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Sample records for extinction training experiment

  1. Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate where Fear Is Expressed Following Extinction Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2011-01-01

    Six experiments used a within-subjects renewal design to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in regulating the expression and recovery of extinguished fear. Rats were trained to fear a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) via pairings with foot shock in a distinctive context (A). This was followed by extinction training of the CS in…

  2. Kappa Opioid Receptors Mediate where Fear Is Expressed Following Extinction Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sindy; Richardson, Rick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2011-01-01

    Six experiments used a within-subjects renewal design to examine the involvement of kappa opioid receptors (KORs) in regulating the expression and recovery of extinguished fear. Rats were trained to fear a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) via pairings with foot shock in a distinctive context (A). This was followed by extinction training of the CS in…

  3. Functional Communication Training with and without Extinction and Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Wayne; And Others

    1993-01-01

    In this study, functional communication training alone and combined with extinction and/or punishment was evaluated for four clients with severe retardation, behavior problems, and communication deficits. Results showed that the combination of training plus punishment produced the largest and most consistent reductions in target behavior problems.…

  4. Training reinforcement rates, resistance to extinction, and the role of context in reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Dukoski, Ludmila; Bensemann, Joshua; Podlesnik, Christopher A

    2016-03-01

    Behavior reduced as a consequence of extinction or intervention can relapse. According to behavioral momentum theory, the extent to which behavior persists and relapses once it has been eliminated depends on the relative training reinforcement rate among discriminative stimuli. In addition, studies of context renewal reveal that relapse depends on the similarity between the training stimulus context and the test stimulus context following disruption by extinction. In the present experiments with pigeons, we arranged different reinforcement rates in the presence of distinct discriminative stimuli across components of a multiple schedule. Following extinction, we attempted to reinstate responding in the presence of those target components with response-independent food presentations. Importantly, we arranged the reinstating food presentations either within the target components or in separate components, either paired with extinction (Experiment 1) or reinforcement (Experiment 2) during baseline. Reinstatement increased with greater training reinforcement rates when the reinstating food presentations were arranged in the target components and the separate components paired with reinforcement during training. Reinstatement was smaller and was not systematically related to training reinforcement rates in the target components when reinstating food presentation occurred in separate components paired with extinction. These findings suggest that relapse depends on the history of reinforcement associated with the discriminative stimuli in which the relapse-inducing event occurs.

  5. Effects of Approach-Avoidance Training on the Extinction and Return of Fear Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos

    Full Text Available Exposure therapy for anxiety involves confronting a patient with fear-evoking stimuli, a procedure based partially on Pavlovian extinction. Exposure and other extinction-based therapies usually lead to (partial reduction of fear symptoms, but a substantial number of patients experience a return of fear after treatment. Here we tested whether the combination of fear extinction with modification of approach-avoidance tendencies using an Approach-Avoidance Task (AAT would result in the further reduction of conditioned fear and/or help prevent return of fear after extinction.Two groups of participants underwent a fear acquisition procedure during which pictures of one neutral object were sometimes paired with shock (CS+, whereas pictures of another neutral object were not (CS-. The next day, in a fear extinction procedure, both objects were presented without shock. During the subsequent joystick AAT, one group primarily pulled CS+ pictures towards themselves and pushed CS- pictures away from themselves; reversed contingencies applied for the other group.Approach training was effective in modifying conditioned action tendencies, with some evidence for transfer to a different approach/avoidance task. No group differences in subjective fear or physiological arousal were found during subsequent post- training and return-of-fear testing.No reliable return-of-fear was observed in either group for either subjective or physiological fear measures.Our results suggest that approach training may be of limited value for enhancing the short- and long-term effects of extinction-based interventions.

  6. Functional communication training with and without extinction and punishment.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, W.; Piazza, C; Cataldo, M.; Harrell, R.; Jefferson, G.; Conner, R

    1993-01-01

    Functional communication training has been reported to be a promising treatment for severe behavior problems. In this study, functional communication training alone and combined with extinction and/or punishment was evaluated for 4 clients with severe retardation, behavior problems, and communication deficits. The participants were inpatients on a hospital unit for treatment of severe behavior disorders. They received individualized interventions based on functional assessment that included r...

  7. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction.

  8. Functional communication training with and without extinction and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W; Piazza, C; Cataldo, M; Harrell, R; Jefferson, G; Conner, R

    1993-01-01

    Functional communication training has been reported to be a promising treatment for severe behavior problems. In this study, functional communication training alone and combined with extinction and/or punishment was evaluated for 4 clients with severe retardation, behavior problems, and communication deficits. The participants were inpatients on a hospital unit for treatment of severe behavior disorders. They received individualized interventions based on functional assessment that included reinforcement of a communication response with the same function as their destructive behavior. Results showed that for some patients, functional communication training was not sufficient to produce clinically significant reductions in destructive behavior, and the combination of training plus punishment produced the largest and most consistent reductions.

  9. Protein synthesis is not required for acquisition, consolidation, and extinction of high foot-shock active avoidance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Salinas, Sofía; Medina, Andrea C; Marín-Vignando, Vera; Ruiz-López, Clyo X; Quirarte, Gina L; Prado-Alcalá, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    Long-term memory of active avoidance in mice is not disturbed by administration of protein synthesis inhibitors (PSIs) when relatively high levels of training are used, whereas a detrimental effect is produced with lower levels of training. PSIs also disrupt extinction of avoidance behaviors in rodents, but it is not clear whether PSIs also affect this form of learning when the behavior to be extinguished was produced by a high level of training. Experiment 1 demonstrated that rats treated with the PSI cycloheximide (CXM) 30 min before training developed normal acquisition after training with either high or low foot-shock stimulation, but that memory consolidation was hindered only after low foot-shock training. Experiment 2 demonstrated that CXM disrupted extinction when administered before the first of a series of extinction sessions when low foot-shock intensity was used during training; in contrast, after training with a higher foot-shock, the PSI treatment only interfered transiently with extinction. These results indicate that acquisition, consolidation, and extinction of active avoidance learning produced by high aversive stimulation are not dependent on protein synthesis and that these processes are governed by mechanisms different from those underlying moderate forms of learning.

  10. Fear erasure in mice requires synergy between antidepressant drugs and extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, Nina N; Pickenhagen, Anouchka; Lindholm, Jesse; Tiraboschi, Ettore; Kulesskaya, Natalia; Agústsdóttir, Arna; Antila, Hanna; Popova, Dina; Akamine, Yumiko; Bahi, Amine; Sullivan, Regina; Hen, René; Drew, Liam J; Castrén, Eero

    2011-12-23

    Antidepressant drugs and psychotherapy combined are more effective in treating mood disorders than either treatment alone, but the neurobiological basis of this interaction is unknown. To investigate how antidepressants influence the response of mood-related systems to behavioral experience, we used a fear-conditioning and extinction paradigm in mice. Combining extinction training with chronic fluoxetine, but neither treatment alone, induced an enduring loss of conditioned fear memory in adult animals. Fluoxetine treatment increased synaptic plasticity, converted the fear memory circuitry to a more immature state, and acted through local brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Fluoxetine-induced plasticity may allow fear erasure by extinction-guided remodeling of the memory circuitry. Thus, the pharmacological effects of antidepressants need to be combined with psychological rehabilitation to reorganize networks rendered more plastic by the drug treatment.

  11. Retrospective revaluation effects following serial compound training and target extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effting, M.; Vervliet, B.; Kindt, M.

    2010-01-01

    Using a conditioned suppression task, two experiments examined retrospective revaluation effects after serial compound training in a release from overshadowing design. In Experiment 1, serial X → A+ training produced suppression to target A, which was enhanced when preceded by feature X, whereas X b

  12. Retrospective Revaluation Effects Following Serial Compound Training and Target Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effting, Marieke; Vervliet, Bram; Kindt, Merel

    2010-01-01

    Using a conditioned suppression task, two experiments examined retrospective revaluation effects after serial compound training in a release from overshadowing design. In Experiment 1, serial X [right arrow] A+ training produced suppression to target A, which was enhanced when preceded by feature X, whereas X by itself elicited no suppression.…

  13. Retrospective Revaluation Effects Following Serial Compound Training and Target Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effting, Marieke; Vervliet, Bram; Kindt, Merel

    2010-01-01

    Using a conditioned suppression task, two experiments examined retrospective revaluation effects after serial compound training in a release from overshadowing design. In Experiment 1, serial X [right arrow] A+ training produced suppression to target A, which was enhanced when preceded by feature X, whereas X by itself elicited no suppression.…

  14. Young and Old Pavlovian Fear Memories Can Be Modified with Extinction Training during Reconsolidation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfurth, Elisa C. K.; Kanen, Jonathan W.; Raio, Candace M.; Clem, Roger L.; Huganir, Richard L.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training during reconsolidation has been shown to persistently diminish conditioned fear responses across species. We investigated in humans if older fear memories can benefit similarly. Using a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm we compared standard extinction and extinction after memory reactivation 1 d or 7 d following acquisition.…

  15. Young and Old Pavlovian Fear Memories Can Be Modified with Extinction Training during Reconsolidation in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfurth, Elisa C. K.; Kanen, Jonathan W.; Raio, Candace M.; Clem, Roger L.; Huganir, Richard L.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training during reconsolidation has been shown to persistently diminish conditioned fear responses across species. We investigated in humans if older fear memories can benefit similarly. Using a Pavlovian fear conditioning paradigm we compared standard extinction and extinction after memory reactivation 1 d or 7 d following acquisition.…

  16. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Mao

    Full Text Available Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5, but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97. Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y, a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias.

  17. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chang, Chih-Hua; Wu, Chia-Chen; Orejarena, M Juliana; Orejanera, Maria Juliana; Manzoni, Olivier J; Gean, Po-Wu

    2013-01-01

    Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97). Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y), a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias.

  18. Inhibition of Spontaneous Recovery of Fear by mGluR5 after Prolonged Extinction Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Chun Mao; Chih-Hua Chang; Chia-Chen Wu; M. Juliana Orejarena; Manzoni, Olivier J.; Po-Wu Gean

    2013-01-01

    Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged e...

  19. Inhibition of Spontaneous Recovery of Fear by mGluR5 after Prolonged Extinction Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Chun Mao; Chih-Hua Chang; Chia-Chen Wu; M Juliana Orejarena; Manzoni, Olivier J.; Po-Wu Gean

    2013-01-01

    Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged e...

  20. Beam Extinction Monitoring in the Mu2e Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, Eric [Fermilab; Bartoszek, Larry [Technicare; Gaponenko, Andrei [Fermilab; Kasper, Peter [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches approximately 200ns FW long, separated by 1.7 microseconds, with no out-of-time protons at the 10⁻¹⁰ fractional level. The verification of this level of extinction is very challenging. The proposed technique uses a special purpose spectrometer which will observe particles scattered from the production target of the experiment. The acceptance will be limited such that there will be no saturation effects from the in-time beam. The precise level and profile of the out-of-time beam can then be built up statistically, by integrating over many bunches.

  1. Effects of extended context discrimination training and context extinction on transfer of context dependency of conditioned flavor aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Yoshio; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Sawa, Kosuke; Ishii, Kiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    We trained rats in a context discrimination paradigm by pairing a sucrose solution with lithium chloride in one context (conditioning context) and simple exposure to the same fluid in a second (neutral) context to establish a context-dependent aversion to the conditioned fluid. We then investigated whether transfer of the context dependency to a test fluid (a sodium chloride solution) was affected by two post-discrimination training treatments, an extended context discrimination training, and non-reinforced exposure to the conditioning context (context extinction). We found that the context-dependent flavor aversion that had been specific to sucrose transferred to the test fluid after the extensive training (Experiment 1). Context extinction eliminated the transfer effect that had been observed immediately after the context discrimination training (Experiment 2). In addition, an aversion acquired by sucrose through a simple conditioning of sucrose-LiCl pairings did not generalize to the test fluid (Experiment 3). These results emphasize the importance of a Pavlovian excitatory association between the conditioning context and nausea as a primary source of transfer of the context dependency, rather than a generalization of aversion acquired by the conditioned fluid to the test fluid.

  2. Effects of acute exercise on fear extinction in rats and exposure therapy in humans: Null findings from five experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquart, Jolene; Roquet, Rheall F; Papini, Santiago; Powers, Mark B; Rosenfield, David; Smits, Jasper A J; Monfils, Marie-H

    2017-08-01

    Exposure therapy is an established learning-based intervention for the treatment of anxiety disorders with an average response rate of nearly 50%, leaving room for improvement. Emerging strategies to enhance exposure therapy in humans and fear extinction retention in animal models are primarily pharmacological. These approaches are limited as many patients report preferring non-pharmacological approaches in therapy. With general cognitive enhancement effects, exercise has emerged as a plausible non-pharmacological augmentation strategy. The present study tested the hypothesis that fear extinction and exposure therapy would be enhanced by a pre-training bout of exercise. We conducted four experiments with rats that involved a standardized conditioning and extinction paradigm and a manipulation of exercise. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated vigorous-intensity exercise prior to a standardized virtual reality exposure therapy session among adults with fear of heights. In experiments 1-4, exercise did not facilitate fear extinction, long-term memory, or fear relapse tests. In experiment 5, human participants showed an overall reduction in fear of heights but exercise did not enhance symptom improvement. Although acute exercise prior to fear extinction or exposure therapy, as operationalized in the present 5 studies, did not enhance outcomes, these results must be interpreted within the context of a broader literature that includes positive findings. Taken all together, this suggests that more research is necessary to identify optimal parameters and key individual differences so that exercise can be implemented successfully to treat anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experience with Dynamic Reinforcement Rates Decreases Resistance to Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Andrew R.; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of f...

  4. Functional Communication Training without Extinction Using Concurrent Schedules of Differing Magnitudes of Reinforcement in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dawn H.; Fredrick, Laura D.; Alberto, Paul A.; Gama, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of functional communication training (FCT) implemented with concurrent schedules of differing magnitudes of reinforcement in lieu of extinction to reduce inappropriate behaviors and increase alternative mands. Participants were four adolescent students diagnosed with severe emotional and behavior disorders…

  5. Impairment in extinction of contextual and cued, fear following post-training whole body irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid HJ Olsen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the use of radiation in cancer therapy, the risk of nuclear contamination from power plants, military conflicts, and terrorism, there is a compelling scientific and public health interest in the effects of environmental radiation exposure on brain function, in particular hippocampal function and learning and memory. Previous studies have emphasized changes in learning and memory following radiation exposure. These approaches have ignored the question of how radiation exposure might impact recently acquired memories, which might be acquired under traumatic circumstances (cancer treatment, nuclear disaster, etc.. To address the question of how radiation exposure might affect the processing and recall of recently acquired memories, we employed a fear-conditioning paradigm wherein animals were trained, and subsequently irradiated (whole-body X-ray irradiation 24 hours later. Animals were given two weeks to recover, and were tested for retention and extinction of hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning. Exposure to irradiation following training was associated with reduced daily increases in body weights over the 22 days of the study and resulted in greater freezing levels and aberrant extinction 2 weeks later. This was also observed when the intensity of the training protocol was increased. Cued freezing levels and measures of anxiety 2 weeks after training were also higher in irradiated than sham-irradiated mice. In contrast to contextual freezing levels, cued freezing levels were even higher in irradiated mice receiving 5 shocks during training than sham-irradiated mice receiving 10 shocks during training. In addition, the effects of radiation on extinction of contextual fear were more profound than those on the extinction of cued fear. Thus, whole body irradiation elevates contextual and cued fear memory recall.

  6. Impairment in extinction of contextual and cued fear following post-training whole-body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Reid H J; Marzulla, Tessa; Raber, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Because of the use of radiation in cancer therapy, the risk of nuclear contamination from power plants, military conflicts, and terrorism, there is a compelling scientific and public health interest in the effects of environmental radiation exposure on brain function, in particular hippocampal function and learning and memory. Previous studies have emphasized changes in learning and memory following radiation exposure. These approaches have ignored the question of how radiation exposure might impact recently acquired memories, which might be acquired under traumatic circumstances (cancer treatment, nuclear disaster, etc.). To address the question of how radiation exposure might affect the processing and recall of recently acquired memories, we employed a fear conditioning paradigm wherein animals were trained, and subsequently irradiated (whole-body X-ray irradiation) 24 h later. Animals were given 2 weeks to recover, and were tested for retention and extinction of hippocampus-dependent contextual fear conditioning or hippocampus-independent cued fear conditioning. Exposure to irradiation following training was associated with reduced daily increases in body weights over the 22-days of the study and resulted in greater freezing levels and aberrant extinction 2 weeks later. This was also observed when the intensity of the training protocol was increased. Cued freezing levels and measures of anxiety 2 weeks after training were also higher in irradiated than sham-irradiated mice. In contrast to contextual freezing levels, cued freezing levels were even higher in irradiated mice receiving 5 shocks during training than sham-irradiated mice receiving 10 shocks during training. In addition, the effects of radiation on extinction of contextual fear were more profound than those on the extinction of cued fear. Thus, whole-body irradiation elevates contextual and cued fear memory recall.

  7. Technician Training Experience

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    There is a real shortage of skilled engineers & technicians in Europe and yet at the same time high unemployment levels. For years CERN has offered a great training ground for engineers & physicists and we are now aiming to do the same for technicians. Th

  8. Hippocampal ripple-contingent training accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning and retards extinction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2010-08-25

    There are at least two distinct oscillatory states of the hippocampus that are related to distinct behavioral patterns. Theta (4-12 Hz) oscillation has been suggested to indicate selective attention during which the animal concentrates on some features of the environment while suppressing reactivity to others. In contrast, sharp-wave ripples ( approximately 200 Hz) can be seen in a state in which the hippocampus is at its most responsive to any kind of afferent stimulation. In addition, external stimulation tends to evoke and reset theta oscillation, the phase of which has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Theoretically, training on a hippocampus-dependent learning task contingent upon ripples could enhance learning rate due to elevated responsiveness and enhanced phase locking of the theta oscillation. We used a brain-computer interface to detect hippocampal ripples in rabbits to deliver trace eyeblink conditioning and extinction trials selectively contingent upon them. A yoked control group was trained regardless of their ongoing neural state. Ripple-contingent training expedited acquisition of the conditioned response early in training and evoked stronger theta-band phase locking to the conditioned stimulus. Surprisingly, ripple-contingent training also resulted in slower extinction in well trained animals. We suggest that the ongoing oscillatory activity in the hippocampus determines the extent to which a stimulus can induce a phase reset of the theta oscillation, which in turn is the determining factor of learning rate in trace eyeblink conditioning.

  9. Effects of Recent Exposure to a Conditioned Stimulus on Extinction of Pavlovian Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wan Yee Macy; Leung, Hiu T.; Westbrook, R. Frederick; McNally, Gavan P.

    2010-01-01

    In six experiments we studied the effects of a single re-exposure to a conditioned stimulus (CS; "retrieval trial") prior to extinction training (extinction-reconsolidation boundary) on the development of and recovery from fear extinction. A single retrieval trial prior to extinction training significantly augmented the renewal and reinstatement…

  10. Out-of-Time Beam Extinction in the MU2E Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebys, E. J. [Fermilab; Werkema, S. [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    The Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab will search for the conversion of a muon to an electron in the field of an atomic nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity. The experiment requires a beam consisting of proton bunches 250 ns FW long, separated by 1.7 $\\mu$ sec, with no out-of-time protons at the $10^{10}$ fractional level. Satisfying this "extinction" requirement is very challenging. The formation of the bunches is expected to result in an extinction on the order of $10^5$. The remaining extinction will be accomplished by a system of resonant magnets and collimators, configured such that only in-time beam is delivered to the experiment. Our simulations show that the total extinction achievable by the system is on the order of $10^{12}$, with an efficiency for transmitting in-time beam of 99.6%.

  11. Involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in the inhibition of methamphetamine-associated contextual memory after prolonged extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hsuan; Yu, Yang-Jung; Chang, Chih-Hua; Gean, Po-Wu

    2016-04-01

    Addiction is thought to be a memory process between perception and environmental cues and addicted patients often relapse when they come into contact with the drug-related context once again. Here, we used a conditioned place preference protocol to seek a more effective extinction methodology of methamphetamine (METH) memory and delineate its underlying mechanism. Conditioning METH for 3 days in mice markedly increased the time spent in the METH-paired compartment. Then the mice were conditioned with saline for 6 days, from day 6 to day 11, a procedure termed extinction training. However, METH memory returned after a priming injection of METH. We prolonged extinction duration from 6 to 10 days and found that this extensive extinction (EE) training prevented priming effect. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the METH-conditioned place preference-induced increase in surface expression of GluA2 and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA)/NMDA ratio in the basolateral amygdala. In addition, we found that extinction with metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation had similar results to EE: reduced relapse after extinction, decreased synaptic AMPA receptors AMPARs and the AMPA/NMDA ratio. On the contrary, EE with mGluR5 inhibition suppressed the results of EE. These data indicate that EE training-elicited inhibition of METH-primed reinstatement is mediated by the mGluR5. Conditioning mice with methamphetamine place preference (METH CPP) increases surface expression of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in the basolateral amygdala. We found prolongation of extinction duration from 6 to 10 days prevented priming effect. At the molecular level, we discovered that extensive extinction (EE) reversed the METH CPP-induced increase in surface expression of GluA2 and AMPA/NMDA ratio. In addition, we found that extinction with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation had similar results to EE

  12. Aerospace engineering training: universities experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mertins Kseniya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary professional working in aerospace engineering must have a set of soft and hard skills. The experience gained in universities shows that training of a competent professional is impossible without an employer involved in this process. The paper provides an analysis of missions, tasks and experience of aerospace professionals and identifies the present and future roles, missions and required skills of a highly qualified specialist in aerospace engineering. This analysis can be used to design a master’s program aiming at providing students with the required knowledge, know-how and attitudes needed to succeed as professionals in industrial companies.

  13. Simulation and Experiment of Extinction or Adaptation of Biological Species after Temperature Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, D.; Arndt, H.

    Can unicellular organisms survive a drastic temperature change, and adapt to it after many generations? In simulations of the Penna model of biological aging, both extinction and adaptation were found for asexual and sexual reproduction as well as for parasex. These model investigations are the basis for the design of evolution experiments with heterotrophic flagellates.

  14. The Effects of Context Extinction on US Signal Value

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    Goddard Murray J.

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments with rats examined the effects of context extinction on responding to the signal value of an unconditioned stimulus (US). In Experiment 1, US signal value was first trained when a single food pellet signaled the delivery of three additional pellets. After training, rats received either context extinction (CE) or home cage (HC)…

  15. Effectiveness of Functional Communication Training with and without Extinction and Punishment: A Summary of 21 Inpatient Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Louis P.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Sullivan, Michelle Thibault; LeBlanc, Linda A.; Acquisto, Jean

    1998-01-01

    A study involving 21 individuals with mental retardation found functional communication training (FCT) with extinction was effective in reducing problem behavior in the majority of cases; however, when demand or delay-to-reinforcement fading was added, treatment efficacy decreased. FCT with punishment resulted in a reduction in problem behavior…

  16. Adolescent traumatic stress experience results in less robust conditioned fear and post-extinction fear cue responses in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Nicole L T; Gauchan, Sangeeta; Genovese, Raymond F

    2014-05-01

    Early exposure to a traumatic event may produce lasting effects throughout the lifespan. Traumatic stress during adolescence may deliver a distinct developmental insult compared with more-often studied neonatal or juvenile traumatic stress paradigms. The present study describes the lasting effects of adolescent traumatic stress upon adulthood fear conditioning. Adolescent rats were exposed to a traumatic stressor (underwater trauma, UWT), then underwent fear conditioning during adulthood. Fear extinction was tested over five conditioned suppression extinction sessions three weeks later. The efficacies of two potential extinction-enhancing compounds, endocannabinoid reuptake inhibitor AM404 (10mg/kg) and M1 muscarinic positive allosteric modulator BQCA (10mg/kg), were also assessed. Finally, post-extinction fear responses were examined using a fear cue (light) as a prepulse stimulus. Rats traumatically stressed during adolescence showed blunted conditioned suppression on day 1 of extinction training, and AM404 reversed this effect. Post-extinction startle testing showed that fear conditioning eliminates prepulse inhibition to the light cue. Startle potentiation was observed only in rats without adolescent UWT exposure. AM404 and BQCA both ameliorated this startle potentiation, while BQCA increased startle in the UWT group. These results suggest that exposure to a traumatic stressor during adolescence alters developmental outcomes related to stress response and fear extinction compared to rats without adolescent traumatic stress exposure, blunting the adulthood fear response and reducing residual post-extinction fear expression. Efficacy of pharmacological interventions may also vary as a factor of developmental traumatic stress exposure.

  17. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes.

  18. Effects of Approach-Avoidance Training on the Extinction and Return of Fear Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Arnaudova, Inna; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Exposure therapy for anxiety involves confronting a patient with fear-evoking stimuli, a procedure based partially on Pavlovian extinction. Exposure and other extinction-based therapies usually lead to (partial) reduction of fear symptoms, but a substantial number of

  19. Effects of Approach-Avoidance Training on the Extinction and Return of Fear Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Arnaudova, Inna; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Exposure therapy for anxiety involves confronting a patient with fear-evoking stimuli, a procedure based partially on Pavlovian extinction. Exposure and other extinction-based therapies usually lead to (partial) reduction of fear symptoms, but a substantial number of patie

  20. Postgraduate training in Ireland: expectations and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D; Dornan, T; Bergin, C; Horgan, M

    2014-12-01

    Postgraduate medical training in Ireland has been compared unfavourably with training abroad and blamed for an "exodus" of graduates of Irish medical schools. Exploration of features of a good training environment and development of tools to measure it have been the focus of much published research. There have been no Irish studies examining training environment using such validated tools. The aim of this study was to use a validated tool, to examine the expectations and experience of training, amongst those training under the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI). The Dutch Residency Education Climate Test (D-RECT) is a 50 item tool to measure postgraduate learning environments. D-RECT was sent to all new entrants to RCPI training programmes in July 2012 (n = 527) and completed in regard to expectations of training (response rate 80.6 %). In March 2013, D-RECT was sent to all RCPI trainees (n = 1,246) to complete in relation to the post held on 1 March (response rate 32.6 %). Data were analysed in SPSS version 18. Experience fell short of expectations for basic specialist training, however, scores for experience rose with greater seniority to match expectations. Positive aspects were teamwork, consultant willingness to discuss patients and respectful treatment of trainees. Areas of weakness were provision of feedback and time to learn new skills. Measurement of learning environment at a national level using a quantitative tool provides useful information for quality assurance and improvement of training.

  1. Tissue banking training courses: Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Artur; Gut, Grzegorz; Uhrynowska-Tyszkiewicz, Izabela; Olender, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Personnel directly involved in the donation, procurement, testing, processing, preservation, storage and distribution of human tissues and cells should be appropriately qualified and provided with timely and relevant training according to EU directives. In the time of new tissue and cells regulations implementation such a training system existed in Poland only at a local level. The first training programme outlines for various groups of health professionals engaged in tissue banking practice was created in co-operation with the Institute for LifeLong Learning at University of Barcelona in 2006. This initial training courses were financially supported by EU Transition Facility Programme 2004. Then, starting from 2006, based on previous experience, system of advanced training courses was created. This training programme was financially supported by the National Programme for the Development of Transplantation Medicine 2006-2009-POLGRAFT financed by Polish Ministry of Health. During 2006 and 2007 first set of tissue banking initial training courses were provided according to TF 2004 project. Over 200 pathologists, forensic medicine specialists and other medical doctors responsible for donor screening and classification, medical directors of tissue establishments, technical staff; tissue graft users: orthopaedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, cardiosurgeons and ophthalmologists were trained. Between 2006 and 2009 there were organized 8 advanced tissue banking training courses according to POLGRAFT programme. There were organized both theoretical and practical courses on various aspects of tissue for over 350 persons. We present our experience in organisation of international and national tissue banking training courses.

  2. A Study of Far-Ultraviolet Extinction in the Upper Scorpius Cloud Using the SPINR Sounding Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, N. K.; Cook, T. A.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, six new interstellar extinction curves in the far-ultraviolet are presented using data from a sounding rocket experiment. The sounding rocket data were combined with IUE data for six lines of sight in the Upper Scorpius group to cover the wavelength range of 912-3030 Å. The extinction curves were produced using the pair comparison method with B stars of similar spectral types. Parameterizations from Fitzpatrick & Massa, Cardelli et al., and Fitzpatrick were then fitted to the derived extinction curves. From the derived extinction curves, their corresponding fits, and the dust model of Weingartner & Draine, it is concluded that the dust population in the Upper Scorpius region exhibits a larger than average grain population with a depletion of smaller grains.

  3. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  4. Waiting experience at train stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hagen, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the railway sector there is a great deal of interest in objective time but hardly any in passengers’ subjective experience of time. The focus of this publication is thus not on (shortening) objective time but on how time itself is experienced and how this can be improved. Aware that a journey

  5. Changes in endocannabinoid and N-acylethanolamine levels in rat brain structures following cocaine self-administration and extinction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrowska, Beata; Smaga, Irena; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-04-03

    Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that drugs of abuse alter the levels of lipid-based signalling molecules, including endocannabinoids (eCBs) and N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), in the rodent brain. In addition, several drugs targeting eCBs and/or NAEs are implicated in reward and/or seeking behaviours related to the stimulation of dopamine systems in the brain. In our study, the brain levels of eCBs (anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG)) and NAEs (oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA)) were analyzed via an LC-MS/MS method in selected brain structures of rats during cocaine self-administration and after extinction training according to the "yoked" control procedure. Repeated (14days) cocaine (0.5mg/kg/infusion) self-administration and yoked drug delivery resulted in a significant decrease (ca. 52%) in AEA levels in the cerebellum, whereas levels of 2-AG increased in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the cerebellum and decreased in the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum. In addition, we detected increases (>150%) in the levels of OEA and PEA in the limbic areas in both cocaine treated groups, as well as an increase in the tissue levels of OEA in the dorsal striatum in only the yoked cocaine group and increases in the tissue levels of PEA in the dorsal striatum (both cocaine groups) and the nucleus accumbens (yoked cocaine group only). Compared to the yoked saline control group, extinction training (10days) resulted in a potent reduction in AEA levels in the frontal cortex, the hippocampus and the nucleus accumbens and in 2-AG levels in the hippocampus, the dorsal striatum and the cerebellum. The decreases in the limbic and subcortical areas were more apparent for rats that self-administered cocaine. Following extinction, there was a region-specific change in the levels of NAEs in rats previously injected with cocaine; a potent increase (ca. 100%) in the levels of OEA and PEA was detected in the prefrontal cortex and the

  6. Experience in Teacher Training Through Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Sánchez Delgado

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the experience of the University of Valencia (UV in the training of new faculty members, beginning in the year 2000 with the course Introduction to University Teaching (CIDU—acronym in Spanish and continuing with the current certification program Diploma in Research, Management and University Teaching (DIGEU—acronym in Catalan. In particular, it posits mentoring, integrated into a broader training proposal, as a strategy for new faculty training; consequently, the mentor training program as well as the theoretical bases for its operation in the case of the University of Valencia, is presented. In addition, we include a report on the program’s evaluation plan, the aim of which is to provide quality information for the improvement of the program. Finally, we provide the results of two editions of said evaluation as evidence of the quality and dynamics of the reflection and the continuous improvement of the mentoring program.

  7. Survivors’ experiences from a train crash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Forsberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rarely described are people's lived experiences from severe injury events such as train crashes. The number of train crashes named disasters with ≥10 killed and/or ≥100 nonfatally injured grows globally and the trend shows that more people survive these disasters today than did so in the past. This results in an increased number of survivors needing care. The aim of the study was to explore survivors’ experiences from a train crash. Narrative interviews were performed with 14 passengers 4 years after a train crash event. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Experiences were captured in three main themes: (1 Living in the mode of existential threat describes how the survivors first lost control, then were thrown into a state of unimaginable chaos as they faced death. (2 Dealing with the unthinkable described how survivors restored control, the central role of others, and the importance of reconstructing the event to move forward in their processing. (3 Having cheated death shows how some became shackled by their history, whereas others overcame the haunting of unforgettable memories. Furthermore, the result shows how all experienced a second chance in life. Experiencing a train crash meant that the passengers experienced severe vulnerability and a threat to life and interdependence turned out to play a crucial role. Focusing on helping other passengers on site was one way to regain the loss of control and kept the chaos at bay. Family, friends, and fellow passengers turned out to be extremely important during the recovery process why such closeness should be promoted and facilitated.

  8. Survivors' experiences from a train crash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Rebecca; Saveman, Britt-Inger

    2011-01-01

    Rarely described are people's lived experiences from severe injury events such as train crashes. The number of train crashes named disasters with ≥10 killed and/or ≥100 nonfatally injured grows globally and the trend shows that more people survive these disasters today than did so in the past. This results in an increased number of survivors needing care. The aim of the study was to explore survivors' experiences from a train crash. Narrative interviews were performed with 14 passengers 4 years after a train crash event. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the interviews. Experiences were captured in three main themes: (1) Living in the mode of existential threat describes how the survivors first lost control, then were thrown into a state of unimaginable chaos as they faced death. (2) Dealing with the unthinkable described how survivors restored control, the central role of others, and the importance of reconstructing the event to move forward in their processing. (3) Having cheated death shows how some became shackled by their history, whereas others overcame the haunting of unforgettable memories. Furthermore, the result shows how all experienced a second chance in life. Experiencing a train crash meant that the passengers experienced severe vulnerability and a threat to life and interdependence turned out to play a crucial role. Focusing on helping other passengers on site was one way to regain the loss of control and kept the chaos at bay. Family, friends, and fellow passengers turned out to be extremely important during the recovery process why such closeness should be promoted and facilitated.

  9. Hamamatsu PMT R7056 Study for the Extinction Monitoring System of the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    CERN Document Server

    Boi, S; Hedin, D; Johnson, E; Prebys, E; Rubinov, P

    2015-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab proposes to search for the coherent neutrino-less conversion of muons to electrons in the presence of a nucleus. The experimental signature for an aluminum target is an isolated 105 MeV electron exiting the stopping target no earlier than ~700 ns after the pulse of proton beam hits the production target. Any protons that hit the production target in between the pulses can lead to fake conversion electrons during the measurement period. We define the beam extinction as the ratio of the number of protons striking the production target between pulses to the number striking the target during the pulses. It has been established that an extinction of approximately 10-10 is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. It would be desirable to measure the extinction of the beam coming out of the accelerator in a minute or less. Studies for the fast extinction monitor based on Hamamatsu PMT R7056 is the subject of this presentation.

  10. Transient inactivation of the pigeon hippocampus or the nidopallium caudolaterale during extinction learning impairs extinction retrieval in an appetitive conditioning paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengersdorf, Daniel; Stüttgen, Maik C; Uengoer, Metin; Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-05-15

    The majority of experiments exploring context-dependent extinction learning employ Pavlovian fear conditioning in rodents. Since mechanisms of appetitive and aversive learning are known to differ at the neuronal level, we sought to investigate extinction learning in an appetitive setting. Working with pigeons, we established a within-subject ABA renewal paradigm based on Rescorla (Q J Exp Psychol 61:1793) and combined it with pharmacological interventions during extinction. From the fear conditioning literature, it is known that both prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus are core structures for context-specific extinction learning. Accordingly, we transiently inactivated the nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL, a functional analogue of mammalian prefrontal cortex) and the hippocampus in separate experiments by intracranial infusion of the sodium-channel blocker tetrodotoxin immediately before extinction training. We find that TTX in both structures non-specifically suppresses conditioned responding, as revealed by a reduction of response rate to both the extinguished conditioned stimulus and a control stimulus which remained reinforced throughout the experiment. Furthermore, TTX during extinction training impaired later extinction retrieval assessed under drug-free conditions. This was true when responding to the extinguished stimulus was assessed in the context of extinction but not when tested in the context of acquisition, although both contexts were matched with respect to their history of conditioning. These results indicate that both NCL and hippocampus are involved in extinction learning under appetitive conditions or, more specifically, in the consolidation of extinction memory, and that their contribution to extinction is context-specific.

  11. Mechanisms of renewal after the extinction of instrumental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Travis P

    2013-07-01

    Four experiments with rats examined renewal of extinguished instrumental behavior when the reinforcement histories of the contexts were equated by giving complementary training and extinction of a different response (lever press and chain pull) in each context. In Experiments 1 through 3, renewal occurred when the response was tested in the acquisition context (ABA) or outside the extinction context (AAB and ABC). Further, in Experiments 1 through 3, when both responses were simultaneously available, there was a clear preference for the response that was not in its extinction context. In Experiment 4, renewal was not reduced when testing occurred in a context that had been associated with extinction of the other instrumental response. The experimental designs rule out differential context-reinforcer associations being the only contributing mechanism of renewal, and also raise questions about configural and occasion-setting accounts. The results are consistent with the idea that during extinction an inhibitory association is formed between the context and the response.

  12. Adrenal-dependent diurnal modulation of conditioned fear extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Chun, Lauren E; Fardi, Sara; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2015-06-01

    Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with altered conditioned fear extinction expression and impaired circadian function including dysregulation of glucocorticoid hormone secretion. We examined in adult male rats the relationship between conditioned fear extinction learning, circadian phase, and endogenous glucocorticoids (CORT). Rats maintained on a 12h light:dark cycle were trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions (conditioned fear acquisition and 2 extinction sessions) that were administered during either the rats' active or inactive circadian phase. In an initial experiment we found that rats at both circadian phases acquired and extinguished auditory cue conditioned fear to a similar degree in the first extinction session. However, rats trained and tested at zeitgeber time-16 (ZT16) (active phase) showed enhanced extinction memory expression during the second extinction session compared to rats trained and tested at ZT4 (inactive phase). In a follow-up experiment, adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham surgery rats were similarly trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions at either ZT4 or ZT16. ADX had no effect on conditioned fear acquisition or conditioned fear memory. Sham ADX rats trained and tested at ZT16 exhibited better extinction learning across the two extinction sessions compared to all other groups of rats. These results indicate that conditioned fear extinction learning is modulated by time of day, and this diurnal modulation requires the presence of adrenal hormones. These results support an important role of CORT-dependent circadian processes in regulating conditioned fear extinction learning, which may be capitalized upon to optimize effective treatment of PTSD.

  13. Adrenal-dependent diurnal modulation of conditioned fear extinction learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Elizabeth R.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Chun, Lauren E.; Fardi, Sara; Hinds, Laura R.; Spencer, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is associated with altered conditioned fear extinction expression and impaired circadian function including dysregulation of glucocorticoid hormone secretion. We examined in adult male rats the relationship between conditioned fear extinction learning, circadian phase, and endogenous glucocorticoids (CORT). Rats maintained on a 12 hr light:dark cycle were trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions (conditioned fear acquisition and 2 extinction sessions) that were administered during either the rats’ active or inactive circadian phase. In an initial experiment we found that rats at both circadian phases acquired and extinguished auditory cue conditioned fear to a similar degree in the first extinction session. However, rats trained and tested at zeitgeber time-16 (ZT16) (active phase) showed enhanced extinction memory expression during the second extinction session compared to rats trained and tested at ZT4 (inactive phase). In a follow-up experiment, adrenalectomized (ADX) or sham surgery rats were similarly trained and tested across 3 separate daily sessions at either ZT4 or ZT16. ADX had no effect on conditioned fear acquisition or conditioned fear memory. Sham ADX rats trained and tested at ZT16 exhibited better extinction learning across the two extinction sessions compared to all other groups of rats. These results indicate that conditioned fear extinction learning is modulated by time of day, and this diurnal modulation requires the presence of adrenal hormones. These results support an important role of CORT-dependent circadian processes in regulating conditioned fear extinction learning, which may be capitalized upon to optimize effective treatment of PTSD. PMID:25746455

  14. Increasing Response Variability of Mand Frames with Script Training and Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Alison M.; Higbee, Thomas S.; Kelley, Kristen N.; Sellers, Tyra P.; Pollard, Joy S.

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often demonstrate less variable behavior than their typically developing peers and those with other cognitive disabilities. A possible reason for lack of response variability emitted by children with autism is that they do not have a variety of response forms in their repertoire. Multiple-exemplar training through the use of…

  15. Determinants of Instrumental Extinction in Terrestrial Toads ("Bufo arenarum")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzio, Ruben N.; Ruetti, Eliana; Papini, Mauricio R.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research in a water-reinforced instrumental training situation with toads ("Bufo arenarum") has shown that performance in both acquisition and extinction is poorer after partial, rather than continuous reinforcement training. In Experiment 1, the performance of a group receiving 24 trials on a 50% partial reinforcement schedule was poorer…

  16. Methanol Droplet Extinction in Oxygen/Carbon-dioxide/Nitrogen Mixtures in Microgravity: Results from the International Space Station Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by the need to understand the flammability limits of condensed-phase fuels in microgravity, isolated single droplet combustion experiments were carried out in the Combustion Integrated Rack Facility onboard the International Space Station. Experimental observations of methanol droplet combustion and extinction in oxygen/carbon-dioxide/nitrogen mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressure in quiescent microgravity environment are reported for initial droplet diameters varying between 2 mm to 4 mm in this study.The ambient oxygen concentration was systematically lowered from test to test so as to approach the limiting oxygen index (LOI) at fixed ambient pressure. At one atmosphere pressure, ignition and some burning were observed for an oxygen concentration of 13% with the rest being nitrogen. In addition, measured droplet burning rates, flame stand-off ratios, and extinction diameters are presented for varying concentrations of oxygen and diluents. Simplified theoretical models are presented to explain the observed variations in extinction diameter and flame stand-off ratios.

  17. The effects of compound stimulus extinction and inhibition of noradrenaline reuptake on the renewal of alcohol seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, T M; Pan, M J; Corbit, L H

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related stimuli can trigger relapse of alcohol-seeking behaviors even after extended periods of abstinence. Extinction of such stimuli can reduce their impact on relapse; however, the expression of extinction can be disrupted when testing occurs outside the context where extinction learning took place, an effect termed renewal. Behavioral and pharmacological methods have recently been shown to augment extinction learning; yet, it is not known whether the improved expression of extinction following these treatments remains context-dependent. Here we examined whether two methods, compound–stimulus extinction and treatment with the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine, would reduce the vulnerability of extinction to a change in context. Following alcohol self-administration, responding was extinguished in a distinct context. After initial extinction, further extinction was given to a target stimulus presented in compound with another alcohol-predictive stimulus intended to augment prediction error (Experiment 1) or after a systemic injection of atomoxetine (1.0 mg kg−1; Experiment 2). A stimulus extinguished as part of a compound elicited less responding than a stimulus receiving equal extinction alone regardless of whether animals were tested in the training or extinction context; however, reliable renewal was not observed in this paradigm. Importantly, atomoxetine enhanced extinction relative to controls even in the presence of a reliable renewal effect. Thus, extinction of alcohol-seeking behavior can be improved by extinguishing multiple alcohol-predictive stimuli or enhancing noradrenaline neurotransmission during extinction training. Importantly, both methods improve extinction even when the context is changed between extinction training and test, and thus could be utilized to enhance the outcome of extinction-based treatments for alcohol-use disorders. PMID:26327688

  18. Remote probing of atmospheric particulates from radiation extinction experiments: A review of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    The existing methodology for reconstructing the particle size distribution and inferring the refractive index of absorbing and scattering atmospheric particulates is critically reviewed. Emphasis is placed on method capabilities and shortcomings and, wherever possible, on achievable accuracy. The nature of the associated remote probing problem is analyzed with regard to the effects of the particulates on EM wave propagation in the atmosphere. The parameterization of size distribution is studied within the unifying framework of Pearson's distribution curves. The inversions of extinction measurements and their ratios are considered separately, and the potentialities of each type of measurement are identified. Work lacking in each of the methods reviewed is indicated. A method of determining both the effective complex refractive index and size distribution model parameters from the same data is also presented. Lastly, determination from extinction ratio data of the complex refractive index independent of size distribution is discussed and error analyzed.

  19. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine facilitates fear extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M B; Andero, R; Ressler, K J; Howell, L L

    2015-09-15

    Acutely administered 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') has been proposed to have long-term positive effects on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms when combined with psychotherapy. No preclinical data support a mechanistic basis for these claims. Given the persistent nature of psychotherapeutic gains facilitated by MDMA, we hypothesized that MDMA improves fear extinction learning, a key process in exposure-based therapies for PTSD. In these experiments, mice were first exposed to cued fear conditioning and treated with drug vehicle or MDMA before extinction training 2 days later. MDMA was administered systemically and also directly targeted to brain structures known to contribute to extinction. In addition to behavioral measures of extinction, changes in mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and Fos were measured after MDMA treatment and extinction. MDMA (7.8 mg kg(-1)) persistently and robustly enhanced long-term extinction when administered before extinction training. MDMA increased the expression of Fos in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), whereas increases in Bdnf expression were observed only in the amygdala after extinction training. Extinction enhancements were recapitulated when MDMA (1 μg) was infused directly into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), and enhancement was abolished when BDNF signaling was inhibited before extinction. These findings suggest that MDMA enhances fear memory extinction through a BDNF-dependent mechanism, and that MDMA may be a useful adjunct to exposure-based therapies for PTSD and other anxiety disorders characterized by altered fear learning.

  20. Postgraduate training in Ireland: expectations and experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, D

    2014-01-05

    Postgraduate medical training in Ireland has been compared unfavourably with training abroad and blamed for an "exodus" of graduates of Irish medical schools. Exploration of features of a good training environment and development of tools to measure it have been the focus of much published research. There have been no Irish studies examining training environment using such validated tools.

  1. How Allies Collaborate; The NATO Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevanter, E., Jr.

    A survey was made of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) coordination of training programs for allied military forces and its implications about collaboration among allies in peacetime. Three types of training were analyzed: (1) higher training, or the coordination of large military formations; (2) unit training of smaller teams; (3)…

  2. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and discu...

  3. Academic Training: The LHC machine /experiment interface

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 18, 19, 20, 21 & 22 April from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 The LHC machine /experiment interface S. TAPPROGGE, Univ. of Mainz, D, R. ASSMANN, CERN-AB E. TSESMELIS and D. MACINA, CERN-TS This series of lectures will cover some of the major issues at the boundary between the LHC machine and the experiments: 1) The physics motivation and expectations of the experiments regarding the machine operation. This will include an overview of the LHC physics programme (in pp and PbPb collisions), of the experimental signatures (from high pT objects to leading nucleons) and of the expected trigger rates as well as the data sets needed for specific measurements. Furthermore, issues related to various modes of operation of the machine (e.g. bunch spacings of 25 ns. vs. 75 ns.) and special requirements of the detectors for their commissioning will be described. 2) The LHC machine aspects: introduction of the main LHC parameters and disc...

  4. Comparing the context specificity of extinction and latent inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ralph R; Laborda, Mario A; Polack, Cody W; Miguez, Gonzalo

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to a cue alone either before (i.e., latent inhibition treatment) or after (i.e., extinction) the cue is paired with an unconditioned stimulus results in attenuated conditioned responding to the cue. Here we report two experiments in which potential parallels between the context specificity of the effects of extinction and latent inhibition treatments were directly compared in a lick suppression preparation with rats. The reversed ordering of conditioning and nonreinforcement in extinction and latent inhibition designs allowed us to examine the effect of training order on the context specificity of what is learned given phasic reinforcement and nonreinforcement of a target cue. Experiment 1 revealed that when conditioned-stimulus (CS) conditioning and CS nonreinforcement were administered in the same context, both extinction and latent inhibition treatments had reduced impacts on test performance, relative to excitatory conditioning when testing occurred outside the treatment context. Similarly, Experiment 2 showed that when conditioning was administered in one context and nonreinforcement was administered in a second context, the effects of both extinction and latent inhibition treatments were attenuated when testing occurred in a neutral context, relative to the context in which the CS was nonreinforced. The observed context specificity of extinction and latent inhibition treatments has been previously reported in both cases, but not in a single experiment under otherwise identical conditions. The results of the two experiments convergently suggest that memory of nonreinforcement becomes context dependent after a cue is both reinforced and nonreinforced, independent of the order of training.

  5. Survival of the Partial Reinforcement Extinction Effect after Contextual Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughner, Robert L.; Papini, Mauricio R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of contextual shifts on the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) were studied in autoshaping with rats. Experiment 1 established that the two contexts used subsequently were easily discriminable and equally salient. In Experiment 2, independent groups of rats received acquisition training under partial reinforcement (PRF) or…

  6. Regulation of extinction-related plasticity by opioid receptors in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Parsons

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has led to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning. Long-term synaptic changes in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC are critical for extinction learning, but very little is currently known about how the mPFC and other brain areas interact during extinction. The current study examined the effect of drugs that impair the extinction of fear conditioning on the activation of the extracellular-related kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK in brain regions that likely participate in the consolidation of extinction learning. Inhibitors of opioid and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA receptors were applied to the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG and amygdala shortly before extinction training. Results from these experiments show that blocking opioid receptors in the vlPAG prevented the formation of extinction memory, whereas NMDA receptor blockade had no effect. Conversely, blocking NMDA receptors in the amygdala disrupted the formation of fear extinction memory, but opioid receptor blockade in the same brain area did not. Subsequent experiments tested the effect of these drug treatments on the activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway in various brain regions following extinction training. Only opioid receptor blockade in the vlPAG disrupted ERK phosphorylation in the mPFC and amygdala. These data support the idea that opiodergic signaling derived from the vlPAG affects plasticity across the brain circuit responsible for the formation of extinction memory.

  7. Extinction of chained instrumental behaviors: Effects of procurement extinction on consumption responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Bouton, Mark E

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental behavior often consists of sequences or chains of responses that minimally include procurement behaviors that enable subsequent consumption behaviors. In such chains, behavioral units are linked by access to one another and eventually to a primary reinforcer, such as food or a drug. The present experiments examined the effects of extinguishing procurement responding on consumption responding after training of a discriminated heterogeneous instrumental chain. Rats learned to make a procurement response (e.g., pressing a lever) in the presence of a distinctive discriminative stimulus; making that response led to the presentation of a second discriminative stimulus that set the occasion for a consumption response (e.g., pulling a chain), which then produced a food-pellet reinforcer. Experiment 1 showed that extinction of either the full procurement-consumption chain or procurement alone weakened the consumption response tested in isolation. Experiment 2 replicated the procurement extinction effect and further demonstrated that the opportunity to make the procurement response, as opposed to simple exposure to the procurement stimulus alone, was required. In Experiment 3, rats learned 2 distinct discriminated heterogeneous chains; extinction of 1 procurement response specifically weakened the consumption response that had been associated with it. The results suggest that learning to inhibit the procurement response may produce extinction of consumption responding through mediated extinction. The experiments suggest the importance of an associative analysis of instrumental behavior chains. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Compound Stimulus Presentation Does Not Deepen Extinction in Human Causal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Oren; Holmes, Nathan; Westbrook, R. Fred

    2017-01-01

    Models of associative learning have proposed that cue-outcome learning critically depends on the degree of prediction error encountered during training. Two experiments examined the role of error-driven extinction learning in a human causal learning task. Target cues underwent extinction in the presence of additional cues, which differed in the degree to which they predicted the outcome, thereby manipulating outcome expectancy and, in the absence of any change in reinforcement, prediction error. These prediction error manipulations have each been shown to modulate extinction learning in aversive conditioning studies. While both manipulations resulted in increased prediction error during training, neither enhanced extinction in the present human learning task (one manipulation resulted in less extinction at test). The results are discussed with reference to the types of associations that are regulated by prediction error, the types of error terms involved in their regulation, and how these interact with parameters involved in training. PMID:28232809

  9. Multicultural Training Experiences as Predictors of Multicultural Competencies: Students' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ginger L.; Jepsen, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The authors surveyed a national sample of master's-level counseling students regarding their multicultural training experiences and their multicultural counseling competencies. A series of hierarchical regression models tested the prediction of inventoried competencies from measures of selected training experiences: (a) program cultural ambience…

  10. Training science centre Explainers. The Techniquest experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Johnson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniquest was established in 1986, and in 1995 moved to its current premises at Cardiff Bay, South Wales. This was the first purpose-built science centre in the UK. It receives around 200,000 visitors every year to its exhibition, and to its programmes for schools and public audiences in the theatre, laboratory, discovery room and planetarium. The author joined the Techniquest project in 1985, became a staff member in 1990 and was the Chief Executive from 1997 until his retirement in 2004. Techniquest has three “out-stations” in Wales, and is responsible for the supply and maintenance of exhibits to the Look Out Discovery Centre in Bracknell, England. There is a Techniquest gallery at the Lisbon Pavilhão do Conhecimento - Ciência Viva, and a traveling exhibition, SciQuest, in South Africa which was also supplied by Techniquest. All these centres rely on the effective intervention of “Explainers” (at Techniquest we call them “Helpers” to provide the best possible experience for visitors. At its most demanding, the tasks of an Explainer are varied and intensive, yet there may be times when the duties are mundane or even dull. When you rely on people to act as both hosts and housekeepers, to provide both support and stimulus, and to be both welcoming and watchful, you are asking a great deal. This article raises some of the issues concerned with the recruitment and retention of Explainers, their training and management, and the way in which their role is recognized and valued by the science centre as a whole.

  11. The role of the amygdala in the extinction of conditioned fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barad, Mark; Gean, Po-Wu; Lutz, Beat

    2006-08-15

    The amygdala has long been known to play a central role in the acquisition and expression of fear. More recently, convergent evidence has implicated the amygdala in the extinction of fear as well. In rodents, some of this evidence comes from the infusion of drugs directly into the amygdala and, in particular, into the basolateral complex of the amygdala, during or after extinction learning. In vivo electrophysiology has identified cellular correlates of extinction learning and memory in the lateral nucleus of that structure. Human imaging experiments also indicate that amygdaloid activity correlates with extinction training. In addition, some studies have directly identified changes in molecular constituents of the basolateral amygdala. Together these experiments strongly indicate that the basolateral amygdala plays a crucial role in extinction learning. Interpreted in the light of these findings, several recent in vitro electrophysiology studies in amygdala-containing brain slices are suggestive of potential synaptic and circuit bases of extinction learning.

  12. Rethinking Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-07

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Rethinking Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavior...

  14. Effects of landscape transformation on bird colonization and extinction patterns in a large-scale, long-term natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelliti, Alessio; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-10-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to forest plantations is a major driver of global change. Studies on the impact of forest plantations on biodiversity in plantations and in the surrounding native vegetation have been inconclusive. Consequently, it is not known how to best manage the extensive areas of the planet currently covered by plantations. We used a novel, long-term (16 years) and large-scale (30,000 ha) landscape transformation natural experiment (the Nanangroe experiment, Australia) to test the effects of land conversion on population dynamics of 64 bird species associated with woodland and forest. A unique aspect of our study is that we focused on the effects of plantations on birds in habitat patches within plantations. Our study design included 56 treatment sites (Eucalyptus patches where the surrounding matrix was converted from grazed land to pine plantations), 55 control sites (Eucalyptus patches surrounded by grazed land), and 20 matrix sites (sites within the pine plantations and grazed land). Bird populations were studied through point counts, and colonization and extinction patterns were inferred through multiple season occupancy models. Large-scale pine plantation establishment affected the colonization or extinction patterns of 89% of studied species and thus led to a comprehensive turnover in bird communities inhabiting Eucalyptus patches embedded within the maturing plantations. Smaller bodied species appeared to respond positively to plantations (i.e., colonization increased and extirpation of these species decreased in patches surrounded by plantations) because they were able to use the newly created surrounding matrix. We found that the effects of forest plantations affected the majority of the bird community, and we believe these effects could lead to the artificial selection of one group of species at the expense of another. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Institutions and Organisations that take training seriously and devote time, effort and resources, etc, to their own teams are more likely to succeed, since both initial teacher training and continuous improvement, studies, hours of group discussion, works on innovation and educational research, talks and permanent meetings, etc, will all serve to enhance teaching and its quality. Teachers will be able to introduce new components from previously taught classes into their university teaching which will contribute to improving their work and developing a suitable academic environment to include shared objectives, teachers and students. Moreover, this training will serve to enhance pedagogic innovation, new teaching-learning methodologies and contribute to getting teaching staff involved in respect of the guidelines set out by the EHEA. Bearing in mind that training and motivation can be key factors in any teacher's "performance", their productivity and the quality of their teaching, Teacher Training for a specific post inside the University Organisation is standard practice of so-called Human Resources management and an integral part of a teacher's work; it is a way of professionalising the teaching of the different branches of Engineering. At Madrid Polytechnic University, in the Institute of Educational Sciences (ICE), since it was founded in 1972, we have been working hard with university teaching staff. But it was not until 1992 after carrying out various studies on training needs that we planned and programmed different training actions, offering a wide range of possibilities. Thus, we designed and taught an "Initial Teacher Training Course", as it was first called in 1992, a programme basically aimed to train young Engineering teachers just setting out on their teaching career. In 2006, the name was changed to "Advanced University Teacher Training Course". Subsequently, with the appearance of the Bologna Declaration and the creation of the European Higher

  16. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional centers of education in order to help teachers to renew their professional knowledge and at the same time to refocus it on the level of consciousness according to the real problems of school and the community. The feature of teaching staff advanced training in France is that it is teachers’ personal matter and duration of all periods of training should come to one year during all professional career. In Finland, teaching staff advanced training is organized directly in schools under aegis of the National Board of Education, the National Centre for Advanced Training in Education, departments of teacher education and other faculties of higher educational institutions on credit system basis. Among the topical forms there are targeted, cascade, common (cooperative teaching and learning by own example. In the UK, advanced training takes place in two models: the course model based on higher educational establishments and school based in-service education. The main purpose of advanced training system is to familiarize teachers with theoretical and practical innovations in educational activities, progressive teaching technologies, and consolidate their skills of independent acquisition of knowledge necessary for their professional development.

  17. Experimenting with a Superconducting Levitation Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miryala, Santosh; Koblischka, M. R.

    2014-01-01

    The construction and operation of a prototype high-"Tc" superconducting train model is presented. The train is levitated by a melt-processed GdBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript x] (Gd-123) superconducting material over a magnetic rail (track). The oval shaped track is constructed in S-N-S or PM3N configuration arranged on an iron…

  18. Explicit Disassociation of a Conditioned Stimulus and Unconditioned Stimulus during Extinction Training Reduces Both Time to Asymptotic Extinction and Spontaneous Recovery of a Conditioned Taste Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, G. Andrew; DiSorbo, Anthony; Wilson, Gina N.; Huffman, Jennifer; Bacik, Stephanie; Hoxha, Zana; Biada, Jaclyn M.; Kim, Ye-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversions (CTAs) may be acquired when an animal consumes a novel taste (CS) and then experiences the symptoms of poisoning (US). This aversion may be extinguished by repeated exposure to the CS alone. However, following a latency period in which the CS is not presented, the CTA will spontaneously recover (SR). In the current…

  19. THE MEMORY SYSTEM ENGAGED DURING ACQUISITION DETERMINES THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT EXTINCTION PROTOCOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarid eGoodman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous research indicates that extinction of rodent maze behavior may occur without explicit performance of the previously required response. In latent extinction, confining an animal to a previously rewarded goal location without reinforcement is typically sufficient to produce extinction of maze learning. However, previous studies have not determined whether latent extinction may be successfully employed to extinguish all types of memory acquired in the maze, or whether only specific types of memory may be vulnerable to latent extinction. The present study examined whether latent extinction may be effective across two plus-maze tasks that depend on anatomically distinct neural systems. Adult male Long-Evans rats were trained in a hippocampus-dependent place learning task (experiment 1, in which animals were trained to approach a consistent spatial location for food reward. A separate group of rats were trained in a dorsolateral striatum-dependent response learning task (experiment 2, in which animals were trained to make a consistent egocentric body-turn response for food reward. Following training, animals received response extinction or latent extinction. For response extinction, animals were given the opportunity to execute the original running approach response toward the empty food cup. For latent extinction, animals were confined to the original goal locations with the empty food cup, thus preventing them from making the original running approach response. Results indicate that, relative to no extinction, latent extinction was effective at extinguishing memory in the place learning task, but remained ineffective in the response learning task. In contrast, typical response extinction remained very effective at extinguishing memory in both place and response learning tasks. The present findings confirm that extinction of maze learning may occur with or without overt performance of the previously acquired response, but that the

  20. Medical microbiology training needs and trainee experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Josephine; Elamin, Wael; Millar, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Training in microbiology is continuing to evolve. Standardisation of this process has, in part, been achieved through the development of a training curriculum by the Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath). A substantial proportion of microbiology training occurs through telephone consultations. To ascertain the content of these interactions and the extent to which the necessary skills outlined by the curriculum are attainable via these consultations. Records of telephone consultations made by microbiology registrars (SpR) on the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) over a 6 month period were analysed with regard to who initiated contact and the type of advice provided. An average of 426 SpR entries per month were made on the LIMS following telephone consultations. These consultations were predominantly initiated by fellow clinicians as opposed to the SpR. The majority (79%) of advice entailed guidance as to the use of antimicrobials which resulted in an alteration of the current regimen in 54% of cases. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the telephone consultations of microbiology trainees. It is concluded that although such interactions provide a means of attaining some of the competencies outlined by the RCPath curriculum, the bias towards antimicrobial advice reflects a discrepancy between the needs of the service users and the broad skill set advocated by the current microbiology training programme. Future modifications will need to take this into account to ensure both the training of SpRs and the microbiology service is fit for purpose.

  1. Mechanisms of renewal after the extinction of discriminated operant behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Travis P; Vurbic, Drina; Bouton, Mark E

    2014-07-01

    Three experiments demonstrated, and examined the mechanisms that underlie, the renewal of extinguished discriminated operant behavior. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to perform 1 response (lever press or chain pull) in the presence of one discriminative stimulus (S; light or tone) in Context A, and to perform the other response in the presence of the other S in Context B. Next, each of the original S/response combinations was extinguished in the alternate context. When the S/response combinations were tested back in the context in which they had been trained, responding in the presence of S returned (an ABA renewal effect was observed). This renewal could not be due to differential context-reinforcer associations, suggesting instead that the extinction context inhibits either the response and/or the effectiveness of the S. Consistent with the latter mechanism, in Experiment 2, ABA renewal was still observed when both the extinction and renewal contexts inhibited the same response. However, in Experiment 3, previous extinction of the response in the renewing context (occasioned by a different S) reduced AAB renewal more than did extinction of the different response. Taken together, the results suggest at least 2 mechanisms of renewal after instrumental extinction. First, extinction performance is at least partly controlled by a direct inhibitory association that is formed between the context and the response. Second, in the discriminated operant procedure, extinction performance can sometimes be partly controlled by a reduction in the effectiveness of the S in the extinction context. Renewal of discriminated operant behavior can be produced by a release from either of these forms of inhibition.

  2. Sense Training as Basis for Aesthetic Experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bente Dahl

    2016-01-01

    . It is a special problem for design engineers, who must guarantee the aesthetic, ethical and utilitarian qualities of products in a product development process. It does not matter whether they or other designers have conceived the product idea. It has been found that sense training can open up to aesthetic...

  3. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers' evaluation at the educational…

  4. The Relationship of Supervisory Experience, Counseling Experience, and Training in Supervision to Supervisory Identity Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelling, Nadine

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between supervisory identity development and supervisory experience, counseling experience, and training in supervision was examined for Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) members. Analyses indicated that supervisory experience and training were related to supervisory identity development, whilst counseling…

  5. Long-term maintenance of immediate or delayed extinction is determined by the extinction-test interval

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Justin S.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney L.

    2010-01-01

    Short acquisition-extinction intervals (immediate extinction) can lead to either more or less spontaneous recovery than long acquisition-extinction intervals (delayed extinction). Using rat subjects, we observed less spontaneous recovery following immediate than delayed extinction (Experiment 1). However, this was the case only if a relatively long extinction-test interval was used; a relatively short extinction-test interval yielded the opposite result (Experiment 2). Previous data appear co...

  6. The Impact of Train Staff on the Customer Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark van Hagen; Jessica Sauren

    2015-01-01

    The NS (Netherlands Railways) has developed an instrument which allows the measurement of both hard and less tangible quality aspects. This instrument, the so-called TEM (train experience monitor), monitors the quality experiences of customers with an aim to influencing key areas and underlying aspects. The TEM is a measurement instrument based on scientific evidence and questions passengers on the most important aspects of the train and train journey. These can be either functional questions on, e.g., security, cleanliness and information provision, or more emotional questions on the atmosphere and comfort of the train, e.g., whether passengers find the train pleasant and they feel welcome, including the role of the staff. The experience of a train journey can be influenced in three dimensions: process, people and place. Our focus in this study is on the importance of the people dimension, and for this purpose, the train staff experimented with a number of scripts which varied in their approach to tannoy announcements, ticket control and service provision. The findings show that the script focusing on control in combination with a warm (instead of a rational/business-like) service provision generates the highest assessment of the staff. On scrutinizing the influence of the scripts on the general assessment of the train journey, it is quite clear that the aforementioned script has a significant and positive impact.

  7. Drug Abuse Treatment Training in Peru: A Social Policy Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Knowlton W.; Young, Linda C.; Suresh, Geetha; Berbaum, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a social policy experiment in 76 drug treatment organizations in Peru from 1997 to 2000. Programs were assigned to one of three training conditions. Positive effects were found for increased staff empowerment to use training tools and principles, and larger effects were found on the implementation of therapeutic community methods with…

  8. Training cardiac surgeons: the Indiana University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, John W

    2016-12-01

    In this article, I will outline the origin of cardiothoracic surgical (CTS) training at Indiana University (IU) and its evolution to the present. I will describe my educational background, surgical training in this specialty, and my role as an educator of CT surgeons. I will describe our faculty and the structure of the CTS residency. Finally, I will describe a newly adopted smart phone "App" called SIMPL, which allows the resident and faculty to quickly (50% of the most critical aspects of each surgical procedure, the resident's performance during the critical portion of the operation from poor to excellent, and the degree of difficulty of the operation from simple to complex. The attending surgeon and the resident data are then forwarded to the SIMPL database where the SIMPL software aggregates data for each resident and procedure producing a report at the end of the rotation of the resident's performance relative to his peers. This additional evaluation process will better ensure that our CTS residents are "practice ready" when they complete their training.

  9. Immediate extinction causes a less durable loss of performance than delayed extinction following either fear or appetitive conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Five experiments with rat subjects compared the effects of immediate and delayed extinction on the durability of extinction learning. Three experiments examined extinction of fear conditioning (using the conditioned emotional response method), and two experiments examined extinction of appetitive conditioning (using the food-cup entry method). In all experiments, conditioning and extinction were accomplished in single sessions, and retention testing took place 24 h after extinction. In both f...

  10. Validation of the CALIPSO-CALIOP extinction coefficients from in situ observations in midlatitude cirrus clouds during the CIRCLE-2 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioche, Guillaume; Josset, Damien; Gayet, Jean-FrançOis; Pelon, Jacques; Garnier, Anne; Minikin, Andreas; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of combined Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) extinction retrievals with airborne lidar and in situ cirrus cloud measurements. Specially oriented research flights were carried out in western Europe in May 2007 during the Cirrus Cloud Experiment (CIRCLE-2) with the German Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) and the French Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement (SAFIRE) Falcon aircraft equipped for remote and in situ measurements, respectively. Four cirrus cloud situations including thin cirrus layers and outflow cirrus linked to midlatitude fronts and convective systems were chosen to perform experimental collocated observations along the satellite overpasses. The measurements were carried out with temperatures ranging between -38°C and -60°C and with extinction coefficients no larger than 2 km-1. Comparisons between CALIOP and airborne lidar (LEANDRE New Generation (LNG)) attenuated backscatter coefficients reveal much larger CALIOP values for one frontal cirrus situation which could be explained by oriented pristine ice crystals. During the four selected cases the CALIOP cirrus extinction profiles were compared with in situ extinction coefficients derived from the Polar Nephelometer. The results show a very good agreement for two situations (frontal and outflow cases) despite very different cloud conditions. The slope parameters of linear fittings of CALIOP extinction coefficients with respect to in situ measurements are 0.90 and 0.94, with correlation coefficients of 0.69 and only 0.36 for the latter case because of a small number of measurements. On the contrary, significant differences are evidenced for two other situations. In thin frontal cirrus at temperatures ranging between -58°C and -60°C, systematic larger CALIOP extinctions can be explained by horizontally

  11. Drug retailer training: experiences from Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, K K; Gartoulla, R P; Pradhan, Y M; Shrestha, A D; Karkee, S B; Quick, J D

    1992-10-01

    Sale of modern medicines by untrained peddlers, general merchants, and other drug sellers is common throughout the developing world. Drug sellers operating in the 'informal sector' are often the first source of health care outside the home. Reasons given by patients for using private drug sellers include expediency, convenience, efficacy of the medicines, dependability of supply, and reasonable cost. At the same time, self-medication through private drug sellers can be ineffective, wasteful, and at times distinctly harmful. Regulatory approaches to controlling drug selling in the informal sector, widely endorsed on paper through national drug control legislation, require a cadre of professional regulatory staff and enforcement mechanisms which are too often beyond the current economic and political reach of countries. In Nepal, where rugged terrain has limited infrastructure development, the doctor to population ratio is 1:23,000, utilization of government health services averages only 0.2 visits per person per year. Retail drug outlets outnumber health posts and health centers by a ratio of 4:1 and private drug sellers often offer the only access to modern medicine for much of the population. Community surveys have found that drug retailers are very often the first and only source of health care outside the home. Given the importance of retail drug outlets and the lack of trained pharmacists, the Department of Drug Administration in 1981 established a 45-hr course for drug retailers which emphasized practical training as well as formal teaching on pharmacology, ethics, storage of drugs, and legal issues. By the end of 1989, 4096 drug retailers had graduated from the course. Still run by the Ministry of Health Department of Drug Administration, the course has proven to be administratively feasible and has been quite popular with drug retailers. Initial reservations expressed by doctors and some pharmacists were soon overcome, and the course is now well accepted by

  12. Opioid receptors regulate the extinction of Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2003-12-01

    Rats received a single pairing of an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) with a footshock unconditioned stimulus (US). The fear (freezing) that had accrued to the CS was then extinguished. Injection of naloxone prior to this extinction significantly impaired the development of extinction. This impairment was mediated by opioid receptors in the brain and was not observed when naloxone was injected after extinction training. Finally, an injection of naloxone on test failed to reinstate extinguished responding that had already accrued to the CS. These experiments show that opioid receptors regulate the development, but not the expression, of fear extinction and are discussed with reference to the roles of opioid receptors in US processing, memory, and appetitive motivation.

  13. Assessing seniors' user experience (UX) of exergames for balance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Ather; Skjæret, Nina; Ystmark, Kristine;

    2014-01-01

    . This study aims to evaluate user experience and preferences of exergame technologies to train balance and to identify different factors that affect seniors' intention to use exergames. Fourteen healthy senior citizens played three different stepping exergames in a laboratory setting. Seniors' experience......Exergames technologies are increasingly used to help people achieve their exercise requirements including balance training. However, little is known about seniors' user experience of exergame technology for balance training and what factors they consider most important for using the exergames...... of the exergames and their preference to use exergames was assessed using a semi-structured interview, the system usability scale (SUS), and card ranking. The results of the study showed that in order for seniors to use exergames to train their balance, the exergames should particularly focus on challenging tasks...

  14. Antenatal hypnosis training and childbirth experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Anette; Uldbjerg, Niels; Zachariae, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Childbirth is a demanding event in a woman's life. The aim of this study was to explore whether a brief intervention in the form of an antenatal course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth could improve the childbirth experience.......Childbirth is a demanding event in a woman's life. The aim of this study was to explore whether a brief intervention in the form of an antenatal course in self-hypnosis to ease childbirth could improve the childbirth experience....

  15. Stimulus magnitude effects on the extinction of conditioned consummatory responses to flavored sucrose solution in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Santiago

    2011-06-01

    Paradoxical extinction effects in the conditioned consummatory behavior of rodents have remained largely elusive. Here, appetitive flavor conditioning was studied to determine if a paradoxical magnitude of reinforcement extinction effect (MREE) can occur in the consummatory behavior of mice. During acquisition training of two experiments with factorial design, animals received daily access to either 32% or 4% sucrose solution, and goal tracking time was measured in one-minute bins. In Experiment 1 the solutions were flavored with either 5% or 0.5% almond essence and in Experiment 2 with 2% almond essence, but combined with continuous or partial schedules of reinforcement. During extinction tests of Experiment 1 and 2, water flavored with 0.5% or 2% almond was presented, respectively. Consummatory performance decreased more abruptly during the initial portion of the extinction sessions after training with 32% as compared to 4% sucrose solution. Furthermore, when given a choice test after extinction training (Experiment 2), animals trained with 32% sucrose, preferred the flavored solution, but animals trained with 4% preferred the unflavored solution. These results are interpreted as indicative of the occurrence of a paradoxical MREE in conditioned consummatory behaviors.

  16. TEACHING ACTIVITIES FOR TEACHER TRAINING: EXPERIENCE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamille Marinho Brazil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is an experience report on the process of teaching and learning developed during the teaching stage. The objective of this study was to report the experience faced by a student of the Post-Graduate Nursing and Health (PPGES level academic master, the State University of Bahia (UESB. The stage totaled 45 hours, counted the 15 extra hours spent by students under the guidance of the guiding teachers. didactic procedures were used: dialogued exposition, didactic video display, seminars and debates, addressing the theoretical contents indicated in Nutrition discipline of menu in Process Health / Disease. It is noticed that the teaching stage is a very important experience for the formation of a master, because at that time you can put into practice the knowledge acquired throughout the course, develop skills and bring out the desire for education.

  17. Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

  18. Informing Educational Psychology Training with Students' Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Liesel; Bender, C. J. Gerda; Carvalho-Malekane, Wendy M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe students' experiences of community engagement in an Educational Psychology practicum in order to inform relevant educational psychology training literature with experiences of students' community engagement. Experiential learning served as our theoretical framework and we employed an instrumental case…

  19. CT colonography: effect of experience and training on reader performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Stuart A.; Burling, David; Morley, Simon; Bartram, Clive I. [Department of Intestinal Imaging, St. Mark' s Hospital, Watford Road, Northwick Park, HA1 3UJ, London (United Kingdom); Halligan, Steve [Department of Intestinal Imaging, St. Mark' s Hospital, Watford Road, Northwick Park, HA1 3UJ, London (United Kingdom); Department of Cancer Research UK Colorectal Cancer Unit, St. Mark' s Hospital, Northwick Park, HA1 3UJ, London (United Kingdom); Bassett, Paul [Department of Statistics, St. Mark' s Hospital, Northwick Park, HA1 3UJ, London (United Kingdom); Atkin, Wendy [Department of Cancer Research UK Colorectal Cancer Unit, St. Mark' s Hospital, Northwick Park, HA1 3UJ, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effect of radiologist experience and increasing exposure to CT colonography on reader performance. Three radiologists of differing general experience (consultant, research fellow, trainee) independently analysed 100 CT colonographic datasets. Readers had no prior experience of CT colonography and received feedback and training after the first 50 cases from an independent experienced radiologist. Diagnostic performance and reporting times were compared for the first and second 50 datasets and compared with the results of a radiologist experienced in CT colonography. Before training only the consultant reader achieved statistical equivalence with the reference standard for detection of larger polyps. After training, detection rates ranged between 25 and 58% for larger polyps. Only the trainee significantly improved after training (P=0.007), with performance of other readers unchanged or even worse. Reporting times following training were reduced significantly for the consultant and fellow (P<0.001 and P=0.03, respectively), but increased for the trainee (P<0.001). In comparison to the consultant reader, the odds of detection of larger polyps was 0.36 (CI 0.16, 0.82) for the fellow and 0.36 (CI 0.14, 0.91) for the trainee. There is considerable variation in the ability to report CT colonography. Prior experience in gastrointestinal radiology is a distinct advantage. Competence cannot be assumed even after directed training via a database of 50 cases. (orig.)

  20. Extinction of goal tracking also eliminates the conditioned reinforcing effects of an appetitive conditioned stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, David N; Tunstall, Brendan J; Marks, Katherine R; Weiss, Stanley J

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the effects of extinction are response-specific. The present study investigated whether an extinction treatment that eliminated goal tracking elicited by an appetitive conditioned stimulus (CS) would also eliminate the conditioned reinforcing effects of that CS. Rats were first trained on a goal-tracking procedure in which an auditory CS was paired with a food unconditioned stimulus. Animals learned to approach the location where the food was delivered. In a subsequent phase, rats in one group received extinction training that eliminated the goal-tracking elicited by the CS. Rats in the other group did not experience extinction of the food-paired CS. Then, both groups received a test for conditioned reinforcement in which leverpresses resulted in the brief presentation of the stimulus previously paired with food. This stimulus did not act as a conditioned reinforcer in the group that had been subjected to extinction training, but did serve as a conditioned reinforcer in the group that did not experience extinction. These results indicate that the effects of extinction generalize from the approach-eliciting to the conditioned reinforcing effects of an appetitive CS.

  1. Management Specialists' Training Social Schemes: World Experience and Russian Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М А Ignatskaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The article offers the analysis of the issues related to the social administration of professional management personnel training which have become particularly complicated over the past two decades. Social schemes, conditions and factors of management are shown to be closely interconnected with the characteristics of human capital as the basis for social, economic and cultural development of the contemporary society. World experience and Russian specificity in the sphere of human resource management specialists' training are analyzed.

  2. Training Experiences and Early Employment Patterns: Experiences with the Portland WIN Voucher Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Lottie

    A program to test the feasibility of vouchering vocational training for clients of the Work Incentive Program (WIN) was conducted in Portland, Oregon. (Vouchering places the buying power for institutional training into the hands of the clients, thus allowing them greater autonomy in deciding their own occupational destiny.) One hundred and…

  3. Long-Term Maintenance of Immediate or Delayed Extinction Is Determined by the Extinction-Test Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin S.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney L.

    2010-01-01

    Short acquisition-extinction intervals (immediate extinction) can lead to either more or less spontaneous recovery than long acquisition-extinction intervals (delayed extinction). Using rat subjects, we observed less spontaneous recovery following immediate than delayed extinction (Experiment 1). However, this was the case only if a relatively…

  4. E-Training in Mechatronics for Professionals: Implementation and Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Rojko

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Mechatronics is in most of the European countries still the profession in which the need for competent and qualified staff exceeds the number of formally educated professionals. E-training in mechatronics presented in this paper is developed in order to at least partially fill that gap. MeRLab training (Innovative Remote Laboratory in the E-training of Mechatronics offers innovative way for acquiring knowledge and skills in mechatronics by offering the high-quality educational materials enhanced by the remote exercises executed on various mechatronic devices and constant supervision of the training instructor. As a basic educational approach, the problem based learning was chosen. During the training this approach was stimulated by introducing a number of complex, practically oriented exercises that finish with the remote experiments. Pilot testing of the training was executed with 60 participants, mostly professionals from related fields such as mechanical and electrical engineering. Most of the participants are employed in the industry, while some were the teachers from secondary or high vocational schools. Feedback from the participants shows that overall response to the training is very good, as the majority of participants think that the training fulfils the goals, that the materials are clear and concise, that the exercises and tests are adequate, and, that the whole learning contents is excellent.

  5. Immediate Extinction Causes a Less Durable Loss of Performance than Delayed Extinction following Either Fear or Appetitive Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Five experiments with rat subjects compared the effects of immediate and delayed extinction on the durability of extinction learning. Three experiments examined extinction of fear conditioning (using the conditioned emotional response method), and two experiments examined extinction of appetitive conditioning (using the food-cup entry method). In…

  6. Context, Learning, and Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Blei, David M.; Niv, Yael

    2010-01-01

    A. Redish et al. (2007) proposed a reinforcement learning model of context-dependent learning and extinction in conditioning experiments, using the idea of "state classification" to categorize new observations into states. In the current article, the authors propose an interpretation of this idea in terms of normative statistical inference. They…

  7. Inhibition of histone deacetylases facilitates extinction and attenuates reinstatement of nicotine self-administration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Castino

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodelling is integral to the formation of long-term memories. Recent evidence suggests that histone modification may play a role in the persistence of memories associated with drug use. The present series of experiments aimed to examine the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibition on the extinction and reinstatement of nicotine self-administration. Rats were trained to intravenously self-administer nicotine for 12 days on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. In Experiment 1, responding was then extinguished through removal of nicotine and response-contingent cues. After each extinction session, the HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaB, was administered immediately, or six hours after each session. In Experiment 2, response-contingent cues remained available across extinction to increase rates of responding during this phase, and NaB was administered immediately after the session. Finally, in Experiment 3, the effect of NaB treatment on extinction of responding for sucrose pellets was assessed. Across all experiments reinstatement to the cue and/or the reward itself was then tested. In the first experiment, treatment with NaB significantly attenuated nicotine and nicotine + cue reinstatement when administered immediately, but not six hours after each extinction session. When administered after cue-extinction (Expt. 2, NaB treatment specifically facilitated the rate of extinction across sessions, indicating that HDAC inhibition enhanced consolidation of the extinction memory. In contrast, there was no effect of NaB on the extinction and reinstatement of sucrose-seeking (Expt. 3, indicating that the observed effects are specific to a drug context. These results provide the first demonstration that HDAC inhibition facilitates the extinction of responding for an intravenously self-administered drug of abuse and further highlight the potential of HDAC inhibitors in the treatment of drug addiction.

  8. Academic Training: Technological challenges for LHC experiments, the CMS example

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 28 February, 1, 2, 3 & 4 March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Technological challenges for LHC experiments, the CMS example by P. SPHICAS/CERN-PH, G. DISSERTORI/ETH, Zürich, Ch. M. MANNELLI/CERN-PH, G. HALL/Imperial College, London. GB, P. FABBRICATORE/INFN, Genova, I Monday 28 February Design principles and performances of CMS P. Sphicas/CERN-PH Tuesday 1st March Crystal calorimetry in LHC environment G. Dissertori/ETH Zürich, CH Wednesday 2 March Silicon tracking in LHC environment M. Mannelli/CERN-PH Thursday 3 March Radhard fast electronics for LHC experiments G. Hall/Imperial College London, GB Friday 4 March Design principles of thin high field superconducting solenoids P. Fabbricatore/INFN Genova, I ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  9. Academic Training: Technological challenges for LHC experiments, the CMS example

    CERN Document Server

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2004-2005 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 28 February, 1, 2, 3 & 4 March from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Technological challenges for LHC experiments, the CMS example by P. SPHICAS/CERN-PH, G. DISSERTORI/ETH, Zürich, Ch. M. MANNELLI/CERN-PH, G. HALL/Imperial College, London. GB, P. FABBRICATORE/INFN, Genova, I Monday 28 February Design principles and performances of CMS P. Sphicas/CERN-PH Tuesday 1st March Crystal calorimetry in LHC environment G. Dissertori/ETH Zürich, CH Wednesday 2 March Silicon tracking in LHC environment M. Mannelli/CERN-PH Thursday 3 March Radhard fast electronics for LHC experiments G. Hall/Imperial College London, GB Friday 4 March Design principles of thin high field superconducting solenoids P. Fabbricatore/INFN Genova, I ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  10. Grief Counseling: An Investigation of Counselors' Training, Experience, and Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ober, Anne M.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Wheaton, Joe E.

    2012-01-01

    Grief is prevalent in counseling, but little is known about the current status of counselors' preparation and competencies to provide effective care. This exploratory study surveyed counselors (N = 369) on grief training, personal and professional experiences with grief, and grief counseling competence. Multiple regression analyses found training…

  11. Research Training in Medical Informatics: The Stanford Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortliffe, Edward H.; Fagan, Lawrence M.

    1989-01-01

    Stanford University created an interdisciplinary program to train researchers and academic leaders in the field of medical information sciences. The program is described, identifying experiences of interest to people developing such a program. The program's background and history, students, curriculum and philosophy, and lessons learned are…

  12. Employment and Training Schemes for Rural Youth: Learning from Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan-Thuy, N.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past two decades a number of African and Asian governments have experimented with various types of youth mobilization or employment and training schemes in trying to cope with rural youth unemployment. A critical appraisal is made of some of these in an attempt to establish criteria that productive employment programs for rural youth…

  13. Experiments of Two-level Training in Hungarian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korcsog, Andras; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An experiment designed to train engineering students to two levels of achievement in three-year and five-year programs within a single institution is reported. Organizational and curricular problems created by such integrated schemes are examined. (Author/LBH)

  14. The Relationship of Counselor Attitudes to Training and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael J.; Finley, Robert E.

    The Test of Counselor Attitudes (Porter) was administered to five groups representing different levels of counselor training and experience. Significant differences were found between the groups on all five of the counselor attitudes meased: (1) evaluative; (2) interpretive; (3) understanding; (4) supportive; and (5) probing. As students receive…

  15. The Relationship of Counselor Attitudes to Training and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Michael J.; Finley, Robert E.

    The Test of Counselor Attitudes (Porter) was administered to five groups representing different levels of counselor training and experience. Significant differences were found between the groups on all five of the counselor attitudes meased: (1) evaluative; (2) interpretive; (3) understanding; (4) supportive; and (5) probing. As students receive…

  16. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  17. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  18. Repeated Acquisitions and Extinctions in Classical Conditioning of the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, E. James

    2006-01-01

    The rabbit nictitating membrane (NM) response underwent successive stages of acquisition and extinction training in both delay (Experiment 1) and trace (Experiment 2) classical conditioning. In both cases, successive acquisitions became progressively faster, although the largest, most reliable acceleration occurred between the first and second…

  19. House Staff Communication Training and Patient Experience Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladoyin A Oladeru MPH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether communication training for house staff via role-playing exercises (1 is well received and (2 improves patient experience scores in house staff clinics. Methods: We conducted a pre–post study in which the house staff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication training led by trained faculty in small groups. Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. House staff completed posttraining questionnaires. For 1 month prior to and 1 month following the training, patients in the house staff clinics completed surveys with Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Preintervention and postintervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results: Forty-four of a possible 45 house staff (97.8% participated, with 31 (70.5% indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences in patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 preintervention surveys to 77 postintervention surveys. Conclusion: Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  20. House staff communication training and patient experience scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeru, Oladoyin A; Hamadu, Musleehat; Cleary, Paul D; Hittelman, Adam B; Bulsara, Ketan R; Laurans, Maxwell SH; DiCapua, Daniel B; Marcolini, Evie G; Moeller, Jeremy J; Khokhar, Babar; Hodge, Jeannette W; Fortin, Auguste H; Hafler, Janet P; Bennick, Michael C; Hwang, David Y

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess whether communication training for housestaff via role-playing exercises (1) is well-received and (2) improves patient experience scores in housestaff clinics. Methods We conducted a pre-post study in which the housestaff for 3 adult hospital departments participated in communication trainingled by trained faculty in small groups . Sessions centered on a published 5-step strategy for opening patient-centered interviews using department-specific role-playing exercises. Housestaff completed post-training questionnaires. For one month prior to and one month following the training, patients in the housestaff clinics completed surveys with CG-CAHPS questions regarding physician communication, immediately following clinic visits. Pre-and post -intervention results for top-box scores were compared. Results Forty -four of a possible 45 housestaff (97.8%) participated, with 31 (70.5%) indicating that the role-playing exercise increased their perception of the 5-step strategy. No differences on patient responses to CG-CAHPS questions were seen when comparing 63 pre-intervention patients surveys to 77 post-intervention surveys. Conclusion Demonstrating an improvement in standard patient experience surveys in resident clinics may require ongoing communication coaching and investigation of the “hidden curriculum” of training.

  1. The effect of morphine on fear extinction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, M D; Gebhart, G F

    1978-05-31

    Rats were trained on an appetitive discretetrial discriminated-punishment task in which they learned to suppress responding when an intense flashing light predicting punishment was present and to respond rapidly on trials when the flashing light was absent. Once animals were performing discriminatively, 0.75, 3.0, or 6.0 mg/kg of morphine (base) was administered and a fear extinction session consisting of 60 nonshocked presentations of the flashing light was given. Two saline control groups, one that received fear extinction and one that did not, were also included in the experiment. On the day following fear extinction, all rats were tested in the undrugged state on the discriminated punishment problem, but without shock. The rats receiving 3.0 and 6.0 mg/kg of morphine before the fear extinction session were suppressed by the flashing light more than the saline extinction group or the 0.75 mg/kg morphine treatment group. Moreover, the two higher dose morphine groups were suppressed as readily as the saline group that received no fear extinction. These results are attributed to the antiemotionality effects of morphine.

  2. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  3. Effectiveness of functional communication training with and without extinction and punishment: a summary of 21 inpatient cases.

    OpenAIRE

    Hagopian, L P; Fisher, W W; Sullivan, M. T.; Acquisto, J; LeBlanc, L A

    1998-01-01

    Functional communication training (FCT) is a frequently used treatment for reducing problem behavior exhibited by individuals with developmental disabilities. Once the operant function of problem behavior is identified by a functional analysis, the client is taught to emit an appropriate communicative response to obtain the reinforcer that is responsible for behavioral maintenance. Studies on FCT have typically used small numbers of participants, have reported primarily on clients for whom FC...

  4. Midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendahls, Lena; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2017-03-01

    In Sweden, simulation- and skills training are implemented in midwifery education in order to prepare students for clinical practice. Research regarding the use of both low to high levels of fidelity in simulation in midwifery programme is limited. The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training. Midwifery students (n=61), at advanced level, were interviewed in 13 group interviews from 2011 to 2105. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and data were analysed by content analysis. The results are presented in four main categories: develops hands on skills and communication, power of collaborative learning, highly valued learning environment and facilitates clinical practice. The majority of students felt that the simulation- and skills training were necessary to become familiar with hands on skills. Having repetitive practices in a safe and secure environment was viewed as important, and students highly valued that mistakes could be made without fear of comprising patient safety. Student's collaboration, reflections and critical thinking increased learning ability. Simulation- and skills training created links between theory and practice, and the lecturer had an important role in providing instructions and feedback. Students felt prepared and confident before their clinical practice, and simulation- and skills training increased safety for all involved, resulting in students being more confident, as patients in clinical practice became less exposed. Furthermore, mentors were satisfied with students' basic skills. Simulation- and skills training support the development of midwifery skills. It creates links between theory and practice, which facilitates students' learning ability. Training needs to include reflections and critical thinking in order to develop their learning. The lecturer has an important role in encouraging time for reflections and creating safe environment during the skills and simulation

  5. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  6. Does adaptive strategy for delayed seed dispersion affect extinction probability of a desert species? an assessment using the population viability analysis and glass house experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Mathur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Canopy seed bank is an important adaptive evolutionary trait that provides various types of protection to the seeds. However, costing of such evolutionary trait on plant survival is largely unknown. Present investigation provided a new insight on the serotonious habit of Blepharis sindica associated with its endangerment status. Extinction probabilities of two available population of B. sindica were quantified using two types of census data, i.e., fruiting body number and actual population size. Population Viability Analysis (PVA revealed that delayed seed release tendency (higher fruiting body number was not synchronized with actual ground conditions (lower population size. PVA analysis based on actual population size indicated that both the available populations would vanish within 20 years. The mean time of extinction calculated from both type census data indicated its extinction within 48 years. For assessing the conservation criteria, a glass house experiment was carried out with different soil types and compositions. Pure sand and higher proportions of sand -silt were more suitable compared to clay; further, gravelly surface was the most unsuitable habitat for this species. Collection of the seeds from mature fruits/capsule and their sowing with moderate moisture availability with sandy soil could be recommended.

  7. Involvement of dopamine D1/D5 and D2 receptors in context-dependent extinction learning and memory reinstatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Agnes Emma Andre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine contributes to the regulation of higher order information processing and executive control. It is important for memory consolidation processes, and for the adaptation of learned responses based on experience. In line with this, under aversive learning conditions, application of dopamine receptor antagonists prior to extinction result in enhanced memory reinstatement. Here, we investigated the contribution of the dopaminergic system to extinction and memory reinstatement (renewal of an appetitive spatial learning task in rodents. Rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze (context ‘A’ to associate a goal arm with a food reward, despite low reward probability (acquisition phase. On day 4, extinction learning (unrewarded occurred, that was reinforced by a context change (‘B’. On day 5, re-exposure to the (unrewarded ‘A’-context took place (renewal of context ‘A’, followed by extinction of context ‘A’. In control animals, significant extinction occurred on day 4, that was followed by an initial memory reinstatement (renewal on day 5, that was, in turn, succeeded by extinction of renewal. Intracerebral treatment with a D1/D5-receptor antagonist prior to the extinction trials, elicited a potent enhancement of extinction in context ‘B’. By contrast, a D1/D5-agonist impaired renewal in context ’A’. Extinction in the ‘A’ context on day 5 was unaffected by the D1/D5-ligands. Treatment with a D2-receptor antagonist prior to extinction had no overall effect on extinction in context ‘B or renewal in context ‘A’, although extinction of the renewal effect was impaired on day 5, compared to controls.Taken together, these data suggest that dopamine acting on the D1/D5-receptor modulates both acquisition and consolidation of context-dependent extinction. By contrast, the D2-receptor may contribute to context-independent aspects of this kind of extinction learning.

  8. Involvement of Dopamine D1/D5 and D2 Receptors in Context-Dependent Extinction Learning and Memory Reinstatement

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Marion Agnès Emma; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine contributes to the regulation of higher order information processing and executive control. It is important for memory consolidation processes, and for the adaptation of learned responses based on experience. In line with this, under aversive learning conditions, application of dopamine receptor antagonists prior to extinction result in enhanced memory reinstatement. Here, we investigated the contribution of the dopaminergic system to extinction and memory reinstatement (renewal) of an appetitive spatial learning task in rodents. Rats were trained for 3 days in a T-maze (context “A”) to associate a goal arm with a food reward, despite low reward probability (acquisition phase). On day 4, extinction learning (unrewarded) occurred, that was reinforced by a context change (“B”). On day 5, re-exposure to the (unrewarded) “A” context took place (renewal of context “A”, followed by extinction of context “A”). In control animals, significant extinction occurred on day 4, that was followed by an initial memory reinstatement (renewal) on day 5, that was, in turn, succeeded by extinction of renewal. Intracerebral treatment with a D1/D5-receptor antagonist prior to the extinction trials, elicited a potent enhancement of extinction in context “B”. By contrast, a D1/D5-agonist impaired renewal in context “A”. Extinction in the “A” context on day 5 was unaffected by the D1/D5-ligands. Treatment with a D2-receptor antagonist prior to extinction had no overall effect on extinction in context “B” or renewal in context “A”, although extinction of the renewal effect was impaired on day 5, compared to controls. Taken together, these data suggest that dopamine acting on the D1/D5-receptor modulates both acquisition and consolidation of context-dependent extinction. By contrast, the D2-receptor may contribute to context-independent aspects of this kind of extinction learning. PMID:26834599

  9. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how work-site health promotion intervention, by involving group-based physical coordination training, may increase participants’ social awareness of new ways to use the body. Purpose: We investigated cleaners’ experiences with a one-year health promotion intervention...... involving group-based physical coordination training (PCT) during working hours. Design: We conducted a qualitative evaluation using method triangulation; continuous unfocused participant observation during the whole intervention, semi-structured focus group interview, and individual written evaluations one...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  10. Fear memory formation can affect a different memory: fear conditioning affects the extinction, but not retrieval, of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The formation of fear memory to a specific stimulus leads to subsequent fearful response to that stimulus. However, it is not known whether the formation of fear memory can affect other memories. We study whether specific fearful experience leading to fear memory affects different memories formation and extinction. We revealed that cued fear conditioning, but not unpaired or naïve training, inhibited the extinction of CTA memory that was formed after fear conditioning training in rats. Fear ...

  11. Experiences of family medicine residents in primary care obstetrics training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith Belle; Jordan, John M

    2012-03-01

    Obstetrical practice by family physicians has been declining rapidly for many reasons over the past number of decades. One reason for this trend is family medicine residents not considering intrapartum care as part of their future careers. Decisions such as this may be related to experiences during obstetrical training. This study explored the experiences of family medicine residents in core primary care obstetrics training. Using qualitative approaches, focus groups of family medicine residents were conducted. The resulting data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was both iterative and interpretive. Data obtained from the focus groups revealed findings relating to the following categories: (1) perceived facilitators to practicing primary care obstetrics, (2) perceived barriers to practicing primary care obstetrics, and (3) learner experiences at the fulcrum of career decision making. Family medicine residents were encouraged by favorable learning experiences and group shared-call arrangements by their primary care obstetrics preceptors. Some concerns about a career including obstetrics persisted; however, positive experiences, including influential fulcrum points, may inspire family medicine residents to pursue a career involving primary care obstetrics.

  12. Differential Effects of Controllable Stress Exposure on Subsequent Extinction Learning in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad-Ophir, Osnat; Brande-Eilat, Noa; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in fear extinction are thought to be related to various anxiety disorders. While failure to extinguish conditioned fear may result in pathological anxiety levels, the ability to quickly and efficiently attenuate learned fear through extinction processes can be extremely beneficial for the individual. One of the factors that may affect the efficiency of the extinction process is prior experience of stressful situations. In the current study, we examined whether exposure to controllable stress, which is suggested to induce stress resilience, can affect subsequent fear extinction. Here, following prolonged two-way shuttle (TWS) avoidance training and a validation of acquired stress controllability, adult rats underwent either cued or contextual fear-conditioning (FC), followed by an extinction session. We further evaluated long lasting alterations of GABAergic targets in the medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC), as these were implicated in FC and extinction and stress controllability. In cued, but not in contextual fear extinction, within-session extinction was enhanced following controllable stress compared to a control group. Interestingly, impaired extinction recall was detected in both extinction types following the stress procedure. Additionally, stress controllability-dependent alterations in GABAergic markers expression in infralimbic (IL), but not prelimbic (PL) cortex, were detected. These alterations are proposed to be related to the within-session effect, but not the recall impairment. The results emphasize the contribution of prior experience on coping with subsequent stressful experiences. Moreover, the results emphasize that exposure to controllable stress does not generally facilitate future stress coping as previously claimed, but its effects are dependent on specific features of the events taking place.

  13. Interstellar Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    This review describes our current understanding of interstellar extinction. This differ substantially from the ideas of the 20th century. With infrared surveys of hundreds of millions of stars over the entire sky, such as 2MASS, SPITZER-IRAC, and WISE, we have looked at the densest and most rarefied regions of the interstellar medium at distances of a few kpc from the Sun. Observations at infrared and microwave wavelengths, where the bulk of the interstellar dust absorbs and radiates, have brought us closer to an understanding of the distribution of the dust particles on scales of the Galaxy and the universe. We are in the midst of a scientific revolution in our understanding of the interstellar medium and dust. Progress in, and the key results of, this revolution are still difficult to predict. Nevertheless, (a) a physically justified model has been developed for the spatial distribution of absorbing material over the nearest few kiloparsecs, including the Gould belt as a dust container, which gives an accurate estimate of the extinction for any object just by its galactic coordinates. It is also clear that (b) the interstellar medium contains roughly half the mass of matter in the galactic vicinity of the solar system (the other half is made up of stars, their remnants, and dark matter) and (c) the interstellar medium and, especially, dust, differ substantially in different regions of space and deep space cannot be understood by only studying near space.

  14. Training for my Life: Lived Experiences of Dislocated Workers in an Advanced Manufacturing Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquita R. Walker

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative paper explores the lived experiences of one group of workers dislocated because of globalized trade policies who completed a hybrid Advanced Manufacturing Training Program (AMTP by taking advantage of Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA, a federally-funded program for retraining workers dislocated because of trade policies. The research questions focus on how satisfied these workers are with the services and programs provided by TAA. Focus groups and survey instrument results indicate these workers found TAA services and processes cumbersome and time- consuming and actually had the effect of discouraging their education, training, and self- employment. The consequences of their dislocation as it relates to TAA experiences are increased frustration and dissatisfaction with the TAA program. Serious consideration for TAA policy changes should be deemed of utmost importance.

  15. [Experience with new teaching methods and testing in psychiatric training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M; Georg, W; Mühlinghaus, I; Fröhmel, A; Rolle, D; Pruskil, S; Heinz, A; Burger, W

    2007-03-01

    In 1999, the Charité Medical University in Berlin, Germany, implemented a reformed medical study course (RMSC) along with traditional undergraduate medical education. The RMSC is characterized by problem-based learning (PBL), training in communication skills with "simulated patients", and interdisciplinary seminars. The curriculum is organized into blocks according to organ system and age (period od life). In a new intensive 4-week psychiatric block, 4th-year students get practical experience in psychiatric wards. Furthermore, PBL groups and workshops are offered that focus on frequent psychiatric disorders. By providing interactive courses with simulated patients, students are intensively trained in taking psychiatric histories and in generating psychopathological findings. Defined learning objectives are tested using multiple-choice items and objectively structured clinical examinations at semester end. First positive results indicate that this course represents an appropriate and practicable curriculum for teaching psychiatry in Germany.

  16. RESURGENCE OF MANDS FOLLOWING FUNCTIONAL COMMUNICATION TRAINING

    Science.gov (United States)

    BERG, WENDY K.; RINGDAHL, JOEL E.; RYAN, STEPHEN E.; ING, ANNA D.; LUSTIG, NICOLE; ROMANI, PATRICK; WACKER, DAVID P.; ANDERSEN, JENNIFER K.; DURAKO, EMILY

    2015-01-01

    Experimental conditions similar to those described by Lieving and Lattal (2003) were used within two experiments to evaluate the resurgence of mands with humans. Two mands from the same operant class were trained with three participants with developmental disabilities during Experiment 1 and with two participants with developmental disabilities and a history of problem behavior during Experiment 2. The two mands were then placed on extinction. Both persisted, but showed different response strength during extinction. The mand with the weaker response strength was targeted for additional functional communication training and the alternative mand was placed on extinction. Following steady levels of occurrence of the targeted mand and no occurrences of the alternative mand, both mands were placed on extinction again. At least one instance of resurgence of the alternative mand occurred with every participant and resurgence of problem behavior occurred for both participants during Experiment 2. PMID:26640311

  17. Constraints on Enhanced Extinction Resulting from Extinction Treatment in the Presence of an Added Excitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Lipatova, Olga; Miller, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    Three Pavlovian fear conditioning experiments with rats as subjects explored the effect of extinction in the presence of a concurrent excitor. Our aim was to explore this particular treatment, documented in previous studies to deepen extinction, with novel control groups to shed light on the processes involved in extinction. Relative to subjects…

  18. The learning of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furini, Cristiane; Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    Recent work on the extinction of fear-motivated learning places emphasis on its putative circuitry and on its modulation. Extinction is the learned inhibition of retrieval of previously acquired responses. Fear extinction is used as a major component of exposure therapy in the treatment of fear memories such as those of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is initiated and maintained by interactions between the hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which involve feedback regulation of the latter by the other two areas. Fear extinction depends on NMDA receptor activation. It is positively modulated by d-serine acting on the glycine site of NMDA receptors and blocked by AP5 (2-amino-5-phosphono propionate) in the three structures. In addition, histamine acting on H2 receptors and endocannabinoids acting on CB1 receptors in the three brain areas mentioned, and muscarinic cholinergic fibers from the medial septum to hippocampal CA1 positively modulate fear extinction. Importantly, fear extinction can be made state-dependent on circulating epinephrine, which may play a role in situations of stress. Exposure to a novel experience can strongly enhance the consolidation of fear extinction through a synaptic tagging and capture mechanism; this may be useful in the therapy of states caused by fear memory like PTSD.

  19. A Reminder of Extinction Reduces Relapse in an Animal Model of Voluntary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Javier; Uengoer, Metin; Bernal-Gamboa, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    One experiment with rats explored whether an extinction-cue prevents the recovery of extinguished lever-pressing responses. Initially, rats were trained to perform one instrumental response (R1) for food in Context A, and a different instrumental response (R2) in Context B. Then, responses were extinguished each in the alternate context (R1 in…

  20. Narrowing down the conditions for extinction of Pavlovian feature-positive discriminations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vooren, P.R.; Franssen, M.; Beckers, T.; Hermans, D.; Baeyens, F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the minimal conditions for extinction of Pavlovian modulation in humans. Previous experiments at our lab showed that, after X-- A+/A- acquisition training, X- trials did not extinguish differential X-- A+/A- responding, while X-- A- trials did. Additionally, X-

  1. Resistance to Extinction Following Variable-Interval Reinforcement: Reinforcer Rate and Amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Richard L.; Grimes, Julie A.

    2006-01-01

    Rats obtained food-pellet reinforcers by nose poking a lighted key. Experiment 1 examined resistance to extinction following single-schedule training with different variable-interval schedules, ranging from a mean interval of 16 min to 0.25 min. That is, for each schedule, the rats received 20 consecutive daily baseline sessions and then a session…

  2. Facilitation of Memory for Extinction of Drug-Induced Conditioned Reward: Role of Amygdala and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Jason P.; Packard, Mark G.

    2004-01-01

    eThese experiments examined the effects of posttrial peripheral and intra-amygdala injections of the cholinergic muscarinic receptor agonist oxotremorine on memory consolidation underlying extinction of amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP) behavior. Male Long-Evans rats were initially trained and tested for an amphetamine (2 mg/kg) CPP.…

  3. A Reminder of Extinction Reduces Relapse in an Animal Model of Voluntary Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Javier; Uengoer, Metin; Bernal-Gamboa, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    One experiment with rats explored whether an extinction-cue prevents the recovery of extinguished lever-pressing responses. Initially, rats were trained to perform one instrumental response (R1) for food in Context A, and a different instrumental response (R2) in Context B. Then, responses were extinguished each in the alternate context (R1 in…

  4. Training Experiences of Family Medicine Residents on Behavioral Health Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatsky, Max; Brieler, Jay; Jacobs, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Although accreditation guidelines for residency in family medicine include behavioral health curriculum, little is known about resident learning activities in real world training. Our study explored residents' perceptions about and exposure to specific activities during their behavioral health rotations. Family medicine residents (N=84) recruited via faculty list serves completed a survey about their experiences during behavioral health rotations. The survey included quantitative Likert scale questions, along with open-ended questions on which a qualitative content analysis was performed. Open-ended responses indicated that many residents receive constructive observation and collaboration opportunities during their training month. However, residents wanted more time to practice behavioral health skills beyond the rotation, more practice in psychotherapy skills, and additional education on medication management. Most residents (62%) received either limited or no training in couples or family therapy during their behavioral health rotation. Residents who reported more behavioral health knowledge gain during the rotation also reported higher self-perceived competency using Motivational Interviewing (M=3.82, P<.01). While family medicine as a discipline is based on the biopsychosocial model of care, residents reported deficits in education about family systems. Residents desire additional opportunities to learn psychotherapy techniques and practice counseling skills. Family medicine residency programs and faculty may consider supplementing their core behavioral curriculum to include these content areas.

  5. One University's Experience with Foreign-trained Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Bustos Flores

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Texas like many states is facing a teacher shortage. The author suggests that the teacher shortage should be considered in light of the diverse school population. Across states there is a need for well-prepared teachers to work with linguistically and culturally diverse school populations. Thus, areas such as bilingual education continue to be critical shortage areas. While different attempts are currently underway to increase the number of preservice bilingual educators, another way districts have addressed this issue is to employ foreign-trained teachers as paraprofessionals or as teachers. Recently, Texas passed a regulation that would allow legally residing foreign-trained teachers to become certified Texas teachers upon passing the appropriate teacher competency exams and demonstrating English proficiency. The passing of this "fast-track" regulation appears to demonstrate that the state board is thinking out of the box by tapping into a community's resources and acknowledging that immigrants can offer the community services beyond menial tasks. However, the researcher cautions that such actions may not increase the number of teachers and may not assure teacher quality. To support this notion, the researcher offers an analysis of a university's experience with the integration of legally residing foreign-trained Mexican teachers in their bilingual education teacher preparation program. The researcher posits that increasing the number of qualified teachers does require for entities to think out of the box, such as tapping into a community's natural resources; nevertheless, any plan of action should be critically examined and deliberated.

  6. Inhibition of Estradiol Synthesis Impairs Fear Extinction in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole,…

  7. Slower Reacquisition after Partial Extinction in Human Contingency Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morís, Joaquín; Barberia, Itxaso; Vadillo, Miguel A.; Andrades, Ainhoa; López, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Extinction is a very relevant learning phenomenon from a theoretical and applied point of view. One of its most relevant features is that relapse phenomena often take place once the extinction training has been completed. Accordingly, as extinction-based therapies constitute the most widespread empirically validated treatment of anxiety disorders,…

  8. Reducing spontaneous recovery and reinstatement of operant performance through extinction-cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Gamboa, Rodolfo; Gámez, A Matías; Nieto, Javier

    2017-02-01

    It has been argued that the response recovery effects share a common mechanism. A possible way to test it is evaluating whether the techniques that impaired renewal would impair the other recovery effects as well. Two experiments with rats used a free operant procedure to explore whether an extinction-cue could prevent the spontaneous recovery and reinstatement of an extinguished lever-pressing. Both experiments consisted of four phases: Acquisition, Extinction and Test 1 and Test 2. First, all rats were trained to perform one instrumental response (R1) for food in context A, and a different instrumental response (R2) for food in context B. Then, responses were extinguished within the same context: R1 in context A and R2 in context B. Throughout this phase all rats received brief presentations of a tone (extinction-cue). In both experiments animals were tested twice. The first test was conducted immediately after the last extinction session. In this test, rats received the extinction-cue for both responses. During the second test, rats experienced the tone only for R1. In Experiment 1 rats were tested after 5days, while for Experiment 2 test 2 took place after a single session of re-exposure to the food. Both experiments showed a recovery effect (spontaneous recovery in Experiment 1 and reinstatement in Experiment 2) for both responses. However, a cue featured in extinction attenuated recovery of R1 in both experiments when presented on the test. The findings suggest that spontaneous recovery, reinstatement and renewal might share a common mechanism. In addition, the present data shows that using an extinction-cue could help to reduces relapsing of voluntary behaviors.

  9. Extinction-Induced Variability in Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinloch, Jennifer M.; Foster, T. Mary; McEwan, James S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Participants earned points by pressing a computer space bar (Experiment 1) or forming rectangles on the screen with the mouse (Experiment 2) under differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedules, followed by extinction. Variability in interresponse time (the contingent dimension) increased during extinction, as for Morgan and Lee (1996);…

  10. Memory extinction entails the inhibition of the transcription factor NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Merlo

    Full Text Available In contextual memories, an association between a positive or negative reinforcement and the contextual cues where the reinforcement occurs is formed. The re-exposure to the context without reinforcement can lead to memory extinction or reconsolidation, depending on the number of events or duration of a single event of context re-exposure. Extinction involves the temporary waning of the previously acquired conditioned response. The molecular processes underlying extinction and the mechanisms which determine if memory will reconsolidate or extinguish after retrieval are not well characterized, particularly the role of transcription factors and gene expression. Here we studied the participation of a transcription factor, NF-kappaB, in memory extinction. In the crab context-signal memory, the activation of NF-kappaB plays a critical role in consolidation and reconsolidation, memory processes that are well characterized in this model. The administration of a NF-kappaB inhibitor, sulfasalazine prior to extinction session impeded spontaneous recovery. Moreover, reinstatement experiments showed that the original memory was not affected and that NF-kappaB inhibition by sulfasalazine impaired spontaneous recovery strengthening the ongoing memory extinction process. Interestingly, in animals with fully consolidated memory, a brief re-exposure to the training context induced neuronal NF-kappaB activation and reconsolidation, while prolonged re-exposure induced NF-kappaB inhibition and memory extinction. These data constitutes a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch between memory reconsolidation and extinction. Moreover, we propose the inhibition of NF-kappaB as the engaged mechanism underlying extinction, supporting a novel approach for the pharmacological enhancement of this memory process. The accurate description of the molecular mechanisms that support memory extinction is potentially useful for developing new strategies

  11. Experience of Social Media, Training and Development on Work Proficiency: A Qualitative Study with Security Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyireh, Rexford Owusu; Okyireh, Marijke Akua Adobea

    2016-01-01

    How useful is social media and training programs to the development of professionals in the security sector? In this study the researchers examined three key issues pertaining to training programs. These were marketing of training programs, participant experiences of training content and work proficiency. A sample of ten participants of a forensic…

  12. Habituation, latent inhibition, and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Wesley P; Todd, Travis P; Bucci, David J; Leaton, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    In two conditioned suppression experiments with a latent inhibition (LI) design, we measured the habituation of rats in preexposure, their LI during conditioning, and then extinction over days. In the first experiment, lick suppression, the preexposed group (PE) showed a significant initial unconditioned response (UR) to the target stimulus and significant long-term habituation (LTH) of that response over days. The significant difference between the PE and nonpreexposed (NPE) groups on the first conditioning trial was due solely to the difference in their URs to the conditioned stimulus (CS)-a habituated response (PE) and an unhabituated response (NPE). In the second experiment, bar-press suppression, little UR to the target stimulus was apparent during preexposure, and no detectable LTH. Thus, there was no difference between the PE and NPE groups on the first conditioning trial. Whether the UR to the CS confounds the interpretation of LI (Exp. 1) or not (Exp. 2) can only be known if the UR is measured. In both experiments, LI was observed in acquisition. Also in both experiments, rats that were preexposed and then conditioned to asymptote were significantly more resistant to extinction than were the rats not preexposed. This result contrasts with the consistently reported finding that preexposure either produces less resistance to extinction or has no effect on extinction. The effect of stimulus preexposure survived conditioning to asymptote and was reflected directly in extinction. These two experiments provide a cautionary procedural note for LI experiments and have shown an unexpected extinction effect that may provide new insights into the interpretation of LI.

  13. Secondary extinction in Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurbic, Drina; Bouton, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    Pavlov (1927/1960) reported that following the conditioning of several stimuli, extinction of one conditioned stimulus (CS) attenuated responding to others that had not undergone direct extinction. However, this secondary extinction effect has not been widely replicated in the contemporary literature. In three conditioned suppression experiments with rats, we further explored the phenomenon. In Experiment 1, we asked whether secondary extinction is more likely to occur with target CSs that have themselves undergone some prior extinction. A robust secondary extinction effect was obtained with a nonextinguished target CS. Experiment 2 showed that extinction of one CS was sufficient to reduce renewal of a second CS when it was tested in a neutral (nonextinction) context. In Experiment 3, secondary extinction was observed in groups that initially received intermixed conditioning trials with the target and nontarget CSs, but not in groups that received conditioning of the two CSs in separate sessions. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that CSs must be associated with a common temporal context during conditioning for secondary extinction to occur.

  14. Facilitation of extinction and re-extinction of operant behavior in mice by chlordiazepoxide and D-cycloserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Julian C; Norwood, Kelly

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to compare operant extinction with re-extinction following re-acquisition and to investigate neuropharmacological mechanisms through administration of drugs potentiating GABAergic or glutamatergic systems. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were trained to lever press for food on a fixed ratio schedule, then extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine administration (15mg/kg in each case), then retrained to lever press for food, then re-extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine. Under vehicle injections, extinction and re-extinction curves were indistinguishable, but drug treatments showed that there was less resistance to extinction in the re-extinction phase. Chlordiazepoxide facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with an earlier effect during re-extinction. d-Cycloserine also facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with some evidence of an earlier effect during re-extinction. These results replicate and extend earlier findings with operant extinction, but differ from some previous reports of d-cycloserine on re-extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear. Implications for accounts of the similarities and differences between neural mechanisms of extinction following either Pavlovian or operant conditioning, and applications of these findings, are discussed.

  15. The atmospheric extinction of light

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Stephen W; Powell, Sean; Carroll, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    An experiment is described that enables students to understand the properties of atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering. The experiment requires the use of red, green and blue lasers attached to a travelling microscope or similar device. The laser beams are passed through an artificial atmosphere, made from milky water, at varying depths, before impinging on either a light meter or a photodiode integral to a Picotech Dr. DAQ ADC. A plot of measured spectral intensity verses depth reveals the contribution Rayleigh scattering has to the extinction coefficient. For the experiment with the light meter, the extinction coefficients for red, green and blue light in the milky sample of water were 0.27, 0.36 and 0.47 cm^-1 respectively and 0.032, 0.037 and 0.092 cm^-1 for the Picotech Dr. DAQ ADC.

  16. Vocational Training in the Development Process. The Singapore Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, G. F.

    The planning and implementation of vocational training in Singapore (training primarily intended for school-leavers) is highly directed toward serving labor force development objectives. This paper explains the vocational training infrastructure (a national system, the conduct of which is vested in the Vocational and Industrial Training Board),…

  17. Differences in Physiological Responses to Interval Training in Cyclists With and Without Interval Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebisz, Rafal; Hebisz, Paulina; Borkowski, Jacek; Zatoń, Marek

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine differences in glycolytic metabolite concentrations and work output in response to an all-out interval training session in 23 cyclists with at least 2 years of interval training experience (E) and those inexperienced (IE) in this form of training. The intervention involved subsequent sets of maximal intensity exercise on a cycle ergometer. Each set comprised four 30 s repetitions interspersed with 90 s recovery periods; sets were repeated when blood pH returned to 7.3. Measurements of post-exercise hydrogen (H+) and lactate ion (LA-) concentrations and work output were taken. The experienced cyclists performed significantly more sets of maximal efforts than the inexperienced athletes (5.8 ± 1.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9 sets, respectively). Work output decreased in each subsequent set in the IE group and only in the last set in the E group. Distribution of power output changed only in the E group; power decreased in the initial repetitions of set only to increase in the final repetitions. H+ concentration decreased in the third, penultimate, and last sets in the E group and in each subsequent set in the IE group. LA- decreased in the last set in both groups. In conclusion, the experienced cyclists were able to repeatedly induce elevated levels of lactic acidosis. Power output distribution changed with decreased acid-base imbalance. In this way, this group could compensate for a decreased anaerobic metabolism. The above factors allowed cyclists experienced in interval training to perform more sets of maximal exercise without a decrease in power output compared with inexperienced cyclists.

  18. Differences in Physiological Responses to Interval Training in Cyclists With and Without Interval Training Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebisz Rafal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine differences in glycolytic metabolite concentrations and work output in response to an all-out interval training session in 23 cyclists with at least 2 years of interval training experience (E and those inexperienced (IE in this form of training. The intervention involved subsequent sets of maximal intensity exercise on a cycle ergometer. Each set comprised four 30 s repetitions interspersed with 90 s recovery periods; sets were repeated when blood pH returned to 7.3. Measurements of post-exercise hydrogen (H+ and lactate ion (LA- concentrations and work output were taken. The experienced cyclists performed significantly more sets of maximal efforts than the inexperienced athletes (5.8 ± 1.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.9 sets, respectively. Work output decreased in each subsequent set in the IE group and only in the last set in the E group. Distribution of power output changed only in the E group; power decreased in the initial repetitions of set only to increase in the final repetitions. H+ concentration decreased in the third, penultimate, and last sets in the E group and in each subsequent set in the IE group. LA- decreased in the last set in both groups. In conclusion, the experienced cyclists were able to repeatedly induce elevated levels of lactic acidosis. Power output distribution changed with decreased acid–base imbalance. In this way, this group could compensate for a decreased anaerobic metabolism. The above factors allowed cyclists experienced in interval training to perform more sets of maximal exercise without a decrease in power output compared with inexperienced cyclists.

  19. The influence of partner cues on the extinction of causal judgments in people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Nathan M; Griffiths, Oren; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-09-01

    Studies in laboratory animals have shown that the extinction of a conditioned stimulus, A, is regulated by the associative history of a second stimulus, X, when the two are extinguished in simultaneous compound: An inhibitory X protects A from extinction (Rescorla Learning & Behavior, 31, 124-132, 2003), whereas an excitatory X facilitates, and under some circumstances deepens, the extinction of A (Rescorla Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 26, 251-260, 2000, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, 32, 135-144, 2006). In the present study, we used the allergist task to examine whether the extinction of causal judgments in people is similarly regulated by the causal status of co-present stimuli. Experiment 1 showed that a cue trained as a conditioned inhibitor protected a target cue from extinction: The target extinguished in compound with the inhibitor was rated as being more causal of the outcome than was a target extinguished in compound with a control cue lacking inhibitory properties. In contrast, the remaining experiments showed that the extinction of a target cue was regulated by the presence, but not the causal status, of a partner cue: Target cues extinguished in compound were protected from extinction, and no evidence showed that an already extinguished partner conferred more protection (Exp. 2), or that an excitatory partner conferred any less protection (Exps. 2 and 3), or that an excitatory partner deepened the extinction of its already extinguished target. These findings are inconsistent with elemental models that rely on a common error term to explain associative changes in extinction. They are largely, but not completely, consistent with the configural model proposed by Pearce (Psychological Review, 94, 61-73, 1987), which predicts an ordering of levels of protection that was not observed.

  20. Adolescent Workers' Experiences of and Training for Workplace Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carolyn R; Gillespie, Gordon L; Beery, Theresa A

    2015-07-01

    Adolescent workers may not be aware that violence is a safety concern in the workplace. As part of a larger mixed-methods pilot study, investigators used a self-administered survey and individual interviews with 30 adolescent workers from a chain of food service stores in a Midwestern metropolitan area to explore experiences of workplace violence (WPV) and ways of learning WPV-specific information. Participants reported experiencing verbal and sexual harassment and robberies. Most participants reported awareness of WPV-specific policies and procedures at their workplace; the ways participants reported learning WPV-specific information varied. Findings support the need for occupational safety training to assist adolescent workers prevent and mitigate potential WPV.

  1. How training and experience affect the benefits of autonomy in a dirty-bomb experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Bruemmer; Curtis W. Nielsen; David I. Gertman

    2008-03-01

    A dirty-bomb experiment conducted at the INL is used to evaluate the effectiveness and suitability of three different modes of robot control. The experiment uses three distinct user groups to understand how participants’ background and training affect the way in which they use and benefit from autonomy. The results show that the target mode, which involves automated mapping and plume tracing together with a point and click tasking tool, provides the best performance for each group. This is true for objective performance such as source detection and localization accuracy as well as subjective measures such as perceived workload, frustration and preference. The best overall performance is achieved by the Explosive Ordinance Disposal group which has experience in both robot teleoperation and dirty bomb response. The user group that benefits least from autonomy is the Nuclear Engineers that have no experience with either robot operation or dirty bomb response. The group that benefits most from autonomy is the Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Response Team that has extensive experience related to the task, but no robot training.

  2. Resistance to extinction and behavioral momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, John A

    2012-05-01

    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, reinforcement is assumed to strengthen discriminated operant behavior in the sense of increasing its resistance to disruption, and extinction is viewed as disruption by contingency termination and reinforcer omission. In multiple schedules of intermittent reinforcement, resistance to extinction is an increasing function of reinforcer rate, consistent with a model based on the momentum metaphor. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect, which opposes the effects of reinforcer rate, can be explained by the large disruptive effect of terminating continuous reinforcement despite its strengthening effect during training. Inclusion of a term for the context of reinforcement during training allows the model to account for a wide range of multiple-schedule extinction data and makes contact with other formulations. The relation between resistance to extinction and reinforcer rate on single schedules of intermittent reinforcement is exactly opposite to that for multiple schedules over the same range of reinforcer rates; however, the momentum model can give an account of resistance to extinction in single as well as multiple schedules. An alternative analysis based on the number of reinforcers omitted to an extinction criterion supports the conclusion that response strength is an increasing function of reinforcer rate during training.

  3. Virtual Reality-Enhanced Extinction of Phobias and Post-Traumatic Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maples-Keller, Jessica L; Yasinski, Carly; Manjin, Nicole; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov

    2017-07-01

    Virtual reality (VR) refers to an advanced technological communication interface in which the user is actively participating in a computer-generated 3-dimensional virtual world that includes computer sensory input devices used to simulate real-world interactive experiences. VR has been used within psychiatric treatment for anxiety disorders, particularly specific phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder, given several advantages that VR provides for use within treatment for these disorders. Exposure therapy for anxiety disorder is grounded in fear-conditioning models, in which extinction learning involves the process through which conditioned fear responses decrease or are inhibited. The present review will provide an overview of extinction training and anxiety disorder treatment, advantages for using VR within extinction training, a review of the literature regarding the effectiveness of VR within exposure therapy for specific phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder, and limitations and future directions of the extant empirical literature.

  4. Basic surgical training in Ireland: the impact of operative experience, training program allocation and mentorship on trainee satisfaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, K E

    2013-12-01

    Application to the Irish basic surgical training (BST) program in Ireland has decreased progressively over the past 5 years. We hypothesised that this decline was secondary to dissatisfaction with training correlated with reduced operative experience and lack of mentorship among BSTs.

  5. Orbitofrontal cortex inactivation impairs between- but not within-session Pavlovian extinction: an associative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Marios C; Killcross, Simon

    2014-02-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is argued to be the neural locus of Pavlovian outcome expectancies. Reinforcement learning theories argue that extinction learning in Pavlovian procedures is caused by the discrepancy between the expected value of the outcome (US) that is elicited by a predictive stimulus (CS), and the lack of experienced US. If the OFC represents Pavlovian outcome expectancies that are necessary for extinction learning, then disrupting OFC function prior to extinction training should impair extinction learning. This was tested. In experiment 1, Long Evans rats received infusions of saline or muscimol targeting the lateral OFC prior to three appetitive Pavlovian extinction sessions. Muscimol infused into the OFC disrupted between-session but not within-session extinction behaviour. This finding was not due to muscimol infusions disrupting the memory consolidation process per se as there was no effect of muscimol infusion when administered immediately post session (experiment 2). These findings support a role for the OFC in representing outcome expectancies that are necessary for learning. A number of ways in which disrupting outcome expectancy information might block learning will be discussed in the context of traditional associative learning theories and the associative structures they depend on. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Enhancing Divergent Search through Extinction Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in evolutionary computation is to create representations as evolvable as those in natural evolution. This paper hypothesizes that extinction events, i.e. mass extinctions, can significantly increase evolvability, but only when combined with a divergent search algorithm, i.e. a search...... for the capacity to evolve. This hypothesis is tested through experiments in two evolutionary robotics domains. The results show that combining extinction events with divergent search increases evolvability, while combining them with convergent search offers no similar benefit. The conclusion is that extinction...

  7. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activation Facilitates Re-Extinction of Fear in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-hui; Maren, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that reduced infralimbic (IL) cortical activity contributes to impairments of fear extinction. We therefore explored whether pharmacological activation of the IL would facilitate extinction under conditions it normally fails (i.e., immediate extinction). Rats received auditory fear conditioning 1 h before extinction training.…

  8. The Effect of D-Cycloserine on Immediate vs. Delayed Extinction of Learned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Julia M.; Richardson, Rick

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effect of D-cycloserine (DCS) on immediate (10 min after conditioning) and delayed (24 h after conditioning) extinction of learned fear in rats. DCS facilitated both immediate and delayed extinction when the drug was administered after extinction training. However, DCS did not facilitate immediate extinction when administered prior…

  9. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Activation Facilitates Re-Extinction of Fear in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-hui; Maren, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that reduced infralimbic (IL) cortical activity contributes to impairments of fear extinction. We therefore explored whether pharmacological activation of the IL would facilitate extinction under conditions it normally fails (i.e., immediate extinction). Rats received auditory fear conditioning 1 h before extinction training.…

  10. Urethral catheter insertion forces: a comparison of experience and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K. Canales

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate the insertion forces utilized during simulated placement of a urethral catheter by healthcare individuals with a variety of catheter experience. Materials and Methods: A 21F urethral catheter was mounted to a metal spring. Participants were asked to press the tubing spring against a force gauge and stop when they met a level of resistance that would typically make them terminate a catheter placement. Simulated catheter insertion was repeated fives times, and peak compression forces were recorded. Healthcare professionals were divided into six groups according to their title: urology staff, non-urology staff, urology resident/ fellow, non-urology resident/ fellow, medical student, and registered nurse. Results: A total of fifty-seven healthcare professionals participated in the study. Urology staff (n = 6 had the lowest average insertion force for any group at 6.8 ± 2.0 Newtons (N. Medical students (n = 10 had the least amount of experience (1 ± 0 years and the highest average insertion force range of 10.1 ± 3.7 N. Health care workers with greater than 25 years experience used significantly less force during catheter insertions (4.9 ± 1.8 N compared to all groups (p < 0.01. Conclusions: We propose the maximum force that should be utilized during urethral catheter insertion is 5 Newtons. This force deserves validation in a larger population and should be considered when designing urethral catheters or creating catheter simulators. Understanding urethral catheter insertion forces may also aid in establishing competency parameters for health care professionals in training.

  11. Revisiting the role of infralimbic cortex in fear extinction with optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Monte, Fabricio H; Manzano-Nieves, Gabriela; Quiñones-Laracuente, Kelvin; Ramos-Medina, Liorimar; Quirk, Gregory J

    2015-02-25

    Previous rodent studies have implicated the infralimbic (IL) subregion of the medial prefrontal cortex in extinction of auditory fear conditioning. However, these studies used pharmacological inactivation or electrical stimulation techniques, which lack temporal precision and neuronal specificity. Here, we used an optogenetic approach to either activate (with channelrhodopsin) or silence (with halorhodopsin) glutamatergic IL neurons during conditioned tones delivered in one of two phases: extinction training or extinction retrieval. Activating IL neurons during extinction training reduced fear expression and strengthened extinction memory the following day. Silencing IL neurons during extinction training had no effect on within-session extinction, but impaired the retrieval of extinction the following day, indicating that IL activity during extinction tones is necessary for the formation of extinction memory. Surprisingly, however, silencing IL neurons optogenetically or pharmacologically during the retrieval of extinction 1 day or 1 week following extinction training had no effect. Our findings suggest that IL activity during extinction training likely facilitates storage of extinction in target structures, but contrary to current models, IL activity does not appear to be necessary for retrieval of extinction memory.

  12. Post-Session Administration of USP Methylene Blue Facilitates the Retention of Pathological Fear Extinction and Contextual Memory in Phobic Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telch, Michael J.; Bruchey, Aleksandra K.; Rosenfield, David; Cobb, Adam R.; Smits, Jasper; Pahl, Sandra; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Preclinical studies have shown that low-dose USP methylene blue increases mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity in the brain and improves memory retention after learning tasks, including fear extinction. We report on the first controlled experiment to examine the memory-enhancing effects of post-training methylene blue administration on retention of fear extinction and contextual memory following fear extinction training. Method Adults (N = 42) displaying marked claustrophobic fear were randomized to double-blind administration of 260 mg of methylene blue versus placebo immediately following six five-minute extinction trials to an enclosed chamber. Retesting occurred one month later to assess fear renewal as indexed by peak fear during exposure to a non-trained enclosed chamber with the prediction that methylene blue's effects would vary as a function of fear reduction achieved during extinction training. Incidental contextual memory was assessed 1 and 30 days after training to assess the cognitive enhancing effects of methylene blue independent of its effects on fear attenuation. Results Consistent with predictions, participants displaying low end fear at post-training showed significantly less fear at follow-up if they received methylene blue post-training relative to placebo. In contrast, participants displaying moderate to high levels of post-training fear tended to fare worse at follow-up relative to placebo. Methylene blue's enhancement of contextual memory was unrelated to initial or post-training claustrophobic fear. Conclusions Methylene blue enhances memory and the retention of fear extinction when administered after a successful exposure session, but may have a deleterious effect on extinction when administered after an unsuccessful exposure session. PMID:25018057

  13. Fear memory formation can affect a different memory: fear conditioning affects the extinction, but not retrieval, of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The formation of fear memory to a specific stimulus leads to subsequent fearful response to that stimulus. However, it is not apparent whether the formation of fear memory can affect other memories. We study whether specific fearful experience leading to fear memory affects different memories formation and extinction. We revealed that cued fear conditioning, but not unpaired or naïve training, inhibited the extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) memory that was formed after fear condi...

  14. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer-Mediated Firefighter Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtkamp, Joske M.; Toet, Alexander; Bos, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently intense to make the training viable and effective.…

  15. Organizing Science Popularization and Teacher Training Workshops : A Nigerian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Kingsley; Okere, Bonaventure

    Funding for science popularization has become a huge challenge in recent times especially for developing countries like Nigeria. However, a change in the school system from the 6-3-3-4 system (6 years primary, 3 years Junior secondary, 3year senior secondary, and 4 years tertiary education) to the 9-3-4 system ( 9 years junior basic, 3 years secondary, and 4 tertiary education) has made it even more convenient to strategically target the students through their teachers to attain the desired quality of education since the introduction of space science into the curriculum at the primary and secondary levels. Considering the size of Nigeria, there Is need for a shift in paradigm for sourcing resources to tackle this deficiency in a sustainable manner. Recently a teacher training and science popularization workshop was organized as a first in a series of subsequent workshops geared towards having a sustainable means of popularizing Science in Nigeria. Principally, the key lies in the partnership with the colleges of education which produce the teachers for primary schools in addition to the usual governmental actions. Experiences from this workshop will be enumerated with the hope of inspiring the same success in similar societies.

  16. Developing management capacity through training: the Mulago Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibwika-Muyinda, A B

    1995-01-01

    As part of its rehabilitation, Mulago Hospital, Uganda's national referral, teaching and research hospital, is undertaking a training programme for its staff both in-country and overseas. The focus of the in-country programme has been to develop the hospital's management capacity to cope with increasing responsibilities as a self-accounting unity due to develop its autonomy. Hitherto, the majority of the hospital's senior and middle-level managers are health professionals who have to carry out management functions without relevant training. The programme is managed by a hospital committee and training is conducted by staff who have themselves undergone training overseas or locally. The training programme has resulted in a number of positive changes such as improved teamwork and organizational cohesion. However, as the training is mainly donor funded, its sustainability is not assured.

  17. Gradual extinction reduces Reinstatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eShiban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day two were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE and gradual extinction (GE procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms. A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli. The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response and startle response. There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. Gradual extinction compared to standard extinction significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for skin conductance response or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the gradual extinction process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction.

  18. Evaluation of the user experience of "astronaut training device": an immersive, vr-based, motion-training system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kang; Wang, Danli; Yang, Xinpan; Hu, Haichen; Liu, Yuqing; Zhu, Xiuqing

    2016-10-01

    To date, as the different application fields, most VR-based training systems have been different. Therefore, we should take the characteristics of application field into consideration and adopt different evaluation methods when evaluate the user experience of these training systems. In this paper, we propose a method to evaluate the user experience of virtual astronauts training system. Also, we design an experiment based on the proposed method. The proposed method takes learning performance as one of the evaluation dimensions, also combines with other evaluation dimensions such as: presence, immersion, pleasure, satisfaction and fatigue to evaluation user experience of the System. We collect subjective and objective data, the subjective data are mainly from questionnaire designed based on the evaluation dimensions and user interview conducted before and after the experiment. While the objective data are consisted of Electrocardiogram (ECG), reaction time, numbers of reaction error and the video data recorded during the experiment. For the analysis of data, we calculate the integrated score of each evaluation dimension by using factor analysis. In order to improve the credibility of the assessment, we use the ECG signal and reaction test data before and after experiment to validate the changes of fatigue during the experiment, and the typical behavioral features extracted from the experiment video to explain the result of subjective questionnaire. Experimental results show that the System has a better user experience and learning performance, but slight visual fatigue exists after experiment.

  19. Relationships Between Program Size, Training Experience, and Career Intentions: Pediatrics Resident Reports From 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationship between pediatric residency program size and resident demographic characteristics, career intentions, and training experiences. Annual national random samples of 1000 graduating pediatrics residents were surveyed between 2010 and 2014. Response years were pooled for analysis, and trends in resident demographic characteristics, career intentions and job search, and training experiences were compared across program class size: small (training as program size decreases. These findings suggest that the training experiences of some residents do not optimally align with their future practice. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Training of Infant Mental Health Practitioners: The Norway Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slinning, Kari; Vannebo, Unni Tranaas

    2015-01-01

    Today the infant mental health field includes a multidisciplinary team of practitioners with very different training and education needs. Implementation research has shown that appropriate training is a key factor for successful outcomes of an intervention and that supervision and coaching are crucial. All professionals who work with young…

  1. Training of Hysteroscopic Skills in Residency Program : The Dutch Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Julienne A.; Driessen, Sara R. C.; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Broekmans, Frank J. M.; Jansen, Frank W.; Schreuder, HWR

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To evaluate whether hysteroscopy training in the Dutch gynecological residency program is judged as sufficient in daily practice, by assessment of the opinion on hysteroscopy training and current performance of hysteroscopic procedures. In addition, the extent of progress in comparis

  2. The Experience of Initial Management Training in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    Management training in ELT organizations is often inadequate. New managers are in severe need of training, especially for tasks which are non-pedagogical, yet they operate in a milieu where there are few opportunities for support compared with colleagues in mainstream education. The purpose of this case study, a rare evidence-based contribution to…

  3. Collective Training & Thinking in JAMD : The Italian JPOWX Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, L.R.M.A.; Schavemaker-Piva, O.; Meijer, Y.G.S.; Nuvoloni, P.; Cioli, C.; Manca, R.; Argiolas, G.

    2009-01-01

    Mission Training through Distributed Simulation (MTDS) has established itself as a powerful tool for collective training in the military domain. This potential has been recognized by the Italian Joint Forces Command and has led to the Italian participation in the 10th edition of Exercise Joint Proje

  4. Return on Investment for Workplace Training: The Canadian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percival, Jennifer C.; Cozzarin, Brian P.; Formaneck, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central problems in managing technological change and maintaining a competitive advantage in business is improving the skills of the workforce through investment in human capital and a variety of training practices. This paper explores the evidence on the impact of training investment on productivity in 14 Canadian industries from 1999…

  5. Critical Incidents in Multicultural Training: An Examination of Student Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. Nicole

    2006-01-01

    This study examined critical incidents in graduate students' multicultural counseling training. Trainees (N=59) were asked to describe a critical incident and their multicultural training environment by responding to a critical incident protocol and the multicultural environment Inventory-Revised (D. B. Pope-Davis, W. M. Liu, J. Nevitt, & R. L.…

  6. A Mandala: A Diagram of the Clinical Education Experience in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohous, Steve; West, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to present the practical use of a Mandala that: 1) provides opportunities for athletic training students to explore, reflect on and appreciate their clinical experiences; 2) provides educators with a model to understand and value athletic training student experiences; 3) organizes and captures factors and…

  7. Defining the Engaging Learning Experience from the Athletic Training Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Bowman, Thomas G.; Benes, Sarah S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Clinical experiences are an integral part of athletic training education and are where students gain the hands-on, practical knowledge and skills necessary to provide quality patient care in the field. However, some clinical education experiences may not allow athletic training students to become clinically integrated. Objective: To…

  8. A Mandala: A Diagram of the Clinical Education Experience in Athletic Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohous, Steve; West, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this paper is to present the practical use of a Mandala that: 1) provides opportunities for athletic training students to explore, reflect on and appreciate their clinical experiences; 2) provides educators with a model to understand and value athletic training student experiences; 3) organizes and captures factors and…

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  10. 消退训练对大鼠条件性恐惧行为及海马CA1区突触超微结构的影响%Effects of extinction training on conditioned fear behaviour and synaptic structure in hippocampal CA1 area in fear conditioned rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽丽; 李培培; 李敏; 韦美; 彭李

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of fear extinction training on the behaviours and the ultrastructure of hippocampal CA1 area in fear conditioned rats. Methods Forty male adult SD rats were randomly divided into native group (re =8), extinction control group (re = 16) and extinction group (re = 16). In 24 h after fear condition was established by reference instruction in the later 2 groups, extinction training was carried out in the extinction group and extinction retention test was performed in 7 and 21 d after fear extinction. The test was performed in 8 and 22 d in extinction control group. The changes of synaptic structure in CA1 of hippocampus were observed at 7 and 21 d after fear extinction. Results Compared with the extinction control group, the scores of extinction retention was significantly increased (P<0.01) at 7 and 21 d after extinction in the extinction group. There was no significant difference between extinction group and native group at 7 and 21 d. At 7 d after extinction training, the synaptic density was significantly higher in extinction group than that in the extinction control group (P <0.05 ) , and there was no difference among groups at 21 d. Compared with native group, the width of synaptic gap was significantly lower at 7 and 21 d after extinction training in extinction group ( P <0.01, 0. 05 ). At 21 d, the width of synaptic gap was significantly lower in the extinction group than that in the control group (P <0. 05). But there was no significant difference between the extinction control group and native group at 7 and 21 d after extinction. Compared with native group, at 7 and 21 d after extinction training, postsynaptic density (PSD) was significantly thicker in extinction group (P<0.01). And at 21 d, the density was significantly thicker in extinction group than that in the extinction control group (P < 0.05 ). There was no significant difference among the groups in active zone length. Conclusion Fear extinction training changes

  11. Is extinction forever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Patten, Brenda D; Bridge, Eli S; Crawford, Priscilla H C; Hough, Daniel J; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Patten, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Mistrust of science has seeped into public perception of the most fundamental aspect of conservation-extinction. The term ought to be straightforward, and yet, there is a disconnect between scientific discussion and public views. This is not a mere semantic issue, rather one of communication. Within a population dynamics context, we say that a species went locally extinct, later to document its return. Conveying our findings matters, for when we use local extinction, an essentially nonsensical phrase, rather than extirpation, which is what is meant, then we contribute to, if not create outright, a problem for public understanding of conservation, particularly as local extinction is often shortened to extinction in media sources. The public that receives the message of our research void of context and modifiers comes away with the idea that extinction is not forever or, worse for conservation as a whole, that an extinction crisis has been invented.

  12. Opportunity Costs in Paediatric Training: The Specialist Registrars Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-08-01

    In the training process, there is a tension between the work life and home life of trainees. This study explored both the personal impact and the opportunity costs of training from the Specialist Paediatric Registrar (SPR) perspective. The survey explored 1) career progression2) perceived functional effectiveness at work 3) psychological impact of hospital based training and 4) the personal and social cost of training. Fifty-three (71%) SPRs responded of whom 47 (89%)were married or in long term relationships. Seventy-five percent of trainees had a definite career plan with 86% intending to undertake fellowship training. Seventy percent believed they were efficient time managers but 53% had difficulty in making time for academic pursuits and fifty percent experienced negative feelings, which lingered after work and interfered with their relationships at home. Seventy-four percent stated training was undertaken at significant personal cost with only 21% achieving a very satisfactory work\\/life balance. To address these difficulties trainee wellbeing should be addressed at the Basic Specialist Training (BST) level and the career path clearly explained outlining the challenges that are likely to be encountered.

  13. Extension of general practice training from three to four years: experiences of a vocational training programme in Southern Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dowling, Stephanie

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of trainees taking part in an extended (four-year) general practice training programme introduced in the South Eastern region of the Republic of Ireland to replace the previous traditional (three-year) programme. In a qualitative design, eight homogeneous focus groups were held to determine the value of the additional year of training. The first cohort of trainees was interviewed towards the start and at the end of their fourth year. Trainees finishing the following year were also interviewed, as were graduates from the final three-year programme. GP trainers and the four members of the programme directing team comprised two further independent focus groups. Trainees reported that the integration of hospital posts and general practice attachments over the four years was particularly beneficial. The exposure to a variety of different general practices and the opportunity to take part in specialty clinics were considered extremely useful. The fourth year of training was felt to be less pressurised than previous years. Professional and personal development was enhanced; improved readiness to practise and confidence were noted. Perceived disadvantages of extended training included a lack of acknowledgment for doctors in their fourth year and excessive emphasis placed on research during the final year of training. The addition of an extra year of vocational training improves professional and personal development and changes the learning experience for doctors. Doctors felt more confident and ready to enter independent practice at the end of the fourth year of training.

  14. Cleaners' experiences with group-based workplace physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Lasse; Mortensen, Ole Steen; Holtermann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    month post-intervention. We analyzed interview data using Systematic Text Condensation. Findings: Participants learned to use their bodies in new ways. Group training permitted social breaks from work, enforcing colleague unity. Participants did not perceive training as stressful, although working...... for implementation seem to be important for sustained effects of health-promotion interventions in the workplace. Originality: The social character of the physical training facilitated a community of practice, which potentially supported the learning of new competencies, and how to improve the organization...

  15. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  16. Adoption of Employment-oriented Experience Training Program to Improve Undergraduates Employment Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To enhance undergraduates employment competitive advantages, communication and expression capability and team cooperation ability in engineering practice experiences, an experience training program is adopted to cultivate compound international talents of software development required by software companies. For the training program, knowledge spans and integration extent of teaching contents, implementation flow and flexible evaluation methods are also illustrated in detail. Especially during practical training project selected from software companies, students are guided to cooperate with team members to complete regular software development, which will improve their employment competence and make them fit for their future work more rapidly. With auxiliary experience training online teaching platform, three times of training program has been carried out successfully and a statistics table shows effects of the training program.

  17. Generalized Imitative Affection: Relationship to Prior Kinds of Imitation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Loren E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the effects of physical contact imitative training and verbal contact imitative training on the degree to which first and second graders exhibited generalized imitative affectionate and aggressive behavior. The effects of punishment as well as extinction on imitative behavior were analyzed. (DP)

  18. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementing Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training Programs in High Schools: Iowa's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyme, Derek B; Atkins, Dianne L

    2017-02-01

    To understand perceived barriers to providing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) education, implementation processes, and practices in high schools. Iowa has required CPR as a graduation requirement since 2011 as an unfunded mandate. A cross-sectional study was performed through multiple choice surveys sent to Iowa high schools to collect data about school demographics, details of CPR programs, cost, logistics, and barriers to implementation, as well as automated external defibrillator training and availability. Eighty-four schools responded (26%), with the most frequently reported school size of 100-500 students and faculty size of 25-50. When the law took effect, 51% of schools had training programs already in place; at the time of the study, 96% had successfully implemented CPR training. Perceived barriers to implementation were staffing, time commitment, equipment availability, and cost. The average estimated startup cost was <$1000 US, and the yearly maintenance cost was <$500 with funds typically allocated from existing school resources. The facilitator was a school official or volunteer for 81% of schools. Average estimated training time commitment per student was <2 hours. Automated external defibrillators are available in 98% of schools, and 61% include automated external defibrillator training in their curriculum. Despite perceived barriers, school CPR training programs can be implemented with reasonable resource and time allocations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Improved explosion protection measures in the face and T-junction by advanced manual extinction techniques and automatic water trough extinction and conception and testing of active explosion protection by means of water mist spraying; Verbesserung der Explosionschutzmassnahmen im Streb und Streb/Streckenuebergang durch Weiterentwicklung manueller Loeschtechniken und der automatisch ausloesenden Wassertrogsperre sowie Konzeption und Erprobung eines aktiven Explosionsschutzes mit Hilfe der Wassernebeltechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foit, W.; Holke, K.; Eickhoff, F.; Uhlenbrock, R. [Deutsche Montan Technologie GmbH, Essen (Germany). Gas and Fire Div.

    2003-07-01

    The explosion protection and fire extinction investigations comprised three sections: 1. Manual extinction techniques. Different types and arrangements of nozzles were investigated for their efficiency in gas fire extinction at different air flow rates. Although all systems were tested satisfactorily, high-pressure systems are recommended as they have a longer range. 2. Explosion protection in the T-junction area with the aid of water trough extinction systems were investigated. A system of this type is described, and background information and the general principle are presented. 3. Methane ignition is a hazard that can not be prevented, but most ignitions in the past were local, so that manual extinction by the mining staff can be recommended. A training programme was developed on the basis of the available long-year experience.

  1. Extinction as discrimination: the molar view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, William M

    2012-05-01

    The traditional molecular view of behavior explains extinction as the dissipation or inhibition of strength, formerly built up by contiguous reinforcement. In obstinate opposition to this explanation was the partial-reinforcement extinction effect: a partially reinforced response extinguishes more slowly than a continuously reinforced response. It suggests instead that extinction is discrimination. Four pigeons were exposed to daily sessions in which a variable period of food delivery, produced by pecking on a variable-interval schedule, was followed by extinction. The rate of food delivery was varied over a wide range across conditions. Varying the amount of food per delivery inversely with rate of delivery kept response rate from varying excessively. The results confirmed and extended the partial-reinforcement effect; persistence of pecking and time to extinction were inversely related to rate of obtaining food. The results support the molar view of extinction, not as loss of strength of a particular discrete response, but as a transition from one allocation of time among activities to another. Although molecular theories dismiss discrimination due to repeated training and extinction as an impurity or complication, repeated cycles of availability and privation are probably typical of the environment in which most vertebrate species evolved.

  2. Multicultural Counselor Training Experiences: Training Effects and Perceptions of Training among a Sample of Predominately Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Ginger L.; Argus-Calvo, Beverley; Tafoya, Nancy Garcia

    2010-01-01

    The effectiveness of multicultural training among a sample of predominately Hispanic counseling students was examined. The results of a series of 2-factor repeated measures analysis of variance and follow-up paired-samples t tests suggest that multicultural training was effective in increasing students' multicultural competencies and in improving…

  3. Modern examples of extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, Gabor L

    2013-01-01

    No species lives forever, and extinction is the ultimate fate of all living species. The fossil record indicates that a recent extinction wave affecting terrestrial vertebrates was parallel with the arrival of modern humans to areas formerly uninhabited by them. These modern instances of extinction...... started at around 40,000 years ago. On continents, large mammals (especially those >50 kg body mass) were affected, while on islands, the impacts were mainly felt by birds. The causes of these extinctions are not well known but hunting, habitat alteration and the introduction of non-native species...... reasons (certain groups do not fossilize) and methodological problems (methods of excavation and identification). Consequently, we can only crudely estimate the current rate of extinction. Nonetheless, it is evident that humans generated a new mass extinction, affecting all species in all habitats, and...

  4. Modern examples of extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, Gabor L

    2013-01-01

    No species lives forever, and extinction is the ultimate fate of all living species. The fossil record indicates that a recent extinction wave affecting terrestrial vertebrates was parallel with the arrival of modern humans to areas formerly uninhabited by them. These modern instances of extinction...... started at around 40,000 years ago. On continents, large mammals (especially those >50 kg body mass) were affected, while on islands, the impacts were mainly felt by birds. The causes of these extinctions are not well known but hunting, habitat alteration and the introduction of non-native species...... are the main causes of extinction. Our knowledge about extinctions is very incomplete, due to bias in research by taxonomy (vertebrate groups are better studied), geography (northern areas have received more attention), habitat (terrestrial habitats are better known than marine ones), as well as biological...

  5. Compassion fatigue resiliency training: the experience of facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Patricia; Pion, Sarah; Gentry, J Eric

    2015-02-01

    This qualitative evaluation examined compassion fatigue facilitators' perceptions of the effects of a compassion fatigue resiliency training program in an urban medical center in the midwestern United States. Nine months after completing a compassion fatigue resiliency facilitator training program, 15 participants wrote short narratives describing how the program affected them. Participants described how the training program benefited them both personally and professionally. Two main themes were identified from the narrative analysis: self-improvement and application of resiliency. All of the participants described one or more self-improvements as a result of the program, particularly in regard to emotional health. All of the participants also described how they regularly applied one or more of the resiliency skills taught in the class to improve their ability to manage stress and prevent compassion fatigue. This program shows promise in ameliorating compassion fatigue and burnout in health care providers.

  6. Learning to prescribe – pharmacists' experiences of supplementary prescribing training in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson Allen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of non-medical prescribing for professions such as pharmacy and nursing in recent years offers additional responsibilities and opportunities but attendant training issues. In the UK and in contrast to some international models, becoming a non-medical prescriber involves the completion of an accredited training course offered by many higher education institutions, where the skills and knowledge necessary for prescribing are learnt. Aims: to explore pharmacists' perceptions and experiences of learning to prescribe on supplementary prescribing (SP courses, particularly in relation to inter-professional learning, course content and subsequent use of prescribing in practice. Methods A postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 808 SP registered pharmacists in England in April 2007, exploring demographic, training, prescribing, safety culture and general perceptions of SP. Results After one follow-up, 411 (51% of pharmacists responded. 82% agreed SP training was useful, 58% agreed courses provided appropriate knowledge and 62% agreed that the necessary prescribing skills were gained. Clinical examination, consultation skills training and practical experience with doctors were valued highly; pharmacology training and some aspects of course delivery were criticised. Mixed views on inter-professional learning were reported – insights into other professions being valued but knowledge and skills differences considered problematic. 67% believed SP and recent independent prescribing (IP should be taught together, with more diagnostic training wanted; few pharmacists trained in IP, but many were training or intending to train. There was no association between pharmacists' attitudes towards prescribing training and when they undertook training between 2004 and 2007 but earlier cohorts were more likely to be using supplementary prescribing in practice. Conclusion Pharmacists appeared to value their SP training and

  7. Mass extinction: a commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    Four neocatastrophist claims about mass extinction are currently being debated; they are that: 1, the late Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by large body impact; 2, as many as five other major extinctions were caused by impact; 3, the timing of extinction events since the Permian is uniformly periodic; and 4, the ages of impact craters on Earth are also periodic and in phase with the extinctions. Although strongly interconnected the four claims are independent in the sense that none depends on the others. Evidence for a link between impact and extinction is strong but still needs more confirmation through bed-by-bed and laboratory studies. An important area for future research is the question of whether extinction is a continuous process, with the rate increasing at times of mass extinctions, or whether it is episodic at all scales. If the latter is shown to be generally true, then species are at risk of extinction only rarely during their existence and catastrophism, in the sense of isolated events of extreme stress, is indicated. This is line of reasoning can only be considered an hypothesis for testing. In a larger context, paleontologists may benefit from a research strategy that looks to known Solar System and Galactic phenomena for predictions about environmental effects on earth. The recent success in the recognition of Milankovitch Cycles in the late Pleistocene record is an example of the potential of this research area.

  8. Impairment of contextual fear extinction by chronic nicotine and withdrawal from chronic nicotine is associated with hippocampal nAChR upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Oliver, Chicora; Huang, Peng; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    Chronic nicotine and withdrawal from chronic nicotine have been shown to be major modulators of fear learning behavior. Moreover, recent studies from our laboratory have shown that acute nicotine impaired fear extinction and safety learning in mice. However, the effects of chronic nicotine and withdrawal on fear extinction are unknown. Therefore, the current experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of chronic nicotine as well as withdrawal from chronic nicotine on contextual fear extinction in mice. C57BL6/J mice were given contextual fear conditioning training and retention testing during chronic nicotine administration. Mice then received contextual fear extinction either during chronic nicotine or during withdrawal from chronic nicotine. Our results showed that contextual fear extinction was impaired both during chronic nicotine administration and subsequent withdrawal. However, it was also observed that the effects of prior chronic nicotine disappeared after 72 h in withdrawal, a timeline that closely matches with the timing of the chronic nicotine-induced upregulation of hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) density. Additional experiments found that 4 days, but not 1 day, of continuous nicotine administration upregulated hippocampal nAChRs and impaired contextual fear extinction. These effects disappeared following 72 h withdrawal. Overall, these experiments provide a potential link between nicotine-induced upregulation of hippocampal nAChRs and fear extinction deficits observed in patients with anxiety disorders, which may lead to advancements in the pharmacological treatment methods for this disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Training Consumer Educators: A Curriculum and Program Handbook. A Report on the Experience of the Consumer Law Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Law School, NY. Consumer Law Training Center.

    Information is presented on the administration of consumer education programs to train teachers and community group leaders who will be teaching consumer education in their own communities. Suggestions and examples are based on experience in creating and teaching such a program in consumer law in New York City. The first three chapters give…

  10. Training Consumer Educators: A Curriculum and Program Handbook. A Report on the Experience of the Consumer Law Training Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Law School, NY. Consumer Law Training Center.

    Information is presented on the administration of consumer education programs to train teachers and community group leaders who will be teaching consumer education in their own communities. Suggestions and examples are based on experience in creating and teaching such a program in consumer law in New York City. The first three chapters give…

  11. Train-induced ground vibrations: modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ditzel, A.

    2003-01-01

    Ground vibrations generated by high-speed trains are of great concern because of the possible damage they can cause to buildings or other structures near the track, and the annoyance to the public living in the vicinity of the track. Particularly in soft-soil regions, where the wave speed is compara

  12. AODA Training Experiences of Blindness and Visual Impairment Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Koch, D. Shane; McKee, Marissa F.; Nelipovich, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Co-existing alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) and blindness or visually impairment may complicate the delivery of rehabilitation services. Professionals working with individuals who are blind or visually impaired need to be aware of unique issues facing those with co-existing disabilities. This study sought to examine the AODA training needs,…

  13. Mental Skills Training Experience of NCAA Division II Softball Catchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Athletes competing at all levels of sport are constantly working on ways to enhance their physical performance. Sport psychology research insists there are higher performance results among athletes who incorporate mental skills training into their practice and competition settings. In order to use the mental skills strategies effectively, athletes…

  14. Mental Skills Training Experience of NCAA Division II Softball Catchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Athletes competing at all levels of sport are constantly working on ways to enhance their physical performance. Sport psychology research insists there are higher performance results among athletes who incorporate mental skills training into their practice and competition settings. In order to use the mental skills strategies effectively, athletes…

  15. Advanced Training of Labour Force: The USA Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushentsev, Artem

    2014-01-01

    The importance of professional development of labor force directly in the workplace has been proved. It's revealed that this is due not only to questions of advanced training, but also to the improvement of the situation on the labor market of unskilled groups of citizen. The current labor market recognizes the value and importance of people.…

  16. An Examination of Advanced Individual Training Platoon Sergeant Training and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    to digital publications. Other concerns included available training aids not adequately replicating actual aircraft and the need to continually use...Pallesen, S., Bartone, P. T. (2009). Predicting transformational leadership in naval cadets: effects of personality hardiness and training. Journal...Preparation 2.0 Intro to PRT 1.5 Teaching Army Values Part #1 1.0 CID/SHARP 1.5 CRM 1.0 ACE for Leaders 1.5 Conduct Unit Formation/D&C

  17. Experience, training and confidence among small, non-community drinking water system operators in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Wendy; McEwen, Scott A; Pintar, Katarina; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Young, Ian; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    The water operator plays an important role in water safety; however, little published research exists that has examined this role. The purpose of this study was to develop a greater understanding of the experience, existing knowledge, confidence and future training needs of the small, non-community drinking water operator in Ontario in order to help guide future outreach and training opportunities. A cross-sectional telephone survey of 332 small, non-community drinking water operators in Ontario was conducted in July and August 2011. Survey questions pertained to respondents' experience as operators, formal training, perceived importance of water safety issues, confidence in handling water safety issues, and future training needs. Approximately 16% (54/330) of respondents had one year or less experience as a water operator, and 60% (199/332) reported that being a water operator was not a chosen profession. Only 37% (124/332) of operators reported completing operator training. Respondents reported a preference for online training courses or on-site training (compared with a classroom setting). Low training rates, inexperience, and in certain situations, low confidence, among many small water system operators highlight a need to provide continued support to the development of ongoing training opportunities in this population.

  18. Content of Bachelors' in Tourism Informative Training in Ukrainian and Polish Experience: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubekhina, Tetiana

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a comparative analysis of the content of Bachelors' in Tourism informative training in Ukrainian and Polish experience. The content of Bachelors' in Tourism informative training in Ukraine and Poland has been analyzed. The content of subjects, namely, "Information Technologies in Tourism" and "The Foundations…

  19. Learning by Helping? Undergraduate Communication Outcomes Associated with Training or Service-Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; DuBois, Melinda; Wigderson, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated communication outcomes after training or applied service-learning experiences. Pre-practicum trainees learned active listening skills over 10 weeks. Practicum students were successful trainees who staffed a helpline. Community interns were trained and supervised at community agencies. Undergraduate students in psychology…

  20. Content of Bachelors' in Tourism Informative Training in Ukrainian and Polish Experience: Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubekhina, Tetiana

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a comparative analysis of the content of Bachelors' in Tourism informative training in Ukrainian and Polish experience. The content of Bachelors' in Tourism informative training in Ukraine and Poland has been analyzed. The content of subjects, namely, "Information Technologies in Tourism" and "The Foundations…

  1. Task-Relevant Sound and User Experience in Computer- Mediated Firefighter Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently int

  2. Task-relevant sound and user experience in computer-mediated firefighter training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtkamp, J.M.; Toet, A.; Bos, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors added task-relevant sounds to a computer-mediated instructor in-the-loop virtual training for firefighter commanders in an attempt to raise the engagement and arousal of the users. Computer-mediated training for crew commanders should provide a sensory experience that is sufficiently int

  3. On the Job Training in Line Heating in Astilleros Espanoles Shipyards, A Profitable Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    1993 Ship Production Symposium Paper No. 5: On the Job Training in Line Heating in Astilleros Espanoles Shipyards, A Profitable Experience U.S...National Shipbuilding Research Program, 1993 Ship Production Symposium Paper No. 5: On the Job Training in Line Heating in Astilleros Espanoles Shipyards

  4. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnova, Myroslava

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists' professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical…

  5. Professional Training of Language Teachers in the Context of British Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyanenko, Kateryna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with revealing the peculiarities of language teachers' professional training in the context of British experience. The notions of philology, linguistics, philologist, linguist, language studies have been outlined and specified in the article. The titles of the curricula and their meanings in reference to language training have…

  6. A novel method of assessing quality of postgraduate psychiatry training: experiences from a large training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizrah, Mukhtar; Iacoponi, Eduardo; Parker, Elizabeth; Rymer, Janice; Iversen, Amy; Wessely, Simon

    2013-06-14

    Most assessments of the quality of postgraduate training are based on anonymised questionnaires of trainees. We report a comprehensive assessment of the quality of training at a large postgraduate psychiatry training institute using non-anonymised face-to-face interviews with trainees and their trainers. Two consultant psychiatrists interviewed 99 trainees and 109 trainers. Scoring of interview responses was determined by using a pre-defined criteria. Additional comments were recorded as free text. Interviews covered 13 domains, including: Clinical, teaching, research and management opportunities, clinical environment, clinical supervision, adequacy of job description, absence of bullying and job satisfaction. Multiple interview domain scores were combined, generating a 'Combined' score for each post. The interview response rate was 97% for trainers 88% for trainees. There was a significant correlation between trainee and trainer scores for the same interview domains (Pearson's r = 0.968, pJob satisfaction scores of year 1 to year 3 core trainees showed a significant increase with increasing seniority (Linear regression coefficient = 0.273, 95% CI: 0.033 to 0.513, ANOVA p= 0.026). This in-depth examination of the quality of training on a large psychiatry training programme successfully elicited strengths and weakness of our programme. Such an interview scheme could be easily implemented in smaller schemes and may well provide important information to allow for targeted improvement of training. Additionally, trends in quality of training and job satisfaction amongst various psychiatric specialities were identified; specifically speciality posts and liaison posts in psychiatry were revealed to be the most popular with trainees.

  7. International experiences of training and support of students with disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnik Y.V.,

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on practices of higher inclusive education in universities of the USA, Canada and Russian Federation and provides their complex assessment. The authors explore modern effective practices of training and support of students with disabilities. The universities are evaluated according to the results of monitoring of accommodations for the disabled carried out in 2015-2016. This evaluation includes assessments made by experts during their visits to the universities as well as an overview of the development of inclusive education practices in each university and, in particular, of the measures aimed at making higher education more accessible to students with disabilities. The authors argue for the necessity of establishing new and developing already existing resource training centers in the Russian regions and discuss the issues concerning the possible use of a single base of educational, information, research and methodological resources to ensure equal access to education and effective learning for students with disabilities.

  8. Nationwide peritoneal dialysis nurse training in Thailand: 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiyuenwong, Jutiporn; Mahatanan, Nanta; Jiravaranun, Somsong; Boonyakarn, Achara; Rodpai, Somrak; Eiam-Ong, Somchai; Tungsanga, Kriang; Dhanakijcharoen, Prateep; Kanjanabuch, Talerngsak

    2011-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) center is not possible to operate if there is no availability of dedicated PD nurse. Generally, the nurse has to play many roles, including educator coordinator, and sometimes leader. As professionalism, the PD nurses need to have both theoretical and practical skills. With the tremendous leap of PD population after the launch of "PD First" policy in Thailand, the shortage of skillful PD nurse is concerned. Hence, the nationwide PD nurse training course was established with the collaborations of many organizations and institutes. Until now, 3 generations of 225 PD nurses are the productions of the course. This number represents 80 percent of PD nurses distributed throughout the whole nation. The survey operated in the year 2010 demonstrated that the output of the course was acceptable in terms of quality since most of the trained PD nurses had a confidence in taking care of PD patients. The quality of patient care is good as indicated by KPIs.

  9. Probing ice clouds by broadband mid-infrared extinction spectroscopy: case studies from ice nucleation experiments in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Series of infrared extinction spectra of ice crystals were recorded in the 6000–800 cm−1 wavenumber regime during expansion cooling experiments in the large aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Either supercooled sulphuric acid solution droplets or dry mineral dust particles were added as seed aerosols to initiate ice formation after having established ice supersaturated conditions inside the chamber. The various ice nucleation runs were conducted at temperatures between 237 and 195 K, leading to median sizes of the nucleated ice particles of 1–15 µm. The measured infrared spectra were fitted with reference spectra from T-matrix calculations to retrieve the number concentration as well as the number size distribution of the generated ice clouds. The precise evaluation of the time-dependent ice particle number concentrations, i.e., the rates of new ice particle formation, is of particular importance to quantitatively analyse the ice nucleation experiments in terms of nucleation rates and ice activation spectra. The ice particles were modelled as finite circular cylinders with aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 3.0. Benefiting from the comprehensive diagnostic tools for the characterisation of ice clouds which are available at the AIDA facility, the infrared retrieval results with regard to the ice particle number concentration could be compared to independent measurements with various optical particle counters. This provided a unique chance to quantitatively assess potential errors or solution ambiguities in the retrieval procedure which mainly originate from the difficulty to find an appropriate shape representation for the aspherical particle habits of the ice crystals. Based on these inter-comparisons, we demonstrate that there is no standard retrieval approach which can be routinely applied to all different experimental scenarios. In particular, the concept to account for the asphericity of the ice crystals

  10. Measuring Noncommissioned Officer Knowledge and Experience to Enable Tailored Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    robustly predictive of broad psychological constructs (Goska & Ackerman, 1996; Gottfredson, 1998; Jensen, 1998; Thorndike , 1985). However, general...An aptitude-treatment interaction approach to transfer within training. Journal of Educational Psychology , 88 (2), 249-259. Gottfredson, L. S... Educational Psychology , 96 (3), 558-568. McNamara, D. S., Kintsch, E., Songer, N. B., & Kintsch, W. (1996). Are good texts always better? Interactions of

  11. Flight physiology training experiences and perspectives: survey of 117 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão, Luís; Zorro, Sara; Silva, Jorge; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Ribeiro, João

    2013-06-01

    Human factors and awareness of flight physiology play a crucial role in flight safety. Even so, international legislation is vague relative to training requirements in hypoxia and altitude physiology. Based on a previously developed survey, an adapted questionnaire was formulated and released online for Portuguese pilots. Specific questions regarding the need for pilot attention monitoring systems were added to the original survey. There were 117 pilots, 2 of whom were women, who completed the survey. Most of the pilots had a light aviation license and flew in unpressurized cabins at a maximum ceiling of 10,000 ft (3048 m). The majority of the respondents never experienced hypoxic symptoms. In general, most of the individuals agreed with the importance of an introductory hypoxia course without altitude chamber training (ACT) for all pilot populations, and with a pilot monitoring system in order to increase flight safety. Generally, most of the pilots felt that hypoxia education and training for unpressurized aircraft is not extensive enough. However, almost all the respondents were willing to use a flight physiology monitoring system in order to improve flight safety.

  12. Modeling the responses to resistance training in an animal experiment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Antony G; Py, Guillaume; Favier, François B; Sanchez, Anthony M J; Bonnieu, Anne; Busso, Thierry; Candau, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test whether systems models of training effects on performance in athletes can be used to explore the responses to resistance training in rats. 11 Wistar Han rats (277 ± 15 g) underwent 4 weeks of resistance training consisting in climbing a ladder with progressive loads. Training amount and performance were computed from total work and mean power during each training session. Three systems models relating performance to cumulated training bouts have been tested: (i) with a single component for adaptation to training, (ii) with two components to distinguish the adaptation and fatigue produced by exercise bouts, and (iii) with an additional component to account for training-related changes in exercise-induced fatigue. Model parameters were fitted using a mixed-effects modeling approach. The model with two components was found to be the most suitable to analyze the training responses (R(2) = 0.53; P experiment makes it possible to model the responses to resistance training. This modeling in rodents could be used in future studies in combination with biological tools for enhancing our understanding of the adaptive processes that occur during physical training.

  13. Effects of post-session administration of methylene blue on fear extinction and contextual memory in adults with claustrophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telch, Michael J; Bruchey, Aleksandra K; Rosenfield, David; Cobb, Adam R; Smits, Jasper; Pahl, Sandra; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2014-10-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that low-dose methylene blue increases mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase activity in the brain and improves memory retention after learning tasks, including fear extinction. The authors report on the first controlled experiment to examine the memory-enhancing effects of posttraining methylene blue administration on retention of fear extinction and contextual memory following fear extinction training. Adult participants displaying marked claustrophobic fear were randomly assigned to double-blind administration of 260 mg of methylene blue (N=23) or administration of placebo (N=19) immediately following six 5-minute extinction trials in an enclosed chamber. Retesting occurred 1 month later to assess fear renewal as indexed by peak fear during exposure to a nontraining chamber, with the prediction that the effects of methylene blue would vary as a function of fear reduction achieved during extinction training. Incidental contextual memory was assessed 1 and 30 days after training to assess the cognitive-enhancing effects of methylene blue independent of its effects on fear attenuation. Consistent with predictions, participants displaying low end fear posttraining showed significantly less fear at the 1-month follow-up if they received methylene blue posttraining compared with placebo. In contrast, participants displaying moderate to high levels of posttraining fear tended to fare worse at the follow-up if they received methylene blue posttraining. Methylene blue's enhancement of contextual memory was unrelated to initial or posttraining claustrophobic fear. Methylene blue enhances memory and the retention of fear extinction when administered after a successful exposure session but may have a deleterious effect on extinction when administered after an unsuccessful exposure session.

  14. Acquisition, extinction and temporal discrimination in human conditioned avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molet, Mikaël; Leconte, Claire; Rosas, Juan M

    2006-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted with the aim of designing a videogame for the study of human conditioned avoidance. Participants had to destroy enemy spaceships with the goal of increasing the score in a counter. Coloured signals might announce the launching of a bomb that could hit participant's spaceship producing a 30 points decrease in participant's score. Three groups of participants were trained in discriminating between a warning signal (W) and a safety signal (S) in Experiment 1. Instrumental group could avoid the loss of points by hiding the spaceship before the offset of W. Participants in the Yoked group received the same treatment received by their instrumental partners, regardless of their behaviour. In the Pavlovian group, W was always followed by the loss of points, regardless of participant's behaviour. Discrimination between W and S was better in the Instrumental groups than in the Yoked and Pavlovian control groups. Experiment 2 found extinction of avoidance when the warning signal was not followed by the bomb. Temporal discrimination was found within the participants that received the instrumental contingency in both experiments, with higher avoidance response towards the end of the warning signal. Temporal discrimination disappeared after extinction in Experiment 2.

  15. Narrowing down the conditions for extinction of Pavlovian feature-positive discriminations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vooren, Priya R; Franssen, Mathijs; Beckers, Tom; Hermans, Dirk; Baeyens, Frank

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to delineate the minimal conditions for extinction of Pavlovian modulation in humans. Previous experiments at our lab showed that, after X-- A+/A- acquisition training, X- trials did not extinguish differential X-- A+/A- responding, while X-- A- trials did. Additionally, X-- A- extinction training seemed only to extinguish differential X-- A+/A- responding, while leaving differential responding on a concurrently trained Y [Symbol: see text] B+/B- discrimination intact. It thus seemed that the X-- A+/A- discrimination can only be extinguished by X-- A- extinction trials. (Rescorla, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes 12, 16-24, 1986), on the other hand, found that the minimal conditions for extinction were broader in pigeons: Namely, he found that an acquired X-- A+/A- discrimination could be extinguished by presenting the original feature X in combination with a different target (B) that was minimally trained as an exciter. We thus wanted to examine whether this was also the case in humans. We found that nonreinforced X-- B- presentations did not abolish discriminative X-- A/A responding when target B was a nonreinforced stimulus. Nonreinforced X-- B- trials did extinguish the X-- A+/A- discrimination when target B had previously been trained as a target for modulation (X-- B+/B- or Y [Symbol: see text] B+/B- training) or as a reinforced exciter (B+). Our results thusf parallel and extend those in nonhuman animals (Rescorla, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes 12, 16-24, 1986).

  16. Assessment of the labor market experiences of CETA-trained solar workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, B.A.; Mason, B.; Mikasa, G.Y.

    1980-12-01

    This study assessed solar training offered by CETA-funded programs and labor market experiences of program graduates. The initial research was restricted to programs within California, because the state is involved in a variety of solar-related activities, including development of jobs and training programs in solar energy. Interviews were conducted with 12 CETA solar training programs and graduates in 1979, in cooperation with California's SolarCal Office. Information on graduates includes demographics, educational and work experience, satisfaction with solar training, types of jobs found, wage levels, and job tenure. Program information includes length, types of training, and the number and kinds of solar systems installed. Results show that major programs problems were: limited funding; shortages of trained instructors; insufficient staff; need for local employment information; need for better defined role for unions; and pressures for high placement rates. The curricula involved general skills, skills specific to solar technologies, and basic job behavior and skills. The training involved both classroom and hands-on experience and was mainly tailored to participants and the local job market. Successful placement of program participants was relatively high; over half the initial job placements involved solar energy. Solar jobs appeared to pay more than nonsolar jobs. Participants generally felt that their training had prepared them adequately for their current work.

  17. Professional Training of Language Teachers in the Context of British Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyanenko Kateryna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with revealing the peculiarities of language teachers’ professional training in the context of British experience. The notions of philology, linguistics, philologist, linguist, language studies have been outlined and specified in the article. The titles of the curricula and their meanings in reference to language training have been analyzed. The reasons for an abundance of university curricula for language training have been justified. The content of Subject Benchmark Statement on Languages, Cultures and Societies has been defined. It has been stated that such processes as enhancing social values in the society, promoting integration processes and forming positive experience in the synthesis of classical and innovative approaches to training as well as the changes in the functions of training characterize the professional training of language teachers in Great Britain. On the example of De Montfort University the peculiarities of language teachers’ professional training, in particular, ESL teachers, have been illustrated. It has been concluded that the methodological basis of future language teacher’s professional training at British universities consists of personality-based, competency-based, integrative and differentiated approaches and is characterized by the orientation of the training content to forming and developing students’ core professional competencies and rational combination of theoretical practical components.

  18. Guidelines for Professional Training of Junior Medical Staff in the Context of European Experience

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    Sosnova Myroslava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with outlining guidelines for improving professional training of junior medical staff based on European experience. Consequently, guidelines and recommendations on enhancing the efficiency of medical education in general and junior medical specialists’ professional training, in particular, published by European Union of Medical Specialists, General Medical Council, World Federation for Medical Education have been studied, analyzed, justified and presented in the paper. According to European Union of Medical Specialists it has been concluded that general aspects of medical specialists’ training are based on the selection process for the access to the medical specialists’ training, duration of training, common trunk, training program and quality assurance; requirements for training institutions involve recognition, size, quality assurance and teaching infructructure; requirements for instructors encompass qualification, training program, teacher/trainee ratio; requirements for trainees cover experience, language and logbook. In addition, the components that define the quality of junior medical specialists’ professional training based on N. Novosolova’s ideas have been indicated. Finally, based on the positive aspects of the guidelines analyzed the appropriate ones that, in our opinion, may be of use in Ukraine, have been presented.

  19. Behavioral and neural bases of extinction learning in Hermissenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Cavallo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extinction of classical conditioning is thought to produce new learning that masks or interferes with the original memory. However, research in the nudibranch Hermissenda crassicornis (H.c. has challenged this view, and instead suggested that extinction erased the original associative memory. We have re-examined extinction in H.c. to test whether extinguished associative memories can be detected on the behavioral and cellular levels, and to characterize the temporal variables involved. Associative conditioning using pairings of light (CS and rotation (US produced characteristic suppression of H.c. phototactic behavior. A single session of extinction training (repeated light-alone presentations reversed suppressed behavior back to pre-training levels when administered 15 min after associative conditioning. This effect was abolished if extinction was delayed by 23 hr, and yet was recovered using extended extinction training (three consecutive daily extinction sessions. Extinguished phototactic suppression did not spontaneously recover at any retention interval tested (2-, 24-, 48-, 72-hr, or after additional US presentations (no observed reinstatement. Extinction training (single session, 15 min interval also reversed the pairing-produced increases in light-evoked spike frequencies of Type B photoreceptors, an identified site of associative memory storage that is causally related to phototactic suppression. These results suggest that the behavioral effects of extinction training are not due to temporary suppression of associative memories, but instead represent a reversal of the underlying cellular changes necessary for the expression of learning. In the companion article, we further elucidate mechanisms responsible for extinction-produced reversal of memory-related neural plasticity in Type B photoreceptors.

  20. Retention of perceptual generalization of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappens, Meike; Schroijen, Mathias; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-12-01

    Fear reduction obtained during a fear extinction procedure can generalize from the extinction stimulus to other perceptually similar stimuli. Perceptual generalization of fear extinction typically follows a perceptual gradient, with increasing levels of fear reduction the more a stimulus resembles the extinction stimulus. The current study aimed to investigate whether perceptual generalization of fear extinction can be observed also after a retention interval of 24h. Fear was acquired to three geometrical figures of different sizes (CS(+), CS1(+) and CS2(+)) by consistently pairing them with a short-lasting suffocation experience (US). Three other geometrical figures that were never followed by the US served as control stimuli (CS(-), CS1(-), CS2(-)). Next, only the CS(+) was extinguished by presenting it in the absence of the US. One day later, fear responses to all stimuli were assessed without any US-presentation. Outcome measures included startle blink EMG, skin conductance, US expectancy, respiratory rate and tidal volume. On day 2 spontaneous recovery of fear was observed in US expectancy and tidal volume, but not in the other outcomes. Evidence for the retention of fear extinction generalization was present in US expectancy and skin conductance, but a perceptual gradient in the retention of generalized fear extinction could not be observed.

  1. Experience-dependent learning of auditory temporal resolution: evidence from Carnatic-trained musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R

    2014-01-22

    Musical training and experience greatly enhance the cortical and subcortical processing of sounds, which may translate to superior auditory perceptual acuity. Auditory temporal resolution is a fundamental perceptual aspect that is critical for speech understanding in noise in listeners with normal hearing, auditory disorders, cochlear implants, and language disorders, yet very few studies have focused on music-induced learning of temporal resolution. This report demonstrates that Carnatic musical training and experience have a significant impact on temporal resolution assayed by gap detection thresholds. This experience-dependent learning in Carnatic-trained musicians exhibits the universal aspects of human perception and plasticity. The present work adds the perceptual component to a growing body of neurophysiological and imaging studies that suggest plasticity of the peripheral auditory system at the level of the brainstem. The present work may be intriguing to researchers and clinicians alike interested in devising cross-cultural training regimens to alleviate listening-in-noise difficulties.

  2. Assessing the relationship between latent inhibition and the partial reinforcement extinction effect in autoshaping with rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughner, Robert L; Papini, Mauricio R

    2008-05-01

    Results from a variety of independently run experiments suggest that latent inhibition (LI) and the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) share underlying mechanisms. Experiment 1 tested this LI=PREE hypothesis by training the same set of rats in situations involving both nonreinforced preexposure to the conditioned stimulus (LI stage) and partial reinforcement training (PREE stage). Control groups were also included to assess both LI and the PREE. The results demonstrated a significant, but negative correlation between the size of the LI effect and that of the PREE. Experiment 2 extended this analysis to the effects on LI and the PREE of the anxiolytic benzodiazepine chlordiazepoxide (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Whereas chlordiazepoxide had no effect on LI, it delayed the onset of the PREE. No evidence in support of the LI=PREE hypothesis was obtained when these two learning phenomena were compared within the same experiment and under the same general conditions of training.

  3. Gradual extinction prevents the return of fear: Implications for the discovery of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Gershman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fear memories are notoriously difficult to erase, often recovering over time. The longstanding explanation for this finding is that, in extinction training, a new memory is formed that competes with the old one for expression but does not otherwise modify it. This explanation is at odds with traditional models of learning such as Rescorla-Wagner and reinforcement learning. A possible reconciliation that was recently suggested is that extinction training leads to the inference of a new state that is different from the state that was in effect in the original training. This solution, however, raises a new question: under what conditions are new states, or new memories formed? Theoretical accounts implicate persistent large prediction errors in this process. As a test of this idea, we reasoned that careful design of the reinforcement schedule during extinction training could reduce these prediction errors enough to prevent the formation of a new memory, while still decreasing reinforcement sufficiently to drive modification of the old fear memory. In two Pavlovian fear-conditioning experiments, we show that gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli, rather than eliminating them abruptly, prevents the recovery of fear. This finding has important implications for theories of state discovery in reinforcement learning.

  4. The experience of community health workers training in Iran: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javanparast Sara

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of Community Health Workers (CHWs in improving access to basic healthcare services, and mobilising community actions on health is broadly recognised. The Primary Health Care (PHC approach, identified in the Alma Ata conference in 1978, stressed the role of CHWs in addressing community health needs. Training of CHWs is one of the key aspects that generally seeks to develop new knowledge and skills related to specific tasks and to increase CHWs’ capacity to communicate with and serve local people. This study aimed to analyse the CHW training process in Iran and how different components of training have impacted on CHW performance and satisfaction. Methods Data were collected from both primary and secondary sources. Training policies were reviewed using available policy documents, training materials and other relevant documents at national and provincial levels. Documentary analysis was supplemented by individual interviews with ninety-one Iranian CHWs from 18 provinces representing a broad range of age, work experience and educational levels, both male and female. Results Recognition of the CHW program and their training in the national health planning and financing facilitates the implementation and sustainability of the program. The existence of specialised training centres managed by district health network provides an appropriate training environment that delivers comprehensive training and increases CHWs’ knowledge, skills and motivation to serve local communities. Changes in training content over time reflect an increasing number of programs integrated into PHC, complicating the work expected of CHWs. In-service training courses need to address better local needs. Conclusion Although CHW programs vary by country and context, the CHW training program in Iran offers transferable lessons for countries intending to improve training as one of the key elements in their CHW program.

  5. Financial stress during medical residency training: an experience from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Zamani,1 Vahid Zamani2 1Student Research Committee, Department of Medicine, 2Vice-Chancellery for Health, Babol University of Medical Sciences, Babol, IranWe have read with great interest the article by Abdulghani et al,1 in which they well documented the high prevalence of stress among the Saudi Arabian medical residents and its effects on their working efficacy and general physical health during the residency training. This important issue similarly applies in Iran. Previous surveys performed on the Iranian resident trainees revealed the increased levels of psychological and emotional disorders such as depression, anxiety, and stress among them.2–4View original paper by Abdulghani et al.

  6. The Infralimbic Cortex Regulates the Consolidation of Extinction after Cocaine Self-Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLumiere, Ryan T.; Niehoff, Kate E.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    The infralimbic cortex (IL) regulates the consolidation of extinction learning for fear conditioning. Whether the IL influences the consolidation of extinction learning for cocaine self-administration is unknown. To address this issue, male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2 wk of cocaine self-administration followed by extinction training. On the…

  7. Resistance to extinction after schedules of partial delay or partial reinforcement in rats with hippocampal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, J N; Feldon, J; Ursin, H; Gray, J A

    1985-01-01

    Two experimental procedures were employed to establish the reason why hippocampal lesions apparently block the development of tolerance for aversive events in partial reinforcement experiments, but do not do so in partial punishment experiments. Rats were trained to run in a straight alley following hippocampal lesions (HC), cortical control lesions (CC) or sham operations (SO), and resistance to extinction was assessed following differing acquisition conditions. In Experiment 1 a 4-8 min inter-trial interval (ITI) was used. Either every acquisition trial was rewarded immediately (Continuous Reinforcement, CR), or only a randomly selected half of the trials were immediately rewarded, the reward being delayed for thirty seconds on the other trials (Partial Delay, PD). This delay procedure produced increased resistance to extinction in rats in all lesion groups. In Experiment 2 the ITI was reduced to a few seconds, and rats were trained either on a CR schedule, or on a schedule in which only half the trials were rewarded (Partial Reinforcement, PR). This form of partial reinforcement procedure also produced increased resistance to extinction in rats in all lesion groups. It thus appears that hippocampal lesions only prevent the development of resistance to aversive events when the interval between aversive and subsequent appetitive events exceeds some minimum value.

  8. Structured extracapsular cataract extraction-intraocular lens microsurgical training: report of a trainee's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaji, A E; Natchiar, G

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to report the experience an ophthalmologist gained in a structured intraocular lens (IOL) microsurgery training program for the information and benefit of colleagues in ophthalmology training institutions. An ophthalmologist was trained in extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE)-IOL implant in Aravind Eye Hospital (AEH), Madurai, for a period of 8 weeks. Details of patients operated on, procedures observed, and conferences attended were prospectively recorded in a log book. Training was available in conventional ECCE with posterior chamber IOL (ECCE-PCIOL), small incision sutureless cataract surgery, and phacoemulsification. During the period, this trainee observed a total of 1527 cataract extractions, administered 528 retrobulbar and 1047 facial blocks, and also operated on 75 patients. The trainee gained experience and confidence to perform high-quality, low-cost cataract surgery. Hands-on experience and competence in quality ECCE-IOL implant microsurgery can be acquired in a short period of time in a high-volume cataract center. Trainees can also be exposed to other techniques of cataract surgery. Ophthalmology training centers with diminishing surgical training opportunities can also benefit from this structured training in a high-volume cataract center like Aravind Eye Hospital.

  9. Seventh Fleet field training exercise : Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo : fires initiatives final report

    OpenAIRE

    Schacher, G. E.; Pilnick, Steve; Irvine, Nelson; Gallup, Shelley

    2003-01-01

    Fleet Battle Experiment Kilo was conducted during Seventh Fleet exercise Tandem Thrust 03. During the Field Training Exercise phase, testing of Time Sensitive Targets processes using the Joint Fires Network was carried out. This report contains results obtained on contributions made by the Joint Fires Network to Navy Time Sensitive Targeting and experiment lessons learned. NA

  10. Measuring Officer Knowledge and Experience to Enable Tailored Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    activities like cartography or obstacle emplacement. To reduce demands on memory, the scale simply asked officers to check the boxes indicating whether or...10. Deployment History (Most recent first) Date: From Date: To Iraq Afghan Other Duty Position Unit Primary Mission e.g. Jun, 2007 Jul, 2008 X...Platoon Leader Route Clearance (Continue if more deployment experience) C-3 11. Assignment History

  11. Forms of School Experience in France's Vocational Training Track Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdevielle-Mougnibas, Valérie; Courtinat-Camps, Amélie

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the existing relations between the social background, the cognitive skills, the sense of schooling experience, the relation to learning and the professional project in the construction of the meaning of their course choice for French boys living in working-class families and guided to vocational studies. It presents the…

  12. Ameliorating Intrusive Memories of Distressing Experiences Using Computerized Reappraisal Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woud, M.L.; Holmes, E.A.; Postma, P.; Dalgleish, T.; Mackintosh, B.

    2012-01-01

    The types of appraisals that follow traumatic experiences have been linked to the emergence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Could changing reappraisals following a stressful event reduce the emergence of PTSD symptoms? The present proof-of-principle study examined whether a nonexplicit, sys

  13. Psychiatry Trainees' Training and Experience in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Roy; O'Connor, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Alcohol is a teratogen. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) affect about 1% of live births, causing severe impairment. Individuals affected by FASDs are overrepresented in psychiatric settings. This study reports on the education and experience of psychiatry trainees in approaching FASDs. Method: Data were collected from…

  14. Temporal Dynamics of Recovery from Extinction Shortly after Extinction Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, Georgina E.; Dobbek, Nick; Nader, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that extinction is new learning. Memory acquisition involves both short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) components; however, few studies have examined early phases of extinction retention. Retention of auditory fear extinction was examined at various time points. Shortly (1-4 h) after extinction acquisition…

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation enhances extinction of conditioned fear and modulates plasticity in the pathway from the infralimbic prefrontal cortex to the amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Frausto Peña

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fearful experiences can produce long-lasting and debilitating memories. Extinction of the fear response requires consolidation of new memories that compete with fearful associations. Subjects with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD show impaired extinction of conditioned fear, which is associated with decreased ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC control over amygdala activity. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS enhances memory consolidation in both rats and humans, and pairing VNS with exposure to conditioned cues enhances the consolidation of extinction learning in rats. Here we investigated whether pairing VNS with extinction learning facilitates plasticity between the infralimbic (IL medial prefrontal cortex and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA. Rats were trained on an auditory fear conditioning task, which was followed by a retention test and one day of extinction training. Vagus nerve stimulation or sham-stimulation was administered concurrently with exposure to the fear-conditioned stimulus and retention of fear conditioning was tested again 24 hours later. VNS-treated rats demonstrated a significant reduction in freezing after a single extinction training session similar to animals that received 5x the number of extinction pairings. To study plasticity in the IL-BLA pathway, we recorded evoked field potentials in the BLA in anesthetized animals 24 h after retention testing. Brief burst stimulation in the IL produced LTD in the BLA field response in fear-conditioned and sham-treated animals. In contrast, the same stimulation resulted in potentiation of the IL-BLA pathway in the VNS-treated group. The present findings suggest that VNS promotes plasticity in the IL-BLA pathway to facilitate extinction of conditioned fear responses.

  16. Advanced Training of Labour Force: The Usa Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushentsev Artem

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The importance of professional development of labor force directly in the workplace has been proved. It’s revealed that this is due not only to questions of advanced training, but also to the improvement of the situation on the labor market of unskilled groups of citizen. The current labor market recognizes the value and importance of people. Along with this a key and fundamental is stability and predictability in the workplace. It is proved that in the center of each production system are people and their collective beliefs and behavior of production culture. An important point here has their adaptation to the new and conditions of work. The requirements of the labor market to the production staff in terms of different employers have been defined. It is revealed that the professional development of labor force according to labor market requirements is not isolated events, but the use of various programs (including program TWI “J”, continuous implementation of “lean tools”, vehicles, methods, ways of staff thinking.

  17. Undergraduate physiotherapy research training in south africa: the Medunsa experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Mothabeng

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Research interest has increased in physiotherapy in the past two decades. During this period, the physiotherapy department at the Medical University of Southern Africa(MEDUNSA started its degree programme. The first undergraduateresearch projects (UGRP were produced in 1985. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UGRPs conducted between 1985 and 1999 in terms of methodological trends (qualitative versus quantitative and subject content.Methods: A retrospective analysis of the 114 UGRPs carried out in the department was conducted. The projects were read and analyzed according to methodology, research context and topic categories. The 15-year period was analyzed in three 5-year phases (1985 - 1989; 1990 - 1994 and 1995 - 1999, using descriptive statistics. Results: There was a gradual increase in the number of UGRPs during the study period in keeping with the increase in student numbers, with the last five years recording the highest number of projects. An interesting finding was a decline in experimental and clinical research, which was lowest in the last five years. Conclusion: The findings are paradoxical, given the need for experimental research to validate current clinical  practice. Non-experimental qualitative research is however important in the view of the national health plan.  A balance between qualitative and quantitative research is therefore important and must be emphasized in student training. Student research projects need to be maximally utilized to improve departmental research output.

  18. Laparoscopic surgical box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Nagendran, Myura; Toon, Clare D; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a box model physical simulator is an option to supplement standard training. However, the value of this modality on trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience is unknown. To compare the benefits and harms of box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience versus standard surgical training or supplementary animal model training. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to May 2013. We planned to include all randomised clinical trials comparing box model trainers versus other forms of training including standard laparoscopic training and supplementary animal model training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of box model training. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5. For each outcome, we calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible. We identified eight trials that met the inclusion criteria. One trial including 17 surgical trainees did not contribute to the meta-analysis. We included seven trials (249 surgical trainees belonging to various postgraduate years ranging from year one to four) in which the participants were randomised to supplementary box model training (122 trainees) versus standard training (127 trainees). Only one trial (50 trainees) was at low risk of bias. The box trainers used in all the seven trials were video trainers. Six trials were

  19. Online training delivery in meteorological continued education and training: Eumetcal experiences & plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siili, Tero; Haga, Lisa; Neitiniemi-Upola, Leena

    2013-04-01

    Eumetcal is the Education and Training (E & T) project of EUMETNET - the collaboration organ­isation of European National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) - with emphasis on Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) from the project's inception in 2002. Finnish Meteorological Institute has been assigned to manage the Eumetcal project since the onset of the project's pilot phase. Participat­ing NMHSs cover most of Europe, their number exceeds 20 and the scales and scopes of their in-house E & T activities vary widely. Eumetcal also collaborates with a number of E & T organisations in Europe and worldwide. Eumetcal's target group includes the meteorological staff and E & T personnel of the participant NMHSs; the target group is hence geographically widely distributed. The subject matters covered include not only scientific and technical skills and competencies, but also other types of competen­cies relevant to NMHSs' staff. Eumetcal's goal and task is to supplement the E & T activities of the participants through collabora­tion and networking, both between project participants and with other E & T organisations. The project also utilises Information and Communications Technologies extensively in delivery of E & T events and materials: Eumetcal is a Virtual Training Organisation and emphasises online and blended E & T events. In the last five years the project has organised or contributed to at least 2-4 E & T events per year. This presentation a) gives an overview of the Eumetcal project and its place among meteorological E & T organisations in Europe and globally, as well as b) describes the E & T events the project has delivered or contributed to in the last years and plans to deliver in 2013. Emphasis will be on the online and blended events and lessons learned from designing and implementing these events and the benefits of using online training.

  20. Training experience in gestures affects the display of social gaze in baboons' communication with a human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourjade, Marie; Canteloup, Charlotte; Meguerditchian, Adrien; Vauclair, Jacques; Gaunet, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Gaze behaviour, notably the alternation of gaze between distal objects and social partners that accompanies primates' gestural communication is considered a standard indicator of intentionality. However, the developmental precursors of gaze behaviour in primates' communication are not well understood. Here, we capitalized on the training in gestures dispensed to olive baboons (Papio anubis) as a way of manipulating individual communicative experience with humans. We aimed to delineate the effects of such a training experience on gaze behaviour displayed by the monkeys in relation with gestural requests. Using a food-requesting paradigm, we compared subjects trained in requesting gestures (i.e. trained subjects) to naïve subjects (i.e. control subjects) for their occurrences of (1) gaze behaviour, (2) requesting gestures and (3) temporal combination of gaze alternation with gestures. We found that training did not affect the frequencies of looking at the human's face, looking at food or alternating gaze. Hence, social gaze behaviour occurs independently from the amount of communicative experience with humans. However, trained baboons-gesturing more than control subjects-exhibited most gaze alternation combined with gestures, whereas control baboons did not. By reinforcing the display of gaze alternation along with gestures, we suggest that training may have served to enhance the communicative function of hand gestures. Finally, this study brings the first quantitative report of monkeys producing requesting gestures without explicit training by humans (controls). These results may open a window on the developmental mechanisms (i.e. incidental learning vs. training) underpinning gestural intentional communication in primates.

  1. Context-Dependent Human Extinction Memory Is Mediated by a Ventromedial Prefrontal and Hippocampal Network

    OpenAIRE

    Kalisch, R; Korenfeld, E; Stephan, K.E.; Weiskopf, N.; Seymour, B; Dolan, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    In fear extinction, an animal learns that a conditioned stimulus (CS) no longer predicts a noxious stimulus [unconditioned stimulus (UCS)] to which it had previously been associated, leading to inhibition of the conditioned response (CR). Extinction creates a new CS-noUCS memory trace, competing with the initial fear (CS-UCS) memory. Recall of extinction memory and, hence, CR inhibition at later CS encounters is facilitated by contextual stimuli present during extinction training. In line wit...

  2. Experiences of Male Nursing Students during Clinical Training in Maternal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    川村, 千恵子; 井端, 美奈子; 田原, 町子; Kawamura, Chieko; IBATA, Minako; Tahara, Machiko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore experiences of male nursing students. Content analysis was used as the study methodology. Data were collected from questionnaires and semi-structured interviews with 5 male nursing students before and after clinical training in Maternal Nursing. Five core categories were extracted before and after the clinical training, and one category was extracted afterwards. The five categories were as follows: fear of an accident happening and disturbance in learn...

  3. Experiment and simulations of sub-ps electron bunch train generation at Fermilab photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.-E; Church, M.; /Fermilab; Piot, P.; Prokop, C.R.; /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-10-01

    Recently the generation of electron bunch trains with sub-picosecond time structure has been experimentally demonstrated at the A0 photoinjector of Fermilab using a transverse-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. The temporal profile of the bunch train can be easily tuned to meet the requirements of the applications of modern accelerator beams. In this paper we report the A0 bunch-train experiment and explore numerically the possible extension of this technique to shorter time scales at the Fermilab SRF Accelerator Test Facility, a superconducting linear electron accelerator currently under construction in the NML building.

  4. Experience of automation failures in training: effects on trust, automation bias, complacency and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen; Chavaillaz, Alain; Wastell, David

    2016-06-01

    This work examined the effects of operators' exposure to various types of automation failures in training. Forty-five participants were trained for 3.5 h on a simulated process control environment. During training, participants either experienced a fully reliable, automatic fault repair facility (i.e. faults detected and correctly diagnosed), a misdiagnosis-prone one (i.e. faults detected but not correctly diagnosed) or a miss-prone one (i.e. faults not detected). One week after training, participants were tested for 3 h, experiencing two types of automation failures (misdiagnosis, miss). The results showed that automation bias was very high when operators trained on miss-prone automation encountered a failure of the diagnostic system. Operator errors resulting from automation bias were much higher when automation misdiagnosed a fault than when it missed one. Differences in trust levels that were instilled by the different training experiences disappeared during the testing session. Practitioner Summary: The experience of automation failures during training has some consequences. A greater potential for operator errors may be expected when an automatic system failed to diagnose a fault than when it failed to detect one.

  5. Increasing the persistence of a heterogeneous behavior chain: Studies of extinction in a rat model of search behavior of working dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Kacelnik, Alex; Porritt, Fay; Bouton, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    Dogs trained to search for contraband perform a chain of behavior in which they first search for a target and then make a separate response that indicates to the trainer that they have found one. The dogs often conduct multiple searches without encountering a target and receiving the reinforcer (i.e., no contraband is present). Understanding extinction (i.e., the decline in work rate when reinforcers are no longer encountered) may assist in training dogs to work in conditions where targets are rare. We therefore trained rats on a search-target behavior chain modeled on the search behavior of working dogs. A discriminative stimulus signaled that a search response (e.g., chain pull) led to a second stimulus that set the occasion for a target response (e.g., lever press) that was reinforced by a food pellet. In Experiment 1 training with longer search durations and intermittent (partial) reinforcement of searching (i.e. some trials had no target present) both led to more persistent search responding in extinction. The loss of search behavior in extinction was primarily dependent on the number of non-reinforced searches rather than time searching without reinforcement. In Experiments 2 and 3, delivery of non-contingent reinforcers during extinction increased search persistence provided they had also been presented during training. Thus, results with rats suggest that the persistence of working dog performance (or chained behavior generally) may be improved by training with partial reinforcement of searching and non-contingent reinforcement during both training and work (extinction).

  6. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  7. The influence of vocal training and acting experience on measures of voice quality and emotional genuineness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Robert Livingstone

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vocal training through singing and acting lessons is known to modify acoustic parameters of the voice. While the effects of singing training have been well documented, the role of acting experience on the singing voice remains unclear. In two experiments, we used linear mixed models to examine the relationships between the relative amounts of acting and singing experience on the acoustics and perception of the male singing voice. In Experiment 1, twelve male vocalists were recorded while singing with five different emotions, each with two intensities. Acoustic measures of pitch accuracy, jitter, and harmonics-to-noise (HNR ratio were examined. Decreased pitch accuracy and increased jitter, indicative of a lower ‘voice quality’, were associated with more years of acting experience, while increased pitch accuracy was associated with more years of singing lessons. We hypothesized that the acoustic deviations exhibited by more experienced actors was an intentional technique to increase the genuineness or truthfulness of their emotional expressions. In Experiment 2, listeners rated vocalists’ emotional genuineness. Vocalists with more years of acting experience were rated as more genuine than vocalists with less acting experience. No relationship was reported for singing training. Increased genuineness was associated with decreased pitch accuracy, increased jitter, and a higher harmonics-to-noise ratio. These effects may represent a shifting of priorities by male vocalists with acting experience to emphasize emotional genuineness over pitch accuracy or voice quality in their singing performances.

  8. Partial reinforcement effects on learning and extinction of place preferences in the water maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, José; Sansa, Joan; Artigas, Antonio A

    2008-11-01

    In two experiments, two groups of rats were trained in a navigation task according to either a continuous or a partial schedule of reinforcement. In Experiment 1, animals that were given continuous reinforcement extinguished the spatial response of approaching the goal location more readily than animals given partial reinforcement-a partial reinforcement extinction effect. In Experiment 2, after partially or continuously reinforced training, animals were trained in a new task that made use of the same reinforcer according to a continuous reinforcement schedule. Animals initially given partial reinforcement performed better in the novel task than did rats initially given continuous reinforcement. These results replicate, in the spatial domain, well-known partial reinforcement phenomena typically observed in the context of Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning, suggesting that similar principles govern spatial and associative learning. The results reported support the notion that salience modulation processes play a key role in determining partial reinforcement effects.

  9. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  10. Impact of Life History on Fear Memory and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Remmes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral profiles are strongly shaped by an individual’s whole life experience. The accumulation of negative experiences over lifetime is thought to promote anxiety-like behavior in adulthood (‘allostatic load hypothesis’. In contrast, the ‘mismatch hypothesis’ of psychiatric disease suggests that high levels of anxiety-like behavior are the result of a discrepancy between early and late environment. The aim of the present study was to investigate how different life histories shape the expression of anxiety-like behavior and modulate fear memory. In addition, we aimed to clarify which of the two hypotheses can better explain the modulation of anxiety and fear. For this purpose, male mice grew up under either adverse or beneficial conditions during early phase of life. In adulthood they were further subdivided in groups that either matched or mismatched the condition experienced before, resulting in four different life histories. The main results were: (i Early life benefit followed by late life adversity caused decreased levels of anxiety-like behavior. (ii Accumulation of adversity throughout life history led to impaired fear extinction learning. Late life adversity as compared to late life benefit mainly affected extinction training, while early life adversity as compared to early life benefit interfered with extinction recall. Concerning anxiety-like behavior, the results do neither support the allostatic load nor the mismatch hypothesis, but rather indicate an anxiolytic effect of a mismatched early beneficial and later adverse life history. In contrast, fear memory was strongly affected by the accumulation of adverse experiences over the lifetime, therefore supporting allostatic load hypothesis. In summary, this study highlights that anxiety-like behavior and fear memory are differently affected by specific combinations of adverse or beneficial events experienced throughout life.

  11. Experiences from tsunami relief activity: implications for medical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharsanam Manni Balasubramaniam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A tsunami struck the coast of Tamilnadu and Pondicherry on 26 December 2004. Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, (JIPMER in Pondicherry played a vital role in providing medical relief. The experiences from the relief activities revealed areas of deficiency in medical education in regards to disaster preparedness. A qualitative study using focus group discussion was employed to find the lacunae in skills in managing medical relief measures. Many skills were identified; the most important of which was addressing the psychological impact of the tsunami on the victims. Limited coordination and leadership skills were also identified. It is recommended that activity-based learning can be included in the curriculum to improve these skills.

  12. Sensory cortical population dynamics uniquely track behavior across learning and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anan; Katz, Donald B

    2014-01-22

    Neural responses in many cortical regions encode information relevant to behavior: information that necessarily changes as that behavior changes with learning. Although such responses are reasonably theorized to be related to behavior causation, the true nature of that relationship cannot be clarified by simple learning studies, which show primarily that responses change with experience. Neural activity that truly tracks behavior (as opposed to simply changing with experience) will not only change with learning but also change back when that learning is extinguished. Here, we directly probed for this pattern, recording the activity of ensembles of gustatory cortical single neurons as rats that normally consumed sucrose avidly were trained first to reject it (i.e., conditioned taste aversion learning) and then to enjoy it again (i.e., extinction), all within 49 h. Both learning and extinction altered cortical responses, consistent with the suggestion (based on indirect evidence) that extinction is a novel form of learning. But despite the fact that, as expected, postextinction single-neuron responses did not resemble "naive responses," ensemble response dynamics changed with learning and reverted with extinction: both the speed of stimulus processing and the relationships among ensemble responses to the different stimuli tracked behavioral relevance. These data suggest that population coding is linked to behavior with a fidelity that single-neuron coding is not.

  13. Exploring the experience of residents during the first six months of family medicine residency training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dawn; Nasmith, Louise; Takahashi, Susan Glover; Harvey, Bart J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The shift from undergraduate to postgraduate education signals a new phase in a doctor’s training. This study explored the resident’s perspective of how the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate (PGME) training is experienced in a Family Medicine program as they first meet the reality of feeling and having the responsibility as a doctor. Methods Qualitative methods explored resident experiences using interpretative inquiry through monthly, individual in-depth interviews with five incoming residents during the first six months of training. Focus groups were also held with residents at various stages of training to gather their reflection about their experience of the first six months. Residents were asked to describe their initial concerns, changes that occurred and the influences they attributed to those changes. Results Residents do not begin a Family Medicine PGME program knowing what it means to be a Family Physician, but learn what it means to fulfill this role. This process involves adjusting to significant shifts in responsibility in the areas of Knowledge, Practice Management, and Relationships as they become more responsible for care outcomes. Conclusion This study illuminated the resident perspective of how the transition is experienced. This will assist medical educators to better understand the early training experiences of residents, how these experiences contribute to consolidating their new professional identity, and how to better align teaching strategies with resident learning needs. PMID:28344713

  14. Extinction of drug seeking: Neural circuits and approaches to augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training can reduce drug seeking behavior. This article reviews the neural circuits that contribute to extinction and approaches to enhancing the efficacy of extinction. Extinction of drug seeking depends on cortical-striatal-hypothalamic and cortical-hypothalamic-thalamic pathways. These pathways interface, in the hypothalamus and thalamus respectively, with the neural circuits controlling reinstatement of drug seeking. The actions of these pathways at lateral hypothalamic orexin neurons, and of perifornical/dorsomedial hypothalamic derived opioid peptides at kappa opioid receptors in the paraventricular thalamus, are important for inhibiting drug seeking. Despite effectively reducing or inhibiting drug seeking in the short term, extinguished drug seeking is prone to relapse. Three different strategies to augment extinction learning or retrieval are reviewed: pharmacological augmentation, retrieval - extinction training, and provision of extinction memory retrieval cues. These strategies have been used in animal models and with human drug users to enhance extinction or cue exposure treatments. They hold promise as novel strategies to promote abstinence from drug seeking. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  15. Course and predictors of posttraumatic stress among male train drivers after the experience of 'person under the train' incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Anja; Nanninga, Imke; Fauth, Mathias; Schäfer, Ingo

    2012-09-01

    The present prospective study aimed to identify the frequency and course of posttraumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, depression, and quality of life in train drivers after the experience of 'person under the train' incidents. Furthermore, associations between predictors of posttraumatic stress stratified by pre-, peri- and posttraumatic factors, psychological distress, quality of life (QoL), sense of coherence, lack of meaning in life, and post-trauma thoughts are analyzed. Patients (100% male, mean age 48 years) were assessed at the beginning (n=73), at the end (n=71) and six months (n=49) after a four-week rehabilitation program and completed validated self-report questionnaires (e.g. Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Short-Form Health Survey). Train drivers experienced averagely 1.8 'person under the train' incidents (range 1-8); the majority (81%) was involved in a railway suicide. At the beginning of the rehabilitation, 44% of the patients were classified as having moderate to severe PTSD, and 14% as having severe PTSD. Posttraumatic stress decreased significantly over time (p=.003, η²=.17). We found no significant differences in the course of posttraumatic stress, anxiety, depression, distress and QoL between patients who experienced one or more than one railway related accident or suicide. Anxiety, sense of guilt and sense of alienation emerged as the most important factors in predicting posttraumatic stress six months after rehabilitation (R²=0.55). Findings emphasize the importance of rehabilitation programs for train drivers after railway-related incidents. However, research is needed to develop effective rehabilitation interventions particularly tailored to this patient group. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The transition from memory retrieval to extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cammarota Martín

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory is measured by measuring retrieval. Retrieval is often triggered by the conditioned stimulus (CS; however, as known since Pavlov, presentation of the CS alone generates extinction. One-trial avoidance (IA is a much used conditioned fear paradigm in which the CS is the safe part of a training apparatus, the unconditioned stimulus (US is a footshock and the conditioned response is to stay in the safe area. In IA, retrieval is measured without the US, as latency to step-down from the safe area (i.e., a platform. Extinction is installed at the moment of the first unreinforced test session, as clearly shown by the fact that many drugs, including PKA, ERK and protein synthesis inhibitors as well as NMDA receptor antagonists, hinder extinction when infused into the hippocampus or the basolateral amygdala at the moment of the first test session but not later. Some, but not all the molecular systems required for extinction are also activated by retrieval, further endorsing the hypothesis that although retrieval is behaviorally and biochemically necessary for the generation of extinction, this last process constitutes a new learning secondary to the unreinforced expression of the original trace.

  17. The Lived Experience and Training Needs of Librarians Serving at the Clinical Point-of-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Jennifer A; Kuntz, Gretchen M; Edwards, Mary E; Butson, Linda C; Auten, Beth

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the emotional experiences and perceptions of librarians embedded into clinical care teams and how those perceptions affect their training and preparation needs. Qualitative research methodologies were applied to textual data drawn from focus groups (n = 21), interviews (n = 2), and an online survey (n = 167), supplemented by quantitative survey data. Phenomenological results show librarians experience strongly affective responses to clinical rounding. Important factors include personal confidence; relationships with team members, patients, and families; and the stressful environment. Analysis of librarians' perceived educational needs indicates that training must address specialized subjects including medical knowledge, clinical culture, and institutional politics.

  18. Effect of Experience and Training on the Concordance and Precision of Strain Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Tomoko; Negishi, Kazuaki; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Popescu, Bogdan A; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kurosawa, Koji; Penicka, Martin; Marwick, Thomas H

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to show the degree to which experience and training affect the precision and validity of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measurement and to evaluate the variability of strain measurement after feedback. The application of GLS for the detection of subclinical dysfunction has been recommended in an expert consensus document and is being used with increasing frequency. The role of experience in the precision and validity of GLS measurement is unknown, as is the efficacy of training. Fifty-eight readers, divided into 4 groups on the basis of their experience with GLS, calculated GLS from speckle strain analysis of 9 cases with various degrees of image quality. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), mean difference, SD, and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared against the measurements of a reference group that had experience with >1,000 cases of strain measurement. Individualized feedback was distributed, and repeat measurements were performed by 40 readers. Comparisons with the baseline variation provided information about whether feedback was effective. The ICC for GLS was significantly greater than that for ejection fraction regardless of image quality. Experience with strain measurement affected the concordance in strain values among the readers; the group with the highest level of experience showed significantly better ICC than those with no experience, although the ICC of the inexperienced readers was still very good (0.996 vs. 0.975; p = 0.0002). As experience increased, the mean difference, SD, and CV became significantly smaller. The CV of segmental strain analysis showed significant improvement after training, regardless of experience. The favorable interobserver agreement of GLS makes it more attractive than ejection fraction for follow-up of left ventricular function by multiple observers. Although experience is important, the precision of GLS was high for all groups. Training appears to be of most value for the assessment of

  19. CERN's Technician Training Experience notches up another success!

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanie Hills

    2015-01-01

    The programme was set up almost three years ago to help address a Europe-wide shortage of highly skilled technicians, with the participants gaining valuable skills and experience in an international environment. It’s clear that the programme works: some of the technician fellows who have taken part are being snapped up by major science projects and the high-tech industry.   Going underground: Fay Chicken at work in ATLAS. Fay Chicken (see UK news from CERN 59) has just accepted a job offer from the European Spallation Source in Sweden, where she will be working in the detector development team: “I’m also going to be setting up a new workshop where prototype detectors will be built. When I went to Lund, I was shown a big, empty room – it’s up to me to equip it!” This level of responsibility is a big step up for Fay, but there is no doubt that her time at CERN has both built her confidence to take on the role, and convinced ESS th...

  20. The teacher training process through distance education: a pioneer experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Massaru Fujita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents briefly the actions conducted in the formation process and established partnerships to achieve the pioneering educational process of Distance Education (DE courses of the State University of Londrina (UEL-PR. The methodological design was developed according to the Qualitative Approach of Action-Research type that prioritizes the development and analysis of the process along with the "meaning" that people give to things and your life than actually the product itself. The data collected through questionnaires at the end of the course signal impressions (positive and constructive criticism we received and the meanings experienced teacher students (testimonials, chats, discussion forums, projects in the courses offered. The experience lived in these three courses: Virtual Learning Environment (60 hours; Tutoring in distance education (60 hours and Teaching Materials in Distance Education (60 hours, from its conception to its actual conclusion, make us think that we are on the right way and by TDIC, new horizons may open up to the institution in short- and medium-term.

  1. Fear extinction can be made state-dependent on peripheral epinephrine: role of norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Jessica; Myskiw, Jociane C; Furini, Cristiane R G; Sapiras, Gerson G; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    We investigate whether the extinction of inhibitory avoidance (IA) learning can be subjected to endogenous state-dependence with systemic injections of epinephrine (E), and whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) and the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS)→locus coeruleus→hippocampus/amygdala (HIPP/BLA) pathway participate in this. Rats trained in IA were submitted to two sessions of extinction 24 h apart: In the first, the animals were submitted to a training session of extinction, and in the second they were tested for the retention of extinction. Saline or E were given i.p. immediately after the extinction training (post-extinction training injections) and/or 6 min before the extinction test (pre-extinction test). Post-extinction training E (50 or 100 μg/kg) induced a poor retrieval of extinction in the test session of this task unless an additional E injection (50 μg/kg) was given prior to the extinction test. This suggested state-dependence. Muscimol (0.01 μg/side) microinfused into the NTS prior to the extinction test session blocked E-induced state-dependence. Norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg/side) infused bilaterally into NTS restores the extinction impairment caused by post-extinction training i.p. E. In animals with bilateral NTS blockade induced by muscimol, NE (1 μg/side) given prior to the extinction test into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or into the basolateral amygdala restored the normal extinction levels that had been impaired by muscimol. These results suggest a role for the NTS→locus coeruleus→HIPP/BLA pathway in the retrieval of extinction, as it has been shown to have in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance and of object recognition learning.

  2. 42 CFR 21.51 - Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or experience in administration and management. 21.51 Section 21.51 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... Appointment of officers having specialized training or experience in administration and management. The... specialized training or experience in administration and management relating to the functions of the...

  3. Hybridization and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, Marco; Pascual, Mariana A; Owens, Gregory L; Ostevik, Katherine L; Moyers, Brook T; Hübner, Sariel; Heredia, Sylvia M; Hahn, Min A; Caseys, Celine; Bock, Dan G; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-08-01

    Hybridization may drive rare taxa to extinction through genetic swamping, where the rare form is replaced by hybrids, or by demographic swamping, where population growth rates are reduced due to the wasteful production of maladaptive hybrids. Conversely, hybridization may rescue the viability of small, inbred populations. Understanding the factors that contribute to destructive versus constructive outcomes of hybridization is key to managing conservation concerns. Here, we survey the literature for studies of hybridization and extinction to identify the ecological, evolutionary, and genetic factors that critically affect extinction risk through hybridization. We find that while extinction risk is highly situation dependent, genetic swamping is much more frequent than demographic swamping. In addition, human involvement is associated with increased risk and high reproductive isolation with reduced risk. Although climate change is predicted to increase the risk of hybridization-induced extinction, we find little empirical support for this prediction. Similarly, theoretical and experimental studies imply that genetic rescue through hybridization may be equally or more probable than demographic swamping, but our literature survey failed to support this claim. We conclude that halting the introduction of hybridization-prone exotics and restoring mature and diverse habitats that are resistant to hybrid establishment should be management priorities.

  4. The Promises and Pitfalls of Retrieval-Extinction Procedures in Preventing Relapse to Drug Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, Gavan P.; Kathryn Elizabeth Hutton-Bedbrook

    2013-01-01

    Relapse to drug seeking after treatment or a period of abstinence remains a fundamental challenge for drug users. The retrieval – extinction procedure offers promise in augmenting the efficacy of exposure based treatment for drug use and for protecting against relapse to drug seeking. Preceding extinction training with a brief retrieval or reminder trial, retrieval – extinction training, has been shown to reduce reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking in animal models and also to produce p...

  5. Cocaine self-administration alters the relative effectiveness of multiple memory systems during extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele, Amanda; Setlow, Barry; Packard, Mark G.

    2009-01-01

    Rats were trained to run a straight-alley maze for an oral cocaine or sucrose vehicle solution reward, followed by either response or latent extinction training procedures that engage neuroanatomically dissociable “habit” and “cognitive” memory systems, respectively. In the response extinction condition, rats performed a runway approach response to an empty fluid well. In the latent extinction condition, rats were placed at the empty fluid well without performing a runway approach response. R...

  6. The Effect of Assertiveness Training on the Mobbing That Nurses Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Sibel Asi; Okanli, Ayşe

    2015-10-01

    This research was designed to determine the impact of assertiveness training on the mobbing experience of nurses. This study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, 218 nurses completed the mobbing scale; the education group consisted of 38 nurses who received a score at or above 204 points. A total of 180 nurses were excluded from the education group because they received less than 204 points. The study was conducted with 30 nurses because 8 nurses did not agree to participate in the study. The 30 nurses received the assertiveness training program. Six months after training, the nurses completed the mobbing scale and Rathus Assertiveness Inventory (RAI) again. The assertiveness training positively affected the assertiveness and mobbing scores (p = .000). After the training, the assertiveness scores increased and the mobbing condition score decreased (p Assertiveness training is an effective method for decreasing mobbing. In line with these results, training programs, which support nurses' personal development by providing counseling and support to nurse victims of mobbing, are recommended. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Recruitment and training for home hemodialysis: experience and lessons from the Nocturnal Dialysis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkin, Mary; Eggers, Paul W; Larive, Brett; Rocco, Michael V; Stokes, John B; Suri, Rita S; Lockridge, Robert S

    2010-09-01

    We assessed perceived barriers and incentives to home hemodialysis and evaluated potential correlates with the duration of home hemodialysis training. Surveys were sent to the principal investigator and study coordinator for each clinical center in the Frequent Hemodialysis Network Nocturnal Trial. Baseline data were obtained on medical comorbidities, cognitive and physical functioning, sessions required for home hemodialysis training, and costs of home renovations. The most commonly perceived barriers included lack of patient motivation, unwillingness to change from in-center modality, and fear of self-cannulation. The most common incentives were greater scheduling flexibility and reduced travel time. The median costs for home renovations varied between $1191 and $4018. The mean number of home hemodialysis training sessions was 27.7 +/- 10.4 (11-59 days). Average training time was less for patients with experience in either self-care or both self-care and cannulation. The number of training sessions was unrelated to the score on the Modified Mini Mental Status or Trailmaking B tests or patient's education level. Training time also did not correlate with the SF-36 Physical Function subscale but did with the modified Charlson comorbidity score and older patient age. Lack of patient or family motivation and fear of the dialysis process are surmountable barriers for accepting home hemodialysis as a modality for renal replacement therapy. Formal education and scores on cognitive function tests are not predictors of training time.

  8. Extinction of chained instrumental behaviors: Effects of consumption extinction on procurement responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Bouton, Mark E

    2016-03-01

    Operant behavior is typically organized into sequences of responses that eventually lead to a reinforcer. Response elements can be categorized as those that directly lead to reward consumption (i.e., a consumption response) and those that lead to the opportunity to make the consumption response (i.e., a procurement response). These responses often differ topographically and in terms of the discriminative stimuli that set the occasion for them. We have recently shown that extinction of the procurement response acts to weaken the specific associated consumption response, and that active inhibition of the procurement response is required for this effect. To expand the analysis of the associative structure of chains, in the present experiments we asked the reverse question: whether extinction of consumption behavior results in a decrease in the associated procurement response in a discriminated heterogeneous chain. In Experiment 1, extinction of consumption alone led to an attenuation of the associated procurement response only when rats were allowed to make the consumption response in extinction. Exposure to the consumption stimulus alone was not sufficient to produce weakened procurement responding. In Experiment 2, rats learned two distinct heterogeneous chains, and extinction of one consumption response specifically weakened the procurement response associated with it. The results add to the evidence suggesting that rats learn a highly specific associative structure in behavior chains, emphasizing the role of learning response inhibition in extinction.

  9. Acute stress impairs the retrieval of extinction memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raio, Candace M; Brignoni-Perez, Edith; Goldman, Rachel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    Extinction training is a form of inhibitory learning that allows an organism to associate a previously aversive cue with a new, safe outcome. Extinction does not erase a fear association, but instead creates a competing association that may or may not be retrieved when a cue is subsequently encountered. Characterizing the conditions under which extinction learning is expressed is important to enhancing the treatment of anxiety disorders that rely on extinction-based exposure therapy as a primary treatment technique. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which plays a critical role in the expression of extinction memory, has been shown to be functionally impaired after stress exposure. Further, recent work in rodents has demonstrated that exposure to stress leads to deficits in extinction retrieval, although this has yet to be tested in humans. To explore how stress might influence extinction retrieval in humans, participants underwent a differential aversive learning paradigm, in which one image was probabilistically paired with an aversive shock while the other image denoted safety. Extinction training directly followed, at which point reinforcement was omitted. A day later, participants returned to the lab and either completed an acute stress manipulation (i.e., cold pressor), or a control task, before undergoing an extinction retrieval test. Skin conductance responses and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured throughout each session as indices of fear arousal and neuroendocrine stress response, respectively. The efficacy of our stress induction was established by observing significant increases in cortisol for the stress condition only. We examined extinction retrieval by comparing conditioned responses during the last trial of extinction (day 1) with that of the first trial of re-extinction (day 2). Groups did not differ on initial fear acquisition or extinction, however, a day later participants in the stress group (n=27) demonstrated significantly

  10. Cocaine Self-Administration Alters the Relative Effectiveness of Multiple Memory Systems during Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Amanda; Setlow, Barry; Packard, Mark G.

    2009-01-01

    Rats were trained to run a straight-alley maze for an oral cocaine or sucrose vehicle solution reward, followed by either response or latent extinction training procedures that engage neuroanatomically dissociable "habit" and "cognitive" memory systems, respectively. In the response extinction condition, rats performed a runway approach response…

  11. D-Cycloserine Enhances Memory Consolidation of Hippocampus-Dependent Latent Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Amanda; Packard, Mark G.

    2007-01-01

    Adult male Long-Evans rats were trained to run in a straight-alley maze for food reward and subsequently received hippocampus-dependent latent extinction training. Immediately following latent extinction, rats received peripheral injections of the NMDA receptor partial agonist D-cycloserine (DCS, 15 mg/kg), or saline. Twenty-four hours later, rats…

  12. 41-D crewmembers Resnik and Walker prepare experiments in training for flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Judith A. Resnik, mission specialist, and Charles D. Walker, payload specialist for 41-D, prepare for some scheduled intravehicular activity involving the continuous flow electrophoresis systems (CFES) experiment. In the background are stowage lockers and a CFES trainer - part of the shuttle one-G trainer at JSC (35755,35757); Resnik works with a sample connected to the CFE experiment during training session (35756,35758).

  13. Combination of fluoxetine and extinction treatments forms a unique synaptic protein profile that correlates with long-term fear reduction in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Dina; Ágústsdóttir, Arna; Lindholm, Jesse; Mazulis, Ulams; Akamine, Yumiko; Castrén, Eero; Karpova, Nina N

    2014-07-01

    The antidepressant fluoxetine induces synaptic plasticity in the visual and fear networks and promotes the structural remodeling of neuronal circuits, which is critical for experience-dependent plasticity in response to an environmental stimulus. We recently demonstrated that chronic fluoxetine administration together with extinction training in adult mice reduced fear in a context-independent manner. Fear conditioning and extinction alter excitatory and inhibitory transmissions within the fear circuitry. In this study, we investigated whether fluoxetine, extinction or their combination produced distinct long-lasting changes in the synaptic protein profile in the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of conditioned mice. We determined that extinction induced synaptophysin expression and down-regulated the GluA1:GluA2 ratio throughout the fear network in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, suggesting a common fluoxetine-independent mechanism for increased synaptic transmission and re-arrangement of AMPA-receptors by extinction training. In contrast to common changes, the presynaptic vesicular neurotransmitter transporters VGAT and Vglut1 were upregulated after extinction in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, respectively. The cortical levels of the GABA transporter Gat1 were reduced in high-freezing water-drinking mice, suggesting a maladaptive increase of GABA spillover at cortical inhibitory synapses. Fear conditioning decreased, and extinction induced the expression of GABA-receptor alpha1 and alpha2 subunits in water- and fluoxetine-treated mice, respectively. Only a combination of fluoxetine with extinction enhanced GluN2A expression in the amygdala and hippocampus, emphasizing the role of this NMDA-receptor subunit in the successful erasure of fear memories. Our finding provides novel data that may become helpful in developing beneficial pharmacological fear-reducing treatment strategies.

  14. Ecological model of extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, G

    1997-01-01

    We present numerical results based on a simplified ecological system in evolution, showing features of extinction similar to that claimed for the biosystem on Earth. In the model each species consists of a population in interaction with the others, that reproduces and evolves in time. Each species is simultaneously a predator and a prey in a food chain. Mutations that change the interactions are supposed to occur randomly at a low rate. Extinctions of populations result naturally from the predator-prey dynamics. The model is not pinned in a fitness variable, and natural selection arises from the dynamics.

  15. Analysis of the Relationship Between Training Experience and Visual Sensory Functions in Athletes from Different Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesiakowski Piotr

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gaining insight into the mechanisms and scope of possible adaptations of visual functions to the conditions determined by the demands imposed by sports training seems to be very interesting not only from a cognitive point of view, but also with respect to the practical applications of the findings of such investigations in the training process. The aim of the study was to assess the function of early visual processing in athletes representing different sports disciplines with varying training experience. Material and methods. The study involved 95 athletes practising football (n = 24, volleyball (n = 22, boxing (n = 26, and rowing (n = 23. The bioelectric function of the visual pathway was assessed based on recordings of visual evoked potentials (VEPs. The regions which were stimulated were the peripheral and central areas of the retina. During the test, we recorded the amplitude (μV and latency (ms of the P100 component of the VEP waveform for both monocular stimulation (for the dominant and non-dominant eye and binocular stimulation. Results. Lower VEP P100 amplitude values were found for the peripheral and central locations for monocular and binocular viewing in more experienced volleyball players and rowers (p 0.05 in intragroup variability in VEP P100 latency in relation to training experience in any of the sports disciplines examined. Conclusions. Training experience has an influence on the early stage of sensory processing with respect to neural activity. Training experience has been found to differentiate athletes in terms of the temporal parameters of the visual evoked potentials recorded in the current study only to a limited extent.

  16. [How Italian midwives contribute to breastfeeding promotion: a national experience of "cascade" training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Angela; Conti, Stefania; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppina; Donati, Serena; Perra, Alberto; Grandolfo, Michele

    2006-01-01

    , promotion and support of breastfeeding. In the original course the final certification was not included; it was introduced in the present course to ensure high qualitative levels of teaching and to let the training groups better integrate with already existing training groups within the Local Health Authorities. To translate the training experience into an effective improvement of health objectives, as much as possible caregivers should be exposed to this kind of courses, from the beginning of their training. The WHO/UNICEF model proved to be a good basic model even for academic education, maybe with some additional elements aimed at the specific professionals. At present about half of the courses for midwives throughout Italy employ at least one teacher who is also in charge of the WHO/UNICEF course.

  17. The Influence of Training and Experience on Rater Performance in Scoring Spoken Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Two factors were investigated that are thought to contribute to consistency in rater scoring judgments: rater training and experience in scoring. Also considered were the relative effects of scoring rubrics and exemplars on rater performance. Experienced teachers of English (N = 20) scored recorded responses from the TOEFL iBT speaking test prior…

  18. Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104): Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Berwyn; Meyers, Dave; Bateman, Andrea; Bluer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This document supports the report "Practitioner Expectations and Experiences with the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAA40104)". The first section outlines the methodology used to undertake the research and covers the design of the research, sample details, data collection processes and the strategy for data analysis and…

  19. Making Space for Racial Dialogue: Our Experience in a Marriage and Family Therapy Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Teresa; Fang, Shi-Ruei; Young, Cecilia Gomez; Khanna, Anchal; Sherman, Brooke; Brownlee, Kenya

    2003-01-01

    Marriage and family therapy (MFT) training programs need to create opportunities for all students to develop cultural competency by raising their racial awareness and sensitivity. Likewise, therapists of color need to be offered space in MFT programs to voice their experiences and venues for their voices to be heard. This article reports on the…

  20. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  1. Microteaching Experience in Distance English Language Teacher Training: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merc, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this single-subject case study was to document the experiences of a teacher trainee during a 12-week microteaching process in the Distance English Language Teacher Training program (DELT). The student teacher subject responded to questionnaires, submitted online dialogue journals, and answered open-ended questions before and after…

  2. The Experience of Counselors in Training and Their Primary Partners through Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    The journey to becoming a counselor affords many opportunities for personal growth and change. It is a journey that will be experienced not only by the enrolled student but by their primary partner as well. This phenomenological study explored these experiences from the viewpoint of both the counselor in training and their non-student spouse. Four…

  3. The Impact of Professional Development Training in Autism and Experience on Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasotti, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Regular education teachers' self-efficacy may be negatively impacted due to a lack of professional development and experience teaching students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Research links teacher self-efficacy with increased student academic achievement. The purpose of this study was to examine to what degree training on ASD during and…

  4. The Influence of Training and Experience on Rater Performance in Scoring Spoken Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Two factors were investigated that are thought to contribute to consistency in rater scoring judgments: rater training and experience in scoring. Also considered were the relative effects of scoring rubrics and exemplars on rater performance. Experienced teachers of English (N = 20) scored recorded responses from the TOEFL iBT speaking test prior…

  5. The Effects of Leadership Training and Experience: A Contingency Model Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Fred E.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes recent studies based on the contingency model of leadership effectiveness, which suggest why research has failed to show that leadership training and experience increase organizational performance. The contingency model postulated that group performance depends on the match between situational favorableness, i.e., the leader's control…

  6. Professional Training in Organic Food Production: A Cross-Country Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiné, Raquel; Costa, Daniela; Correia, Paula; Costa, Cristina; Correia, Helena; Castro, Moises; Guerra, Luis; Seeds, Catherine; Coll, Collette; Radics, Laszlo; Arslan, Meahmet; Soylu, Soner; Tothova, Monika; Toth, Peter; Basile, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to characterize the agricultural activities and past experiences in professional training in the context of mobile learning in different countries (Portugal, Spain, Slovakia, Hungary, UK, Italy and Turkey). Design/methodology/approach: For the survey, a questionnaire was prepared in English and Portuguese and…

  7. University Teacher Competencies in a Virtual Teaching/Learning Environment: Analysis of a Teacher Training Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis; Espasa, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to shed light on the competencies a university teacher must have in order to teach in virtual learning environments. A teacher training experience was designed by taking into account the methodological criteria established in line with previous theoretical principles. The main objective of our analysis was to identify the…

  8. Whether Experience and Training of Teachers Affect Their Attitude towards Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahanowas, S. K.; Halder, Santoshi

    2016-01-01

    Teaching experience and training of the teachers are important variables for teaching and evaluating effectively having an immense impact to their inclination, attitude and perfection. West Bengal Board of Secondary Education (W.B.B.S.E), India, has taken the initiative to implement Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation system up to class VIII…

  9. Innovative Training in Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, and Child Psychiatry: Background, Outcomes, and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Mary Margaret; Fritz, Gregory K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors describe the history, rationale, and outcomes of combined training programs in pediatrics, psychiatry, and child psychiatry ("triple board"), including narrative feedback from graduates and reflections upon the important components of the program. Methods: This article reviews the background and experiences of triple board…

  10. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  11. Long-term intended and unintended experiences after Advanced Life Support training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M.B.; Dieckmann, Peter; Issenberg, Berry

    2012-01-01

    Highly structured simulation-based training (SBT) on managing emergency situations can have a significant effect on immediate satisfaction and learning. However, there are some indications of problems when applying learned skills to practice. The aim of this study was to identify long-term intend...... and unintended learner reactions, experiences and reflections after attending a simulation based Advanced Life Support (ALS) course....

  12. Evaluating the Relationship of Computer Literacy Training Competence and Nursing Experience to CPIS Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Dorothy J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive/correlational project was to examine the relationship between the level of computer literacy, informatics training, nursing experience, and perceived competence in using computerized patient information systems (CPIS) and nursing resistance to using CPIS. The Nurse Computerized Patient Information…

  13. Turning Experience into Learning: Educational Contributions of Collaborative Peer Songwriting during Music Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity; Krout, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of 21 Australian and United States (US) tertiary/university students involved in training to become professional music therapists. The study aimed to identify the learning outcomes--musical, professional, and personal--that occurred when students participated in collaborative peer songwriting experiences. Student…

  14. Turning Experience into Learning: Educational Contributions of Collaborative Peer Songwriting during Music Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity; Krout, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of 21 Australian and United States (US) tertiary/university students involved in training to become professional music therapists. The study aimed to identify the learning outcomes--musical, professional, and personal--that occurred when students participated in collaborative peer songwriting experiences. Student…

  15. Faith, Race, and LGB Affirmation: Experiences of African American Counselors-in-Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Janeé R. Avent; Roberston, Derek L.; Jones, Brenda; Prado, Ashley M.

    2017-01-01

    In this phenomenological study, the authors investigated the experiences of African American counselors-in-training, with roots in the Black church, as they navigated their faith and professional responsibilities to provide affirming services to lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients. Findings suggest attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual…

  16. Improving the Quality of Experience Journals: Training Educational Psychology Students in Basic Qualitative Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Keefer, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of teaching basic qualitative methodology to preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course in the quality of observation journals. Preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course requiring 45 hr of field experience were given qualitative methodological training as a part of the…

  17. International Counseling Trainees' Experiences and Perceptions of Their Multicultural Counseling Training in the United States: A Mixed Method Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon D.; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2009-01-01

    This study examined international counseling students' (ICTs) experiences and perceptions of their multicultural counseling training (MCT) in the United States. The focus was on (a) relevance of the training, (b) effectiveness of the training methods, and (c) development of cross-cultural competence as trainees. Major findings indicated that ICTs…

  18. A national evaluation of workplace-based assessment tools (WPBAs) in foundation dental training: a UK study. Effective and useful but do they provide an equitable training experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirton, J A; Palmer, N O A; Grieveson, B; Balmer, M C

    2013-03-01

    A questionnaire study was undertaken with trainers and trainees from 12 deaneries in England and Northern Ireland in June 2010 to evaluate workplace-based assessments (WPBAs) in foundation training. From the sample consisting of 741 trainers and 643 foundation trainees, experience of WPBAs was positive overall, playing an important role in trainees' learning during foundation training and building confidence. However, there is a need for comprehensive training in the WPBA tools used to ensure their efficacy.

  19. Social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Kaori; Kiyokawa, Yasushi; Takeuchi, Yukari; Mori, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    In social species, the phenomenon in which the presence of conspecific animals mitigates stress responses is called social buffering. We previously reported that social buffering in male rats ameliorated behavioral fear responses, as well as hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation, elicited by an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). However, after social buffering, it is not clear whether rats exhibit fear responses when they are re-exposed to the same CS in the absence of another rat. In the present study, we addressed this issue using an experimental model of extinction. High stress levels during extinction training impaired extinction, suggesting that extinction is enhanced when stress levels during extinction training are low. Therefore, we hypothesized that rats that had received social buffering during extinction training would not show fear responses to a CS, even in the absence of another rat, because social buffering had enhanced the extinction of conditioned fear responses. To test this, we subjected male fear-conditioned rats to extinction training either alone or with a non-conditioned male rat. The subjects were then individually re-exposed to the CS in a recall test. When the subjects individually underwent extinction training, no responses were suppressed in the recall test. Conversely, when the subjects received social buffering during extinction training, freezing and Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and lateral amygdala were suppressed. Additionally, the effects of social buffering were absent when the recall test was conducted in a different context from the extinction training. The present results suggest that social buffering enhances extinction of conditioned fear responses.

  20. Can training improve the quality of inferences made by raters in competency modeling? A quasi-experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Filip; Sanchez, Juan I

    2007-05-01

    A quasi-experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of frame-of-reference training on the quality of competency modeling ratings made by consultants. Human resources consultants from a large consulting firm were randomly assigned to either a training or a control condition. The discriminant validity, interrater reliability, and accuracy of the competency ratings were significantly higher in the training group than in the control group. Further, the discriminant validity and interrater reliability of competency inferences were highest among an additional group of trained consultants who also had competency modeling experience. Together, these results suggest that procedural interventions such as rater training can significantly enhance the quality of competency modeling.

  1. Iranian parents' experiences about children sexual training: Control, restriction and education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboubeh Sharifi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sexual training is one of the most important and sensitive aspects of upbringing of children, to which little attention is paid for some reasons, such as shame, pudency, and being a taboo subject in some societies. Parents also do not have sufficient knowledge and insight into this context, and by gaining knowledge from invalid sources, maybe they cannot play this important educational role. This study has dealt with exploring parents' experiences about children sexual training, through a qualitative approach. This study was designed as a qualitative content analysis method. Thirty seven qualified parents were selected using a purposeful sampling method. Data collection was performed by holding 6 focus group discussions (FGDs and 5 individual interviews. FGDs and individual interviews were written and data analysis was performed using a conventional content analysis. Analyzing participants` experiences in the sexual training of children, led to the emergence of three main categories; control and punishment of the child, restricting the child and trying to educate the child, as parenting strategies. The parents adopted several strategies for the sexual training of their children, most of them associated with control and restriction and some of which could have led to subsequent injuries. They had not received any education in this area and experienced frequent worry, doubt, and wandering during their children sexual training. Hence it seems necessary to provide valid educational resources according to the cultural and religious teachings, create opportunities to educate parents,and respond to their problems.

  2. Implementing school health promotion in Austria: experiences from a pilot training course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschberger, Edith; Nitsch, Martina; Waldherr, Karin

    2012-05-01

    A pilot training course on school health promotion in Austria focused on supporting teachers and school heads during the implementation of the health-promoting school (HPS) concept. The participants talked about their experiences during the implementation phase in focus groups held in a feedback seminar at the end of the training course. The focus groups were analyzed by using an inductive approach. A coding method for thematic analysis was applied. Compatibility of the training course with the school setting was examined and supporting and hindering structures and processes pertaining to the schools and the training course are described. The results can be displayed in a model showing connections between the themes. Internal and external collaboration structures were identified as central aspects in the implementation phase. Particularly collaboration within the faculty is shown to be of importance when implementing the HPS approach. Voluntary cooperation especially of teachers, which is often connected with work in their spare time, is another aspect influencing the sustainability and therefore also the compatibility of the training course with the school setting. For future designs of teacher training courses in health promotion, the aspects of collaboration, teamwork, and collective commitment have to be taken into consideration.

  3. Field experiment of subgrade vibration induced by passing train in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xianzhang; Zhang Feng; Zhu Zhanyuan; Ding Lin; Hu Qinli

    2009-01-01

    The vibration characteristics and attenuation of the subgrade caused by passing trains in a seasonally frozen region of Daqing, China are investigated. Three field experiments were conducted during different times through the year, in normal, freezing and thawing periods, respectively, and the influence of the season, train speed and train type, is described in this paper. The results show that: (l) the vertical component is the greatest among the three components of the measured vibration near the rail track, and as the distance to the railway track increases, the dominant vibration depends on the season. (2) Compared with the vibration in the normal period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations increase while the lateral vibration decreases in the freezing period. However, in the thawing period, the vertical and longitudinal vibrations decrease, and the lateral vibration increases. (3) As train speeds increase, the subgrade vibration increases. (4) The vibration induced by a freight train is greater than by a passenger train. These observations provide a better understanding of the vibration and dynamic stability of the subgrade and may be useful in developing criteria for railway and building construction in cold regions.

  4. The place of experience, culture and multimedia learning in teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Fantin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available What are the challenges of training children, young people and teachers today? Speaking of knowledge and skills necessary for teachers to perform in current scenarios implies asking to what extent university degree courses and teacher training institutions are adapting to the new demands of education. By highlighting some current challenges of university education, this article emphasizes the importance of experience, cultural training and multimedia in teacher training, from a culturalistic perspective of media education. Considering that media education is a field under construction, the transversality and the contribution of multidisciplinary knowledge of science, education, communication and the arts are a “border-object”, an interface that can better interpret the current transformation of knowledge and the tools of digital culture which are not limited to school education. The text discusses the possibility of multimedia education and its skills, such as integration of knowledge and methodological contributions deriving from different areas of knowledge and from the perspective of multiple languages in school and culture. From this results the need to set up other spaces for thinking about educational and training praxis, discussing news forms of cultural mediation in contemporary settings of teachers training.

  5. Analysis of training experience of military men to hand-to-hand combat in the foreign countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marakushyn A.I.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It is shown the main systems of hand-to-hand combat on the bases of hand-to-hand military men training in the world leading countries armies. Summarized the experience of hand-to-hand combat training. It is analyzes the main existing systems hand-to-hand training of servicemen of foreign armies. The analysis of publications, guidance documents, manuals, statutes which display the contents of hand-to-hand combat training of servicemen of foreign armies. Defined views, concerns and tendencies of hand-to-hand training to develop guidelines an advanced hand-to-hand combat training of servicemen.

  6. Unexpectedly many extinct hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokma, Folmer; van den Brink, Valentijn; Stadler, Tanja

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that Neanderthal and Denisova hominins may have been separate species, while debate continues on the status of Homo floresiensis. The decade-long debate between "splitters," who recognize over 20 hominin species, and "lumpers," who maintain that all these fossils belong to just a few lineages, illustrates that we do not know how many extinct hominin species to expect. Here, we present probability distributions for the number of speciation events and the number of contemporary species along a branch of a phylogeny. With estimates of hominin speciation and extincton rates, we then show that the expected total number of extinct hominin species is 8, but may be as high as 27. We also show that it is highly unlikely that three very recent species disappeared due to natural, background extinction. This may indicate that human-like remains are too easily considered distinct species. Otherwise, the evidence suggesting that Neanderthal and the Denisova hominin represent distinct species implies a recent wave of extinctions, ostensibly driven by the only survivor, H. sapiens. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Medical students' unique experience of army leadership training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earis, John; Garner, J; Haddock, D; Jenkins, J; Jha, V

    2017-02-13

    To assess the interactive experience of first year medical students attending the leadership and management course hosted by a British Army Reserve Field Hospital developed in partnership with Liverpool University. 244 students submitted a 1000-word structured reflective learning assignment about their reaction to, learning from and any behaviour and attitude changes as a result of, the training. The assignments were thematically analysed to identify how aspects of the training had impacted upon the students' understanding of leadership and teamwork. Their comments relating to the army were analysed to gain insight into their views and experience of the training. Students were surprised at how enjoyable and useful they found the course. Initially they expressed scepticism about what they could learn in an army-based environment. However, the training, particularly command and planning tasks, helped them appreciate and understand the different skills individuals can bring to a team environment, and the importance of everyone contributing. While some students were challenged by aspects of the course, with support and encouragement from team-mates and the army personnel, they learned they could achieve more together. Teaching leadership and management skills to medical students is a challenge which can be effectively addressed by adapting and developing army training resources. Students overcame initial scepticism about participating, and learned a lot about themselves and each other. In addition, the army developed a better understanding of the doctors of the future. The expertise of the army in delivering this training was crucial to its success as the medical school could not have provided this experience unsupported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis.

  9. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. © 2013.

  10. Digital rectal examination skills: first training experiences, the motives and attitudes of standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, Christoph; Diefenbacher, Katja; Köhl-Hackert, Nadja; Lauber, Heike; Huber, Julia; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Herzog, Wolfgang; Schultz, Jobst-Hendrik; Jünger, Jana; Krautter, Markus

    2015-02-01

    Physical clinical examination is a core clinical competence of medical doctors. In this regard, digital rectal examination (DRE) plays a central role in the detection of abnormalities of the anus and rectum. However, studies in undergraduate medical students as well as newly graduated doctors show that they are insufficiently prepared for performing DRE. Training units with Standardized Patients (SP) represent one method to deliver DRE skills. As yet, however, it is little known about SPs' attitudes. This is a qualitative study using a grounded theory approach. Interviews were conducted with 4 standardized patients about their experiences before, during and after structured SP training to deliver DRE competencies to medical students. The resulting data were subjected to thematic content analysis. Results show that SPs do not have any predominant motives for DRE program participation. They participate in the SP training sessions with relatively little prejudice and do not anticipate feeling highly vulnerable within teaching sessions with undergraduate medical students. The current study examined SPs' motives, views, expectations and experiences regarding a DRE program during their first SP training experiences. The results enabled us to derive distinct action guidelines for the recruitment, informing and briefing of SPs who are willing to participate in a DRE program.

  11. Content of Bachelors’ in Tourism Informative Training in Ukrainian and Polish Experience: Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubekhina Tetiana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a comparative analysis of the content of Bachelors’ in Tourism informative training in Ukrainian and Polish experience. The content of Bachelors’ in Tourism informative training in Ukraine and Poland has been analyzed. The content of subjects, namely, “Information Technologies in Tourism” and “The Foundations of Bachelors’ in Tourism Information Culture” being the basis of Bachelors’ in Tourism informative training in Ukraine has been justified. It has been concluded that the study of foreign experience in specialists’ professional training, in particular, specialists’ in tourism, that requires critical analysis of achievements in education systems abroad and outlining of positive aspects of such experience, is extremely necessary for the development of higher education in Ukraine as the implementation of new information technologies into educational process creates optimal conditions for the forming of students’ information culture that is not limited to knowledge and skills in the field of information processing and implies the development of the personality, his/her preparation for professional careers in the information society.

  12. In-service English language training for Italian Primary School Teachers An experience in syllabus design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dawes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report on an in-service English Language Teacher Training Programme devised for the Government project to equip Italian primary school teachers  with the skills to teach English. The paper focuses on the first phase of the project which envisaged research into the best training models and the preparation of appropriate  English Language syllabuses. In  the first three sections of the paper we report on the experience of designing the language syllabus. In the last section we suggest ways of using the syllabus as a tool for self reflective professional development.

  13. The relationship of previous training and experience of journal peer reviewers to subsequent review quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Callaham

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peer review is considered crucial to the selection and publication of quality science, but very little is known about the previous experiences and training that might identify high-quality peer reviewers. The reviewer selection processes of most journals, and thus the qualifications of their reviewers, are ill defined. More objective selection of peer reviewers might improve the journal peer review process and thus the quality of published science. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 306 experienced reviewers (71% of all those associated with a specialty journal completed a survey of past training and experiences postulated to improve peer review skills. Reviewers performed 2,856 reviews of 1,484 separate manuscripts during a four-year study period, all prospectively rated on a standardized quality scale by editors. Multivariable analysis revealed that most variables, including academic rank, formal training in critical appraisal or statistics, or status as principal investigator of a grant, failed to predict performance of higher-quality reviews. The only significant predictors of quality were working in a university-operated hospital versus other teaching environment and relative youth (under ten years of experience after finishing training. Being on an editorial board and doing formal grant (study section review were each predictors for only one of our two comparisons. However, the predictive power of all variables was weak. CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that there are no easily identifiable types of formal training or experience that predict reviewer performance. Skill in scientific peer review may be as ill defined and hard to impart as is "common sense." Without a better understanding of those skills, it seems unlikely journals and editors will be successful in systematically improving their selection of reviewers. This inability to predict performance makes it imperative that all but the smallest journals implement routine review ratings

  14. Sonic hedgehog signaling regulates amygdalar neurogenesis and extinction of fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Hui-Chi; Hsiao, Ya-Hsin; Gean, Po-Wu

    2015-10-01

    It is now recognized that neurogenesis occurs throughout life predominantly in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between neurogenesis in the amygdala and extinction of fear memory. Mice received 15 tone-footshock pairings. Twenty-four hours after training, the mice were given 15 tone-alone trials (extinction training) once per day for 7 days. Two hours before extinction training, the mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5-bromo-3-deoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-positive and NeuN-positive cells were analyzed 52 days after the training. A group of mice that received tone-footshock pairings but no extinction training served as controls (FC+No-Ext). The number of BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells was significantly higher in the extinction (FC+Ext) than in the FC+No-Ext mice. Proliferation inhibitor methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) or DNA synthesis inhibitor cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) reduced neurogenesis and retarded extinction. Silencing Sonic hedgehog (Shh) gene with short hairpin interfering RNA (shRNA) by means of a retrovirus expression system to knockdown Shh specifically in the mitotic neurons reduced neurogenesis and retarded extinction. By contrast, over-expression of Shh increased neurogenesis and facilitated extinction. These results suggest that amygdala neurogenesis and Shh signaling are involved in the extinction of fear memory.

  15. Mass Extinctions Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmon, Warren Douglas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some parallels that seem to exist between mass extinction recognizable in the geologic record and the impending extinction of a significant proportion of the earth's species due largely to tropical deforestation. Describes some recent theories of causal factors and periodicities in mass extinction. (Author/TW)

  16. Periaqueductal gray c-Fos expression varies relative to the method of conditioned taste aversion extinction employed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, G Andrew; Wilson, Gina N; Remus, Jennifer L; Ramos, Linnet; Ketchesin, Kyle D; Biesan, Orion R; Luchsinger, Joseph R; Prodan, Suzanna

    2011-11-14

    A conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is acquired when an animal consumes a novel taste (CS) and then experiences the symptoms of poisoning (US). Following CTA training, animals will avoid the taste that was previously associated with malaise. This defensive reaction to a learned fear can be extinguished by repeated exposure to the CS alone (CS-only; CSO-EXT). However, following a latency period in which the CS is not presented, the CTA will spontaneously recover (SR). Through the use of an explicitly unpaired extinction procedure (EU-EXT) we have shown that we can speed up extinction and attenuate SR of the CTA. Here we compared and contrasted the ability of CSO and EU extinction procedures to affect c-Fos expression in the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Fluid-deprived Sprague-Dawley rats acquired a strong CTA [via 3 pairings of 0.3% oral saccharin (SAC; the CS) and 81mg/kg i.p. lithium chloride (LiCl; the US)] followed by extinction trials consisting of multiple exposures to either, (a) the CS every-other day (CSO-EXT), or (b) CS and US on alternate days (EU-EXT). A different group of rats did not receive multiple CS exposures and served as a "no extinction" (NE) control. Both extinction procedures resulted in ≥90% reacceptance of SAC (achieving asymptotic extinction). Some of the animals were sacrificed for c-Fos immunohistochemical analysis following asymptotic extinction. Other rats entered a 30-day latency period where they drank water only. These remaining animals were then tested for SR with a final exposure to SAC before being sacrificed for c-Fos immunohistochemistry. As reported previously, rats in the CS-only group exhibited a significant SR of the CTA. However, animals in the EU extinction group reached asymptotic extinction more rapidly than did CSO rats and they did not show SR of the CTA. As compared to rats that retained their CTA, both groups of extinguished rats showed suppression in the number of c-Fos-labeled neurons in all 4 longitudinal columns of

  17. The Cultural Genogram: experiences from within a marriage and family therapy training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiley, Margaret K; Dolbin, Megan; Hill, Jennifer; Karuppaswamy, Nithyakala; Liu, Ting; Natrajan, Rajeswari; Poulsen, Shruti; Robbins, Natashia; Robinson, Pamela

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and demonstrate the use of the Cultural Genogram (CG) in a graduate-level course in gender and culture for family therapists-in-training at a large Midwestern university's accredited program in family therapy. Although the importance of the CG as a training tool is delineated by Hardy and Laszloffy, very little information exists about the actual implementation and usefulness of this tool within a training program for family therapists. In this article, we present a qualitative research study of the lived experiences of a class of women from diverse cultures as they constructed and presented their CGs. We discuss the basic curriculum and structure of the course in which the CG was used, the process the class members developed to create and present their CGs, the effects of presenting the CGs, and a set of recommendations and ideas for further exploration.

  18. Significance of assessment experiences during initial teacher training in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study investigates how students in the final semester of their teacher training program (licensure at the Center of Physical Education and Sports (CEFD, Espírito Santo Federal University, Brazil, (reinterpret their assessment experiences, an integral component of their teacher training. It employs the narrative as a theoretical and methodological perspective, and it utilizes student portfolios, as well as focus groups and semi-structured individual interviews as inputs for data generation. Ten students in their eighth, or final, semester participated in this study. These were the total respondents to a "call for volunteers" among the 2014 graduating class. The results suggest that the students believe the assessment processes of their teaching practices in physical education are disjointed. They feel that the disciplines that allow them to review their own performance during teacher training are more efficient and play a stronger role in their education.

  19. Safety in High School Supervised Agricultural Experiences: Teachers' Training and Students' Injury Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, M L; Lawver, R G; Sorensen, T J

    2016-01-01

    This research study sought to gather evidence of school-based agriculture teachers' hazard perceptions, safety practices, training experiences, and awareness of student injuries related to supervised agricultural experience (SAE) programs. Teachers agreed that students should follow safety guidelines developed by the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Safety and Health during SAE work. Approximately 66% (f = 153) of teachers reported having general training in first aid, CPR, and AED. Twenty participants (8.6%) indicated having no safety certifications or training. Abrasions, lacerations, bites/stings, and burns accounted for a majority of the student SAE-related injuries that were reported. There were 82 participants (35.5%) who stated that no injuries had been reported or they were not aware of any injuries that occurred. The majority of teachers (66%) had received some form offirst aid or first response training, but fewer teachers had received safety training for ATVs (f = 25, 10.8%), tractors (f = 48, 20.7%), and livestock (f = 39, 16.8%). Results indicated a disparity between required safe work habits and the types of hazardous tasks students should be allowed to complete alone while participating in SAE activities. It appears most responding teachers in this study agreed to allow students to operate equipment and machinery alone. Recommendations for teachers include attending professional development training specific to SAE safety and keeping records of any risk assessments conducted during SAE supervision. Further development of best practices for SAE supervision and safety are needed to assist agricultural education professionals in protecting and shaping our future leaders in agriculture.

  20. Stressor controllability modulates fear extinction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Catherine A; Gorun, Alyson; Reddan, Marianne C; Ramirez, Franchesca; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic events are proposed to play a role in the development of anxiety disorders, however not all individuals exposed to extreme stress experience a pathological increase in fear. Recent studies in animal models suggest that the degree to which one is able to control an aversive experience is a critical factor determining its behavioral consequences. In this study, we examined whether stressor controllability modulates subsequent conditioned fear expression in humans. Participants were randomly assigned to an escapable stressor condition, a yoked inescapable stressor condition, or a control condition involving no stress exposure. One week later, all participants underwent fear conditioning, fear extinction, and a test of extinction retrieval the following day. Participants exposed to inescapable stress showed impaired fear extinction learning and increased fear expression the following day. In contrast, escapable stress improved fear extinction and prevented the spontaneous recovery of fear. Consistent with the bidirectional controllability effects previously reported in animal models, these results suggest that one's degree of control over aversive experiences may be an important factor influencing the development of psychological resilience or vulnerability in humans.

  1. How Life Experience Shapes Cognitive Control Strategies: The Case of Air Traffic Control Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arbula

    Full Text Available Although human flexible behavior relies on cognitive control, it would be implausible to assume that there is only one, general mode of cognitive control strategy adopted by all individuals. For instance, different reliance on proactive versus reactive control strategies could explain inter-individual variability. In particular, specific life experiences, like a highly demanding training for future Air Traffic Controllers (ATCs, could modulate cognitive control functions. A group of ATC trainees and a matched group of university students were tested longitudinally on task-switching and Stroop paradigms that allowed us to measure indices of cognitive control. The results showed that the ATCs, with respect to the control group, had substantially smaller mixing costs during long cue-target intervals (CTI and a reduced Stroop interference effect. However, this advantage was present also prior to the training phase. Being more capable in managing multiple task sets and less distracted by interfering events suggests a more efficient selection and maintenance of task relevant information as an inherent characteristic of the ATC group, associated with proactive control. Critically, the training that the ATCs underwent improved their accuracy in general and reduced response time switching costs during short CTIs only. These results indicate a training-induced change in reactive control, which is described as a transient process in charge of stimulus-driven task detection and resolution. This experience-based enhancement of reactive control strategy denotes how cognitive control and executive functions in general can be shaped by real-life training and underlines the importance of experience in explaining inter-individual variability in cognitive functioning.

  2. 条件性恐惧记忆消退返回的性别差异%Sex Differences in Extinction Return of Conditioned Fear Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙楠; 魏艺铭; 李倩; 郑希付

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder is a kind of anxiety disorder which developed after severe trauma. Conditioned fear model is the most emblematical model of posttraumatic stress disorder. At the present time, the most effective therapy is the exposure therapy which uses extinction training to repress the conditioned fear memory. However, some of the PTSD patients were having relapses after the exposure therapy, these relapses were later named as the extinction return.An experiment was designed to research for sex differences in the extinction return of conditioned fear memory. Forty normal students participated in the experiment, including 20 females and 20 males. Before the actual experiment, the participants had to attend the extinction training session; the participants were trained to consciously establish and extinguish the connection between neutral stimulus and repugnant stimulus. The experiment consisted of pre-exposure, acquisition, extinction, and test phases. The pre-exposure phase required the participants to understand the procedure. In the acquisition phase, the participants would acquire the conditioned fear response via the connection of the neutral stimulus and the repugnant stimulus. In the extinction, the neutral stimulus would be presented alone without the repugnant stimulus. Four hours later, test phase was to examine whether the extinction return would be found, and whether males or females performed differently on the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear memory.The results were as following: (1) The participants were observed to have obvious extinction return overall when they were tested after 4 hours later during the extinction phase. (2)The extinction return in females was much more significant than in males. (3)The females tended to acquire the conditioned fear memory more effectively and extinguish more slowly than males. But the difference is not significant.The results of this study suggested that the extinction return was a

  3. Effects of sleep on memory for conditioned fear and fear extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace-Schott, Edward F.; Germain, Anne; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory for extinction of conditioned fear is a basic mammalian mechanism for regulating negative emotion. Sleep promotes both the consolidation of memory and the regulation of emotion. Sleep can influence consolidation and modification of memories associated with both fear and its extinction. After brief overviews of the behavior and neural circuitry associated with fear conditioning, extinction learning and extinction memory in the rodent and human, interactions of sleep with these processes will be examined. Animal and human studies suggest that sleep can serve to consolidate both fear and extinction memory. In humans, sleep also promotes generalization of extinction memory. Time-of-day effects on extinction learning and generalization are also seen. REM may be a sleep stage of particular importance for the consolidation of both fear and extinction memory as evidenced by selective REM deprivation experiments. REM sleep is accompanied by selective activation of the same limbic structures implicated in the learning and memory of fear and extinction. Preliminary evidence also suggests extinction learning can take place during slow wave sleep. Study of low-level processes such as conditioning, extinction and habituation may allow sleep effects on emotional memory to be identified and inform study of sleep’s effects on more complex, emotionally salient declarative memories. Anxiety disorders are marked by impairments of both sleep and extinction memory. Improving sleep quality may ameliorate anxiety disorders by strengthening naturally acquired extinction. Strategically timed sleep may be used to enhance treatment of anxiety by strengthening therapeutic extinction learned via exposure therapy. PMID:25894546

  4. Empowering families with the experience of mental illness. A presentation of the Polish version of CAMILLE training package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Zabłocka-Żytka, Lidia; Czabała, Jan C

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the CAMILLE training package prepared in the EU program Empowerment of Children and Adolescents of Mentally Ill Parents through Training of Professionals working with children and adolescents. The training is designed for psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, teachers and others working with children and adolescents where a parent experiences mental disorders. The project was realized on 4 stages: (1) pre-analyses (quality and quantity) with professionals, family members and people experiencing mental disorders, in regards to the needs, experiences and expectations in education of professionals working with families of parents with mental illness; (2) development of a new pan-European training program for specialists working with these families; (3) pre-pilot implementation and evaluation of the training; (4) preparing of the final version of the training and pilot implementation in 7 countries participating in the project, also in Poland. The training program consists of 9 subjects, divided into 3 main groups: the basic knowledge (mental disorders, child development, attachment), experiences and needs of the families (experiences of parents, children, stigma), methods of family support (talking with children, resilience, successful services). The pilot implementation of the program showed great professionals' interest in the subject and training methods. The evaluation showed significant positive effects of the training in terms of the raise of awareness of influence of the parent's illness on needs of the child, parental abilities and ability of building the child resilience. The CAMILLE training is a valuable program that can be implemented in Poland.

  5. Failure of Serial Taste-Taste Compound Presentations to Produce Overshadowing of Extinction of Conditioned Taste Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineno, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study overshadowing of extinction in a conditioned taste aversion preparation. In both experiments, aversive conditioning with sucrose was followed by extinction treatment with either sucrose alone or in compound with another taste, citric acid. Experiment 1 employed a simultaneous compound extinction treatment…

  6. Forming Competing Fear Learning and Extinction Memories in Adolescence Makes Fear Difficult to Inhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages.…

  7. Forming Competing Fear Learning and Extinction Memories in Adolescence Makes Fear Difficult to Inhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages.…

  8. Education and training in LCA and life-cycle thinking experience and needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Bey, Niki; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2003-01-01

    was gathered by means of a survey among providers and users of education and training in this field, while the qualitative data was established in the course of a dialogue meeting to which particular interested individuals, selected among those who had returned the questionnaire, were invited....... The questionnaire for providers was returned by 20 institutions, describing 47 educational offers and the questionnaire for users of education was filled by 41 companies and 16 consultancies. Most of the companies and consultancies that participated in the survey have experience with LCA and/or life cycle thinking......This paper discusses experience and needs for education and training in LCA and life-cycle thinking based on project carried out for the Environmental Protection Agency in Denmark. An approach was chosen where both quantitative and qualitative facts and records were collected. The quantitative data...

  9. Education and training in LCA and life-cycle thinking experience and needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Bey, Niki; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2003-01-01

    was gathered by means of a survey among providers and users of education and training in this field, while the qualitative data was established in the course of a dialogue meeting to which particular interested individuals, selected among those who had returned the questionnaire, were invited......This paper discusses experience and needs for education and training in LCA and life-cycle thinking based on project carried out for the Environmental Protection Agency in Denmark. An approach was chosen where both quantitative and qualitative facts and records were collected. The quantitative data....... The questionnaire for providers was returned by 20 institutions, describing 47 educational offers and the questionnaire for users of education was filled by 41 companies and 16 consultancies. Most of the companies and consultancies that participated in the survey have experience with LCA and/or life cycle thinking...

  10. Neuronal circuits of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herry, Cyril; Ferraguti, Francesco; Singewald, Nicolas; Letzkus, Johannes J; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Lüthi, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Fear extinction is a form of inhibitory learning that allows for the adaptive control of conditioned fear responses. Although fear extinction is an active learning process that eventually leads to the formation of a consolidated extinction memory, it is a fragile behavioural state. Fear responses can recover spontaneously or subsequent to environmental influences, such as context changes or stress. Understanding the neuronal substrates of fear extinction is of tremendous clinical relevance, as extinction is the cornerstone of psychological therapy of several anxiety disorders and because the relapse of maladaptative fear and anxiety is a major clinical problem. Recent research has begun to shed light on the molecular and cellular processes underlying fear extinction. In particular, the acquisition, consolidation and expression of extinction memories are thought to be mediated by highly specific neuronal circuits embedded in a large-scale brain network including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. Moreover, recent findings indicate that the neuronal circuitry of extinction is developmentally regulated. Here, we review emerging concepts of the neuronal circuitry of fear extinction, and highlight novel findings suggesting that the fragile phenomenon of extinction can be converted into a permanent erasure of fear memories. Finally, we discuss how research on genetic animal models of impaired extinction can further our understanding of the molecular and genetic bases of human anxiety disorders.

  11. Forming competing fear learning and extinction memories in adolescence makes fear difficult to inhibit

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Kathryn D.; Richardson, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Fear inhibition is markedly impaired in adolescent rodents and humans. The present experiments investigated whether this impairment is critically determined by the animal's age at the time of fear learning or their age at fear extinction. Male rats (n = 170) were tested for extinction retention after conditioning and extinction at different ages. We examined neural correlates of impaired extinction retention by detection of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase immunoreactivity (pMA...

  12. The impact of musical training and tone language experience on talker identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Myers, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Listeners can use pitch changes in speech to identify talkers. Individuals exhibit large variability in sensitivity to pitch and in accuracy perceiving talker identity. In particular, people who have musical training or long-term tone language use are found to have enhanced pitch perception. In the present study, the influence of pitch experience on talker identification was investigated as listeners identified talkers in native language as well as non-native languages. Experiment 1 was designed to explore the influence of pitch experience on talker identification in two groups of individuals with potential advantages for pitch processing: musicians and tone language speakers. Experiment 2 further investigated individual differences in pitch processing and the contribution to talker identification by testing a mediation model. Cumulatively, the results suggested that (a) musical training confers an advantage for talker identification, supporting a shared resources hypothesis regarding music and language and (b) linguistic use of lexical tones also increases accuracy in hearing talker identity. Importantly, these two types of hearing experience enhance talker identification by sharpening pitch perception skills in a domain-general manner. PMID:25618071

  13. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  14. Inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Tong, Jianbin; Li, Jinnan; Chai, Anping; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Wang, Liping; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Promoting extinction of fear memory is the main treatment of fear disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, fear extinction is often incomplete in these patients. Our previous study had shown that Rac1 activity in hippocampus plays a crucial role in the learning of contextual fear memory in rats. Here, we further investigated whether Rac1 activity also modulated the extinction of contextual fear memory. We found that massed extinction obviously upregulated hippocampal Rac1 activity and induced long-term extinction of contextual fear in rats. Intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 prevents extinction of contextual fear in massed extinction training rats. In contrast, long-spaced extinction downregulated Rac1 activity and caused less extinction. And Rac1 activator CN04-A promotes extinction of contextual fear in long-spaced extinction rats. Our study demonstrates that inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear, suggesting that modulating Rac1 activity of the hippocampus may be promising therapy of fear disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. What do UK doctors in training value in a post? A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jennifer; Johnston, Peter; Watson, Verity; Krucien, Nicolas; Skåtun, Diane

    2016-02-01

    Many individual and job-related factors are known to influence medical careers decision making. Medical trainees' (residents) views of which characteristics of a training post are important to them have been extensively studied but how they trade-off these characteristics is under-researched. Such information is crucial for the development of effective policies to enhance recruitment and retention. Our aim was to investigate the strength of UK foundation doctors' and trainees' preferences for training post characteristics in terms of monetary value. We used an online questionnaire study incorporating a discrete choice experiment (DCE), distributed to foundation programme doctors and doctors in training across all specialty groups within three UK regions, in August-October 2013. The main outcome measures were monetary values for training-post characteristics, based on willingness to forgo and willingness to accept extra income for a change in each job characteristic, calculated from regression coefficients. The questionnaire was answered by 1323 trainees. Good working conditions were the most influential characteristics of a training position. Trainee doctors would need to be compensated by an additional 49.8% above the average earnings within their specialty to move from a post with good working conditions to one with poor working conditions. A training post with limited rather than good opportunities for one's spouse or partner would require compensation of 38.4% above the average earnings within their specialty. Trainees would require compensation of 30.8% above the average earnings within their specialty to move from a desirable to a less desirable locality. These preferences varied only to a limited extent according to individual characteristics. Trainees place most value on good working conditions, good opportunities for their partners and desirable geographical location when making career-related decisions. This intelligence can be used to develop alternative

  16. Assessing bioterrorism preparedness and response of rural veterinarians: experiences and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiehwen Ed; Jacobson, Holly; Feldman, Katherine; Miller, Jerry A; Rodriguez, Lori; Soto Mas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Veterinarians play a unique role in emergency preparedness and response, and federal agencies and academic institutions therefore allocate considerable resources to provide training to enhance their readiness. However, the level of preparedness of veterinarians in many rural regions is yet to be improved. This article reports an assessment of the bioterrorism preparedness, specifically the experience and training needs, of rural veterinarians in North Texas. The study employed a cross-sectional design with a study population that included all veterinarians (N = 352) in the 37 counties within Texas Department of State Health Services Regions 2 and 3. Data on veterinarians practicing or residing in the target region were obtained from the Texas State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. The response rate was 35% (n = 121). Results indicate that chemical exposure was the condition most frequently seen and treated, followed by botulism and anthrax. The majority (80%) of respondents indicated that they had not previously participated in training related to bioterrorism preparedness, and many (41%) also indicated a willingness to participate in a state health department-initiated bioterrorism response plan. However, only 18% were confident in their ability to diagnose and treat bioterrorism cases. These results suggest that many North Texas veterinarians practicing in rural regions could benefit from additional training in bioterrorism preparedness and response. An area in particular need of further training is the diagnosis and treatment of Category A agents. Federal, state, and local health agencies are urged to increase training opportunities and to make additional efforts to involve veterinarians in bioterrorism preparedness and response.

  17. Education and training in dental schools in Spain, Sevilla University experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Carrera, F.; Gomez, A.; Luis, J.; Rodriguez, M.; Herrador, M.

    2003-07-01

    The ICRP, in its publication 73 entitled Radiological Protection and Safety in Medicine states (paragraph 128) that one important need is to provide adequate resources for the education and training in radiological protection for future professional and technical staff in medical practice. The training programme should include initial training for all incoming staff and regular updating retraining. The European Directive 97/743/EURATOM on Medical Exposure (MED) lays down requirements for education and training. The document RP 116 published by the European commission give guidelines on Education and Training in Radiation Protection and in its paragraph 51 establish that Members States shall encourage the introduction of a course on radiation protection in the basic curriculum of medical and dental schools according to the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED). In the Spanish legislation RD 815/2001 referred to the medical exposures, it is encourage the need for the introduction of Radiological Protection courses in Medicine and Dental schools with the objective of patient protection. In this study it has been analysed the actual situation of the education and training in Radiation Protection in Dental Schools in Spain. In addition it is described the experience of the University of Sevilla. The results of the study shows that only 4 from 9 dental schools have disciplines of Radiation Protection in its curriculum. In one of them the course is mandatory and has a content of 2 credits (20 hours). In the rest of dental schools the discipline has an optional character with an average of 4 credits. The discipline of Radiation Protection of the curriculum of Dental School at Sevilla university has 4 credits and it is configured as a course with the necessary requirements from the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council to obtain the Radiological Accreditation of Responsible of Dental Radiodiagnostic Installations. This diploma is given once the students have finished the Bachelor

  18. Creating an infrastructure for training in the responsible conduct of research: the University of Pittsburgh's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Barbara E; Friedman, Charles P; Rosenberg, Jerome L; Russell, Joanne; Beedle, Ari; Levine, Arthur S

    2006-02-01

    In response to public concerns about the consequences of research misconduct, academic institutions have become increasingly cognizant of the need to implement comprehensive, effective training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) for faculty, staff, students, and external collaborators. The ability to meet this imperative is challenging as universities confront declining financial resources and increasing complexity of the research enterprise. The authors describe the University of Pittsburgh's design, implementation, and evaluation of a Web-based, institution-wide RCR training program called Research and Practice Fundamentals (RPF). This project, established in 2000, was embedded in the philosophy, organizational structure, and technology developed through the Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems grant from the National Library of Medicine. Utilizing a centralized, comprehensive approach, the RPF system provides an efficient mechanism for deploying content to a large, diverse cohort of learners and supports the needs of research administrators by providing access to information about who has successfully completed the training. During its first 3 years of operation, the RPF served over 17,000 users and issued more than 38,000 training certificates. The 18 modules that are currently available address issues required by regulatory mandates and other content areas important to the research community. RPF users report high levels of satisfaction with content and ease of using the system. Future efforts must explore methods to integrate non-RCR education and training into a centralized, cohesive structure. The University of Pittsburgh's experience with the RPF demonstrates the importance of developing an infrastructure for training that is comprehensive, scalable, reliable, centralized, affordable, and sustainable.

  19. Preservice Teachers' Classroom Management Training: A Survey of Self-Reported Training Experiences, Content Coverage, and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Michael; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Many teachers report that their preservice training in classroom management was inadequate or ineffective, but little is known about the types of training they receive. In this exploratory study, 157 preservice teachers from throughout the United States were surveyed about the training sources through which they obtained knowledge and skills in…

  20. Preservice Teachers' Classroom Management Training: A Survey of Self-Reported Training Experiences, Content Coverage, and Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Michael; Sullivan, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Many teachers report that their preservice training in classroom management was inadequate or ineffective, but little is known about the types of training they receive. In this exploratory study, 157 preservice teachers from throughout the United States were surveyed about the training sources through which they obtained knowledge and skills in…

  1. Exploring chiropractic students' experiences of the educational environment in healthcare professional training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Per J; Laksov, Klara Bolander

    2015-08-05

    The educational environment has a significant impact on students' behavior, sense of well-being, and academic advancement. While various research methodologies have been used to explore the educational environment, there is a paucity of studies employing qualitative research methods. This study engages in an in-depth exploration of chiropractic students' experiences of the meaning of the educational environment. A qualitative approach was employed by interviewing 26 students in four focus group interviews at two different points in time. A conventional manifest and latent content analysis was chosen to investigate and interpret the experiences of the educational environment in an undergraduate chiropractic training institution in Sweden. The analysis resulted in five overarching themes: Personal growth; Being part of a community; A place of meaningfulness; Trust in a regulated system; and Scaffolding relationships. Early in the training, the meaning of the educational environment was experienced as part of a vocational community and the scaffolding of intra-institutional relationships. In later stages, the environment was experienced in terms of personal growth - balancing academic pressures and progress within the professional community - thus laying the foundations for autonomy and motivation. During the clinical training, the environment was experienced as where learning happens, thus creating a place of meaningfulness. Throughout the training, the formal and clinical environments were experienced as isolating, with little bridging between the two. A regulated system - conveying an operative organization with clear communication regarding what to expect - was experienced as important for an apt educational environment. We found that experiences of an educational environment are dynamic and change over time. When restructuring or evaluating curriculums, educational managers can consider the emerged themes as constituting facets relating to the educational

  2. Extinction learning, which consists of the inhibition of retrieval, can be learned without retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Schmidt, Bianca; Ferreira, Flávia; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2015-01-13

    In the present study we test the hypothesis that extinction is not a consequence of retrieval in unreinforced conditioned stimulus (CS) presentation but the mere perception of the CS in the absence of a conditioned response. Animals with cannulae implanted in the CA1 region of hippocampus were subjected to extinction of contextual fear conditioning. Muscimol infused intra-CA1 before an extinction training session of contextual fear conditioning (CFC) blocks retrieval but not consolidation of extinction measured 24 h later. Additionally, this inhibition of retrieval does not affect early persistence of extinction when tested 7 d later or its spontaneous recovery after 2 wk. Furthermore, both anisomycin, an inhibitor of ribosomal protein synthesis, and rapamycin, an inhibitor of extraribosomal protein synthesis, given into the CA1, impair extinction of CFC regardless of whether its retrieval was blocked by muscimol. Therefore, retrieval performance in the first unreinforced session is not necessary for the installation, maintenance, or spontaneous recovery of extinction of CFC.

  3. Extinction of fear is facilitated by social presence: Synergism with prefrontal oxytocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill-Maoz, Naama; Maroun, Mouna

    2016-04-01

    This study addressed the question of whether extinction in pairs would have a beneficial effect on extinction of fear conditioning. To that end, we established an experimental setting for extinction in which we trained animals to extinguish contextual fear memory in pairs. Taking advantage of the role of oxytocin (OT) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the mediation of memory extinction and social interaction, we also sought to study its role in social interaction-induced effects on extinction. Our results clearly show that the social presence of another animal in the extinction context facilitates extinction, and that this facilitation is mediated through mPFC-OT. Our results suggest that social interaction may be a positive regulator of fear inhibition, implying that social interaction may be an easy, accessible therapeutic tool for the treatment of fear-associated disorders.

  4. Method of stimulus combination impacts resistance to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Bai, John Y H

    2015-07-01

    Reinforcing an alternative response in the presence of the stimuli governing a target response increases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to training target responding on its own. Conversely, training alternative and target responses in the presence of different stimuli and combining those stimuli only decreases resistance to extinction of target responding, relative to target responding on its own. The present study assessed how different methods of combining discriminative stimuli influence resistance to extinction of responding in pigeons. As in previous studies, combining stimuli across different keys only decreased resistance to extinction of target responding relative to target responding on its own. In comparison, combining stimuli on the same key initially increased resistance to extinction of target responding, but repeated tests resulted in similar levels of responding as target responding with stimuli combined on separate keys. Moreover, greater overall reinforcement rates produced greater resistance to extinction with both methods of combining stimuli, consistent with behavioral momentum theory. These findings reveal several behavioral processes influence the outcome of combining stimuli--including perceptual processes, discriminative control by contingencies, response competition, and behavioral momentum.

  5. Experience-dependent plasticity in white matter microstructure: Reasoning training alters structural connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson P Mackey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI techniques have made it possible to investigate white matter plasticity in humans. Changes in DTI measures, principally increases in fractional anisotropy (FA, have been observed following training programs as diverse as juggling, meditation, and working memory. Here, we sought to test whether three months of reasoning training could alter white matter microstructure. We recruited participants (n=23 who were enrolled in a course to prepare for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT, a test that places strong demands on reasoning skills, as well as age- and IQ-matched controls planning to take the LSAT in the future (n=22. DTI data were collected at two scan sessions scheduled three months apart. In trained participants but not controls, we observed decreases in radial diffusivity (RD in white matter connecting frontal cortices, and in mean diffusivity (MD within frontal and parietal lobe white matter. Further, participants exhibiting larger gains on the LSAT exhibited greater decreases in MD in the right internal capsule. In summary, reasoning training altered multiple measures of white matter structure in young adults. While the cellular underpinnings are unknown, these results provide evidence of experience-dependent white matter changes that may not be limited to myelination.

  6. Education, training, and academic experience of newly hired, first-time pharmacy faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanat, Matthew A; Fleming, Marc L; Fernandez, Julianna M; Garey, Kevin W

    2014-06-17

    Objective. To describe the education, training, and academic experiences of newly hired faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. Methods. A survey regarding education, training, and academic experiences was conducted of all first-time faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy hired during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members accounted for the majority (68.2%) of new hires. Ambulatory care was the most common pharmacy specialty position (29.8%). Most new faculty members had a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) as their terminal degree (74.8%), and 88.3% of pharmacy practice faculty members completed a residency. Of new faculty members who responded to the survey, 102 (67.5%) had at least 3 prior academic teaching, precepting, or research experiences. Conclusion. New faculty members were hired most frequently for clinical faculty positions at the assistant professor level and most frequently in the specialty of ambulatory care. Prior academic experience included precepting pharmacy students, facilitating small discussions, and guest lecturing.

  7. M-LEARNING (MOBILE LEARNING IN PRACTICE: A TRAINING EXPERIENCE WITH IT PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarolinda Zanela Saccol

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study that addresses the following question: what are the real possibilities of m-learning (mobile learning for the development of individual competences and also for collaboration in the organizational setting? The paper analyzes a real experience in m-learning for training IT professionals. For this purpose a mobile virtual learning environment called COMTEXT was developed and implemented, which was designed to support competence development for workers using PocketPCs. The participants of the training activity (13 professionals evaluated the m-learning experience via a structured questionnaire; all the content and interactions within COMTEXT were analyzed via content analysis. The results generated important insights into the ergonomic, technological and pedagogical possibilities and limitations of mobile and wireless technologies for corporate training and also on methodologies and learning tools that can be applied to m-learning. As an exploratory study, it also indicates issues for further research on m-learning in the organizational context.

  8. Assertiveness levels of nursing students who experience verbal violence during practical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sati; Hisar, Filiz; Görgülü, Ulkü

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate students' verbal violence experiences, the effect of assertiveness on being subjected to violence, the behaviour of students after the violence and the experience of psychological distress during practical training. The study sample consisted of 274 students attending a school of nursing. A questionnaire form and the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule (RAS) were used for data collection. Percentages, means and the independent samples t-test were used for the evaluation of data. During practical training, the students suffered verbal violence from teachers, department nurses and doctors. The students had higher mean scores of RAS for most types of violence committed by the teachers and being reprimanded by the nurses and 69.3% had not responded to the violence. Students with a high level of assertiveness are subjected to violence more frequently. Being subjected to verbal violence and feeling psychological distress during practical training are a major problem among nursing students. Students should be supported in terms of assertiveness and dealing with violence effectively.

  9. The Experience-Based Safety Training System Using Vr Technology for Chemical Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Nakai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In chemical plants, safety measures are needed in order to minimize the impact of severe accidents and natural disasters. At the same time, carrying out the education and training to workers the corresponding operation in non-stationary situation is essential. However, reproducing the non-stationary conditions to actual equipment or mock-up cannot be performed because it is dangerous. By using the virtual reality (VR technology, we can build up a virtual chemical plant with lower cost compared to real plant. The operator can experience the fire and explosion accidents in the virtual space. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an experienced-based safety training system for implementing the education and training by using the non-stationary situation in the computer. This proposed system is linked with the dynamic plant simulator. A trainee can learn the correct operation through the simulated experience to prevent an accident. The safety awareness of workers will improve by experiential learning. The proposed system is useful for safety education in chemical plant.

  10. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific......Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate...... evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending...

  11. Extinction events can accelerate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    Full Text Available Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term.

  12. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term. PMID:26266804

  13. Expatriate Cross-Cultural Training for China: Views and Experience of 'China Hands'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the views and experience of cross-cultural training (CCT) of experienced Western business expatriates ("China Hands") assigned to China. Design/methodology/approach - Data for this study were extracted from a mail questionnaire...... further highlight the need for more CCT for business expatriates destined for China. A clear majority of respondents preferred pre-departure training a few weeks before departing for China and only a few of them claimed that CCT would not have been useful at any time. Most of the China Hands thought....... Original/value - The paper offers the view of experienced management practitioners concerning the Chinese business environment. The findings will be of value to both Western business people in China as well as business people considering an expatriate positing to China....

  14. NASA Virtual Glovebox: An Immersive Virtual Desktop Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, I. Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey; Bruyns, Cynthia; Montgomery, Kevin; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX) integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real- time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF DIFFERENTIAL REINFORCEMENT OF ALTERNATIVE BEHAVIOR WITHOUT EXTINCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Athens, Elizabeth S; Vollmer, Timothy R

    2010-01-01

    We manipulated relative reinforcement for problem behavior and appropriate behavior using differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) without an extinction component. Seven children with developmental disabilities participated. We manipulated duration (Experiment 1), quality (Experiment 2), delay (Experiment 3), or a combination of each (Experiment 4), such that reinforcement favored appropriate behavior rather than problem behavior even though problem behavior still produced rei...

  16. Physical activity levels during youth sport practice: does coach training or experience have an influence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechter, Chelsey R; Rosenkranz, Richard R; Milliken, George A; Dzewaltowski, David A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) levels in youth during flag football practice and compared youth MVPA in practices led by trained or untrained, and by experienced or inexperienced, coaches. Boys (n = 111, mean age = 7.9 ± 1.2 years) from 14 recreation-level flag football teams wore an accelerometer during two practices. Each team's volunteer head coach reported prior training and coaching experience. Mixed-model team-adjusted means showed the proportion of practice time spent in sedentary (13 ± 1%), MVPA (34 ± 2%) and vigorous (12 ± 1%) activity. Practice contributed ~20 min of MVPA towards public health guidelines. There was no significant difference in percentage time spent in MVPA between teams with trained (mean = 33.3%, 95% CI = 29.4%, 37.2%) and untrained coaches (mean = 35.9%, 95% CI = 25.5%, 42.4%) or between experienced (mean = 34.1%, 95% CI = 30.2%, 38.0%) and inexperienced coaches (mean = 33.8, 95% CI = 27.9%, 39.7%). Although sport provides a setting for youth to accrue MVPA, two-thirds of practice was spent sedentarily or in light activity. Participation in a coach training programme was not associated with higher MVPA. Further research is needed to inform volunteer coach training programmes that provide coaches with skills necessary to increase the percentage of practice time spent in MVPA.

  17. EXPERIENCES OF OPERATING AND STUDYING IN SECOND LIFE: Conclusions for Training Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta LISKI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Educational Association Citizens´ Forum SKAF ry is an educational institution for non-formal education. The Citizens’ Forum has been an active Second Life participant since 2007, researching its potential and challenges in educational use and non-governmental organisation activities. The first training sessions were organised in 2008 on a block of land rented from EduFinland I island. Later, ownership was acquired of the Suomi ry (Finland ry island, which was customised to serve Finnish organisations and non-governmental organisations (further NGO. The citizens’ Forum’s training courses have covered training in Second Life and the organisation of cooperative meetings and various other events in Second Life. The overall length of training sessions has been one month. Each course has consisted of 3-5. 1.5 hour meetings in Second Life and interim tasks completed either individually or in small groups. In addition to Second Life, Moodle, an online learning environment, has been employed in which tasks, experiences and feedback have been gathered and which has also contained written summaries of what was learned during the Second Life meetings. The Second Life environment has also been regularly utilised in Citizens’ Forum staff and various other work group work related meetings.Funding and ventures 2008: Ministry of Education special funding, Initiation of Second Life courses and construction of environment 2009-2010: ESF programme Open Learning Environments-AVO venture, development and implementation of Second Life educational programmes.This article is based on practical experiences gained from Ø suitability of cooperative educational processes for Second LifeØ constructing a Second Life environment for educational useØ suitability of Second Life technology and tools for education and team workØ practical methods related to educational situations .

  18. Foreign Experience in Training Future Engineering Educators for Modeling Technological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokhonko Yevhen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of foreign experience in training engineering educators for modeling technological processes. It has been stated that engineering education is a field that is being dramatically developed taking into account the occurring changes in educational paradigms, global higher education space, national higher education systems, economics, society, etc. It has been indicated that the abundance of the latest information and communication technologies alter the approaches to training various specialists, and, in particular, engineering educators. It has been mentioned that engineering teacher education is undergoing significant development. The activities of the International Society for Engineering Education – IGIP have been justified. It has been found out that there is the vital need for those specialists able to combine the techniques of traditional teaching and innovative scientific achievements, design technical structures, be leader and facilitator of the education process. It has been defined that the activity of the society is aimed at providing engineering educators with relevant training that involves their obtaining the qualification that is accorded with European education standards. US experience in training engineering educators for professional activity has been analyzed. It has been specified that engineering education has become more integrated into the curricula of elementary, middle and high school because of the increasing focus on STEM subjects; the demand for engineering educators is dramatically growing at all the levels of the education system. The peculiarities of engineering educators’ training have been demonstrated on the example of the Purdue Polytechnic Institute. It has been concluded that Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology Teacher Education is a rather interdisciplinary degree program and trains future engineering educators for a wide range of fields. The organization of the

  19. The promises and pitfalls of retrieval-extinction procedures in preventing relapse to drug seeking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavan P McNally

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Relapse to drug seeking after treatment or a period of abstinence remains a fundamental challenge for drug users. The retrieval – extinction procedure offers promise in augmenting the efficacy of exposure based treatment for drug use and for protecting against relapse to drug seeking. Preceding extinction training with a brief retrieval or reminder trial, retrieval – extinction training, has been shown to reduce reinstatement of extinguished drug seeking in animal models and also to produce profound and long lasting decrements in cue-induced craving in human heroin users. However, the mechanisms that mediate these effects of retrieval - extinction training are unclear. Moreover, under some circumstances, the retrieval – extinction procedure can significantly increase vulnerability to reinstatement in animal models.

  20. Polyandry prevents extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tom A R; Hurst, Greg D D; Wedell, Nina

    2010-03-09

    Females of most animal species are polyandrous, with individual females usually mating with more than one male. However, the ubiquity of polyandry remains enigmatic because of the potentially high costs to females of multiple mating. Current theory to account for the high prevalence of polyandry largely focuses on its benefits to individual females. There are also higher-level explanations for the high incidence of polyandry-polyandrous clades may speciate more rapidly. Here we test the hypothesis that polyandry may also reduce population extinction risk. We demonstrate that mating with multiple males protects populations of the fruit fly Drosophila pseudoobscura against extinction caused by a "selfish" sex-ratio-distorting element. Thus, the frequency of female multiple mating in nature may be associated not only with individual benefits to females of this behavior but also with increased persistence over time of polyandrous species and populations. Furthermore, we show that female remating behavior can determine the frequency of sex-ratio distorters in populations. This may also be true for many other selfish genetic elements in natural populations.

  1. Influence of observer experience and training on proficiency in coronary CT angiography interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Christopher [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Radiologie München, Burgstraße 7, 80331 Munich (Germany); Kerl, J. Matthias [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); De Rosa, Salvatore [Department of Cardiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Tekin, Tuna [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Boehme, Eike [Department of Cardiology, Bayerwaldklinik, Cham, Klinikstraße 22, 93413 Cham (Germany); Liem, Sven [Kardiologie am Rotkreuzplatz, Volkartstr. 5, 80634 Munich (Germany); Scheuchenzuber, Miriam [Radiologie München, Burgstraße 7, 80331 Munich (Germany); Kim, He-Ri [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Silverman, Justin R. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Medical University of South Carolina, 25 Courtenay Drive, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of experience and training on the proficiency in coronary CT angiography (CCTA) interpretation of practitioners with different levels of experience. Methods and materials: Nine radiologist and cardiologist observers with varying prior CCTA experience ranging from novice to expert independently analyzed two case series of 50 catheter-correlated CCTA studies for coronary artery stenosis (0%, ≤49%, 50–74%, 75–99%, or 100%). Results of the first case series were unblinded and presented along with catheter angiography results to each reader before proceeding to the second series. Diagnostic accuracy on a per-segment basis was compared for all readers and both case series, respectively. Results: Correlation coefficients between CCTA and catheter angiography initially ranged between good (r = 0.87) and poor (r = 0.26), depending on reader experience, and significantly (p < 0.05) improved in the second case series (range: r = 0.42 to r = 0.91). Diagnostic accuracy was significantly (p < 0.05) higher for more experienced readers (range: 96.5–97.8%) as compared to less experienced observers (range: 90.7–93.6%). After completion of the second case series for less experienced readers sensitivity and PPV significantly (p < 0.05) improved (range: 62.7–67.8%/51.4–84.1%), but still remained significantly (p < 0.05) lower as compared to more experienced observers (range: 89.8–93.3%/80.6–93.3%). Conclusion: The level of experience appears to be a strong determinant of proficiency in CCTA interpretation. Limited one-time training improves proficiency in novice readers, but not to clinically satisfactory levels.

  2. Stress-enhanced fear learning in rats is resistant to the effects of immediate massed extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Virginia A; Fanselow, Michael S

    2012-11-01

    Enhanced fear learning occurs subsequent to traumatic or stressful events and is a persistent challenge to the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Facilitation of learning produced by prior stress can elicit an exaggerated fear response to a minimally aversive event or stimulus. Stress-enhanced fear learning (SEFL) is a rat model of PTSD; rats previously exposed to the SEFL 15 electrical shocks procedure exhibit several behavioral responses similar to those seen in patients with PTSD. However, past reports found that SEFL is not mitigated by extinction (a model of exposure therapy) when the spaced extinction began 24 h after stress. Recent studies found that extinction from 10 min to 1 h subsequent to fear conditioning "erased" learning, whereas later extinction, occurring from 24 to 72 h after conditioning did not. Other studies indicate that massed extinction is more effective than spaced procedures. Therefore, we examined the time-dependent nature of extinction on the stress-induced enhancement of fear learning using a massed trial's procedure. Experimental rats received 15 foot shocks and were given either no extinction or massed extinction 10 min or 72 h later. Our present data indicate that SEFL, following traumatic stress, is resistant to immediate massed extinction. Experimental rats showed exaggerated new fear learning regardless of when extinction training occurred. Thus, post-traumatic reactivity such as SEFL does not seem responsive to extinction treatments.

  3. A comparison of the education and work experiences of immigrant and the United States of America-trained nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurenko, O; Gupte, G; Shan, G

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the education and work experience of immigrant and American-trained registered nurses from 1988 to 2008. The USA increasingly relies on immigrant nurses to fill a significant nursing shortage. These nurses receive their training overseas, but can obtain licenses to practice in different countries. Although immigrant nurses have been in the USA workforce for several decades, little is known about how their education and work experience compares with USA-trained nurses. Yet much is presumed by policy makers and administrators who perpetuate the stereotype that immigrant nurses are not as qualified. We analysed the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses datasets from 1988 to 2008 using the Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Our findings showed similar work experience and upward trends in education among both groups of nurses. However, American-trained nurses were more likely to further advance their education, whereas immigrant nurses were more likely to have more work experience and practice in a wider range of healthcare settings. Although we discovered differences between nurses trained in the USA and abroad, we theorize that these differences even out, as education and work experience each have their own distinct caregiving advantages. Immigrant nurses are not less qualified than their American-trained counterparts. However, healthcare providers should encourage them to further pursue their education and certifications. Even though immigrant nurses' education and work experience are comparable with their American counterparts, workforce development policies may be particularly beneficial for this group. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Evaluative research of a learning experience within the Secondary Education Teachers’ Training Master

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente CARRASCO EMBUENA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes the results of the evaluative research of a didactic experience contextualized within the Master on Secondary education Teachers’ Training, developed at the University of Alicante during the 2009-2010 year and related to the subject Curricular Design and Adaptation, which belongs to the general module. An active learning methodological proposal has been offered to guarantee the students’ motivation, to train them in competences and to help their learning process. what has been researched is the incidence these methodologies have on learning, from a subjective perception, through the analysis of the results of a questionnaire offered to two different groups of students, which gave their opinion about the class development and about what it has contributed to their own training. On the other hand, the students’ level of achievement has been objectively analyzed. In both cases, the results show important percentages of achievement success and a high degree of satisfaction towards the class activities and the learning carried out. In addition, some suggestions to improve this curricular proposal are also set out.

  5. How do radiologists do it? The influence of experience and training on searching for chest nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, David [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: d.manning@ucsm.ac.uk; Ethell, Susan [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom); Donovan, Tim [Department of Medical Imaging Sciences, St Martin' s College, Lancaster LA1 3JD (United Kingdom); Crawford, Trevor [Department of Psychology, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Four observer groups with different levels of expertise were tested to investigate the nature of expert performance. The task was the detection and localisation of significant pulmonary nodules in postero-anterior views of the chest. One hundred and twenty digitised chest images were used. The observer groups were 8 experienced radiologists, 5 experienced radiographers before and after six months training in chest image interpretation, and 8 undergraduate radiography students. Eye tracking was carried out to investigate differences in visual search strategies between observers. Detection performance was measured with an Alternate Free Response Operating Characteristic technique. Performance measures showed the experienced group of radiologists plus radiographers after training were better at the task than the remainder (t-test p = 0.046). Differences were shown in the eye-tracking parameters between the groups: saccadic amplitude (ANOVA p 0.00047), number of fixations before and after training (t-test p = 0.041), and scrutiny time per decision and per film for the experienced versus the inexperienced observers (t-test p = 0.02). Visual coverage reduced with increasing level of experience but this result did not reach significance. Generally there were distinct differences in the search strategies between the experienced and inexperienced observers and we discuss the significance of these findings. We believe the results support some recent theoretical models of expert performance and that the findings may prove to be helpful in 'fast-track' educational programmes of image interpretation for non-radiology practitioners.

  6. Spontaneous recovery from extinction in the infant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revillo, D A; Paglini, M G; Arias, C

    2014-11-01

    Within the Pavlovian conditioning framework, extinction is a procedure in which, after conditioning, the conditioned stimulus (CS) is repeatedly presented without the unconditioned stimulus (US). During this procedure the conditioned response (CR) is gradually attenuated. It has been suggested that extinction during the early stages of ontogeny is a qualitatively different process from extinction in adulthood: during infancy, extinction may result in erasure of the memory, while during adulthood extinction involves new learning. This conclusion was supported by studies showing that renewal, reinstatement or spontaneous recovery procedures were not effective during infancy for recovering the CR once it had been extinguished. These studies used the freezing response as the only behavioral index, although some recent evidence indicates that the absence of freezing after conditioning or after extinction does not necessarily imply a deficit in memory, and that other behavioral indexes may be more sensitive to detecting conditioning effects. The goal of the present study was to analyze extinction in preweanling rats by examining the possibility of the spontaneous recovery of a conditioned fear response, measured through a different set of mutually-exclusive behaviors that constitute an exhaustive ethogram, and including control groups (Experiment 1: US-Only and CS-Only; Experiment 2: US-Only, CS-Only and Unpaired) in order to examine whether non-associative learning may explain quantitative or qualitative changes in the frequency of specific responses during extinction or recovery. Extinction produced changes in the expression of freezing, grooming and exploration, and the clearest evidence of spontaneous recovery came from the analysis of freezing behavior. The pattern of behavior observed during extinction is compatible with theoretical approaches which consider different dynamic behavioral systems, and it also fit in well with a molar approach to the analysis of

  7. Psycho-physiological characteristics of students-powerlifters of different training experience, who have affections of muscular skeletal apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobko V.S.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: study of many years’ power lifting trainings influence on psycho-physiological and other characteristics of students, who have affections of muscular skeletal apparatus. Material: the research covered 73 students of 18-22 yrs. Age, who have different training experience. To exclude influence of previous training on experiment’s results, researches were conducted after 2-3 days of rest. The author studied personality’s features (by T. Elers. Psychological diagnostic was conducted by methodic of M.V. Makarenko. Results: different psycho-physiological characteristics, indicators of psychological state and personality’s features were found in students, depending on their power lifting training experience. Improvement of functional and nervous power indicators under influence of systemic power lifting trainings was detected. Conclusions: it was determined that improvement of students’ sportsmanship is accompanied by noticeable improvement of practically all tested indicators.

  8. Would you train me with my mental illness? Evidence from a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuchert, Eva; Kauer, Lukas; Meisen Zannol, Flurina

    2013-06-01

    Mental illness is the prime reason for the inflow into disability insurance in many countries. The integration of persons with a disability into the regular labor market is costly and in the case of mentally ill persons, particularly difficult. Supported Education and Employment - a rehabilitation method that directly places patients in a realistic work environment - has been shown to be effective in increasing competitive employment. However, it has not yet been widely implemented. We evaluate ex-ante the willingness to participate in Supported Education and Employment and the barriers to do so from the employer's perspective. We conducted a discrete choice experiment implemented in an online survey. The survey was carried out among all Swiss companies which provide standard dual-track vocational education and training for commercial occupations in Eastern Switzerland. We presented respondents (employees who are responsible for vocational training and/or for the selection of applicants) with a sample of five hypothetical profiles. These profiles vary along different medical diagnoses, different illness related (dys-)functions, and other characteristics that may be associated with a company's willingness to accept the candidate (such as school performance, motivation, and illness related absences). Respondents were asked whether or not they would train this person. 22% of the profiles are accepted. However, our results demonstrate that the hypothetical bias - which is the difference between individual saying what they would do in a hypothetical setting and what they will do when they have the opportunity - is severe. Correcting for this bias using follow-up scales ("Are you sure?") reduces the overall acceptance in our sample to 9%. Keeping in mind the response rate to our survey of 35%, overall acceptance may be as low as 3%. Non-cognitive dysfunctions (e.g. non-adherence to regulations, difficulties with contacts with others) that are related to mental disorders

  9. Analysis of accessibility for buildings of a graduation school--an experiment in ergonomics training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioly, A S G; Oliveira, M D; Freitas, V H F

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a description of a study experience developed in the Discipline of Supervised Internship of the Industrial Design Course of the Federal University of Paraíba. The study is based on focused on ergonomics analysis and accessibility as an object of study, access into and out of buildings of classrooms and laboratories of the same institution. Among the buildings selected, which encompass where the course is established, is a contemporary building and a renovated building of historical and artistic values for current use. The study is characterized by a description of the objects of study, analysis of the reference literature and recommendations for adjustments in the event of any inconsistency with the accessibility standards. The experience of this supervised training provided an opportunity to perform design activities to a group of students in applied ergonomics, as well as enabling contact with professional practice, adding the contact with the appropriate guidelines governing intervention in historic heritage buildings.

  10. Errorless learning for training individuals with schizophrenia at a community mental health setting providing work experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Robert S; Liberman, Robert P; Becker, Deborah R; Drake, Robert E; Sugar, Catherine A; Green, Michael F

    2009-07-01

    The effects of errorless learning (EL) on work performance, tenure, and personal well-being were compared with conventional job training in a community mental health fellowship club offering 12-week time-limited work experience. Participants were 40 clinically stable schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder outpatients randomly assigned to EL vs conventional instruction (CI) at a thrift-type clothing store. EL participants received training on how to perform their assigned job tasks based on principles of EL, such as error reduction and automation of task performance. CI participants received training common to other community-based entry-level jobs that included verbal instruction, a visual demonstration, independent practice, and corrective feedback. Participants were scheduled to work 2 hours per week for 12 weeks. For both groups, job training occurred during the first 2 weeks at the worksite. Work performance (assessed using the Work Behavior Inventory, WBI) and personal well-being (self-esteem, job satisfaction, and work stress) were assessed at weeks 2, 4, and 12. Job tenure was defined as the number of weeks on the job or total number of hours worked prior to quitting or study end. The EL group performed better than the CI group on the Work Quality Scale from the WBI, and the group differences were relatively consistent over time. Results from the survival analyses of job tenure revealed a non-significant trend favoring EL. There were no group differences on self-esteem, job satisfaction, or work stress. The findings provide modest support for the extensions of EL to community settings for enhancing work performance.

  11. Does reflective web-based discussion strengthen nursing students' learning experiences during clinical training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Vähämaa, Kristiina

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this research was to study how a web-based discussion forum can be used as a supervision tool during nursing students' clinical training. The study emphasises peer support and its importance for the students. The empirical research was carried out at a Finnish university of applied sciences. 25 nursing students took part in web-based discussion during their eight-week clinical training period. All in all, 395 comments were submitted. The material was analysed by using categorisation and a thematic analysis process. Finally, the results were reported using a modified Salmon's (2002) 5-stage model of Teaching and Learning On-line and Mezirow's (1981) levels of reflection. The students motivated each other by sharing their feelings and experiences. They noticed the value of peer support and started to learn from each other as well. By reflecting on their experiences, the students progressed in their learning process and at the same time advanced their reflective thinking process. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practice, based on the students' needs and interests, could lead to a deeper understanding which could also result in better clinical skills. This method offers the lecturers the possibility to support and follow the professional growth process in a new evidence-based manner.

  12. Sensorimotor synchronization and perception of timing: effects of music training and task experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, Bruno H

    2010-04-01

    To assess individual differences in basic synchronization skills and in perceptual sensitivity to timing deviations, brief tests made up of isochronous auditory sequences containing phase shifts or tempo changes were administered to 31 college students (most of them with little or no music training) and nine highly trained musicians (graduate students of music performance). Musicians showed smaller asynchronies, lower tapping variability, and greater perceptual sensitivity than college students, on average. They also showed faster phase correction following a tempo change in the pacing sequence. Unexpectedly, however, phase correction following a simple phase shift was unusually quick in both groups, especially in college students. It emerged that some of the musicians, who had previous experience with laboratory synchronization tasks, showed a much slower corrective response to phase shifts than did the other musicians. When these others were retested after having gained some task experience, their phase correction was slower than previously. These results show (1) that instantaneous phase correction in response to phase perturbations is more common than was previously believed, and suggest that (2) gradual phase correction is not a shortcoming but reflects a reduction in the strength of sensorimotor coupling afforded by practice.

  13. OSCEs in Japanese postgraduate clinical training Hiroshima experience 2000-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, N; Ogawa, T

    2010-11-01

    Hiroshima University Hospital used the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) as a formative and summative assessment tool to evaluate trainees' competence. To reflect on Hiroshima University Hospital experience of OSCEs in postgraduate training in terms of OSCE structure and trainees' perception of the OSCE they attended. A total 27 OSCEs implemented in Hiroshima University Hospital from 2000 to 2009 were examined. The OSCE in postgraduate training, Hiroshima University Hospital, was influenced by many factors from organisational and pedagogical perspectives, and changed to meet social and curriculum needs. At each OSCE, all examinees were required to answer an anonymous questionnaire, which consisted of ten checklists, just after their experience of OSCE. Five hundred and forty trainees who attended each OSCE were required to answer a questionnaire and 510 were returned (94.4%). In the comparison between formative and summative OSCEs, the number of trainees who answered "the OSCE is meaningful" in formative OSCE was significantly higher than that in summative OSCE (P process of OSCE change has helped with educational reforms because of its adaptability. Flexible attitudes to change are necessary for stakeholders to achieve the desired reforms. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Measuring Extinction with ALE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Smith, J.; Fitch, J.

    2007-12-01

    ALE (Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction) is deployed at the University of New Mexico's (UNM) Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM. It has begun a year-long testing phase prior deployment at McDonald Observatory in support of the CCD/Transit Instrument II (CTI-II). ALE is designed to produce a high-precision measurement of atmospheric absorption and scattering above the observatory site every ten minutes of every moderately clear night. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is the VIS/UV/IR analog of radar, using a laser, telescope and time-gated photodetector instead of a radio transmitter, dish and receiver. In the case of ALE -- an elastic backscatter LIDAR -- 20ns-long, eye-safe laser pulses are launched 2500 times per second from a 0.32m transmitting telescope co-mounted with a 50mm short-range receiver on an alt-az mounted 0.67m long-range receiver. Photons from the laser pulse are scattered and absorbed as the pulse propagates through the atmosphere, a portion of which are scattered into the field of view of the short- and long-range receiver telescopes and detected by a photomultiplier. The properties of a given volume of atmosphere along the LIDAR path are inferred from both the altitude-resolved backscatter signal as well as the attenuation of backscatter signal from altitudes above it. We present ALE profiles from the commissioning phase and demonstrate some of the astronomically interesting atmospheric information that can be gleaned from these data, including, but not limited to, total line-of-sight extinction. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  15. Rural general practice training: experience of a rural general practice team and a postgraduate year two registrar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott-Jones J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Undertaking training in rural areas is a recognised way of helping recruit staff to work in rural communities. Postgraduate year two medical doctors in New Zealand have been able to undertake a three-month placement in rural practice as part of their pre-vocational training experience since November 2010. AIM: To describe the experience of a rural general practice team providing training to a postgraduate year two medical trainee, and to describe the teaching experience and range of conditions seen by the trainee. METHODS: A pre- and post-placement interview with staff, and analysis of a logbook of cases and teaching undertaken in the practice. RESULTS: The practice team's experience of having the trainee was positive, and the trainee was exposed to a wide range of conditions over 418 clinical encounters. The trainee received 22.5 hours of formal training over the three-month placement. DISCUSSION: Rural general practice can provide a wide range of clinical experience to a postgraduate year two medical trainee. Rural practices in New Zealand should be encouraged to offer teaching placements at this training level. Exposure to rural practice at every level of training is important to encourage doctors to consider rural practice as a career.

  16. Lesions of the lateral habenula facilitate active avoidance learning and threat extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mihee; Jo, Yong Sang; Lee, Yeon-Kyung; Choi, June-Seek

    2017-02-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic brain structure that provides strong projections to midbrain monoaminergic systems that are involved in motivation, emotion, and reinforcement learning. LHb neurons are known to convey information about aversive outcomes and negative prediction errors, suggesting a role in learning from aversive events. To test this idea, we examined the effects of electrolytic lesions of the LHb on signaled two-way active avoidance learning in which rats were trained to avoid an unconditioned stimulus (US) by taking a proactive shuttling response to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). The lesioned animals learned the avoidance response significantly faster than the control groups. In a separate experiment, we also investigated whether the LHb contributes to Pavlovian threat (fear) conditioning and extinction. Following paired presentations of the CS and the US, LHb-lesioned animals showed normal acquisition of conditioned response (CR) measured with freezing. However, extinction of the CR in the subsequent CS-only session was significantly faster. The enhanced performance in avoidance learning and in threat extinction jointly suggests that the LHb normally plays an inhibitory role in learning driven by absence of aversive outcomes.

  17. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T.; Lopez, Ana V.; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, A...

  18. Influence of teacher experience and training on their attitudes towards education of children with impaired vision in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As a contemporary educational tendency, inclusion captures a great deal of attention from researchers, and hence there are numerous studies dealing with various aspects of this process. This paper is aimed at studying whether experience in work with children with impaired vision and training for work with children with disabilities lead to differences in teacher evaluations of: (a the problems the children with impaired vision are facing in regular school; (b readiness of regular school for inclusive education of this group of children. The sample comprised 63 teachers in regular secondary schools: 54% have had previous experience in working with children with impaired vision, while 42.9% attended training for work with children with disabilities. The results of two-factor analysis (ANOVA suggest that teacher experience and training have an independent effect on their evaluations. Compared to the teachers without experience in work with visually impaired children, the teachers who have had this experience evaluate considerably lower the problems of adaptation and students’ fitting in school environment, complying with the demands of compulsory curriculum and the level of teacher education, while they evaluate much higher school readiness when it comes to the level of training of teaching staff. The teachers trained for work with children with disabilities evaluate lower than teachers without previous training the student problems in the accomplishment of the compulsory curriculum and much higher teacher training, adjustment of textbooks and teaching aids. The obtained findings indicate that teacher experience and training play a significant role in teacher readiness for inclusive education.

  19. The end-Permian mass extinction: A complex, multicausal extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most extensive in the history of life and remains one of the most complex. Understanding its causes is particularly important because it anchors the putative 26-m.y. pattern of periodic extinction. However, there is no good evidence for an impact and this extinction appears to be more complex than others, involving at least three phases. The first began with the onset of a marine regression during the Late Permian and resulting elimination of most marine basins, reduction in habitat area, and increased climatic instability; the first pulse of tetrapod extinctions occurred in South Africa at this time. The second phase involved increased regression in many areas (although apparently not in South China) and heightened climatic instability and environmental degradation. Release of gas hydrates, oxidation of marine carbon, and the eruption of the Siberian flood basalts occurred during this phase. The final phase of the extinction episode began with the earliest Triassic marine regression and destruction of nearshore continental habitats. Some evidence suggests oceanic anoxia may have developed during the final phase of the extinction, although it appears to have been insufficient to the sole cause of the extinction.

  20. An Investigation of Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior without Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athens, Elizabeth S.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    We manipulated relative reinforcement for problem behavior and appropriate behavior using differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) without an extinction component. Seven children with developmental disabilities participated. We manipulated duration (Experiment 1), quality (Experiment 2), delay (Experiment 3), or a combination of…

  1. The Relationship of a Pilot's Educational Background, Aeronautical Experience and Recency of Experience to Performance In Initial Training at a Regional Airline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Nancy R.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how a pilot's educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience relate to their performance during initial training at a regional airline. Results show that variables in pilots' educational background, aeronautical experience and recency of experience do predict performance in training. The most significant predictors include years since graduation from college, multi-engine time, total time and whether or not a pilot had military flying experience. Due to the pilot shortage, the pilots entering regional airline training classes since August 2013 have varied backgrounds, aeronautical experience and recency of experience. As explained by Edward Thorndike's law of exercise and the law of recency, pilots who are actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit strong performance in those areas and pilots who have not been actively using their aeronautical knowledge and exercising their flying skills should exhibit degraded performance in those areas. Through correlation, chi-square and multiple regression analysis, this study tests this theory as it relates to performance in initial training at a regional airline.

  2. Functional Extinctions of Species in Ecological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Säterberg, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Current rates of extinctions are estimated to be around 1000 times higher than background rates that would occur without anthropogenic impacts. These extinction rates refer to the traditional view of extinctions, i.e. numerical extinctions. This thesis is about another type of extinctions: functional extinctions. Those occur when the abundance of a species is too small to uphold the species’ ecologically interactive role. I have taken a theoretical approach and used dynamical models to invest...

  3. Sexual selection affects local extinction and turnover in bird communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P.F.; Sorci, G.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Boulinier, T.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting extinction risks has become a central goal for conservation and evolutionary biologists interested in population and community dynamics. Several factors have been put forward to explain risks of extinction, including ecological and life history characteristics of individuals. For instance, factors that affect the balance between natality and mortality can have profound effects on population persistence. Sexual selection has been identified as one such factor. Populations under strong sexual selection experience a number of costs ranging from increased predation and parasitism to enhanced sensitivity to environmental and demographic stochasticity. These findings have led to the prediction that local extinction rates should be higher for species/populations with intense sexual selection. We tested this prediction by analyzing the dynamics of natural bird communities at a continental scale over a period of 21 years (1975-1996), using relevant statistical tools. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, we found that sexual selection increased risks of local extinction (dichromatic birds had on average a 23% higher local extinction rate than monochromatic species). However, despite higher local extinction probabilities, the number of dichromatic species did not decrease over the period considered in this study. This pattern was caused by higher local turnover rates of dichromatic species, resulting in relatively stable communities for both groups of species. Our results suggest that these communities function as metacommunities, with frequent local extinctions followed by colonization. Anthropogenic factors impeding dispersal might therefore have a significant impact on the global persistence of sexually selected species.

  4. Webinar Training: an acceptable, feasible and effective approach for multi-site medical record abstraction: the BOWII experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Charles Meaghan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abstractor training is a key element in creating valid and reliable data collection procedures. The choice between in-person vs. remote or simultaneous vs. sequential abstractor training has considerable consequences for time and resource utilization. We conducted a web-based (webinar abstractor training session to standardize training across six individual Cancer Research Network (CRN sites for a study of breast cancer treatment effects in older women (BOWII. The goals of this manuscript are to describe the training session, its participants and participants' evaluation of webinar technology for abstraction training. Findings A webinar was held for all six sites with the primary purpose of simultaneously training staff and ensuring consistent abstraction across sites. The training session involved sequential review of over 600 data elements outlined in the coding manual in conjunction with the display of data entry fields in the study's electronic data collection system. Post-training evaluation was conducted via Survey Monkey©. Inter-rater reliability measures for abstractors within each site were conducted three months after the commencement of data collection. Ten of the 16 people who participated in the training completed the online survey. Almost all (90% of the 10 trainees had previous medical record abstraction experience and nearly two-thirds reported over 10 years of experience. Half of the respondents had previously participated in a webinar, among which three had participated in a webinar for training purposes. All rated the knowledge and information delivered through the webinar as useful and reported it adequately prepared them for data collection. Moreover, all participants would recommend this platform for multi-site abstraction training. Consistent with participant-reported training effectiveness, results of data collection inter-rater agreement within sites ranged from 89 to 98%, with a weighted average of

  5. The Experience of Training Pilots over the Age of 40 Transitioning to Technologically Advanced Aircraft: A Grounded Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmos, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Older adults face many challenges in the workplace, one being the advancement of technologies both in hardware and software development. The purpose of the study was to understand the learned experiences of older adults integrating advanced technologies into their critical decision-making work experience because of training. Literature claimed a…

  6. Mass Extinctions in Earth's History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. D.

    2002-12-01

    Mass extinctions are short intervals of elevated species death. Possible causes of Earth's mass extinctions are both external (astronomical) and internal (tectonic and biotic changes from planetary mechanisms). Paleontologists have identified five "major" mass extinctions (>50 die-off in less than a million years) and more than 20 other minor events over the past 550 million years. Earlier major extinction events undoubtedly also occurred, but we have no fossil record; these were probably associated with, for example, the early heavy bombardment that cleared out the solar system, the advent of oxygen in the atmosphere, and various "snowball Earth" events. Mass extinctions are viewed as both destructive (species death ) and constructive, in that they allow evolutionary innovation in the wake of species disappearances. From an astrobiological perspective, mass extinctions must be considered as able both to reduce biodiversity and even potentially end life on any planet. Of the five major mass extinctions identified on Earth, only one (the Cretaceous/Tertiary event 65 million years ago that famously killed off the dinosaurs ) is unambiguously related to the impact of an asteroid or comet ( 10-km diameter). The Permian/Triassic (250 Myr ago) and Triassic/Jurassic (202 Myr ago) events are now the center of debate between those favoring impact and those suggesting large volume flooding by basaltic lavas. The final two events, Ordovician (440 Myr ago) and Devonian (370 Myr ago) have no accepted causal mechanisms.

  7. Preventing return of fear in an animal model of anxiety: additive effects of massive extinction and extinction in multiple contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2013-06-01

    Fear conditioning and experimental extinction have been presented as models of anxiety disorders and exposure therapy, respectively. Moreover, the return of fear serves as a model of relapse after exposure therapy. Here we present two experiments, with rats as subjects in a lick suppression preparation, in which we assessed the additive effects of two different treatments to attenuate the return of fear. First, we evaluated whether two phenomena known to generate return of fear (i.e., spontaneous recovery and renewal) summate to produce a stronger reappearance of extinguished fear. At test, rats evaluated outside the extinction context following a long delay after extinction (i.e., a delayed context shift) exhibited greater return of extinguished fear than rats evaluated outside the extinction context alone, but return of extinguished fear following a delayed context shift did not significantly differ from the return of fear elicited in rats tested following a long delay after extinction alone. Additionally, extinction in multiple contexts and a massive extinction treatment each attenuated the strong return of fear produced by a delayed context shift. Moreover, the conjoint action of these treatments was significantly more successful in preventing the reappearance of extinguished fear, suggesting that extensive cue exposure administered in several different therapeutic settings has the potential to reduce relapse after therapy for anxiety disorders, more than either manipulation alone.

  8. Training health care professionals in root cause analysis: a cross-sectional study of post-training experiences, benefits and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bowie Paul

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Root cause analysis (RCA originated in the manufacturing engineering sector but has been adapted for routine use in healthcare to investigate patient safety incidents and facilitate organizational learning. Despite the limitations of the RCA evidence base, healthcare authorities and decision makers in NHS Scotland – similar to those internationally - have invested heavily in developing training programmes to build local capacity and capability, and this is a cornerstone of many organizational policies for investigating safety-critical issues. However, to our knowledge there has been no systematic attempt to follow-up and evaluate post-training experiences of RCA-trained staff in Scotland. Given the significant investment in people, time and funding we aimed to capture and learn from the reported experiences, benefits and attitudes of RCA-trained staff and the perceived impact on healthcare systems and safety. Methods We adapted a questionnaire used in a published Australian research study to undertake a cross sectional online survey of health care professionals (e.g. nursing & midwifery, medical doctors and pharmacists formally trained in RCA by a single territorial health board region in NHS Scotland. Results A total of 228/469 of invited staff completed the survey (48%. A majority of respondents had yet to participate in a post-training RCA investigation (n=127, 55.7%. Of RCA-experience staff, 71 had assumed a lead investigator role (70.3% on one or more occasions. A clear majority indicated that their improvement recommendations were generally or partly implemented (82%. The top three barriers to RCA success were cited as: lack of time (54.6%, unwilling colleagues (34% and inter-professional differences (31%. Differences in agreement levels between RCA-experienced and inexperienced respondents were noted on whether a follow-up session would be beneficial after conducting RCA (65.3% v 39.4% and if peer feedback on RCA

  9. Issues and Challenges of Providing Online Inservice Teacher Training: Korea's experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insung Jung

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available To meet the need for flexible and interactive teacher training, the Korean government created a Cyber Teacher Training Center (CTTC in the summer of 1997. The CTTC project developed a software platform for managing online inservice teacher training, 11 general training courses, with plans to add more courses each year. This article examines the needs met through the introduction of online inservice teacher training and the strategies that have been employed in the process. This paper also analyzes the major impacts of online teacher training and looks at the challenges facing online inservice teacher training in the coming years.

  10. Vibration immission forecast by means of train equivalent synthetic vibration experiments

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    Steinhauser Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration abatement measures at a railway track require forecasts before the rails are put into place. Due to the multiple feedback system between train, track, geodynamics of the local underground and the dynamic behavior of the neighbourhood buildings these prognoses become very elaborate. All the parameters of the dynamic system scatter extremely as the results from numerous investigations prove. This concerns vibration emission spectra, tunnel mobility, geodynamic vibration loss along the transfer through the underground as well as the natural frequencies from buildings and ceilings. Therefore experimental in-situ investigations are indispensable for trustworthy forecasts. In this paper the VibroScan method is presented, whose basic idea is to implement the principle of equivalence between the synthetic vibrations used for the experiments and train vibration emissions at the highest possible degree. This is focused on emission spectra, force of excitation, unsprung wheelset mass and axle load. The necessary experimental provisions are discussed and some examples of results are given like the protection of the Musikverein building in Vienna or the Sagrada Familia basilica in Barcelona against vibrations from tunnels in the immediate neighbourhood.

  11. Teacher training workshops in education: summary of 15 years' personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, J J

    1985-09-01

    Teachers of doctors and other health personnel have become increasingly aware of the potential usefulness of applying to their programmes the principles and methods elaborated by educational scientists. Teacher training took many forms, but the workshop was by far the most common. This report is a summary account of the personal experience of the author over 15 years, from 1968 to 1983, as organizer and leader of more than 100 workshops for eleven categories of health professions, in sixteen working languages for over 2000 participants in thirty countries. It shows the way the organization of the workshops was modified from a teacher-centred to a learner-centred approach. The report goes on to describe the first implementation phase (1972-1975), which showed the need for efficient learning materials such as a semi-programmed text providing guidance during the learner's progression through the whole educational cycle. It also became clear that the working language used during a workshop was as important factor in the determination of its success. The report describes further how leaders were selected and trained through 'learning by doing' and how the second implementation phase (1976-1983) developed so that the programme of each workshop was prepared after (and not before) the beginning of the workshop on the basis of independent choices made by each participant.

  12. An evaluation of experiences and views of Scottish leadership training opportunities amongst primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Ailsa; Allbutt, Helen; Munro, Lucy; MacLeod, Marion; Kennedy, Susan; Cameron, Donald; Scoular, Ken; Orr, Graham; Gillies, John

    2017-05-01

    To determine experiences of leadership training of six primary care professions in Scotland and consider future development. A questionnaire on previous leadership course attendance and future intentions was distributed to community pharmacists, general dental practitioners, general practitioners, practice nurses, practice managers and optometrists. Analysis comprised descriptive statistics for closed questions and management of textual data. Formal leadership training participation was fairly low except for practice managers. Leadership was perceived to facilitate development of staff, problem-solving and team working. Preference for future delivery was similar across the six professions with e-modules and small group learning being preferred. Time and financial pressures to undertake courses were common barriers for professionals. Leadership is key to improve quality, safety and efficiency of care and help deliver innovative services and transformative change. To date, leadership provision for primary care professionals has typically been patchy, uni-disciplinary in focus and undertaken outwith work environments. Future development must reflect needs of busy primary care professionals and the reality of team working to deliver integrated services at local level.

  13. [Training as an institutional function: institutional transformation experience by the Paraná Sanitary Company].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübert, I H

    1982-01-01

    The experience of the Companhia de Saneamento do Paraná (SANEPAR) in recent years show that it is possible for a public service enterprise to operate on the entrepreneurial lines of a private business. For it to do this, it must start out with an awareness of entrepreneurial values and by creating an atmosphere that is congenial at the same time to the service mentality, motivation, the realization of individual potential, and efficiency. When the entrepreneurial values to be espoused have been defined and translated into concrete and measurable targets, incentives must be provided. In consequence of measures of this kind, SANEPAR has undergone a distinct institutional transformation whose concrete results are visible and measureable. A central feature of this transformation has been the broad participation and consequent involvement of the employees in the fate of the organization. Because of this involvement and the importance given to human resources, it became necessary to formulate and carry out an extensive personnel development program, in which training has come to the forefront as a means for stimulating and accelerating the realization of human potential. The measures taken have proved highly valid and have indelibly stamped the organization with the values and mentality of service. The assimilation of entrepreneurial values and the motivation and training of the employees has brought about real conditions for the growth and development of the entire organization.

  14. Experience of Use of Knowledge Relative Assessment System for Training in Area of Civil Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova Elena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays E-Learning is becoming more and more relevant in training civil engineers. Electronic resources are used for classroom activities and for independent work. It allows allocating extra time for development of practical skills. Experience of remote knowledge control application in the educational process of Moscow State University of Civil Engineering is presented in the article. The control system is called Knowledge Relative Assessment System using Bekker's method. The following steps of system using are described in detail in the article: loading test material, action of users, protection from wrong acts and calculation of rating. The main merits and demerits from the point of view of teachers and students are listed.

  15. Impact of Sales Experience and Training on Sales Presentation Skills between Industrial Salespersons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Abdolvand

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to examine the relations between important sales presentation skills and salesperson job performance. Data on each construct in the model was gathered and the relations analyzed using LISREL software. More sales skills need to be considered and salespeople in other industry and also in other than those in the business to business environment should be studied. Finding shows that one of the salesperson characteristics, sales experience, underlies all the sales presentation skills and that the other, training, is associated with all the sales presentation skills with the exception of active listening skills. Sales managers are urged to ensure their business to business salespeople develop their skills in adaptive communication and closing as one means to improve sales performance.

  16. The impact of soft skills training on female youth employment: Evidence from a randomized experiment in Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Groh, Matthew; Krishnan, Nandini; McKenzie, David; Vishwanath, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Employers around the world complain that youth lack the soft skills needed for success in the workplace. In response, a number of employment programs have begun to incorporate soft skills training, but to date there has been little evidence as to the effectiveness of such programs. This paper reports on a randomized experiment in Jordan in which female community college graduates were randomly assigned to a soft skills training program. Despite this program being twice as long in length as th...

  17. FAAH inhibitor, URB-597, promotes extinction and CB(1) antagonist, SR141716, inhibits extinction of conditioned aversion produced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal, but not extinction of conditioned preference produced by morphine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwell, Laurie A; Satvat, Elham; Lang, Stefan T; Allen, Craig P; Leri, Francesco; Parker, Linda A

    2009-11-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid (eCB) system is involved in extinction of learned behaviours. Using operant and classical conditioning procedures, the potential of the fatty acid amide (FAAH) inhibitor, URB-597, and the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, SR141716, to promote and inhibit (respectively) extinction of learned responses previously motivated by either rewarding or aversive stimuli was investigated. In the operant conditioning procedure (Expt. 1), rats previously trained to lever press for sucrose reward were administered URB-597 (0.3 mg/kg) or the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716 (2.5 mg/kg) prior to each of three extinction trials. In the conditioned floor preference procedure (Expts 2a-d), rats trained to associate morphine with one of two distinctive floors were administered one of several doses of the CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist, AM-251 (Expt 2a) or URB-597 (Expt 2b and 2d) prior to each extinction/test trial wherein a choice of both floors was presented and prior to forced exposure to each floor (Expt 2c). In the conditioned floor aversion procedure (Expt. 3), rats trained to associate a naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal with a floor cue were administered URB-597 or SR141716 prior to each of 24 extinction/testing trials. URB-597 did not promote and SR141716 did not reduce extinction rates for sucrose reward-induced operant responding (Expt. 1) or morphine-induced conditioned floor preference (Expts. 2a-d). In contrast, URB-597 facilitated, whereas SR141716 impaired, extinction of the conditioned floor aversion (Expt. 3). These data support previous reports that the eCB system selectively facilitates extinction of aversive memories. URB-597 may prove useful in targeting extinction of aversively motivated behaviours.

  18. Becoming a Mentor: The Impact of Training and the Experience of Mentoring University Students on the Autism Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Josette; Stevens, Gillian; Girdler, Sonya

    2016-01-01

    While it is widely recognised that the number of young adults diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disoders (ASD) is increasing, there is currently limited understanding of effective support for the transition to adulthood. One approach gaining increasing attention in the university sector is specialised peer mentoring. The aim of this inductive study was to understand the impact of peer mentor training on seven student mentors working with university students with an ASD. Kirkpatrick's model framed a mixed methods evaluation of the mentors' training and description of their experience. Overall, the training was well received by the mentors, who reported on average a 29% increase in their ASD knowledge following the training. Results from the semi-structured interviews conducted three months after the training, found that mentors felt that the general ASD knowledge they gained as part of their training had been essential to their role. The mentors described how their overall experience had been positive and reported that the training and support provided to them was pivotal to their ability to succeed in as peer mentors to students with ASD. This study provides feedback in support of specialist peer-mentoring programs for university students and can inform recommendations for future programs and research.

  19. Blockade of Dopamine Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Impairs Learning Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman-Assif, Orit; Laurent, Vincent; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to investigate the role of dopamine activity in learning to inhibit conditioned fear responses (freezing) in extinction. In Experiment 1, rats systemically injected with the D2 dopamine antagonist, haloperidol, froze more across multiple extinction sessions and on a drug-free retention test than control rats. In…

  20. Blockade of Dopamine Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Impairs Learning Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman-Assif, Orit; Laurent, Vincent; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments used rats to investigate the role of dopamine activity in learning to inhibit conditioned fear responses (freezing) in extinction. In Experiment 1, rats systemically injected with the D2 dopamine antagonist, haloperidol, froze more across multiple extinction sessions and on a drug-free retention test than control rats. In…

  1. Occasional Reinforced Responses during Extinction Can Slow the Rate of Reacquisition of an Operant Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Three experiments with rats examined reacquisition of an operant response after either extinction or a response-elimination procedure that included occasional reinforced responses during extinction. In each experiment, reacquisition was slower when response elimination had included occasional reinforced responses, although the effect was…

  2. The Sixth Great Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagler, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Five past great mass extinctions have occurred during Earth's history. Humanity is currently in the midst of a sixth, human-induced great mass extinction of plant and animal life (e.g., Alroy 2008; Jackson 2008; Lewis 2006; McDaniel and Borton 2002; Rockstrom et al. 2009; Rohr et al. 2008; Steffen, Crutzen, and McNeill 2007; Thomas et al. 2004;…

  3. Dilemmas in the process of weight reduction: Exploring how women experience training as a means of losing weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Synne Groven

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients diagnosed with obesity are usually offered group-based behavior interventions which include dietary advice and exercise programs. In particular, high-intensity training—combining weight lifting with aerobic exercising—has been proven effective for losing weight. Moreover, recent studies have shown that persons participating in high-intensity training are more likely to maintain their weight loss compared to persons with lower levels of physical activity. However, most of the research in the field has made use of quantitative methods focusing on the measurable effect of such interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to show how the training is experienced from a first-person perspective, namely the patients themselves. Our hope was to shed some new light on the process of weight loss that concerns more than the measurable “impacts” of the training. A qualitative approach was used based on interviews with five women selected from a primary healthcare clinic in Norway. Our results show that experiences of training are connected to the participants’ general experience of being overweight. Both relationships to other people and earlier experiences are important for how the training is carried out and perceived. Five themes were identified supporting this line of argument: (1 the gaze of others; (2 a common ground; (3 dependence of close-follow up; (4 bodily discomfort as painful; and (5 aiming for results—an ambivalent experience. The results highlight the importance of finding the proper context and support for each patient's needs.

  4. Resurrecting extinct interactions with extant substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Christine J; Hansen, Dennis M; Jones, Carl G; Zuël, Nicolas; Harris, Stephen

    2011-05-10

    There is increasing evidence that restoration ecologists should be most concerned with restoring species interactions rather than species diversity per se [1]. Rewilding with taxon substitutes, the intentional introduction of exotic species to replace the ecosystem functions of recently extinct species, is one way to reverse ecosystem dysfunction following the loss of species interactions [2]. This is highly controversial [3], in part because of a lack of rigorous scientific studies [4]. Here we present the first empirical evidence of an in situ rewilding project undertaken as a hypothesis-driven ecosystem management option. On Ile aux Aigrettes, a 25-hectare island off Mauritius, the critically endangered large-fruited endemic ebony, Diospyros egrettarum (Ebenaceae), was seed-dispersal limited after the extinction of all native large-bodied frugivores, including giant tortoises. We introduced exotic Aldabra giant tortoises, Aldabrachelys gigantea, to disperse the ebony seeds. Not only did the tortoises ingest the large fruits and disperse substantial numbers of ebony seeds, but tortoise gut passage also improved seed germination, leading to the widespread, successful establishment of new ebony seedlings. Our results demonstrate that the introduction of these exotic frugivores is aiding the recovery of ebonies. We argue for more reversible rewilding experiments to investigate whether extinct species interactions can be restored.

  5. Accelerating experience : utility sector case studies in training and knowledge management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel-Ferrari, C.C. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the development of effective training and knowledge management systems for recently hired personnel in electric utilities. Case studies of best practices from electric utilities in Ontario, consultants, and universities were used to develop an overview of current training practices. Methods of identifying, attracting, and recruiting personnel were presented and knowledge management and mentoring programs were discussed. The use of training programs in developing knowledge databases was also evaluated. Knowledge management formats included qualification training; simulation training; knowledge transfer; and curriculum development. Human resources, revenue, and management issues currently challenging electric utilities were discussed along with various new training practices. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  6. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Injection of a Benzodiazepine (Midazolam) Impairs Extinction but Spares Re-Extinction of Conditioned Fear Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Rats were subjected to one or two cycles of fear conditioning and extinction, injected with a benzodiazepine, midazolam, before the first or second extinction, and tested for long-term inhibition of fear responses (freezing). In Experiment 1, inhibition of context-conditioned fear was spared when midazolam was injected before the second…

  7. Systemic or Intra-Amygdala Injection of a Benzodiazepine (Midazolam) Impairs Extinction but Spares Re-Extinction of Conditioned Fear Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Genevra; Harris, Justin A.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Rats were subjected to one or two cycles of fear conditioning and extinction, injected with a benzodiazepine, midazolam, before the first or second extinction, and tested for long-term inhibition of fear responses (freezing). In Experiment 1, inhibition of context-conditioned fear was spared when midazolam was injected before the second…

  8. Experiences in the health services network and in the street: Captures and detours in psychology training for public health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Ana Kalliny de Sousa; Amorim, Ana Karenina de Melo Arraes; Romagnoli, Roberta Carvalho

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the internships at the psychosocial health system of Natal, Northeast region of Brazil, as part of training in psychology. The objective of these internships is to offer students work experiences in public health both inside and outside health services. Based on Institutional Analysis and Schizoanalysis, these experiences were examined through two analysers: (1) the power of knowledge and (2) the need for by-passes. We conclude that health provokes tensions between instituted practices in health services and those instituted in psychology training.

  9. 'Feel the Feeling': Psychological practitioners' experience of acceptance and commitment therapy well-being training in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardley, Matt Nj; Flaxman, Paul E; Willig, Carla; Gillanders, David

    2016-08-01

    This empirical study investigates psychological practitioners' experience of worksite training in acceptance and commitment therapy using an interpretative phenomenological analysis methodology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight participants, and three themes emerged from the interpretative phenomenological analysis data analysis: influence of previous experiences, self and others and impact and application The significance of the experiential nature of the acceptance and commitment therapy training is explored as well as the dual aspects of developing participants' self-care while also considering their own clinical practice. Consistencies and inconsistencies across acceptance and commitment therapy processes are considered as well as clinical implications, study limitations and future research suggestions.

  10. The context dependency of extinction negates the effectiveness of cognitive enhancement to reduce cocaine-primed reinstatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Sherri; Wagner, John J

    2013-09-01

    With respect to the treatment of addiction, the objective of extinction training is to decrease drug-seeking behavior by repeatedly exposing the patient to cues in the absence of unconditioned reinforcement. Such exposure therapy typically takes place in a novel (clinical) environment. This is potentially problematic, as the effects of extinction training include a context dependent component and therefore diminished efficacy is expected upon the patient's return to former drug-seeking/taking environments. We have reported that treatment with the NMDAR coagonist d-serine is effective in facilitating the effects of extinction to reduce cocaine-primed reinstatement. The present study assesses d-serine's effectiveness in reducing drug-primed reinstatement under conditions in which extinction training occurs in a novel environment. After 22 days of cocaine self-administration (0.5 mg/kg) in context "A", animals underwent 5 extinction training sessions in context "B". Immediately after each extinction session in "B", animals received either saline or d-serine (60 mg/kg) treatment. Our results indicate that d-serine treatment following extinction in "B" had no effect on either IV or IP cocaine-primed reinstatement conducted in "A". These results stand in contrast to our previous findings where extinction occurred in "A", indicating that d-serine's effectiveness in facilitating extinction training to reduce drug-primed reinstatement is not transferable to a novel extinction environment. This inability of d-serine treatment to reduce the context specificity of extinction training may explain the inconsistent effects observed in clinical studies published to date in which adjunctive cognitive enhancement treatment has been combined with behavioral therapy without significant benefit.

  11. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect and the contingent-sampling hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Guy; Erev, Ido

    2013-12-01

    The partial-reinforcement extinction effect (PREE) implies that learning under partial reinforcements is more robust than learning under full reinforcements. While the advantages of partial reinforcements have been well-documented in laboratory studies, field research has failed to support this prediction. In the present study, we aimed to clarify this pattern. Experiment 1 showed that partial reinforcements increase the tendency to select the promoted option during extinction; however, this effect is much smaller than the negative effect of partial reinforcements on the tendency to select the promoted option during the training phase. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the overall effect of partial reinforcements varies inversely with the attractiveness of the alternative to the promoted behavior: The overall effect is negative when the alternative is relatively attractive, and positive when the alternative is relatively unattractive. These results can be captured with a contingent-sampling model assuming that people select options that provided the best payoff in similar past experiences. The best fit was obtained under the assumption that similarity is defined by the sequence of the last four outcomes.

  12. Association between physicians’ experience after training and maternal obstetrical outcomes: cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Sindhu K; Nicholson, Sean; Herrin, Jeph; Asch, David A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between obstetricians’ years of experience after training and the maternal complications of their patients during their first 40 years of post-residency practice. Design Retrospective cohort analysis. Setting Obstetrical discharges from acute care hospitals in Florida and New York between academic years 1992 and 2009. Population 6 704 311 deliveries performed by 5175 obstetricians. Main outcome measure Three composite measures of maternal complication rates per physician year from vaginal and cesarean births separately and combined, adjusted for secular trends. Results Obstetricians’ maternal complication rates declined during the first three decades after completion of residency. The improvement was largest in the first decade and diminished thereafter. For all deliveries, the change was −0.21 (95% confidence interval −0.23 to −0.19) percentage points per year in the first decade, −0.11 (−0.13 to −0.09) percentage points per year in the second decade, and −0.05 (−0.08 to −0.01) percentage points in the third decade (P<0.001 for second to first decade comparison; P=0.001 for third to second decade comparison). The patterns were comparable for cesarean deliveries and vaginal deliveries and across several sensitivity checks. Conclusions Among obstetricians practicing in Florida and New York, those with more years of experience had fewer maternal complications. This association persisted over the first three decades of practice but diminished in magnitude. PMID:23538919

  13. Advocacy training for pediatricians: the experience of running a course in leeds, United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Mary

    2003-09-01

    Given the critical role of pediatricians in child advocacy, it is important to understand how to train pediatricians to speak out to improve the health and well-being of children. This article describes the experience of developing and implementing a 5-day child advocacy course at the University of Leeds, which formed part of a master's program. Eight community pediatricians and pediatric registrars participated in the initial course. The material from the course has been published in Archives of Disease in Childhood.(1) This exercise was about the only time as a teacher that I also started at the same level as the students in the course. We started off by defining what we meant by advocacy. The definition that we chose was "the active support of a cause or course of action," and we applied this to any child problem for which the system was at fault and use of action was required. What is needed to be an effective advocate? One must have an awareness of issues confronting children, in particular on the local level and not only on the national and international levels. One then needs to gain an understanding of the political framework of the issue, how change can occur, and how one can contribute to bringing about the necessary change. Then follows the identification and acquisition of the practical skills and competencies related to effecting these changes. Finally, one needs to have a successful experience tackling a particular issue to realize that one can be effective.

  14. Increasing sensitivity of pulse EPR experiments using echo train detection schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentink-Vigier, F.; Collauto, A.; Feintuch, A.; Kaminker, I.; Tarle, V.; Goldfarb, D.

    2013-11-01

    Modern pulse EPR experiments are routinely used to study the structural features of paramagnetic centers. They are usually performed at low temperatures, where relaxation times are long and polarization is high, to achieve a sufficient Signal/Noise Ratio (SNR). However, when working with samples whose amount and/or concentration are limited, sensitivity becomes an issue and therefore measurements may require a significant accumulation time, up to 12 h or more. As the detection scheme of practically all pulse EPR sequences is based on the integration of a spin echo - either primary, stimulated or refocused - a considerable increase in SNR can be obtained by replacing the single echo detection scheme by a train of echoes. All these echoes, generated by Carr-Purcell type sequences, are integrated and summed together to improve the SNR. This scheme is commonly used in NMR and here we demonstrate its applicability to a number of frequently used pulse EPR experiments: Echo-Detected EPR, Davies and Mims ENDOR (Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance), DEER (Electron-Electron Double Resonance|) and EDNMR (Electron-Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR)-Detected NMR), which were combined with a Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) type detection scheme at W-band. By collecting the transient signal and integrating a number of refocused echoes, this detection scheme yielded a 1.6-5 folds SNR improvement, depending on the paramagnetic center and the pulse sequence applied. This improvement is achieved while keeping the experimental time constant and it does not introduce signal distortion.

  15. Signal or noise: brain network interactions underlying the experience and training of mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooneyham, Benjamin W; Mrazek, Michael D; Mrazek, Alissa J; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2016-04-01

    A broad set of brain regions has been associated with the experience and training of mindfulness. Many of these regions lie within key intrinsic brain networks, including the executive control, salience, and default networks. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the cognitive neuroscience of mindfulness through the lens of network science. We describe the characteristics of the intrinsic brain networks implicated in mindfulness and summarize the relevant findings pertaining to changes in functional connectivity (FC) within and between these networks. Convergence across these findings suggests that mindfulness may be associated with increased FC between two regions within the default network: the posterior cingulate cortex and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, extensive meditation experience may be associated with increased FC between the insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. However, little consensus has emerged within the existing literature owing to the diversity of operational definitions of mindfulness, neuroimaging methods, and network characterizations. We describe several challenges to develop a coherent cognitive neuroscience of mindfulness and to provide detailed recommendations for future research.

  16. Experiences for Education –What for? Training and inclusion in perspective of Critical Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdelúcia Alves da Costa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay discusses possibilities of formative experiences in education and its relation to inclusion, with reference to Critical Theory, with emphasis on the thought ofAdorno (2002; 2000, as to its emancipatory dimension inprocess of training of teachers and their activities in the area of inclusive education. Adorno analyzes the purposes of education as having central question - ‘Education – What for?’, starting from the initial idea about the formative experiences, as marked by resistance actions that are contradictory and dialectically against what is standardized, imposed and regulated and crystallized in class society, under the aegis of the capital. Adorno, to consider education after Auschwitz, says that causes that led to barbarism still exist, as they have to persist in the fundamental conditions that generate this regression. Despite the non-visibility of the current woes in its entirety, social pressure keeps imposing on all individuals, with or without disabilities, and at current stage of civilization, education makes sense only if directed to critical self- reflection and combating prejudice in school and other social organizations. Thus, only effective power against principle of Auschwitz would beautonomy, power to reflection and self-determination of individuals in society in favor of social inclusion and inclusive education.

  17. Training for Changing Managerial Role Behaviour: Experience in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    The process of organizational transformation in a bank included a training program for managers to prepare them for changing role behaviors. Training emphasized role clarity, coping with role pressures, team building, raising expectations, and interpersonal dynamics. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  18. Thermal Transgressions and Phanerozoic Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, T. R.; Kidder, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    A number of significant Phanerozoic extinctions are associated with marine transgressions that were probably driven by rapid ocean warming. The conditions associated with what we call thermal transgressions are extremely stressful to life on Earth. The Earth system setting associated with end-Permian extinction exemplifies an end-member case of our model. The conditions favoring extreme warmth and sea-level increases driven by thermal expansion are also conducive to changes in ocean circulation that foster widespread anoxia and sulfidic subsurface ocean waters. Equable climates are characterized by reduced wind shear and weak surface ocean circulation. Late Permian and Early Triassic thermohaline circulation differs considerably from today's world, with minimal polar sinking and intensified mid-latitude sinking that delivers sulfate from shallow evaporative areas to deeper water where it is reduced to sulfide. Reduced nutrient input to oceans from land at many of the extinction intervals results from diminished silicate weathering and weakened delivery of iron via eolian dust. The falloff in iron-bearing dust leads to minimal nitrate production, weakening food webs and rendering faunas and floras more susceptible to extinction when stressed. Factors such as heat, anoxia, ocean acidification, hypercapnia, and hydrogen sulfide poisoning would significantly affect these biotas. Intervals of tectonic quiescence set up preconditions favoring extinctions. Reductions in chemical silicate weathering lead to carbon dioxide buildup, oxygen drawdown, nutrient depletion, wind and ocean current abatement, long-term global warming, and ocean acidification. The effects of extinction triggers such as large igneous provinces, bolide impacts, and episodes of sudden methane release are more potent against the backdrop of our proposed preconditions. Extinctions that have characteristics we call for in the thermal transgressions include the Early Cambrian Sinsk event, as well as

  19. Experiences of training and implementation of integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI in South Africa: a qualitative evaluation of the IMCI case management training course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollins Nigel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI is a strategy to reduce mortality and morbidity in children under-5 years by improving management of common illnesses at primary level. IMCI has been shown to improve health worker performance, but constraints have been identified in achieving sufficient coverage to improve child survival, and implementation remains sub-optimal. At the core of the IMCI strategy is a clinical guideline whereby health workers use a series of algorithms to assess and manage a sick child, and give counselling to carers. IMCI is taught using a structured 11-day training course that combines classroom work with clinical practise; a variety of training techniques are used, supported by comprehensive training materials and detailed instructions for facilitators. Methods We conducted focus group discussions with IMCI trained health workers to explore their experiences of the methodology and content of the IMCI training course, whether they thought they gained the skills required for implementation, and their experiences of follow-up visits. Results Health workers found the training interesting, informative and empowering, and there was consensus that it improved their skills in managing sick children. They appreciated the variety of learning methods employed, and felt that repetition was important to reinforce knowledge and skills. Facilitators were rated highly for their knowledge and commitment, as well as their ability to identify problems and help participants as required. However, health workers felt strongly that the training time was too short to acquire skills in all areas of IMCI. Their increased confidence in managing sick children was identified by health workers as an enabling factor for IMCI implementation in the workplace, but additional time required for IMCI consultations was expressed as a major barrier. Although follow-up visits were described as very helpful, these were often delayed

  20. No sex diference in contextual control over the expression of latent inhibition and extinction in pavlovian fear conditioning in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, J.H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Three experiments with Wistar rats searched for a sex difference in contextual control over the expression of latent inhibition and extinction. Experiment 1 used a latent inhibition procedure; Experiments 2 and 3 employed an extinction preparation. All experiments used a shock as the unconditioned s

  1. Rats that sign-track are resistant to Pavlovian but not instrumental extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Allison M; Singer, Bryan F; Fitzpatrick, Christopher J; Morrow, Jonathan D; Robinson, Terry E

    2016-01-01

    Individuals vary in the extent to which they attribute incentive salience to a discrete cue (conditioned stimulus; CS) that predicts reward delivery (unconditioned stimulus; US), which results in some individuals approaching and interacting with the CS (sign-trackers; STs) more than others (goal-trackers; GTs). Here we asked how periods of non-reinforcement influence conditioned responding in STs vs. GTs, in both Pavlovian and instrumental tasks. After classifying rats as STs or GTs by pairing a retractable lever (the CS) with the delivery of a food pellet (US), we introduced periods of non-reinforcement, first by simply withholding the US (i.e., extinction training; experiment 1), then by signaling alternating periods of reward (R) and non-reward (NR) within the same session (experiments 2 and 3). We also examined how alternating R and NR periods influenced instrumental responding for food (experiment 4). STs and GTs did not differ in their ability to discriminate between R and NR periods in the instrumental task. However, in Pavlovian settings STs and GTs responded to periods of non-reward very differently. Relative to STs, GTs very rapidly modified their behavior in response to periods of non-reward, showing much faster extinction and better and faster discrimination between R and NR conditions. These results highlight differences between Pavlovian and instrumental extinction learning, and suggest that if a Pavlovian CS is strongly attributed with incentive salience, as in STs, it may continue to bias attention toward it, and to facilitate persistent and relatively inflexible responding, even when it is no longer followed by reward.

  2. Structured On-the-Job Training: Unleashing Employee Experience in the Workplace. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ronald L.

    This book presents detailed guidelines for conducting structured on-the-job training (S-OJT), which is training based on the premise that OJT can be structured and planned so as to produce more predictable and reliable training outcomes. Together, the book's 15 chapters systematically examine the topics of meeting the demand for employee…

  3. Low-frequency stimulation of the ventral hippocampus facilitates extinction of contextual fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleren, Carine; Tallarida, Isabelle; Guiniec, Emilie Le; Janin, François; Nachon, Ophélie; Canini, Frédéric; Spennato, Guillaume; Moreau, Jean-Luc; Garcia, René

    2013-03-01

    Difficulties to treat fear-associated disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder, are thought to result from dysfunction in fear extinction learning and/or memory. Animal studies on extinction modulation are therefore promising for the development of new treatments. Recent rat studies, including ones using low-frequency stimulation (LFS), have demonstrated that the ventral hippocampus (VH) modulates extinction memory. The present study explores whether the VH also modulates extinction learning. For this, rats were implanted with stimulating electrodes in the VH and experienced contextual fear conditioning, followed 6 or 24 h later by VH LFS and three sessions of extinction training. We found that, whatever the delay used (6 or 24 h), animals that received VH LFS displayed persistent low levels of freezing from the second extinction session, whereas control rats showed low levels of freezing only during the third session. In animals submitted to a stress condition (provoked by a single inescapable foot-shock followed by three sessions of situational reminders) prior to fear conditioning, VH LFS also reduced freezing levels, which, in contrast, remained high in control rats during the course of extinction training. These data suggest that LFS, targeting the VH, may be useful in reducing fear responses during extinction learning.

  4. Extinction learning deficit in a rodent model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brackney Ryan J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficient operant extinction has been hypothesized to be constitutive of ADHD dysfunction. In order to elucidate the behavioral mechanisms underlying this deficit, the performance of an animal model of ADHD, the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR, was compared against the performance of a control strain, the Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY during extinction. Method Following extensive training of lever pressing under variable interval schedules of food reinforcement (reported previously, SHR and WKY rats were exposed to two sessions of extinction training. Extinction data was analyzed using the Dynamic Bi-Exponential Refractory Model (DBERM of operant performance. DBERM assumes that operant responses are organized in bouts separated by pauses; during extinction, bouts may decline across multiple dimensions, including frequency and length. DBERM parameters were estimated using hierarchical Bayesian modeling. Results SHR responded more than WKY during the first extinction session. DBERM parameter estimates revealed that, at the onset of extinction, SHR produced more response bouts than WKY. Over the course of extinction, response bouts progressively shortened for WKY but not for SHR. Conclusions Based on prior findings on the sensitivity of DBERM parameters to motivational and schedule manipulations, present data suggests that (1 more frequent response bouts in SHR are likely related to greater incentive motivation, and (2 the persistent length of bouts in SHR are likely related to a slower updating of the response-outcome association. Overall, these findings suggest specific motivational and learning deficits that may explain ADHD-related impairments in operant performance.

  5. Exploring Leadership Capability Team Leaders for Construction Industry in Malaysia: Training and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, W. H. N. Wan; Halim, F. Ab; Libunao, W. H.

    2017-08-01

    It has been said that the construction industry must unleash its potential as a source of wealth creation and provide opportunity for the betterment of quality of life. In ensuring the quality of workmanship at construction sites, supervisory skills of site supervisors need to be enhanced. It stressed out that to match business growth and excellence overseas, we must recognize and act on the importance of continuously developing niche expertise and capabilities. Undoubtedly, the role of research in determining the specific leadership skills and the needed core capabilities cannot be over-emphasized. In ensuring the quality of workmanship at construction sites, leadership skills especially supervisory skill for site supervisors need to be enhanced. In this study, quantitative research design with survey questionnaire was used to collect the data and simple random sampling was employed in selecting 248 respondents involving team leaders in construction industry from whole of Malaysia. The data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics; ANOVA in SPSS 21.0. Training and experience in leadership has been found to be significance to leadership capability of team leaders. The opinions from the respondents also indicated that they need the training of leadership and they had to enhance themselves to enable them to become better and more competitive leaders. The results of this assessment can pinpoint the areas needing improvement and therefore can be used as basis in designing and/or deciding development programmes. This study also found that generally the team leaders in construction industry needed more opportunities to expand their leadership capability to become the effective leaders in future.

  6. CLIL and CALL for a teacher’s expertise: an international training experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Cinganotto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the link between Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL, that is the use of ICT to enhance language teaching-learning and the teaching of subject content in a foreign language. Starting from this background, the paper describes an online training initiative promoted by the authors within an international community of peers, made up of teachers, trainers and educators from all over the world, named “Techno-CLIL for EVO 2016”. The initiative was aimed at supporting and guiding participants to discover and experiment digital tools for CLIL lessons, offering the opportunity to share ideas, materials, good practices in an international perspective. Particular attention is devoted to the personal and professional enrichment and growth this training pathway may have helped the 5.000 participants to achieve.CLIL e CALL nell’expertise del docente: un’esperienza di formazione internazionaleIl contributo focalizza l’attenzione sulla correlazione tra Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL e Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL, cioè l’uso delle tecnologie per una maggiore efficacia dell’insegnamento-apprendimento delle lingue o di contenuti disciplinari veicolati in lingua straniera. Partendo da questo background, il contributo descrive una iniziativa di formazione online in lingua inglese promossa dalle autrici all’interno di un contesto internazionale, costituito da una comunità di pratica di docenti, formatori, educatori di tutto il mondo, denominata “Techno-CLIL for EVO 2016”. L’iniziativa mirava a sensibilizzare e guidare i partecipanti nella scoperta e sperimentazione della didattica CLIL in modalità digitale, offrendo l’opportunità di un confronto ed uno scambio di idee, materiali, buone pratiche in una prospettiva internazionale. Particolarmente significative le ricadute che questo percorso ha comportato per i circa 5.000 partecipanti

  7. High-fidelity simulation in anesthesiology training: a survey of Canadian anesthesiology residents' simulator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W; Price, John R; Pratt, Dan D; Collins, John B; McDonald, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this survey was to explore Canadian anesthesiology residents' educational experience with high-fidelity simulation and to improve understanding of the factors perceived to have either a positive or a negative effect on residents' learning. In 2008, all Canadian anesthesiology residents (n = 599) were invited to complete a ten-minute anonymous online survey. Survey questions were derived from two sources, a literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to present), EMBASE (1980 to present), and the Cochrane and Campbell collaboration libraries and the experience of 25 pilot residents and the lead author. The survey response rate was 27.9% (n = 167). Junior residents (PGY1-3) responded that it would be helpful to have an introductory simulation course dealing with common intraoperative emergencies. The introduction of multidisciplinary scenarios (where nurses and colleagues from different specialties were involved in scenarios) was strongly supported. With respect to gender, male anesthesia residents indicated their comfort in making mistakes and asking for help in the simulator more frequently than female residents. In accordance with the ten Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) principles of successful simulator education, Canadian centres could improve residents' opportunities for repetitive practice (with feedback), individualization of scenarios, and defined learning outcomes for scenarios. Anesthesiology residents indicate that simulation-based education is an anxiety provoking experience, but value its role in promoting safe practice and enhancing one's ability to deal with emergency situations. Suggestions to improve simulation training include increasing residents' access, adopting a more student-centred approach to learning, and creating a safer learning environment.

  8. Declining Otolaryngology Resident Training Experience in Tracheostomies: Case Log Trends from 2005 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, David; Showmaker, Jason; Ukatu, Ceisha; Wu, Qiwei; Chang, C W David

    2017-06-01

    Objective To evaluate recent tracheostomy surgical experience among otolaryngology residents and general surgery residents. Study Design Retrospective database review. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology and general surgery programs. Subjects and Methods Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case log data from 2005 to 2015 for resident graduates in otolaryngology and general surgery were used to obtain mean graduate tracheostomy numbers, mean graduate composite case numbers, and number of graduating residents. Market share for each specialty was estimated through the derived metric of nationwide total tracheostomy graduate experience, calculated by multiplying the number of graduating residents by the mean number of graduate tracheostomies. Linear regression analysis was used to calculate trends. Multiple linear regression analysis was used for pairwise comparison of trends. Results From 2005 to 2015, mean graduate tracheostomy numbers for otolaryngology residents declined 2.3% per year, while those for general surgery residents increased 1.8% per year. Accounting for changes in number of resident graduates, market share of tracheostomy decreased 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and increased 3.0% per year for general surgery. Mean graduate composite case numbers increased significantly by 1.8% and 1.0% per year for otolaryngology and general surgery residents, respectively. Conclusion Tracheostomy case volume in otolaryngology residency has decreased steadily in comparison with general surgery residency. However, current otolaryngology graduates have more experience in tracheostomy when compared with general surgery graduates. While otolaryngology residents have excellent exposure to tracheostomy, otolaryngology programs should be made aware of this declining trend as well as changing procedural trends, which may affect training needs.

  9. Effects of the contiguity between the extinction and the reinforcement components in observing-response procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Rogelio Escobar; Carlos A. Bruner

    2008-01-01

    The role of the stimulus correlated with extinction (S-) in observing-response procedures has been ambiguous. Although the S- is associated with extinction, some studies demonstrated that it effectively sustained observing behavior. To explore the conditions responsible for the S- to function as a conditioned reinforcer, the present experiment showed whether observing responses during an extinction component are controlled by the temporal contiguity between S- presentation and the reinforceme...

  10. Post-Learning Sleep Transiently Boosts Context Specific Operant Extinction Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Inostroza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Operant extinction is learning to supress a previously rewarded behavior. It is known to be strongly associated with the specific context in which it was acquired, which limits the therapeutic use of operant extinction in behavioral treatments, e.g., of addiction. We examined whether sleep influences contextual memory of operant extinction over time, using two different recall tests (Recent and Remote. Rats were trained in an operant conditioning task (lever press in context A, then underwent extinction training in context B, followed by a 3-h retention period that contained either spontaneous morning sleep, morning sleep deprivation, or spontaneous evening wakefulness. A recall test was performed either immediately after the 3-h experimental retention period (Recent recall or after 48 h (Remote, in the extinction context B and in a novel context C. The two main findings were: (i at the Recent recall test, sleep in comparison with sleep deprivation and spontaneous wakefulness enhanced extinction memory but, only in the extinction context B; (ii at the Remote recall, extinction performance after sleep was enhanced in both contexts B and C to an extent comparable to levels at Recent recall in context B. Interestingly, extinction performance at Remote recall was also improved in the sleep deprivation groups in both contexts, with no difference to performance in the sleep group. Our results suggest that 3 h of post-learning sleep transiently facilitate the context specificity of operant extinction at a Recent recall. However, the improvement and contextual generalization of operant extinction memory observed in the long-term, i.e., after 48 h, does not require immediate post-learning sleep.

  11. Fear extinction induces mGluR5-mediated synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in infralimbic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Orengo, Marian T; Lopez, Ana V; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Porter, James T

    2013-04-24

    Studies suggest that plasticity in the infralimbic prefrontal cortex (IL) in rodents and its homolog in humans is necessary for inhibition of fear during the recall of fear extinction. The recall of extinction is impaired by locally blocking metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) activation in IL during extinction training. This finding suggests that mGluR5 stimulation may lead to IL plasticity needed for fear extinction. To test this hypothesis, we recorded AMPA and NMDA currents, AMPA receptor (AMPAR) rectification, and intrinsic excitability in IL pyramidal neurons in slices from trained rats using whole-cell patch-clamp recording. We observed that fear extinction increases the AMPA/NMDA ratio, consistent with insertion of AMPARs into IL synapses. In addition, extinction training increased inward rectification, suggesting that extinction induces the insertion of calcium-permeable (GluA2-lacking) AMPARs into IL synapses. Consistent with this, selectively blocking calcium-permeable AMPARs with Naspm reduced the AMPA EPSCs in IL neurons to a larger degree after extinction. Extinction-induced changes in AMPA/NMDA ratio, rectification, and intrinsic excitability were blocked with an mGluR5 antagonist. These findings suggest that mGluR5 activation leads to consolidation of fear extinction by regulating the intrinsic excitability of IL neurons and modifying the composition of AMPARs in IL synapses. Therefore, impaired mGluR5 activity in IL synapses could be one factor that causes inappropriate modulation of fear expression leading to anxiety disorders.

  12. Master’s Training as a Part of Young Researcher’S Professional Development: British and Ukrainian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyuk Natalya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the professional development of young researchers in terms of Master’s training has been analyzed. The analysis of the literature references, documental and other sources gave grounds to state that the basic principle of Master’s professional training is a research-oriented paradigm. The necessity of using the innovative ideas of foreign experience for improving the quality of Master's education due to European approaches has been proved. It has been stressed that the main task of Master’s programs is the preparation of young researchers for the next stage of their career both in research activities and success achievement in various fields of employment, assistance and creation of opportunities as well as optimal conditions for their contribution to the research of a particular scientific field or discipline. An important source for defining strategic priorities of solving the problems of Master’s professional training is studying and analyzing theoretical and practical experience of leading countries (USA, Australia and UK. The features of Masters’ research training in the British experience and the ways of supporting and developing the research activities and fostering Master's professional development in UK and Ukraine have been studied. It has been considered that Master’s training should be realized on the basis of such theories as social, human, intellectual and cultural capital, career orientation, constructive and cognitive concepts, continuing education and adult education, learner-centered education, comparative studies.

  13. The influence of experience in orientation: GPS tracking of homing pigeons released over the sea after directional training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'ariccia, Gaia; Dell'omo, Giacomo; Lipp, Hans-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Flight experience is one of the factors that influences initial orientation of displaced homing pigeons (Columba livia). Prior studies showed a systematic dependence of initial orientation on previously flown direction. Using GPS data loggers, this study sought to examine the effect of previous directional training of 40 homing pigeons when they were released over the sea, in the absence of proximal landmarks, in a direction almost perpendicular to that of previous training flights. Our results demonstrated that previous directional training evoked a systematic and predicted deviation from the beeline over the sea that appeared as a compromise between the direction of training and the direction to the loft. Pigeons were able to efficiently correct their flight direction only once over land, where they flew significantly slower and less directly than over the sea.

  14. Examining the Relationship between the Research Training Environment, Course Experiences, and Graduate Students’ Research Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Chesnut

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between graduate students’ research training environment, course experience, and research self-efficacy beliefs. The findings of the descriptive and regression analyses suggest that graduate students’ (n = 161 general research, quantitative, and qualitative research self-efficacy beliefs varied and that these beliefs were related to different aspects of the research training environment and course experiences, including their own personal research experiences. While course experience variables were significant predictors of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy, they were not predictive of general research methods self-efficacy. Also, while mentorship was a significant predictor of general research methods self-efficacy, it was not a significant predictor of quantitative and qualitative research self-efficacy. The implications of this study for research and graduate education are discussed.

  15. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students’ Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. Objective The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners’ reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students’ perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Results Four categories characterizing the students’ experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Conclusions Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance. PMID:27986645

  16. The training and fieldwork experiences of community health workers conducting population-based, noninvasive screening for CVD in LMIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Denman, Catalina A; Montano, Carlos Mendoza; Gaziano, Thomas A; Levitt, Naomi; Rivera-Andrade, Alvaro; Carrasco, Diana Munguía; Zulu, Jabu; Khanam, Masuma Akter; Puoane, Thandi

    2015-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise in low- and middle-income countries and is proving difficult to combat due to the emphasis on improving outcomes in maternal and child health and infectious diseases against a backdrop of severe human resource and infrastructure constraints. Effective task-sharing from physicians or nurses to community health workers (CHW) to conduct population-based screening for persons at risk has the potential to mitigate the impact of CVD on vulnerable populations. CHW in Bangladesh, Guatemala, Mexico, and South Africa were trained to conduct noninvasive population-based screening for persons at high risk for CVD. This study sought to quantitatively assess the performance of CHW during training and to qualitatively capture their training and fieldwork experiences while conducting noninvasive screening for CVD risk in their communities. Written tests were used to assess CHW's acquisition of content knowledge during training, and focus group discussions were conducted to capture their training and fieldwork experiences. Training was effective at increasing the CHW's content knowledge of CVD, and this knowledge was largely retained up to 6 months after the completion of fieldwork. Common themes that need to be addressed when designing task-sharing with CHW in chronic diseases are identified, including language, respect, and compensation. The importance of having intimate knowledge of the community receiving services from design to implementation is underscored. Effective training for screening for CVD in community settings should have a strong didactic core that is supplemented with culture-specific adaptations in the delivery of instruction. The incorporation of expert and intimate knowledge of the communities themselves is critical, from the design to implementation phases of training. Challenges such as role definition, defining career paths, and providing adequate remuneration must be addressed. Copyright © 2015 World Heart

  17. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training by Avatars: A Qualitative Study of Medical Students' Experiences Using a Multiplayer Virtual World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzfeldt, Johan; Hedman, Leif; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2016-12-16

    Emergency medical practices are often team efforts. Training for various tasks and collaborations may be carried out in virtual environments. Although promising results exist from studies of serious games, little is known about the subjective reactions of learners when using multiplayer virtual world (MVW) training in medicine. The objective of this study was to reach a better understanding of the learners' reactions and experiences when using an MVW for team training of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Twelve Swedish medical students participated in semistructured focus group discussions after CPR training in an MVW with partially preset options. The students' perceptions and feelings related to use of this educational tool were investigated. Using qualitative methodology, discussions were analyzed by a phenomenological data-driven approach. Quality measures included negotiations, back-and-forth reading, triangulation, and validation with the informants. Four categories characterizing the students' experiences could be defined: (1) Focused Mental Training, (2) Interface Diverting Focus From Training, (3) Benefits of Practicing in a Group, and (4) Easy Loss of Focus When Passive. We interpreted the results, compared them to findings of others, and propose advantages and risks of using virtual worlds for learning. Beneficial aspects of learning CPR in a virtual world were confirmed. To achieve high participant engagement and create good conditions for training, well-established procedures should be practiced. Furthermore, students should be kept in an active mode and frequent feedback should be utilized. It cannot be completely ruled out that the use of virtual training may contribute to erroneous self-beliefs that can affect later clinical performance.

  18. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  19. Application of arm support training in sub-acute stroke rehabilitation: first results on effectiveness and user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, G B Gerdienke; Kottink, Air Anke; Buurke, J H Jaap; Rietman, J S Hans

    2013-06-01

    A multi-center randomized clinical trial was performed in 7 Dutch rehabilitation centers, in the context of an implementation project (ROBAR), to compare the effect of an arm support (AS) training device to equally intensive conventional reach training (CON) on recovery of arm-hand function in sub-acute stroke. The Fugl-Meyer assessment (FM) and user experiences of therapists and patients were examined in both groups. An improvement of 10 and 8 points on the FM was found for respectively the CON and AS group. Both therapists and patients reported positive experiences on several aspects of user acceptance. These findings indicate that a low-tech system for arm support results in similar gains in arm function as conventional reach training in equal intensity, and is suitable for application in clinical practice.

  20. The Formation and Extinction of Fear Memory in Tree Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujiang eShang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fear is an emotion that is well studied due to its importance for animal survival. Experimental animals, such as rats and mice, have been widely used to model fear. However, higher animals such as nonhuman primates have rarely been used to study fear due to ethical issues and high costs. Tree shrews are small mammals that are closely related to primates; they have been used to model human-related psychosocial conditions such as stress and alcohol tolerance. Here, we describe an experimental paradigm to study the formation and extinction of fear memory in tree shrews. We designed an experimental apparatus of a light/dark box with a voltage foot shock. We found that tree shrews preferred staying in the dark box in the daytime without stimulation and showed avoidance to voltage shocks applied to the footplate in a voltage-dependent manner. Foot shocks applied to the dark box for 5 days (10 minutes per day effectively reversed the light–dark preference of the tree shrews, and this memory lasted for more than 50 days without any sign of memory decay (extinction in the absence of further stimulation. However, this fear memory was reversed with 4 days of reverse training by applying the same stimulus to the light box. When reducing the stimulus intensity during the training period, a memory extinction and subsequently reinstatement effects were observed. Thus, our results describe an efficient method of monitoring fear memory formation and extinction in tree shrews.

  1. The formation and extinction of fear memory in tree shrews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shujiang; Wang, Cong; Guo, Chengbing; Huang, Xu; Wang, Liecheng; Zhang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Fear is an emotion that is well-studied due to its importance for animal survival. Experimental animals, such as rats and mice, have been widely used to model fear. However, higher animals such as nonhuman primates have rarely been used to study fear due to ethical issues and high costs. Tree shrews are small mammals that are closely related to primates; they have been used to model human-related psychosocial conditions such as stress and alcohol tolerance. Here, we describe an experimental paradigm to study the formation and extinction of fear memory in tree shrews. We designed an experimental apparatus of a light/dark box with a voltage foot shock. We found that tree shrews preferred staying in the dark box in the daytime without stimulation and showed avoidance to voltage shocks applied to the footplate in a voltage-dependent manner. Foot shocks applied to the dark box for 5 days (10 min per day) effectively reversed the light-dark preference of the tree shrews, and this memory lasted for more than 50 days without any sign of memory decay (extinction) in the absence of further stimulation. However, this fear memory was reversed with 4 days of reverse training by applying the same stimulus to the light box. When reducing the stimulus intensity during the training period, a memory extinction and subsequently reinstatement effects were observed. Thus, our results describe an efficient method of monitoring fear memory formation and extinction in tree shrews.

  2. The extinction of the dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Butler, Richard J; Barrett, Paul M; Carrano, Matthew T; Evans, David C; Lloyd, Graeme T; Mannion, Philip D; Norell, Mark A; Peppe, Daniel J; Upchurch, Paul; Williamson, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    Non-avian dinosaurs went extinct 66 million years ago, geologically coincident with the impact of a large bolide (comet or asteroid) during an interval of massive volcanic eruptions and changes in temperature and sea level. There has long been fervent debate about how these events affected dinosaurs. We review a wealth of new data accumulated over the past two decades, provide updated and novel analyses of long-term dinosaur diversity trends during the latest Cretaceous, and discuss an emerging consensus on the extinction's tempo and causes. Little support exists for a global, long-term decline across non-avian dinosaur diversity prior to their extinction at the end of the Cretaceous. However, restructuring of latest Cretaceous dinosaur faunas in North America led to reduced diversity of large-bodied herbivores, perhaps making communities more susceptible to cascading extinctions. The abruptness of the dinosaur extinction suggests a key role for the bolide impact, although the coarseness of the fossil record makes testing the effects of Deccan volcanism difficult.

  3. Measuring Galactic Extinction A Test

    CERN Document Server

    Arce, H G; Arce, Hector G.; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    1999-01-01

    We test the recently published all-sky reddening map of Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998 [SFD]) using the extinction study of a region in the Taurus dark cloud complex by Arce & Goodman (1999 [AG]). In their study, AG use four different techniques to measure the amount and structure of the extinction toward Taurus, and all four techniques agree very well. Thus we believe that the AG results are a truthful representation of the extinction in the region and can be used to test the reliability of the SFD reddening map. The results of our test show that the SFD all-sky reddening map, which is based on data from COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA, overestimates the reddening by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5 in regions of smooth extinction with A_V > 0.5 mag. In some regions of steep extinction gradients the SFD map underestimates the reddening value, probably due to its low spatial resolution. We expect that the astronomical community will be using the SFD reddening map extensively. We offer this Letter as a cautionary n...

  4. Training to Teach Physical Education in an Opposite-Sex Secondary School: A Qualitative Analysis of Trainee Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidder, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the school-based training experiences of trainee physical education teachers in opposite-sex secondary schools in south-east England which has been presented and discussed elsewhere in the academic community. Through an interpretive paradigm, using critical incident writing as a means of collecting computer-mediated data, one…

  5. Flow Experience During Attentional Training Improves Cognitive Functions in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: An Exploratory Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Yoshida

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The results for Patient A suggested that the flow task was more effective than general OT for improving attention deficits. Moreover, the results for Patient B suggested that the flow task was more effective than the control task. Attention training inducing flow experience may thus facilitate improvement of attention.

  6. Training Teachers at a Distance: Perceptions and Challenges of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) in Teacher Education: The Zimbabwean Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkange, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    Zimbabwe like most developing countries continues to experience shortages in skills. One such area that has experienced skills shortages is education. This has resulted in governments and education institutions coming up with innovative ways to improve the training of of teachers. Such innovative models include the Open & Distance Learning…

  7. Nurses' Learning Experiences with the Kinaesthetics Care Concept Training in a Nursing Home: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fringer, André; Huth, Martina; Hantikainen, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    In geriatric care, movement support skills of nurses are often limited, resulting in unnecessary functional decline of older adult residents and physical strain of nurses. Kinaesthetics training aims to improve movement competences of nurses and residents. The aim of this qualitative descriptive study is to describe nursing teams' experience with…

  8. Timing of SCH 23390 administration influences extinction of conditioned hyperactivity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhut, Anthony S

    2016-02-01

    The precise role of the dopamine subtype-1 (D1) receptor in differentially mediating extinction-related processes (memory retrieval vs. memory reconsolidation) in the conditioned hyperactivity paradigm is unknown. Thus, the present experiments determined the effect of a selective D1 receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, on extinction of conditioned hyperactivity when SCH 23390 was administered immediately after (memory reconsolidation; experiment 1) or before (memory retrieval; experiment 2) extinction sessions. Male, Swiss-Webster mice received subcutaneous injections of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) associated with locomotor activity chambers (paired) or in their home cages (unpaired) during the acquisition phase. Following acquisition, paired and unpaired mice received an intraperitoneal injection of either vehicle (physiological saline) or SCH 23390 (0.0125, 0.025, 0.05 mg/kg) immediately after (experiment 1) or received vehicle or SCH 23390 (0.05 mg/kg) 30 min before (experiment 2), daily extinction sessions. Methamphetamine produced robust conditioned hyperactivity, followed by extinction. Furthermore, SCH 23390 (0.05 mg/kg) blocked expression of conditioned hyperactivity, without nonspecifically impairing locomotor activity, when administered before the extinction session, but did not alter the rate of extinction when administered immediately following the sessions. Taken together, these results suggest that the D1 receptor is involved in memory retrieval, but not memory reconsolidation, processes during extinction of conditioned hyperactivity.

  9. Geographically Distributed Citizen Scientist Training for the 2017 Citizen CATE Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Richard; Penn, Matt; Baer, Robert; Isberner, Fred; Pierce, Michael; Walter, Donald K.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Sheeley, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    The solar eclipse of 21 August 2017 will be visible to over a half billion people across the entire North American continent. The roughly 100-mile wide path of totality, stretching from Oregon to South Carolina, will be the destination for tens of millions of people. In the decades since 1979, when the last total solar eclipse was visible from the continental USA, the phenomenon of Internet enabled citizen science has grown to be an accepted mode for science. The Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (Citizen CATE) experiment has been funded as one of the three 2017 eclipse related NASA STEM agreements to engage citizen scientists in a unique, cutting-edge solar physics experiment. Teams across the USA will be trained to use standardized refracting telescope and digital imager set-ups to observe the solar corona during the eclipse, acquiring multiple exposures to create one high dynamic range image. After observing during the eclipse, the CATE volunteers will upload the combined image to a cloud-storage site and the CATE team will then work to properly orient and align all the images collected from across the continent to produce a continuous 90-minutes movie. A time-compressed first cut of the entire sequence will be made available to media outlets on the same afternoon of the eclipse, with hope that high quality images will encourage the most accurate coverage of this Great American Eclipse. We discuss overall the project, as well as details of the initial tests of the prototype set-up (including in the Faroe Islands during the March 2015 total solar eclipse) and plans for the future night-time and day-time observing campaigns, and for a handful of observing teams positioned for overlapping observations of the March 2016 total solar eclipse in the South Pacific.

  10. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretos Michael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary Health Care (PHC is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8 primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p Conclusion The primary health care course achieved the objectives of introducing students to comprehensive, community oriented care, although there was variation between the PCUs. The assessment scale that was developed to analyse the case-write ups of the students provided data that can be used to evaluate the course.

  11. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. E. MacPhee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters.

  12. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, or the direct exposure of lethal x-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be exclude...

  13. Extinction debt on oceanic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantis, Kostas A.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Ladle, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat destruction is the leading cause of species extinctions. However, there is typically a time-lag between the reduction in habitat area and the eventual disappearance of the remnant populations. These "surviving but ultimately doomed" species represent an extinction debt. Calculating...... the magnitude of such future extinction events has been hampered by potentially inaccurate assumptions about the slope of species-area relationships, which are habitat- and taxon-specific. We overcome this challenge by applying a method that uses the historical sequence of deforestation in the Azorean Islands...... in the last 45 yr, despite the extensive sampling effort, offer support to the predictions made. We argue that immediate action to restore and expand native forest habitat is required to avert the loss of numerous endemic species in the near future...

  14. Prefrontal single-unit firing associated with deficient extinction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J; Whittle, Nigel; Flynn, Shaun M; Graybeal, Carolyn; Pinard, Courtney R; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Kravitz, Alexxai V; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    The neural circuitry mediating fear extinction has been increasingly well studied and delineated. The rodent infralimbic subregion (IL) of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has been found to promote extinction, whereas the prelimbic cortex (PL) demonstrates an opposing, pro-fear, function. Studies employing in vivo electrophysiological recordings have observed that while increased IL single-unit firing and bursting predicts robust extinction retrieval, increased PL firing can correlate with sustained fear and poor extinction. These relationships between single-unit firing and extinction do not hold under all experimental conditions, however. In the current study, we further investigated the relationship between vmPFC and PL single-unit firing and extinction using inbred mouse models of intact (C57BL/6J, B6) and deficient (129S1/SvImJ, S1) extinction strains. Simultaneous single-unit recordings were made in the PL and vmPFC (encompassing IL) as B6 and S1 mice performed extinction training and retrieval. Impaired extinction retrieval in S1 mice was associated with elevated PL single-unit firing, as compared to firing in extinguishing B6 mice, consistent with the hypothesized pro-fear contribution of PL. Analysis of local field potentials also revealed significantly higher gamma power in the PL of S1 than B6 mice during extinction training and retrieval. In the vmPFC, impaired extinction in S1 mice was also associated with exaggerated single-unit firing, relative to B6 mice. This is in apparent contradiction to evidence that IL activity promotes extinction, but could reflect a (failed) compensatory effort by the vmPFC to mitigate fear-promoting activity in other regions, such as the PL or amygdala. In support of this hypothesis, augmenting IL activity via direct infusion of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin rescued impaired extinction retrieval in S1 mice. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced modest reductions in fear during extinction retrieval and

  15. Dissociable Roles of Prelimbic and Infralimbic Cortices, Ventral Hippocampus, and Basolateral Amygdala in the Expression and Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; Padilla-Coreano, Nancy; Quirk, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Current models of conditioned fear expression and extinction involve the basolateral amygdala (BLA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and the hippocampus (HPC). There is some disagreement with respect to the specific roles of these structures, perhaps due to subregional differences within each area. For example, growing evidence suggests that infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) subregions of vmPFC have opposite influences on fear expression. Moreover, it is the ventral HPC (vHPC), rather than the dorsal HPC, that projects to vmPFC and BLA. To help determine regional specificity, we used small doses of the GABAA agonist muscimol to selectively inactivate IL, PL, BLA, or vHPC in an auditory fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Infusions were performed prior to extinction training, allowing us to assess the effects on both fear expression and subsequent extinction memory. Inactivation of IL had no effect on fear expression, but impaired the within-session acquisition of extinction as well as extinction memory. In contrast, inactivation of PL impaired fear expression, but had no effect on extinction memory. Inactivation of the BLA or vHPC impaired both fear expression and extinction memory. Post-extinction inactivations had no effect in any structure. We suggest a model in which amygdala-dependent fear expression is modulated by inputs from PL and vHPC, whereas extinction memory requires extinction-induced plasticity in IL, BLA, and/or vHPC. PMID:20962768

  16. Experiences in disaster-related mental health relief work: An exploratory model for the interprofessional training of psychological relief workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, ZhengJia; Wang, HongTao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to begin to generate an exploratory model of the disaster-related mental health education process associated with the training experiences of psychological relief workers active during the Sichuan earthquake in China. The data consisted of semi-structured interviews with 20 psychological relief workers from four different professions (social workers, psychiatric nurses, psychiatrists, and counsellors) regarding their experiences in training and ideas for improvement. The model explains the need to use a people-centred community interprofessional education approach, which focuses on role-modelling of the trainer, caring for relief workers, paying attention to the needs of the trainee, and building systematic interprofessional education strategies. The proposed model identifies areas for the comprehensive training of relief workers and aims to address the importance of people-centred mental health service provisions, ensure intentional and strategic training of relief workers using interprofessional concepts and strategies, and use culturally attuned and community-informed strategies in mental health training practices.

  17. The effects of Crew Resource Mangement (CRM) training in airline maintenance: Results following three years' experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. C.; Robertson, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes three years' evaluation of the effects of one airline's Crew Resources Management (CRM) training operation for maintenance. This evaluation focuses on the post-training attitudes of maintenance managers' and technical support professionals, their reported behaviors, and the safety, efficiency and dependable maintenance performance of their units. The results reveal a strong positive effect of the training. The overall program represents the use of CRM training as a long-term commitment to improving performance through effective communication at all levels in airline maintenance operations. The initial findings described in our previous progress reports are reinforced and elaborated here. The current results benefit from the entire pre-post training survey, which now represents total attendance of all managers and staff professionals. Additionally there are now full results from the two-month, six-month, and 12-month follow-up questionnaires, together with as many as 33 months of post-training performance data, using several indicators. In this present report, we examine participants' attitudes, their reported behaviors following the training, the performance of their work units, and the relationships among these variables. Attitudes include those measured immediately before and after the training as well as participants' attitudes months after their training. Performance includes measures, by work units, of on-time flight departures, on-schedule maintenance releases, occupational and aircraft safety, and efficient labor costs. We report changes in these performance measures following training, as well their relationships with the training participants' attitudes. Highlights of results from this training program include increased safety and improved costs associated with positive attitudes about the use of more assertive communication, and the improved management of stress. Improved on-time performance is also related to those improved

  18. Extinction risk of soil biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veresoglou, Stavros D; Halley, John M; Rillig, Matthias C

    2015-11-23

    No species lives on earth forever. Knowing when and why species go extinct is crucial for a complete understanding of the consequences of anthropogenic activity, and its impact on ecosystem functioning. Even though soil biota play a key role in maintaining the functioning of ecosystems, the vast majority of existing studies focus on aboveground organisms. Many questions about the fate of belowground organisms remain open, so the combined effort of theorists and applied ecologists is needed in the ongoing development of soil extinction ecology.

  19. HISTORICAL EXPERIENCE OF SPECIALIST STAFF TRAINING FOR THE VILLAGE (A CASE STUDY OF CHIASSR. 1966-1975

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagutin M. S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The historical experience of specialist staff training for rural areas in our country is invaluable for the countries in which differences between urban and rural areas there still exist. Rural development is unthinkable without the active work of the rural literate. In this article, we consider this process in Chechen-Ingush Republic in 1966-1975. There is a rapid growth in number of knowledge workers in the rural areas there. Chechen-Ingush State University dominated in the process of qualified staff training for non-agricultural occupations for the village. 7 Faculties functioned there, where, at the end of the period, 5,000 students studied. Half of them were the national staff. They were trained by qualified highereducation teaching personnel. The following material and technical conditions were available for normal training: a hostel for 1480 people, a canteen, and a library with a huge book collection. Every year, a large number of teachers from a number of regions of the Russian Federation arrived in the republic. For rural people, admission to universities of the country was facilitated. As a result of work done, within two fiveyear periods universities of CHIASSR prepared 16.9 thousand highly qualified specialists, most of whom were directed to work in rural areas. Scope of training of specialists with secondary education for the village was widened. As a result of performed work, staff scarcity for trained specialist decreased in rural areas

  20. Research and Development for the Mu2e Extinction Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Casey Benjamin [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-01-01

    Mu2e is a planned experiment to search for flavor-violating conversion from a muon to an electron. The experiment will use a pulsed 8 GeV proton beam to produce muons which will then stop in an aluminum target. Mu2e will search for the $\\mu^- + Al \\rightarrow e^- + Al$ process. For Mu2e, an extinction rate of 10$^{-10}$ is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. Extinction is the ratio of the amount of protons striking the production target between beam pulses to the number striking it during the beam pulse. One of the backgrounds, off-target interactions, was simulated using G4beamline and Fermilab's Grid setup to confirm that an extinction rate of 10$^{-10}$ is possible. The extinction level will be measured by the extinction monitor which will include scintillation counters read out by photomultiplier tubes. In order to build a beam time profile, low fake responses (after pulses) are needed in the photomultiplier tubes. This thesis determines the best combination of resistors, voltage, and other components that provide the lowest after pulse rate.

  1. Research and development for the Mu2E extinction monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Casey B.

    Mu2e is a planned experiment to search for flavor violating conversion from a muon to an electron. The experiment will use a pulsed 8 GeV proton beam to produce muons which will then stop in an aluminum target. Mu2e will search for the mu-- + Al → e-- + Al process. For Mu2e, an extinction rate of 10--10 is required to reduce the backgrounds to an acceptable level. Extinction is the ratio of the amount of protons striking the production target between beam pulses to the number striking it during the beam pulse. One of the backgrounds, off-target interactions, was simulated using G4beamline and Fermilab's Grid setup to confirm that an extinction rate of 10--10 is possible. The extinction level will be measured by the extinction monitor which will include scintillation counters read out by photomultiplier tubes. In order to build a beam time profile, low fake responses (after pulses) are needed in the photomultiplier tubes. This thesis determines the best combination of resistors, voltage, and other components that provide the lowest after pulse rate.

  2. Interstellar Grains: Effect of Inclusions on Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Vaidya, D B

    2011-01-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1$\\mu m$ using the extinction efficiencies of the composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  3. Interstellar grains: Effect of inclusions on extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1 μm using the extinction efficiencies of composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  4. Enhanced extinction of aversive memories by high-frequency stimulation of the rat infralimbic cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Maroun

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, including the infralimbic cortex (IL, immediately prior to or during fear extinction training facilitates extinction memory. Here we examined the effects of high-frequency stimulation (HFS of the rat IL either prior to conditioning or following retrieval of the conditioned memory, on extinction of Pavlovian fear and conditioned taste aversion (CTA. IL-HFS applied immediately after fear memory retrieval, but not three hours after retrieval or prior to conditioning, subsequently reduced freezing during fear extinction. Similarly, IL-HFS given immediately, but not three hours after, retrieval of a CTA memory reduced aversion during extinction. These data indicate that HFS of the IL may be an effective method for reducing both learned fear and learned aversion.

  5. Feasibility of training nurses in motivational interviewing to improve patient experience in mental health inpatient rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, M; Crowley, J; Smedley, N; Mutti, M-F; Cashen, A; Thompson, T; Foster, J

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Recently, concerns have been raised about how well United Kingdom National Health Service nurses care for their patients and their level of compassion. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an established approach to helping people make positive behaviour changes, through directive, person-centred counselling within a collaborative relationship between clinician and recipient. Based on evidence that MI may influence nursing practice positively, an investigation into the feasibility of training nurses on mental health inpatient rehabilitation wards ('rehabilitation') in MI to improve patient experience was reported. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This pilot study demonstrates that training rehabilitation nurses in MI is feasible and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that a larger study to examine efficacy is warranted, including a calculation of sample size required to draw robust statistical conclusions. Nurses evaluated the training as highly relevant to their work. Patients responded well to interviews and focus groups with support from experts-by-experience; they were generally fairly satisfied with the rehabilitation ward and slight improvements in their experience were found following MI training for nurses but not at 6-month follow-up. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Rehabilitation nurses may face conflicting demands between ensuring patients with severe difficulties meet their basic needs and working with them to develop greater independence. Qualitative findings question whether nurse-patient interactions are fully valued as nursing interventions in inpatient rehabilitation. Learning MI might be a useful way of helping nurses think in detail about their interactions with patients and how to improve communications with their patients. The principles of MI should be incorporated into pre-registration training. Introduction There is limited research addressing the experiences of patients in inpatient

  6. VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING FOR TOURISM. SPECIFIC ASPECTS WHICH INFLUENCE THE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION OF THE QUALITY OF THEIR LEARNING EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVIA IRIMIEA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vocational Education and Training for Tourism. Specific Aspects which Influence the Students’ Perception of the Quality of Their Learning Experience. Quality in education has been defined in various ways, each definition representing a different approach. Karl Popper defines human rationality by the adequacy of one’s action to a specific situation. Furthermore, the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu argues that the actions that people undertake are based on their previous life experiences and on their social and professional status. Vocational Education and Training (VET addresses young people and adults whose social status can influence their level of satisfaction with the quality of the educational process. The present article seeks to present the results of a questionnaire-based survey applied to the students who have attended the travel agent and tourism manager courses at the Centre for Tourism Training of the Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca. The data illustrate the strong influence of the variable age and previous educational experience on the subjects' satisfaction regarding some aspects of the training activities.

  7. Learning from the other limb's experience: sharing the 'trained' M1 representation of the motor sequence knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitov, Ella; Manor, David; Karni, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Participants were scanned during the untrained-hand performance of a motor sequence, intensively trained a day earlier, and also a similarly constructed but novel, untrained sequence. The superior performance levels for the trained, compared to the untrained sequence, were associated with a greater magnitude of activity within the primary motor cortex (M1), bilaterally, for the trained sequence. The differential responses in the 'trained' M1, ipsilateral to the untrained hand, were positively correlated with experience-related differences in the functional connectivity between the 'trained' M1 and (1) its homologue and (2) the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) within the contralateral hemisphere. No significant correlation was evident between experience-related differences in M1 - M1 and M1 - PMd connectivity measures. These results suggest that the transfer of sequence-specific information between the two primary motor cortices is predominantly mediated by excitatory mechanisms driven by the 'trained' M1 via two independent neural pathways. Following unimanual training on a novel sequence of movements, sequence-specific performance may improve overnight not only in the trained hand, but also in the hand afforded no actual physical experience. It is not clear, however, how transfer to the untrained hand is achieved. In the present study, we examined whether and how interaction between the two primary motor cortices contributes to the performance of a sequence of movements, extensively trained the day before, by the untrained hand. Accordingly, we studied participants during the untrained-hand performance of a finger-to-thumb opposition sequence (FOS), intensively trained a day earlier (T-FOS), and a similarly constructed, but novel, untrained FOS (U-FOS). Changes in neural signals driven by task performance were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. To minimize potential differences as a result of the rate of sequence execution per se, participants

  8. Some Factors Modulating the Strength of Resurgence after Extinction of an Instrumental Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbauer, Neil E.; Lucke, Sara; Bouton, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    In resurgence, an operant behavior that has undergone extinction can return ("resurge") when a second operant that has replaced it itself undergoes extinction. The phenomenon may provide insight into relapse that may occur after incentive or contingency management therapies in humans. Three experiments with rats examined the impact of several…

  9. Cued Reacquisition Trials during Extinction Weaken Contextual Renewal in Human Predictive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effting, Marieke; Vervliet, Bram; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2013-01-01

    Extinction is generally more context specific than acquisition, as illustrated by the renewal effect. While most strategies to counteract renewal focus on decreasing the context specificity of extinction, the present work aimed at increasing the context specificity of acquisition learning. Two experiments examined whether presenting cued…

  10. Factors Regulating the Effects of Hippocampal Inactivation on Renewal of Conditional Fear after Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Kevin A.; Maren, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    After extinction of fear to a Pavlovian conditional stimulus (CS), contextual stimuli come to regulate the expression of fear to that CS. There is growing evidence that the context dependence of memory retrieval after extinction involves the hippocampus. In the present experiment, we examine whether hippocampal involvement in memory retrieval…

  11. Cued Reacquisition Trials during Extinction Weaken Contextual Renewal in Human Predictive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effting, Marieke; Vervliet, Bram; Beckers, Tom; Kindt, Merel

    2013-01-01

    Extinction is generally more context specific than acquisition, as illustrated by the renewal effect. While most strategies to counteract renewal focus on decreasing the context specificity of extinction, the present work aimed at increasing the context specificity of acquisition learning. Two experiments examined whether presenting cued…

  12. Endangered and Extinct Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, M. D.

    1993-07-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual nucleosynthesis events, via observations of short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring global galactic nucleosynthesis today with detections of longer-lived radioactivity. Many of the astrophysical issues addressed by these observations are precisely those that must be understood in order to interpret observations of extinct radioactivity in meteorites. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both 56Co [1] and 57Co [2] were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions. Live 26Al in the galaxy might come from Type II supernovae and their progenitors, and if this is eventually shown to be the case, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, the galactic Type II supernova rate, and even models of the chemical evolution of the galaxy [3]. Titanium-44 is produced primarily in the alpha-rich freezeout from nuclear statistical equilibrium, possibly in Type Ia [4] and almost certainly in Type II supernovae [5]. The galactic recurrence time of these events is comparable to the 44Ti lifetime, so we expect to be able to see at most a few otherwise unseen 44Ti remnants at any given time. No such remnants have been detected yet [6]. Very simple arguments lead to the expectation that about 4 x 10^-4 M(sub)solar mass of 44Ca are produced per century. The product of the supernova frequency times the 44Ti yield per event must equal this number. Even assuming that only the latest event would be seen, rates in excess of 2 century^-1 are ruled out at >=99% confidence by the gamma ray limits. Only rates less than 0.3 century^-1 are acceptable at >5% confidence, and this means that the yield per event must be >10^-3 M(sub)solar mass to produce the requisite 44Ca. Rates this low are incompatible with current estimates for Type II supernovae and yields this high are also very

  13. Retraumatization Mediates the Effect of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Clinical Training-Related Secondary Traumatic Stress Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Lisa D; Maguin, Eugene; Carello, Janice

    2017-03-10

    Previous research (Butler, Carello, & Maguin, 2016) has found that exposure to trauma-related material in graduate clinical coursework and field training can put students at risk for reactivations of feelings/memories from negative past experiences (retraumatization) and for secondary traumatic stress (STS) symptoms. The present report sought to examine the role, if any, of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in these outcomes. Using the Butler et al. (2016) sample, we examined: (1) rates of ACEs in 195 graduate social work students, (2) whether the total number of ACEs was associated with training-related retraumatization (TRT) and/or STS symptoms, and (3) if TRT mediated the relationship between ACEs and STS symptoms. The results indicate that more than three quarters of the sample had experienced one or more ACEs before age 18 and almost one third endorsed 4 or more. The most commonly reported ACEs were household mental illness, parental separation/divorce, household alcohol/substance abuse, and emotional abuse or neglect by a parent or household member. Higher ACE scores were associated with increased likelihood of TRT experiences and STS symptoms during training. A mediation analysis confirmed that TRT mediated the effect of ACE scores on STS symptoms; this finding also provides support for the role of proximal emotional reactions in mediating the effects of distal adverse experiences on the development of trauma symptoms. In summary, despite the evident resilience of this graduate student sample, those with ACE histories were at heightened risk for training-related distress. These results underscore the need for a trauma-informed approach to clinical training.

  14. Impact of Work Experience and Training in the Current and Previous Occupations on Earnings: Micro Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Dougherty

    2000-01-01

    In the empirical literature on work experience, job tenure, training and earnings, only one previous study has made a distinction between the effects of work experience in the current occupation and work experience in previous ones, and no study has made the distinction with respect to training. Yet it is reasonable to hypothesize that the distinction is important. Using data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, it is found that the returns to work experience in the current occu...

  15. Staff Training and Development for University Management and Administration--Swedish Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoglund, Anders

    1984-01-01

    Some recent Swedish training activities in college administration for both faculty and administrators are described, focusing on problem areas such as retrenchment and how they affect the work of management and administration. The design of training programs to provide support in such situations is discussed. (MSE)

  16. Master's Training as a Part of Young Researcher's Professional Development: British and Ukrainian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidyuk, Natalya

    2014-01-01

    The problem of the professional development of young researchers in terms of Master's training has been analyzed. The analysis of the literature references, documental and other sources gave grounds to state that the basic principle of Master's professional training is a research-oriented paradigm. The necessity of using the innovative ideas of…

  17. Science teacher's perception about science learning experiences as a foundation for teacher training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, Marisa Christina; Firman, Harry; Redjeki, Sri; Chandra, Didi Teguh

    2017-05-01

    Teacher training is one form of continuous professional development. Before organizing teacher training (material, time frame), a survey about teacher's need has to be done. Science teacher's perception about science learning in the classroom, the most difficult learning model, difficulties of lesson plan would be a good input for teacher training program. This survey conducted in June 2016. About 23 science teacher filled in the questionnaire. The core of questions are training participation, the most difficult science subject matter, the most difficult learning model, the difficulties of making lesson plan, knowledge of integrated science and problem based learning. Mostly, experienced teacher participated training once a year. Science training is very important to enhance professional competency and to improve the way of teaching. The difficulties of subject matter depend on teacher's education background. The physics subject matter in class VIII and IX are difficult to teach for most respondent because of many formulas and abstract. Respondents found difficulties in making lesson plan, in term of choosing the right learning model for some subject matter. Based on the result, inquiry, cooperative, practice are frequently used in science class. Integrated science is understood as a mix between Biology, Physics and Chemistry concepts. On the other hand, respondents argue that problem based learning was difficult especially in finding contextual problem. All the questionnaire result can be used as an input for teacher training program in order to enhanced teacher's competency. Difficult concepts, integrated science, teaching plan, problem based learning can be shared in teacher training.

  18. State-Owned Enterprise Director Training: A Review of Canadian Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    This article surveys state-owned enterprise director training programmes in Canada at both the national and provincial levels. In Canada director training programmes have emerged to enable good private-sector corporate governance. This trend has been embraced by governments seeking to improve corporate governance among their state-owned…

  19. Effects of an Intensive Disability-Focused Training Experience on University Faculty Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Seely, John R.; Gerdes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates the short-term effects of a disability-focused training on the disability-related self-efficacy of university faculty. Three consecutive cohorts of faculty (N = 102) participated in an intensive four-day training institute focused on understanding and supporting university students with disabilities. Self-efficacy for…

  20. The efficacy of a first aid training course for drivers: an experience from northern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Ali Vakili; Ali Mohjervatan; Seyed Taghi Heydari; Armin Akbarzadeh; Nazanin Sadat Hosini; Farideh Alizad; Peyman Arasteh

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the efficacy of a first aid training course for a group of drivers.Methods:This study comprised 500 drivers,randomly selected from the road transport companies.They underwent a course of first aid training and the results were evaluated at 0-3 and 4-6 months after training.Results:Both quantitative and qualitative improvements were observed in the drivers' efficacy in giving first aid.Also the rate of correct interventions was higher at 4-6 months than at 0-3 months.The exception was airway management which was not favorably improved after training.Conclusion:The first aid training course for drivers is beneficial and helpful for prehospital care system in road traffic accidents.