Liu, Long; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-04-01

    Alkaline amylase is one of alkaline enzymes with optimum pH in the alkaline range, and it could keep stability and efficiently hydrolyze starch under alkaline conditions. Alkaline amylase finds wide applications in textile, detergent, pharmaceutical, food and other fields. Alkaline amylases could be produced by alkaliphilic microorganisms. In this work, the advances of alkaline amylase production and applications were reviewed.

  19. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  20. Catabolism of Serine by Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus

    OpenAIRE

    Irmler, Stefan; Bavan, Tharmatha; Oberli, Andrea; Roetschi, Alexandra; Badertscher, René; Guggenbühl, Barbara; Berthoud, Hélène

    2013-01-01

    The ability to produce diacetyl from pyruvate and l-serine was studied in various strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Pediococcus acidilactici isolated from cheese. After being incubated on both substrates, only P. pentosaceus produced significant amounts of diacetyl. This property correlated with measurable serine dehydratase activity in cell extracts. A gene encoding the serine dehydratase (dsdA) was identified in P. pentosaceus, and strains that showed no serine dehydratase activity car...

  1. Increased tolerance towards serine obtained by adaptive laboratory evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Seoane, Jose Miguel; Koza, Anna;

    2014-01-01

    by glyA), the conversion of serine to pyruvate (encoded by sdaA, sdaB and tdcG) was also deleted. As expected, the resulting strain turned out to be susceptible to even low concentrations of serine in the media. In order to improve the tolerance of the strain towards serine, adaptive laboratory evolution...

  2. Method for the production of l-serine using genetically engineered microorganisms deficient in serine degradation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes encoding for enzymes...... concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  3. Alkaline broadening in Stars

    CERN Document Server

    De Kertanguy, A

    2015-01-01

    Giving new insight for line broadening theory for atoms with more structure than hydrogen in most stars. Using symbolic software to build precise wave functions corrected for ds;dp quantum defects. The profiles obtained with that approach, have peculiar trends, narrower than hydrogen, all quantum defects used are taken from atomic database topbase. Illustration of stronger effects of ions and electrons on the alkaline profiles, than neutral-neutral collision mechanism. Keywords : Stars: fundamental parameters - Atomic processes - Line: profiles.

  4. Feedback inactivation of D-serine synthesis by NMDA receptor-elicited translocation of serine racemase to the membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balan, Livia; Foltyn, Veronika N; Zehl, Martin;

    2009-01-01

    D-serine is a physiological coagonist of N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) that plays a major role in several NMDAR-dependent events. In this study we investigate mechanisms regulating D-serine production by the enzyme serine racemase (SR). We now report that NMDAR activation promotes trans...

  5. Treatment with amino acids in serine deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koning, T J

    2006-01-01

    Serine deficiency disorders are rare defects in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine. At present two disorders have been reported: 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency and 3-phosphoserine phosphatase deficiency. These enzyme defects lead to severe neurological symptoms such as congenital microcephaly and severe psychomotor retardation and in addition in patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase deficiency to intractable seizures. These symptoms respond to a variable degree to treatment with L-serine, sometimes combined with glycine. In this paper the current practice of amino acid treatment with L-serine and glycine in serine deficiency is reviewed.

  6. Purification and Characterization of an Extracellular Proteinase from Brevibacterium-Linens ATCC-9174

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, F P; Bockelmann, W; Fox, P F

    1995-01-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase from Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9174 was purified to homogeneity. pH and temperature optima were 8,5 and 50 degrees C, respectively. The results for the molecular mass of the proteinase were 56 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and...

  7. Radiolysis of Serine in High Radiation Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Y. Aguilar-Ovando

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of amino acids under simulated condition suggests that this type of compounds were readily formed on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, there is no conclusive explanation to the origin of their specific chirality in biological systems. Differences in their stability in the primitive conditions may give some clues about this unsolved problem. Protection mechanisms have been considered, such as the adsorption of the organic compounds onto mineral surfaces. By using HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of serine adsorbed on clay (sodium montmorillonite and a meteorite (Allende irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the aim of this work was to study the possible protector role of these mineral surfaces when an amino acid, serine, is adsorbed onto them and the system is exposed to a high radiation source. The results showed that adsorption is better at acidic pH and desorption from the mineral at basic pH. The irradiation of the free amino acid destroyed it almost completely at a dose of 91 kGy, but the presence of the mineral abruptly decreases the decomposition, acting as a protective agent. At the same time, the results in aqueous solution show no statistically significant differences in adsorption or radiolysis of D and L serine.

  8. A practical total synthesis of the microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor (MAPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haebich, Dieter; Hillisch, Alexander; El Sheikh, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Diverse serine and cysteine proteases as well as alkaline proteinases and elastases play a crucial role in numerous biological processes. Natural peptide aldehydes such as the "microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor" (MAPI, 1) are valuable tools to characterize novel enzymes and to study their function in nature. Within a drug discovery program we wanted to design and explore non-natural MAPI congeners with novel biological profiles. To that end we devised a simple, practical, and scalable synthesis of MAPI 1 from readily available amino acid building blocks. The modular nature of our approach allows convenient structural modification of the MAPI backbone.

  9. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Marc D; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N; Barros, Nilana M T; Millán, José L; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth - where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix - is essential for dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition in which teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibers (Sharpey's fibers) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth-suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here, with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome. Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia, respectively, where the levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In X-linked hypophosphatemia, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins, such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein and osteopontin, and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them, such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich-motif peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease.

  10. Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors: roles in synaptic function and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Antoine G; Sweatt, J David

    2011-08-17

    Serine proteases, serine protease inhibitors, and protease-activated receptors have been intensively investigated in the periphery and their roles in a wide range of processes-coagulation, inflammation, and digestion, for example-have been well characterized (see Coughlin, 2000; Macfarlane et al., 2001; Molinari et al., 2003; Wang et al., 2008; Di Cera, 2009 for reviews). A growing number of studies demonstrate that these protein systems are widely expressed in many cell types and regions in mammalian brains. Accumulating lines of evidence suggest that the brain has co-opted the activities of these interesting proteins to regulate various processes underlying synaptic activity and behavior. In this review, we discuss emerging roles for serine proteases in the regulation of mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. D-serine transporter in Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlinghaus, Lennart; Huß, Melanie; Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc-Güler, Türkan; Gatermann, Sören G

    2016-07-01

    Among staphylococci Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species that is typically uropathogenic and an important cause of urinary tract infections in young women. The amino acid D-serine occurs in relatively high concentrations in human urine and has a bacteriostatic or toxic effect on many bacteria. In uropathogenic Escherichia coli and S. saprophyticus, the amino acid regulates the expression of virulence factors and can be used as a nutrient. The ability of uropathogens to respond to or to metabolize D-serine has been suggested as a factor that enables colonization of the urinary tract. Until now nothing is known about D-serine transport in S. saprophyticus We generated mutants of putative transporter genes in S. saprophyticus 7108 that show homology to the D-serine transporter cycA of E. coli and tested them in a D-serine depletion assay to analyze the D-serine uptake rate of the cells. The mutant of SPP1070 showed a strong decrease in D-serine uptake. Therefore, SSP1070 was identified as a major D-serine transporter in S. saprophyticus 7108 and was named D-serine transporter A (DstA). D-serine caused a prolonged lag phase of S. saprophyticus in a chemically defined medium. This negative effect was dependent on the presence of DstA.

  12. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  13. Economical evolution: microbes reduce the synthetic cost of extracellular proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R; Chapman, Matthew R

    2010-08-24

    Protein evolution is not simply a race toward improved function. Because organisms compete for limited resources, fitness is also affected by the relative economy of an organism's proteome. Indeed, many abundant proteins contain relatively high percentages of amino acids that are metabolically less taxing for the cell to make, thus reducing cellular cost. However, not all abundant proteins are economical, and many economical proteins are not particularly abundant. Here we examined protein composition and found that the relative synthetic cost of amino acids constrains the composition of microbial extracellular proteins. In Escherichia coli, extracellular proteins contain, on average, fewer energetically expensive amino acids independent of their abundance, length, function, or structure. Economic pressures have strategically shaped the amino acid composition of multicomponent surface appendages, such as flagella, curli, and type I pili, and extracellular enzymes, including type III effector proteins and secreted serine proteases. Furthermore, in silico analysis of Pseudomonas syringae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and over 25 other microbes spanning a wide range of GC content revealed a broad bias toward more economical amino acids in extracellular proteins. The synthesis of any protein, especially those rich in expensive aromatic amino acids, represents a significant investment. Because extracellular proteins are lost to the environment and not recycled like other cellular proteins, they present a greater burden on the cell, as their amino acids cannot be reutilized during translation. We hypothesize that evolution has optimized extracellular proteins to reduce their synthetic burden on the cell.

  14. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  15. Fatal cerebral edema associated with serine deficiency in CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keularts, Irene M L W; Leroy, Piet L J M; Rubio-Gozalbo, Estela M; Spaapen, Leo J M; Weber, Biene; Dorland, Bert; de Koning, Tom J; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M

    2010-12-01

    Two young girls without a notable medical history except for asthma presented with an acute toxic encephalopathy with very low serine concentrations both in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) comparable to patients with 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency. Clinical symptoms and enzyme measurement (in one patient) excluded 3-PGDH deficiency. Deficiencies in other serine biosynthesis enzymes were highly unlikely on clinical grounds. On basis of the fasting state, ketone bodies and lactate in plasma, urine and CSF, we speculate that reduced serine levels were due to its use as gluconeogenic substrate, conversion to pyruvate by brain serine racemase or decreased L-serine production because of a lack of glucose. These are the first strikingly similar cases of patients with a clear secondary serine deficiency associated with a toxic encephalopathy.

  16. An alkaline element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arita, T.; Murakami, K.; Okha, K.

    1983-04-28

    A cathode with a dual layer active mass is installed in the disk shaped alkaline silver and zinc element. The first layer, which is turned towards the anode, contains 85 parts Ag2O, 5 parts electrolytic MnO2 and 10 parts graphite. The second layer, which contacts the bottom of the element, contains 35 parts Ag2O, 60 parts electrolytic MnO2 and 5 parts graphite. The electrical capacity of the first and second layers is 60 and 40, respectively. The first layer may be discharged with a high current density and the second layer with less current density. The element has high characteristics with comparatively low cost.

  17. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto; Apon Zaenal Mustopa; Kustiariyah Tarman

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii) KT30. Methods:In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results:Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions:Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  18. Isolation, purification and characterization of extracellular protease produced by marine-derived endophytic fungus Xylaria psidii KT30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugi Ratno Budiarto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To isolate, purify and characterize extracellular protease produced by Xylaria psidii (X. psidii KT30. Methods: In the present study, the extracellular protease secreted by X. psidii KT30 was isolated and purified by using three steps of protein purification, then the purified protease was characterized by applying qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Results: Extracellular protease with molecular mass 71 kDa has been purified successfully by applying diethylaminoethanol-Sepharose followed by sephadex SG75 with its final specific protease activity of 0.091 IU/mg. Protease was the most active at temperature 60 °C and pH 7. The activity of enzyme was abolished mostly by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, showing it is family of serine protease. Conclusions: Extracellular serine protease produced by X. psidii KT30 with good biochemical properties displayed some promising results for its further application in field of biotechnology or medicine.

  19. Neonatal disruption of serine racemase causes schizophrenia-like behavioral abnormalities in adulthood: clinical rescue by d-serine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Hagiwara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: D-Serine, an endogenous co-agonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, is synthesized from L-serine by serine racemase (SRR. Given the role of D-serine in both neurodevelopment and the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we examined whether neonatal disruption of D-serine synthesis by SRR inhibition could induce behavioral abnormalities relevant to schizophrenia, in later life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Neonatal mice (7-9 days were injected with vehicle or phenazine methosulfate (Met-Phen: 3 mg/kg/day, an SRR inhibitor. Behavioral evaluations, such as spontaneous locomotion, novel object recognition test (NORT, and prepulse inhibition (PPI were performed at juvenile (5-6 weeks old and adult (10-12 weeks old stages. In addition, we tested the effects of D-serine on PPI deficits in adult mice after neonatal Met-Phen exposure. Finally, we assessed whether D-serine could prevent the onset of schizophrenia-like behavior in these mice. Neonatal Met-Phen treatment reduced D-serine levels in the brain, 24 hours after the final dose. Additionally, this treatment caused behavioral abnormalities relevant to prodromal symptoms in juveniles and to schizophrenia in adults. A single dose of D-serine improved PPI deficits in adult mice. Interestingly, chronic administration of D-serine (900 mg/kg/day from P35 to P70 significantly prevented the onset of PPI deficits after neonatal Met-Phen exposure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that disruption of D-serine synthesis during developmental stages leads to behavioral abnormalities relevant to prodromal symptoms and schizophrenia, in later life. Furthermore, early pharmacological intervention with D-serine may prevent the onset of psychosis in adult.

  20. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  1. Serine phosphorylation of syndecan-2 proteoglycan cytoplasmic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion, and the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-2 contains two serines (residues 197 and 198) which lie in a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by PKC. Other serine and threonine residues are present but not in a consensus seque...

  2. Selective N-hydroxyhydantoin carbamate inhibitors of mammalian serine hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognetta, Armand B.; Niphakis, Micah J.; Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Martini, Michael L.; Hulce, Jonathan J.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2015-01-01

    Serine hydrolase inhibitors, which facilitate enzyme function assignment and are used to treat a range of human disorders, often act by an irreversible mechanism that involves covalent modification of the serine hydrolase catalytic nucleophile. The portion of mammalian serine hydrolases for which selective inhibitors have been developed, however, remains small. Here, we show that N-hydroxyhydantoin (NHH) carbamates are a versatile class of irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitors that can be modified on both the staying (carbamylating) and leaving (NHH) groups to optimize potency and selectivity. Synthesis and screening of a small library of NHH carbamates by competitive activity-based protein profiling furnished selective, in vivo-active inhibitors and tailored activity-based probes for multiple mammalian serine hydrolases, including palmitoyl protein thioesterease-1 (PPT1), mutations of which cause the human disease infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. PMID:26120000

  3. Novel extracellular medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate depolymerase from Streptomyces exfoliatus K10 DSMZ 41693

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Virginia; de Santos, Patricia Gómez; García-Hidalgo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel extracellular medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) depolymerase from Streptomyces exfoliatus K10 DSMZ 41693 are described. The primary structure of the depolymerase (PhaZSex2) includes the lipase consensus sequence (serine-histidin...

  4. Participation of D-serine in the development and reproduction of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigawa, Minoru; Suzuki, Chihiro; Niwano, Kimio; Kanekatsu, Rensuke; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Horiike, Kihachiro; Hamase, Kenji; Nagata, Yoko

    2016-04-01

    The silkworm Bombyx mori contains high concentrations of free D-serine, an optical isomer of L-serine. To elucidate its function, we first investigated the localization of D-serine in various organs of silkworm larvae, pupae, and adult moths. Using immunohistochemical analysis with an anti-D-serine antibody, we found D-serine in the microvilli of midgut goblet and cylindrical cells and in peripheral matrix components of testicular and ovarian cells. By spectrophotometric analysis, D-serine was also found in the hemolymph and fat body. D-Alanine was not detected in the various organs by immunohistochemistry. Serine racemase, which catalyzes the inter-conversion of L- and D-serine, was found to co-localize with D-serine, and D-serine production from L-serine by intrinsic serine racemase was suggested. O-Phospho-L-serine is an inhibitor of serine racemase, and it was administered to the larvae to reduce the D-serine level. This reagent decreased the midgut caspase-3 level and caused a delay in spermatogenesis and oogenesis. The reagent also decreased mature sperm and egg numbers, suggesting D-serine participation in these processes. D-Serine administration induced an increase in pyruvate levels in testis, midgut, and fat body, indicating conversion of D-serine to pyruvate. On the basis of these results, together with our previous investigation of ATP biosynthesis in testis, we consider the possible involvement of D-serine in ATP synthesis for metamorphosis and reproduction.

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of the alkaline ceramidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Leeuwen, S. van; Jack, R.W.; Egmond, M.R.; Götz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramidase (CDase) hydrolyzes the amide bond in ceramides to yield free fatty acid and sphingosine. From a 3-L Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 culture, 70 μg of extracellular alkaline, Ca2+-dependent CDase, was purified to homogeneity, the N-terminal sequence was determined, and the CDase gene was clone

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the alkaline ceramidase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Leeuwen, S. van; Jack, R.W.; Egmond, M.R.; Götz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramidase (CDase) hydrolyzes the amide bond in ceramides to yield free fatty acid and sphingosine. From a 3-L Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 culture, 70 μg of extracellular alkaline, Ca2+-dependent CDase, was purified to homogeneity, the N-terminal sequence was determined, and the CDase gene was clone

  7. Engineering of quorum-sensing systems for improved production of alkaline protease by Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, H; Koetje, EJ; Kiewiet, R; Kuipers, OP; Kolkman, M; van der Laan, J; Daskin, R; Ferrari, E; Bron, S

    2004-01-01

    Aim: Engineering of Rap-Phr quorum-sensing systems of Bacillus subtilis and subsequent evaluation of the transcription of the aprE gene, encoding a major extracellular alkaline protease. Methods and Results: Addition of synthetic Phr pentapeptides to the growth medium, or overproduction of pre-Phr p

  8. A new alkaline elastase of an alkalophilic bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y C; Yamasaki, M; Yamamoto-Suzuki, Y; Tamura, G

    1983-11-01

    A new alkaline elastase was purified from the culture broth of an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. Ya-B. This was a serine proteinase. Molecular weight was 25,000. The optimum pH for elastin and casein was 11.75. The enzyme had very high specific activity, 12,400 units/mg protein for casein, and 2,440 units/mg protein for elastin at the optimum pH. It showed marked preference for elastin. The relative activity of elastin/casein of this enzyme was 17 and 6 times higher than those of subtilisin BPN' and subtilisin Carlsberg, respectively. This enzyme also had higher keratin and collagen hydrolyzing activity in comparison with subtilisin.

  9. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  10. Alkaline detergent enzymes from alkaliphiles: enzymatic properties, genetics, and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S; Kobayashi, T; Ara, K; Ozaki, K; Kawai, S; Hatada, Y

    1998-08-01

    The cleaning power of detergents seems to have peaked; all detergents contain similar ingredients and are based on similar detergency mechanisms. To improve detergency, modern types of heavy-duty powder detergents and automatic dishwasher detergents usually contain one or more enzymes, such as protease, amylase, cellulase, and lipase. Alkaliphilic Bacillus strains are often good sources of alkaline extracellular enzymes, the properties of which fulfil the essential requirements for enzymes to be used in detergents. We have isolated numbers of alkaliphilic Bacillus that produce such alkaline detergent enzymes, including cellulase (CMCase), protease, alpha-amylase, and debranching enzymes, and have succeeded in large-scale industrial production of some of these enzymes. Here, we describe the enzymatic properties, genetics, and structures of the detergent enzymes that we have developed.

  11. Catabolism of serine by Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmler, Stefan; Bavan, Tharmatha; Oberli, Andrea; Roetschi, Alexandra; Badertscher, René; Guggenbühl, Barbara; Berthoud, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    The ability to produce diacetyl from pyruvate and l-serine was studied in various strains of Pediococcus pentosaceus and Pediococcus acidilactici isolated from cheese. After being incubated on both substrates, only P. pentosaceus produced significant amounts of diacetyl. This property correlated with measurable serine dehydratase activity in cell extracts. A gene encoding the serine dehydratase (dsdA) was identified in P. pentosaceus, and strains that showed no serine dehydratase activity carried mutations that rendered the gene product inactive. A functional dsdA was cloned from P. pentosaceus FAM19132 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme catalyzed the formation of pyruvate from L- and D-serine and was active at low pH and elevated NaCl concentrations, environmental conditions usually present in cheese. Analysis of the amino acid profiles of culture supernatants from dsdA wild-type and dsdA mutant strains of P. pentosaceus did not show differences in serine levels. In contrast, P. acidilactici degraded serine. Moreover, this species also catabolized threonine and produced alanine and α-aminobutyrate.

  12. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alan C; Farnsworth, Jill; Lind, Genevieve E; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Dang, Van; Penjwini, Mahmud; Viswanath, Veena; Staubli, Ursula; Kavanaugh, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1) and SLC1A5 (ASCT2) mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1) may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity.

  13. D-Serine Is a Substrate for Neutral Amino Acid Transporters ASCT1/SLC1A4 and ASCT2/SLC1A5, and Is Transported by Both Subtypes in Rat Hippocampal Astrocyte Cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C Foster

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors play critical roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Activation of NMDA receptors by synaptically released L-glutamate also requires occupancy of co-agonist binding sites in the tetrameric receptor by either glycine or D-serine. Although D-serine appears to be the predominant co-agonist at synaptic NMDA receptors, the transport mechanisms involved in D-serine homeostasis in brain are poorly understood. In this work we show that the SLC1 amino acid transporter family members SLC1A4 (ASCT1 and SLC1A5 (ASCT2 mediate homo- and hetero-exchange of D-serine with physiologically relevant kinetic parameters. In addition, the selectivity profile of D-serine uptake in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes is consistent with uptake mediated by both ASCT1 and ASCT2. Together these data suggest that SLC1A4 (ASCT1 may represent an important route of Na-dependent D-serine flux in the brain that has the ability to regulate extracellular D-serine and thereby NMDA receptor activity.

  14. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  15. Purification and characterization of a keratinolytic serine proteinase from Streptomyces albidoflavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressollier, P; Letourneau, F; Urdaci, M; Verneuil, B

    1999-06-01

    Streptomyces strain K1-02, which was identified as a strain of Streptomyces albidoflavus, secreted at least six extracellular proteases when it was cultured on feather meal-based medium. The major keratinolytic serine proteinase was purified to homogeneity by a two-step procedure. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 18,000 and was optimally active at pH values ranging from 6 to 9.5 and at temperatures ranging from 40 to 70 degrees C. Its sensitivity to protease inhibitors, its specificity on synthetic substrates, and its remarkably high level of NH2-terminal sequence homology with Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) showed that the new enzyme, designated SAKase, was homologous to SGPB. We tested the activity of SAKase with soluble and fibrous substrates (elastin, keratin, and type I collagen) and found that it was very specific for keratinous substrates compared to SGPB and proteinase K.

  16. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  17. Potent and Selective Peptidyl Boronic Acid Inhibitors of the Serine Protease Prostate-Specific Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Singh, Pratap; Isaacs, John T.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Prostate cancer cells produce high (microgram to milligram/milliliter) levels of the serine protease Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA). PSA is enzymatically active in the extracellular fluid surrounding prostate cancers but is found at 1,000- to 10,000-fold lower concentrations in the circulation, where it is inactivated due to binding to abundant serum protease inhibitors. The exclusive presence of high levels of active PSA within prostate cancer sites makes PSA an attractive candidate for targeted imaging and therapeutics. A synthetic approach based on a peptide substrate identified first peptide aldehyde and then boronic acid inhibitors of PSA. The best of these had the sequence Cbz-Ser-Ser-Lys-Leu-(boro)Leu, with a Ki for PSA of 65 nM. The inhibitor had a 60-fold higher Ki for chymotrypsin. A validated model of PSA’s catalytic site confirmed the critical interactions between the inhibitor and residues within the PSA enzyme. PMID:18635003

  18. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes produced by human pathogenic Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichi eMiyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria in the genus Vibrio produce extracellular proteolytic enzymes to obtain nutrients via digestion of various protein substrates. However, the enzymes secreted by human pathogenic species have been documented to modulate the bacterial virulence. Several species including Vibrio cholerae and V. vulnificus are known to produce thermolysin-like metalloproteases termed vibriolysin. The vibriolysin from V. vulnificus, a causative agent of serious systemic infection, is a major toxic factor eliciting the secondary skin damage characterized by formation of the hemorrhagic brae. The vibriolysin from intestinal pathogens may play indirect roles in pathogenicity because it can activate protein toxins and hemagglutinin by the limited proteolysis and can affect the bacterial attachment to or detachment from the intestinal surface by degradation of the mucus layer. Two species causing wound infections, V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus, produce another metalloproteases so-called collagenases. Although the detailed pathological roles have not been studied, the collagenase is potent to accelerate the bacterial dissemination through digestion of the protein components of the extracellular matrix. Some species produce cymotrypsin-like serine proteases, which may also affect the bacterial virulence potential. The intestinal pathogens produce sufficient amounts of the metalloprotease at the small intestinal temperature; however, the metalloprotease production by extra-intestinal pathogens is much higher around the body surface temperature. On the other hand, the serine protease is expressed only in the absence of the metalloprotease.

  19. Induction of serine racemase expression and D-serine release from microglia by secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengzhou; Basile, Anthony S; Barger, Steven W

    2007-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves neuronal loss and reduction of synaptic density in specific brain region. Some of the neuronal deaths are associated with excitotoxicity. We previously reported that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) induced release of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) co-agonists, including glutamate and D-serine. The induction of D-serine production by Abeta involves transcriptional and/or translational regulation of serine racemase gene. Similarly, we report here that conditioned medium from microglia treated with secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) contained elevated levels of D-serine. In microglia, sAPP increased the steady-state dimeric protein level of serine racemase. Promoter-reporter and mRNA analyses suggested that serine racemase is transcriptionally induced by sAPP. These data extend the link between excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. D-serine may cooperate with glutamate to link neuroinflammation with excitotoxicity, suggesting a pathogenic mechanism applicable to neuronal death in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ane H.; Mingossi, Fabiana B.; Dias, Renata O.; Franco, Flávia P.; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O.; Moura, Daniel S.; Silva-Filho, Marcio C.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane’s (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory. PMID:27598134

  1. Characterization and stability of extracellular alkaline proteases from halophilic and alkaliphilic bacteria isolated from saline habitat of coastal Gujarat, India Caracterização e estabilidade de proteases alcalinas extracelulares de bactérias halofílicas e alcalifílicas isoladas de habitat salino de Gujarat, Índia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mital S. Dodia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the isolation and characterization of the moderately halophilic-alkaliphilic bacteria from a saline habitat in western India. Eight different bacterial strains were isolated using enrichment techniques at 20% (w/v NaCl and pH 10. The isolates exhibited diversity towards gram's reaction, colony and cell morphology. They were able to grow and produce alkaline protease over a broad range of NaCl, 5-20% (w/v and pH, 8-10. None of the isolates could grow at pH 7, and one could not grow even at pH 8. Crude and partially purified proteases from strain S5 were subjected to characterization with reference to pH, salt stability and protein folding. Optimum protease activity and stability was recorded at 10% salt and pH 9-9.5. Denaturation kinetics of S5 alkaline protease along with a reference protease was studied at 8M urea followed by renaturation. The S5 alkaline protease could be partially renatured up to 32% of the original activity. Despite of the fact that all the 8 isolates were from the same site, they displayed significant diversity with respect to their salt requirement for growth and enzyme secretion. While the effect of pH was less demarcated on growth, the protease production was significantly affected. Isolate S5 produced substantial amount of halotolerant and alkaline protease. The activity and stability of the alkaline protease in a broader range of pH and salt would definitely make this enzyme an important candidate for various industrial applications.O presente estudo relata o isolamento e caracterização de bactérias moderadamente halofilicas e alcalífilicas de um habitat salino no oeste da Índia. Oito cepas diferentes de bactérias foram isoladas empregando técnicas de enriquecimento em NaCl a 20% (p/v e pH 10. As cepas apresentaram diversidade em relação à coloração de Gram e à morfologia das colônias e células. As cepas foram capazes de multiplicar e produzir protease alcalina em uma ampla

  2. Serine one-carbon catabolism with formate overflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiser, Johannes; Tumanov, Sergey; Maddocks, Oliver; Labuschagne, Christiaan Fred; Athineos, Dimitris; Van Den Broek, Niels; Mackay, Gillian M.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Blyth, Karen; Vousden, Karen; Kamphorst, Jurre J.; Vazquez, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Serine catabolism to glycine and a one-carbon unit has been linked to the anabolic requirements of proliferating mammalian cells. However, genome-scale modeling predicts a catabolic role with one-carbon release as formate. We experimentally prove that in cultured cancer cells and nontransformed fibroblasts, most of the serine-derived one-carbon units are released from cells as formate, and that formate release is dependent on mitochondrial reverse 10-CHO-THF synthetase activity. We also show that in cancer cells, formate release is coupled to mitochondrial complex I activity, whereas in nontransformed fibroblasts, it is partially insensitive to inhibition of complex I activity. We demonstrate that in mice, about 50% of plasma formate is derived from serine and that serine starvation or complex I inhibition reduces formate synthesis in vivo. These observations transform our understanding of one-carbon metabolism and have implications for the treatment of diabetes and cancer with complex I inhibitors.

  3. Bacterial Versus Archaeal Origin of Extracellular Enzymatic Activity in the Northeast Atlantic Deep Waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, F.; Arístegui, J.; Gasol, J.M.; Yokokawa, T.; Herndl, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    We determined the total and dissolved extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) of alpha-glucosidase and beta-glucosidase (AGase and BGase), alkaline phosphatase (APase) and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) activities in the epi-, meso- and bathypelagic waters of the subtropical Northeast Atlantic. EEA

  4. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    Science.gov (United States)

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  5. Cloning, overexpression, and characterization of a serine/threonine protein kinase pknI from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Radha; Narayanan, P R; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2004-07-01

    Protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation is the principal mechanism for translation of external signals into cellular responses. Eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases have been reported to play important roles in bacterial development and/or virulence. The PknI protein is one of the 11 eukaryotic-like serine/threonine kinases in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. From the bioinformatic studies, PknI protein has been shown to have an N-terminal cytoplasmic domain followed by a transmembrane region and an extracellular C-terminus suggestive of a sensor molecule. In this study, we have cloned, overexpressed, and characterized the entire coding region and the cytoplasmic domain of PknI as a fusion protein with an N-terminal histidine tag, and used immobilized metal affinity chromatography for purification of recombinant proteins. The purified recombinant proteins were found to be functionally active through in vitro phosphorylation assay and phosphoamino acid analysis. In vitro kinase assay of both proteins revealed that PknI is capable of autophosphorylation and showed manganese-dependent activity. Phosphoamino acid analysis indicated phosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Southern blot analysis with genomic DNA highlighted the conserved nature of pknI among the various mycobacterial species. In silico analysis revealed a close homology of PknI to Stk1 from Streptococcus agalactiae, shown to have a role in virulence and cell segregation of the organism.

  6. A metagenomic alkaline protease from saline habitat: cloning, over-expression and functional attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Megha K; Singh, Satya P

    2013-02-01

    Metagenomics has opened new horizon to unlock the biotechnological potential for novel enzymes. An alkaline protease gene was obtained from the total environmental DNA extracted from a saline habitat. After cloning and sequencing, it was identified that the protease gene related to uncultivable bacteria (HM219181). The protease was over expressed at 6h of induction with optimum induction at 1mM IPTG and 27°C. The purified enzyme was characterized with respect to various factors; temperature, pH, NaCl and chemical denaturant. The sequence analysis indicated a hydrophobic tendency of the protein, while the predicted 3D structure indicated the enzyme as a serine protease.

  7. 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Lars; Kjartansdóttir, Cecilia Kristin; Allebrod, Frank;

    This report provides the results of the 2nd Generation Alkaline Electrolysis project which was initiated in 2008. The project has been conducted from 2009-2012 by a consortium comprising Århus University Business and Social Science – Centre for Energy Technologies (CET (former HIRC)), Technical...

  8. Alkaline resistant ceramics; Alkalimotstaandskraftiga keramer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Stig-Bjoern [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden)

    2001-02-01

    Despite durability in several environments, ceramics and refractories can not endure alkaline environments at high temperature. An example of such an environment is when burning biofuel in modern heat and power plants in which the demand for increasing efficiency results in higher combustion temperatures and content of alkaline substances in the flue gas. Some experiences of these environments has been gained from such vastly different equipment as regenerator chambers in the glass industry and MHD-generators. The grains of a ceramic material are usually bonded together by a glassy phase which despite it frequently being a minor constituent render the materials properties and limits its use at elevated temperature. The damage is usually caused by alkaline containing low-melting phases and the decrease of the viscosity of the bonding glass phase which is caused by the alkaline. The surfaces which are exposed to the flue gas in a modern power plant are not only exposed to the high temperature but also a corroding and eroding, particle containing, gas flow of high velocity. The use of conventional refractory products is limited to 1300-1350 deg C. Higher strength and fracture toughness as well as durability against gases, slag and melts at temperatures exceeding 1700 deg C are expected of the materials of the future. Continuous transport of corrosive compounds to the surface and corrosion products from the surface as well as a suitable environment for the corrosion to occur in are prerequisites for extensive corrosion to come about. The highest corrosion rate is therefore found in a temperature interval between the dew point and the melting point of the alkaline-constituent containing compound. It is therefore important that the corrosion resistance is sufficient in the environment in which alkaline containing melts or slag may appear. In environments such as these, even under normal circumstances durable ceramics, such as alumina and silicon carbide, are attacked

  9. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Christian Carrijo-Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipocalin family members have been implicated in development, regeneration, and pathological processes, but their roles are unclear. Interestingly, these proteins are found abundant in the venom of the Lonomia obliqua caterpillar. Lipocalins are β-barrel proteins, which have three conserved motifs in their amino acid sequence. One of these motifs was shown to be a sequence signature involved in cell modulation. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a synthetic peptide comprising the lipocalin sequence motif in fibroblasts. This peptide suppressed caspase 3 activity and upregulated Bcl-2 and Ki-67, but did not interfere with GPCR calcium mobilization. Fibroblast responses also involved increased expression of proinflammatory mediators. Increase of extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin, was observed. Increase in collagen content was also observed in vivo. Results indicate that modulation effects displayed by lipocalins through this sequence motif involve cell survival, extracellular matrix remodeling, and cytokine signaling. Such effects can be related to the lipocalin roles in disease, development, and tissue repair.

  11. Microstructure and nanomechanical properties of enamel remineralized with asparagine-serine-serine peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hsiu-Ying, E-mail: hychung@mail.fcu.edu.tw; Li, Cheng Che

    2013-03-01

    A highly biocompatible peptide, triplet repeats of asparagine-serine-serine (3NSS) was designed to regulate mineral deposition from aqueous ions in saliva for the reconstruction of enamel lesions. Healthy human enamel was sectioned and acid demineralized to create lesions, then exposed to the 3NSS peptide solution, and finally immersed in artificial saliva for 24 h. The surface morphology and roughness were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to identify the phases and crystallinity of the deposited minerals observed on the enamel surface. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to quantitatively analyze the mineral variation by calculating the relative integrated-area of characteristic bands. Nanohardness and elastic modulus measured by nanoindentation at various treatment stages were utilized to evaluate the degree of recovery. Biomimetic effects were accessed according to the degree of nanohardness recovery and the amount of hydroxyapatite deposition. The charged segments in the 3NSS peptide greatly attracted aqueous ions from artificial saliva to form hydroxyapatite crystals to fill enamel caries, in particular the interrod areas, resulting in a slight reduction in overall surface roughness. Additionally, the deposited hydroxyapatites were of a small crystalline size in the presence of the 3NSS peptide, which effectively restrained the plastic deformations and thus resulted in greater improvements in nanohardness and elastic modulus. The degree of nanohardness recovery was 5 times greater for remineralized enamel samples treated with the 3NSS peptide compared to samples without peptide treatment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The degree of nanohardness recovery of enamel was 4 times greater with the aid of 3NSS peptide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3NSS peptide promoted the formation of hydroxyapatites with

  12. Overexpression of serine racemase in retina and overproduction of D-serine in eyes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Guibin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent data indicate that inflammatory mechanisms contribute to diabetic retinopathy (DR. We have determined that serine racemase (SR expression is increased by inflammatory stimuli including liposaccharide (LPS, amyloid β-peptide (A-beta, and secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP; expression is decreased by the anti-inflammatory drug, dexamethasone. We tested possibility that SR and its product, D-serine, were altered in a rat model of DR. Methods Intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 70 mg/kg body weight to Sprague-Dawley rats produced type-I diabetic mellitus (fasting blood sugar higher than 300 mg/dL. At 3 and 5 months after STZ or saline injection, retinas from some rats were subjected to cryosectioning for immunofluorescent analysis of SR and TUNEL assay of apoptosis. Retinal homogenates were used to detect SR levels and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation by immunoblotting. Aqueous humor and retina were also collected to assay for neurotransmitters, including glutamate and D-serine, by reverse-phase HPLC. Results Compared to saline-injected rats, STZ-injected (diabetic rats showed elevation of SR protein levels in retinal homogenates, attributed to the inner nuclear layer (INL by immunofluorescence. Aqueous humor fluid from STZ-injected rats contained significantly higher levels of glutamate and D-serine compared to controls; by contrast, D-serine levels in retinas did not differ. Levels of activated JNK were elevated in diabetic retinas compared to controls. Conclusions Increased expression of SR in retina and higher levels of glutamate and D-serine in aqueous humor of STZ-treated rats may result from activation of the JNK pathway in diabetic sequelae. Our data suggest that the inflammatory conditions that prevail during DR result in elevation of D-serine, a neurotransmitter contributing to glutamate toxicity, potentially exacerbating the death of retinal ganglion cells in this condition.

  13. Extracellular matrix structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Achilleas D; Skandalis, Spyros S; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a non-cellular three-dimensional macromolecular network composed of collagens, proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans, elastin, fibronectin, laminins, and several other glycoproteins. Matrix components bind each other as well as cell adhesion receptors forming a complex network into which cells reside in all tissues and organs. Cell surface receptors transduce signals into cells from ECM, which regulate diverse cellular functions, such as survival, growth, migration, and differentiation, and are vital for maintaining normal homeostasis. ECM is a highly dynamic structural network that continuously undergoes remodeling mediated by several matrix-degrading enzymes during normal and pathological conditions. Deregulation of ECM composition and structure is associated with the development and progression of several pathologic conditions. This article emphasizes in the complex ECM structure as to provide a better understanding of its dynamic structural and functional multipotency. Where relevant, the implication of the various families of ECM macromolecules in health and disease is also presented.

  14. Drosophila melanogaster clip-domain serine proteases: Structure, function and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillard, Florian; Troxler, Laurent; Reichhart, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian chymotrypsin-like serine proteases (SPs) are one of the best-studied family of enzymes with roles in a wide range of physiological processes, including digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and humoral immunity. Extracellular SPs can form cascades, in which one protease activates the zymogen of the next protease in the chain, to amplify physiological or pathological signals. These extracellular SPs are generally multi-domain proteins, with pro-domains that are involved in protein-protein interactions critical for the sequential organization of the cascades, the control of their intensity and their proper localization. Far less is known about invertebrate SPs than their mammalian counterparts. In insect genomes, SPs and their proteolytically inactive homologs (SPHs) constitute large protein families. In addition to the chymotrypsin fold, many of these proteins contain additional structural domains, often with conserved mammalian orthologues. However, the largest group of arthropod SP regulatory modules is the clip domains family, which has only been identified in arthropods. The clip-domain SPs are extracellular and have roles in the immune response and embryonic development. The powerful reverse-genetics tools in Drosophila melanogaster have been essential to identify the functions of clip-SPs and their organization in sequential cascades. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Drosophila clip-SPs and presents, when necessary, data obtained in other insect models. We will first cover the biochemical and structural features of clip domain SPs and SPHs. Clip-SPs are implicated in three main biological processes: the control of the dorso-ventral patterning during embryonic development; the activation of the Toll-mediated response to microbial infections and the prophenoloxydase cascade, which triggers melanization. Finally, we review the regulation of SPs and SPHs, from specificity of activation to inhibition by endogenous or pathogen

  15. Accelerated evolution of crotalinae snake venom gland serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Chijiwa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Niwa, M; Yamashina, I; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1996-11-11

    Eight cDNAs encoding serine proteases isolated from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (habu snake) and T. gramineus (green habu snake) venom gland cDNA libraries showed that nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions have accumulated in the mature protein-coding regions to cause amino acid changes. Southern blot analysis of T. flavoviridis genomic DNAs using two proper probes indicated that venom gland serine protease genes form a multigene family in the genome. These observations suggest that venom gland serine proteases have diversified their amino acid sequences in an accelerating manner. Since a similar feature has been previously discovered in crotalinae snake venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isozyme genes, accelerated evolution appears to be universal in plural isozyme families of crotalinae snake venom gland.

  16. Positive control of D-serine deaminase synthesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heincz, M C; Kelker, N E; McFall, E

    1978-04-01

    Efficient constitutive synthesis of D-serine deaminase [D-serine hydro-lyase (deaminating); EC 4.2.1.14] is obtained in vitro by using a slightly modified Zubay system programmed with dsdO6 dsdA+DNA. Synthesis from a dsdO+ dsdA+ template requires active dsdC gene product and 3':5'-cyclic AMP. In vitro synthesis of dsdC product is obtained with a dsdC+ dsdO+ dsdA+ or a dsdCc dsdO+ dsdA+ template; this synthesis is thermosensitive and can be uncoupled from D-serine deaminase synthesis by temperature shift.

  17. Synthesis of o-L-α-glycerylphosphoryl-L-serine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Rui-ren; YAN Zi-er; LUO Yi-ming

    2005-01-01

    A new efficient method for preparing o-L-α-glycerylphosphoryl-L-serine was presented. D-α, β-isopropylidene glycerol was phosphorylated with phenylphosphoryl dichloride and the resulting o-D-α,β-isopropylidene glycerylphenylphosphoryl chloride was esterified with N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-L-serine ethyl ester in the presence of pyridine to give acetone L-α-glycerylphenylphosphoryl-N-tert-butoxycarbonyl-L-serine ethyl ester. Finally, the protective groups were removed by two-step hydrolysis while strictly controlling pH value. The reaction to produce (1, 2), (5, 6)-diisopropylidene-D-mannitol, which is the key precursor for the preparation of D-α, β-isopropylidene glycerol, was monitored by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometer in order to obtain an optimum yield of 65%. All compounds were characterized through elemental analysis, infrared spectra, 1H, 13C, 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and mass spectra.

  18. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassovs research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herrings group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  19. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2016-05-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/ susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus (P<0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  20. Polymorphisms of clip domain serine proteinase and serine proteinase homolog in the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus and their association with Vibrio alginolyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Liu, Yuan; Hui, Min; Song, Chengwen; Cui, Zhaoxia

    2017-03-01

    Clip domain serine proteases (cSPs) and their homologs (SPHs) play an important role in various biological processes that are essential components of extracellular signaling cascades, especially in the innate immune responses of invertebrates. Here, polymorphisms of PtcSP and PtSPH from the swimming crab Portunus trituberculatus were investigated to explore their association with resistance/susceptibility to Vibrio alginolyticus. Polymorphic loci were identified using Clustal X, and characterized with SPSS 16.0 software, and then the significance of genotype and allele frequencies between resistant and susceptible stocks was determined by a χ 2 test. A total of 109 and 77 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the genomic fragments of PtcSP and PtSPH, respectively. Notably, nearly half of PtSPH polymorphisms were found in the non-coding exon 1. Fourteen SNPs investigated were significantly associated with susceptibility/resistance to V. alginolyticus ( P <0.05). Among them, eight SNPs were observed in introns, and one synonymous, four non-synonymous SNPs and one ins-del were found in coding exons. In addition, five simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected in intron 3 of PtcSP. Although there was no statistically significant difference of allele frequencies, the SSRs showed different polymorphic alleles on the basis of the repeat number between resistant and susceptible stocks. After further validation, polymorphisms investigated here might be applied to select potential molecular markers of P. trituberculatus with resistance to V. alginolyticus.

  1. Serine protease identification (in vitro) and molecular structure predictions (in silico) from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Sa, Tongmin; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2014-07-01

    Serine proteases are involved in an enormous number of biological processes. The present study aims at characterizing three-dimensional (3D) molecular architecture of serine proteases from early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani that are hypothesized to be markers of phytopathogenicity. A serine protease was purified to homogeneity and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed that protease produced by A. solani belongs to alkaline serine proteases (AsP). AsP is made up of 403 amino acid residues with molecular weight of 42.1 kDa (Isoelectric point - 6.51) and its molecular formula was C1859 H2930 N516 O595 S4 . AsP structure model was built based on its comparative homology with serine protease using the program, MODELER. AsP had 16 β-sheets and 10 α-helices, with Ser(350) (G347-G357), Asp(158) (D158-H169), and His(193) (H193-G203) in separate turn/coil structures. Biological metal binding region situated near 6th-helix and His(193) residue is responsible for metal binding site. Also, calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is coordinated by the carboxyl groups of Lys(84), Ile(85), Lys(86), Asp(87), Phe(88), Ala(89), Ala(90) (K84-A90) for first Ca(2+) binding site and carbonyl oxygen atom of Lys(244), Gly(245), Arg(246), Thr(247), Lys(248), Lys(249), and Ala(250) (K244-A250), for second Ca(2+) binding site. Moreover, Ramachandran plot analysis of protein residues falling into most favored secondary structures were determined (83.3%). The predicted molecular 3D structural model was further verified using PROCHECK, ERRAT, and VADAR servers to confirm the geometry and stereo-chemical parameters of the molecular structural design. The functional analysis of AsP 3D molecular structure predictions familiar in the current study may provide a new perspective in the understanding and identification of antifungal protease inhibitor designing. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamoto, Eiji [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Okamoto, Takayuki, E-mail: okamotot@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Takagi, Yoshimi [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Honda, Goichi [Medical Affairs Department, Asahi Kasei Pharma Corporation, 1-105 Kanda Jinbo-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8101 (Japan); Suzuki, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3, Minamitamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8679 (Japan); Imai, Hiroshi [Emergency and Critical Care Center, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu 514-8507 (Japan); Shimaoka, Motomu, E-mail: shimaoka@doc.medic.mie-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins regulate leukocyte trafficking in health and disease by binding primarily to IgSF ligand ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 on endothelial cells. Here we have shown that the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin (TM), found on the surface of endothelial cells, functions as a potentially new ligand for leukocyte integrins. We generated a recombinant extracellular domain of human TM and Fc fusion protein (TM-domains 123-Fc), and showed that pheripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) bind to TM-domains 123-Fc dependent upon integrin activation. We then demonstrated that αL integrin-blocking mAb, αM integrin-blocking mAb, and β2 integrin-blocking mAb inhibited the binding of PBMCs to TM-domains 123-Fc. Furthermore, we show that the serine/threonine-rich domain (domain 3) of TM is required for the interaction with the LFA-1 (αLβ2) and Mac-1 (αMβ2) integrins to occur on PBMCs. These results demonstrate that the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on leukocytes bind to TM, thereby establishing the molecular and structural basis underlying LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrin interaction with TM on endothelial cells. In fact, integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells. - Highlights: • LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins bind to the anti-coagulant molecule thrombomodulin. • The serine/threonine-rich domain of thrombomodulin is essential to interact with the LFA-1 and Mac-1 integrins on PBMCs. • Integrin-TM interactions might be involved in the dynamic regulation of leukocyte adhesion with endothelial cells.

  3. Intervention with Serine Protease Activity with Small Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    , plasma kallikrein, which contributes to the pathogenesis in hereditary angioedema. According to the X-ray crystal structure analysis, we proposed a principle for designing inhibitors of other serine proteases from mupain-1. In order to be able to evaluate the inhibitory activities of our peptides in vivo...

  4. Intermolecular Phosphoryl Transfer Between Serine and Histidine Residues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Qian SU; Ming Yu NIU; Shu Xia CAO; Jian Chen ZHANG; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    A novel intermolecular phosphoryl transfer from O-trimethylsilyl-N-(O, O-diisopropyl) phosphoryl serine trimethylsilyl ester to N, N'-bis(trimethylsilyl) histidine trimethylsilyl ester was studied through electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It was proposed that the transfer reaction went through penta-coordinated phosphorus intermediate.

  5. Establishment of a cell-based assay system for hepatitis C virus serine protease and its primary applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Mao; Shui-Yun Lan; Yun-Wen Hu; Li Xiang; Zheng-Hong Yuan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To establish an efficient, sensitive, cell-based assay system for NS3 serine protease in an effort to study further the property of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and develop new antiviral agents.METHOOS: We constructed pCI-neo-NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric plasmid, in which the secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) was fused in-frame to the downstream of NS4A/4B cleavage site. The protease activity of NS3 was reflected by the activity of SEAP in the culture media of transient or stable expression cells. Stably expressing cell lines were obtained by G418 selection. Pefabloc SC, a potent irreversible serine protease inhibitor, was used to treat the stably expressing cell lines to assess the system for screening NS3 inhibitors. To compare the activity of serine proteases from 1b and 1a, two chimeric clones were constructed and introduced into both transient and stable expression systems.RESULTS: The SEAP activity in the culture media could be detected in both transient and stable expression systems,and was apparently decreased after Pefabloc SC treatment.In both transient and stable systems, NS3/4A-SEAP chimeric gene from HCV genotype 1b produced higher SEAP activity in the culture media than that from 1a.CONCLUSION: The cell-based system is efficient and sensitive enough for detection and comparison of NS3 protease activity, and screening of anti-NS3 inhibitors. The functional difference between NS3/4A from 1a and 1b subtypes revealed by this system provides a clue for further investigations.

  6. Sphingoid bases and the serine catabolic enzyme CHA1 define a novel feedforward/feedback mechanism in the response to serine availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco, David J; Newcomb, Benjamin; Gandy, Jason L; Brice, Sarah E; Matmati, Nabil; Cowart, L Ashley; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2012-03-16

    Targets of bioactive sphingolipids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were previously identified using microarray experiments focused on sphingolipid-dependent responses to heat stress. One of these heat-induced genes is the serine deamidase/dehydratase Cha1 known to be regulated by increased serine availability. This study investigated the hypothesis that sphingolipids may mediate the induction of Cha1 in response to serine availability. The results showed that inhibition of de novo synthesis of sphingolipids, pharmacologically or genetically, prevented the induction of Cha1 in response to increased serine availability. Additional studies implicated the sphingoid bases phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine as the likely mediators of Cha1 up-regulation. The yeast protein kinases Pkh1 and Pkh2, known sphingoid base effectors, were found to mediate CHA1 up-regulation via the transcription factor Cha4. Because the results disclosed a role for sphingolipids in negative feedback regulation of serine metabolism, we investigated the effects of disrupting this mechanism on sphingolipid levels and on cell growth. Intriguingly, exposure of the cha1Δ strain to high serine resulted in hyperaccumulation of endogenous serine and in turn a significant accumulation of sphingoid bases and ceramides. Under these conditions, the cha1Δ strain displayed a significant growth defect that was sphingolipid-dependent. Together, this work reveals a feedforward/feedback loop whereby the sphingoid bases serve as sensors of serine availability and mediate up-regulation of Cha1 in response to serine availability, which in turn regulates sphingolipid levels by limiting serine accumulation.

  7. [Purification and properties of serine proteinases from European catfish Silurus glanis L. pancreas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulitina, N N; Khabliuk, V V; Proskuriakov, M T

    2005-01-01

    Three trypsin isoforms (designated as T1, T2, and T3), three chymotrypsin isoforms (Kh1, Kh2, and Kh3), and two elastase isoforms (E1 and E2) were isolated from the pancreas of European catfish Silurus glanis L. by salting out with (NH4)2SO4, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and ion exchange chromatography on DEAE cellulose. Isoelectric points of the enzymes, determined by isoelectric focusing, amounted to 4.42 for T1, 5.64 for T2, 6.90 for T3, 4.93 for Khl, 5.23 for Kh2, 6.18 for Kh3, 6.17 for E1, and 8.48 for E2. Molecular weights of proteinases within each group were close and amounted to 30100 Da for trypsins, 39800 Da for chymotrypsins, and 24000 Da for elastases. The enzymes isolated displayed maximal activities at alkaline pH values. Inhibitor analysis demonstrated that all the proteinases isolated from European catfish pancreas belonged to the serine type.

  8. Response of maize serine/arginine-rich protein gene family in seedlings to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiao; Guo, Yuqi; Cui, Weiling; Xu, Aihua; Tian, Zengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) in eukaryotic organisms is closely related to the gene regulation in plant abiotic stress responses, in which serine/arginine-rich proteins (SR proteins) act as key regulators. The genome sequence of maize inbred line B73 was analyzed, showing that the promoter regions of SR genes possess about three to eight kinds of cis-acting regulatory elements. Twenty-seven SR genes encode alkaline proteins, and 23 of which are divided into five subgroups in terms of the first RNA recognition motif (RRM) at the amino terminal. The expression of SR genes showed tissue-specific and genotype-dependent features under drought stress in the hybrid Zhengdan-958 and its parents, Zheng-58 and Chang-7-2 via bidirectional hierarchical clustering. SR genes were down-regulated in roots while they were up-regulated in shoots under drought stress. However, SR genes were down-regulated in both roots and shoots in three different rehydration stages after severe drought stress. Additionally, a widespread alternative splicing exists in all SR genes although SR genes showed differential expression tendency under drought stress and/or during rehydration stages. Results above will deepen our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of plant response to abiotic stress from the perspective of AS-network.

  9. Development of activity-based probes for trypsin-family serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhengying; Jeffery, Douglas A; Chehade, Kareem; Beltman, Jerlyn; Clark, James M; Grothaus, Paul; Bogyo, Matthew; Baruch, Amos

    2006-06-01

    A series of diphenylphosphonate-based probes were developed for the trypsin-like serine proteases. These probes selectively target serine proteases rather than general serine hydrolases that are targets for fluorophosphonate-based probes. This increased selectivity allows detection of low abundance serine proteases in complex proteomes using simple SDS-PAGE methods. We present here the application of multiple probes in enzyme activity profiling of intact mast cells, a type of inflammatory cell implicated in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

  10. Alkaline Water and Longevity: A Murine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro, Massimiliano; Corain, Livio; Ferro, Silvia; Baratella, Davide; Bonaiuto, Emanuela; Terzo, Milo; Corraducci, Vittorino; Salmaso, Luigi; Vianello, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The biological effect of alkaline water consumption is object of controversy. The present paper presents a 3-year survival study on a population of 150 mice, and the data were analyzed with accelerated failure time (AFT) model. Starting from the second year of life, nonparametric survival plots suggest that mice watered with alkaline water showed a better survival than control mice. Interestingly, statistical analysis revealed that alkaline water provides higher longevity in terms of "deceleration aging factor" as it increases the survival functions when compared with control group; namely, animals belonging to the population treated with alkaline water resulted in a longer lifespan. Histological examination of mice kidneys, intestine, heart, liver, and brain revealed that no significant differences emerged among the three groups indicating that no specific pathology resulted correlated with the consumption of alkaline water. These results provide an informative and quantitative summary of survival data as a function of watering with alkaline water of long-lived mouse models.

  11. Glutamatergic transmission in hydra: NMDA/D-serine affects the electrical activity of the body and tentacles of Hydra vulgaris (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, J C; Kass-Simon, G

    2009-04-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies on the early-evolved metazoan Hydra vulgaris provided evidence that glutamate, acting through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptors, affects hydra's pacemaker systems; immunocytochemical studies showed that N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were present in hydra tentacles; behavioral studies demonstrated that NMDA/d-serine affected mouth opening induced by reduced glutathione, and with AMPA/kainate, discharge of nematocysts. In this study, extracellular recordings were made from the tentacle and peduncle of hydra during bath application of NMDA and d-serine (both at 1 x 10(-5) mol l(-1) to 1 x 10(-9) mol l(-1)) in the presence of 1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1) AMPA or kainate. NMDA/d-serine produced a significant increase in tentacle activity, increasing the rate of tentacle pacemaker pulses (TPs) at 1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1), and small, behaviorally uncorrelated tentacle pulses (SUTPs) at 1 x 10(-5) mol l(-1). The NMDA antagonist, d-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), counteracted the effects. NMDA/d-serine (1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1)) also caused a potentially significant (trend) decrease in the rate of small, behaviorally uncorrelated electrical body pulses (SUBPs) and rhythmic potentials (RPs). The effect was counteracted by D-AP5. The ectodermal contraction burst (CB) pacemaker system was unaffected by NMDA/d-serine. Our results indicate that glutamate, acting on NMDA/AMPA-kainate receptors, may cause opposing effects on the coordinating systems of tentacle and body-exciting the tentacle effectors and potentially causing an inhibition in the body column.

  12. Restoration of visual performance by d-serine in models of inner and outer retinal dysfunction assessed using sweep VEP measurements in the conscious rat and rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubli, Ursula; Rangel-Diaz, Natalie; Alcantara, Miguel; Li, Yong-Xin; Yang, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Kai-Ming; Foster, Alan C

    2016-10-01

    The NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor and its co-agonist d-serine play a key role in synaptic function in the central nervous system (CNS), including visual cortex and retina. In retinal diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration, a loss of vision arises from malfunction of retinal cells, resulting in a glutamate hypofunctional state along the visual pathway in the affected parts of the visual field. An effective strategy to remedy this loss of function might be to increase extracellular levels of d-serine and thereby boost synaptic NMDA receptor-mediated visual transmission and/or plasticity to compensate for the impairment. We tested this idea in brain slices of visual cortex exhibiting long-term potentiation, and in rodent models of visual dysfunction caused by retinal insults at a time when the injury had stabilized to look for neuroenhancement effects. An essential aspect of the in vivo studies involved adapting sweep VEP technology to conscious rats and rabbits and combining it with intracortical recording while the animals were actively attending to visual information. Using this technology allowed us to establish complete contrast sensitivity function curves. We found that systemic d-serine dose-dependently rescued the contrast sensitivity impairment in rats with blue light-induced visual dysfunction. In rabbits with inner retinal dysfunction, both systemic and intravitreal routes of d-serine provided a rescue of visual function. In sum, we show that co-agonist stimulation of the NMDA receptor via administration of exogenous d-serine might be an effective therapeutic strategy to enhance visual performance and compensate for the loss of vision resulting from retinal disease.

  13. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained

  14. Modeling and structural analysis of PA clan serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laskar Aparna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases account for over a third of all known proteolytic enzymes; they are involved in a variety of physiological processes and are classified into clans sharing structural homology. The PA clan of endopeptidases is the most abundant and over two thirds of this clan is comprised of the S1 family of serine proteases, which bear the archetypal trypsin fold and have a catalytic triad in the order Histidine, Aspartate, Serine. These proteases have been studied in depth and many three dimensional structures have been experimentally determined. However, these structures mostly consist of bacterial and animal proteases, with a small number of plant and fungal proteases and as yet no structures have been determined for protozoa or archaea. The core structure and active site geometry of these proteases is of interest for many applications. This study investigated the structural properties of different S1 family serine proteases from a diverse range of taxa using molecular modeling techniques. Results Our predicted models from protozoa, archaea, fungi and plants were combined with the experimentally determined structures of 16 S1 family members and used for analysis of the catalytic core. Amino acid sequences were submitted to SWISS-MODEL for homology-based structure prediction or the LOOPP server for threading-based structure prediction. Predicted models were refined using INSIGHT II and SCRWL and validated against experimental structures. Investigation of secondary structures and electrostatic surface potential was performed using MOLMOL. The structural geometry of the catalytic core shows clear deviations between taxa, but the relative positions of the catalytic triad residues were conserved. Some highly conserved residues potentially contributing to the stability of the structural core were identified. Evolutionary divergence was also exhibited by large variation in secondary structure features outside the core

  15. Extracellular pH regulates bone cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2008-02-01

    The skeletons of land vertebrates contain a massive reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to buffer metabolic H+ if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. The negative impact of acidosis on the skeleton has long been known but was thought to result from passive, physicochemical dissolution of bone mineral. This brief, selective review summarizes what is now known of the direct functional responses of bone cells to extracellular pH. We discovered that bone resorption by cultured osteoclasts is stimulated directly by acid. The stimulatory effect is near-maximal at pH 7.0, whereas above pH 7.4, resorption is switched off. In bone organ cultures, H+-stimulated bone mineral release is almost entirely osteoclast-mediated, with a negligible physicochemical component. Acidification is the key requirement for osteoclasts to excavate resorption pits in all species studied to date, and extracellular H+ may thus be regarded as the long-sought osteoclast activation factor. Acid-activated osteoclasts can be stimulated further by agents such as parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand. Osteoclasts may respond to pH changes via H+-sensing ion channels such as transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, a nociceptor that is also activated by capsaicin. Acidosis also exerts a powerful, reciprocal inhibitory effect on the mineralization of bone matrix by cultured osteoblasts. This is caused by increased hydroxyapatite solubility at low pH, together with selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase, which is required for mineralization. Diets or drugs that shift acid-base balance in the alkaline direction may provide useful treatments for bone loss disorders.

  16. Antinociceptive Effect of Rat D-Serine Racemase Inhibitors, L-Serine-O-Sulfate, and L-Erythro-3-Hydroxyaspartate in an Arthritic Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Laurido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAr activation requires the presence of D-serine, synthesized from L-serine by a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent serine racemase (SR. D-serine levels can be lowered by inhibiting the racemization of L-serine. L-serine-O-sulfate (LSOS and L-erythro-3-hydroxyaspartate (LEHA, among others, have proven to be effective in reducing the D-serine levels in culture cells. It is tempting then to try these compounds in their effectiveness to decrease nociceptive levels in rat arthritic pain. We measured the C-reflex paradigm and wind-up potentiation in the presence of intrathecally injected LSOS (100 μg/10 μL and LEHA (100 μg/10 μL in normal and monoarthritic rats. Both compounds decreased the wind-up activity in normal and monoarthritic rats. Accordingly, all the antinociceptive effects were abolished when 300 μg/10 μL of D-serine were injected intrathecally. Since no in vivo results have been presented so far, this constitutes the first evidence that SR inhibitions lower the D-serine levels, thus decreasing the NMDAr activity and the consequent development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  17. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra L. Fox; Xina Xie; Greg Bala

    2004-11-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones to enhance oil recovery (EOR). Polymer technology relies mainly on the use of polyacrylamides cross-linked by a hazardous metal or organic. Contemporary polymer plugging has investigated the stimulation of in-situ microorganisms to produce polymers (Jenneman et. al., 2000) and the use of biocatalysts to trigger gelling (Bailey et. al., 2000). The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium species ATCC # 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. Microbial polymers are of interest due to their potential cost savings, compared to conventional use of synthetic chemical polymers. Numerous microorganisms are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. One microbiological polymer of interest is curdlan, â - (1, 3) glucan, which has demonstrated gelling properties by a reduction in pH. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability.

  18. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 2; Changes in Muscle Serine Proteases, Serpins and Matrix Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festoff, B. W.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Rayford, A. R.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Reddy, B. R.; Rao, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    In zero or micro-gravity, type 1 muscle fibers atrophy and lose predominance, especially in slow-twitch muscles. No increase in mononuclear cells has been observed, just as in simple denervation, where both types 1 and 2 fibers atrophy, again without infiltration of cells, but with clear satellite cell proliferation. However, extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation takes place after denervation and if re-innervation is encouraged, functional recovery to near control levels may be achieved. No information is available concerning the ECM milieu, the activation of serine proteases, their efficacy in degrading ECM components and the production of locally-derived natural protease inhibitors (serpins) in effecting surface proteolytic control. In addition, no studies are available concerning the activation of these enzymes in micro- or zero gravity or their response to muscle injury on the ground and what alterations, if any, occur in space. These studies were the basis for the experiments in Cosmos 2044.

  19. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...... kinetics and thermodynamics by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that upain-1 changes both main-chain conformation and side-chain orientations as it binds to the protease, in particular its Trp3 residue and the surrounding backbone. The properties of upain-1...

  20. Proteolytic profiling and comparative analyses of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in preimaginal stages of Culex quinquefasciatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges-Veloso Andre

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatu s, a widespread insect in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, is a vector of multiple arboviruses and parasites, and is considered an important risk to human and veterinary health. Proteolytic enzymes play crucial roles in the insect physiology including the modulation of embryonic development and food digestion. Therefore, these enzymes represent important targets for the development of new control strategies. This study presents zymographic characterization and comparative analysis of the proteolytic activity found in eggs, larval instars and pupae of Culex quinquefasciatus. Methods The proteolytic profiles of eggs, larvae and pupa of Cx. quinquefasciatus were characterized by SDS-PAGE co-polymerized with 0.1% gelatin, according to the pH, temperature and peptidase inhibitor sensitivity. In addition, the proteolytic activities were characterized in solution using 100 μM of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Results Comparison of the proteolytic profiles by substrate-SDS-PAGE from all preimaginal stages of the insect revealed qualitative and quantitative differences in the peptidase expression among eggs, larvae and pupae. Use of specific inhibitors revealed that the proteolytic activity from preimaginal stages is mostly due to trypsin-like serine peptidases that display optimal activity at alkaline pH. In-solution, proteolytic assays of the four larval instars using the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC in the presence or absence of a trypsin-like serine peptidase inhibitor confirmed the results obtained by substrate-SDS-PAGE analysis. The trypsin-like serine peptidases of the four larval instars were functional over a wide range of temperatures, showing activities at 25°C and 65°C, with an optimal activity between 37°C and 50°C. Conclusion The combined use of zymography and in-solution assays, as performed in this study, allowed for a more detailed analysis of the

  1. New Insights into the Regulation of Serine Palmitoyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-07

    is catalyzed by the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) which is present in all eukaryotes and even in some prokaryotes . The S. cerevisiae SPT...based on their molecular shapes and chemical properties. They are important components of membranes , predominantly found in the plasma membrane in...contrast to the intracellular membranes which have less sphingolipids (87). The chemical properties of the sphingolipids modulate the physical

  2. Dynamics simulation of the interaction between serine and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Peng; Lu, Ying-Bo; Han, Sheng-Hao; Yu, Hui

    2013-05-01

    Using the first principles density functional theory (DFT), we simulated the neutron scattering spectra of the hydration dynamics of serine. Experimental data analyses have shown that dissociative H2O molecules were more likely to form hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with an -OH group in monohydrated serine and easily shift to a -NH_3 ^ + group at a higher hydration level [P. Zhang, Y. Zhang, S. H. Han, Q. W. Yan, R. C. Ford, and J. C. Li, J. Phys. Chem. A 110, 5000 (2006), 10.1021/jp0569741]. We set the 1:1 ratio hydrated compounds at the two positions and found that the H2O could be optimized to form H-bonds with -OH and -NH3+ separately. When the simulated phonon signals of the -OH…H2O and -NH3+…H2O combinations were summed on a 3:1 scale, the calculating spectra were in good agreement with the experimental results, especially for the peak at 423 cm-1 of the -OH…H2O combination and the peak at 367 cm-1 of the -NH3+…H2O combination, which mutually complemented the real spectrum. We confirm that H2O may break the intermolecular H-bonds of the interlaced binding -OH to form a new structure, and that with the skeleton deformation of serine, H2O forms stronger H-bonds more often with the -NH3+ side indicating the flexible dynamic mechanism of the serine hydration process.

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and infection-related vascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2012-11-01

    The innate immune system orchestrated by leukocytes primarily neutrophils, serves to remove dead and dying host cells and to provide protection against invasion by pathogens. Failure of this system results in the onset of sepsis leading to grave consequences for the host. Together with mechanical methods to physically isolate and remove the pathogen, neutrophils also release an important set of proinflammatory biological modulators that mediate recruitment of additional cells to a site of infection and amplify the innate protective response. Additionally, neutrophils release highly charged mixtures of DNA and nuclear proteins named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These electrostatically-charged adhesive networks trigger intrinsic coagulation, limit dispersion and entrap the pathogens. NETs also contain the neutrophil secretary granule-derived serine proteases, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G, known to regulate the reactivity of both neutrophils and platelets. Since the characterization of NETs in 2004, new studies of their functional effect in vivo continue to expand upon unexpected extracellular roles for DNA, and in doing so renew attention to the haemostatic role of the leukocyte. This review will provide a basic description of NETs and examine current knowledge of this important system of defense, including recent work illustrating a role for NETs in activation of thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracellular matrix molecules as targets for brown spider venom toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veiga S.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Loxoscelism, the term used to describe lesions and clinical manifestations induced by brown spider's venom (Loxosceles genus, has attracted much attention over the last years. Brown spider bites have been reported to cause a local and acute inflammatory reaction that may evolve to dermonecrosis (a hallmark of envenomation and hemorrhage at the bite site, besides systemic manifestations such as thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hemolysis, and renal failure. The molecular mechanisms by which Loxosceles venoms induce injury are currently under investigation. In this review, we focused on the latest reports describing the biological and physiopathological aspects of loxoscelism, with reference mainly to the proteases recently described as metalloproteases and serine proteases, as well as on the proteolytic effects triggered by L. intermedia venom upon extracellular matrix constituents such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, entactin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan, besides the disruptive activity of the venom on Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm basement membranes. Degradation of these extracellular matrix molecules and the observed disruption of basement membranes could be related to deleterious activities of the venom such as loss of vessel and glomerular integrity and spreading of the venom toxins to underlying tissues.

  5. Novel serine keratinase from Caldicoprobacter algeriensis exhibiting outstanding hide dehairing abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouacem, Khelifa; Bouanane-Darenfed, Amel; Zaraî Jaouadi, Nadia; Joseph, Manon; Hacene, Hocine; Ollivier, Bernard; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Bejar, Samir; Jaouadi, Bassem

    2016-05-01

    The current paper reports on the purification of an extracellular thermostable keratinase (KERCA) produced from Caldicoprobacter algeriensis strain TH7C1(T), a thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium isolated from a hydrothermal hot spring in Algeria. The maximum keratinase activity recorded after 24-h of incubation at 50 °C was 21000 U/ml. The enzyme was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation-dialysis and heat treatment (2h at 50 °C) followed by UNO Q-6 FPLC anion exchange chromatography, and submitted to biochemical characterization assays. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis revealed that the purified enzyme was a monomer with a molecular mass of 33246.10 Da. The sequence of the 23 N-terminal residues of KERCA showed high homology with those of bacterial keratinases. Optimal activity was achieved at pH 7 and 50 °C. The enzyme was completely inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and diiodopropyl fluorophosphates (DFP), which suggests that it belongs to the serine keratinase family. KERCA displayed higher levels of hydrolysis and catalytic efficiency than keratinase KERQ7 from Bacillus tequilensis strain Q7. These properties make KERCA a potential promising and eco-friendly alternative to the conventional chemicals used for the dehairing of goat, sheep, and bovine hides in the leather processing industry.

  6. Biophysical characterization of in vitro bound Streptomyces peucetius daunorubicin-serine protease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Rashmi; Prasad, Ranjan

    2014-03-01

    A serine protease of Streptomyces peucetius is found in association with daunorubicin in the culture filtrate and co-purifies as a complex as reported earlier by us (Dubey et al., 2013). The same protease was purified without drug attachment from dpsA(-) mutant of S. peucetius, which does not produce daunorubicin. Drug-protein complex was made in vitro by mixing daunorubicin and the protease. Spectral analysis and circular dichroism (CD) analysis were employed to determine the interaction between daunorubicin and the protease. Our study showed that interaction of daunorubicin with the protease affects the spectral characteristics of the drug and changes the secondary structure of the protein. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis showed that the drug-protein interaction results in partial conversion of the drug to aglyconic form. The complex formation implies sequestration of the drug when it attains potentially lethal level in the extracellular milieu of S. peucetius culture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine protease inhibitors (serpins are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles.

  8. A serine proteinase inhibitor from frog eggs with bacteriostatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yaoping; Yu, Haining; Yang, Xinbo; Rees, Huw H; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren

    2008-01-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, Resource Q anionic exchange and C4 reversed phase liquid high performance liquid chromatography, a proteinase inhibitor protein (Ranaserpin) was identified and purified from the eggs of the odour frog, Rana grahami. The protein displayed a single band adjacent to the molecular weight marker of 14.4 kDa analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The inhibitor protein homogeneity and its molecular weight were confirmed again by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrum analysis gave this inhibitor protein an m/z of 14422.26 that was matched well with the result from SDS-PAGE. This protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor targeting multiple proteinases including trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. Ranaserpin inhibited the proteolytic activities of trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. It has an inhibitory constant (K(i)) of 6.2 x 10(-8) M, 2.7 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-8) M for trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin, respectively. This serine proteinase inhibitor exhibited bacteriostatic effect on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633). It was suggested that ranaserpin might act as a defensive role in resistance to invasion of pests or pathogens. This is the first report of serine proteinase inhibitor and its direct defensive role from amphibian eggs.

  9. graal: a Drosophila gene coding for several mosaic serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Anne Isabelle; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Janeway, Charles A; Doucet, Daniel; Capovilla, Maria; Lagueux, Marie

    2004-10-01

    Serine proteases play vital roles in several biological processes such as development and immunity. We have characterized Graal, a large multi-domain serine protease from Drosophila. Graal is spliced in at least three transcripts that are present throughout development. The domains found in Graal proteins are: chitin-binding domains (CBD), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domains, low density lipoprotein receptor cysteine-rich (LDLR-CR) domains, histidine and proline-rich domains, a NGGYQPP-repeat domain and a serine protease domain. The last 2370 nucleotides of these RNAs are identical and encode a His-rich domain, two SRCR domains, two LDLR-CR domains and a protease domain. The transcription of graal is upregulated after fungal or bacterial infection. Analysis of the Iso1 (y;cn,sp,bw) strain shows that graal transcription is impaired in this fly line due to the insertion of a retrotransposon in the sixth exon. However, no phenotype could be observed consecutive to the absence of graal full length transcripts, particularly in the context of an immune challenge.

  10. Pnserpin: A Novel Serine Protease Inhibitor from Extremophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Fei, Rui; Xue, Baigong; Yu, Shanshan; Zhang, Zuoming; Zhong, Sheng; Gao, Yuanqi; Zhou, Xiaoli

    2017-01-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are native inhibitors of serine proteases, constituting a large protein family with members spread over eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, only very few prokaryotic serpins, especially from extremophiles, have been characterized to date. In this study, Pnserpin, a putative serine protease inhibitor from the thermophile Pyrobaculum neutrophilum, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and characterization. It irreversibly inhibits chymotrypsin-, trypsin-, elastase-, and subtilisin-like proteases in a temperature range from 20 to 100 °C in a concentration-dependent manner. The stoichiometry of inhibition (SI) of Pnserpin for proteases decreases as the temperature increases, indicating that the inhibitory activity of Pnserpin increases with the temperature. SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) showed that Pnserpin inhibits proteases by forming a SDS-resistant covalent complex. Homology modeling and molecular dynamic simulations predicted that Pnserpin can form a stable common serpin fold. Results of the present work will help in understanding the structural and functional characteristics of thermophilic serpin and will broaden the current knowledge about serpins from extremophiles. PMID:28067849

  11. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaprakash, N. [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); SRM Valliammai Engineering College, Department of Chemistry, Chennai 603 203 (India); Judith Vijaya, J., E-mail: jjvijayaloyola@yahoo.co.in [Catalysis and Nanomaterials Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Loyola College, Chennai 600 034 (India); John Kennedy, L. [Materials Division, School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Chennai Campus, Chennai 600 048 (India); Priadharsini, K.; Palani, P. [Department of Center for Advanced Study in Botany, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV–Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443 nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484 nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO{sub 3} against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. - Highlights: • Microwave irradiation method is used to synthesize silver nanoparticles. • Highly stable silver nanoparticles are produced from serine. • A detailed study of antibacterial activities is discussed. • Formation mechanism of silver microspheres has been proposed.

  12. Serine racemase: a key player in apoptosis and necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia eCanu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A fine balance between cell survival and cell death is required to sculpt the nervous system during development. However, an excess of cell death can occur following trauma, exposure to neurotoxins or alcohol, and some developmental and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs support synaptic plasticity and survival of many neuronal populations whereas inappropriate activation may promote various forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis representing the two extremes of a continuum of cell death processes both in vitro and in vivo. Hence, by identifying the switches controlling pro-survival vs. apoptosis and apoptosis vs. pro-excitotoxic outcome of NMDAR stimulation, NMDAR modulators could be developed that selectively block the cell death enhancing pro-survival signaling or synaptic plasticity mediated by NMDAR. Among these modulators, a role is emerging for the enzyme serine racemase (SR that synthesizes D-serine, a key co-agonist with glutamate at NMDAR. This review summarizes the experimental evidence from in vitro neuronal cultures -- with special emphasis on cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs -- and in vivo models of neurodegeneration, where the dual role of the SR/D-serine pathway as a master regulator of apoptosis and the apoptosis-necrosis shift will be discussed.

  13. Serine racemase expression in mouse cerebral cortex after permanent focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-zhen WANG; Xing-zu ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the alterations of the expressions of serine racemase in C57BL/6 mouse brain after permanent focal cerebral ischemia. METHODS: The mRNA level and the protein level of serine racemase were assayed by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. The amount of D-serine and L-serine were measured by HPLC. RESULTS: High levels of serine racemase were constitutively expressed in the normal cortex of mouse. At early stage after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), no significant change in expression of serine racemase was observed in temporoparietal cortex in ipsilateral hemisphere. However,delayed transient decreases of serine racemase in both mRNA and protein levels were detected from d 6 to d 10 after ischemia. Correspondingly, D-serine concentration also declined in the ipsilateral cortex during this period when compared with the D-serine level in the contralateral cortex. CONCLUSION:Delayed decreases in serine racemase expression and D-serine level occurred in the temporoparietal cortex at the late stage after focal cerebral ischemia.

  14. Modulation by extracellular pH of low- and high-voltage-activated calcium currents of rat thalamic relay neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M J; Meis, S; Munsch, T; Pape, H C

    2001-03-01

    The effects of changes in the extracellular pH (pH(o)) on low-voltage- (LVA) and high-voltage- (HVA) activated calcium currents of acutely isolated relay neurons of the ventrobasal thalamic complex (VB) were examined using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Modest extracellular alkalinization (pH 7.3 to 7.7) reversibly enlarged LVA calcium currents by 18.6 +/- 3.2% (mean +/- SE, n = 6), whereas extracellular acidification (pH 7.3 to 6.9) decreased the current by 24.8 +/- 3.1% (n = 9). Normalized current amplitudes (I/I(7.3)) fitted as a function of pH(o) revealed an apparent pK(a) of 6.9. Both, half-maximal activation voltage and steady-state inactivation were significantly shifted to more negative voltages by 2-4 mV on extracellular alkalinization and to more positive voltages by 2-3 mV on extracellular acidification, respectively. Recovery from inactivation of LVA calcium currents was not significantly affected by changes in pH(o). In contrast, HVA calcium currents were less sensitive to changes in pH(o). Although extracellular alkalinization increased maximal HVA current by 6.0 +/- 2.0% (n = 7) and extracellular acidification decreased it by 11.9 +/- 0.02% (n = 11), both activation and steady-state inactivation were only marginally affected by the moderate changes in pH(o) used in the present study. The results show that calcium currents of thalamic relay neurons exhibit different pH(o) sensitivity. Therefore activity-related extracellular pH transients might selectively modulate certain aspects of the electrogenic behavior of thalamic relay neurons.

  15. Handbook of Indigenous Foods Involving Alkaline Fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, P.K.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    This book details the basic approaches of alkaline fermentation, provides a brief history, and offers an overview of the subject. The book discusses the diversity of indigenous fermented foods involving an alkaline reaction, as well as the taxonomy, ecology, physiology, and genetics of predominant m

  16. Extracellular Polyhydroxyalkanoate Depolymerase by Acidovorax sp. DP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vigneswari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria capable of degrading polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA by secreting extracellular depolymerase enzymes were isolated from water and soil samples collected from various environments in Malaysia. A total of 8 potential degraders exhibited clear zones on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate [P(3HB] based agar, indicating the presence of extracellular PHA depolymerase. Among the isolates, DP5 exhibited the largest clearing zone with a degradation index of 6.0. The highest degradation activity of P(3HB was also observed with depolymerase enzyme of DP5 in mineral salt medium containing P(3HB. Based on biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA cloning and sequencing, isolate DP5 was found to belong to the genus Acidovorax and subsequently named as Acidovorax sp. DP5. The highest extracellular depolymerase enzyme activity was achieved when 0.25% (w/v of P(3HB and 1 g/L of urea were used as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively, in the culture media. The most suitable assay condition of the depolymerase enzyme in response to pH and temperature was tested. The depolymerase produced by strain Acidovorax sp. DP5 showed high percentage of degradation with P(3HB films in an alkaline condition with pH 9 and at a temperature of 40°C.

  17. Modulation of the dimer interface at ionotropic glutamate-like receptor d2 by D-serine and extracellular calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Bø; Naur, Peter; Kurtkaya, Natalie L

    2009-01-01

    GluRdelta2 is a member of the iGluR family, but despite a prominent role in cerebellar synaptic plasticity, this receptor does not appear to function as an ion channel. Endogenous ligands that modulate the activity of native GluRdelta2 in the cerebellum have not been identified, but two candidate...

  18. Multisystemic functions of alkaline phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchet, René; Millán, José Luis; Magne, David

    2013-01-01

    Human and mouse alkaline phosphatases (AP) are encoded by a multigene family expressed ubiquitously in multiple tissues. Gene knockout (KO) findings have helped define some of the precise exocytic functions of individual isozymes in bone, teeth, the central nervous system, and in the gut. For instance, deficiency in tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in mice (Alpl (-/-) mice) and humans leads to hypophosphatasia (HPP), an inborn error of metabolism characterized by epileptic seizures in the most severe cases, caused by abnormal metabolism of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (the predominant form of vitamin B6) and by hypomineralization of the skeleton and teeth featuring rickets and early loss of teeth in children or osteomalacia and dental problems in adults caused by accumulation of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi). Enzyme replacement therapy with mineral-targeting TNAP prevented all the manifestations of HPP in mice, and clinical trials with this protein therapeutic are showing promising results in rescuing life-threatening HPP in infants. Conversely, TNAP induction in the vasculature during generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), type II diabetes, obesity, and aging can cause medial vascular calcification. TNAP inhibitors, discussed extensively in this book, are in development to prevent pathological arterial calcification. The brush border enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an important role in fatty acid (FA) absorption, in protecting gut barrier function, and in determining the composition of the gut microbiota via its ability to dephosphorylate lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Knockout mice (Akp3 (-/-)) deficient in duodenal-specific IAP (dIAP) become obese, and develop hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis when fed a high-fat diet (HFD). These changes are accompanied by upregulation in the jejunal-ileal expression of the Akp6 IAP isozyme (global IAP, or gIAP) and concomitant upregulation of FAT/CD36, a phosphorylated fatty acid

  19. Purification and characterization of a 33 kDa serine protease from Acanthamoeba lugdunensis KA/E2 isolated from a Korean keratitis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo-Kyung; Ha, Young-Ran; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il

    2003-12-01

    In order to evaluate the possible roles of secretory proteases in the pathogenesis of amoebic keratitis, we purified and characterized a serine protease secreted by Acanthamoeba lugdunensis KA/E2, isolated from a Korean keratitis patient. The ammonium sulfate-precipitated culture supernatant of the isolate was purified by sequential chromatography on CM-Sepharose, Sephacryl S-200, and mono Q-anion exchange column. The purified 33 kDa protease had a pH optimum of 8.5 and a temperature optimum of 55 degrees C. Phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride and 4-(2- Aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl-fluoride, both serine protease specific inhibitors, inhibited almost completely the activity of the 33 kDa protease whereas other classes of inhibitors did not affect its activity. The 33 kDa enzyme degraded various extracellular matrix proteins and serum proteins. Our results strongly suggest that the 33 kDa serine protease secreted from this keratopathogenic Acanthamoeba play important roles in the pathogenesis of amoebic keratitis, such as in corneal tissue invasion, immune evasion and nutrient uptake.

  20. Interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vif with APOBEC3G is not dependent on serine/threonine phosphorylation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopietz, Ferdinand; Jaguva Vasudevan, Ananda Ayyappan; Krämer, Melanie; Muckenfuss, Heide; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Cichutek, Klaus; Flory, Egbert; Münk, Carsten

    2012-11-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 accessory protein Vif is important for viral infectivity because it counteracts the antiviral protein APOBEC3G (A3G). ³²P metabolic labelling of stimulated cells revealed in vivo phosphorylation of the control protein, whereas no serine/threonine phosphorylation was detected for Vif or the A3G protein. These data were confirmed by in vitro kinase assays using active recombinant kinase. Mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 efficiently phosphorylated its target ELK, but failed to phosphorylate Vif. Putative serine/threonine phosphorylation point mutations in Vif (T96, S144, S165, T188) using single-round infection assays demonstrated that these mutations did not alter Vif activity, with the exception of Vif.T96E. Interestingly, T96E and not T96A was functionally impaired, indicating that this residue is critical for Vif-A3G physical interaction and activity. Our data suggest that Vif and A3G are not serine/threonine phosphorylated in human cells and phosphorylation is not linked to their functional activities.

  1. Association of alkaline phosphatase phenotypes with arthritides

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    Padmini A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides, a symmetrical polyarticular disease of the bone are a heterogenous group of disorders in which hereditary and environmental factors in combination with an altered immune response appear to play a causative and pathogenic role in its occurrence. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP is an enzyme found in all tissues, with particularly high concentrations of ALP observed in the liver, bile ducts, placenta, and bone.Alkaline phosphatase is an orthophosphoric monoester phosphohydrolase catalyzing the hydrolysis of organic esters at alkaline pH, indicating that alkaline phosphatase is involved in fundamental biological processes.1 The present study envisages on identifying the specific electromorphic association of alkaline phosphatase with arthritides. Phenotyping of serum samples was carried out by PAGE (Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis following Davies (19642 protocol on 41 juvenile arthritis, 150 rheumatoid arthritis and 100 osteo arthritis apart from, 25 normal children and 100 adult healthy subjects. Phenotyping of alkaline phosphatase revealed an increase in preponderance of p+ and p++ phenotypes in juvenile, rheumatoid and osteo arthritic patients. However a significant association of these phenotypes was observed only with rheumatoid arthritis condition (c2:17.46. Similarly, a significant increase of p+ phenotypes in female rheumatoid arthritis patients was observed (c2:14.973, suggesting that the decrease in p° (tissue non specific synthesis/secretion of alkaline phosphatase could be associated with decreased mineralization and ossification process in arthritis condition.

  2. Alkaline solution neutralization capacity of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline eluate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residue deposited in landfill alkalizes waste and soil layers. From the viewpoint of accelerating stability and preventing heavy metal elution, pH of the landfill layer (waste and daily cover soil) should be controlled. On the other hand, pH of leachate from existing MSW landfill sites is usually approximately neutral. One of the reasons is that daily cover soil can neutralize alkaline solution containing Ca(2+) as cation. However, in landfill layer where various types of wastes and reactions should be taken into consideration, the ability to neutralize alkaline solutions other than Ca(OH)(2) by soil should be evaluated. In this study, the neutralization capacities of various types of soils were measured using Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH solutions. Each soil used in this study showed approximately the same capacity to neutralize both alkaline solutions of Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH. The cation exchange capacity was less than 30% of the maximum alkali neutralization capacity obtained by the titration test. The mechanism of neutralization by the pH-dependent charge can explain the same neutralization capacities of the soils. Although further investigation on the neutralization capacity of the soils for alkaline substances other than NaOH is required, daily cover soil could serve as a buffer zone for alkaline leachates containing Ca(OH)(2) or other alkaline substances.

  3. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Lokesh P

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc. were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes

  4. Extracellular vesicles for drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vader, Pieter; Mol, Emma A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived membrane vesicles, and represent an endogenous mechanism for intercellular communication. Since the discovery that EVs are capable of functionally transferring biological information, the potential use of EVs as drug delivery vehicles has gained consider

  5. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherif Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature.... Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C. The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry, was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment

  6. An analysis of five serine transfer ribonucleic acids from Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B N; Dunn, R; Gillam, I; Tener, G M; Armstrong, D J; Skoog, F; Frihart, C R; Leonard, N J

    1975-01-25

    Crude tRNA from adult Drosophila melanogaster was fractionated on bensoylated-diethylaminoethyl cellulose columns. The eluate was assayed for both amino acid acceptance and cytokinin activity. Most of the cytokinin activity was associated with a peak of serine acceptance. The five major serine tRNAs were purified by chromatography on benzoylated-dietyhlaminoethyl cellulose and reversed phase chromatography-5 columns. The major species, tRNA7-Ser was isolated from this tRNA and was shown to be N-6-(delta-2-isopentenyl)adenosine (i-6A) on the basis of ultraviolet and mass spectral data. The nucleoside somposition of all five serine tRNAs was determined directly and by the 3-H derivative method. They all contain pseudouridine, ribothymidine, 1-methyladenosine, 5-methylcytosine, N-2-dimethylguanosine, 5, 6-hydrouridine, and 3-methylcytosine, while two contain an unidentified nucleoside, and one containes 1-methylguanosine. These techniques also confirmed the presence of i-6A in tRNA7-Ser as well as showing its presence in tRNA6-Ser and tRNA4-Ser. These three tRNA-Ser species exhibit marked changes in elution from reversed phase chromatography-5 columns as a function of temperature and this may be related to their minor base composition. The tRNAs-Ser were bound to ribosomes in response to the following triplets: tRNA2-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA4-Ser, UCG; tRNA5-Ser, AGU, AGC; tRNA7-Ser, UCG.

  7. Properties of serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Kendziorek; Andrzej Paszkowski

    2008-01-01

    The photorespiratory enzyme L-serine: glyoxylate aminotransferase (SGAT; EC 2.6.1.45) was purified from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The final enzyme was approximately 80% pure as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with silver staining. The identity of the enzyme was confirmed by LC/MS/MS analysis.The molecular mass estimated by gel filtration chromatography on Sephadex G-150 under non-denaturing conditions, mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization/time of flight technique) and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was 82.4 kDa,42.0 kDa, and 39.8 kDa, respectively, indicating dimer as the active form. The optimum Ph value was 9.2. The enzyme activity was inhibited by aminooxyacetate and β-chloro-L-alanine both compounds reacting with the carbonyl group of pyridoxal phosphate. The enzyme's transaminating activity with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates was approximately 55% of that observed with L-serine and glyoxylate, The lower Km value (1.25 Mm) for L-alanine, compared with that of other plant SGATs, and the kcat/Km(Ala) ratio being approximately 2-fold higher than kcat/Km(Ser) suggested that, during photorespiration, Ala and Ser are used by Arabidopsis SGAT with equal efficiency as amino group donors for glyoxylate. The equilibrium constant (Keq), derived from the Haldane relation, for the transamination reaction between L-serine and glyoxylate with the formation of hydroxypyruvate and glycine was 79.1, strongly favoring glycine synthesis. However, it was accompanied by a low Km value of 2.83 Mm for glycine. A comparison of some kinetic properties of the studied enzymes with the recombinant Arabidopsis SGATs previously obtained revealed substantial differences. The ratio of the velocity of the transamination reaction with L-alanine and glyoxylate as substrates versus that with L-serine and glyoxylate was 1:1.8 for the native enzyme, whereas it was 1: 7 for the recombinant SGAT

  8. Extracellular peptidase hunting for improvement of protein production in plant cells and roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme eLallemand

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant-based recombinant protein production systems have gained an extensive interest over the past few years, because of their reduced cost and relative safety. Although the first products are now reaching the market, progress are still needed to improve plant hosts and strategies for biopharming. Targeting recombinant proteins toward the extracellular space offers several advantages in terms of protein folding and purification, but degradation events are observed, due to endogenous peptidases. This paper focuses on the analysis of extracellular proteolytic activities in two production systems: cell cultures and root-secretion (rhizosecretion, in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. Proteolytic activities of extracellular proteomes (secretomes were evaluated in vitro against two substrate proteins: bovine serum albumin (BSA and human serum immunoglobulins G (hIgGs. Both targets were found to be degraded by the secretomes, BSA being more prone to proteolysis than hIgGs. The analysis of the proteolysis pH-dependence showed that target degradation was mainly dependent upon the production system: rhizosecretomes contained more peptidase activity than extracellular medium of cell suspensions, whereas variations due to plant species were smaller. Using class-specific peptidase inhibitors, serine and metallopeptidases were found to be responsible for degradation of both substrates. An in-depth in silico analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data from Arabidopsis was then performed and led to the identification of a limited number of serine and metallo-peptidases that are consistently expressed in both production systems. These peptidases should be prime candidates for further improvement of plant hosts by targeted silencing.

  9. Association between intrinsic disorder and serine/threonine phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajinder Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine/threonine phosphorylation is an important mechanism that is involved in the regulation of protein function. In eukaryotes, phosphorylation occurs predominantly in intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Though serine/threonine phosphorylation and protein disorder are much less prevalent in prokaryotes, some bacteria have high levels of serine/threonine phosphorylation and disorder, including the medically important M. tuberculosis. Here I show that serine/threonine phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis are highly enriched in intrinsically disordered regions, indicating similarity in the substrate recognition mechanisms of eukaryotic and M. tuberculosis kinases. Serine/threonine phosphorylation has been linked to the pathogenicity and survival of M. tuberculosis. Thus, a better understanding of how its kinases recognize their substrates could have important implications in understanding and controlling the biology of this deadly pathogen. These results also indicate that the association between serine/threonine phosphorylation and disorder is not a feature restricted to eukaryotes.

  10. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Stephen R.; Adney, William S.; Vinzant, Todd B.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  11. Reaction pathway of tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Tryptophanase, L-tryptophan indole-lyase with extremely absolute stereospecificity, can change the stereospecificity in concentrated diammonium hydrogenphosphate solution. While tryptophanase is not inert to d-serine in the absence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate, it can undergo L-tryptophan synthesis from d-serine along with indole in the presence of it. It has been well known that tryptophanase synthesizes L-tryptophan from l-serine through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type. ...

  12. The tillage effect on the soil acid and alkaline phosphatase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacramioara Oprica

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphatases (acid and alkaline are important in soils because these extracellular enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of organic phosphate esters to orthophosphate; thus they form an important link between biologically unavailable and mineral phosphorous. Phosphatase activity is sensitive to environmental perturbations such as organic amendments, tillage, waterlogging, compaction, fertilizer additions and thus it is often used as an environmental indicator of soil quality in riparian ecosystems. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of tillage systems on phosphatases activity in a field experiment carried out in Ezăreni farm. The phosphatase activitiy were determined at two depths (7-10 cm and 15-25cm layers of a chernozem soil submitted to conventional tillage (CT in a fertilised and unfertilised experiment. Monitoring soil alkaline phosphatase activity showed, generally, the same in fertilized soil profiles collected from both depths; the values being extremely close. In unfertilized soils, alkaline phosphatase activity is different only in soils that were exposed to unconventional work using disc harrows and 30cm tillage. Both works type (no tillage and conventional tillage cause an intense alkaline phosphatase activity in 7-10 cm soil profile. Acid phosphatase activity is highly fluctuating in both fertilized as well unfertilized soil, this enzyme being influenced by the performed works.

  13. Characterization and quantification of biochar alkalinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidel, Rivka B; Laird, David A; Thompson, Michael L; Lawrinenko, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Lack of knowledge regarding the nature of biochar alkalis has hindered understanding of pH-sensitive biochar-soil interactions. Here we investigate the nature of biochar alkalinity and present a cohesive suite of methods for its quantification. Biochars produced from cellulose, corn stover and wood feedstocks had significant low-pKa organic structural (0.03-0.34 meq g(-1)), other organic (0-0.92 meq g(-1)), carbonate (0.02-1.5 meq g(-1)), and other inorganic (0-0.26 meq g(-1)) alkalinities. All four categories of biochar alkalinity contributed to total biochar alkalinity and are therefore relevant to pH-sensitive soil processes. Total biochar alkalinity was strongly correlated with base cation concentration, but biochar alkalinity was not a simple function of elemental composition, soluble ash, fixed carbon, or volatile matter content. More research is needed to characterize soluble biochar alkalis other than carbonates and to establish predictive relationships among biochar production parameters and the composition of biochar alkalis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification and characterization of cloned alkaline protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Irfana; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Afzal, Mohammed; Ur-Rehman, Asad; Aftab, Saima; Zafar, Asma; Ud-Din, Zia; Khuharo, Ateeque Rahman; Iqbal, Jawad; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2015-02-01

    Thermostable alkaline serine protease gene of Geobacillus stearothermophilus B-1172 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using pET-22b(+), as an expression vector. The growth conditions were optimized for maximal production of the protease using variable fermentation parameters, i.e., pH, temperature, and addition of an inducer. Protease, thus produced, was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by ion exchange chromatography with 13.7-fold purification, with specific activity of 97.5 U mg(-1) , and a recovery of 23.6%. Molecular weight of the purified protease, 39 kDa, was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was stable at 90 °C at pH 9. The enzyme activity was steady in the presence of EDTA indicating that the protease was not a metalloprotease. No significant change in the activity of protease after addition of various metal ions further strengthened this fact. However, an addition of 1% Triton X-100 or SDS surfactants constrained the enzyme specific activity to 34 and 19%, respectively. Among organic solvents, an addition of 1-butanol (20%) augmented the enzyme activity by 29% of the original activity. With casein as a substrate, the enzyme activity under optimized conditions was found to be 73.8 U mg(-1) . The effect of protease expression on the host cells growth was also studied and found to negatively affect E. coli cells to certain extent. Catalytic domains of serine proteases from eight important thermostable organisms were analyzed through WebLogo and found to be conserved in all serine protease sequences suggesting that protease of G. stearothermophilus could be beneficially used as a biocontrol agent and in many industries including detergent industry.

  15. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  16. Purification and characterization of D-serine deaminase activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heincz, M C; Bornstein, S M; McFall, E

    1984-10-01

    We purified the dsdC gene product, the specific activator of dsdA (D-serine deaminase) gene expression, to about 25% homogeneity from a strain in which its expression was amplified 100-fold. The purification involved, successively: DNase and high-salt treatment of cell extracts, DNA-cellulose chromatography, and Dyematrex (Amicon Corp.) column chromatography. We identified the protein as a discrete spot on two-dimensional O'Farrell gels after the DNA-cellulose step and quantitated it by densitometry. The active form was found to be a dimer. We estimated that there were eight activator dimers per wild-type cell. The activator is a slightly basic protein, with an experimental Km for its ligand D-serine of about 7 X 10(-6)M. The low concentration of the activator in wild-type cells and its autorepression may explain the previously observed partial dominance of dsdC+ in dsdCc/dsdC+ merodiploids.

  17. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor.

  18. Okadaic acid: the archetypal serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounay, A B; Forsyth, C J

    2002-11-01

    As the first recognized member of the "okadaic acid class" of phosphatase inhibitors, the marine natural product okadaic acid is perhaps the most well-known member of a diverse array of secondary metabolites that have emerged as valuable probes for studying the roles of various cellular protein serine/threonine phosphatases. This review provides a historical perspective on the role that okadaic acid has played in stimulating a broad spectrum of modern scientific research as a result of the natural product's ability to bind to and inhibit important classes of protein serine / threonine phosphatases. The relationships between the structure and biological activities of okadaic acid are briefly reviewed, as well as the structural information regarding the particular cellular receptors protein phosphatases 1 (PP1) and 2A. Laboratory syntheses of okadaic acid and its analogs are thoroughly reviewed. Finally, an interpretation of the critical contacts observed between okadaic acid and PP1 by X-ray crystallography is provided, and specific molecular recognition hypotheses that are testable via the synthesis and assay of non-natural analogs of okadaic acid are suggested.

  19. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  20. Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized from serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakash, N; Judith Vijaya, J; John Kennedy, L; Priadharsini, K; Palani, P

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by a simple microwave irradiation method using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent and serine as a reducing agent. UV-Visible spectra were used to confirm the formation of Ag NPs by observing the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 443nm. The emission spectrum of Ag NPs showed an emission band at 484nm. In the presence of microwave radiation, serine acts as a reducing agent, which was confirmed by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectrum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) were used to investigate the morphology of the synthesized sample. These images showed the sphere-like morphology. The elemental composition of the sample was determined by the energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) was used to find the crystalline nature of the Ag NPs. The electrochemical behavior of the synthesized Ag NPs was analyzed by the cyclic voltammetry (CV). Antibacterial experiments showed that the prepared Ag NPs showed relatively similar antibacterial activities, when compared with AgNO3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Heterogeneity of D-Serine Distribution in the Human Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masataka; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Mita, Masashi; Hamase, Kenji; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2017-01-01

    D-serine is an endogenous ligand for N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors. Accumulating evidence including genetic associations of D-serine metabolism with neurological or psychiatric diseases suggest that D-serine is crucial in human neurophysiology. However, distribution and regulation of D-serine in humans are not well understood. Here, we found that D-serine is heterogeneously distributed in the human central nervous system (CNS). The cerebrum contains the highest level of D-serine among the areas in the CNS. There is heterogeneity in its distribution in the cerebrum and even within the cerebral neocortex. The neocortical heterogeneity is associated with Brodmann or functional areas but is unrelated to basic patterns of cortical layer structure or regional expressional variation of metabolic enzymes for D-serine. Such D-serine distribution may reflect functional diversity of glutamatergic neurons in the human CNS, which may serve as a basis for clinical and pharmacological studies on D-serine modulation. PMID:28604057

  2. The VA, VCD, Raman and ROA spectra of tri-L-serine in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2006-01-01

    The structures of one conformer of the nonionic neutral and zwitterionic species of L-serinyl L-serinyl L-serine (SSS or tri-L-serine), together with its cationic and anionic species and the capped N-acetyl tri-L-serine N'-methylamide analog were optimized with density functional theory...... the latest methods in experimental and theoretical vibrational spectroscopy are used to gain useful information about the coupling of the nuclear, electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom and structure of tri-L-serine and its capped peptide analog with the environment....

  3. [Alkaline phosphatase in Amoeba proteus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    2005-01-01

    In free-living Amoeba proteus (strain B), 3 phosphatase were found after disc-electrophoresis of 10 microg of protein in PAGE and using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate a pH 9.0. These phosphatases differed in their electrophoretic mobilities - "slow" (1-3 bands), "middle" (one band) and "fast" (one band). In addition to 1-naphthyl phosphate, "slow" phosphatases were able to hydrolyse 2-naphthyl phosphate and p-nitrophenyl phosphate. They were slightly activated by Mg2+, completely inhibited by 3 chelators (EDTA, EGTA and 1,10-phenanthroline), L-cysteine, sodium dodecyl sulfate and Fe2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ (50 mM), considerably inactivated by orthovanadate, molybdate, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 1, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, Na2HPO4, DL-dithiothreitol and urea and partly inhibited by H2O2, DL-phenylalanine, 2-mercaptoethanol, phosphatase inhibitor cocktail 2 and Ca2+. Imidazole, L-(+)-tartrate, okadaic acid, NaF and sulfhydryl reagents -p-(hydroxy-mercuri)benzoate and N-ethylmaleimide - had no influence on the activity of "slow" phosphatases. "Middle" and "fast" phosphatases, in contrast to "slow" ones, were not inactivated by 3 chelators. The "middle" phosphatase differed from the "fast" one by smaller resistance to urea, Ca2+, Mn2+, phosphates and H2O2 and greater resistance to dithiothreitol and L-(+)-tartrate. In addition, the "fast" phosphatase was inhibited by L-cysteine but the "middle" one was activated by it. Of 5 tested ions (Mg2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Ca2+ and Zn2+), only Zn2+ reactivated "slow" phosphatases after their inactivation by EDTA treatment. The reactivation of apoenzyme was only partial (about 35 %). Thus, among phosphatases found in amoebae at pH 9.0, only "slow" ones are Zn-metalloenzymes and may be considered as alkaline phosphatases (EC 3.1.3.1). It still remains uncertain, to which particular phosphatase class "middle" and "fast" phosphatases (pH 9.0) may belong.

  4. Extracellular vesicles: Exosomes, microvesicles, and friends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposo, G.; Stoorvogel, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074352385

    2013-01-01

    Cells release into the extracellular environment diverse types of membrane vesicles of endosomal and plasma membrane origin called exosomes and microvesicles, respectively. These extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for

  5. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  6. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed. PMID:28373994

  7. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1-100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  8. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps and Microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Rada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophil extracellular traps represent a fascinating mechanism by which PMNs entrap extracellular microbes. The primary purpose of this innate immune mechanism is thought to localize the infection at an early stage. Interestingly, the ability of different microcrystals to induce NET formation has been recently described. Microcrystals are insoluble crystals with a size of 1–100 micrometers that have different composition and shape. Microcrystals have it in common that they irritate phagocytes including PMNs and typically trigger an inflammatory response. This review is the first to summarize observations with regard to PMN activation and NET release induced by microcrystals. Gout-causing monosodium urate crystals, pseudogout-causing calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals, cholesterol crystals associated with atherosclerosis, silicosis-causing silica crystals, and adjuvant alum crystals are discussed.

  9. Variation in Extracellular Protease Production among Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus Due to Different Levels of Expression of the Protease Repressor sarA

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anna; Arvidson, Staffan

    2002-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces four major extracellular proteases: staphylococcal serine protease (V8 protease; SspA), cysteine protease (SspB), metalloprotease (aureolysin; Aur), and staphopain (Scp). Several in vitro studies have suggested that these enzymes are important virulence factors. Here we analyzed the protease production of 92 S. aureus strains from infected human soft tissue. Twenty-one strains produced variable zones of proteolysis on casein agar plates, while the remaining 71 s...

  10. Drosophila glia use a conserved cotransporter mechanism to regulate extracellular volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiserson, William M; Forbush, Biff; Keshishian, Haig

    2011-02-01

    The nervous system is protected by blood barriers that use multiple systems to control extracellular solute composition, osmotic pressure, and fluid volume. In the human nervous system, misregulation of the extracellular volume poses serious health threats. Here, we show that the glial cells that form the Drosophila blood-nerve barrier have a conserved molecular mechanism that regulates extracellular volume: the Serine/Threonine kinase Fray, which we previously showed is an ortholog of mammalian PASK/SPAK; and the Na-K-Cl cotransporter Ncc69, which we show is an ortholog of human NKCC1. In mammals, PASK/SPAK binds to NKCC1 and regulates its activity. In Drosophila, larvae mutant for Ncc69 develop a peripheral neuropathy, where fluid accumulates between glia and axons. The accumulation of fluid has no detectable impact on action potential conduction, suggesting that the role of Ncc69 is to maintain volume or osmotic homeostasis. Drosophila Ncc69 has kinetics similar to human NKCC1, and NKCC1 can rescue Ncc69, suggesting that they function in a conserved physiological mechanism. We show that fray and Ncc69 are coexpressed in nerve glia, interact in a yeast-two-hybrid assay, and have an essentially identical bulging nerve phenotype. We propose that normally functioning nerves generate extracellular solutes that are removed by Ncc69 under the control of Fray. This mechanism may perform a similar role in humans, given that NKCC1 is expressed at the blood-brain barrier.

  11. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. Engineering of high yield production of L-serine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Schneider, Konstantin; Christensen, Hanne Bjerre; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-04-01

    L-serine is a widely used amino acid that has been proposed as a potential building block biochemical. The high theoretical yield from glucose makes a fermentation based production attractive. In order to achieve this goal, serine degradation to pyruvate and glycine in E. coli MG1655 was prevented by deletion of three L-serine deaminases sdaA, sdaB, and tdcG, as well as serine hydroxyl methyl transferase (SHMT) encoded by glyA. Upon overexpression of the serine production pathway, consisting of a feedback resistant version of serA along with serB and serC, this quadruple deletion strain showed a very high serine production yield (0.45 g/g glucose) during small-scale batch fermentation in minimal medium. Serine, however, was found to be highly toxic even at low concentrations to this strain, which lead to slow growth and production during fed batch fermentation, resulting in a serine production of 8.3 g/L. The production strain was therefore evolved by random mutagenesis to achieve increased tolerance towards serine. Additionally, overexpression of eamA, a cysteine/homoserine transporter was demonstrated to increase serine tolerance from 1.6 g/L to 25 g/L. During fed batch fermentation, the resulting strain lead to the serine production titer of 11.7 g/L with yield of 0.43 g/g glucose, which is the highest yield reported so far for any organism.

  13. Metabolic engineering and flux analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-serine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shujuan; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Shuwen; Liang, Yong; Shang, Xiuling; Chai, Xin; Wen, Tingyi

    2012-04-01

    L-Serine plays a critical role as a building block for cell growth, and thus it is difficult to achieve the direct fermentation of L-serine from glucose. In this study, Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 was engineered de novo by blocking and attenuating the conversion of L-serine to pyruvate and glycine, releasing the feedback inhibition by L-serine to 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PGDH), in combination with the co-expression of 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and feedback-resistant PGDH (PGDH(r)). The resulting strain, SER-8, exhibited a lower specific growth rate and significant differences in L-serine levels from Phase I to Phase V as determined for fed-batch fermentation. The intracellular L-serine pool reached (14.22 ± 1.41) μmol g(CDM) (-1), which was higher than glycine pool, contrary to fermentation with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, metabolic flux analysis demonstrated that the over-expression of PGK directed the flux of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) towards the glycolysis pathway (EMP), and the expression of PGDH(r) improved the L-serine biosynthesis pathway. In addition, the flux from L-serine to glycine dropped by 24%, indicating that the deletion of the activator GlyR resulted in down-regulation of serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) expression. Taken together, our findings imply that L-serine pool management is fundamental for sustaining the viability of C. glutamicum, and improvement of C(1) units generation by introducing the glycine cleavage system (GCV) to degrade the excessive glycine is a promising target for L-serine production in C. glutamicum.

  14. Prophylactic treatment with alkaline phosphatase in cardiac surgery induces endogenous alkaline phosphatase release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kats, Suzanne; Brands, Ruud; Hamad, Mohamed A. Soliman; Seinen, Willem; Schamhorst, Volkher; Wulkan, Raymond W.; Schoenberger, Jacques P.; van Oeveren, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Laboratory and clinical data have implicated endotoxin as an important factor in the inflammatory response to cardiopulmonary bypass. We assessed the effects of the administration of bovine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (bIAP), an endotoxin detoxifier, on alkaline phosphatase levels

  15. Uptake of arsenic by alkaline soils near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoust, Amid P; Theis, Thomas L; Murarka, Ishwar P; Naithani, Pratibha; Babaeivelni, Kamel

    2013-12-01

    The attenuation of arsenic in groundwater near alkaline coal fly ash disposal facilities was evaluated by determining the uptake of arsenic from ash leachates by surrounding alkaline soils. Ten different alkaline soils near a retired coal fly ash impoundment were used in this study with pH ranging from 7.6 to 9.0, while representative coal fly ash samples from two different locations in the coal fly ash impoundment were used to produce two alkaline ash leachates with pH 7.4 and 8.2. The arsenic found in the ash leachates was present as arsenate [As(V)]. Adsorption isotherm experiments were carried out to determine the adsorption parameters required for predicting the uptake of arsenic from the ash leachates. For all soils and leachates, the adsorption of arsenic followed the Langmuir and Freundlich equations, indicative of the favorable adsorption of arsenic from leachates onto all soils. The uptake of arsenic was evaluated as a function of ash leachate characteristics and the soil components. The uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates, which occurred mainly as calcium hydrogen arsenate, increased with increasing clay fraction of soil and with increasing soil organic matter of the alkaline soils. Appreciable uptake of arsenic from alkaline ash leachates with different pH and arsenic concentration was observed for the alkaline soils, thus attenuating the contamination of groundwater downstream of the retired coal fly ash impoundment.

  16. Structural diversity in serine derived homochiral metal organic frameworks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tanay Kundu; Rahul Banerjee

    2014-09-01

    Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) based homochiral metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) [SerCdOAc and Zn(Ser)2] have been synthesized using pyridyl functionalized amino acid, viz., serine, as an organic linker. The SerCdOAc structure is three dimensional, while that of the Zn(Ser)2 is two dimensional. The polar voids of the corresponding MOFs are filled with solvent molecules (water in the case of SerCdOAc and methanol in the case of Zn(Ser)2). In both cases, metal centres, i.e., Zn(II) and Cd(II), are hexacoordinated. However, with a change in the solvent for synthesis, ligand coordinationmode and incorporation of additional coordinated anion resulted in a great change in the final MOF architecture. Herein, for the first time, we could achieve structural variety and synthesize MOFs composed of only metal ion and pyridyl functionalized amino acid linker.

  17. Serine Proteases an Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    De Santis, L

    1999-01-01

    In serine proteases (SP's), the H-bond between His-57 and Asp-102, and that between Gly-193 and the transition state intermediate play a crucial role for enzymatic function. To shed light on the nature of these interactions, we have carried out ab initio molecular dynamics simulations on complexes representing adducts between the reaction intermediate and elastase (one protein belonging to the SP family). Our calculations indicate the presence of a low--barrier H-bond between His-57 and Asp-102, in complete agreement with NMR experiments on enzyme--transition state analog complexes. Comparison with an ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on a model of the substrate--enzyme adduct indicates that the Gly-193--induced strong stabilization of the intermediate is accomplished by charge/dipole interactions and not by H-bonding as previously suggested. Inclusion of the protein electric field in the calculations does not affect significantly the charge distribution.

  18. Conformation effects on the molecular orbitals of serine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ke-Dong; Ma Peng-Fei; Shan Xu

    2011-01-01

    This paper calculates the five most stable conformers of serine with Hartree-Fock theory, density functional theory (B3LYP), M0ller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP4(SDQ)) and electron propagation theory with the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. The calculated vertical ionization energies for the valence molecular orbitals of each conformer are in agreement with the experimental data, indicating that a range of molecular conformations would coexist in an equilibrium sample. Information of the five outer valence molecular orbitals for each conformer is explored in coordinate and momentum spaces using dual space analysis to investigate the conformational processes, which are generated from the global minimum conformer Serl by rotation of C2-C3 (Ser4), C1-C2 (Ser5) and C1-O2 (Ser2 and Ser3). Orbitals 28a, 27a and 26a are identified as the fingerprint orbitals for all the conformational processes.

  19. Crystallographic Refinement by Incorporation of Molecular Dynamics : Thermostable Serine Protease Thermitase Complexed with Eglin c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gros, Piet; Fujinaga, Masao; Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Kalk, Kor H.; Hol, W G J

    1989-01-01

    In order to investigate the principles of protein thermostability, the crystal structure of thermitase from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris, a thermostable member of the subtilisin family of serine proteases, has been determined in a complex with eglin c. Eglin c is a serine protease inhibitor from the l

  20. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  1. Engineering of High Yield Production of L-serine in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundhada, Hemanshu; Schneider, Konstantin; Christensen, Hanne Bjerre

    2016-01-01

    L-serine is a widely used amino acid that has been proposed as a potential building block biochemical. The high theoretical yield from glucose makes a fermentation based production attractive. In order to achieve this goal, serine degradation to pyruvate and glycine in E. coli MG1655 was prevente...

  2. DMPD: The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15694833 The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1. Bachmann M, Moroy T. Int J Biochem Cell... Biol. 2005 Apr;37(4):726-30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The serine/threonine kinase Pim-1. PubmedID 15694833 Title The

  3. Cobalamin deficiency results in severe metabolic disorder of serine and threonine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebara, S; Toyoshima, S; Matsumura, T; Adachi, S; Takenaka, S; Yamaji, R; Watanabe, F; Miyatake, K; Inui, H; Nakano, Y

    2001-12-05

    Dietary cobalamin (vitamin B12; Cbl) deficiency caused significant increases in plasma serine, threonine, glycine, alanine, tyrosine, lysine and histidine levels in rats. In particular, the serine and threonine levels were over five and eight times, respectively, higher in the Cbl-deficient rats than those in the sufficient controls. In addition, some amino acids, including serine and threonine, were excreted into urine at significantly higher levels in the deficient rats. When Cbl was supplemented into the deficient rats for 2 weeks, in coincidence with the disappearance of the urinary excretion of methylmalonic acid (an index of Cbl deficiency), the plasma serine and threonine levels were normalized. These results indicate that Cbl deficiency results in metabolic disorder of certain amino acids, including serine and threonine. The expression level of hepatic serine dehydratase (SDH), which catalyzes the conversion of serine and threonine to pyruvate and 2-oxobutyrate, respectively, was significantly lowered by Cbl deficiency, even though Cbl does not participate directly in the enzyme reaction. The SDH activity in the deficient rats was less than 20% of that in the sufficient controls, and was normalized 2 weeks after the Cbl supplementation. It is thus suggested that the decrease of the SDH expression relates closely with the abnormalities in the plasma and urinary levels of serine and threonine in the Cbl-deficient rats.

  4. Single and chronic L-serine treatments exert antidepressant-like effects in rats possibly by different means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Togo, Yuki; Yamanaga, Masakazu; Yoshida, Junki; Uotsu, Nobuo; Teramoto, Sachiyuki; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2017-06-06

    In the present study, the effects of both single (6 mmol L-serine/10 ml/kg orally administrated) and chronic (2% L-serine solution freely given for 28 days) treatments on depression-like behavior were evaluated in Wistar rats, representing the control, and Wistar Kyoto rats, representing an animal model of depression. Both single and chronic L-serine treatments decreased the duration of immobility, which is an index of a depressive-like state, in the forced swimming test in both strains. However, the decreases in the duration of immobility appear to be regulated differently by the different mechanisms involved in single and chronic L-serine treatments. In the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, single L-serine treatment increased the concentrations of L-serine, but not D-serine, while chronic L-serine treatment increased those of D-serine, but not L-serine. These data suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of single and chronic L-serine treatments may have been induced by the increased L-serine and D-serine concentrations, respectively, in the brain. In addition, chronic L-serine treatment increased cystathionine concentrations in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in Wistar rats, but not in Wistar Kyoto rats, suggesting that Wistar Kyoto rats have an abnormality in the serine-cystathionine metabolic pathway. In conclusion, single and chronic L-serine treatments may induce antidepressant-like effects via the different mechanisms related to serine metabolism in the brain.

  5. Purification and characterization of an alkaline protease from Micrococcus sp. isolated from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Enling; Xia, Tao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Mao, Xiangzhao

    2017-04-01

    Protease is wildly used in various fields, such as food, medicine, washing, leather, cosmetics and other industrial fields. In this study, an alkaline protease secreted by Micrococcus NH54PC02 isolated from the South China Sea was purified and characterized. The growth curve and enzyme activity curve indicated that the cell reached a maximum concentration at the 30th hour and the enzyme activity reached the maximum value at the 36th hour. The protease was purified with 3 steps involving ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography and hydrophobic chromatography with 8.22-fold increase in specific activity and 23.68% increase in the recovery. The molecular mass of the protease was estimated to be 25 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. The optimum temperature and pH for the protease activity were 50°C and pH 10.0, respectively. The protease showed a strong stability in a wide range of pH values ranging from 6.0-11.0, and maintained 90% enzyme activity in strong alkaline environment with pH 11.0. Inhibitor trials indicated that the protease might be serine protease. But it also possessed the characteristic of metalloprotease as it could be strongly inhibited by EDTA and strongly stimulated by Mn2+. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight MS (MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS) showed that the protease might belong to the peptidase S8 family.

  6. Biophysicochemical characterization of an alkaline protease from Beauveria sp. MTCC 5184 with multiple applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shiv; Laxman, Ryali Seeta

    2015-01-01

    This study illustrates the biophysicochemical properties of an alkaline protease, BAP (Beauveria sp. alkaline protease) from Beauveria sp. MTCC 5184. This protease exhibited maximum activity at 50 °C, pH 9.0, and stability in a broad pH range, in the presence of organic solvents, denaturants, as well as detergents. Wash performance studies revealed that BAP was able to remove blood clots/stains from blood-soaked cloth. Peptide mass fingerprinting results demonstrated partial homology of BAP with subtilisin-like proteinase. BAP showed catalytic activity against natural as well as synthetic substrates. Active site characterization of BAP confirmed the involvement of serine, tryptophan, and aspartic acid in catalytic activity. Detailed kinetic and thermodynamic studies of BAP demonstrated that the activation energy (Ea) for casein hydrolysis was 82.55 kJ/M, the specificity constant (Kcat/K m), and the values of ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) decreased with increase in temperature, whereas ∆H (change in enthalapy) and ∆S (change in entropy) were constant. The results of the present study indicate that BAP has potential for applications as detergent additive, in peptide synthesis, and in basic research.

  7. Peptidoglycan inducible expression of a serine proteinase homologue from kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanachai, Achara; Hirono, Ikuo; Ohira, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yukinori; Aoki, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a serine proteinase homologue of kuruma shrimp (Marsupenaeus japonicus) was cloned. The 1257 bp cDNA encodes a 339 amino acid putative peptide, with a signal sequence of 16 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence is 42-67% similar to the immune-related serine proteinases and serine proteinase homologues of arthropods. It contains catalytic triad residues in the putative catalytic domain except for one substitution of Ser by a Gly residue. The six cysteine residues that form three disulphide bridges in most serine proteinases were conserved. The M. japonicus serine proteinase homologue was mainly expressed in haemocytes, in which expression dramatically increased after 3 days feeding with peptidoglycan at 0.2 mg kg(-1) shrimp body weight per day.

  8. Transcribing RNA polymerase II is phosphorylated at CTD residue serine-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Rob D; Heidemann, Martin; Albert, Thomas K; Mailhammer, Reinhard; Flatley, Andrew; Meisterernst, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Eick, Dirk

    2007-12-14

    RNA polymerase II is distinguished by its large carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD), composed of repeats of the consensus heptapeptide Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7. Differential phosphorylation of serine-2 and serine-5 at the 5' and 3' regions of genes appears to coordinate the localization of transcription and RNA processing factors to the elongating polymerase complex. Using monoclonal antibodies, we reveal serine-7 phosphorylation on transcribed genes. This position does not appear to be phosphorylated in CTDs of less than 20 consensus repeats. The position of repeats where serine-7 is substituted influenced the appearance of distinct phosphorylated forms, suggesting functional differences between CTD regions. Our results indicate that restriction of serine-7 epitopes to the Linker-proximal region limits CTD phosphorylation patterns and is a requirement for optimal gene expression.

  9. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  10. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from ectopic mineralization and rat bone marrow cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Ana Maria S; Beloti, Márcio M; Cezarino, Rodrigo M; Rosa, Adalberto Luiz; Pizauro, João M; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2007-04-01

    Cells from rat bone marrow exhibit the proliferation-differentiation sequence of osteoblasts, form mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro and release alkaline phosphatase into the medium. Membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase was obtained by method that is easy to reproduce, simpler and fast when compared with the method used to obtain the enzyme from rat osseous plate. The membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase from cultures of rat bone marrow cells has a MW(r) of about 120 kDa and specific PNPP activity of 1200 U/mg. The ecto-enzyme is anchored to the plasma membrane by the GPI anchor and can be released by PIPLC (selective treatment) or polidocanol (0.2 mg/mL protein and 1% (w/v) detergent). The apparent optimum pH for PNPP hydrolysis by the enzyme was pH 10. This fraction hydrolyzes ATP (240 U/mg), ADP (350 U/mg), glucose 1-phosphate (1100 U/mg), glucose 6-phosphate (340 U/mg), fructose 6-phosphate (460 U/mg), pyrophosphate (330 U/mg) and beta-glycerophosphate (600 U/mg). Cooperative effects were observed for the hydrolysis of PPi and beta-glycerophosphate. PNPPase activity was inhibited by 0.1 mM vanadate (46%), 0.1 mM ZnCl2 (68%), 1 mM levamisole (66%), 1 mM arsenate (44%), 10 mM phosphate (21%) and 1 mM theophylline (72%). We report the biochemical characterization of membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase obtained from rat bone marrow cells cultures, using a method that is simple, rapid and easy to reproduce. Its properties are compared with those of rat osseous plate enzyme and revealed that the alkaline phosphatase obtained has some kinetics and structural behaviors with higher levels of enzymatic activity, facilitating the comprehension of the mineralization process and its function.

  11. Some durability aspects of hybrid alkaline cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatello S.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Blended cements that contain a high content of fly ash and a low content of Portland cement typically suffer from low early strength development and long setting times. Recently, one method of overcoming these problems has been to use an alkali activator to enhance the reactivity of fly ash particles at early ages. Such cements can be grouped under the generic term “hybrid alkaline cements”, where both cement clinker and fly ash, encouraged by the presence of alkalis, are expected to contribute to cementitious gel formation. The work presented here examines some of the durability aspects of high fly ash content hybrid alkaline cement. Specifically, the aspects investigated were: exposure at high temperatures (up to 1000°C, resistance to immersion in aggressive solutions and susceptibility to the alkali aggregate reaction. All tests were repeated with a commercially available sulfate resistant Portland cement for comparison. When exposed to high temperatures, the hybrid alkaline cement showed strikingly different behaviour compared to the control Portland cement, showing fewer micro-cracks and maintaining residual compressive strengths at least equal to original strengths. Beyond 700°C, the hybrid alkaline cement began to sinter, which resulted in shrinkage of around 5% and a 100% increase in residual compressive strengths. No such sintering event was noted in the control Portland cement, which showed a drastic loss in residual compressive strengths upon heating. In immersion tests, the hybrid alkaline cement possessed excellent resistance to sulfate and seawater attack, similar to the control sulfate resistant cement. Both cements were however severely degraded by immersion in 0.1M HCl for 90 days. Both binders complied with the accelerated alkali-aggregate test but when this test was extended, the hybrid alkaline binder showed much greater dimensional stability. Possible reasons for the differences in durability behaviour in both cements

  12. Purification and characterization of an extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; HUANG Xiao-wei; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2004-01-01

    @@ An extracellular protease from Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) was purified to SDSPAGE homogeneity with 14-fold purification by ultrafiltration、 ammonium sulfate precipetation、hydrophobic interaction chromatography and anion exchange chromatography. The molecular weight of the protease was 32 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE. The N-terminal sequence of first 10 amino acids was A-T-Q-S-N-A-P-W-G-L. This enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima of 9-10 and 60℃, respectively, and was stable over a wide range of pH 4-10 and temperature 4-50 ℃. It did not require Ca2+ for activity and thermal stability. Pre-incubation of enzyme with Zn2+ , Cu2+ , Hg2+,Fe3+ inhibited most of the enzyme activity, but Mn2+ increased enzyme activity up to 38%. It remained stable in the presence of Tween20, H2O2, EDTA. The inhibition profile of the enzymes by PMSF, suggested that this purified protease belongs to the serine protease family. The protease could immobilize nematodes (Panagrellus redivirus) in bioassays and hydrolyzed proteins of the purified cuticle.

  13. Purification and characterization of major extracellular proteinases from Trichophyton rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, M; Lindquist, R; Fukuyama, K; Apodaca, G; Epstein, W L; McKerrow, J H

    1985-11-15

    Two extracellular proteinases that probably play a central role in the metabolism and pathogenesis of the most common dermatophyte of man, Trichophyton rubrum, were purified to homogeneity. Size-exclusion chromatography and Chromatofocusing were used to purify the major proteinases 42-fold from crude fungal culture filtrate. The major enzyme has pI 7.8 and subunit Mr 44 000, but forms a dimer of Mr approx. 90 000 in the absence of reducing agents. A second enzyme with pI 6.5 and subunit Mr 36 000, was also purified. It is very similar in substrate specificity to the major enzyme but has lower specific activity, and may be an autoproteolysis product. The major proteinase has pH optimum 8, a Ca2+-dependence maximum of 1 mM, and was inhibited by serine-proteinase inhibitors, especially tetrapeptidyl chloromethane derivatives with hydrophobic residues at the P-1 site. Kinetic studies also showed that tetrapeptides containing aromatic or hydrophobic residues at P-1 were the best substrates. A kcat./Km of 27 000 M-1 X S-1 was calculated for the peptide 3-carboxypropionyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide. The enzyme has significant activity against keratin, elastin and denatured type I collagen (Azocoll).

  14. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  15. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rendón-Ramírez

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP. CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV, we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC, using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM. Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  16. Electrochemical behaviour of alkaline copper complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C L Aravinda; S M Mayanna; V R Muralidharan

    2000-10-01

    A search for non-cyanide plating baths for copper resulted in the development of alkaline copper complex baths containing trisodium citrate [TSC] and triethanolamine [TEA]. Voltammetric studies were carried out on platinum to understand the electrochemical behaviour of these complexes. In TSC solutions, the deposition of copper involves the slow formation of a monovalent species. Adsorption of this species obeys Langmuir isotherm. In TEA solutions the deposition involves the formation of monovalent ions obeying the non-activated Temkin isotherm. Conversion of divalent to monovalent copper is also slow. In TEA and TSC alkaline copper solutions, the predominant species that undergo stepwise reduction contain only TEA ligands

  17. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  18. Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST--An Alkaliphilic Halotolerant Bacterium Capable of Electricity Generation under Alkaline-Saline Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shi

    Full Text Available A great challenge in wastewater bioremediation is the sustained activity of viable microorganisms, which can contribute to the breakdown of waste contaminants, especially in alkaline pH conditions. Identification of extremophiles with bioremediation capability can improve the efficiency of wastewater treatment. Here, we report the discovery of an electrochemically active alkaliphilic halotolerant bacterium, Anditalea andensis ANESC-ST (=CICC10485T=NCCB 100412T, which is capable of generating bioelectricity in alkaline-saline conditions. A. andensis ANESC-ST was shown to grow in alkaline conditions between pH 7.0-11.0 and also under high salt condition (up to 4 wt% NaCl. Electrical output was further demonstrated in microbial fuel cells (MFCs with an average current density of ~0.5 µA/cm2, even under the harsh condition of 4 wt% NaCl and pH 9.0. Subsequent introduction of secreted extracellular metabolites into MFCs inoculated with Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas aeruginosa yielded enhanced electrical output. The ability of A. andensis ANESC-ST to generate energy under alkaline-saline conditions points towards a solution for bioelectricity recovery from alkaline-saline wastewater. This is the first report of A.andensis ANESC-ST producing bioelectricity at high salt concentration and pH.

  19. Interplay between intestinal alkaline phosphatase, diet, gut microbes and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estaki, Mehrbod; DeCoffe, Daniella; Gibson, Deanna L

    2014-11-14

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) plays an essential role in intestinal homeostasis and health through interactions with the resident microbiota, diet and the gut. IAP's role in the intestine is to dephosphorylate toxic microbial ligands such as lipopolysaccharides, unmethylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides and flagellin as well as extracellular nucleotides such as uridine diphosphate. IAP's ability to detoxify these ligands is essential in protecting the host from sepsis during acute inflammation and chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. Also important in these complications is IAP's ability to regulate the microbial ecosystem by forming a complex relationship between microbiota, diet and the intestinal mucosal surface. Evidence reveals that diet alters IAP expression and activity and this in turn can influence the gut microbiota and homeostasis. IAP's ability to maintain a healthy gastrointestinal tract has accelerated research on its potential use as a therapeutic agent against a multitude of diseases. Exogenous IAP has been shown to have beneficial effects when administered during ulcerative colitis, coronary bypass surgery and sepsis. There are currently a handful of human clinical trials underway investigating the effects of exogenous IAP during sepsis, rheumatoid arthritis and heart surgery. In light of these findings IAP has been marked as a novel agent to help treat a variety of other inflammatory and infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to highlight the essential characteristics of IAP in protection and maintenance of intestinal homeostasis while addressing the intricate interplay between IAP, diet, microbiota and the intestinal epithelium.

  20. Purification and characterization of alkaline protease from Lysinibacillus fusiformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suppiah S*

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel alkaline protease producing bacterium was isolated from the gut of an estuarine fish Etroplus suratensis. The strain was identified by sequencing the fragment of their bacterial 16s rRNA and its homology was 97% closest to the Lysinibacillus fusiformis. An extracellular protease from this organism was purified by acetone precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography methods and the specific activity of the purified enzyme was found to be 20.39 U/mg, 169.46U/mg and 352.0U/mg respectively. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was determined to be 29kDa through SDS/PAGE analysis. The enzyme showed that the maximum at pH 9.0 and temperature at 40ºC. The purified enzyme remains active in the presence of various metal ions and it was strongly stimulated by the addition of Ca2+. Among the tested surfactants, the optimum activity was observed in SDS when compared to the other tested surfactants. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  1. Differential gene expression for suicide-substrate serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins) in vegetative and grain tissues of barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, T.H.; Marttila, S.; Rasmussen, S.K.;

    2003-01-01

    Proteins of the serpin superfamily (similar to43 kDa) from mature cereal grains are in vitro suicide-substrate inhibitors of specific mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family. However, unlike the 'standard-mechanism' serine proteinase inhibitors (

  2. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  3. Intraperitoneal injection of d-serine inhibits high-fat diet intake and preference in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Yasoshima, Yasunobu; Matsui, Sho; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2017-11-01

    d-serine is a co-agonist of the N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an important modulator of glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. We previously reported that oral d-serine ingestion inhibited the intake of highly preferred food and promoted the intake of less preferred food in mice. Here, we analyzed the effects of intraperitoneal (IP) d-serine injections on feeding behavior in mice. We assessed the effects of d-serine during both the acquisition and maintenance of a preference for high-fat diets (HFDs). Aversiveness of IP d-serine was analyzed in the conditioned taste aversion paradigm. The effects on food intake were assessed by providing liquid meals with different fat contents. Finally, we measured brain d-serine and l-serine levels after d-serine administration. We found that IP-injected d-serine effectively inhibited the acquisition of a HFD preference, but failed to prevent expression of a previously learned HFD preference. IP-injected d-serine was not sufficient to condition taste aversion. The effect on HFD preference acquisition was associated with increases in d-serine levels in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. IP-injected d-serine most effectively inhibited the intake of liquid meals with high fat content. This effect was dose-dependent, but the responses varied significantly among male C57BL/6J mice. The differential responses to d-serine were consistent among multiple trials in each mouse. In summary, IP-injected d-serine inhibited HFD intake and the acquisition of an HFD preference. Individual mice with the same genetic background showed different sensitivities to d-serine; thus, d-serine sensitivity may be associated with unidentified traits. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  5. The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry K. Schwalfenberg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

  6. Persistently increased intestinal fraction of alkaline phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, E; Baatrup, G; Berg, H

    1984-01-01

    Persistent elevation of the intestinal fraction of the alkaline phosphatase (API) as an isolated finding has to our knowledge not been reported previously. It was found in a boy followed during a period of 5.5 years. The only symptom was transient periodic fatigue observed at home, but not appare...

  7. Alkaline electrochemical cells and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, H. E.; Pfluger, H. L. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    Equilibrated cellulose ether membranes of increased electrolytic conductivity for use as separators in concentrated alkaline electrochemical cells are investigated. The method of making such membranes by equilibration to the degree desired in an aqueous alkali solution mantained at a temperature below about 10 C is described.

  8. Use Alkalinity Monitoring to Optimize Bioreactor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher S; Kult, Keegan J

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the agricultural community has reduced flow of nitrogen from farmed landscapes to stream networks through the use of woodchip denitrification bioreactors. Although deployment of this practice is becoming more common to treat high-nitrate water from agricultural drainage pipes, information about bioreactor management strategies is sparse. This study focuses on the use of water monitoring, and especially the use of alkalinity monitoring, in five Iowa woodchip bioreactors to provide insights into and to help manage bioreactor chemistry in ways that will produce desirable outcomes. Results reported here for the five bioreactors show average annual nitrate load reductions between 50 and 80%, which is acceptable according to established practice standards. Alkalinity data, however, imply that nitrous oxide formation may have regularly occurred in at least three of the bioreactors that are considered to be closed systems. Nitrous oxide measurements of influent and effluent water provide evidence that alkalinity may be an important indicator of bioreactor performance. Bioreactor chemistry can be managed by manipulation of water throughput in ways that produce adequate nitrate removal while preventing undesirable side effects. We conclude that (i) water should be retained for longer periods of time in bioreactors where nitrous oxide formation is indicated, (ii) measuring only nitrate and sulfate concentrations is insufficient for proper bioreactor operation, and (iii) alkalinity monitoring should be implemented into protocols for bioreactor management.

  9. Biomass production on saline-alkaline soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    In a trial of twelve tree species (both nitrogen fixing and non-fixing) for fuel plantations on saline-alkaline soil derived from Gangetic alluvium silty clay, Leucaena leucocephala failed completely after showing rapid growth for six months. Results for other species at age two showed that Prosopis juliflora had the best productivity.

  10. Alkaline Hydrolysis Conversion of Nitrocellulose Fines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The conversion of 1,125,000 pounds of bone-dry nitrocellulose fines into a liquid fertilizer was documented. Alkaline hydrolysis was the conversion... fertilizer . Fertilizer nutrient value was 1.3% nitrogen (N), 8.0% potassium (K2O) and 0.9% phosphorus (P2O5). Conversion met all applicable federal and state safety and environmental regulations.

  11. Delignification of biomass using alkaline glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucuk, M. [YYU Educational Facility, Van (Turkey)

    2005-10-15

    Ailanthus altissima and Spruce orientalis chips were delignified by using glycerol as a solvent and alkaline-gliycerol with and without catalyst at different temperatures (438, 458, 478, and 498 K) in atmospheric pressure, and results were compared with the other organic solvent systems. (Author)

  12. Alterations in brain extracellular dopamine and glycine levels following combined administration of the glycine transporter type-1 inhibitor Org-24461 and risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Katalin; Marko, Bernadett; Zsilla, Gabriella; Matyus, Peter; Pallagi, Katalin; Szabo, Geza; Juranyi, Zsolt; Barkoczy, Jozsef; Levay, Gyorgy; Harsing, Laszlo G

    2010-12-01

    The most dominant hypotheses for the pathogenesis of schizophrenia have focused primarily upon hyperfunctional dopaminergic and hypofunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The therapeutic efficacy of all atypical antipsychotics is explained in part by antagonism of the dopaminergic neurotransmission, mainly by blockade of D(2) dopamine receptors. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor hypofunction in schizophrenia can be reversed by glycine transporter type-1 (GlyT-1) inhibitors, which regulate glycine concentrations at the vicinity of NMDA receptors. Combined drug administration with D(2) dopamine receptor blockade and activation of hypofunctional NMDA receptors may be needed for a more effective treatment of positive and negative symptoms and the accompanied cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. To investigate this type of combined drug administration, rats were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone together with the GlyT-1 inhibitor Org-24461. Brain microdialysis was applied in the striatum of conscious rats and determinations of extracellular dopamine, DOPAC, HVA, glycine, glutamate, and serine concentrations were carried out using HPLC/electrochemistry. Risperidone increased extracellular concentrations of dopamine but failed to influence those of glycine or glutamate measured in microdialysis samples. Org-24461 injection reduced extracellular dopamine concentrations and elevated extracellular glycine levels but the concentrations of serine and glutamate were not changed. When risperidone and Org-24461 were added in combination, a decrease in extracellular dopamine concentrations was accompanied with sustained elevation of extracellular glycine levels. Interestingly, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate were also enhanced. Our data indicate that coadministration of an antipsychotic with a GlyT-1 inhibitor may normalize hypofunctional NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission with reduced

  13. Gelatinases and serine proteinase inhibitors of seminal plasma and the reproductive tract of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotłowska, M; Kowalski, R; Glogowski, J; Jankowski, J; Ciereszko, A

    2005-04-01

    This study examined proteolytic enzymes and serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma with relation to their distribution within the reproductive tract and to yellow semen syndrome (YSS). Proteases of blood plasma, extracts from the reproductive tract, and seminal plasma were analyzed by gelatin zymography. We found a clear regional distribution of proteolytic enzymes in the turkey reproductive tract. Each part was characterized by a unique profile of serine proteolytic enzymes of molecular weights ranging from 29 to 88 kDa. The ductus deferens was found to be a site of very intense proteolytic activity. Two metalloproteases of 58 and 66 kDa were detected in all parts of the reproductive tract and seminal plasma. Using electrophoretic methods for detection of anti-trypsin activity, we found three serine proteinase inhibitors in turkey seminal plasma. Two inhibitors were found in the testis and epididymis and a third in the ductus deferens and seminal plasma. Blood plasma was characterized by the presence of two metalloproteinases and one serine proteinase inhibitor (of low migration rate) that were also detected in the reproductive tract. Amidase and anti-trypsin activities (expressed per gram of protein) differed for yellow and white seminal plasma. We concluded that turkey seminal plasma contains metalloproteases, serine proteinases, and serine proteinase inhibitors. The metalloproteases and one proteinase inhibitor are related to blood proteinases but the other two inhibitors and serine proteinases seem to be unique for the reproductive tract.

  14. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  15. Reaction pathway of tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2011-11-01

    Tryptophanase, L-tryptophan indole-lyase with extremely absolute stereospecificity, can change the stereospecificity in concentrated diammonium hydrogenphosphate solution. While tryptophanase is not inert to D-serine in the absence of diammonium hydrogenphosphate, it can undergo L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine along with indole in the presence of it. It has been well known that tryptophanase synthesizes L-tryptophan from L-serine through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type. However, a metabolic pathway of L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine has remained unclear. The present study aims to elucidate it. Diammonium hydrogenphosphate plays a role in the emergence of catalytic activity on D-serine. The salt gives tryptophanase a small conformational change, which makes it possible to catalyze D-serine. Tryptophanase-bound D-serine produces L-tryptophan synthesis by β-replacement reaction via the enzyme-bound aminoacrylate intermediate. Our result will be valuable in studying the origin of homochirality.

  16. Traditional Food Items in Ogimi, Okinawa: l-Serine Content and the Potential for Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Paul Alan; Metcalf, James S

    2017-01-01

    Ogimi village is renowned for its aging population. We sought to determine if the l-serine content of their diet could account for their neurological health. The most frequently consumed food items, including tofu and seaweeds, are rich in the dietary amino acid l-serine. l-serine content of the Ogimi diet >8 grams/day for Ogimi women significantly exceeds the average American dietary intake of 2.5 grams/day for women >70 years old. Our hypothesis that the high l-serine content of the Ogimi diet is related to the paucity of tangle diseases among villagers is buttressed by in vivo results with non-human primates where dietary l-serine slowed development of neurofibrillary tangles and β-amyloid plaques by up to 85% and a human clinical trial finding that l-serine at 15 grams/day twice daily slows functional decline in ALS patients. Analysis of the Ogimi diet suggests that l-serine should be evaluated for therapeutic potential as a neuroprotective agent.

  17. Enzymatic Synthesis of Galactosylated Serine/Threonine Derivatives by β-Galactosidase from Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyoun Seo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transgalactosylations of serine/threonine derivatives were investigated using β-galactosidase from Escherichia coli as biocatalyst. Using ortho-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside as donor, the highest bioconversion yield of transgalactosylated N-carboxy benzyl L-serine benzyl ester (23.2% was achieved in heptane:buffer medium (70:30, whereas with the lactose, the highest bioconversion yield (3.94% was obtained in the buffer reaction system. The structures of most abundant galactosylated serine products were characterized by MS/MS. The molecular docking simulation revealed that the binding of serine/threonine derivatives to the enzyme’s active site was stronger (−4.6~−7.9 kcal/mol than that of the natural acceptor, glucose, and mainly occurred through interactions with aromatic residues. For N-tert-butoxycarbonyl serine methyl ester (6.8% and N-carboxybenzyl serine benzyl ester (3.4%, their binding affinities and the distances between their hydroxyl side chain and the 1′-OH group of galactose moiety were in good accordance with the quantified bioconversion yields. Despite its lower predicted bioconversion yield, the high experimental bioconversion yield obtained with N-carboxybenzyl serine methyl ester (23.2% demonstrated the importance of the thermodynamically-driven nature of the transgalactosylation reaction.

  18. Proteome-wide reactivity profiling identifies diverse carbamate chemotypes tuned for serine hydrolase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jae Won; Cognetta, Armand B; Niphakis, Micah J; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2013-07-19

    Serine hydrolases are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in Nature. Inhibitors of serine hydrolases are used to treat many diseases, including obesity, diabetes, cognitive dementia, and bacterial and viral infections. Nonetheless, the majority of the 200+ serine hydrolases in mammals still lack selective inhibitors for their functional characterization. We and others have shown that activated carbamates, through covalent reaction with the conserved serine nucleophile of serine hydrolases, can serve as useful inhibitors for members of this enzyme family. The extent to which carbamates, however, cross-react with other protein classes remains mostly unexplored. Here, we address this problem by investigating the proteome-wide reactivity of a diverse set of activated carbamates in vitro and in vivo, using a combination of competitive and click chemistry (CC)-activity-based protein profiling (ABPP). We identify multiple classes of carbamates, including O-aryl, O-hexafluoroisopropyl (HFIP), and O-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) carbamates that react selectively with serine hydrolases across entire mouse tissue proteomes in vivo. We exploit the proteome-wide specificity of HFIP carbamates to create in situ imaging probes for the endocannabinoid hydrolases monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and α-β hydrolase-6 (ABHD6). These findings, taken together, designate the carbamate as a privileged reactive group for serine hydrolases that can accommodate diverse structural modifications to produce inhibitors that display exceptional potency and selectivity across the mammalian proteome.

  19. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  20. The alkaline diet: is there evidence that an alkaline pH diet benefits health?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K

    2012-01-01

    This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy...

  1. Recent Alkaline Lakes: Clues to Understanding the Evolution of Early Planetary Alkaline Oceans and Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, S.; Hartmann, J.; Kazmierczak, J.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract New models suggest that terrestrial weathering consumes 0.26GtC/a (72% silicate-, 28% carbonateweathering), equivalent to a loss of one atmospheric C content every 3700a. Rapid weathering leads in volcanic areas to alkaline conditions, illustrated by the crater lake of Niuafo`ou/Tonga and Lake Van/Turkey, the largest soda lake on Earth. Alkaline conditions cause high CaCO3 supersaturation, permineralization of algal mats and growth of stromatolites. Alkaline conditions can nearly depress free [Ca2+] to levels necessary for proteins to function. Therefore early oceans on Earth (and possibly on Mars) should have been alkaline (i.e. "Soda Oceans"). Recent findings of MgSO4 in top soils on Mars may be misleading about the early history of martian oceans.

  2. D-Serine and D-Cycloserine Reduce Compulsive Alcohol Intake in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Taban; Simms, Jeffrey A; Lei, Kelly; Wegner, Scott; Bonci, Antonello; Messing, Robert O; Hopf, F Woodward

    2015-09-01

    There is considerable interest in NMDAR modulators to enhance memory and treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction, depression, and schizophrenia. D-serine and D-cycloserine, the NMDAR activators at the glycine site, are of particular interest because they have been used in humans without serious adverse effects. Interestingly, D-serine also inhibits some NMDARs active at hyperpolarized potentials (HA-NMDARs), and we previously found that HA-NMDARs within the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) are critical for promoting compulsion-like alcohol drinking, where rats consume alcohol despite pairing with an aversive stimulus such as quinine, a paradigm considered to model compulsive aspects of human alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Here, we examined the impact of D-serine and D-cycloserine on this aversion-resistant alcohol intake (that persists despite adulteration with quinine) and consumption of quinine-free alcohol. Systemic D-serine reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, without altering consumption of quinine-free alcohol or saccharin with or without quinine. Importantly, D-serine within the NAcore but not the dorsolateral striatum also selectively reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking. In addition, D-serine inhibited EPSCs evoked at -70 mV in vitro by optogenetic stimulation of mPFC-NAcore terminals in alcohol-drinking rats, similar to reported effects of the NMDAR blocker AP5. Further, D-serine preexposure occluded AP5 inhibition of mPFC-evoked EPSCs, suggesting that D-serine reduced EPSCs by inhibiting HA-NMDARs. Systemic D-cycloserine also selectively reduced intake of quinine-adulterated alcohol, and D-cycloserine inhibited NAcore HA-NMDARs in vitro. Our results indicate that HA-NMDAR modulators can reduce aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, and support testing of D-serine and D-cycloserine as immediately accessible, FDA-approved drugs to treat AUDs.

  3. D-Serine and D-Cycloserine Reduce Compulsive Alcohol Intake in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Taban; Simms, Jeffrey A; Lei, Kelly; Wegner, Scott; Bonci, Antonello; Messing, Robert O; Hopf, F Woodward

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable interest in NMDAR modulators to enhance memory and treat neuropsychiatric disorders such as addiction, depression, and schizophrenia. D-serine and D-cycloserine, the NMDAR activators at the glycine site, are of particular interest because they have been used in humans without serious adverse effects. Interestingly, D-serine also inhibits some NMDARs active at hyperpolarized potentials (HA-NMDARs), and we previously found that HA-NMDARs within the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) are critical for promoting compulsion-like alcohol drinking, where rats consume alcohol despite pairing with an aversive stimulus such as quinine, a paradigm considered to model compulsive aspects of human alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Here, we examined the impact of D-serine and D-cycloserine on this aversion-resistant alcohol intake (that persists despite adulteration with quinine) and consumption of quinine-free alcohol. Systemic D-serine reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, without altering consumption of quinine-free alcohol or saccharin with or without quinine. Importantly, D-serine within the NAcore but not the dorsolateral striatum also selectively reduced aversion-resistant alcohol drinking. In addition, D-serine inhibited EPSCs evoked at −70 mV in vitro by optogenetic stimulation of mPFC–NAcore terminals in alcohol-drinking rats, similar to reported effects of the NMDAR blocker AP5. Further, D-serine preexposure occluded AP5 inhibition of mPFC-evoked EPSCs, suggesting that D-serine reduced EPSCs by inhibiting HA-NMDARs. Systemic D-cycloserine also selectively reduced intake of quinine-adulterated alcohol, and D-cycloserine inhibited NAcore HA-NMDARs in vitro. Our results indicate that HA-NMDAR modulators can reduce aversion-resistant alcohol drinking, and support testing of D-serine and D-cycloserine as immediately accessible, FDA-approved drugs to treat AUDs. PMID:25801502

  4. Involvement of serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development of Entamoeba invadens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makioka, Asao; Kumagai, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Seiki; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2009-10-01

    Although the functions of cysteine proteases involved in the pathogenicity and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica have been demonstrated, little is known about the functions of serine proteases. We examined the involvement of serine proteases in amoebic excystation and metacystic development using inhibitors specific for serine proteases. Entamoeba invadens IP-1 strain was used as the model of excystation and metacystic development of E. histolytica. Four serine protease inhibitors, phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 4-(2-aminoethyl) bezensulfonylfluoride hydrochloride, 3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin, and N-tosyl-phe-chloromethylketone, decreased the number of metacystic amoebae in a dose-dependent manner, without showing cytotoxicity to cysts. PMSF inhibited not only the increase but also the development of metacystic amoebae as determined by the change of nucleus number from four- to one-nucleate amoebae. The protease activity in cyst lysates was also inhibited by PMSF and the band of protease on gelatin sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was weaker than controls when treated with PMSF. Three serine protease families, S28 (three types), S9 (two), and S26 (one) were retrieved from the database of E. invadens. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that amebic enzymes from the serine protease families formed different clades from those from other organisms. The expression levels of these serine proteases in cysts 5 h after the induction of excystation as assessed by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were higher than those observed prior to induction assayed by real-time RT-PCR; the increase in one type of S9 (named S9-3) expression was the highest. The expression of S9 enzymes also increased from cysts to trophozoites higher than the other family serine proteases. Thus, the results show that Entamoeba uses their serine proteases in the excystation and metacystic development, which leads to successful infection.

  5. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  6. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  7. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  8. In situ activity-based protein profiling of serine hydrolases in E. coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Shamshurin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorophosphonate based alkyne activity probe was used for the selective labeling of active serine hydrolases in intact Escherichia coli cells. A biotin-azide tag was subsequently attached to the alkyne functionality of the probe with copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC reaction. Comparison of proteins from in-cell and lysate labeled preparations suggested qualitatively similar patterns of reactivity in both preparations. Approximately 68%, 30 of the total 44 serine hydrolases detectable in E. coli were labeled with the probe indicating significant coverage with a single probe. The methods described here offer a useful tool for profiling and monitoring serine hydrolase activity in situ.

  9. Improved electrodes and gas impurity investigations on alkaline electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reissner, R.; Schiller, G.; Knoeri, T.;

    Alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogenproduction is a well-established techniquebut some technological issues regarding thecoupling of alkaline water electrolysis andRenewable Energy Sources (RES) remain tobe improved....

  10. Exploring a new serine protease from Cucumis sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafeesa, Zohara; Shivalingu, B R; Vivek, H K; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2015-03-01

    Coagulation is an important physiological process in hemostasis which is activated by sequential action of proteases. This study aims to understand the involvement of aqueous fruit extract of Cucumis sativus L. (AqFEC) European burp less variety in blood coagulation cascade. AqFEC hydrolyzed casein in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of protease activity was further confirmed by casein zymography which revealed the possible presence of two high molecular weight protease(s). The proteolytic activity was inhibited only by phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride suggesting the presence of serine protease(s). In a dose-dependent manner, AqFEC also hydrolysed Aα and Bβ subunits of fibrinogen, whereas it failed to degrade the γ subunit of fibrinogen even at a concentration as high as 100 μg and incubation time up to 4 h. AqFEC reduced the clotting time of citrated plasma by 87.65%. The protease and fibrinogenolytic activity of AqFEC suggests its possible role in stopping the bleeding and ensuing wound healing process.

  11. Regulation of Adrenal Aldosterone Production by Serine Protease Prostasin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiro Ko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A serine protease prostasin has been demonstrated to have a pivotal role in the activation of the epithelial sodium channel. Systemic administration of adenovirus carrying human prostasin gene in rats resulted in an increase in plasma prostasin and aldosterone levels. However, the mechanism by which the elevation of prostasin levels in the systemic circulation stimulated the plasma aldosterone levels remains unknown. Therefore, we examined if prostasin increases the aldosterone synthesis in a human adrenocortical cell line (H295R cells. Luciferase assay using CYP11B2 promoter revealed that prostasin significantly increased the transcriptional activity of CYP11B2. Prostasin significantly increased both CYP11B2 mRNA expression and aldosterone production in a dose-dependent manner. Surprisingly, treatment with camostat mesilate, a potent prostasin inhibitor, had no effect on the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin and also a protease-dead mutant of prostasin significantly stimulated the aldosterone production. A T-type/L-type calcium channel blocker and a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor significantly reduced the aldosterone synthesis by prostasin. Our findings suggest a stimulatory effect of prostasin on the aldosterone synthesis by adrenal gland through the nonproteolytic action and indicate a new role of prostasin in the systemic circulation.

  12. D-Serine in Neuropsychiatric Disorders: New Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Durrant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available D-Serine (DSR is an endogenous amino acid involved in glia-synapse interactions that has unique neurotransmitter characteristics. DSR acts as obligatory coagonist at the glycine site associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors (NMDAR and has a cardinal modulatory role in major NMDAR-dependent processes including NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission, neurotoxicity, synaptic plasticity, and cell migration. Since either over- or underfunction of NMDARs may be involved in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders; the pharmacological manipulation of DSR signaling represents a major drug development target. A first generation of proof-of-concept animal and clinical studies suggest beneficial DSR effects in treatment-refractory schizophrenia, movement, depression, and anxiety disorders and for the improvement of cognitive performance. A related developing pharmacological strategy is the indirect modification of DSR synaptic levels by use of compounds that alter the function of main enzymes responsible for DSR production and degradation. Accumulating data indicate that, during the next decade, we will witness important advances in the understanding of DSR role that will further contribute to elucidating the causes of neuropsychiatric disorders and will be instrumental in the development of innovative treatments.

  13. Homologous inhibitors from potato tubers of serine endopeptidases and metallocarboxypeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, C M; Venkatakrishnan, R; Ryan, C A

    1976-06-01

    A potent polypeptide inhibitor of chymotrypsin has been purified from Russett Burbank potatoes. The inhibitor has no effect on bovine carboxypeptidases A or B but exhibits homology with a carboxypeptidase inhibitor that is also present in potato tubers. The chymotrypsin inhibitor has a molecular weight of approximately 5400 as estimated by gel filtration, amino acid analysis, and titration with chymotrypsin. The polypeptide chain consists of 49 amino acid residues, of which six are half-cystine, forming three disulfide bonds. Its size is similar to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor, which contains 39 amino acid residues and also has three disulfide bridges. In immunological double diffusion assays, the chymotrypsin inhibitor and the carboxypeptidase inhibitor do not crossreact; however, automatic Edman degradation of reduced and alkylated derivatives of the chymotrypsin inhibitor, yielding a partial sequence of 18 amino acid residues at the NH2-terminus, reveals a similarity in sequence to that of the carboxypeptidase inhibitor. Thus, inhibitors directed toward two distinct classes of proteases, the serine endopeptidases and the metallocarboxypeptidases, appear to have evolved from a common ancestor.

  14. The role of extracellular proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the central nervous system 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Konopka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular matrix (ECM of the central nervous system has a specific structure and protein composition that are different from those in other organs. Today we know that the ECM not only provides physical scaffolding for the neurons and glia, but also actively modifies their functions. Over the last two decades, a growing body of research evidence has been collected, suggesting an important role of ECM proteolysis in synaptic plasticity of the brain. So far the majority of data concern two large families of proteases: the serine proteases and the matrix metalloproteinases. The members of these families are localized at the synapses, and are secreted into the extracellular space in an activity-dependent manner. The proteases remodel the local environment as well as influencing synapse structure and function. The structural modifications induced by proteases include shape and size changes, as well as synapse elimination, and synaptogenesis. The functional changes include modifications of receptor function in the postsynaptic part of the synapse, as well as the potentiation or depression of neurotransmitter secretion by the presynaptic site. The present review summarizes the current view on the role of extracellular proteolysis in the physiological synaptic plasticity underlying the phenomena of learning and memory, as well as in the pathological plasticity occurring during epileptogenesis or development of drug addiction. 

  15. Human pancreatic cancer tumors are nutrient poor and tumor cells actively scavenge extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphorst, Jurre J; Nofal, Michel; Commisso, Cosimo; Hackett, Sean R; Lu, Wenyun; Grabocka, Elda; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Miller, George; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Thompson, Craig B; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2015-02-01

    Glucose and amino acids are key nutrients supporting cell growth. Amino acids are imported as monomers, but an alternative route induced by oncogenic KRAS involves uptake of extracellular proteins via macropinocytosis and subsequent lysosomal degradation of these proteins as a source of amino acids. In this study, we examined the metabolism of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a poorly vascularized lethal KRAS-driven malignancy. Metabolomic comparisons of human PDAC and benign adjacent tissue revealed that tumor tissue was low in glucose, upper glycolytic intermediates, creatine phosphate, and the amino acids glutamine and serine, two major metabolic substrates. Surprisingly, PDAC accumulated essential amino acids. Such accumulation could arise from extracellular proteins being degraded through macropinocytosis in quantities necessary to meet glutamine requirements, which in turn produces excess of most other amino acids. Consistent with this hypothesis, active macropinocytosis is observed in primary human PDAC specimens. Moreover, in the presence of physiologic albumin, we found that cultured murine PDAC cells grow indefinitely in media lacking single essential amino acids and replicate once in the absence of free amino acids. Growth under these conditions was characterized by simultaneous glutamine depletion and essential amino acid accumulation. Overall, our findings argue that the scavenging of extracellular proteins is an important mode of nutrient uptake in PDAC.

  16. [Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase in normal and pathological pregnancy (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, K H; Zaki, I; Sobolewski, K

    1981-01-01

    The activities of leucocyte alkaline phosphatase were determined in 511 patients with normal and pathological pregnancy. Mean values were compared and the enzyme followed up, and the conclusion was drawn that leucocyte alkaline phosphatase was no safe indicator of foetal condition. No direct relationship were found to exist between leucocyte alkaline phosphatase, total oestrogens, HSAP, HLAP, HPL, and oxytocinase.

  17. Serine-threonine protein kinase activation may be an effective target for reducing neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The signaling mechanisms underlying ischemia-induced nerve cell apoptosis are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of apoptosis-related signal transduction pathways following ischemic spinal cord injury, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathways. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury by inserting a catheter balloon in the left subclavian artery for 25 minutes. Rat models exhibited notable hindlimb dysfunction. Apoptotic cells were abundant in the anterior horn and central canal of the spinal cord. The number of apoptotic neurons was highest 48 hours post injury. The expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt and phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK increased immediately after reperfusion, peaked at 4 hours (p-Akt or 2 hours (p-ERK, decreased at 12 hours, and then increased at 24 hours. Phosphorylated JNK expression reduced after reperfusion, increased at 12 hours to near normal levels, and then showed a downward trend at 24 hours. Pearson linear correlation analysis also demonstrated that the number of apoptotic cells negatively correlated with p-Akt expression. These findings suggest that activation of Akt may be a key contributing factor in the delay of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord ischemia, particularly at the stage of reperfusion, and thus may be a target for neuronal protection and reduction of neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord injury.

  18. Improvement in regional CBF by L-serine contributes to its neuroprotective effect in rats after focal cerebral ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao-Jie Ren

    Full Text Available To investigate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of L-serine, permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery while monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF. Rats were divided into control and L-serine-treated groups after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The neurological deficit score and brain infarct volume were assessed. Nissl staining was used to quantify the cortical injury. L-serine and D-serine levels in the ischemic cortex were analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography. We found that L-serine treatment: 1 reduced the neurological deficit score, infarct volume and cortical neuron loss in a dose-dependent manner; 2 improved CBF in the cortex, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of apamin plus charybdotoxin while the alleviation of both neurological deficit score and infarct volume was blocked; and 3 increased the amount of L-serine and D-serine in the cortex, and inhibition of the conversion of L-serine into D-serine by aminooxyacetic acid did not affect the reduction of neurological deficit score and infarct volume by L-serine. In conclusion, improvement in regional CBF by L-serine may contribute to its neuroprotective effect on the ischemic brain, potentially through vasodilation which is mediated by the small- and intermediate-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ channels on the cerebral blood vessel endothelium.

  19. Effects of Chronic D-Serine Elevation on Animal Models of Depression and Anxiety-Related Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David-Marian Otte

    Full Text Available NMDA receptors are activated after binding of the agonist glutamate to the NR2 subunit along with a co-agonist, either L-glycine or D-serine, to the NR1 subunit. There is substantial evidence to suggest that D-serine is the most relevant co-agonist in forebrain regions and that alterations in D-serine levels contribute to psychiatric disorders. D-serine is produced through isomerization of L-serine by serine racemase (Srr, either in neurons or in astrocytes. It is released by astrocytes by an activity-dependent mechanism involving secretory vesicles. In the present study we generated transgenic mice (SrrTg expressing serine racemase under a human GFAP promoter. These mice were biochemically and behaviorally analyzed using paradigms of anxiety, depression and cognition. Furthermore, we investigated the behavioral effects of long-term administration of D-serine added to the drinking water. Elevated brain D-serine levels in SrrTg mice resulted in specific behavioral phenotypes in the forced swim, novelty suppression of feeding and olfactory bulbectomy paradigms that are indicative of a reduced proneness towards depression-related behavior. Chronic dietary D-serine supplement mimics the depression-related behavioral phenotype observed in SrrTg mice. Our results suggest that D-serine supplementation may improve mood disorders.

  20. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  1. Chasing One-Carbon Units to Understand the Role of Serine in Epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Seth J; Metallo, Christian M

    2016-01-21

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Maddocks et al. (2016) use stable isotope tracing, mass spectrometry, and nutrient modulation in cancer cells to highlight the role of serine in supporting methylation through maintenance of nucleotide levels.

  2. Optical properties of D-serine doped TGS crystals for pyroelectric sensors*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurlyak V.Yu.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Refractive and birefringence indices in the range of transparency of 300 to 700 nm for triglycine sulphate crystals doped with D-serine molecules have been measured in the temperature range of 290 K to 340 K. The obtained optical properties are discussed together with characteristic electrical features of these materials used as pyroelectric sensors for measurement of temperature. The experimental results obtained in this study will be necessary as the reference data for comparison with the calculated refractive indices of TGS + D-serine on the basis of density functional theory. Determination of the proper position of D-serine, will reveal the features of TGS + D-serine crystal structure necessary to achieve stable unipolarity.

  3. Ixodes scapularis tick serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin gene family; annotation and transcriptional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalaire Katelyn C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteinase inhibitors (Serpins are a large superfamily of structurally related, but functionally diverse proteins that control essential proteolytic pathways in most branches of life. Given their importance in the biology of many organisms, the concept that ticks might utilize serpins to evade host defenses and immunizing against or disrupting their functions as targets for tick control is an appealing option. Results A sequence homology search strategy has allowed us to identify at least 45 tick serpin genes in the Ixodes scapularis genome that are structurally segregated into 32 intronless and 13 intron-containing genes. Nine of the intron-containing serpins occur in a cluster of 11 genes that span 170 kb of DNA sequence. Based on consensus amino acid residues in the reactive center loop (RCL and signal peptide scanning, 93% are putatively inhibitory while 82% are putatively extracellular. Among the 11 different amino acid residues that are predicted at the P1 sites, 16 sequences possess basic amino acid (R/K residues. Temporal and spatial expression analyses revealed that 40 of the 45 serpins are differentially expressed in salivary glands (SG and/or midguts (MG of unfed and partially fed ticks. Ten of the 38 serpin genes were expressed from six to 24 hrs of feeding while six and fives genes each are predominantly or exclusively expressed in either MG and SG respectively. Conclusion Given the diversity among tick species, sizes of tick serpin families are likely to be variable. However this study provides insight on the potential sizes of serpin protein families in ticks. Ticks must overcome inflammation, complement activation and blood coagulation to complete feeding. Since these pathways are regulated by serpins that have basic residues at their P1 sites, we speculate that I. scapularis may utilize some of the serpins reported in this study to manipulate host defense. We have discussed our data in the context of

  4. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  5. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  6. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  7. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2013-11-15

    Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in bioremediation of nuclear and other waste. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. D-Amino-Acid Oxidase Inhibition Increases D-Serine Plasma Levels in Mouse But not in Monkey or Dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Camilo; Alt, Jesse; Ator, Nancy A; Thomas, Ajit G; Wu, Ying; Hin, Niyada; Wozniak, Krystyna; Ferraris, Dana; Rais, Rana; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2016-05-01

    D-serine has been shown to improve positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms when used as add-on therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, D-serine has to be administered at high doses to observe clinical effects. This is thought to be due to D-serine undergoing oxidation by D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO) before it reaches the brain. Consequently, co-administration of D-serine with a DAAO inhibitor could be a way to lower the D-serine dose required to treat schizophrenia. Early studies in rodents to evaluate this hypothesis showed that concomitant administration of structurally distinct DAAO inhibitors with D-serine enhanced plasma and brain D-serine levels in rodents compared with administration of D-serine alone. In the present work we used three potent DAAO inhibitors and confirmed previous results in mice. In a follow-up effort, we evaluated plasma D-serine levels in monkeys after oral administration of D-serine in the presence or absence of these DAAO inhibitors. Even though the compounds reached steady state plasma concentrations exceeding their Ki values by >60-fold, plasma D-serine levels remained the same as those in the absence of DAAO inhibitors. Similar results were obtained with dogs. In summary, in contrast to rodents, DAAO inhibition in monkeys and dogs did not influence the exposure to exogenously administered D-serine. Results could be due to differences in D-serine metabolism and/or clearance mechanisms and suggest that the role of DAAO in the metabolism of D-serine is different across species. These data provide caution regarding the utility of DAAO inhibition for patients with schizophrenia.

  9. Metagenome resource for D-serine utilization in a DsdA-disrupted Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mi Young; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Pil

    2011-04-01

    To find alternative genetic resources for D-serine dehydratase (E.C. 4.3.1.18, dsdA) mediating the deamination of D-serine into pyruvate, metagenomic libraries were screened. The chromosomal dsdA gene of a wild-type Escherichia coli W3110 strain was disrupted by inserting the tetracycline resistance gene (tet), using double-crossover, for use as a screening host. The W3110 dsdA::tet strain was not able to grow in a medium containing D-serine as a sole carbon source, whereas wild-type W3110 and the complement W3110 dsdA::tet strain containing a dsdA-expression plasmid were able to grow. After introducing metagenome libraries into the screening host, a strain containing a 40-kb DNA fragment obtained from the metagenomic souce derived from a compost was selected based on its capability to grow on the agar plate containing D-serine as a sole carbon source. For identification of the genetic resource responsible for the D-serine degrading capability, transposon- micron was randomly inserted into the 40-kb metagenome. Two strains that had lost their D-serine degrading ability were negatively selected, and the two 6-kb contigs responsible for the D-serine degrading capability were sequenced and deposited (GenBank code: HQ829474.1 and HQ829475.1). Therefore, new alternative genetic resources for D-serine dehydratase was found from the metagenomic resource, and the corresponding ORFs are discussed.

  10. Repurposing Suzuki Coupling Reagents as a Directed Fragment Library Targeting Serine Hydrolases and Related Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Serine hydrolases are susceptible to potent reversible inhibition by boronic acids. Large collections of chemically diverse boronic acid fragments are commercially available because of their utility in coupling chemistry. We repurposed the approximately 650 boronic acid reagents in our collection as a directed fragment library targeting serine hydrolases and related enzymes. Highly efficient hits (LE > 0.6) often result. The utility of the approach is illustrated with the results against autotaxin, a phospholipase implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:28564542

  11. Alkaline phosphatase of Physarum polycephalum is insoluble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    The plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum grow as multinucleated cells in the presence of sufficient humidity and nutriment. Under non-illuminating conditions, stresses such as low temperature or high concentrations of salts transform the plasmodia into spherules whereas dehydration induces sclerotization. Some phosphatases including protein phosphatase and acid phosphatase have been purified from the plasmodia, but alkaline phosphatase remains to be elucidated. Phosphatase of the plasmodia, spherules and sclerotia was visualized by electrophoresis gel-staining assay using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate. Insoluble fractions of the sclerotia were abundant in phosphatase activity. The phosphatase which was extracted by nonionic detergent was subjected to column chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. Purified phosphatase showed the highest activity at pH 8.8, indicating that this enzyme belongs to alkaline phosphatase. The apparent molecular mass from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under non-reducing condition was estimated to be 100 kDa whereas that under reducing was 105 kDa. An amount of 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate or 0.5 M NaCl had no effects on the activity although the phosphatase showed heat instability, Mg(2+)-dependency and sensitivity to 2-glycerophosphate or NaF. The extracting conditions and enzymatic properties suggest that this alkaline phosphatase which is in a membrane-bound form plays important roles in phosphate metabolism.

  12. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  13. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase: indispensability and display of distinct localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthanakasem Wichai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, plays a vital role in the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway in malaria parasites. Two genes have been identified in Plasmodium spp. encoding a cytosolic SHMT (cSHMT and putative mitochondria SHMT (mSHMT, but their roles have not been fully investigated. Methods The presence of Plasmodium SHMT isoforms in the intra-erythrocytic stage was assessed based on their gene expression using reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR. Localization studies of Plasmodium SHMT isoforms were performed by transfection of fluorescent-tagged gene constructs into P. falciparum and expressions of fluorescent fusion proteins in parasites were observed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. Genetic targeting through homologous recombination was used to study the essentiality of SHMT in Plasmodium spp. Results Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed the expression of these two genes throughout intra-erythrocytic development. Localization studies using P. falciparum expressing fluorescent-tagged SHMT showed that PfcSHMT-red fluorescent fusion protein (PfcSHMT-DsRed is localized in the cytoplasm, while PfmSHMT-green fluorescent fusion protein (PfmSHMT-GFP co-localized with Mitotracker™-labelled mitochondria as predicted. The essentiality of plasmodial cSHMT was inferred from transfection experiments where recovery of viable knock-out parasites was not achieved, unless complemented with a functional equivalent copy of shmt. Conclusions Distinct compartment localizations of PfSHMT were observed between cytoplasmic and mitochondrial isoforms, and evidence was provided for the indispensable role of plasmodial cSHMT indicating it as a valid target for development of novel anti-malarials.

  14. Optimal conditions for production of extracellular protease from newly isolated Bacillus cereus strain CA15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Uyar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An alkaline protease producer Bacillus sp. strain CA15 was isolated from soil. The microorganism was found to be closely related to Bacillus cereus based on 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. The culture conditions for higher protease production were optimized with respect to carbon and nitrogen sources, metal ions, pH and temperature. Maximum protease production was obtained in the medium supplemented with 1% skim milk, 1% starch and 0.6% MgSO4.7H2O, initial pH 8.0 at 35oC. The best enzyme production was obtained during the stationary phase in which the cell density reached to 1.8x108 cells/mL. The level of protease was found to be low in the presence of inorganic nitrogen sources. The protease production was diminished in the presence of sucrose and lactose. The extreme stability towards Triton X-100, Tween 20 and SDS was observed by Bacillus sp. CA15 alkaline protease. The enzyme activity was inhibited by PMSF suggested that presence of serine residues at the active sites.

  15. A novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iketani, Aya; Nakamura, Mayumi; Suzuki, Yuya; Awai, Koichiro; Shioi, Yuzo

    2013-03-01

    A serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities from basidiocarps of the edible basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes was characterized. The protease was purified to near homogeneity by three steps of chromatography using acetyl-Tyr-Val-Ala-Asp-4-methylcoumaryl-7-amide (Ac-YVAD-MCA) as a substrate. The enzyme was termed FvSerP (F. velutipes serine protease). This enzyme activity was completely inhibited by the caspase-specific inhibitor, Ac-YVAD-CHO, as well as moderately inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Based on the N-terminal sequence, the cDNA of FvSerP was identified. The deduced protease sequence was a peptide composed of 325 amino acids with a molecular mass of 34.5 kDa. The amino acid sequence of FvSerP showed similarity to neither caspases nor to the plant subtilisin-like serine protease with caspase-like activity called saspase. FvSerP shared identity to the functionally unknown genes from class of Agaricomycetes, with similarity to the peptidase S41 domain of a serine protease. It was thus concluded that this enzyme is likely a novel serine protease with caspase- and legumain-like activities belonging to the peptidase S41 family and distributed in the class Agaricomycetes. This enzyme possibly functions in autolysis, a type of programmed cell death that occurs in the later stages of development of basidiocarps with reference to their enzymatic functions.

  16. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli use d-serine deaminase to modulate infection of the murine urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Paula L; Redford, Peter; Batchelet, Stephanie; Moritz, Rebecca L; Pellett, Shahaireen; Haugen, Brian J; Blattner, Frederick R; Welch, Rodney A

    2003-07-01

    Although once thought to be unique to bacteria, d-amino acids are also produced by mammals. For example, d-serine is excreted in human urine at concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 40 micro g ml-1. An epidemiological survey demonstrated that urine isolates of E. coli are more likely to catabolise d-serine via expression of d-serine deaminase, DsdA than enteric disease isolates. The urosepsis strain, CFT073, and an isogenic dsdA mutant have similar growth kinetics in minimal or complex media. However, relative to the wild type, the dsdA mutant has a pleiomorphic cell shape and a prolonged, 4-6 h lag phase when grown in human urine. This suggests that d-serine catabolism provides a growth advantage in the urinary tract. Unexpectedly, in a direct competition model of urinary tract infection, the dsdA mutant was recovered 300-times more frequently than the wild type in the bladders of mice 48 h after infection. A new model of E. coli uropathogenesis is proposed where growth and gene expression are modulated in response to environmental d-serine levels. In support of this, the CFT073 dsdA mutant is hyperflagellated and more motile than the wild type indicating that intracellular levels of d-serine may directly or indirectly influence the expression of regulons associated with E. coli uropathogenesis.

  17. Contribution of the D-Serine-dependent pathway to the cellular mechanisms underlying cognitive aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Rouaud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available An association between age-related memory impairments and changes in functional plasticity in the aging brain has been under intense study within the last decade. In this article, we show that an impaired activation of the strychnine-insensitive glycine site of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptors (NMDA-R by its agonist D-serine contributes to deficits of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats. Supplementation with exogenous D-serine prevents the age-related deficits of isolated NMDA-R-dependent synaptic potentials as well as those of theta-burst-induced long-term potentiation and synaptic depotentiation. Endogenous levels of D-serine are reduced in the hippocampus with aging, that correlates with a weaker expression of serine racemase synthesizing the amino acid. On the contrary, the affinity of D-serine binding to NMDA-R is not affected by aging. These results point to a critical role for the D-serine-dependent pathway in the functional alterations of the brain underlying memory impairment and provide key information in the search for new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of memory deficits in the elderly.

  18. Serine, but Not Glycine, Supports One-Carbon Metabolism and Proliferation of Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan F. Labuschagne

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has shown that some cancer cells are highly dependent on serine/glycine uptake for proliferation. Although serine and glycine can be interconverted and either might be used for nucleotide synthesis and one-carbon metabolism, we show that exogenous glycine cannot replace serine to support cancer cell proliferation. Cancer cells selectively consumed exogenous serine, which was converted to intracellular glycine and one-carbon units for building nucleotides. Restriction of exogenous glycine or depletion of the glycine cleavage system did not impede proliferation. In the absence of serine, uptake of exogenous glycine was unable to support nucleotide synthesis. Indeed, higher concentrations of glycine inhibited proliferation. Under these conditions, glycine was converted to serine, a reaction that would deplete the one-carbon pool. Providing one-carbon units by adding formate rescued nucleotide synthesis and growth of glycine-fed cells. We conclude that nucleotide synthesis and cancer cell proliferation are supported by serine—rather than glycine—consumption.

  19. Haemodynamic and extracellular matrix cues regulate the mechanical phenotype and stiffness of aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Osborne, Lukas D; Guilluy, Christophe; Chen, Zhongming; O'Brien, E Tim; Reader, John S; Burridge, Keith; Superfine, Richard; Tzima, Ellie

    2014-06-11

    Endothelial cells (ECs) lining blood vessels express many mechanosensors, including platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), that convert mechanical force into biochemical signals. While it is accepted that mechanical stresses and the mechanical properties of ECs regulate vessel health, the relationship between force and biological response remains elusive. Here we show that ECs integrate mechanical forces and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues to modulate their own mechanical properties. We demonstrate that the ECM influences EC response to tension on PECAM-1. ECs adherent on collagen display divergent stiffening and focal adhesion growth compared with ECs on fibronectin. This is because of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent serine phosphorylation and inactivation of RhoA. PKA signalling regulates focal adhesion dynamics and EC compliance in response to shear stress in vitro and in vivo. Our study identifies an ECM-specific, mechanosensitive signalling pathway that regulates EC compliance and may serve as an atheroprotective mechanism that maintains blood vessel integrity in vivo.

  20. Alkaline and ultrasound assisted alkaline pretreatment for intensification of delignification process from sustainable raw-material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasound-assisted alkaline pretreatment under mild operating conditions have been investigated for intensification of delignification. The effect of NaOH concentration, biomass loading, temperature, ultrasonic power and duty cycle on the delignification has been studied. Most favorable conditions for only alkaline pretreatment were alkali concentration of 1.75 N, solid loading of 0.8% (w/v), temperature of 353 K and pretreatment time of 6 h and under these conditions, 40.2% delignification was obtained. In case of ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach, most favorable conditions obtained were alkali concentration of 1N, paper loading of 0.5% (w/v), sonication power of 100 W, duty cycle of 80% and pretreatment time of 70 min and the delignification obtained in ultrasound-assisted alkaline approach under these conditions was 80%. The material samples were characterized by FTIR, SEM, XRD and TGA technique. The lignin was recovered from solution by precipitation method and was characterized by FTIR, GPC and TGA technique.

  1. Processing Methods of Alkaline Hydrolysate from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga D. Arefieva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper devoted to finding processing methods of alkaline hydrolysate produced from rice husk pre-extraction, and discusses alkaline hydrolysate processing schemed and disengagement of some products: amorphous silica of various quality, alkaline lignin, and water and alkaline extraction polysaccharides. Silica samples were characterized: crude (air-dried, burnt (no preliminary water treatment, washed in distilled water, and washed in distilled water and burnt. Waste water parameters upon the extraction of solids from alkaline hydrolysate dropped a few dozens or thousand times depending on the applied processing method. Color decreased a few thousand times, turbidity was virtually eliminated, chemical oxygen demanded about 20–136 times; polyphenols content might decrease 50% or be virtually eliminated. The most prospective scheme obtained the two following solid products from rice husk alkaline hydrolysate: amorphous silica and alkaline extraction polysaccharide. Chemical oxygen demand of the remaining waste water decreased about 140 times compared to the silica-free solution.

  2. Imaging of alkaline phosphatase activity in bone tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence P Gade

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a paradigm for quantitative molecular imaging of bone cell activity. We hypothesized the feasibility of non-invasive imaging of the osteoblast enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP using a small imaging molecule in combination with (19Flourine magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((19FMRSI. 6, 8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (DiFMUP, a fluorinated ALP substrate that is activatable to a fluorescent hydrolysis product was utilized as a prototype small imaging molecule. The molecular structure of DiFMUP includes two Fluorine atoms adjacent to a phosphate group allowing it and its hydrolysis product to be distinguished using (19Fluorine magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((19FMRS and (19FMRSI. ALP-mediated hydrolysis of DiFMUP was tested on osteoblastic cells and bone tissue, using serial measurements of fluorescence activity. Extracellular activation of DiFMUP on ALP-positive mouse bone precursor cells was observed. Concurringly, DiFMUP was also activated on bone derived from rat tibia. Marked inhibition of the cell and tissue activation of DiFMUP was detected after the addition of the ALP inhibitor levamisole. (19FMRS and (19FMRSI were applied for the non-invasive measurement of DiFMUP hydrolysis. (19FMRS revealed a two-peak spectrum representing DiFMUP with an associated chemical shift for the hydrolysis product. Activation of DiFMUP by ALP yielded a characteristic pharmacokinetic profile, which was quantifiable using non-localized (19FMRS and enabled the development of a pharmacokinetic model of ALP activity. Application of (19FMRSI facilitated anatomically accurate, non-invasive imaging of ALP concentration and activity in rat bone. Thus, (19FMRSI represents a promising approach for the quantitative imaging of bone cell activity during bone formation with potential for both preclinical and clinical applications.

  3. Implantation serine proteinase 2 is a monomeric enzyme with mixed serine proteolytic activity and can silence signalling via proteinase activated receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Navneet; Fahr, Jochen; Renaux, Bernard; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Kumar, Rajeev; Nishikawa, Sandra; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Hollenberg, Morley D; Rancourt, Derrick E

    2013-12-01

    Implantation serine proteinase 2 (ISP2), a S1 family serine proteinase, is known for its role in the critical processes of embryo hatching and implantation in the mouse uterus. Native implantation serine proteinases (ISPs) are co-expressed and co-exist as heterodimers in uterine and blastocyst tissues. The ISP1-ISP2 enzyme complex shows trypsin-like substrate specificity. In contrast, we found that ISP2, isolated as a 34 kDa monomer from a Pichia pastoris expression system, exhibited a mixed serine proteolytic substrate specificity, as determined by a phage display peptide cleavage approach and verified by the in vitro cleavage of synthetic peptides. Based upon the peptide sequence substrate selectivity, a database search identified many potential ISP2 targets of physiological relevance, including the proteinase activated receptor 2 (PAR2). The in vitro cleavage studies with PAR2-derived peptides confirmed the mixed substrate specificity of ISP2. Treatment of cell lines expressing proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1, 2, and 4 with ISP2 prevented receptor activation by either thrombin (PARs 1 and 4) or trypsin (PAR2). The disarming and silencing of PARs by ISP2 may play a role in successful embryo implantation.

  4. Insights into the serine protease mechanism based on structural observations of the conversion of a peptidyl serine protease inhibitor to a substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Andersen, Lisbeth Moreau; Andreasen, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serine proteases are one of the most studied group of enzymes. Despite the extensive mechanistic studies, some crucial details remain controversial, for example, how the cleaved product is released in the catalysis reaction. A cyclic peptidyl inhibitor (CSWRGLENHRMC, upain-1) of a ser...

  5. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated serine protease-1 (MASP-1), a serine protease associated with humoral pattern-recognition molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Steffen; Degn, Søren Egedal; Nielsen, H J;

    2012-01-01

    The pattern-recognition molecules mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the three ficolins circulate in blood in complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs). When MBL or ficolin recognizes a microorganism, activation of the MASPs occurs leading to activation of the complement system, an impo...

  6. Extracellular DNA metabolism in Haloferax volcanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eChimileski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular DNA is found in all environments and is a dynamic component of the micro-bial ecosystem. Microbial cells produce and interact with extracellular DNA through many endogenous mechanisms. Extracellular DNA is processed and internalized for use as genetic information and as a major source of macronutrients, and plays several key roles within prokaryotic biofilms. Hypersaline sites contain some of the highest extracellular DNA con-centrations measured in nature–a potential rich source of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus for halophilic microorganisms. We conducted DNA growth studies for the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii DS2 and show that this model Halobacteriales strain is capable of using exogenous double-stranded DNA as a nutrient. Further experiments with varying medium composition, DNA concentration and DNA types revealed that DNA is utilized primarily as a phosphorus source, that growth on DNA is concentration-dependent and that DNA isolated from different sources is metabolized selectively, with a bias against highly divergent methylated DNA sources. Additionally, fluorescence microscopy experiments showed that labeled DNA colocalized with Haloferax volcanii cells. The gene Hvo_1477 was also identified using a comparative genomic approach as a factor likely to be involved in extracellular DNA processing at the cell surface, and deletion of Hvo_1477 created an H. volcanii strain deficient in its ability to grow on extracellular DNA. Widespread distribution of Hvo_1477 homologs in archaea suggests metabolism of extracellular DNA may be of broad ecological and physiological relevance in this domain of life.

  7. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of its Binding Model towards its Applications as Detergent Additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehak Baweja

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10˚C -70˚C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50 ºC and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and ̴ 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50ºC and 4ºC with low supplementation (109 U/ml. Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash.

  8. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10-70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash.

  9. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding: Buffering at intermediate alkaline pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, J.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1993-11-01

    The alkaline flooding process involves injecting alkaline agents into the reservoir to produce more oil than is produced through conventional waterflooding. The interaction of the alkali in the flood water with the naturally occurring acids in the reservoir oil results in in-situ formation of soaps, which are partially responsible for lowering IFT and improving oil recovery. The extent to which IFT is lowered depends on the specific oil and injection water properties. Numerous investigators have attempted to clarify the relationship between system chemical composition and IFT. An experimental investigation of buffered alkaline flooding system chemistry was undertaken to determine the influence of various species present on interfacial tension (IFT) as a function of pH and ionic strength. IFT was found to go through an ultralow minimum in certain pH ranges. This synergism results from simultaneous adsorption of un-ionized and ionized acid species on the interface.

  10. Expression of intra- and extracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Hanna K; Garcia-Laorden, Maria Isabel; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Parry, Christopher M; Maude, Rapeephan R; Dondorp, Arjen M; Faiz, Mohammed Abul; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, Willem Joost

    2017-07-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhi, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes are serine proteases promoting cytotoxic lymphocytes mediated eradication of intracellular pathogens via the induction of cell death and which can also play a role in inflammation. We aimed to characterize the expression of extracellular and intracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever and whether the extracellular levels of granzyme correlated with IFN-γ release. We analyzed soluble protein levels of extracellular granzyme A and B in healthy volunteers and patients with confirmed S. Typhi infection on admission and day of discharge, and investigated whether this correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ release, a cytokine significantly expressed in typhoid fever. The intracellular expression of granzyme A, B and K in subsets of lymphocytic cells was determined using flow cytometry. Patients demonstrated a marked increase of extracellular granzyme A and B in acute phase plasma and a correlation of both granzymes with IFN-γ release. In patients, lower plasma levels of granzyme B, but not granzyme A, were found at day of discharge compared to admission, indicating an association of granzyme B with stage of disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of typhoid fever patients had a higher percentage of lymphocytic cells expressing intracellular granzyme A and granzyme B, but not granzyme K, compared to controls. The marked increase observed in extra- and intracellular levels of granzyme expression in patients with typhoid fever, and the correlation with stage of disease, suggests a role for granzymes in the host response to this disease.

  11. Expression of intra- and extracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Laorden, Maria Isabel; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Maude, Rapeephan R.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Faiz, Mohammed Abul; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, Willem Joost

    2017-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever, caused by the intracellular pathogen Salmonella (S.) enterica serovar Typhi, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Granzymes are serine proteases promoting cytotoxic lymphocytes mediated eradication of intracellular pathogens via the induction of cell death and which can also play a role in inflammation. We aimed to characterize the expression of extracellular and intracellular granzymes in patients with typhoid fever and whether the extracellular levels of granzyme correlated with IFN-γ release. Methods and principal findings We analyzed soluble protein levels of extracellular granzyme A and B in healthy volunteers and patients with confirmed S. Typhi infection on admission and day of discharge, and investigated whether this correlated with interferon (IFN)-γ release, a cytokine significantly expressed in typhoid fever. The intracellular expression of granzyme A, B and K in subsets of lymphocytic cells was determined using flow cytometry. Patients demonstrated a marked increase of extracellular granzyme A and B in acute phase plasma and a correlation of both granzymes with IFN-γ release. In patients, lower plasma levels of granzyme B, but not granzyme A, were found at day of discharge compared to admission, indicating an association of granzyme B with stage of disease. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of typhoid fever patients had a higher percentage of lymphocytic cells expressing intracellular granzyme A and granzyme B, but not granzyme K, compared to controls. Conclusion The marked increase observed in extra- and intracellular levels of granzyme expression in patients with typhoid fever, and the correlation with stage of disease, suggests a role for granzymes in the host response to this disease. PMID:28749963

  12. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor coagonist d-serine suppresses intake of high-preference food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Kinoshita, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Sho; Kakuta, Shigeru; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kinoshita, Kuni; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kinoshita, Toshio; Yada, Toshihiko; Amano, Naoji; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2015-09-01

    d-Serine is abundant in the forebrain and physiologically important for modulating excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission as a coagonist of synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. NMDA signaling has been implicated in the control of food intake. However, the role of d-serine on appetite regulation is unknown. To clarify the effects of d-serine on appetite, we investigated the effect of oral d-serine ingestion on food intake in three different feeding paradigms (one-food access, two-food choice, and refeeding after 24-h fasting) using three different strains of male mice (C57Bl/6J, BKS, and ICR). The effect of d-serine was also tested in leptin signaling-deficient db/db mice and sensory-deafferented (capsaicin-treated) mice. The expression of orexigenic neuropeptides [neuropeptide Y (Npy) and agouti-related protein (Agrp)] in the hypothalamus was compared in fast/refed experiments. Conditioned taste aversion for high-fat diet (HFD) was tested in the d-serine-treated mice. Under the one-food-access paradigm, some of the d-serine-treated mice showed starvation, but not when fed normal chow. HFD feeding with d-serine ingestion did not cause aversion. Under the two-food-choice paradigm, d-serine suppressed the intake of high-preference food but not normal chow. d-Serine also effectively suppressed HFD intake but not normal chow in db/db mice and sensory-deafferented mice. In addition, d-serine suppressed normal chow intake after 24-h fasting despite higher orexigenic gene expression in the hypothalamus. d-Serine failed to suppress HFD intake in the presence of L-701,324, the selective and full antagonist at the glycine-binding site of the NMDA receptor. Therefore, d-serine suppresses the intake of high-preference food through coagonism toward NMDA receptors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Cloning of Mouse Enamel Matrix Serine Proteinase Encoding Mature Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Ya-bing; SUN Hong-chen; ZHANG Ze-bing; OUYANG Jie

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To clone cDNA of enamel matrix serine proteinase (EMSP1) encoding mature protein from mouse dental germs. Methods: Total RNA was isolated from developing incisors and molars of 7 days mouse pups and reverse-transcribed into cDNA. Two pairs of specific primers was designed to obtain the desired gene by Touchdown PCR and Nested PCR. The segment was inserted into Vector pMD-18T, and recombined vectors was transformed into E.coli JM109.The positive clone was chose and analysed by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. Results:700 bp of cDNA of mouse EMSP1 was sueccessfully cloned from mouse tooth germs tissue. The sequence was consistent with that displayed in PubMed. Conclusion:The mouse EMSP1 cDNA encoding mature protein is obtained for further study.%目的:克隆小鼠牙胚组织中釉基质丝氨酸蛋白酶(EMSP1)成熟肽编码区基因.方法:提取出生后7 d昆明种小白鼠切牙、磨牙牙胚总RNA,逆转录为cDNA,设计两对特异性引物,采用Touchdown PCR 和嵌套PCR方法,扩增出小鼠EMSP1起始密码子至终止密码子基因片段.将目的基因连入载体pMD-18T,转化入大肠杆菌JM109,通过蓝白筛选,挑选阳性克隆培养扩增,纯化重组质粒进行限制性酶切和核苷酸序列分析鉴定.结果:限制性酶切图谱和核苷酸序列分析均表明所克隆cDNA为小鼠700 bp的EMSP1成熟肽基因编码.结论:成功地克隆了小鼠编码EMSP1成熟肽基因片段.

  14. Synthetic osteogenic extracellular matrix formed by coated silicon dioxide nanosprings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hass Jamie L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The design of biomimetic materials that parallel the morphology and biology of extracellular matrixes is key to the ability to grow functional tissues in vitro and to enhance the integration of biomaterial implants into existing tissues in vivo. Special attention has been put into mimicking the nanostructures of the extracellular matrix of bone, as there is a need to find biomaterials that can enhance the bonding between orthopedic devices and this tissue. Methods We have tested the ability of normal human osteoblasts to propagate and differentiate on silicon dioxide nanosprings, which can be easily grown on practically any surface. In addition, we tested different metals and metal alloys as coats for the nanosprings in tissue culture experiments with bone cells. Results Normal human osteoblasts grown on coated nanosprings exhibited an enhanced rate of propagation, differentiation into bone forming cells and mineralization. While osteoblasts did not attach effectively to bare nanowires grown on glass, these cells propagated successfully on nanosprings coated with titanium oxide and gold. We observed a 270 fold increase in the division rate of osteoblasts when grow on titanium/gold coated nanosprings. This effect was shown to be dependent on the nanosprings, as the coating by themselves did not alter the growth rate of osteoblast. We also observed that titanium/zinc/gold coated nanosprings increased the levels of osteoblast production of alkaline phosphatase seven folds. This result indicates that osteoblasts grown on this metal alloy coated nanosprings are differentiating to mature bone making cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that osteoblasts grown on the same metal alloy coated nanosprings have an enhanced ability to deposit calcium salt. Conclusion We have established that metal/metal alloy coated silicon dioxide nanosprings can be used as a biomimetic material paralleling the morphology and biology of

  15. Extracellular pH modulates GABAergic neurotransmission in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z L; Huang, R Q

    2014-06-20

    Changes in extracellular pH have a modulatory effect on GABAA receptor function. It has been reported that pH sensitivity of the GABA receptor is dependent on subunit composition and GABA concentration. Most of previous investigations focused on GABA-evoked currents, which only reflect the postsynaptic receptors. The physiological relevance of pH modulation of GABAergic neurotransmission is not fully elucidated. In the present studies, we examined the influence of extracellular pH on the GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission in rat hypothalamic neurons. The inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), tonic currents, and the GABA-evoked currents were recorded with whole-cell patch techniques on the hypothalamic slices from Sprague-Dawley rats at 15-26 postnatal days. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous GABA IPSCs were significantly increased while the external pH was changed from 7.3 to 8.4. In the acidic pH (6.4), the spontaneous GABA IPSCs were reduced in amplitude and frequency. The pH induced changes in miniature GABA IPSCs (mIPSCs) similar to that in spontaneous IPSCs. The pH effect on the postsynaptic GABA receptors was assessed with exogenously applied varying concentrations of GABA. The tonic currents and the currents evoked by sub-saturating concentration of GABA ([GABA]) (10 μM) were inhibited by acidic pH and potentiated by alkaline pH. In contrast, the currents evoked by saturating [GABA] (1mM) were not affected by pH changes. We also investigated the influence of pH buffers and buffering capacity on pH sensitivity of GABAA receptors on human recombinant α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors stably expressed in HEK 293 cells. The pH influence on GABAA receptors was similar in HEPES- and MES-buffered media, and not dependent on protonated buffers, suggesting that the observed pH effect on GABA response is a specific consequence of changes in extracellular protons. Our data suggest that the hydrogen ions suppress the GABAergic neurotransmission

  16. An essential signal peptide peptidase identified in an RNAi screen of serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine X Moss

    Full Text Available The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1. This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival.

  17. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhen [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, Beijing Advanced Innovation Center of Food Nutrition and Human Health, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yan, Qiaojuan [College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Qingjun [Key Laboratory of Experimental Marine Biology, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China); Jiang, Zhengqiang, E-mail: zhqjiang@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, Beijing Advanced Innovation Center of Food Nutrition and Human Health, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-10-23

    L-serine ammonia-lyase, as a member of the β-family of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes, catalyzes the conversion of L-serine (L-threonine) to pyruvate (α-ketobutyrate) and ammonia. The crystal structure of L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmSDH) was solved at 1.76 Å resolution by X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of RmSDH had the characteristic β-family PLP dependent enzyme fold. It consisted of two distinct domains, both of which show the typical open twisted α/β structure. A PLP cofactor was located in the crevice between the two domains, which was attached to Lys52 by a Schiff-base linkage. Unique residue substitutions (Gly78, Pro79, Ser146, Ser147 and Thr312) were discovered at the catalytic site of RmSDH by comparison of structures of RmSDH and other reported eukaryotic L-serine ammonia-lyases. Optimal pH and temperature of the purified RmSDH were 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively. It was stable in the pH range of 7.0–9.0 and at temperatures below 40 °C. This is the first crystal structure of a fungal L-serine ammonia-lyase. It will be useful to study the catalytic mechanism of β-elimination enzymes and will provide a basis for further enzyme engineering. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of a fungal L-serine ammonia-lyase (RmSDH) was solved. • Five unique residue substitutions are found at the catalytic site of RmSDH. • RmSDH was expressed in Pichia. pastoris and biochemically characterized. • RmSDH has potential application in splitting D/L-serine.

  18. Allosteric activation and contrasting properties of L-serine dehydratase types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shawei; Xu, Xiao Lan; Grant, Gregory A

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial L-serine dehydratases differ from mammalian L- and D-serine dehydratases and bacterial D-serine dehydratases by the presence of an iron-sulfur center rather than a pyridoxyl phosphate prosthetic group. They exist in two forms, types 1 and 2, distinguished by their sequence and oligomeric configuration. Both types contain an ASB domain, and the type 1 enzymes also contain an ACT domain in a tandem arrangement with the ASB domain like that in type 1 D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs). This investigation reveals striking kinetic differences between L-serine dehydratases from Bacillus subtilis (bsLSD, type 1) and Legionella pneumophila (lpLSD, type 2). lpLSD is activated by monovalent cations and inhibited by monovalent anions. bsLSD is strongly activated by cations, particularly potassium, and shows a mixed response to anions. Flouride is a competitive inhibitor for lpLSD but an apparent activator for bsLSD at low concentrations and an inhibitor at high concentrations. The reaction products, pyruvate and ammonia, also act as activators but to different extents for each type. Pyruvate activation is competitive with L-serine, but activation of the enzyme is not compatible with it simply competing for binding at the active site and suggests the presence of a second, allosteric site. Because activation can be eliminated by higher levels of L-serine, it may be that this second site is actually a second serine binding site. This is consistent with type 1 PGDH in which the ASB domain functions as a second site for substrate binding and activation.

  19. Alkaline carbonates in blast furnace process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Besta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of iron in blast furnaces is a complex of physical, chemical and mechanical processes. The input raw materials contain not only metallic components, but also a number of negative elements. The most important negative elements include alkaline carbonates. They can significantly affect the course of the blast furnace process and thus the overall performance of the furnace. As a result of that, it is essential to accurately monitor the alkali content in the blast furnace raw materials. The article analyzes the alkali content in input and output raw materials and their impact on the blast furnace process.

  20. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... for immobilization of aqueous KOH solutions. Electrolysis cells with this electrolyte and metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C at 40 bar. Different electro-catalysts were tested in order to reduce the oxygen and hydrogen overpotentials. Current...

  1. Identification of a nuclear localization motif in the serine/arginine protein kinase PSRPK of physarum polycephalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Shengli

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine/arginine (SR protein-specific kinases (SRPKs are conserved in a wide range of organisms, from humans to yeast. Studies showed that SRPKs can regulate the nuclear import of SR proteins in cytoplasm, and regulate the sub-localization of SR proteins in the nucleus. But no nuclear localization signal (NLS of SRPKs was found. We isolated an SRPK-like protein PSRPK (GenBank accession No. DQ140379 from Physarum polycephalum previously, and identified a NLS of PSRPK in this study. Results We carried out a thorough molecular dissection of the different domains of the PSRPK protein involved in its nuclear localization. By truncation of PSRPK protein, deletion of and single amino acid substitution in a putative NLS and transfection of mammalian cells, we observed the distribution of PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein in mammalian cells using confocal microscopy and found that the protein was mainly accumulated in the nucleus; this indicated that the motif contained a nuclear localization signal (NLS. Further investigation with truncated PSPRK peptides showed that the NLS (318PKKGDKYDKTD328 was localized in the alkaline Ω-loop of a helix-loop-helix motif (HLHM of the C-terminal conserved domain. If the 318PKKGDK322 sequence was deleted from the loop or K320 was mutated to T320, the PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein could not enter and accumulate in the nucleus. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the 318PKKGDKYDKTD328 peptides localized in the C-terminal conserved domain of PSRPK with the Ω-loop structure could play a crucial role in the NLS function of PSRPK.

  2. Identification of a nuclear localization motif in the serine/arginine protein kinase PSRPK of physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shide; Zhou, Zhuolong; Lin, Ziyang; Ouyang, Qiuling; Zhang, Jianhua; Tian, Shengli; Xing, Miao

    2009-08-25

    Serine/arginine (SR) protein-specific kinases (SRPKs) are conserved in a wide range of organisms, from humans to yeast. Studies showed that SRPKs can regulate the nuclear import of SR proteins in cytoplasm, and regulate the sub-localization of SR proteins in the nucleus. But no nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SRPKs was found. We isolated an SRPK-like protein PSRPK (GenBank accession No. DQ140379) from Physarum polycephalum previously, and identified a NLS of PSRPK in this study. We carried out a thorough molecular dissection of the different domains of the PSRPK protein involved in its nuclear localization. By truncation of PSRPK protein, deletion of and single amino acid substitution in a putative NLS and transfection of mammalian cells, we observed the distribution of PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein in mammalian cells using confocal microscopy and found that the protein was mainly accumulated in the nucleus; this indicated that the motif contained a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Further investigation with truncated PSPRK peptides showed that the NLS (318PKKGDKYDKTD328) was localized in the alkaline Omega-loop of a helix-loop-helix motif (HLHM) of the C-terminal conserved domain. If the 318PKKGDK322 sequence was deleted from the loop or K320 was mutated to T320, the PSRPK fluorescent fusion protein could not enter and accumulate in the nucleus. This study demonstrated that the 318PKKGDKYDKTD328 peptides localized in the C-terminal conserved domain of PSRPK with the Omega-loop structure could play a crucial role in the NLS function of PSRPK.

  3. Affinity and Western blotting reveal homologies between ovine intervertebral disc serine proteinase inhibitory proteins and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melrose, J; Shen, B; Ghosh, P

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess any similarities between ovine intervertebral disc (IVD) serine proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIs) and known mammalian IVD SPIs. Ovine IVDs were dissected into the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus and the tissue finely diced then extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The tissue extracts were subjected to caesium chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation to separate the large high buoyant density (rho > 1.5 g/mL) proteoglycans from the SPI proteins of low buoyant density (rho top two ultracentrifuge fractions containing the SPIs of interest were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA) and also examined by Western and Affinity blotting using an antibody to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and biotinylated trypsin respectively for detection and an alkaline phosphatase 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium system for visualisation. The major SPI proteins present in the Western and Affinity blots were 34-36 kDa species, minor 12 and 16, and 85 and 120 kDa species were also present. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for each respective tissue zone of the lumbar and lumbosacral disc specimens examined. Densitometric analysis of the major 34-36 kDa SPI bands visualised on Western and Affinity blots using NIH 1.61.1 image analysis software indicated that lumbar IVD samples contained higher levels of this SPI species than lumbosacral IVD samples. ELISA confirmed that lumbar IVD extracts contained quantitatively higher levels of BPTI equivalents per g of tissue extracted than lumbosacral IVDs. This study therefore has demonstrated that the ovine disc contains a range of SPI species which share some homology with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and in this respect are similar to SPIs previously demonstrated in canine IVDs.

  4. and extracellular laccase isoenzymes from Pleurotus ostreatus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ZMG

    Colonia Vicentina, Delegación Iztapalapa, 09340 México D.F., México. ... In this study, extracellular laccase enzymes produced by Pleurotus ostreatus was identified in .... the intracellular forms), through the modified zymography method of.

  5. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of a novel alkaline protease produced by Penicillium nalgiovense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagianni, M; Sergelidis, D

    2014-04-01

    Penicillium nalgiovense PNA9 produces an extracellular protease during fermentation with characteristics of growth-associated product. Enzyme purification involved ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, and ultrafiltration, resulting in 12.1-fold increase of specific activity (19.5 U/mg). The protein was isolated through a series of BN-PAGE and native PAGE runs. ESI-MS analysis confirmed the molecular mass of 45.2 kDa. N-Terminal sequencing (MGFLKLLKGSLATLAVVNAGKLLTANDGDE) revealed 93 % similarity to a Penicillium chrysogenum protease, identified as major allergen. The protease exhibits simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics and K m (1.152 mg/ml), V max (0.827 mg/ml/min), and k cat (3.2 × 10(2)) (1/s) values against azocasein show that it possesses high substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency. The protease is active within 10-45 °C, pH 4.0-10.0, and 0-3 M NaCl, while maximum activity was observed at 35 °C, pH 8.0, and 0.25 M NaCl. It is active against the muscle proteins actin and myosin and inactive against myoglobin. It is highly stable in the presence of non-ionic surfactants, hydrogen peroxide, BTNB, and EDTA. Activity was inhibited by SDS, Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), and by the serine protease inhibitor PMSF, indicating the serine protease nature of the enzyme. These properties make the novel protease a suitable candidate enzyme in meat ripening and other biotechnological applications.

  7. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  8. The extracellular RNA complement of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Anubrata; Upadhyaya, Bimal Babu; Fritz, Joëlle V; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Desai, Mahesh S; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Huang, David; Baumuratov, Aidos; Wang, Kai; Galas, David; Wilmes, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The secretion of biomolecules into the extracellular milieu is a common and well-conserved phenomenon in biology. In bacteria, secreted biomolecules are not only involved in intra-species communication but they also play roles in inter-kingdom exchanges and pathogenicity. To date, released products, such as small molecules, DNA, peptides, and proteins, have been well studied in bacteria. However, the bacterial extracellular RNA complement has so far not been comprehensively characterized. Here, we have analyzed, using a combination of physical characterization and high-throughput sequencing, the extracellular RNA complement of both outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-associated and OMV-free RNA of the enteric Gram-negative model bacterium Escherichia coli K-12 substrain MG1655 and have compared it to its intracellular RNA complement. Our results demonstrate that a large part of the extracellular RNA complement is in the size range between 15 and 40 nucleotides and is derived from specific intracellular RNAs. Furthermore, RNA is associated with OMVs and the relative abundances of RNA biotypes in the intracellular, OMV and OMV-free fractions are distinct. Apart from rRNA fragments, a significant portion of the extracellular RNA complement is composed of specific cleavage products of functionally important structural noncoding RNAs, including tRNAs, 4.5S RNA, 6S RNA, and tmRNA. In addition, the extracellular RNA pool includes RNA biotypes from cryptic prophages, intergenic, and coding regions, of which some are so far uncharacterised, for example, transcripts mapping to the fimA-fimL and ves-spy intergenic regions. Our study provides the first detailed characterization of the extracellular RNA complement of the enteric model bacterium E. coli. Analogous to findings in eukaryotes, our results suggest the selective export of specific RNA biotypes by E. coli, which in turn indicates a potential role for extracellular bacterial RNAs in intercellular communication. © 2015 The

  9. Enzymatic production of L-serine with a feedback control system for formaldehyde addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, H Y; Wei, T

    1986-10-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) in the form of crude extract from a recombinant strain of Klebsiella aerogenes was used for the production of L-serine from glycine and formaldehyde (HCHO). A stirred tank bio-reactor with a continuous feed of HCHO (37%) was employed. Since the performance of the serine bioreactor was heavily dependent on how HCHO was fed, an automatic feedback control system was developed for HCHO delivery utilizing the phenomenon of formol titration. This control procedure was based on the following circumstance: as a bioconversion proceeded, if the rate of HCHO feed was balanced by the rate of serine synthesis so that HCHO concentration was maintained near zero, then there was no pH change in the bioreactor. Once the rate of HCHO addition exceeded that of serine synthesis, the HCHO concentration built up and the excess HCHO reacted with the amino group of an amino acid (e.g. glycine or serine) to produce a Schiff base and a proton which lowered the pH. A pH controller detected and relayed this pH change to the on-off switch of the HCHO feed pump. Thus, HCHO infusion stopped when the pH was lower than the set point, which was the initial pH of the reaction. With this control system, the maximum concentration of HCHO that was reached in the bioreactor was only 1mM-3.3mM depending on the pH and amino acid composition in the bioreactor. Moreover, a decrease in pH also signaled the use of a slower feed rate at which HCHO was to be, delivered once the pH resumed its initial value after excess HCHO was consumed by the reaction. Employing this control system, we have optimized the performance of the serine bioreactor to give a serine titer of 450 g/L with an 88% molar conversion of glycine at a volumetric serine productivity of 8.9 g/L/h.

  10. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  11. Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

    1995-05-01

    Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

  12. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Yan, Qiaojuan; Ma, Qingjun; Jiang, Zhengqiang

    2015-10-23

    L-serine ammonia-lyase, as a member of the β-family of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes, catalyzes the conversion of L-serine (L-threonine) to pyruvate (α-ketobutyrate) and ammonia. The crystal structure of L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmSDH) was solved at 1.76 Å resolution by X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of RmSDH had the characteristic β-family PLP dependent enzyme fold. It consisted of two distinct domains, both of which show the typical open twisted α/β structure. A PLP cofactor was located in the crevice between the two domains, which was attached to Lys52 by a Schiff-base linkage. Unique residue substitutions (Gly78, Pro79, Ser146, Ser147 and Thr312) were discovered at the catalytic site of RmSDH by comparison of structures of RmSDH and other reported eukaryotic L-serine ammonia-lyases. Optimal pH and temperature of the purified RmSDH were 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively. It was stable in the pH range of 7.0-9.0 and at temperatures below 40 °C. This is the first crystal structure of a fungal L-serine ammonia-lyase. It will be useful to study the catalytic mechanism of β-elimination enzymes and will provide a basis for further enzyme engineering.

  13. D-Serine and Glycine Differentially Control Neurotransmission during Visual Cortex Critical Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire N J Meunier

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs play a central role in synaptic plasticity. Their activation requires the binding of both glutamate and d-serine or glycine as co-agonist. The prevalence of either co-agonist on NMDA-receptor function differs between brain regions and remains undetermined in the visual cortex (VC at the critical period of postnatal development. Here, we therefore investigated the regulatory role that d-serine and/or glycine may exert on NMDARs function and on synaptic plasticity in the rat VC layer 5 pyramidal neurons of young rats. Using selective enzymatic depletion of d-serine or glycine, we demonstrate that d-serine and not glycine is the endogenous co-agonist of synaptic NMDARs required for the induction and expression of Long Term Potentiation (LTP at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Glycine on the other hand is not involved in synaptic efficacy per se but regulates excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission by activating strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors, then producing a shunting inhibition that controls neuronal gain and results in a depression of synaptic inputs at the somatic level after dendritic integration. In conclusion, we describe for the first time that in the VC both D-serine and glycine differentially regulate somatic depolarization through the activation of distinct synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors.

  14. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  15. Paradox of mistranslation of serine for alanine caused by AlaRS recognition dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Chong, Yeeting E; Shapiro, Ryan; Beebe, Kirk; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Schimmel, Paul

    2009-12-10

    Mistranslation arising from confusion of serine for alanine by alanyl-tRNA synthetases (AlaRSs) has profound functional consequences. Throughout evolution, two editing checkpoints prevent disease-causing mistranslation from confusing glycine or serine for alanine at the active site of AlaRS. In both bacteria and mice, Ser poses a bigger challenge than Gly. One checkpoint is the AlaRS editing centre, and the other is from widely distributed AlaXps-free-standing, genome-encoded editing proteins that clear Ser-tRNA(Ala). The paradox of misincorporating both a smaller (glycine) and a larger (serine) amino acid suggests a deep conflict for nature-designed AlaRS. Here we show the chemical basis for this conflict. Nine crystal structures, together with kinetic and mutational analysis, provided snapshots of adenylate formation for each amino acid. An inherent dilemma is posed by constraints of a structural design that pins down the alpha-amino group of the bound amino acid by using an acidic residue. This design, dating back more than 3 billion years, creates a serendipitous interaction with the serine OH that is difficult to avoid. Apparently because no better architecture for the recognition of alanine could be found, the serine misactivation problem was solved through free-standing AlaXps, which appeared contemporaneously with early AlaRSs. The results reveal unconventional problems and solutions arising from the historical design of the protein synthesis machinery.

  16. Cysteine biosynthesis in Lactobacillus casei: identification and characterization of a serine acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogicevic, Biljana; Berthoud, Hélène; Portmann, Reto; Bavan, Tharmatha; Meile, Leo; Irmler, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    In bacteria, cysteine can be synthesized from serine by two steps involving an L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and a cysteine synthase (CysK). While CysK is found in the publicly available annotated genome from Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a gene encoding SAT (cysE) is missing. In this study, we found that various strains of L. casei grew in a chemically defined medium containing sulfide as the sole sulfur source, indicating the presence of a serine O-acetyltransferase. The gene lying upstream of cysK is predicted to encode a homoserine trans-succinylase (metA). To study the function of this gene, it was cloned from L. casei FAM18110. The purified, recombinant protein did not acylate L-homoserine in vitro. Instead, it catalyzed the formation of O-acetyl serine from L-serine and acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, the plasmid expressing the L. casei gene complemented an Escherichia coli cysE mutant strain but not an E. coli metA mutant. This clearly demonstrated that the gene annotated as metA in fact encodes the SAT function and should be annotated as cysE.

  17. The uropathogenic species Staphylococcus saprophyticus tolerates a high concentration of D-serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakinç, Türkân; Michalski, Nadine; Kleine, Britta; Gatermann, Sören G

    2009-10-01

    Human urine contains a relatively high concentration of d-serine, which is toxic to several nonuropathogenic bacteria, but can be utilized or detoxified by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). The sequenced genome of uropathogenic Staphylococcus saprophyticus contains a gene with homology to the d-serine deaminase gene (dsdA) of UPEC. We found the gene in several clinical isolates of S. saprophyticus; however, the gene was absent in Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus cohnii, phylogenetically close relatives of S. saprophyticus, and could also not be detected in isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and 13 other staphylococcal species. In addition, the genomes of other sequenced staphylococci do not harbor homologues of this operon. Interestingly, S. saprophyticus could grow in media supplemented with relatively high concentrations of d-serine, whereas S. aureus, S. epidermidis and other staphylococcal species could not. The association of the dsdA gene with growth in media including d-serine was proved by introducing the gene into S. aureus Newman. Given the fact that UPEC and S. saprophyticus tolerate this compound, d-serine utilization and detoxification may be a general property of uropathogenic bacteria.

  18. Covalent binding of the organophosphorus agent FP-biotin to tyrosine in eight proteins that have no active site serine

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoryan, Hasmik; Li, Bin; Anderson, Erica K.; Xue, Weihua; Nachon, Florian; Lockridge, Oksana; Schopfer, Lawrence M.

    2009-01-01

    Organophosphorus esters (OP) are known to bind covalently to the active site serine of enzymes in the serine hydrolase family. It was a surprise to find that proteins with no active site serine are also covalently modified by OP. The binding site in albumin, transferrin, and tubulin was identified as tyrosine. The goal of the present work was to determine whether binding to tyrosine is a general phenomenon. Fourteen proteins were treated with a biotin-tagged organophosphorus agent called FP-b...

  19. Allosteric inactivation of a trypsin-like serine protease by an antibody binding to the 37- and 70-loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann-Hansen, Tobias; Lund, Ida K; Liu, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Serine protease catalytic activity is in many cases regulated by conformational changes initiated by binding of physiological modulators to exosites located distantly from the active site. Inhibitory monoclonal antibodies binding to such exosites are potential therapeutics and offer opportunities...... criteria similar to the E* conformation described for other serine proteases. Hence, agents targeting serine protease conformation through binding to exosites in the 37- and 70-loops represent a new class of potential therapeutics....

  20. Low serum alkaline phosphatase activity in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, W A; Bhatt, H; Combes, B

    1986-01-01

    Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase activity were observed early in the course of two patients with Wilson's disease presenting with the combination of severe liver disease and Coombs' negative acute hemolytic anemia. A review of other cases of Wilson's disease revealed that 11 of 12 patients presenting with hemolytic anemia had values for serum alkaline phosphatase less than their respective sex- and age-adjusted mean values; in eight, serum alkaline phosphatase activity was less than the lower value for the normal range of the test. Low values for serum alkaline phosphatase were much less common in Wilson's disease patients with more chronic forms of presentation. Copper added in high concentration to serum in vitro did not have an important effect on serum alkaline phosphatase activity. The mechanism responsible for the decrease in serum alkaline phosphatase activity in patients is uncertain.

  1. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  2. Effect of amino acids on the repression of alkaline protease synthesis in haloalkaliphilic Nocardiopsis dassonvillei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit K. Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A newly isolated salt-tolerant alkaliphilic actinomycete, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei strain OK-18 grows on mineral salts medium with glucose as carbon source. It also grows and produces protease with amino acids as sole carbon source. The synthesis of extracellular alkaline protease parallel to growth was repressible by substrate concentrations. The absolute production of the protease was delinked with growth under nutritional stress, as protease production was high, despite poor growth. When amino acids served as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, the enzyme production was significantly controlled by the number of amino acids. Maximal protease production was achieved with proline, asparagine, tyrosine, alanine, methionine and valine as sole source of carbon and nitrogen in minimal medium. With the increasing number of different amino acids in the presence and absence of glucose, the protease production was synergistically lower as compared to complex medium.

  3. The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, P.B.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Production, characterization and gene cloning of the extracellular enzymes from the marine-derived yeasts and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenming; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Guanglei; Li, Jing; Wang, Xianghong

    2009-01-01

    In this review article, the extracellular enzymes production, their properties and cloning of the genes encoding the enzymes from marine yeasts are overviewed. Several yeast strains which could produce different kinds of extracellular enzymes were selected from the culture collection of marine yeasts available in this laboratory. The strains selected belong to different genera such as Yarrowia, Aureobasidium, Pichia, Metschnikowia and Cryptococcus. The extracellular enzymes include cellulase, alkaline protease, aspartic protease, amylase, inulinase, lipase and phytase, as well as killer toxin. The conditions and media for the enzyme production by the marine yeasts have been optimized and the enzymes have been purified and characterized. Some genes encoding the extracellular enzymes from the marine yeast strains have been cloned, sequenced and expressed. It was found that some properties of the enzymes from the marine yeasts are unique compared to those of the homologous enzymes from terrestrial yeasts and the genes encoding the enzymes in marine yeasts are different from those in terrestrial yeasts. Therefore, it is of very importance to further study the enzymes and their genes from the marine yeasts. This is the first review on the extracellular enzymes and their genes from the marine yeasts.

  5. The Cryptococcus neoformans alkaline response pathway: identification of a novel rim pathway activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla S Ost

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rim101/PacC transcription factor acts in a fungal-specific signaling pathway responsible for sensing extracellular pH signals. First characterized in ascomycete fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Rim/Pal pathway maintains conserved features among very distantly related fungi, where it coordinates cellular adaptation to alkaline pH signals and micronutrient deprivation. However, it also directs species-specific functions in fungal pathogens such as Cryptococcus neoformans, where it controls surface capsule expression. Moreover, disruption of the Rim pathway central transcription factor, Rim101, results in a strain that causes a hyper-inflammatory response in animal infection models. Using targeted gene deletions, we demonstrate that several genes encoding components of the classical Rim/Pal pathway are present in the C. neoformans genome. Many of these genes are in fact required for Rim101 activation, including members of the ESCRT complex (Vps23 and Snf7, ESCRT-interacting proteins (Rim20 and Rim23, and the predicted Rim13 protease. We demonstrate that in neutral/alkaline pH, Rim23 is recruited to punctate regions on the plasma membrane. This change in Rim23 localization requires upstream ESCRT complex components but does not require other Rim101 proteolysis components, such as Rim20 or Rim13. Using a forward genetics screen, we identified the RRA1 gene encoding a novel membrane protein that is also required for Rim101 protein activation and, like the ESCRT complex, is functionally upstream of Rim23-membrane localization. Homologs of RRA1 are present in other Cryptococcus species as well as other basidiomycetes, but closely related genes are not present in ascomycetes. These findings suggest that major branches of the fungal Kingdom developed different mechanisms to sense and respond to very elemental extracellular signals such as changing pH levels.

  6. Expression of a serine protease gene prC is up-regulated by oxidative stress in the fungus Clonostachys rosea: implications for fungal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil fungi face a variety of environmental stresses such as UV light, high temperature, and heavy metals. Adaptation of gene expression through transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in fungal response to environmental stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Msn2/4 induce stress-mediated gene expression by binding to the stress response element. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of extracellular proteases is up-regulated in response to heat shock in fungi. However, the physiological significance of regulation of these extracellular proteases by heat shock remains unclear. The nematophagous fungus Clonostachys rosea can secret an extracellular serine protease PrC during the infection of nematodes. Since the promoter of prC has three copies of the stress response element, we investigated the effect of environmental stress on the expression of prC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrated that the expression of prC was up-regulated by oxidants (H(2O(2 or menadione and heat shock, most likely through the stress response element. After oxidant treatment or heat shock, the germination of conidia in the wild type strain was significantly higher than that in the prC mutant strain in the presence of nematode cuticle. Interestingly, the addition of nematode cuticle significantly attenuated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidants and heat shock in the wild type strain, but not in prC mutant strain. Moreover, low molecule weight (<3 kD degradation products of nematode cuticle suppressed the inhibitory effect of conidial germination induced by oxidants and heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PrC plays a protective role in oxidative stress in C. rosea. PrC degrades the nematode cuticle to produce degradation products, which in turn offer a protective effect against oxidative stress by scavenging ROS. Our study reveals a novel

  7. An extracellular proteolytic cascade promotes neuronal degeneration in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E; Rogove, A D; Bugge, T H; Degen, J L; Strickland, S

    1997-01-15

    Mice lacking the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are resistant to excitotoxin-mediated hippocampal neuronal degeneration. We have used genetic and cellular analyses to study the role of tPA in neuronal cell death. Mice deficient for the zymogen plasminogen, a known substrate for tPA, are also resistant to excitotoxins, implicating an extracellular proteolytic cascade in degeneration. The two known components of this cascade, tPA and plasminogen, are both synthesized in the mouse hippocampus. tPA mRNA and protein are present in neurons and microglia, whereas plasminogen mRNA and protein are found exclusively in neurons. tPA-deficient mice exhibit attenuated microglial activation as a reaction to neuronal injury. In contrast, the microglial response of plasminogen-deficient mice was comparable to that of wild-type mice, suggesting a tPA-mediated, plasminogen-independent pathway for activation of microglia. Infusion of inhibitors of the extracellular tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade into the hippocampus protects neurons against excitotoxic injury, suggesting a novel strategy for intervening in neuronal degeneration.

  8. Role of a conserved arginine residue during catalysis in serine palmitoyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Jonathan; Charmier, Guillaume; Raman, Marine C; Ikushiro, Hiroko; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Campopiano, Dominic J

    2011-06-23

    All sphingolipid-producing organisms require the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) to catalyse the first reaction on the de novo sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. SPT is a member of the alpha oxoamine synthase (AOS) family that catalyses a Claisen-like condensation of palmitoyl-CoA and L-serine to form 3-ketodihydrosphingosine (KDS). Protein sequence alignment across various species reveals an arginine residue, not involved in PLP binding, to be strictly conserved in all prokaryotic SPTs, the lcb2 subunits of eukaryotic SPTs and all members of the AOS family. Here we use UV-vis spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis, in combination with a substrate analogue, to show that the equivalent residue (R370) in the SPT from Sphingomonas wittichii is required to form the key PLP:L-serine quinonoid intermediate that condenses with palmitoyl-CoA and thus plays an essential role enzyme catalysis.

  9. Modulatory effect of a serine protease inhibitor on surgical stress: its clinical implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwagaki H

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between endogenous cytokine antagonists and surgical stress is poorly understood. Surgical stress induces immunosuppression, and the reversed therapy of postoperative immunosuppression has been expected. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a serine protease inhibitor on postoperative immune reactivity. Twenty patients with colorectal cancer were randomly separated into experimental and control groups of 10 patients each. The experimental group received perioperative administration of a serine protease inhibitor while the control group did not. Plasma levels of cytokine antagonists, which suppress cell-mediated immunity, such as cortisol, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R and soluble tumor necrosis factors p55, p75 (sTNF-R55, -R75 were simultaneously measured. Significant reductions of plasma concentration of sIL-2R and sTNF-R55 were observed. Perioperative administration of a serine protease inhibitor may contribute to ameliorating immunosuppression after major surgery.

  10. Conservation of sequence and function in fertilization of the cortical granule serine protease in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulhen, Nathalie; Xu, Dongdong; Wessel, Gary M

    2014-08-01

    Conservation of the cortical granule serine protease during fertilization in echinoderms was tested both functionally in sea stars, and computationally throughout the echinoderm phylum. We find that the inhibitor of serine protease (soybean trypsin inhibitor) effectively blocks proper transition of the sea star fertilization envelope into a protective sperm repellent, whereas inhibitors of the other main types of proteases had no effect. Scanning the transcriptomes of 15 different echinoderm ovaries revealed sequences of high conservation to the originally identified sea urchin cortical serine protease, CGSP1. These conserved sequences contained the catalytic triad necessary for enzymatic activity, and the tandemly repeated LDLr-like repeats. We conclude that the protease involved in the slow block to polyspermy is an essential and conserved element of fertilization in echinoderms, and may provide an important reagent for identification and testing of the cell surface proteins in eggs necessary for sperm binding.

  11. Escherichia coli K-12 mutant forming a temperature-sensitive D-serine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, E

    1975-03-01

    A single-site mutant of Escherichia coli K-12 able to grow in minimal medium in the presence of D-serine at 30 C but not at 42 C was isolated. The mutant forms a D-serine deaminase that is much more sensitive to thermal denaturation in vitro at temperatures above but not below 47 C than that of the wild type. No detectable enzyme is formed by the mutant at 42 C, however, and very little is formed at 37 C. The mutant enzyme is probably more sensitive to intracellular inactivation at high temperatures than the wild-type enzyme. The mutation lies in the dsdA region. The mutant also contains a dsdO mutation, which does not permit hyperinduction of D-serine deaminase synthesis.

  12. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes are found in P. falciparum, of which serine proteases are of particular interest due to their involvement in parasite-specific processes of egress and invasion. In P. falciparum, a number of serine proteases belonging to chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and rhomboid clans are found. This review focuses on the potential of P. falciparum serine proteases as antimalarial drug targets.

  13. The VA, VCD, Raman and ROA spectra of tri-L-serine in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgensen, Vibeke Würtz; Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2006-01-01

    investigated for one conformer, with the goal to determine which level of theory is appropriate to use in the systematic search of the conformational space. In addition, the effects of the counterion, here Cl- anion, are also investigated. Here we present the current state of the art in nanobiology, where......The structures of one conformer of the nonionic neutral and zwitterionic species of L-serinyl L-serinyl L-serine (SSS or tri-L-serine), together with its cationic and anionic species and the capped N-acetyl tri-L-serine N'-methylamide analog were optimized with density functional theory...... with the Becke 3LYP hybrid exchange correlation (XC) functional and the PW91 GGA XC functional and the 6-31G* and aug-cc-pVDZ basis sets. Subsequently, the vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism, Raman and Raman optical activity spectra were simulated in order to compare them to experimentally...

  14. Possible Role of Mg2+ ion in the Reaction of Organophosphate (dichlorvos with Serine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Vahid Shetab-Boushehri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate pesticides (OPs inhibit both true and pseudo-cholinesterases by reaction with the hydroxyl group of serine in their active sites. Poisoning with OPs is commonly seen in clinics. A common antidote for OP poisoning is atropine but, after ageing and OP dealkylation, even oximes could not be effective. It has been shown that oximes are not always useful in management of OP poisoning. On the other hand, magnesium has been found effective in both clinical and experimental studies. Studies to find more effective antidotes for OP poisoning are in progress. Presently, the possible role of magnesium ion in catalysis of reaction of dichlorvos (2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate, DDVP, a water-soluble OP, with serine is proposed. The hydroxyl group of serine could be a target to which DDVP can react. Nucleophilic attack of pralidoxime to DDVP was previously investigated. To confirm the idea, data were derived from recent and previous research on the role of magnesium in phosphoryl group transfer reactions. Possible reactions of serine and pralidoxime with DDVP in the absence and the presence of magnesium ion were separately investigated theoretically.We propose that the chemical reaction of serine with DDVP exclusively occurs in the presence of a magnesium divalent cation, whereas the reaction of pralidoxime with DDVP occurs independent of the presence of the magnesium ion. The role of the dissociation constant (pKa of functional groups in these reactions seems important.It is suggested that application of serine in combination with the magnesium cation can become a more efficient antidote for treatment of OP poisoning.

  15. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  16. Selective Uptake of Alkaline Earth Metals by Cyanobacteria Forming Intracellular Carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, Nithavong; Benzerara, Karim; Georgelin, Thomas; Jaber, Maguy; Lambert, Jean-François; Poinsot, Mélanie; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Cordier, Laure

    2016-11-01

    The uptakes of calcium (Ca), strontium (Sr), and barium (Ba) by two cyanobacterial strains, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 and Gloeomargarita lithophora, both forming intracellular carbonates, were investigated in laboratory cultures. In the culture medium BG-11 amended with 250 μM Ca and 50 or 250 μM Sr and Ba, G. lithophora accumulated first Ba, then Sr, and finally Ca. Sr and Ba were completely accumulated by G. lithophora cells at rates between 0.02 and 0.10 fmol h(-1) cell(-1) and down to extracellular concentrations below the detection limits of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Accumulation of Sr and Ba did not affect the growth rate of the strain. This sequential accumulation occurred mostly intracellularly within polyphosphate and carbonate granules and resulted in the formation of core-shell structures in carbonates. In contrast, Cyanothece sp. PCC7425 showed neither a preferential accumulation of heavier alkaline earth metals nor core-shell structures in the carbonates. This indicated that fractionation between alkaline earth metals was not inherent to intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria but was likely a genetically based trait of G. lithophora. Overall, the capability of G. lithophora to sequester preferentially Sr and Ba at high rates may be of considerable interest for designing new remediation strategies and better understanding the geochemical cycles of these elements.

  17. Ligand Exchange Between Penta-Coordinated Phosphoryl Serine and Histidine Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹书霞; 牛明玉; 苏玉倩; 廖新成; 卢奎; 赵玉芬

    2003-01-01

    With the assistance of HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, the self-assembly products of serine and histidine penta-coordinated phosphorus compound were separated and identified. The expectative product was seryl-histidine dipeptide, but it was found that there was almost equimolar amount of histidyl-histidine dipeptide as well as seryl-histidine dipeptide. The mechanism was speculated that there was iigand exchange between penta-coordinated phosphoryl serine and histidine in the reaction process. As a result,two types of dipeptide were produced.

  18. Expression and biochemical properties of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase encoded by bacteriophage lambda.

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, S

    1993-01-01

    The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the open reading frame 221 (orf221) of bacteriophage lambda exhibited a high degree of similarity to the catalytic subunits of a variety of protein serine/threonine phosphatases belonging to PP1, PP2A, and PP2B groups. Cloning and expression of the orf221 gene in Escherichia coli provided direct evidence that the gene codes for a protein serine/threonine phosphatase. The single-subunit recombinant enzyme was purified in soluble form and shown to po...

  19. Propargyloxycarbonyl as a protecting group for the side chains of serine, threonine and tyrosine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ramapanicker Ramesh; Kavita De; Shipra Gupta; Srinivasan Chandrasekaran

    2008-01-01

    Propargyloxycarbonyl group is used as a protecting group for the hydroxyl groups of serine, threonine and tyrosine. The propargyloxycarbonyl derivatives of these hydroxy amino acids are stable to acidic and basic reagents commonly employed in peptide synthesis. The deprotection of the -Poc derivatives using tetrathiomolybdate does not affect commonly used protecting groups such as -Boc, -Cbz, -Fmoc, methyl and benzyl esters. The di- and tripeptides synthesized using -Poc derivatives of serine, threonine and tyrosine are stable, isolable compounds and give the hydroxy peptides in good yields when treated with tetrathiomolybdate.

  20. Processing of Neutrophil α-Defensins Does Not Rely on Serine Proteases In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Nickles, Katrin; Cowland, Jack;

    2015-01-01

    in promyelocytes: Neutrophil elastase (NE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3), all of which are able to process recombinant proHNP into HNP in vitro. We investigated whether serine proteases are in fact responsible for processing of proHNP in human bone marrow cells and in human and murine myeloid cell...... lines. Subcellular fractionation of the human promyelocytic cell line PLB-985 demonstrated proHNP processing to commence in fractions containing endoplasmic reticulum. Processing of 35S-proHNP was insensitive to serine protease inhibitors. Simultaneous knockdown of NE, CG, and PR3 did not decrease pro...

  1. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA for human medullasin: an inflammatory serine protease in bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, K; Aoki, Y; Sakurai, T; Kajitani, M; Kanai, S; Shimazu, T; Shimizu, H; Naruto, M

    1987-07-01

    Medullasin, an inflammatory serine protease in bone marrow cells, modifies the functions of natural killer cells, monocytes, and granulocytes. We have cloned a medullasin cDNA from a human acute promyelocytic cell (ML3) cDNA library using oligonucleotide probes synthesized from the information of N-terminal amino acid sequence of natural medullasin. The cDNA contained a long open reading frame encoding 237 amino acid residues beginning from the second amino acid of natural meduallasin. The deduced amino acid sequence of medullasin shows a typical serine protease structure, with 41% homology with pig elastase 1.

  2. Effects of intracellular alkalinization on resting and agonist-induced vascular tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danthuluri, N R; Deth, R C

    1989-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of intracellular alkalinization on basal and agonist-induced vascular tone, we studied the effect of NH4Cl on rat aorta. NH4Cl induced a gradually developing contraction in a dose-dependent manner. Although the contractile response to 20 mM NH4Cl was associated with a latent period (LP) of 23.4 +/- 2.8 min, intracellular pH (pHi) measurements in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells showed that NH4Cl-induced intracellular alkalinization was immediate and transient, returning to basal pHi levels in about 30-35 min. Agents that elevate Ca2+, such as A23187 and high KCl, significantly reduced the LP associated with 20 mM NH4Cl-induced contraction. NH4Cl-induced contractions were sensitive to extracellular Ca2+ removal and to the addition of forskolin (1 microM); however, NH4Cl by itself did not cause Ca2+-influx as shown by 45Ca-uptake studies. Addition of 20 mM NH4Cl to precontracted tissues resulted in a transient relaxation, which was complete in approximately 10 min, followed by a contraction above the original level of tone. NH4Cl pretreatment caused time-dependent alterations in both the rapid and slow phases of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase of phenylephrine and angiotensin II contractions. Rapid-phase responses were diminished at shorter NH4Cl incubation times (10 min), whereas slow-phase response was augmented after a longer incubation (20 min). Overall, the vasorelaxant and vasoconstrictor effects induced by NH4Cl suggest a complex relationship between intracellular alkalinization and arterial contractility.

  3. An overview on fermentation, downstream processing and properties of microbial alkaline proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R; Beg, Q K; Khan, S; Chauhan, B

    2002-12-01

    Microbial alkaline proteases dominate the worldwide enzyme market, accounting for a two-thirds share of the detergent industry. Although protease production is an inherent property of all organisms, only those microbes that produce a substantial amount of extracellular protease have been exploited commercially. Of these, strains of Bacillus sp. dominate the industrial sector. To develop an efficient enzyme-based process for the industry, prior knowledge of various fermentation parameters, purification strategies and properties of the biocatalyst is of utmost importance. Besides these, the method of measurement of proteolytic potential, the selection of the substrate and the assay protocol depends upon the ultimate industrial application. A large array of assay protocols are available in the literature; however, with the predominance of molecular approaches for the generation of better biocatalysts, the search for newer substrates and assay protocols that can be conducted at micro/nano-scale are becoming important. Fermentation of proteases is regulated by varying the C/N ratio and can be scaled-up using fed-batch, continuous or chemostat approaches by prolonging the stationary phase of the culture. The conventional purification strategy employed, involving e.g., concentration, chromatographic steps, or aqueous two-phase systems, depends on the properties of the protease in question. Alkaline proteases useful for detergent applications are mostly active in the pH range 8-12 and at temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees C, with a few exceptions of extreme pH optima up to pH 13 and activity at temperatures up to 80-90 degrees C. Alkaline proteases mostly have their isoelectric points near to their pH optimum in the range of 8-11. Several industrially important proteases have been subjected to crystallization to extensively study their molecular homology and three-dimensional structures.

  4. Nano-TiO2 affects Cu speciation, extracellular enzyme activity, and bacterial communities in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenhong; Liu, Tong; Li, Xiaomin; Peng, Ruishuang; Zhang, Yilin

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) coexist with heavy metals and influence the existing forms and toxicities of the metal in water. However, limited information is available regarding the ecological risk of this coexistence in sediments. In this study, the effect of nano-TiO2 on Cu speciation in sediments was investigated using sequential extraction. The microcosm approach was also employed to analyze the effects of the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu on extracellular enzyme activity and bacterial communities in sediments. Results showed that nano-TiO2 decreased the organic matter-bound fraction of Cu and increased the corresponding residual fraction Cu. As a result, speciation of exogenous Cu in sediments changed. During the course of the 30-day experiment, the presence of nano-TiO2 did not affect Cu-induced changes in bacterial community structure. However, the coexistence of nano-TiO2 and Cu restrained the activity of bacterial extracellular enzymes, such as alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase. The degree of inhibition also varied because of the different properties of extracellular enzymes. This research highlighted the importance of understanding and predicting the effects of the coexistence of nanomaterials and other pollutants in sediments.

  5. Mutations affecting extracellular protease production in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M E; Flynn, P K; vanKuyk, P A; Cheetham, B F

    1996-04-10

    The extracellular proteases of Aspergillus nidulans are known to be regulated by carbon, nitrogen and sulphur metabolite repression. In this study, a mutant with reduced levels of extracellular protease was isolated by screening for loss of halo production on milk plates. Genetic analysis of the mutant showed that it contains a single, recessive mutation, in a gene which we have designated xprE, located on chromosome VI. The xprE1 mutation affected the production of extracellular proteases in response to carbon, nitrogen and, to a lesser extent, sulphur limitation. Three reversion mutations, xprF1, xprF2 and xprG1, which suppress xprE1, were characterised. Both xprF and xprG map to chromosome VII but the two genes are unlinked. The xprF1, xprF2 and xprG1 mutants showed high levels of milk-clearing activity on medium containing milk as a carbon source but reduced growth on a number of nitrogen sources. Evidence is presented that the xprE1 and xprG1 mutations alter expression of more than one protease and affect levels of alkaline protease gene mRNA.

  6. KSR1 is a functional protein kinase capable of serine autophosphorylation and direct phosphorylation of MEK1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettel, Jeremy A. [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Liang, Dongchun [Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Hilliard, Valda C.; Edelblum, Karen L.; Broadus, Matthew R. [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Gould, Kathleen L. [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Hanks, Steven K. [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Polk, D. Brent, E-mail: dbpolk@chla.usc.edu [Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) pathway is a highly conserved signaling pathway that regulates diverse cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, and survival. Kinase suppressor of Ras-1 (KSR1) binds each of the three ERK cascade components to facilitate pathway activation. Even though KSR1 contains a C-terminal kinase domain, evidence supporting the catalytic function of KSR1 remains controversial. In this study, we produced recombinant wild-type or kinase-inactive (D683A/D700A) KSR1 proteins in Escherichia coli to test the hypothesis that KSR1 is a functional protein kinase. Recombinant wild-type KSR1, but not recombinant kinase-inactive KSR1, underwent autophosphorylation on serine residue(s), phosphorylated myelin basic protein (MBP) as a generic substrate, and phosphorylated recombinant kinase-inactive MAPK/ERK kinase-1 (MEK1). Furthermore, FLAG immunoprecipitates from KSR1{sup -/-} colon epithelial cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged wild-type KSR1 (+KSR1), but not vector (+vector) or FLAG-tagged kinase-inactive KSR1 (+D683A/D700A), were able to phosphorylate kinase-inactive MEK1. Since TNF activates the ERK pathway in colon epithelial cells, we tested the biological effects of KSR1 in the survival response downstream of TNF. We found that +vector and +D683A/D700A cells underwent apoptosis when treated with TNF, whereas +KSR1 cells were resistant. However, +KSR1 cells were sensitized to TNF-induced cell loss in the absence of MEK kinase activity. These data provide clear evidence that KSR1 is a functional protein kinase, MEK1 is an in vitro substrate of KSR1, and the catalytic activities of both proteins are required for eliciting cell survival responses downstream of TNF.

  7. DsdX is the second D-serine transporter in uropathogenic Escherichia coli clinical isolate CFT073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfora, Andrew T; Welch, Rodney A

    2006-09-01

    d-Serine is an amino acid present in mammalian urine that is inhibitory to Escherichia coli strains lacking a functional dsdA gene. Counterintuitively, a dsdA strain of E. coli clinical isolate CFT073 hypercolonizes the bladder and kidneys of mice relative to wild type during a coinfection in the murine model of urinary tract infection. We are interested in the mechanisms for uptake of d-serine in CFT073. d-Serine enters E. coli K-12 via CycA, the d-alanine transporter and d-cycloserine sensitivity locus. CFT073 cycA can grow on minimal medium with d-serine as a sole carbon source. The dsdX gene of the dsdCXA locus is a likely candidate for an additional d-serine transporter based on its predicted amino acid sequence similarity to gluconate transporters. In minimal medium, CFT073 dsdX can grow on d-serine as a sole carbon source; however, CFT073 dsdX cycA cannot. Additionally, CFT073 dsdXA cycA is not sensitive to inhibitory concentrations of d-serine during growth on glycerol and d-serine minimal medium. d-[(14)C]serine uptake experiments with CFT073 dsdX cycA harboring dsdX or cycA recombinant plasmids confirm that d-serine is able to enter E. coli cells via CycA or DsdX. In whole-cell d-[(14)C]serine uptake experiments, DsdX has an apparent K(m) of 58.75 microM and a V(max) of 75.96 nmol/min/mg, and CycA has an apparent K(m) of 82.40 microM and a V(max) of 58.90 nmol/min/mg. Only d-threonine marginally inhibits DsdX-mediated d-serine transport, whereas d-alanine, glycine, and d-cycloserine inhibit CycA-mediated d-serine transport. DsdX or CycA is sufficient to transport physiological quantities of d-serine, but DsdX is a d-serine-specific permease.

  8. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution.

  9. Vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory egg coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkhorst, Ellen; Selwood, Lynne

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular egg coats deposited by maternal or embryonic tissues surround all vertebrate conceptuses during early development. In oviparous species, the time of hatching from extracellular coats can be considered equivalent to the time of birth in viviparous species. Extracellular coats must be lost during gestation for implantation and placentation to occur in some viviparous species. In the most recent classification of vertebrate extracellular coats, Boyd and Hamilton (Cleavage, early development and implantation of the egg. In: Parkes AS (ed.), Marshall's Physiology of Reproduction, vol. 2, 3rd ed. London: Longmans, Green & Co; 1961:1-126) defined the coat synthesized by the oocyte during oogenesis as primary and the coat deposited by follicle cells surrounding the oocyte as secondary. Tertiary egg coats are those synthesized and deposited around the primary or secondary coat by the maternal reproductive tract. This classification is difficult to reconcile with recent data collected using modern molecular biological techniques that can accurately establish the site of coat precursor synthesis and secretion. We propose that a modification to the classification by Boyd and Hamilton is required. Vertebrate egg coats should be classed as belonging to the following two broad groups: the preovulatory coat, which is deposited during oogenesis by the oocyte or follicle cells, and the postovulatory coats, which are deposited after fertilization by the reproductive tract or conceptus. This review discusses the origin and classification of vertebrate extracellular preovulatory and postovulatory coats and illustrates what is known about coat homology between the vertebrate groups.

  10. Advanced-capability alkaline fuel cell powerplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    The alkaline fuel cell powerplant utilized in the Space Shuttle Orbiter has established an excellent performance and reliability record over the past decade. Recent AFC technology programs have demonstrated significant advances in cell durability and power density. These capabilities provide the basis for substantial improvement of the Orbiter powerplant, enabling new mission applications as well as enhancing performance in the Orbiter. Improved durability would extend the powerplant's time between overhaul fivefold, and permit longer-duration missions. The powerplant would also be a strong candidate for lunar/planetary surface power systems. Higher power capability would enable replacement of the Orbiter's auxiliary power units with electric motors, and benefits mass-critical applications such as the National AeroSpace Plane.

  11. Corrosion of copper in alkaline chloride environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F. [Integrity Corrosion Consulting Ltd., Calgary (Canada)

    2002-08-01

    The available literature information on the corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of copper in alkaline environments has been reviewed. The purpose of the review was to assess the impact of an alkaline plume from cementitious material on the corrosion behaviour of a copper canister in an SKB-3 type repository. The effect of the evolution of the environmental conditions within the repository have been considered, including the effects of temperature, redox conditions, pore-water salinity and pH. If the pore-water pH increases prior to the establishment of anoxic conditions, the canister surface will passivate as the pore-water pH exceeds a value of {approx} pH 9. Passivation will result from the formation of a duplex Cu{sub 2}O/Cu(OH){sub 2} film. The corrosion potential will be determined by the equilibrium potential for the Cu{sub 2}O/Cu(OH){sub 2} couple under oxic conditions, or by the Cu/Cu{sub 2}O redox couple under anoxic conditions (in the absence of sulphide). Pitting corrosion is only likely to occur early in the evolution of the repository environment, whilst the canister is still relatively cool (<40 deg C), whilst there is still O{sub 2} available to support localised corrosion, and prior to the increase in pore-water pH and salinity. The subsequent increase in canister surface temperature, pore-water pH and salinity, and decrease in O{sub 2} will make pit initiation less likely, although the canister will remain passive provided the pore-water pH is maintained above pH 9. The higher the pore-water pH, the more strongly the canister is passivated and the less likely the surface is to undergo localised attack. If the pore-water salinity increases prior to the increase in pH, there could be a period of active canister corrosion before passivation occurs.Under these circumstances, the corrosion potential will be a true mixed potential, determine by the relative kinetics of Cu dissolution as CuCl{sub 2} - and of the reduction of O{sub 2}. The development

  12. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures and pressures. To perform measurements under high pressure and at elevated temperatures it was necessary to build a measurement system around an autoclave which could stand high temperatures up to 250 °C and pressures up to 200 bar...... as well as extremely caustic environments. Based on a literature study to identify resistant materials for these conditions, Inconel 600 was selected among the metals which are available for autoclave construction. An initial single atmosphere high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build...... comprising this autoclave. A second high temperature and pressure measurement setup was build based on experiences from the first setup in order to perform automatized measurements. The conductivity of aqueous KOH at elevated temperatures and high concentrations was investigated using the van der Pauw method...

  13. Polyvinyl alcohol membranes as alkaline battery separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O.; Manzo, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    Polyvinly alcohol (PVA) cross-linked with aldehyde reagents yields membranes that demonstrate properties that make them suitable for use as alkaline battery separators. Film properties can be controlled by the choice of cross-linker, cross-link density and the method of cross-linking. Three methods of cross-linking and their effects on film properties are discussed. Film properties can also be modified by using a copolymer of vinyl alcohol and acrylic acid as the base for the separator and cross-linking it similarly to the PVA. Fillers can be incorporated into the films to further modify film properties. Results of separator screening tests and cell tests for several variations of PBA films are discussed.

  14. Acylglucuronide in alkaline conditions: migration vs. hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, Florent; Steel, Michele; Nicolas, Picard; Marquet, Pierre; Duroux, Jean-Luc; Trouillas, Patrick

    2013-06-01

    This work rationalizes the glucuronidation process (one of the reactions of the phase II metabolism) for drugs having a carboxylic acid moiety. At this stage, acylglucuronides (AG) metabolites are produced, that have largely been reported in the literature for various drugs (e.g., mycophenolic acid (MPA), diclofenac, ibuprofen, phenylacetic acids). The competition between migration and hydrolysis is rationalized by adequate quantum calculations, combing MP2 and density functional theory (DFT) methods. At the molecular scale, the former process is a real rotation of the drug around the glucuconic acid. This chemical-engine provides four different metabolites with various toxicities. Migration definitely appears feasible under alkaline conditions, making proton release from the OH groups. The latter reaction (hydrolysis) releases the free drug, so the competition is of crucial importance to tackle drug action and elimination. From the theoretical data, both migration and hydrolysis appear kinetically and thermodynamically favored, respectively.

  15. Hydrogen production by alkaline water electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo M. F. Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water electrolysis is one of the simplest methods used for hydrogen production. It has the advantage of being able to produce hydrogen using only renewable energy. To expand the use of water electrolysis, it is mandatory to reduce energy consumption, cost, and maintenance of current electrolyzers, and, on the other hand, to increase their efficiency, durability, and safety. In this study, modern technologies for hydrogen production by water electrolysis have been investigated. In this article, the electrochemical fundamentals of alkaline water electrolysis are explained and the main process constraints (e.g., electrical, reaction, and transport are analyzed. The historical background of water electrolysis is described, different technologies are compared, and main research needs for the development of water electrolysis technologies are discussed.

  16. RES Hydrogen: efficient pressurised alkaline electrolysers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Jacob R.; Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley;

    including BoP. Investigation of cathodes revealed highly heterogeneous microstructures and 3D microstructure quantification methods were developed. Nanometre scale -Ni(OH)2 formation was identified on tested cathode surfaces and is considered a potential degradation mechanism that is not presently well......The RESelyser project addresses issues associated with coupling alkaline electrolysis to renewable energy sources such as electrode stability and gas purity by implementing improved electrodes and a new separator membrane concept. The project aims to improve performance, operation pressure...... and reduce system cost. The project supports DTU Energy's activities on electrodes within the larger FCH-JU project. The overall project demonstrated: improved electrode efficiency also during cyclic operation, safe gas purity at a system pressure of 30 bar, 10 kW stack operation and estimated system costs...

  17. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pretreated Coconut Coir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarningrum Fatmawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study the effect of concentration and temperature on the cellulose and lignin content, and the reducing sugars produced in the enzymatic hydrolysis of coconut coir. In this research, the coconut coir is pretreated using 3%, 7%, and 11% NaOH solution at 60oC, 80oC, and 100oC. The pretreated coir were assayed by measuring the amount of cellulose and lignin and then hydrolysed using Celluclast and Novozyme 188 under various temperature (30oC, 40oC, 50oC and pH (3, 4, 5. The hydrolysis results were assayed for the reducing sugar content. The results showed that the alkaline delignification was effective to reduce lignin and to increase the cellulose content of the coir. The best delignification condition was observed at 11% NaOH solution and 100oC which removed 14,53% of lignin and increased the cellulose content up to 50,23%. The best condition of the enzymatic hydrolysis was obtained at 50oC and pH 4 which produced 7,57 gr/L reducing sugar. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 2nd October 2012; Revised: 31st January 2013; Accepted: 6th February 2013[How to Cite: Fatmawati, A., Agustriyanto, R., Liasari, Y. (2013. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pre-treated Coconut Coir. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 34-39 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39[Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39] | View in  |

  18. On electrochemical devices using alkaline polymer electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, L. [Wuhan Univ., Wuhan (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) enable a compact assembly of fuel cells and electrolyzers, thereby increasing the space-specific conversion efficiency and avoiding electrolyte leakage. The most widely used SPE in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and chloro-alkali electrolyzers is Nafion. However, this strongly acidic polyelectrolyte allows only noble metals to be used as the catalysts in the electrochemical devices, which poses a problem in terms of price and resource limits. In principle, alkaline polymer electrolytes (APEs) should be used to eliminate the dependence on noble metal catalysts. The general structure of alkaline polymer electrolytes is a positively charged polymer, notably, a polymer chain attached with fixed cations such as quaternary ammonia group, and dissociated anion, OH-, to act as the charge carrier. This presentation described the challenges of developing APEs in terms of the chemical stability of quaternary ammonia group, the mobility of OH-, and high ionic concentration. The authors have been working on developing high-performance APEs since 2001. The most recent APEs were quaternary ammonia polysulfone (QAPS), which were found to be suitable for fuel cell and electrolyzer applications. The ionic conductivity was high and the crosslinked membrane had excellent mechanical strength, enabling operation at 90 degrees C. Non-precious metal catalysts were used in the APEs. For APE-based fuel cells (APEFC), chromium decorated nickel was used as the anode catalyst for hydrogen oxidation, and silver was used as the cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction. The preliminary performance of such an APEFC with non-Pt catalysts was found to be much better than that of traditional water electrolyzers using KOH solutions. 2 refs.

  19. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  20. Advanced membranes for alkaline primary and rechargeable alkaline cells with zinc anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Harlan; Jackson, Patricia; Salkind, Alvin; Danko, Thomas; Bell, Roger

    Several advanced cellulosic and radiation grafted polypropylene membrane materials are currently under evaluation in the laboratories at Navsea Crane and Rutgers University, for application to alkaline primary and rechargeable cell chemistries which employ zinc as the anode material. A portion of these tests involve model cell evaluations of cellulosic membranes for silver migration rates through the membranes as a function of separation layers and changes in the degree of polymerisation (DP), wet tensile strength (WTS) and voltage changes at both electrodes as a function of model rechargeable cell life cycle. Other testing on the actual membranes is generating data for both cellulosic and polypropylene materials on impedance, swelling properties, and silver and zinc penetration rates. The overall goal of these investigations is to obtain candidate separation membranes which will reduce zinc anode shape change and shedding and resist alkaline oxidative degradation to extend the active wet life in primary cells and both wet and life cycle in rechargeable cells.

  1. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  2. The thesis of the alkaline milieu in oncology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, S L

    1993-02-01

    An alkaline milieu is a common factor in some carcinomas of the oropharynx and oesophagus, the stomach, the bronchus, the cervix and the large bowel. The hypothesis is advanced that a change to an alkaline pH enhances the mitotic activity of mucous cells and that this change can be often avoided by alterations in diet and habit.

  3. Space-time variability of alkalinity in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Cossarini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides a basin assessment of the spatial distribution of ocean alkalinity in the Mediterranean Sea. The assessment is made using a 3-D transport-biogeochemical-carbonate model to integrate the available experimental findings, which also constrains model output. The results indicate that the Mediterranean Sea shows alkalinity values that are much higher than those observed in the Atlantic Ocean on a basin-wide scale. A marked west-to-east surface gradient of alkalinity is reproduced as a response to the terrestrial discharges, the mixing effect with the Atlantic water entering from the Gibraltar Strait and the Black Sea water from Dardanelles, and the surface flux of evaporation minus precipitation. Dense water production in marginal seas (Adriatic and Aegean Seas, where alkaline inputs are relevant, and the Mediterranean thermohaline circulation sustains the west-to-east gradient along the entire water column. In the surface layers, alkalinity has a relevant seasonal cycle (up to 40 μmol kg−1 that is driven both by physical and biological processes. A comparison of alkalinity vs. salinity indicates that different regions present different relationships. In regions of freshwater influence, the two measures are negatively correlated due to riverine alkalinity input, whereas they are positively correlated in open seas. Alkalinity always is much higher than in the Atlantic waters, which might indicate a higher than usual buffering capacity towards ocean acidification, even at high concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon.

  4. Increased river alkalinization in the Eastern U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, S.; Likens, G. E.; Utz, R.; Pace, M.; Grese, M.; Yepsen, M.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between human activities and watershed geology is accelerating long-term changes in the carbon cycle of rivers. We evaluated changes in bicarbonate alkalinity, a product of chemical weathering, and tested for long-term trends at 97 sites in the eastern United States draining over 260,000 km2. We observed statistically significant increasing trends in alkalinity at 62 of the 97 sites, while remaining sites exhibited no significant decreasing trends. Over 50% of study sites also had statistically significant increasing trends in concentrations of calcium (another product of chemical weathering) where data were available. River alkalinization rates were significantly related to watershed carbonate lithology, acid deposition, and topography. These 3 variables explained ~40% of variation in river alkalinization rates. The strongest predictor of river alkalinization rates was carbonate lithology. The most rapid rates of river alkalinization occurred at sites with highest inputs of acid deposition and highest elevation. The rise of alkalinity in many rivers throughout the eastern U.S. suggests human-accelerated chemical weathering, in addition to previously documented impacts of mining and land use. Increased river alkalinization has major environmental implications including impacts on water hardness and salinization of drinking water, alterations of air-water exchange of CO2, coastal ocean acidification, and the influence of bicarbonate availability on primary production.

  5. Increased river alkalinization in the Eastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Sujay S; Likens, Gene E; Utz, Ryan M; Pace, Michael L; Grese, Melissa; Yepsen, Metthea

    2013-09-17

    The interaction between human activities and watershed geology is accelerating long-term changes in the carbon cycle of rivers. We evaluated changes in bicarbonate alkalinity, a product of chemical weathering, and tested for long-term trends at 97 sites in the eastern United States draining over 260,000 km(2). We observed statistically significant increasing trends in alkalinity at 62 of the 97 sites, while remaining sites exhibited no significant decreasing trends. Over 50% of study sites also had statistically significant increasing trends in concentrations of calcium (another product of chemical weathering) where data were available. River alkalinization rates were significantly related to watershed carbonate lithology, acid deposition, and topography. These three variables explained ~40% of variation in river alkalinization rates. The strongest predictor of river alkalinization rates was carbonate lithology. The most rapid rates of river alkalinization occurred at sites with highest inputs of acid deposition and highest elevation. The rise of alkalinity in many rivers throughout the Eastern U.S. suggests human-accelerated chemical weathering, in addition to previously documented impacts of mining and land use. Increased river alkalinization has major environmental implications including impacts on water hardness and salinization of drinking water, alterations of air-water exchange of CO2, coastal ocean acidification, and the influence of bicarbonate availability on primary production.

  6. The Pochonia chlamydosporia serine protease gene vcp1 is subject to regulation by carbon, nitrogen and pH: implications for nematode biocontrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Ward

    Full Text Available The alkaline serine protease VCP1 of the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia belongs to a family of subtilisin-like enzymes that are involved in infection of nematode and insect hosts. It is involved early in the infection process, removing the outer proteinaceous vitelline membrane of nematode eggs. Little is known about the regulation of this gene, even though an understanding of how nutrients and other factors affect its expression is critical for ensuring its efficacy as a biocontrol agent. This paper provides new information on the regulation of vcp1 expression. Sequence analysis of the upstream regulatory region of this gene in 30 isolates revealed that it was highly conserved and contained sequence motifs characteristic of genes that are subject to carbon, nitrogen and pH-regulation. Expression studies, monitoring enzyme activity and mRNA, confirmed that these factors affect VCP1 production. As expected, glucose reduced VCP1 expression and for a few hours so did ammonium chloride. Surprisingly, however, by 24 h VCP1 levels were increased in the presence of ammonium chloride for most isolates. Ambient pH also regulated VCP1 expression, with most isolates producing more VCP1 under alkaline conditions. There were some differences in the response of one isolate with a distinctive upstream sequence including a variant regulatory-motif profile. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the presence of nematode eggs stimulates VCP1 production by P. chlamydosporia, but only where the two are in close contact. Overall, the results indicate that readily-metabolisable carbon sources and unfavourable pH in the rhizosphere/egg-mass environment may compromise nematode parasitism by P. chlamydosporia. However, contrary to previous indications using other nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, ammonium nitrate (e.g. from fertilizers may enhance biocontrol potential in some circumstances.

  7. Thermostable alkaline halophilic-protease production by Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hagagy, Nashwa; Abdel Aziz, Mohamed; El-Meleigy, El Syaed; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the production and biochemical characterisation of a thermostable alkaline halophilic protease from Natronolimnobius innermongolicus WN18 (HQ658997), isolated from soda Lake of Wadi An-Natrun, Egypt. The enzyme was concentrated by spinning through a centriplus, centrifugal ultrafiltration Millipore membrane with a total yield of 25%. The relative molecular mass of this protease determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis ranged from 67 to 43 kDa. The extracellular protease of N. innermongolicus WN18 was dependent on high salt concentrations for activity and stability, and it had an optimum temperature of 60°C in the presence of 2.5 M NaCl. This enzyme was stable in a broad pH range (6-12) with an optimum pH of 9-10 for azocasein hydrolysis. This extracellular protease, therefore, could be defined as thermostable and haloalkaliphilic with distinct properties that make the enzyme applicable for different industrial purposes.

  8. Enslavement in the water body by toxic Aphanizomenon ovalisporum, inducing alkaline phosphatase in phytoplanktons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Yosef, Yehonathan; Sukenik, Assaf; Hadas, Ora; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit; Kaplan, Aaron

    2010-09-14

    The hepatotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) produced by certain cyanobacteria, including Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (hereafter Aphanizomenon) [1], seriously affects lake water quality [2], but its biological role is not known. Strong correlation between Aphanizomenon abundance in Lake Kinneret, Israel, and alkaline phosphatase (APase) activity suggests that inorganic phosphate (Pi) limitation induces the PHO regulon and APase secretion [3]. Staining lake samples with DAPI [4] revealed a high level of polyphosphate bodies (PPB) in Aphanizomenon. Application of enzyme-labeled fluorescence (ELF-APase) [5] showed APase in various organisms, but not in Aphanizomenon. ELF-APase signals and extracellular APase activity in Aphanizomenon were detected only after exploiting PPB under prolonged Pi deprivation in cultures or toward the end of its autumn bloom. Pi deprivation of Aphanizomenon induces CYN production, high-affinity Pi uptake, and an internal, not external, APase. Addition of Aphanizomenon spent media or CYN to various phytoplanktons, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, induced genes typically upregulated under Pi limitation and a rise in extracellular APase activity, despite ample surrounding Pi. Coculturing Aphanizomenon with Chlamydomonas or with Debarya sp. showed positive ELF-APase signals, but not in Aphanizomenon. CYN producers promote Pi supply by inducing APase secretion by other phytoplanktons, possibly explaining their increased abundance despite reduced Pi supply from watersheds.

  9. Alkaline stability of quaternary ammonium cations for alkaline fuel cell membranes and ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, M G; Kreuer, K D

    2015-02-01

    The alkaline stability of 26 different quaternary ammonium groups (QA) is investigated for temperatures up to 160 °C and NaOH concentrations up to 10 mol L(-1) with the aim to provide a basis for the selection of functional groups for hydroxide exchange membranes in alkaline fuel cells and of ionic-liquid cations stable in basic conditions. Most QAs exhibit unexpectedly high alkaline stability with the exception of aromatic cations. β-Protons are found to be far less susceptible to nucleophilic attack than previously suggested, whereas the presence of benzyl groups, nearby hetero-atoms, or other electron-withdrawing species promote degradation reactions significantly. Cyclic QAs proved to be exceptionally stable, with the piperidine-based 6-azonia-spiro[5.5]undecane featuring the highest half-life at the chosen conditions. Absolute and relative stabilities presented herein stand in contrast to literature data, the differences being ascribed to solvent effects on degradation.

  10. Characterization of serine 916 as an in vivo autophosphorylation site for protein kinase D/Protein kinase Cmu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S A; Rozengurt, E; Cantrell, D

    1999-09-10

    Activation of the serine kinase protein kinase D (PKD)/PKCmicro is controlled by the phosphorylation of two serine residues within its activation loop via a PKC-dependent signaling cascade. In this study we have identified the C-terminal serine 916 residue as an in vivo phosphorylation site within active PKD/PKCmu. An antibody that recognized PKD/PKCmu proteins specifically phosphorylated on the serine 916 residue was generated and used to show that phosphorylation of Ser-916 is induced by phorbol ester treatment of cells. Thus, the pS916 antibody is a useful tool to study the regulation of PKD/PKCmu activity in vivo. Antigen receptor ligation of T and B lymphocytes also induced phosphorylation of the serine 916 residue of PKD/PKCmu. Furthermore the regulatory FcgammaRIIB receptor, which mediates vital negative feedback signals to the B cell antigen receptor complex, inhibited the antigen receptor-induced activation and serine 916 phosphorylation of PKD/PKCmu. The degree of serine 916 phosphorylation during lymphocyte activation and inhibition exactly correlated with the activation status of PKD/PKCmu. Moreover, using different mutants of PKD/PKCmu, we show that serine 916 is not trans-phosphorylated by an upstream kinase but is rather an autophosphorylation event that occurs following activation of PKD/PKCmu.

  11. Feasibility study on the reaction of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO with (L-Serine-L-Serine and (L-Phenylalanine-L-Serine diketopiperazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitaram Bhavaraju

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the reaction of DABCO with the enol tosylate derivatives made from (L-Ser-L-Ser and (L-Phe-L-Ser diketopiperazines (DKP’s. The reaction between DABCO and EE-di-tosylate (L-Ser-L-Ser DKP (2, results in the isomerization of the serine di-tosylate from EE-2 to ZZ-2. This is the first direct example of the utility of DABCO as a reagent demonstrating the successful isomerization in a DKP derivative. The E-enol tosylate of (L-Phe-L-Ser DKP (4 upon reaction with DABCO provided a unique bis-ylidiene product (5.

  12. Perturbation of red blood cell membrane rigidity by extracellular ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulitschke, M; Nash, G B; Anstee, D J; Tanner, M J; Gratzer, W B

    1995-07-01

    It is known that binding of extracellular antibodies against the major sialoglycoprotein, glycophorin A, reduced the deformability of the red blood cell membrane. This has been taken to result from new or altered interactions between the glycophorin A and the membrane skeleton. We have shown by means of the micropipette aspiration technique that antibodies against the preponderant transmembrane protein, band 3, induce similar effects. A definite but much smaller reduction in elasticity of the membrane is engendered by univalent Fab fragments of the anti-band 3 antibodies. By examining cells genetically devoid of glycophorin A or containing a variant of this constituent, truncated at the inner membrane surface, we have shown that the anti-band 3 antibodies do not act through the band 3-associated glycophorin A. We examined the effect of anti-glycophorin A antibodies on homozygous Wr(a+b-) cells, in which an amino acid replacement in band 3 annihilates the Wright b (Wrb) epitope (comprising sequence elements of glycophorin A and band 3) and thus, by implication disrupts or perturbs the band 3-glycophorin A interaction; these cells show a much smaller response to an anti-glycophorin A antibody than do normal controls. We infer that in this case anti-glycophorin A antibodies exert their rigidifying effect through the associated band 3. Another anti-glycophorin A antibody, directed against an epitope remote from the membrane surface, however, increases the rigidity of both Wr(a+b-) and normal cells. This implies that not all antibodies act in the same manner in modifying the membrane mechanical properties. The effect exerted by anti-band 3 antibodies appears not to be transmitted through the band 3-ankyrin-spectrin pathway because the rigidifying effect of the intact antibody persists at alkaline pH, at which there is evidence that the ankyrin-band 3 link is largely dissociated. The large difference between the effects of saturating concentrations of the divalent and

  13. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  14. The matricellular receptor LRP1 forms an interface for signaling and endocytosis in modulation of the extracellular tumor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart eVan Gool

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The membrane protein low-density lipoprotein receptor related-protein 1 (LRP1 has been attributed a role in cancer. However, its presumably often indirect involvement is far from understood. LRP1 has both endocytic and signaling activities. As a matricellular receptor it is involved in regulation, mostly by clearing, of various extracellular matrix degrading enzymes including matrix metalloproteinases, serine proteases, protease-inhibitor complexes and the endoglycosidase heparanase. Furthermore, by binding extracellular ligands including growth factors and subsequent intracellular interaction with scaffolding and adaptor proteins it is involved in regulation of various signaling cascades. LRP1 expression levels are often downregulated in cancer and some studies consider low LRP1 levels a poor prognostic factor. On the contrary, upregulation in brain cancers has been noted and clinical trials explore the use of LRP1 as cargo receptor to deliver cytotoxic agents.This mini-review focuses on LRP1’s role in tumor growth and metastasis especially by modulation of the extracellular tumor environment. In relation to this role its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential will be discussed.

  15. Serine Protease Catalysis: A Computational Study of Tetrahedral Intermediates and Inhibitory Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Phong D; Mansoorabadi, Steven O; Frey, Perry A

    2016-08-04

    Peptide boronic acids and peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones (TFKs) inhibit serine proteases by forming monoanionic, tetrahedral adducts to serine in the active sites. Investigators regard these adducts as analogs of monoanionic, tetrahedral intermediates. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and fractional charge analysis show that tetrahedral adducts of model peptidyl TFKs are structurally and electrostatically very similar to corresponding tetrahedral intermediates. In contrast, the DFT calculations show the structures and electrostatic properties of analogous peptide boronate adducts to be significantly different. The peptide boronates display highly electrostatically positive boron, with correspondingly negative ligands in the tetrahedra. In addition, the computed boron-oxygen and boron-carbon bond lengths in peptide boronates (which are identical or very similar to the corresponding bonds in a peptide boronate adduct of α-lytic protease determined by X-ray crystallography at subangstrom resolution) are significantly longer than the corresponding bond lengths in model tetrahedral intermediates. Since protease-peptidyl TFKs incorporate low-barrier hydrogen bonds (LBHBs) between an active site histidine and aspartate, while the protease-peptide boronates do not, these data complement the spectroscopic and chemical evidence for the participation of LBHBs in catalysis by serine proteases. Moreover, while the potency of these classes of inhibitors can be correlated to the structures of the peptide moieties, the present results indicate that the strength of their bonds to serine contribute significantly to their inhibitory properties.

  16. Cloning, Expression and Activity Analysis of a Novel Fibrinolytic Serine Protease fromArenicola cristata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunling; JU Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplifi-cation of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encod-ing a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (<40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form ofA. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed inE. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result sug-gested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clotin vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene inA. cristata.

  17. Serine protease immunohistochemistry and lectin histochemistry in the small intestine of weaned and unweaned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, P J; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Wells, M

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of goblet cells containing serine protease and of those binding the lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) in the pig small intestine is altered during the period after weaning. Goblet cells exhibiting binding of other lectins were not altered. These alterations and other...

  18. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND PROTEIN ENGINEERING STRATEGY OF SUBTILASES, THE FAMILY OF SUBTILISIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEINASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIEZEN, RJ; DEVOS, WM; LEUNISSEN, JAM

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, > 50 subtilases are known, > 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase a

  19. Homology modelling and protein engineering strategy of subtilases, the family of subtilisin-like serine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de; Leunissen, Jack A.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, >50 subtilases are known, >40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and

  20. Identification and characterization of a surface-associated, subtilisin-like serine protease in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Romano, Pablo; Hernández, Roberto; Arroyo, Rossana; Alderete, John F; López-Villaseñor, Imelda

    2010-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite causing trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted infection in humans. This parasite has numerous proteases, most of which are cysteine proteases that appear to be involved in adherence and cytotoxicity of host cells. In this report we identify and characterize a putative subtilisin-like serine protease (SUB1). The sub1 gene encodes a 101-kDa protein. In silico analyses predict signal and pro-peptides at the N-terminus, and a transmembrane helix at the carboxy-terminal region. The sub1 gene was found as single copy by Southern analysis, albeit additional serine protease related genes are annotated in the T. vaginalis genome. The expression of sub1 could only be detected by RT-PCR and Ribonuclease Protection Assays, suggesting a low abundant mRNA. The sub1 gene transcription start site was correctly assigned by RPA. The transcript abundance was found to be modulated by the availability of iron in the growth medium. Antibodies raised to a specific SUB1 peptide recognized a single protein band (approximately 82 kDa) in Western blots, possibly representing the mature form of the protein. Immunofluorescence showed SUB1 on the trichomonad surface, and in dispersed vesicles throughout the cytoplasm. A bioinformatic analysis of genes annotated as serine proteases in the T. vaginalis genome is also presented. To our knowledge this is the first putative serine protease experimentally described for T. vaginalis.

  1. Serine aspartate repeat protein D increases Staphylococcus aureus virulence and survival in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askarian, Fatemeh; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Valderrama, J. Andrés; Ajayi, Clement; Sollid, Johanna U E; van Sorge, Nina M.; Nizet, Victor; van Strijp, Jos A G; Johannessen, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus expresses a panel of cell wall-anchored adhesins, including proteins belonging to the microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) family, exemplified by the serine-aspartate repeat protein D (SdrD), which serve key roles in colonization and

  2. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  3. CSF d-serine concentrations are similar in Alzheimer's disease, other dementias, and elderly controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, Elisanne A L M; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Gerrits, Johan; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Kuiperij, H Bea; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of d-serine were recently reported as a potential new biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), showing a perfect distinction between AD patients and healthy controls. In this study, we aimed to confirm these results and extend these previous findings to dementia with

  4. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  5. An Epithelial-Derived, Integral Membrane, Kunitz-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    an epithelial membrane serine protease. J Biol Chein 275: 36720-36725, 2000. prevents15. Lin CY, Anders J, Johnson M, and Dickson RB. Purification and...functions properly, thus trypsin-like activity. J Biol Chein 274: 18231--18236, 1999. 0 avoiding harmful effects. 17. Lin CY, Wang JK, Torri J, Dou L, Sang

  6. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND PROTEIN ENGINEERING STRATEGY OF SUBTILASES, THE FAMILY OF SUBTILISIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEINASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIEZEN, RJ; DEVOS, WM; LEUNISSEN, JAM

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, > 50 subtilases are known, > 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase a

  7. Identification and purification of O-acetyl-L-serine sulphhydrylase in Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    østergaard, Simon; Theilgaard, Hanne Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1998-01-01

    in relation to the cell-free extract. Two bands, showing exactly the same intensity, were present on a sodium dodecyl sulphate/ polyacrylamide gel, and the molecular masses of these were estimated to be 59 kDa and 68 kDa respectively. The K-m value for O-acetyl-L-serine and V-max of O...

  8. Entamoeba dispar: genetic diversity of Iranian isolates based on serine-rich Entamoeba dispar protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighi, A; Rasti, S; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, E; Kazemi, B; Bandehpour, M; Nochi, Z; Hooshyar, H; Rezaian, M

    2008-12-01

    The nucleotide sequences of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) gene have already exhibited stable and significant polymorphism in the gene studies. Serine-rich protein is also present and polymorphic in Entamoeba dispar which called SREDP. The polymorphism of the Serine-Rich Entamoeba dispar Protein (SREDP) gene among 8 isolates obtained from Iranian cyst carriers were analyzed by a nested PCR-RFLP followed by sequencing of the PCR products. From those isolates, six distinct DNA patterns were observed after PCR-RFLP of the nested PCR, whereas sequencing showed 8 different patterns among the isolates. The results demonstrate an extensive genetic variability among Iranian E. dispar isolates. The repeat-containing region of the SREDP was found extensively polymorphic in size, number and order of repeat units. Genetic diversity of Iranian E. dispar isolates based on the SREDP was more polymorphic in comparison of Serine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Protein (SREHP) of the E. histolytica isolates as well as were different from a few known SREDP genes.

  9. Ketamine induces tau hyperphosphorylation at serine 404 in the hippocampus of neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Jin; Zhiyong Hu; Mengjie Dong; Yidong Wu; Zhirui Zhu; Lili Xu

    2013-01-01

    Male Wistar 7-day-old rats were injected with 40 mg/kg ketamine intraperitoneally, followed by three additional injections of 20 mg/kg ketamine each upon restoration of the righting reflex. Neonatal rats injected with equivalent volumes of saline served as controls. Hippocampal samples were collected at 1, 7 or 14 days following administration. Electron microscopy showed that neuronal structure changed noticeably following ketamine treatment. Specifically, microtubular structure became irregular and disorganized. Quantitative real time-PCR revealed that phosphorylated tau mRNA was upregulated after ketamine. Western blot analysis demonstrated that phosphorylated tau levels at serine 396 initially decreased at 1 day after ketamine injection, and then gradually returned to control values. At 14 days after injection, levels of phosphorylated tau were higher in the ketamine group than in the control group. Tau protein phosphorylated at serine 404 significantly increased after ketamine injection, and then gradually decreased with time. However, the levels of tau protein at serine 404 were significantly greater in the ketamine group than in the control group until 14 days. The present results indicate that ketamine induces an increase of phosphorylated tau mRNA and excessive phosphorylation of tau protein at serine 404, causing disruption of microtubules in the neonatal rat hippocampus and potentially resulting in damage to hippocampal neurons.

  10. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Theresa Sigle

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2. Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania.

  11. Taraxalisin -- a serine proteinase from dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb s.l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenskaya, G N; Bogacheva, A M; Preusser, A; Kuznetsova, A V; Dunaevsky YaE; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1998-10-23

    Latex of dandelion roots contains a serine proteinase that hydrolyzes a chromogenic peptide substrate Glp-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA optimally at pH 8.0. Maximal activity of the proteinase in the roots is attained in April, at the beginning of plant development after the winter period. The protease was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation of the root extract followed by affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-Ala-Ala-Leu-mrp and gel filtration on Superose 6R performed in FPLC regime. Pure serine proteinase named taraxalisin was inactivated by specific inhibitors of serine proteinases, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Its molecular mass is 67 kDa and pI 4.5. pH stability range is 6-9 in the presence of 2 mM Ca2+, temperature optimum is at 40 degrees C; Km=0.37+/-0.06 mM. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin towards synthetic peptides and insulin B-chain is comparable with that of two other subtilisin-like serine proteinases, cucumisin and macluralisin. The taraxalisin N-terminal sequence traced for 15 residues revealed 40% coinciding residues when aligned with that of subtilisin Carlsberg.

  12. Cloning, expression and activity analysis of a novel fibrinolytic serine protease from Arenicola cristata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunling; Ju, Jiyu

    2015-06-01

    The full-length cDNA of a protease gene from a marine annelid Arenicola cristata was amplified through rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique and sequenced. The size of the cDNA was 936 bp in length, including an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 270 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequnce consisted of pro- and mature sequences. The protease belonged to the serine protease family because it contained the highly conserved sequence GDSGGP. This protease was novel as it showed a low amino acid sequence similarity (< 40%) to other serine proteases. The gene encoding the active form of A. cristata serine protease was cloned and expressed in E. coli. Purified recombinant protease in a supernatant could dissolve an artificial fibrin plate with plasminogen-rich fibrin, whereas the plasminogen-free fibrin showed no clear zone caused by hydrolysis. This result suggested that the recombinant protease showed an indirect fibrinolytic activity of dissolving fibrin, and was probably a plasminogen activator. A rat model with venous thrombosis was established to demonstrate that the recombinant protease could also hydrolyze blood clot in vivo. Therefore, this recombinant protease may be used as a thrombolytic agent for thrombosis treatment. To our knowledge, this study is the first of reporting the fibrinolytic serine protease gene in A. cristata.

  13. Homology modelling and protein engineering strategy of subtilases, the family of subtilisin-like serine proteinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, Roland J.; Vos, Willem M. de; Leunissen, Jack A.M.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, >50 subtilases are known, >40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and

  14. HOMOLOGY MODELING AND PROTEIN ENGINEERING STRATEGY OF SUBTILASES, THE FAMILY OF SUBTILISIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEINASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIEZEN, RJ; DEVOS, WM; LEUNISSEN, JAM

    1991-01-01

    Subtilases are members of the family of subtilisin-like serine proteases. Presently, > 50 subtilases are known, > 40 of which with their complete amino acid sequences. We have compared these sequences and the available three-dimensional structures (subtilisin BPN', subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase

  15. Identification and characterization of a chymotrypsin-like serine protease from periodontal pathogen, Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockensmith, K; Dillard, K; Sanders, B; Harville, B A

    2016-11-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a bacteria associated with severe periodontal disease. This study reports identification and characterization of a membrane-associated serine protease from T. forsythia. The protease was isolated from T. forsythia membrane fractions and shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen. The protease was able to cleave both substrates over a wide range of pH values, however optimal cleavage occurred at pH 7.5 for gelatin and 8.0 for type I collagen. The protease was also shown to cleave both gelatin and type I collagen at the average reported temperature for the gingival sulcus however it showed a lack of thermal stability with a complete loss of activity by 60 °C. When treated with protease inhibitors the enzyme's activity could only be completely inhibited by serine protease inhibitors antipain and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Further characterization of the protease utilized serine protease synthetic peptides. The protease cleaved N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide but not Nα-benzoyl-dl-arginine p-nitroanilide (BAPNA) or N-methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val p-nitroanilide indicating that the protease is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease. Since type I collagen is a major component in the gingival tissues and periodontal ligament, identification and characterization of this enzyme provides important information regarding the role of T. forsythia in periodontal disease.

  16. The serine-threonine kinase LKB1 is essential for survival under energetic stress in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, Y.U.; Wang, L.; Zevenhoven, J.; van Rooijen, E.; van Lohuizen, M.; Giles, R.H.; Clevers, H.; Haramis, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the serine-threonine kinase (LKB1) lead to a gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis disorder with increased predisposition to cancer (Peutz-Jeghers syndrome). LKB1 has many targets, including the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that is phosphorylated under low-energy conditions.

  17. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan.

  18. The effect of irrigated rice cropping on the alkalinity of two alkaline rice soils in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, van P.J.A.; Zelfde, van 't J.A.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Hammecker, C.

    2004-01-01

    Irrigated rice cropping is practiced to reclaim alkaline-sodic soils in many parts of the world. This practice is in apparent contrast with earlier studies in the Sahel, which suggests that irrigated rice cropping may lead to the formation of alkaline-sodic soils. Soil column experiments were done w

  19. The mechanism of mineralization and the role of alkaline phosphatase in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orimo, Hideo

    2010-02-01

    Biomineralization is the process by which hydroxyapatite is deposited in the extracellular matrix. Physiological mineralization occurs in hard tissues, whereas pathological calcification occurs in soft tissues. The first step of mineralization is the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals within matrix vesicles that bud from the surface membrane of hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and odontoblasts. This is followed by propagation of hydroxyapatite into the extracellular matrix and its deposition between collagen fibrils. Extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate, provided by NPP1 and ANKH, inhibits hydroxyapatite formation. Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) hydrolyzes pyrophosphate and provides inorganic phosphate to promote mineralization. Inorganic pyrophosphate, pyridoxal phosphate, and phosphoethanolamine are thought to be the physiologic substrates of TNAP. These accumulate in the event of TNAP deficiency, e.g., in cases of hypophosphatasia. The gene encoding TNAP is mapped to chromosome 1, consists of 12 exons, and possesses regulatory motifs in the 5'-untranslated region. Inhibition of TNAP enzymatic activity suppresses TNAP mRNA expression and mineralization in vitro. Hypophosphatasia is an inherited systemic bone disease characterized by hypomineralization of hard tissues. The phenotype of hypophosphatasia is varied. To date, more than 200 mutations in the TNAP gene have been reported. Knockout mice mimic the phenotypes of severe hypophosphatasia. Among the mutations in the TNAP gene, c.1559delT is frequent in the Japanese population. This frameshift mutation results in the expression of an abnormally long protein that is degraded in cells. DNA-based prenatal diagnosis using chorionic villus sampling has been developed, but requires thorough genetic counseling. Although hypophosphatasia is untreatable at present, the recent success of enzyme replacement therapy offers promise. The problems presented by impaired mineralization in age

  20. The selection of alkaline protease-producing yeasts from marine environments and evaluation of their bioactive peptide production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; CHI Zhenming; WANG Xianghong; PENG Ying; CHI Zhe

    2009-01-01

    A total of 400 yeast strains from seawater, sediments, saltern mud, marine fish guts, and marine algae were obtained. The protease activity of the yeast cultures was estimated, after which four strains (HN3.11, N11b, YF04C and HN4.9) capable of secreting extracellular alkaline protease were isolated. The isolated strains were identified as Aureobasidium pullulans, Yarrowia lipolytica, Issatchenkia orientalis and Cryptococcus cf. aureus. The optimal pH of the protease activity produced by strains HN3.11, YF04C, and HN4.9 was 9.0, while that of the protease produced by strain N11b was 10.0. The optimal temperature for protease activity was 45°C for strains HN3.11, N11b, and YF04C, and 50°C for strain HN4.9. After digestion of shrimp (Penaeus vannamei) protein and spirulina (Arthospira platensis) protein with the four crude alkaline proteases, the filtrate from spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) powder digested by the crude alkaline protease of strain HN3.11 was found to have the highest antioxidant activity (61.4%) and the highest angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities (68.4%). The other filtrates had much lower antioxidant activity and ACE-inhibitory activities.

  1. Distinct biochemical properties of human serine hydroxymethyltransferase compared with the Plasmodium enzyme: implications for selective inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinthong, Chatchadaporn; Maenpuen, Somchart; Amornwatcharapong, Watcharee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-06-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) catalyzes the transfer of a hydroxymethyl group from l-serine to tetrahydrofolate to yield glycine and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate. Our previous investigations have shown that SHMTs from Plasmodium spp. (P. falciparum, Pf; P. vivax, Pv) are different from the enzyme from rabbit liver in that Plasmodium SHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. In this report, the biochemical and biophysical properties of the Plasmodium and the human cytosolic form (hcSHMT) enzymes including ligand binding and kinetics were investigated. The data indicate that, similar to Plasmodium enzymes, hcSHMT can use d-serine as a substrate. However, hcSHMT displays many properties that are different from those of the Plasmodium enzymes. The molar absorption coefficient of hcSHMT-bound pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) is much greater than PvSHMT-bound or PfSHMT-bound PLP. The binding interactions of hcSHMT and Plasmodium SHMT with d-serine are different, as only the Plasmodium enzyme undergoes formation of a quinonoid-like species upon binding to d-serine. Furthermore, it has been noted that hcSHMT displays strong substrate inhibition by tetrahydrofolate (THF) (at THF > 40 μm), compared with SHMTs from Plasmodium and other species. The pH-activity profile of hcSHMT shows higher activities at lower pH values corresponding to a pKa value of 7.8 ± 0.1. Thiosemicarbazide reacts with hcSHMT following a one-step model [k1 of 12 ± 0.6 m(-1) ·s(-1) and k-1 of (1.0 ± 0.6) × 10(-3) s(-1) ], while the same reaction with PfSHMT involves at least three steps. All data indicated that the ligand binding environment of SHMT from human and Plasmodium are different, indicating that it should be possible to develop species-selective inhibitors in future studies. serine hydroxymethyltransferase, EC 2.1.2.1; 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase, EC 1.5.1.5. © 2014 FEBS.

  2. Batteries: from alkaline to zinc-air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondelinger, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    There is no perfect disposable battery--one that will sit on the shelf for 20 years, then continually provide unlimited current, at a completely constant voltage until exhausted, without producing heat. There is no perfect rechargeable battery--one with all of the above characteristics and will also withstand an infinite overcharge while providing an equally infinite cycle life. There are only compromises. Every battery selection is a compromise between the ideally required characteristics, the advantages, and the limitations of each battery type. General selection of a battery type to power a medical device is largely outside the purview of the biomed. Initially, these are engineering decisions made at the time of medical equipment design and are intended to be followed in perpetuity. However, since newer cell types evolve and the manufacturer's literature is fixed at the time of printing, some intelligent substitutions may be made as long as the biomed understands the characteristics of both the recommended cell and the replacement cell. For example, when the manufacturer recommends alkaline, it is usually because of the almost constant voltage it produces under the devices' design load. Over time, other battery types may be developed that will meet the intent of the manufacturer, at a lower cost, providing longer operational life, at a lower environmental cost, or with a combination of these advantages. In the Obstetrical Doppler cited at the beginning of this article, the user had put in carbon-zinc cells, and the biomed had unknowingly replaced them with carbonzinc cells. If the alkaline cells recommended by the manufacturer had been used, there would have been the proper output voltage at the battery terminals when the [table: see text] cells were at their half-life. Instead, the device refused to operate since the battery voltage was below presumed design voltage. While battery-type substitutions may be easily and relatively successfully made in disposable

  3. Roles of serine accumulation and catabolism in the colonization of the murine urinary tract by Escherichia coli CFT073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfora, Andrew T; Haugen, Brian J; Roesch, Paula; Redford, Peter; Welch, Rodney A

    2007-11-01

    A D-serine deaminase (DsdA) mutant of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain CFT073 has a hypercolonization phenotype in a murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) due to increased virulence gene expression by an unknown mechanism (B. J. Haugen et al., Infect. Immun. 75:278-289, 2007). DsdC is a D-serine-dependent activator of dsdXA transcription. DsdC may regulate the virulence genes responsible for hypercolonization. The loss of DsdA leads to increased intracellular accumulation of D-serine. In this study we show that deletion of the genes encoding L-serine deaminases SdaA and SdaB resulted in a mutant that accumulates higher intracellular levels of L-serine than CFT073. CFT073 sdaA sdaB has a mild competitive colonization defect whereas a CFT073 dsdA sdaA sdaB triple mutant shows a greater loss in competitive colonization ability. Thus, the inability to generate serine-specific catabolic products does not result in hypercolonization and the ability to catabolize serine represents a positive physiological trait during murine UTI. CFT073 dsdC and CFT073 dsdC dsdA mutants continue to outcompete the wild type in the UTI model. These results confirm that loss of DsdA activity results in the hypercolonization phenotype and that DsdC does not play a direct role in the elevated-colonization phenotype. Interestingly, a CFT073 dsdA mutant with deletions of D-serine transporter genes dsdX and cycA shows wild-type colonization levels of the bladder but is attenuated for kidney colonization. Thus, D-serine acts as a signal for hypercolonization and virulence gene expression by CFT073 dsdA, whereas overall catabolism of serine represents a positive Escherichia coli fitness trait during UTI.

  4. Roles of Serine Accumulation and Catabolism in the Colonization of the Murine Urinary Tract by Escherichia coli CFT073▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anfora, Andrew T.; Haugen, Brian J.; Roesch, Paula; Redford, Peter; Welch, Rodney A.

    2007-01-01

    A d-serine deaminase (DsdA) mutant of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain CFT073 has a hypercolonization phenotype in a murine model of urinary tract infection (UTI) due to increased virulence gene expression by an unknown mechanism (B. J. Haugen et al., Infect. Immun. 75:278-289, 2007). DsdC is a d-serine-dependent activator of dsdXA transcription. DsdC may regulate the virulence genes responsible for hypercolonization. The loss of DsdA leads to increased intracellular accumulation of d-serine. In this study we show that deletion of the genes encoding l-serine deaminases SdaA and SdaB resulted in a mutant that accumulates higher intracellular levels of l-serine than CFT073. CFT073 sdaA sdaB has a mild competitive colonization defect whereas a CFT073 dsdA sdaA sdaB triple mutant shows a greater loss in competitive colonization ability. Thus, the inability to generate serine-specific catabolic products does not result in hypercolonization and the ability to catabolize serine represents a positive physiological trait during murine UTI. CFT073 dsdC and CFT073 dsdC dsdA mutants continue to outcompete the wild type in the UTI model. These results confirm that loss of DsdA activity results in the hypercolonization phenotype and that DsdC does not play a direct role in the elevated-colonization phenotype. Interestingly, a CFT073 dsdA mutant with deletions of d-serine transporter genes dsdX and cycA shows wild-type colonization levels of the bladder but is attenuated for kidney colonization. Thus, d-serine acts as a signal for hypercolonization and virulence gene expression by CFT073 dsdA, whereas overall catabolism of serine represents a positive Escherichia coli fitness trait during UTI. PMID:17785472

  5. Roscovitine inhibits EBNA1 serine 393 phosphorylation, nuclear localization, transcription, and episome maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A; Koehler, Angela N; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-03-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and (486)RALL(489) and (580)KDLVM(584) as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence.

  6. Roscovitine Inhibits EBNA1 Serine 393 Phosphorylation, Nuclear Localization, Transcription, and Episome Maintenance▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Soo; Lee, Eun Kyung; Soni, Vishal; Lewis, Timothy A.; Koehler, Angela N.; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Kieff, Elliott

    2011-01-01

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection causes human lymphomas and carcinomas. EBV usually persists as an episome in malignant cells. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBNA1 binding to multiple cognate sites in oriP. To search for inhibitors of EBNA1- and oriP-dependent episome maintenance or transcription, a library of 40,550 small molecules was screened for compounds that inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and do not inhibit EBNA1- and oriP-independent transcription. This screening identified roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), CDK2, CDK5, and CDK7. Based on motif predictions of EBNA1 serine 393 as a CDK phosphorylation site and 486RALL489 and 580KDLVM584 as potential cyclin binding domains, we hypothesized that cyclin binding to EBNA1 may enable CDK1, -2, -5, or -7 to phosphorylate serine 393. We found that Escherichia coli-expressed EBNA1 amino acids 387 to 641 were phosphorylated in vitro by CDK1-, -2-, -5-, and -7/cyclin complexes and serine 393 phosphorylation was roscovitine inhibited. Further, S393A mutation abrogated phosphorylation. S393A mutant EBNA1 was deficient in supporting EBNA1- and oriP-dependent transcription and episome persistence, and roscovitine had little further effect on the diminished S393A mutant EBNA1-mediated transcription or episome persistence. Immunoprecipitated FLAG-EBNA1 was phosphorylated in vitro, and roscovitine inhibited this phosphorylation. Moreover, roscovitine decreased nuclear EBNA1 and often increased cytoplasmic EBNA1, whereas S393A mutant EBNA1 was localized equally in the nucleus and cytoplasm and was unaffected by roscovitine treatment. These data indicate that roscovitine effects are serine 393 specific and that serine 393 is important in EBNA1- and oriPCp-dependent transcription and episome persistence. PMID:21209116

  7. Signaling pathways induced by serine proteases to increase intestinal epithelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahey, Kelcie A; Ronaghan, Natalie J; Shang, Judie; Dion, Sébastien P; Désilets, Antoine; Leduc, Richard; MacNaughton, Wallace K

    2017-01-01

    Changes in barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract are thought to contribute to the inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Previous work in our lab demonstrated that apical exposure of intestinal epithelial cell lines to serine proteases results in an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). However, the underlying mechanisms governing this response are unclear. We aimed to determine the requirement for proteolytic activity, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and downstream intracellular signaling in initiating and maintaining enhanced barrier function following protease treatment using a canine intestinal epithelial cell line (SCBN). We also examined the role of phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on the serine protease-induced increase in TER through. It was found that proteolytic activity of the serine proteases trypsin and matriptase is required to initiate and maintain the protease-mediated increase in TER. We also show that MMP-independent EGFR activation is essential to the sustained phase of the protease response, and that Src kinases may mediate EGFR transactivation. PI3-K and ERK1/2 signaling were important in reaching a maximal increase in TER following protease stimulation; however, their upstream activators are yet to be determined. CK2 inhibition prevented the increase in TER induced by serine proteases. The bradykinin B(2) receptor was not involved in the change in TER in response to serine proteases, and no change in phosphorylation of MLC was observed after trypsin or matriptase treatment. Taken together, our data show a requirement for ongoing proteolytic activity, EGFR transactivation, as well as downstream PI3-K, ERK1/2, and CK2 signaling in protease-mediated barrier enhancement of intestinal epithelial cells. The pathways mediating enhanced barrier function by proteases may be novel therapeutic targets for intestinal disorders characterized by disrupted epithelial

  8. Microbial thiocyanate utilization under highly alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, D Y; Tourova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kuenen, J G

    2001-02-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS-) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  9. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  10. Extracellular vesicles: fundamentals and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Nassar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All types of cells of eukaryotic organisms produce and release small nanovesicles into their extracellular environment. Early studies have described these vesicles as ′garbage bags′ only to remove obsolete cellular molecules. Valadi and colleagues, in 2007, were the first to discover the capability of circulating extracellular vesicles (EVs to horizontally transfer functioning gene information between cells. These extracellular vesicles express components responsible for angiogenesis promotion, stromal remodeling, chemoresistance, genetic exchange, and signaling pathway activation through growth factor/receptor transfer. EVs represent an important mode of intercellular communication by serving as vehicles for transfer between cells of membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, signaling proteins, and RNAs. They contribute to physiology and pathology, and they have a myriad of potential clinical applications in health and disease. Moreover, vesicles can pass the blood-brain barrier and may perhaps even be considered as naturally occurring liposomes. These cell-derived EVs not only represent a central mediator of the disease microenvironment, but their presence in the peripheral circulation may serve as a surrogate for disease biopsies, enabling real-time diagnosis and disease monitoring. In this review, we′ll be addressing the characteristics of different types of extracellular EVs, as well as their clinical relevance and potential as diagnostic markers, and also define therapeutic options.

  11. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  12. Fragmentation of extracellular matrix by hypochlorous acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Alan A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of extracellular matrix with cells regulates their adhesion, migration and proliferation, and it is believed that damage to vascular matrix components is a factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Evidence has been provided for a role for the haem enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase)...

  13. Titratable Acidity and Alkalinity of Red Soil Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAOZONG-CHEN; HEQUN; 等

    1993-01-01

    The surfaces of red soils have an apparent amphoteric character,carrying titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity simultaneously.The titratable acidity arises from deprotonation of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces and dissociation of weak-acid functional groups of soil organic matter,while the titratable alkalinity is derived from release of hydroxyl groups of hydrous oxide-type surfaces.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity mainly depended on the composition and content of iron and aluminum oxides in the soils.The results showed that the titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity were in significantly positive correlation not only with the content of amorphous aluminum oxide(Alo) and iron oxide(Feo) extracted with acid ammonium oxalate solution,free iron oxide(Fed) extracted with sodium dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate(DCB) and clays,but also with the zero point of charge (ZPC) of the samples.Organic matter made an important contribution to the titratable acidity.the titratable alkalinity was closely correlated with the amount of fluoride ions adsorbed.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity of red soils were influenced by parent materials,being in the order of red soil derived from basalt> that from tuff> that from granite.The titratable acidity and titratable alkalinity ware closely related with origination of the variable charges of red soils,and to a certain extent were responsible for variable negative and positive charges of the soils.

  14. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daye(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cheng. W. Y., Cyclic 3', 5'-nucleotide phosphodiestrase: demonstration of an activator, Biochm. Biophys. Res. Commun.,1970, 38: 533-538.[2]Boynton, A. L., Whitfield, J. F., MacManus, J. P., Calmodulin stimulates DNA synthesis by rat liver cells, BBRC.1980,95(2): 745-749.[3]Gorbacherskaya, L. V., Borovkova, T. V., Rybin, U. O. et al., Effect of exogenous calmodulin on lymphocyte proliferation in normal subjects, Bull Exp. Med. Biol., 1983, 95: 361-363.[4]Wong, P. Y.-K., Lee, W. H., Chao, PH.-W., The role of calmodulin in prostaglandin metabolism, Ann. NY Acad. Sci.,1980, 356: 179-189.[5]Mac Neil, S., Dawson, R. A., Crocker, G. et al., Effects of extracellular calmodulin and calmodulin antagonists on B16 melanoma cell growth, J. Invest. Dermatol., 1984, 83: 15-19.[6]Crocker, D. G., Dawson, R. A., Mac Neil, S. et al., An extracellular role for calmodulin-like activity in cell proliferation,Biochem. J., 1988, 253: 877-884.[7]Polito. V. S., Calmodulin and calmodulin inhibitors: effect on pollen germination and tube growth, in Pollen: Biology and Implications for Plant Breeding (eds. Mulvshy, D. L., Ottaviaro, E.), New York: Elsevier, 1983.53-60.[8]Biro, R. L., Sun, D. Y., Roux, S. J.et al., Characterization of oat calmodulin and radioimmunoassay of its subcellular distribution, Plant Physiol., 1984,75: 382-386.[9]Terry, M. E., Bonner, B. A., An examination of centrifugation as a method of extracting an extracellular solution from peas, and its use for the study of IAA-induced growth, Plant Physiol., 1980, 66: 321-325.[10]Josefina, H. N., Aldasars, J. J., Rodriguez, D., Localization of calmodulin on embryonic Cice aricium L, in Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Calcium in Plant Development (ed. Trewavas, A. J.), New York, London: Plenum Press, 1985, 313.[11]Dauwalder, M., Roux, S. J., Hardison, L., Distribution of calmodulin in pea seedling: immunocytochemical localization in plumules and root apices, Planta, 1986, 168: 461

  15. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Bethany A

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  16. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Bethany A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs), revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP) proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) and intestinal AP (IAP). This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont. PMID:28824625

  17. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  18. Alkaline phosphatase as a periodontal disease marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malhotra Ranjan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The potential of alkaline phosphatase (ALP as an important diagnostic marker of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF has been the subject to investigation since 1970. ALP is stored in specific granules and secretory vesicles of the neutrophils and is mainly released during their migration to the site of infection. It is also present in bacteria within dental plaque, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. It has, thus, become important to elucidate whether GCF levels of ALP are potential measures of the inflammatory activity occurring in the adjacent periodontal tissues. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the total activity of ALP in the GCF collected from healthy sites, sites with gingivitis and with chronic adult periodontitis. An attempt was also made to establish the correlation of ALP activity with plaque index, gingival index, bleeding index and probing depth. Materials and Methods: A total of 18 patients were divided into three groups: viz., healthy sites, Group I; gingivitis, Group II; chronic periodontitis, Group III. Clinical parameters like plaque index, bleeding index, gingival index and probing depth were recorded. The ALP level in GCF of all three groups was determined by spectrophotometric analysis. Results: Total enzyme activity of ALP was significantly higher in periodontitis as compared with that in healthy and gingivitis sites, and was significantly and positively correlated with probing depth. Conclusion: ALP can be considered as a periodontal disease marker as it can distinguish between healthy and inflamed sites. However, to better define its capacity for periodontal diagnosis, additional longitudinal studies are required.

  19. Alkaline Phosphatase, an Unconventional Immune Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Rader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen an increase in the number of studies focusing on alkaline phosphatases (APs, revealing an expanding complexity of function of these enzymes. Of the four human AP (hAP proteins, most is known about tissue non-specific AP (TNAP and intestinal AP (IAP. This review highlights current understanding of TNAP and IAP in relation to human health and disease. TNAP plays a role in multiple processes, including bone mineralization, vitamin B6 metabolism, and neurogenesis, is the genetic cause of hypophosphatasia, influences inflammation through regulation of purinergic signaling, and has been implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. IAP regulates fatty acid absorption and has been implicated in the regulation of diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome. IAP and TNAP can dephosphorylate bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharide, and IAP has been identified as a potential regulator of the composition of the intestinal microbiome, an evolutionarily conserved function. Endogenous and recombinant bovine APs and recombinant hAPs are currently being explored for their potential as pharmacological agents to treat AP-associated diseases and mitigate multiple sources of inflammation. Continued research on these versatile proteins will undoubtedly provide insight into human pathophysiology, biochemistry, and the human holobiont.

  20. 2nd Generation alkaline electrolysis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, L. [Aarhus Univ. Business and Social Science - Centre for Energy Technologies (CET), Aarhus (Denmark); Kjartansdottir, C.K. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Mechanical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Allebrod, F. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-03-15

    The overall purpose of this project has been to contribute to this load management by developing a 2{sup nd} generation of alkaline electrolysis system characterized by being compact, reliable, inexpensive and energy efficient. The specific targets for the project have been to: 1) Increase cell efficiency to more than 88% (according to the higher heating value (HHV)) at a current density of 200 mA /cm{sup 2}; 2) Increase operation temperature to more than 100 degree Celsius to make the cooling energy more valuable; 3) Obtain an operation pressure more than 30 bar hereby minimizing the need for further compression of hydrogen for storage; 4) Improve stack architecture decreasing the price of the stack with at least 50%; 5) Develop a modular design making it easy to customize plants in the size from 20 to 200 kW; 6) Demonstrating a 20 kW 2{sup nd} generation stack in H2College at the campus of Arhus University in Herning. The project has included research and development on three different technology tracks of electrodes; an electrochemical plating, an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) and finally a high temperature and pressure (HTP) track with operating temperature around 250 deg. C and pressure around 40 bar. The results show that all three electrode tracks have reached high energy efficiencies. In the electrochemical plating track a stack efficiency of 86.5% at a current density of 177mA/cm{sup 2} and a temperature of 74.4 deg. C has been shown. The APS track showed cell efficiencies of 97%, however, coatings for the anode side still need to be developed. The HTP cell has reached 100 % electric efficiency operating at 1.5 V (the thermoneutral voltage) with a current density of 1. 1 A/cm{sup 2}. This track only tested small cells in an externally heated laboratory set-up, and thus the thermal loss to surroundings cannot be given. The goal set for the 2{sup nd} generation electrolyser system, has been to generate 30 bar pressure in the cell stack. An obstacle to be

  1. Engineering challenges of ocean alkalinity enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, T.; Renforth, P.

    2012-04-01

    The addition of calcium oxide (CaO) to the ocean as a means of enhancing the capacity of the ocean as a carbon sink was first proposed by Haroon Kheshgi in 1995. Calcium oxide is created by heating high purity limestone in a kiln to temperatures of approximately 1000°C. Addition of this material to the ocean draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere (approximately 1 tonne of CaO could sequester 1.3 tonnes of CO2). Abiotic carbonate precipitation is inhibited in the surface ocean. This is a carbon and energy expensive process, where approximately 0.8 tonnes of CO2 are produced at a point source for every tonne sequestered. The feasibility of ocean alkalinity enhancement requires capture and storage of the point source of CO2. We present details of a feasibility study of the engineering challenges of Kheshgi's method focusing on the potential scalability and costs of the proposed process. To draw down a PgC per year would require the extraction and processing of ~6Pg of limestone per year, which is similar in scale to the current coal industry. Costs are estimated at ~USD30-40 per tonne of CO2 sequestered through the process, which is favourable to comparative processes. Kheshgi, H. (1995) Energy 20 (9) 915-922

  2. Alkaline fuel cell with nitride membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shen-Huei; Pilaski, Moritz; Wartmann, Jens; Letzkus, Florian; Funke, Benedikt; Dura, Georg; Heinzel, Angelika

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this work is to fabricate patterned nitride membranes with Si-MEMS-technology as a platform to build up new membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEA) for alkaline fuel cell applications. Two 6-inch wafer processes based on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) were developed for the fabrication of separated nitride membranes with a nitride thickness up to 1 μm. The mechanical stability of the perforated nitride membrane has been adjusted in both processes either by embedding of subsequent ion implantation step or by optimizing the deposition process parameters. A nearly 100% yield of separated membranes of each deposition process was achieved with layer thickness from 150 nm to 1 μm and micro-channel pattern width of 1μm at a pitch of 3 μm. The process for membrane coating with electrolyte materials could be verified to build up MEA. Uniform membrane coating with channel filling was achieved after the optimization of speed controlled dip-coating method and the selection of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as electrolyte solvent. Finally, silver as conductive material was defined for printing a conductive layer onto the MEA by Ink-Technology. With the established IR-thermography setup, characterizations of MEAs in terms of catalytic conversion were performed successfully. The results of this work show promise for build up a platform on wafer-level for high throughput experiments.

  3. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  4. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    and pressures. Two measurement systems were built to perform measurements under high pressures and at elevated temperatures of up to 95 bar and 250 °C, respectively. The conductivity of aqueous KOH and aqueous KOH immobilized in a porous SrTiO3 structure were investigated at elevated temperatures and high...... the operational temperature and pressure to produce pressurized hydrogen at high rate (m3 H2·h-1·m-2 cell area) and high electrical efficiency. This work describes an exploratory technical study of the possibility to produce hydrogen and oxygen with a new type of alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures...... concentrations of the electrolyte using the van der Pauw method in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Conductivity values as high as 2.9 S cm-1 for 45 wt% KOH aqueous KOH and 0.84 S cm-1 for the immobilized KOH of the same concentration were measured at 200 °C. Porous SrTiO3 was used...

  5. Oxidative and other posttranslational modifications in extracellular vesicle biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó-Taylor, Katalin; Ryan, Brent; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Szabó, Tamás G; Sódar, Barbara; Holub, Marcsilla; Németh, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; Pállinger, Éva; Winyard, Paul; Buzás, Edit I

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular vesicles including exosomes, microvesicles and apoptotic vesicles, are phospholipid bilayer surrounded structures secreted by cells universally, in an evolutionarily conserved fashion. Posttranslational modifications such as oxidation, citrullination, phosphorylation and glycosylation play diverse roles in extracellular vesicle biology. Posttranslational modifications orchestrate the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles. The signals extracellular vesicles transmit between cells also often function via modulating posttranslational modifications of target molecules, given that extracellular vesicles are carriers of several active enzymes catalysing posttranslational modifications. Posttranslational modifications of extracellular vesicles can also contribute to disease pathology by e.g. amplifying inflammation, generating neoepitopes or carrying neoepitopes themselves.

  6. Optimization of Soilless Media for Alkaline Irrigation Water

    OpenAIRE

    Tramp, Cody Alexander; Chard, Julie K.; Bugbee, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    High root zone pH reduces nutrient availability and high alkalinity water is strongly buffered around an alkaline pH. Soilless media can be altered to improve nutrient availability. This study was conducted to optimize the composition of soilless media for use with high alkalinity water. Mixes of peat and/or perlite or vermiculite in 50/50 and 33/33/33 volumetric ratios were tested. In some studies, mixes were also amended with up to 2.4 g/L of dolomite limestone to neutralize the initial aci...

  7. Mixed alkaline earth effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    2013-01-01

    While the mixed alkali effect has received significant attention in the glass literature, the mixed alkaline earth effect has not been thoroughly studied. Here, we investigate the latter effect by partial substitution of magnesium for calcium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and NMR...... spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural and topological features of these glasses, and hence into the mixed alkaline earth effect. We demonstrate that the mixed alkaline earth effect manifests itself as a maximum in the amount of bonded tetrahedral units and as a minimum in liquid fragility index...

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Stimulates Extracellular-Signal Regulated Kinase Phosphorylation of a Novel Site on Cytoplasmic Dynein Intermediate Chain 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Catling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK signaling is required for a multitude of physiological and patho-physiological processes. However, the identities of the proteins that ERK phosphorylates to elicit these responses are incompletely known. Using an affinity purification methodology of general utility, here we identify cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain 2 (DYNC1I-2, IC-2 as a novel substrate for ERK following epidermal growth factor receptor stimulation of fibroblasts. IC-2 is a subunit of cytoplasmic dynein, a minus-end directed motor protein necessary for transport of diverse cargos along microtubules. Emerging data support the hypothesis that post-translational modification regulates dynein but the signaling mechanisms used are currently unknown. We find that ERK phosphorylates IC-2 on a novel, highly conserved Serine residue proximal to the binding site for the p150Glued subunit of the cargo adapter dynactin. Surprisingly, neither constitutive phosphorylation nor a phosphomimetic substitution of this Serine influences binding of p150Glued to IC-2. These data suggest that ERK phosphorylation of IC-2 regulates dynein function through mechanisms other than its interaction with dynactin.

  9. Inside the alkalinity engine: the role of electron donors in the organomineralization potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, K L; Kading, T J; Braissant, O; Dupraz, C; Visscher, P T

    2012-11-01

    Mineral precipitation in microbial mats may have been the key to their preservation as fossil stromatolites, potentially documenting evidence of the earliest life on Earth. Two factors that contribute to carbonate mineral precipitation are the saturation index (SI) and the presence of nucleation sites. Both of these can be influenced by micro-organisms, which can either alter SI through their metabolisms, or produce and consume organic substances such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that can affect nucleation. It is the balance of individual metabolisms within the mat community that determines the pH and the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, thereby potentially increasing the alkalinity and consequently the SI. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are an important component of this 'alkalinity engine.' The activity of SRB often peaks in layers where CaCO(3) precipitates, and mineral precipitation has been demonstrated in SRB cultures; however, the effect of their metabolism on the alkalinity engine and actual contribution to mineral precipitation is the subject of controversy. Here, we show through culture experiments, theoretical calculations, and geochemical modeling studies that the pH, alkalinity, and organomineralization potential will vary depending on the type of electron donor. Specifically, hydrogen and formate can increase the pH, but electron donors like lactate and ethanol, and to a lesser extent glycolate, decrease the pH. The implication of this for the lithification of mats is that the combination of processes supplying electron donors and the utilization of these compounds by SRB may be critical to promoting mineral precipitation.

  10. Inhibition of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and endothelial cell damage by l-serine and glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Woo-Cheol; Han, Inhoi; Lee, Wonseok; Choi, You-Jin; Lee, Kang-Yo; Kim, Dong Gwang; Jung, Seung-Hwan; Oh, Seon-Hee; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The use of vitamins to modulate homocysteine metabolism substantially lowers the risk by reducing plasma homocysteine levels. In this study, we evaluated the effects of l-serine and related amino acids on homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and endothelial cell damage using EA.hy926 human endothelial cells. Homocysteine treatment decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis, which were reversed by cotreatment with l-serine. l-Serine inhibited homocysteine-induced ER stress as verified by decreased glucose-regulated protein 78kDa (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) expression as well as X-box binding protein 1 (xbp1) mRNA splicing. The effects of l-serine on homocysteine-induced ER stress are not attributed to intracellular homocysteine metabolism, but instead to decreased homocysteine uptake. Glycine exerted effects on homocysteine-induced ER stress, apoptosis, and cell viability that were comparable to those of l-serine. Although glycine did not affect homocysteine uptake or export, coincubation of homocysteine with glycine for 24h reduced the intracellular concentration of homocysteine. Taken together, l-serine and glycine cause homocysteine-induced endothelial cell damage by reducing the level of intracellular homocysteine. l-Serine acts by competitively inhibiting homocysteine uptake in the cells. However, the mechanism(s) by which glycine lowers homocysteine levels are unclear.

  11. Optimisation of freeze drying conditions for purified serine protease from mango (Mangifera indicaCv. Chokanan) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrnoush, Amid; Tan, Chin Ping; Hamed, Mirhosseini; Aziz, Norashikin Ab; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the possible relationship between the encapsulation variables, namely serine protease content (9-50mg/ml, X1), Arabic gum (0.2-10%(w/w), X2), maltodextrin (2-5%(w/w), X3) and calcium chloride (1.3-5.5%(w/w), X4) on the enzymatic properties of encapsulated serine protease. The study demonstrated that Arabic gum, maltodextrin and calcium chloride, as coating agents, protected serine protease from activity loss during freeze-drying. The overall optimum region resulted in a suitable freeze drying condition with a yield of 92% for the encapsulated serine protease, were obtained using 29.5mg/ml serine protease content, 5.1%(w/w) Arabic gum, 3.5%(w/w) maltodextrin and 3.4%(w/w) calcium chloride. It was found that the interaction effect of Arabic gum and calcium chloride improved the serine protease activity, and Arabic gum was the most effective amongst the examined coating agents. Thus, Arabic gum should be considered as potential protection in freeze drying of serine protease.

  12. Serine dipeptide lipids of Porphyromonas gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation: Relationship to Toll-like receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hsiung; Nemati, Reza; Anstadt, Emily; Liu, Yaling; Son, Young; Zhu, Qiang; Yao, Xudong; Clark, Robert B; Rowe, David W; Nichols, Frank C

    2015-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a periodontal pathogen strongly associated with loss of attachment and supporting bone for teeth. We have previously shown that the total lipid extract of P. gingivalis inhibits osteoblast differentiation through engagement of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis engage both mouse and human TLR2. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether these serine lipids inhibit osteoblast differentiation in vitro and in vivo and whether TLR2 engagement is involved. Osteoblasts were obtained from calvaria of wild type or TLR2 knockout mouse pups that also express the Col2.3GFP transgene. Two classes of serine dipeptide lipids, termed Lipid 654 and Lipid 430, were tested. Osteoblast differentiation was monitored by cell GFP fluorescence and osteoblast gene expression and osteoblast function was monitored as von Kossa stained mineral deposits. Osteoblast differentiation and function were evaluated in calvarial cell cultures maintained for 21 days. Lipid 654 significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation and this inhibition was dependent on TLR2 engagement. Lipid 430 also significantly inhibited GFP expression, osteoblast gene expression and mineral nodule formation but these effects were only partially attributed to engagement of TLR2. More importantly, Lipid 430 stimulated TNF-α and RANKL gene expression in wild type cells but not in TLR2 knockout cells. Finally, osteoblast cultures were observed to hydrolyze Lipid 654 to Lipid 430 and this likely occurs through elevated PLA2 activity in the cultured cells. In conclusion, our results show that serine dipeptide lipids of P. gingivalis inhibit osteoblast differentiation and function at least in part through engagement of TLR2. The Lipid 430 serine class also increased the expression of genes that could increase osteoclast activity. We conclude that Lipid 654 and Lipid 430 have the potential

  13. Alkaline pH induces IRR-mediated phosphorylation of IRS-1 and actin cytoskeleton remodeling in a pancreatic beta cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyev, Igor E; Popova, Nadezhda V; Serova, Oxana V; Zhenilo, Svetlana V; Regoli, Marì; Bertelli, Eugenio; Petrenko, Alexander G

    2017-07-01

    Secretion of mildly alkaline (pH 8.0-8.5) juice to intestines is one of the key functions of the pancreas. Recent reports indicate that the pancreatic duct system containing the alkaline juice may adjoin the endocrine cells of pancreatic islets. We have previously identified the insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) that is expressed in islets as a sensor of mildly alkaline extracellular media. In this study, we show that those islet cells that are in contact with the excretory ducts are also IRR-expressing cells. We further analyzed the effects of alkaline media on pancreatic beta cell line MIN6. Activation of endogenous IRR but not of the insulin receptor was detected that could be inhibited with linsitinib. The IRR autophosphorylation correlated with pH-dependent linsitinib-sensitive activation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), the primary adaptor in the insulin signaling pathway. However, in contrast with insulin stimulation, no protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) phosphorylation was detected as a result of alkali treatment. We observed overexpression of several early response genes (EGR2, IER2, FOSB, EGR1 and NPAS4) upon alkali treatment of MIN6 cells but those were IRR-independent. The alkaline medium but not insulin also triggered actin cytoskeleton remodeling that was blocked by pre-incubation with linsitinib. We propose that the activation of IRR by alkali might be part of a local loop of signaling between the exocrine and endocrine parts of the pancreas where alkalinization of the juice facilitate insulin release that increases the volume of secreted juice to control its pH and bicabonate content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfate—Exchange Alkalinity of Ferralsol Colloid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGGANGYA; ZHANGXIAONIAN

    1999-01-01

    The amount of OH- replaced by sulfate,i.e.,sulfate-exchange alkalinity,from the electric double layer of ferralsol colloid was measured quantitatively in different conditions with an automatic titration equipment.The amount of OH- release increased with the amount of Na2SO4 added and decreased with raising pH in the suspension of ferralsol colloid.The exchange acidity was displayed as pH was higher than 5.6,If the negative effect of sodium ions was offset,the amount of OH- replaced by sulfate was larger than the original amount of OH- released in the pH range of lower than 5.8.The amount of OH- released decreased rapidly as pH was higher than 6.0 and dropped to zero when pH reached 6.5.In the solution of 2.0molL-1 NaClO4,the amount of OH- repleaced by sulfate from the surface of ferralsol colloid could be considered as the amount of OH- adsorbed by ligand exchange reaction.The amount of OH- released in the solution of NaClO4 concentration below 2.0mol L-1 from which the amount of OH- adsorbed by ligand exchange reaction was subtracted could be conidered as the OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force,The OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force decreased with increases in the concentration of NaClO4 and pH and increased almost linearly with the increasing amount of Na2SON4 added.The percentages of OH- adsorbed by electrostatic force in water and in the electrolyte solutions of 0.05 and 0.5mol L-1 NaClO4 in the total OH- released were calculated,respectively.

  15. Photovoltaic hydrogen production with commercial alkaline electrolysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ursua, A.; Lopez, J.; Gubia, E.; Marroyo, L.; Sanchis, P. [Public Univ. of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Dept. of Electric and Electronic Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Renewable energy sources and Electrolysis generate the so-called green Hydrogen, a zero-emission and potentially fossil fuel independent energy source. However, the inherent variability of the renewable energy sources implies a mode of operation for which most current electrolysers have not been designed. This paper analyses the operation of a water electrolyser fed with photovoltaic (PV) generator electric profile. The system, Integrated by a 1 Nm{sup 3}/h Hydrogenics alkaline electrolyser and a 5100 W PV generator with 60 BP585 modules, is installed at the Public University of Navarra (Spain). The PV generator profile fed to the electrolyser is emulated by a custom-made apparatus designed and built by the authors of this paper. The profile is designed according to real irradiance data measured by a calibration cell. The irradiance data are converted to the electric power profile that the PV generator would have delivered in case of having been connected to the electrolyser by means of a DC/DC converter with maximum power point tracking (MPPT). Finally, from previously measured power-current electrolyser characteristic curves, the current profile to be delivered to the electrolyser is obtained and programmed to the electronic device. The electrolyser was tested for two types of days. During the first day, the irradiance was very stable, whereas during the second day, the irradiance was very variable. The experimental results show an average power consumption rate and an efficiency of 4908 Wh/Nm{sup 3} and 72.1%, on the first day, and 4842 Wh/Nm{sup 3} and 73.3% on the second day. The electrolyser performance was particularly good in spite of the high variability of the electric supply of the second day. (orig.)

  16. Chlorine solubility in evolved alkaline magmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Carroll

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies of Cl solubility in trachytic to phonolitic melts provide insights into the capacity of alkaline magmas to transport Cl from depth to the earth?s surface and atmosphere, and information on Cl solubility variations with pressure, temperature and melt or fluid composition is crucial for understanding the reasons for variations in Cl emissions at active volcanoes. This paper provides a brief review of Cl solubility experiments conducted on a range of trachytic to phonolitic melt compositions. Depending on the experimental conditions the melts studied were in equilibrium with either a Cl-bearing aqueous fluid or a subcritical assemblage of low- Cl aqueous fluid + Cl-rich brine. The nature of the fluid phase(s was identified by examination of fluid inclusions present in run product glasses and the fluid bulk composition was calculated by mass balance. Chlorine concentrations in the glass increase with increasing Cl molality in the fluid phase until a plateau in Cl concentration is reached when melt coexists with aqueous fluid + brine. With fluids of similar Cl molality, higher Cl concentrations are observed in peralkaline phonolitic melts compared with peraluminous phonolitic melts; overall the Cl concentrations observed in phonolitic and trachytic melts are approximately twice those found in calcalkaline rhyolitic melts under similar conditions. The observed negative pressure dependence of Cl solubility implies that Cl contents of melts may actually increase during magma decompression if the magma coexists with aqueous fluid and Cl-rich brine (assuming melt-vapor equilibrium is maintained. The high Cl contents (approaching 1 wt% Cl observed in some melts/glasses from the Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei areas suggest saturation with a Cl-rich brine prior to eruption.

  17. Oxygen electrodes for rechargeable alkaline fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.

    1989-12-01

    Electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate temperature single-unit rechargeable alkaline fuel cells are being investigated and developed. Candidate support materials were drawn from transition metal carbides, borides, nitrides and oxides which have high conductivity (greater than 1 ohm/cm). Candidate catalyst materials were selected largely from metal oxides of the form ABO sub x (where A = Pb, Cd, Mn, Ti, Zr, La, Sr, Na, and B = Pt, Pd, Ir, Ru, Ni (Co) which were investigated and/or developed for one function only, O2 reduction or O2 evolution. The electrical conductivity requirement for catalysts may be lower, especially if integrated with a higher conductivity support. All candidate materials of acceptable conductivity are subjected to corrosion testing. Materials that survive chemical testing are examined for electrochemical corrosion activity. For more stringent corrosion testing, and for further evaluation of electrocatalysts (which generally show significant O2 evolution at at 1.4 V), samples are held at 1.6 V or 0.6 V for about 100 hours. The surviving materials are then physically and chemically analyzed for signs of degradation. To evaluate the bifunctional oxygen activity of candidate catalysts, Teflon-bonded electrodes are fabricated and tested in a floating electrode configuration. Many of the experimental materials being studied have required development of a customized electrode fabrication procedure. In advanced development, the goal is to reduce the polarization to about 300 to 350 mV. Approximately six support materials and five catalyst materials were identified to date for further development. The test results will be described.

  18. Alkaline Peroxide Delignification of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh [Biosciences; Katahira, Rui [National; Donohoe, Bryon S. [Biosciences; Black, Brenna A. [National; Pattathil, Sivakumar [Complex; Stringer, Jack M. [National; Beckham, Gregg T. [National

    2017-05-30

    Selective biomass fractionation into carbohydrates and lignin is a key challenge in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals. In the present study, alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment was investigated to fractionate lignin from polysaccharides in corn stover (CS), with a particular emphasis on the fate of the lignin for subsequent valorization. The influence of peroxide loading on delignification during AHP pretreatment was examined over the range of 30-500 mg H2O2/g dry CS at 50 degrees C for 3 h. Mass balances were conducted on the solid and liquid fractions generated after pretreatment for each of the three primary components, lignin, hemicellulose, and cellulose. AHP pretreatment at 250 mg H2O2/g dry CS resulted in the pretreated solids with more than 80% delignification consequently enriching the carbohydrate fraction to >90%. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) spectroscopy of the AHP pretreated residue shows that, under high peroxide loadings (>250 mg H2O2/g dry CS), most of the side chain structures were oxidized and the aryl-ether bonds in lignin were partially cleaved, resulting in significant delignification of the pretreated residues. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis shows that AHP pretreatment effectively depolymerizes CS lignin into low molecular weight (LMW) lignin fragments in the aqueous fraction. Imaging of AHP pretreated residues shows a more granular texture and a clear lamellar pattern in secondary walls, indicative of layers of varying lignin removal or relocalization. Enzymatic hydrolysis of this pretreated residue at 20 mg/g of glucan resulted in 90% and 80% yields of glucose and xylose, respectively, after 120 h. Overall, AHP pretreatment is able to selectively remove more than 80% of the lignin from biomass in a form that has potential for downstream valorization processes and enriches the solid pulp into a highly digestible material.

  19. Marked Transient Alkaline Phosphatemia Following Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneru, Baburao; Carone, Eduardo; Malatack, J. Jeffrey; Esquivel, Carlos O.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    An isolated marked transient rise in serum alkaline phosphatase levels in otherwise healthy children is a well-documented occurrence. However, in children undergoing liver transplantation, elevated alkaline phosphatase values raise the possibility of biliary obstruction, rejection, or both. During a 6-year period, 6 of 278 children undergoing liver transplantation exhibited a similar phenomenon as an isolated abnormality. None had rejection, biliary obstruction, or other allograft dysfunction during a long follow-up. Eventually and without intervention, the alkaline phosphatase levels returned to normal. These instructive cases suggest that caution be used in advocating Invasive procedures if elevated alkaline phosphatase levels are an isolated abnormality, and close observation with noninvasive testing is recommended. PMID:2658549

  20. Isolation of alkaline protease from Bacillus subtilis AKRS3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ashok

    2012-08-28

    Aug 28, 2012 ... sodium chloride concentration), production by submerged fermentation and analytical ... subtilis AKRS3 for alkaline protease production indicated that 3% of .... using eight different carbon sources namely, glucose, lactose,.

  1. Stability and selectivity of alkaline proteases in hydrophilic solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars Haastrup; Ritthitham, Sinthuwat; Pleissner, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    proteases, but at higher concentrations and particularly in anhydrous systems most enzymes including alkaline proteases will denature and consequently loose activity [1]. However, partial denaturing and increased structural flexibility due to the interaction between hydrophilic solvents and alkaline...... proteases has been agued as the primary reasons for increasing activity, influencing regio-selectivity and improving the enantio-selectivity of these enzymes [2]. Alkaline proteases have been shown to be active not only on peptides, but on a wide range of renewable resources for synthesis of biologically...... active molecules and carriers, and in synthesis of carbohydrate derivatives with designed functional properties.  When it comes to regio-selectivity of alkaline proateses on carbohydrates both the properties of the particular enzyme and the influence of the solvent is determining for the position...

  2. Microbial alkaline pectinases and their industrial applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoondal, G S; Tiwari, R P; Tewari, R; Dahiya, N; Beg, Q K

    2002-08-01

    The biotechnological potential of pectinolytic enzymes from microorganisms has drawn a great deal of attention from various researchers worldwide as likely biological catalysts in a variety of industrial processes. Alkaline pectinases are among the most important industrial enzymes and are of great significance in the current biotechnological arena with wide-ranging applications in textile processing, degumming of plant bast fibers, treatment of pectic wastewaters, paper making, and coffee and tea fermentations. The present review features the potential applications and uses of microbial alkaline pectinases, the nature of pectin, and the vast range of pectinolytic enzymes that function to mineralize pectic substances present in the environment. It also emphasizes the environmentally friendly applications of microbial alkaline pectinases thereby revealing their underestimated potential. The review intends to explore the potential of these enzymes and to encourage new alkaline pectinase-based industrial technology.

  3. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...

  4. Effects of alkaline treatment for fibroblastic adhesion on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam Cuellar-Flores

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The treatment of Ti plates with NaOH enhances cell adhesion and the proliferation of HPLF cells. Clinically, the alkaline treatment of Ti-based implants could be an option to improve and accelerate osseointegration.

  5. Alkaline protease production on date waste by an alkalophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... activity and stability towards anionic surfactants like SDS and oxidants ... Alkaline protease activity was determined by the method of. Higahara et al. ... rpm, the media was analyzed for cell mass, total protein concentration ...

  6. Optimization of alkaline protease production by Streptomyces sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hacene

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... The results showed the presence of an alkaline protease with optimal pH and ... significant effect on the production of the enzyme (fructose and malt extract), then defining theirs ..... Urease test. + ..... terminating inhibitors. Proc.

  7. Palladium-based nanocatalysts for alcohol electrooxidation in alkaline media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, RM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct alcohol alkaline fuel cells (DAAFCs) are potential power sources for a variety of portable applications as they provide unique advantages over hydrogen-based fuel cell devices. Alcohols (such as methanol, ethanol, ethylene glycol...

  8. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  9. Involvement of cAMP-dependent unique signaling cascades in the decrease of serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins in boar sperm head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isono, Ayane; Tate, Shunsuke; Nakamura-Mori, Kazumi; Noda, Taichi; Ishikawa, Sho; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    We previously suggested that protein phosphatase-dependent decrease of postacrosomal phosphorylated proteins may be necessary for the occurrence of acrosome reaction in livestock spermatozoa (Adachi et al., J Reprod Dev 54, 171-176, 2008; Mizuno et al., Mol Reprod Dev 82, 232-250, 2015). The aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the intracellular cAMP signaling cascades in the regulation of the decrease of postacrosomal phosphorylated proteins in boar spermatozoa. Boar ejaculated spermatozoa were incubated with cAMP analogs and then used for the immunodetection of serine/threonine-phosphorylated proteins and assessment of acrosome morphology. The protein phosphatase-dependent decrease of postacrosomal phosphorylated proteins was greatly promoted by the incubation with a cAMP analog Sp-5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole-3',5'-monophosphorothioate (cBiMPS). This decrease was induced before the initiation of acrosome reaction and did not require the millimolar concentration of extracellular Ca(2+) which was necessary for the initiation of acrosome reaction. Moreover, suppression of protein kinase A activity with an inhibitor (H89) had almost no influence on both decrease of phosphorylated proteins and occurrence of acrosome reaction in the spermatozoa incubated with cBiMPS. In addition, the prolonged incubation with a potentially exchange protein directly activated by cAMP-selective cAMP analog (8pM) could only partially mimic effects of cBiMPS on these events. These results indicate that the cAMP-dependent signaling cascades which are less dependent on protein kinase A may regulate the decrease of postacrosomal phosphorylated proteins in boar spermatozoa before the extracellular Ca(2+)-triggered initiation of acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. AQP4 plasma membrane trafficking or channel gating is not significantly modulated by phosphorylation at COOH-terminal serine residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assentoft, Mette; Larsen, Brian R; Olesen, Emma T B;

    2014-01-01

    . Phosphorylation of aquaporins can regulate plasma membrane localization and, possibly, the unit water permeability via gating of the AQP channel itself. In vivo phosphorylation of six serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4 has been detected by mass spectrometry: Ser(276), Ser(285), Ser(315), Ser(316), Ser...... heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes (along with serine-to-aspartate mutants of the same residues to mimic a phosphorylation). None of the mutant AQP4 constructs displayed alterations in the unit water permeability. Thus phosphorylation of six different serine residues in the COOH terminus of AQP4...

  11. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-11-04

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases.

  12. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1 at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα, RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75 and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18, is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 might be one of the upstream kinases.

  13. 丝氨酸羧肽酶及其类蛋白的研究进展%Research Progress of Serine Carboxypeptidases and Serine Carboxypeptidase-Like Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶玲飞; 罗光宇; 向建华; 刘爱玲; 陈信波

    2013-01-01

    Serine carboxypeptidases (SCP) widely exist in animals, plants and fungi and form a large protease family. This review briefly introduces the structural characteristics and classification of SCP and serine carboxy-peptidase-like proteins (SCPLs), and summarizes the current research advances of SCP/SCPLs in their subcel-lular localization, gene expression, the regulatory role in stress tolerance, cellular regulation and synthesis of plant secondary metabolites.%丝氨酸羧肽酶(SCP)是一个庞大的蛋白酶家族,普遍存在于动物、植物和真菌中.本文简要介绍了SCP及丝氨酸羧肽酶类蛋白(SCPLs)的结构特点和分类,综述了它们的亚细胞定位、基因表达水平、提高植物耐逆性、调控植物生长发育和影响次生代谢产物合成等方面的最新研究进展.

  14. Alkaline mineral water lowers bone resorption even in calcium sufficiency: alkaline mineral water and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Emma; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Aeschlimann, Jean-Marc; Burckhardt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dietary acid charge enhances bone loss. Bicarbonate or alkali diet decreases bone resorption in humans. We compared the effect of an alkaline mineral water, rich in bicarbonate, with that of an acid one, rich in calcium only, on bone markers, in young women with a normal calcium intake. This study compared water A (per litre: 520 mg Ca, 291 mg HCO(3)(-), 1160 mg SO(4)(-), Potential Renal Acid load (PRAL) +9.2 mEq) with water B (per litre: 547 mg Ca, 2172 mg HCO(3)(-), 9 mg SO(4)(-), PRAL -11.2 mEq). 30 female dieticians aged 26.3 yrs (SD 7.3) were randomized into two groups, followed an identical weighed, balanced diet (965 mg Ca) and drank 1.5 l/d of the assigned water. Changes in blood and urine electrolytes, C-telopeptides (CTX), urinary pH and bicarbonate, and serum PTH were measured after 2 and 4 weeks. The two groups were not different at baseline, and showed a similar increase in urinary calcium excretion. Urinary pH and bicarbonate excretion increased with water B, but not with water A. PTH (p=0.022) and S-CTX (p=0.023) decreased with water B but not with water A. In calcium sufficiency, the acid calcium-rich water had no effect on bone resorption, while the alkaline water rich in bicarbonate led to a significant decrease of PTH and of S-CTX.

  15. Extracellular matrix component signaling in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Leitinger, Birgit; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization and motil...... as well as matrix constitution and protein crosslinking. Here we summarize roles of the three major matrix receptor types, with emphasis on how they function in tumor progression. [on SciFinder(R)]......Cell responses to the extracellular matrix depend on specific signaling events. These are important from early development, through differentiation and tissue homeostasis, immune surveillance, and disease pathogenesis. Signaling not only regulates cell adhesion cytoskeletal organization...... and motility but also provides survival and proliferation cues. The major classes of cell surface receptors for matrix macromols. are the integrins, discoidin domain receptors, and transmembrane proteoglycans such as syndecans and CD44. Cells respond not only to specific ligands, such as collagen, fibronectin...

  16. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  17. Physical processing efficiency of saline vs. alkaline spent batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral,Marta; Nogueira, C. A.; Margarido, F.

    2008-01-01

    Physical processing of spent batteries which includes shredding and sieving operation is the first step for chemical treatment by hydrometallurgy. A laboratory study was carried out to evaluate physical processing efficiency, by analysing the resulting particle size, of alkaline and saline mignon-type Zn-MnO2 batteries. After shredding with a tip shredder, results obtained showed that alkaline batteries were more efficiently size reduced than saline batteries. Difference in particle size dist...

  18. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle Formation and Function

    OpenAIRE

    Andreu, Zoraida; Yáñez-Mó, María

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles, and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size, and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different phy...

  19. Tetraspanins in Extracellular Vesicle formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Zoraida Andreu Martínez; María eYáñez-Mó

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) represent a novel mechanism of intercellular communication as vehicles for intercellular transfer of functional membrane and cytosolic proteins, lipids, and RNAs. Microvesicles, ectosomes, shedding vesicles, microparticles and exosomes are the most common terms to refer to the different kinds of EVs based on their origin, composition, size and density. Exosomes have an endosomal origin and are released by many different cell types, participating in different physi...

  20. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  1. Engineering hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Geckil, Hikmet; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Moon, SangJun; Demirci, Utkan

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex cellular environment consisting of proteins, proteoglycans, and other soluble molecules. ECM provides structural support to mammalian cells and a regulatory milieu with a variety of important cell functions, including assembling cells into various tissues and organs, regulating growth and cell–cell communication. Developing a tailored in vitro cell culture environment that mimics the intricate and organized nanoscale meshwork of native ECM is desirable....

  2. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  3. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  4. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  5. Extracellular conversion of adiponectin hexamers into trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-a; Nuñez, Martha; Briggs, David B.; Laskowski, Bethany L.; Chhun, Jimmy J.; Eleid, Joseph K.; Quon, Michael J.; Tsao, Tsu-Shuen

    2012-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone that exists as trimers, hexamers and larger species collectively referred to as HMW (high-molecular-weight) adiponectin. Whether hexamers or HMW adiponectin serve as precursors for trimers outside the circulation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that adiponectin trimers can be generated from larger oligomers secreted from primary rat adipose cells or differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Purified hexameric, but not HMW, adiponectin converted into trimers in conditioned media separated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes or, more efficiently, when enclosed in the dialysis membrane in the presence of adipocytes. Several lines of evidence indicate that the conversion is mediated by an extracellular redox system. First, N-terminal epitope-tagged hexamers converted into trimers without proteolytic removal of the tag. Secondly, appearance of trimers was associated with conversion of disulfide-bonded dimers into monomers. Thirdly, thiol-reactive agents inhibited conversion into trimers. Consistent with a redox-based mechanism, purified hexamers reductively converted into trimers in defined glutathione redox buffer with reduction potential typically found in the extracellular environment while the HMW adiponectin remained stable. In addition, conversion of hexamers into trimers was enhanced by NADPH, but not by NADP+. Collectively, these data strongly suggest the presence of an extracellular redox system capable of converting adiponectin oligomers. PMID:22973892

  6. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  7. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  8. Intracellular Biopotentials During Static Extracellular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Two properties of the intracellular potentials and electric fields resulting from static extracellular stimulation are obtained for arbitrarily shaped cells. First, the values of intracellular potential are shown to be bounded by the maximum and minimum values of extracellular potential on the surface of the cell. Second, the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field is shown to have an upper bound given by the ratio of the magnitude of the largest extracellular potential difference on the surface of the cell to a generalized length constant λ = [σintraVcell/(σmemb Acell)]1/2, where Vcell and Acell are the volume and surface area of the cell, σintra is the intracellular conductivity (reciprocal ohms per centimeter), and σmemb is the membrane conductivity (reciprocal ohms per square centimeter). The use of the upper bound on the volume average of the magnitude of intracellular electric field as an estimate for intracellular isopotentiality is discussed and the use of the generalized length constant for electrically describing arbitrary cells is illustrated for cylindrical- and spheroidal-shaped cells. PMID:4726882

  9. Characterization and molecular cloning of a serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (OsSHM1) in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dekai; Liu, Heqin; Li, Sujuan; Zhai, Guowei; Shao, Jianfeng; Tao, Yuezhi

    2015-09-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is important for one carbon metabolism and photorespiration in higher plants for its participation in plant growth and development, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. A rice serine hydroxymethyltransferase gene, OsSHM1, an ortholog of Arabidopsis SHM1, was isolated using map-based cloning. The osshm1 mutant had chlorotic lesions and a considerably smaller, lethal phenotype under natural ambient CO2 concentrations, but could be restored to wild type with normal growth under elevated CO2 levels (0.5% CO2 ), showing a typical photorespiratory phenotype. The data from antioxidant enzymes activity measurement suggested that osshm1 was subjected to significant oxidative stress. Also, OsSHM1 was expressed in all organs tested (root, culm, leaf, and young panicle) but predominantly in leaves. OsSHM1 protein is localized to the mitochondria. Our study suggested that molecular function of the OsSHM1 gene is conserved in rice and Arabidopsis.

  10. The importance of SERINE DECARBOXYLASE1 (SDC1) and ethanolamine biosynthesis during embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Ian Sofian; Liu, Yu-Chi; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-11-01

    In plants, ethanolamine is considered a precursor for the synthesis of choline, which is an essential dietary nutrient for animals. An enzyme serine decarboxylase (SDC) has been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, which directly converts serine to ethanolamine, a precursor to phosphorylethanolamine and its subsequent metabolites in plants. However, the importance of SDC and ethanolamine production in plant growth and development remains unclear. Here, we show that SDC is required for ethanolamine biosynthesis in vivo and essential in plant embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. The knockout of SDC1 caused an embryonic lethal defect due to the developmental arrest of the embryos at the heart stage. During embryo development, the expression was observed at the later stages, at which developmental defect occurred in the knockout mutant. Overexpression of SDC1 in planta increased levels of ethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine both in leaves and siliques. These results suggest that SDC1 plays an essential role in ethanolamine biosynthesis during the embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  11. Structural basis of serine/threonine phosphatase inhibition by the archetypal small molecules cantharidin and norcantharidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, I; Calderone, V; Fragai, M; Luchinat, C; Talluri, E

    2009-08-13

    The inhibition of a subgroup of human serine/threonine protein phosphatases is responsible for the cytotoxicity of cantharidin and norcantharidin against tumor cells. It is shown that the anhydride rings of cantharidin and norcantharidin are hydrolyzed when bound to the catalytic domain of the human serine/threonine protein phosphatases 5 (PP5c), and the high-resolution crystal structures of PP5c complexed with the corresponding dicarboxylic acid derivatives of the two molecules are reported. Norcantharidin shows a unique binding conformation with the catalytically active Mn2PP5c, while cantharidin is characterized by a double conformation in its binding mode to the protein. Different binding modes of norcantharidin are observed depending of whether the starting ligand is in the anhydride or in the dicarboxylic acid form. All these structures will provide the basis for the rational design of new cantharidin-based drugs.

  12. Characterization of the Usage of the Serine Metabolic Network in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahya Mehrmohamadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serine, glycine, one-carbon (SGOC metabolic network is implicated in cancer pathogenesis, but its general functions are unknown. We carried out a computational reconstruction of the SGOC network and then characterized its expression across thousands of cancer tissues. Pathways including methylation and redox metabolism exhibited heterogeneous expression indicating a strong context dependency of their usage in tumors. From an analysis of coexpression, simultaneous up- or downregulation of nucleotide synthesis, NADPH, and glutathione synthesis was found to be a common occurrence in all cancers. Finally, we developed a method to trace the metabolic fate of serine using stable isotopes, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and a mathematical model. Although the expression of single genes didn’t appear indicative of flux, the collective expression of several genes in a given pathway allowed for successful flux prediction. Altogether, these findings identify expansive and heterogeneous functions for the SGOC metabolic network in human cancer.

  13. Nucleotide sequences of three tRNA(Ser) from Drosophila melanogaster reading the six serine codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribbs, D L; Gillam, I C; Tener, G M

    1987-10-05

    The nucleotide sequences of three serine tRNAs from Drosophila melanogaster, together capable of decoding the six serine codons, were determined. tRNA(Ser)2b has the anticodon GCU, tRNA(Ser)4 has CGA and tRNA(Ser)7 has IGA. tRNA(Ser)2b differs from the last two by about 25%. However, tRNA(Ser)4 and tRNA(Ser)7 are 96% homologous, differing only at the first position of the anticodon and two other sites. This unusual sequence relationship suggests, together with similar pairs in the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that eukaryotic tRNA(Ser)UCN may be undergoing concerted evolution.

  14. The Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Ana; Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic "chymotrypsin family" (Group S1A by th e 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution , being especially common in animals, entirely absent from plants and protists, and rare among fungi. The distribution in Bacteria is larg ely restricted to the genus Streptomyces, although a few isolated occ urrences in other bacteria have been reported. The family may be enti rely absent from Archaea. Although more than a thousand sequences have been reported for enzymes of this type from animals, none of them ha ve been from early diverging phyla like Porifera or Cnidaria, We now report the existence of Group SlA serine proteases in a sponge (phylu m Porifera) and a jellyfish (phylum Cnidaria), making it safe to conc lude that all animal groups possess these enzymes.

  15. Acid transformation of bauxite residue: Conversion of its alkaline characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Meng; Xue, Shengguo; Hartley, William; Chen, Chengrong; Wu, Chuan; Li, Xiaofei; Li, Yiwei

    2017-02-15

    Bauxite residue (BR) is a highly alkaline solid hazardous waste produced from bauxite processing for alumina production. Alkaline transformation appears to reduce the environmental risk of bauxite residue disposal areas (BRDAs) whilst potentially providing opportunities for the sustainable reuse and on-going management of BR. Mineral acids, a novel citric acid and a hybrid combination of acid-gypsum treatments were investigated for their potential to reduce residue pH and total alkalinity and transform the alkaline mineral phase. XRD results revealed that with the exception of andradite, the primary alkaline solid phases of cancrinite, grossular and calcite were transformed into discriminative products based on the transformation used. Supernatants separated from BR and transformed bauxite residue (TBR) displayed distinct changes in soluble Na, Ca and Al, and a reduction in pH and total alkalinity. SEM images suggest that mineral acid transformations promote macro-aggregate formation, and the positive promotion of citric acid, confirming the removal or reduction in soluble and exchangeable Na. NEXAFS analysis of Na K-edge revealed that the chemical speciation of Na in TBRs was consistent with BR. Three acid treatments and gypsum combination had no effect on Na speciation, which affects the distribution of Na revealed by sodium STXM imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Acid/alkaline ash diets: time for assessment and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J; Foulkes, E; Evans, M; Ausman, L

    1985-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to review critically the assumptions made to predict the effects of different diets on the pH of urine by calculations from food tables and lists of acid or alkaline ash in foods. Acid/alkaline ash calculations were completed for 7 days' worth of omnivore, lacto-ovo, and vegan diets. The vegetarian diets were significantly more alkaline than the omnivore diets, and the vegan diets were more alkaline than lacto-ovo vegetarian diets. The article discusses the history of the acid/alkaline ash concept, assumptions underlying it, mechanisms by which urine is acidified, how the acid/alkaline ash content of diets is calculated from food tables, difficulties arising in acid/ash calculations, and their validity in predicting urine pH. The authors conclude that while diet does influence the pH of urine, present calculation methods are time consuming, imprecise, and do not permit quantitative prediction of urine pH. Better methods for calculating the effects of diet on acid-base balance are needed.

  17. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  18. Overexpression of Human Bone Alkaline Phosphatase in Pichia Pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Laurel; Malone, Christine, C.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Pichiapastoris expression system was utilized to produce functionally active human bone alkaline phosphatase in gram quantities. Bone alkaline phosphatase is a key enzyme in bone formation and biomineralization, yet important questions about its structural chemistry and interactions with other cellular enzymes in mineralizing tissues remain unanswered. A soluble form of human bone alkaline phosphatase was constructed by deletion of the 25 amino acid hydrophobic C-terminal region of the encoding cDNA and inserted into the X-33 Pichiapastoris strain. An overexpression system was developed in shake flasks and converted to large-scale fermentation. Alkaline phosphatase was secreted into the medium to a level of 32mgAL when cultured in shake flasks. Enzyme activity was 12U/mg measured by a spectrophotometric assay. Fermentation yielded 880mgAL with enzymatic activity of 968U/mg. Gel electrophoresis analysis indicates that greater than 50% of the total protein in the fermentation is alkaline phosphatase. A purification scheme has been developed using ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by hydrophobic interaction chromatography. We are currently screening crystallization conditions of the purified recombinant protein for subsequent X-ray diffraction analyses. Structural data should provide additional information on the role of alkaline phosphatase in normal bone mineralization and in certain bone mineralization anomalies.

  19. Selective Inhibition of Plant Serine Hydrolases by Agrochemicals Revealed by Competitive ABPP

    OpenAIRE

    Kaschani, Farnusch; Nickel, Sabrina; Pandey, Bikram; Benjamin F Cravatt; Kaiser, Markus; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2011-01-01

    Organophosphate and –phosphonates and their thiol derivatives are often used in agroindustry as herbicides and insecticides, but their potential off-targets in the plant and their consumers are poorly investigated. Here, we use competitive Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP) of serine hydrolases (SHs) to detect targets of these agrochemicals and other compounds in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using broad-range and specific probes, and by overexpression of various SHs in planta, we are able to co...

  20. The Self-catalytic Esterification Reaction of O-Phosphoryl Serine Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Tang DU; Yan Mei LI; Zhong Zhou CHEN; Shi Zhong LUO; Yu Fen ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    O-Phosphoryl serine derivative can perform self-catalytic esterification reaction in the mixture of CH3OH and CHCl3 at the room temperature. The phosphoryl group participation was the key step of the esterification. This type of reactions were proposed through an intermediate of mixed phosphoric-carboxylic anhydride that might provide a clue to the function of the phosphoryl group in the phosphorylated enzymes and in the prebiotic synthesis of protein.