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Sample records for extinct outer arc

  1. Transient thermal regimes in the Sierra Nevada and Baja California extinct outer arcs following the cessation of Farallon subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Kamil; Blackwell, David

    2009-02-01

    We examine the thermal relaxation of the Sierra Nevada and Baja California extinct outer arc blocks following the progressive cessation of Farallon subduction under western North America beginning at ˜30 Ma. Being parts of the same outer arc until the inland jump of the San Andreas transform fault at ˜5 Ma, these two regions show many similarities in their geology, geomorphology, rigid body behavior, and their relatively low seismicity. In the thermal model, we combine results of different geophysical and geophysical studies to constrain the thermal state and geometry of the outer arcs before the cessation of subduction and then model the postsubduction temperature responses in these regions using the results of the tectonic reconstructions. A well-constrained regional thermal model of these blocks using the results of many earlier studies in these regions confirms that the present low heat flow values in these regions are the remnants of the very cold outer arc thermal regime of the subduction zone even as long as 30 Ma after cessation of subduction. Thus the entire Pacific boundary of the North American plate is still in a transient thermal state. The calculated low lithospheric temperatures in the Sierra Nevada and Peninsular blocks correlate very well with their rigid body behavior obtained from geodetic studies, and seismogenic layer thicknesses obtained from seismological studies. This is in contrast with the fact that both regions are surrounded by intense deformation associated with the western North America intraplate and extraplate motions. These low-temperature islands play important roles in the present interaction of the North American and Pacific plates and contribute to the broad deformation of the transform boundary. The thermal relaxation of the extinct outer arcs includes both vertical heating from the underlying asthenosphere and the lateral heating from the extinct back arc (Basin and Range), which has remained as a high heat flow region after

  2. Calculation of the Dynamic Characteristics of an Electric Arc Subjected to Forced Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekrasov, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    Models and methods of calculating the currents in a free-burning arc and in an arc in an arc chute with magnetic blow and the voltages across them in the process of their extinction are considered. A comparison of calculation and experimental data has been performed.

  3. AMPA Receptors Control Fear Extinction through an Arc-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Simon; Barnes, Philip; Hall, Jeremy; Thomas, Kerrie L.

    2017-01-01

    Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) supports fear memory through synaptic plasticity events requiring actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. We have previously shown that reducing hippocampal Arc levels through antisense knockdown leads to the premature extinction of contextual fear. Here we show that the AMPA receptor antagonist…

  4. Thermal radiation effect on the extinction properties of electric arcs in HV circuit breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziani Abderrahmane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available During the formation of the electric arc at the opening of a high voltage circuit breaker, the generated plasma will be the seat of a very important thermal exchange. Models founded only on conduction and convection thermal transfers don't reproduce the whole thermal exchanges that are governing the extinction process. This paper is devoted to the development of a model of the electric arc extinction in a high voltage circuit breaker taking in account the thermal radiation of the plasma, in addition to the conduction and convection phenomena. The Stefan-Boltzman equation is coupled with the heat equation, and both equations are solved simultaneously in order to follow the evolution of the arc voltage and the conductance of the thermal plasma. The obtained results are found in good agreement with experimental recordings.

  5. Hydrodynamic performance of combined cylinders structure with dual arc-shaped porous outer walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gao; Liu, Jun

    2012-11-01

    This study examines the hydrodynamic performance of short-crested wave interaction with a new porous cylindrical structure by using the scaled boundary finite element method (SBFEM), which is a semi-analytical technique combining the advantages of the finite element method and the boundary element method and with its own special features as well. The cylindrical structure consists of dual arc-shaped porous outer cylinders circumscribing an impermeable inner cylinder. A central feature of the newly extended method is that two virtual outer cylinders extending the arc-shaped porous outer cylinders with the same centre are introduced and variable porous-effect parameters are also introduced for the two virtual cylinders, so that the final SBFEM equation still can be handled in a closed-form analytical manner in the radial direction and by a finite element approximation in the circumferential direction. The entire computational domain is divided into two bounded and one unbounded domains, and a variational principle formulation is used to derive the SBFEM equation in each sub-domain. The velocity potential in bounded and unbounded domains is formulated using sets of Bessel and Hankel functions respectively, and the unknown coefficients are determined from the matching conditions. The results of numerical verification show that the approach discretises only the outermost virtual cylinder with surface finite-elements and fewer elements are required to obtain very accurate results. Influences of the incident wave parameters and structural configurations on the hydrodynamics are examined.

  6. Subsurface deformation along major thrusts in the outer-arc high off northwest Sumatra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, A.; Hirata, K.; Seeber, L.; Arai, K.; Ashi, J.; Rahardiawan, R.; Udrekh, U.; Baba, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Tokuyama, H.; Nakamura, Y.; Permana, H.; Djajadihardja, Y. S.

    2012-12-01

    A huge ocean-wide tsunami, with average heights of more than 20 meters along the west coast of the northern tip of Sumatra followed the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake (Mw9.2). Several working hypotheses have been proposed, but the generation mechanism for this tsunami remains unresolved. Several hypotheses suggest a possible coseismic slip on splay faults in the outer-arc-high off northwest Sumatra [e.g., Sibuet et al., 2007]. Among these splay faults, the Middle Thrust(MT) (or possibly the Lower Thrust(LT)), can best account for features of the Indian Ocean tsunamis observed at regional and ocean-wide distances [Hirata et al., 2008]. In 2009, we conducted KY09-09 bathymetry survey offshore northern Sumatra and recognized many geological structures, including candidate traces of these splay faults in the outer-arc-high. In 2010, we conducted the KH-10-5 high-resolution MCS survey with a total of 18 seismic lines to image the subsurface structure associated with LT, MT, and the Upper Thrust(UT) in the outer-arc high. Many of subsurface deformations that can be identified on MCS profiles are distributed along these major thrusts. For an example, more than ten of these MCS profiles show clear indication of subsurface deformation along MT. However, a fraction of subsurface deformations are distributed along other large faults existing between these major thrusts. 14 MCS lines cross basins adjoining MT. Several of these MCS profiles show that the uppermost sediment layers of the basins are deformed, either progressively tilted up to a horizontal sea floor, or sub-parallel tilted along with the sea floor. This suggests geologically "recent" deformation associated with slip along MT. However, other MCS lines did not image such a clear "recent" deformation structures near MT. This may imply lack of deformation, or lack of recent sediment along these profiles to record the deformation. Three MCS lines cross UT of Sibuet et al.[2007] or neighboring basins but we could not

  7. Role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction in nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Yong Ho

    2013-03-01

    This study of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames with finite burner diameters investigates the important role of the outer-edge flame on flame extinction through experimental and numerical analyses. It explores flame stability diagrams mapping the flame extinction response of nitrogen-diluted non-premixed counterflow flames to varying global strain rates in terms of burner diameter, burner gap, and velocity ratio. A critical nitrogen mole fraction exists beyond which the flame cannot be sustained; the critical nitrogen mole fraction versus global strain rate curves have C-shapes for various burner diameters, burner gaps, and velocity ratios. At sufficiently high strain-rate flames, these curves collapse into one curve; therefore, the flames follow the one-dimensional flame response of a typical diffusion flame. Low strain-rate flames are significantly affected by radial conductive heat loss, and therefore flame length. Three flame extinction modes are identified: flame extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame with or without oscillations at the outer-edge flame prior to the extinction, and flame extinction through a flame hole at the flame center. The extinction modes are significantly affected by the behavior of the outer-edge flame. Detailed explanations are provided based on the measured flame-surface temperature and numerical evaluation of the fractional contribution of each term in the energy equation. Radial conductive heat loss at the flame edge to ambience is the main mechanism of extinction through shrinkage of the outer-edge flame in low strain-rate flames. Reduction of the burner diameter can extend the flame extinction mode by shrinking the outer-edge flame in higher strain-rate flames. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quaternary outer fore-arc deformation and uplift inboard of the Panama Triple Junction, Burica Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Kristin D.; Fisher, Donald M.; Gardner, Thomas W.; La Femina, Peter; Davidson, Daniel; Teletzke, Allison

    2011-05-01

    The Panama Triple Junction (Cocos-Nazca-Caribbean) represents the point that abruptly separates the thick and rapidly subducting Cocos plate to the northwest from the thin and obliquely subducting Nazca plate to the southeast along the Central American convergent margin. New structural and geomorphic analyses on the Burica Peninsula, an outer fore-arc peninsula located only ˜100 km inboard the Panama Triple Junction, reveal that the peninsula is dominated primarily by contractional deformation along three listric thrust faults that root in the underlying plate boundary. The geometry and spatial distribution of these thrusts indicate that this deformation occurs primarily in response to the change in crustal thickness occurring as a result of eastern migration of the flank of the Cocos Ridge coeval with migration of the Panama Triple Junction at a rate of ˜55 mm/yr to the southeast. Mapping and detailed elevation surveys reveal eight marine terraces on the peninsula with a distribution of inner edge elevations indicating that uplift is spatially uniform from north to south along strike in this area. However, terraces along the northwest part of the peninsula are offset across major thrust faults. Age control provided by 14C, OSL and soil chronosequences indicate that the terraces within the easternmost portion of the peninsula range in age from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 to Holocene, a result that indicates that this portion of the peninsula is younger than ˜60 ka. Time-averaged uplift rates calculated from marine terraces and other Quaternary marine deposits yield consistent uplift rates that range between 2.1 ± 0.1 and 7.7 ± 0.5 mm/yr for samples older than 1 ka and between 6.9 ± 1.0 and 19.3 ± 8.0 mm/yr for samples younger than 1 ka. We interpret this temporal distribution in uplift rates to suggest that the eight terraces preserved on the peninsula are produced coseismically wherein the anomalously high uplift rates calculated from the youngest samples

  9. Tectonic evolution of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: initial results from IODP Expedition 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.; Robertson, A. H. F.; Avery, A. J.; Kutterolf, S.

    2015-12-01

    During International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352, a section through the volcanic stratigraphy of the outer fore arc of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) system was drilled to trace magmatism, tectonics, and crustal accretion associated with subduction initiation. Structures within drill cores, borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer IBM fore arc is mainly post-magmatic. Extension generated asymmetric sediment basins such as half-grabens at sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442 on the upper trench slope. Along their eastern margins the basins are bounded by west-dipping normal faults. Deformation was localized along multiple sets of faults, accompanied by syn-tectonic pelagic and volcaniclastic sedimentation. The lowermost sedimentary units were tilted eastward by ~20°. Tilted beds were covered by sub-horizontal beds. Biostratigraphic constraints reveal a minimum age of the oldest sediments at ~ 35 Ma; timing of the sedimentary unconformities is between ~ 27 and 32 Ma. At sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 on the outer fore arc strike-slip faults are bounding sediment basins. Sediments were not significantly affected by tectonic tilting. Biostratigraphy gives a minimum age of the basement-cover contact between ~29.5 and 32 Ma. The post-magmatic structures reveal a multiphase tectonic evolution of the outer IBM fore arc. At sites 352-U1439 and 352-U1442, shear with dominant reverse to oblique reverse displacement was localized along subhorizontal fault zones, steep slickensides and shear fractures. These were either re-activated as or cut by normal-faults and strike-slip faults. Extension was also accommodated by steep to subvertical mineralized veins and extensional fractures. Faults at sites 352-U1440 and 352-U1441 show mainly strike-slip kinematics. Sediments overlying the igneous basement(maximum Late Eocene to Recent age), document ash and aeolian input, together with mass wasting of the fault-bounded sediment ponds.

  10. Breakdown Electric Field of Hot 30% CF3I/CO2 Mixtures at Temperature of 300-3500 K During Arc Extinction Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoling; Jiao, Juntao; Xiao, Dengming

    2016-11-01

    We calculated the uniform dielectric breakdown field strength of residual 30% CF3I/CO2 gas mixtures during the arc extinction process over the temperature range 300-3500 K at 0.1 MPa. The limiting reduced field strengths are decided by a balance of electron generation and loss based on chemical reactions estimated by the electron energy distribution function (EEDF), which employs the Boltzmann equation method with two-term expanding approximation in the steady-state Townsend (SST) condition. During the insulation recovery phase, the hot CF3I/CO2 gas mixtures have maximum dielectric strength at a temperature of about 1500 K. At room temperature 300 K, the electric strength after arc extinction (90.3 Td, 1 Td=10-21 V·m2) is only 38% of the original value before arc (234.9 Td). The adverse insulation recovery ability of CF3I/CO2 gas mixtures in arc extinction hinders its application in electric circuit breakers and other switchgears as an arc quenching and insulating medium. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10875093)

  11. Modeled IBEX/INCA skymaps including the keV-ENA source extinction in the outer heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Siewert, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the outer heliospheric interface is a major challenge, especially in the light of recent observations by the IBEX and Voyager missions. We present further details on a new required theoretical correction that has been identified as substantial in a recent paper, the so-called source depletion effect. These results complement and expand earlier calculations of transit-time delays by presenting global skymaps of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) calculated with the depletion correction, comparing them with skymaps calculated without these corrections. Our results demonstrate that the depletion correction is critical for interpreting IBEX-Hi ENA fluxes generated in the inner heliosheath, and that any attempt to reconstruct the shape of the heliospheric boundary needs to include the depletion correction, unless arriving at considerably erroneous results.

  12. Meso- and microscale structures related to post-magmatic deformation of the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheuz, P.; Kurz, W.; Ferre, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Bonin fore arc. Four sites were drilled, two on the outer fore arc and two on the upper trench slope. Analysis of structures within drill cores, combined with borehole and site survey seismic data, indicates that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic, associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement, deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones, and the formation of tension fractures, hybrid (tension and shear) fractures, and shear fractures. Veins commonly form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and, generally, show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. The vein filling generally consists of (Low Mg-) calcite and/or various types of zeolite as well as clay. Vein frequency varies with depth but does not seem to correlate with the proximity of faults. This may indicate that these veins are genetically related to hydrothermal activity taking place shortly after magma cooling. Host-rock fragments are commonly embedded within precipitated vein material pointing to a high fluid pressure. Vein thickness varies from < 1 mm up to 15 mm. The wider veins appear to have formed in incremental steps of extension. Calcite veins tend to be purely dilational at shallow depths, but gradually evolve towards oblique tensional veins at depth, as shown by the growth of stretched calcite and/or zeolites (idiomorphic and/or stretched) with respect to vein margins. With increasing depth, the calcite grains exhibit deformation microstructures more frequently than at shallower core intervals. These microstructures include thin twinning (type I twins), increasing in width with depth (type I and type II twins), curved twins, and subgrain boundaries indicative of incipient plastic deformation.

  13. Meso- and microscale vein structures in fore-arc basalts and boninites related to post-magmatic tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc system: preliminary results from IODP Expedition 352

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Dennis; Micheuz, Peter; Kurz, Walter

    2016-04-01

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 352 aimed to drill through the entire volcanic sequence of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc. Two drill sites are situated on the outer fore arc composed of fore arc basalts (FAB) whereas two more sites are located on the upper trench slope penetrating the younger boninites. First results from IODP Expedition 352 and preliminary post-cruise data suggest that FAB were generated by decompression melting during near-trench sea-floor spreading, and that fluids from the subducting slab were not involved in their genesis. Subduction zone fluids involved in boninite genesis appear to have been derived from progressively higher temperatures and pressures over time as the subducting slab thermally matured. Structures within the drill cores combined with borehole and site survey seismic data indicate that tectonic deformation in the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc is mainly post-magmatic associated with the development of syn-tectonic sedimentary basins. Within the magmatic basement deformation was accommodated by shear along cataclastic fault zones and the formation of tension fractures, shear fractures and hybrid (tension and shear) fractures. Veins form by mineral filling of tension or hybrid fractures and show no or limited observable macroscale displacement along the fracture plane. (Low Mg-) Calcite and/or various types of zeolite are the major vein constituents, where the latter are considered to be alteration products of basaltic glass. Micrite contents vary significantly and are related to neptunian dikes. In boninites calcite develops mainly blocky shapes but veins with fibrous and stretched crystals also occur in places indicating antitaxial as well as ataxial growth, respectively. In FAB calcite forms consistently blocky crystals without any microscopic identifiable growth direction suggesting precipitation from a highly supersaturated fluid under dropping fluid pressure conditions. However, fluid pressure

  14. 挪威Hardanger大桥钢箱梁外侧电弧喷锌工艺设计%Design of zinc arc-spraying process for outer steel box girder of Hardanger Bridge in Norway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仪德强; 钱胜杰; 金树军; 李敏风; 丁祥

    2012-01-01

    在承接挪威Hardanger大桥钢结构制作中,根据业主的要求,以电弧喷锌作为配套涂层底漆.为了适应钢结构涂装流水线以及佐敦公司的重防腐配套涂料,从钢结构缺陷处理等级、磨料拼配方案、喷砂技术条件、电弧喷锌设备及锌丝线材要求、电弧喷锌工艺参数以及喷锌层质量要求等方面对钢箱梁外侧电弧喷锌工艺进行了设计.%Based on the requirement of proprietor, arc zinc spray coating was used as a primer during the manufacturing of the Norwegian Hardanger bridge's steel structure. In order to adapt the steel structure coating flow line and Jotun's heavy corrosion protection accessory coating, the arc zinc spraying process of outer steel box girder was designed from aspects of pretreatment grade of defects in steel structure, composition for abrasives, sandblasting process conditions, arc zinc spraying equipment, zinc wire requirement, arc zinc spraying process parameters, quality requirement of arc sprayed zinc coating, etc.

  15. 输电线路潜供电弧自熄特性仿真%Simulation for Self-extinction Behavior of Secondary Arc in Transmission Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜湘莲; 陈维江; 李志兵; 王承玉; 贺子鸣

    2012-01-01

    The self-extinguishing behavior of secondary arcs affects the single-phase re-closure time of transmission lines,so it is important to improve the power system's transmission capacity and reliability.Based on the classic Mayr arc model,the non-linear time-varying arc resistance was introduced to describe the condition of an arc channel,and the arc resistance equations were established.By analyzing the movement characteristics of the secondary arc,the arc's real time length was obtained to iteratively compute the arc resistance.Then an arc resistance criterion was proposed to judge whether arc extinguishes by itself or not according to the law of energy conservation.The equivalent circuit of the arc resistance connected with the system circuit was also put forward to calculate the arc characteristics,and the simulation flow for the self-extinguishing behavior of the secondary arc was further expressed in detail.With the arcing test data at low currents,the parameter estimation was performed for this arc model,and some waveforms of arc voltage,current,resistance and arcing duration were obtained.According to the obtained results,the potential gradient of secondary arc is in a range of 1 500~2 000 V/m.The calculation waveforms are close to the test results,and the arcing duration error is within the permission error of engineering.It is concluded that the presented secondary arc model and its simulation method are reasonable and practicable.%潜供电弧自熄特性影响输电线路的单相重合闸时间,对提高系统的输送容量和可靠性至关重要。基于经典的Mayr电弧模型,采用非线性时变电阻描述弧道特性,建立了弧阻方程,分析潜供电弧的运动特性,获得电弧实时长度以迭代计算弧道电阻,根据能量守恒原则提出了判断电弧是否自熄的弧阻判据。给出了输电线路潜供电弧的计算电路,进而阐明了计算电弧自熄特性的仿真流程。利用长间隙小电流电弧试验数据,

  16. Three-dimensional velocity structure of the outer fore arc of the Colombia-Ecuador subduction zone and implications for the 1958 megathrust earthquake rupture zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cano, Lina Constanza; Galve, Audrey; Charvis, Philippe; Marcaillou, Boris

    2014-02-01

    In 2005, an onshore, offshore 3-D refraction and wide-angle reflection seismic experiment was conducted along the convergent margin at the border between Colombia and Ecuador, over the rupture zone of the 1958, Mw 7.6 subduction earthquake. A well-defined Vp velocity model of the plate boundary and upper and lower plates was constructed, down to 25 km depth, using first arrival traveltimes inversion. The model reveals a several kilometers thick, low-velocity zone in the upper plate, located immediately above the interplate contact. This low-velocity zone might be related to alteration and fracturing of the mafic and ultramafic rocks, which composed the upper plate in this area by fluids released by the lower plate with possible contributions from sediment underplating. Near the toe of the margin, the model shows a low-velocity gradient in the outer wedge, which is interpreted as highly faulted and fractured rocks. This low-velocity/low-gradient region appears to limit the oceanward extension of the rupture zones of the 1958 and 1979 earthquakes, possibly because coseismic deformation and uplift of the outer margin wedge dissipates most of the seismic energy.

  17. Rethinking Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-07

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavioral technique, and consider whether traditional understandings warrant a re-examination. We discuss the neurobiology, cognitive factors, and major computational theories, and revisit the predominant view that extinction results in new learning that interferes with expression of the original memory. Additionally, we reconsider the limitations of extinction as a technique to prevent the relapse of maladaptive behavior and discuss novel approaches, informed by contemporary theoretical advances, that augment traditional extinction methods to target and potentially alter maladaptive memories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rethinking Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Niv, Yael; Daw, Nathaniel; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction serves as the leading theoretical framework and experimental model to describe how learned behaviors diminish through absence of anticipated reinforcement. In the past decade, extinction has moved beyond the realm of associative learning theory and behavioral experimentation in animals and has become a topic of considerable interest in the neuroscience of learning, memory, and emotion. Here, we review research and theories of extinction, both as a learning process and as a behavior...

  19. Internal Extinction in Spiral Galaxies in the Near Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, K L; Haynes, M P; Masters, Karen L.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the effects of internal extinction in spiral galaxies we search for correlations of near infrared (NIR) photometric parameters with inclination. We use data from the 2 Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Extended Source Catalog (XSC) on 15,224 spiral galaxies for which we also have redshifts. For 3035 of the galaxies, I-band photometry is available which is included in the analysis. From the simple dependence of reddening on inclination we derive a lower limit to the difference in magnitude between the face-on and edge-on aspect of 0.9, 0.3 and 0.1 magnitudes in I (0.81 um), J (1.25 um) and H (1.65 um) bands. We find that the faintest isophotal radius reported in the XSC (at the 21st mag/arc sq level) is closer to the centers of the galaxies than other common isophotal measures (e.g. the 23.5 mag/arc sq radius in I-band), and argue that it should not be assumed to represent an outer isophote at which galaxies are transparent at all viewing angles. A simple linear extinction law (i.e. Delta M = gam...

  20. Measuring Galactic Extinction A Test

    CERN Document Server

    Arce, H G; Arce, Hector G.; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    1999-01-01

    We test the recently published all-sky reddening map of Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998 [SFD]) using the extinction study of a region in the Taurus dark cloud complex by Arce & Goodman (1999 [AG]). In their study, AG use four different techniques to measure the amount and structure of the extinction toward Taurus, and all four techniques agree very well. Thus we believe that the AG results are a truthful representation of the extinction in the region and can be used to test the reliability of the SFD reddening map. The results of our test show that the SFD all-sky reddening map, which is based on data from COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA, overestimates the reddening by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5 in regions of smooth extinction with A_V > 0.5 mag. In some regions of steep extinction gradients the SFD map underestimates the reddening value, probably due to its low spatial resolution. We expect that the astronomical community will be using the SFD reddening map extensively. We offer this Letter as a cautionary n...

  1. Interstellar Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    This review describes our current understanding of interstellar extinction. This differ substantially from the ideas of the 20th century. With infrared surveys of hundreds of millions of stars over the entire sky, such as 2MASS, SPITZER-IRAC, and WISE, we have looked at the densest and most rarefied regions of the interstellar medium at distances of a few kpc from the Sun. Observations at infrared and microwave wavelengths, where the bulk of the interstellar dust absorbs and radiates, have brought us closer to an understanding of the distribution of the dust particles on scales of the Galaxy and the universe. We are in the midst of a scientific revolution in our understanding of the interstellar medium and dust. Progress in, and the key results of, this revolution are still difficult to predict. Nevertheless, (a) a physically justified model has been developed for the spatial distribution of absorbing material over the nearest few kiloparsecs, including the Gould belt as a dust container, which gives an accurate estimate of the extinction for any object just by its galactic coordinates. It is also clear that (b) the interstellar medium contains roughly half the mass of matter in the galactic vicinity of the solar system (the other half is made up of stars, their remnants, and dark matter) and (c) the interstellar medium and, especially, dust, differ substantially in different regions of space and deep space cannot be understood by only studying near space.

  2. Cathodic arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  3. Cathodic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bia...

  4. UV extinction properties of carina nebular dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Derck

    1993-01-01

    I have performed an analysis of the UV extinction by dust along the line of sight to the young open cluster Tr 16. The observed curves are parameterized in order to extract quantitative information about the structure of the curves. Furthermore, by constructing differential extinction curves, obtained by differencing curves for stars which lie within a few arc seconds of each other on the sky, I was able to obtain a curve which is free of the effects of foreground extinction, and represents the extinction by the dust in the Tr 16 molecular cloud. I then show that this curve is nearly identical to one due to dust in the Orion molecular cloud. This result shows that dust in the Carina arm exhibits the same behavior as that in the local arm.

  5. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  6. Collisional Simulations of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänninen, J.; Porco, C.

    1997-03-01

    The currently accepted model for Neptune arc confinement relies on the radial and azimuthal confining perturbations due to the nearby satellite, Galatea. This model calls for arc particle orbits exhibiting a negative eccentricity gradient and crossing at quadrature, a configuration that paradoxically leads to collisions energetic enough to disrupt arc confinement. We confirm with numerical collisional N-body simulations that the confinement mechanism relying on a 42:43 corotation-inclination resonance and a 42:43 outer Lindblad resonance with Galatea is indeed capable of confining a large population of 10-m-size and bigger particles over short time scales. Moreover, we find that an 84:86 outer vertical resonance, also due to Galatea, falling within 20 m of the arcs' radial position, effectively reduces the collision frequency and relative collisional velocities and consequently stabilizes the arcs over long time scales against the disruptive effects of collisions.

  7. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  8. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  9. Gradual extinction reduces Reinstatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef eShiban

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study investigated whether gradually reducing the frequency of aversive stimuli during extinction can prevent the return of fear. Thirty-one participants of a three-stage procedure (acquisition, extinction and a reinstatement test on day two were randomly assigned to a standard extinction (SE and gradual extinction (GE procedure. The two groups differed only in the extinction procedure. While the SE group ran through a regular extinction process without any negative events, the frequency of the aversive stimuli during the extinction phase was gradually reduced for the GE group. The unconditioned stimulus was an air blast (5 bar, 10 ms. A spider and a scorpion were used as conditioned stimuli. The outcome variables were contingency ratings and physiological measures (skin conductance response and startle response. There were no differences found between the two groups for the acquisition and extinction phases concerning contingency ratings, SCR, or startle response. Gradual extinction compared to standard extinction significantly reduced the return of fear in the reinstatement test for the startle response but not for skin conductance response or contingency ratings. This study was successful in translating the findings in rodent to humans. The results suggest that the gradual extinction process is suitable for increasing the efficacy of fear extinction.

  10. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Haoxi; Li, Qingmin; Xing, Jinyuan; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51277061 and 51420105011)

  11. Is extinction forever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Patten, Brenda D; Bridge, Eli S; Crawford, Priscilla H C; Hough, Daniel J; Kelly, Jeffrey F; Patten, Michael A

    2015-05-01

    Mistrust of science has seeped into public perception of the most fundamental aspect of conservation-extinction. The term ought to be straightforward, and yet, there is a disconnect between scientific discussion and public views. This is not a mere semantic issue, rather one of communication. Within a population dynamics context, we say that a species went locally extinct, later to document its return. Conveying our findings matters, for when we use local extinction, an essentially nonsensical phrase, rather than extirpation, which is what is meant, then we contribute to, if not create outright, a problem for public understanding of conservation, particularly as local extinction is often shortened to extinction in media sources. The public that receives the message of our research void of context and modifiers comes away with the idea that extinction is not forever or, worse for conservation as a whole, that an extinction crisis has been invented.

  12. Astrophysical life extinctions what killed the dinosaurs?

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    1999-01-01

    Geological records indicate that the exponential diversification of marine and continental life on Earth in the past 500 My was interrupted by many life extinctions. They also indicate that the major mass extinctions were correlated in time with large meteoritic impacts, gigantic volcanic eruptions, sea regressions and drastic changes in global climate. Some of these catastrophes coincided in time. The astrophysical life extinction mechanisms which were proposed so far, in particular, meteoritic impacts, nearby supernova explosions, passage through molecular or dark matter clouds, and Galactic gamma/cosmic ray bursts cannot explain the time coincidences between these catastrophes. However, recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, ...

  13. Modern examples of extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, Gabor L

    2013-01-01

    No species lives forever, and extinction is the ultimate fate of all living species. The fossil record indicates that a recent extinction wave affecting terrestrial vertebrates was parallel with the arrival of modern humans to areas formerly uninhabited by them. These modern instances of extinction...... started at around 40,000 years ago. On continents, large mammals (especially those >50 kg body mass) were affected, while on islands, the impacts were mainly felt by birds. The causes of these extinctions are not well known but hunting, habitat alteration and the introduction of non-native species...... reasons (certain groups do not fossilize) and methodological problems (methods of excavation and identification). Consequently, we can only crudely estimate the current rate of extinction. Nonetheless, it is evident that humans generated a new mass extinction, affecting all species in all habitats, and...

  14. Modern examples of extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, Gabor L

    2013-01-01

    No species lives forever, and extinction is the ultimate fate of all living species. The fossil record indicates that a recent extinction wave affecting terrestrial vertebrates was parallel with the arrival of modern humans to areas formerly uninhabited by them. These modern instances of extinction...... started at around 40,000 years ago. On continents, large mammals (especially those >50 kg body mass) were affected, while on islands, the impacts were mainly felt by birds. The causes of these extinctions are not well known but hunting, habitat alteration and the introduction of non-native species...... are the main causes of extinction. Our knowledge about extinctions is very incomplete, due to bias in research by taxonomy (vertebrate groups are better studied), geography (northern areas have received more attention), habitat (terrestrial habitats are better known than marine ones), as well as biological...

  15. Mass extinction: a commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    Four neocatastrophist claims about mass extinction are currently being debated; they are that: 1, the late Cretaceous mass extinction was caused by large body impact; 2, as many as five other major extinctions were caused by impact; 3, the timing of extinction events since the Permian is uniformly periodic; and 4, the ages of impact craters on Earth are also periodic and in phase with the extinctions. Although strongly interconnected the four claims are independent in the sense that none depends on the others. Evidence for a link between impact and extinction is strong but still needs more confirmation through bed-by-bed and laboratory studies. An important area for future research is the question of whether extinction is a continuous process, with the rate increasing at times of mass extinctions, or whether it is episodic at all scales. If the latter is shown to be generally true, then species are at risk of extinction only rarely during their existence and catastrophism, in the sense of isolated events of extreme stress, is indicated. This is line of reasoning can only be considered an hypothesis for testing. In a larger context, paleontologists may benefit from a research strategy that looks to known Solar System and Galactic phenomena for predictions about environmental effects on earth. The recent success in the recognition of Milankovitch Cycles in the late Pleistocene record is an example of the potential of this research area.

  16. Cretaceous stem chondrichthyans survived the end-Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Guillaume; Adnet, Sylvain; Cavin, Lionel; Cappetta, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Cladodontomorph sharks are Palaeozoic stem chondrichthyans thought to go extinct at the end-Permian mass extinction. This extinction preceded the diversification of euselachians, including modern sharks. Here we describe an outer-platform cladodontomorph shark tooth assemblage from the Early Cretaceous of southern France, increasing the fossil record of this group by circa 120 million years. Identification of this material rests on new histological observations and morphological evidence. Our finding shows that this lineage survived mass extinctions most likely by habitat contraction, using deep-sea refuge environments during catastrophic events. The recorded gap in the cladodontomorph lineage represents the longest gap in the fossil record for an extinct marine vertebrate group. This discovery demonstrates that the deep-sea marine diversity, poorly known during most of the fish evolutionary history, contains essential data for a complete understanding of the long-term evolution of marine fish paleobiodiversity.

  17. Evolution of dust extinction curves in galaxy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kuan-Chou; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nagamine, Kentaro; Aoyama, Shohei; Shimizu, Ikkoh

    2017-07-01

    To understand the evolution of extinction curve, we calculate the dust evolution in a galaxy using smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations incorporating stellar dust production, dust destruction in supernova shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation, and grain disruption by shattering. The dust species are separated into carbonaceous dust and silicate. The evolution of grain size distribution is considered by dividing grain population into large and small grains, which allows us to estimate extinction curves. We examine the dependence of extinction curves on the position, gas density and metallicity in the galaxy, and find that extinction curves are flat at t ≲ 0.3 Gyr because stellar dust production dominates the total dust abundance. The 2175 Å bump and far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise become prominent after dust growth by accretion. At t ≳ 3 Gyr, shattering works efficiently in the outer disc and low-density regions, so extinction curves show a very strong 2175 Å bump and steep FUV rise. The extinction curves at t ≳ 3 Gyr are consistent with the Milky Way extinction curve, which implies that we successfully included the necessary dust processes in the model. The outer disc component caused by stellar feedback has an extinction curve with a weaker 2175 Å bump and flatter FUV slope. The strong contribution of carbonaceous dust tends to underproduce the FUV rise in the Small Magellanic Cloud extinction curve, which supports selective loss of small carbonaceous dust in the galaxy. The snapshot at young ages also explains the extinction curves in high-redshift quasars.

  18. Arc erosion behavior of a nanocomposite W-Cu electrical contact material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The erosion behavior of a nanocomposite W-Cu material under arc breakdown was investigated. The arc erosion rates of the material were determined, and the eroded surfaces and arc erosion mechanisms were studied by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that the nanocomposite W-Cu electrical contact material shows a characteristic of spreading arcs. The arc breakdown of a commercially used W-Cu alloy was limited in a few areas, and its average arc erosion rate is twice as large as that of the former. Furthermore, it is also proved that the arc extinction ability and arc stability of the nanocomposite W-Cu material are excellent, and melting is the major failure modality in the make-and-break operation of arcs.

  19. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Pacific Region - West Coast NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shape file format for the BOEM Pacific Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  20. An Arc in Saturn's G Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M.; Tiscareno, M.; Porco, C.; Jones, G.; Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.

    2006-09-01

    The G ring is a narrow, faint ring located between the orbits of Janus and Mimas. Approximately 4000 km wide, it has a strongly asymmetric brightness profile with a sharp inner edge between 167,000 km and 168,000 km from Saturn's center and a more diffuse outer part. In Cassini images, a portion of the ring contains a bright arc that abuts the G-ring's inner edge and extends over 30 degrees in longitude. By tracking this arc over the first two years of the Cassini Mission, we find its orbital period is 0.80813 day, corresponding to a semi-major axis of 167,496 km. Since this location places the arc within 6 km of the Mimas 7:6 Co-rotation Eccentricity Resonance and within 12 km of the Mimas 7:6 Inner Lindblad Resonance, the arc is likely confined in longitude by Mimas just as Neptune's ring arcs are held in place by Galatea. The arc's longitude relative to Mimas is consistent with this model. Cassini now has the opportunity to study the dynamics of this sort of system in detail over a period of years. The arc, which may be the debris of a fragmented moon, may also supply the particles found in the rest of the G ring; micron-sized grains drift outwards by non-gravitational processes in this region. The G-ring is responsible for a broad, relatively modest decrease in the fluxes of magnetospheric charged particles. When Cassini passed over the G ring in the vicinity of the arc, on September 5, 2005, the MIMI instrument detected a particularly sharp and deep charged particle absorption signature. Such a pronounced charged particle absorption was not seen in the other G-ring passages that occurred longitudinally far from the arc. The nature of this absorption provides constraints on the population of large particles in this arc.

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Recovery from Extinction Shortly after Extinction Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbold, Georgina E.; Dobbek, Nick; Nader, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that extinction is new learning. Memory acquisition involves both short-term memory (STM) and long-term memory (LTM) components; however, few studies have examined early phases of extinction retention. Retention of auditory fear extinction was examined at various time points. Shortly (1-4 h) after extinction acquisition…

  2. Extinction and retrieval+extinction of conditioned fear differentially activate medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjoo Joanne Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pairing a previously neutral conditioned stimulus (CS; e.g., a tone to an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US; e.g., a footshock leads to associative learning such that the tone alone comes to elicit a conditioned response (e.g., freezing. We have previously shown that an extinction session that occurs within the reconsolidation window (termed retrieval+extinction attenuates fear responding and prevents the return of fear in Pavlovian fear conditioning (Monfils et al., 2009. To date, the mechanisms that explain the different behavioral outcomes between standard extinction and retrieval+extinction remain poorly understood. Here we sought to examine the differential temporal engagement of specific neural systems by these 2 approaches using Arc catFISH (cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrate that extinction and retrieval+extinction lead to differential patterns of expression, suggesting that they engage different networks. These findings provide insight into the neural mechanisms that allow extinction during reconsolidation to prevent the return of fear in rats.

  3. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  4. Hybridization and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todesco, Marco; Pascual, Mariana A; Owens, Gregory L; Ostevik, Katherine L; Moyers, Brook T; Hübner, Sariel; Heredia, Sylvia M; Hahn, Min A; Caseys, Celine; Bock, Dan G; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-08-01

    Hybridization may drive rare taxa to extinction through genetic swamping, where the rare form is replaced by hybrids, or by demographic swamping, where population growth rates are reduced due to the wasteful production of maladaptive hybrids. Conversely, hybridization may rescue the viability of small, inbred populations. Understanding the factors that contribute to destructive versus constructive outcomes of hybridization is key to managing conservation concerns. Here, we survey the literature for studies of hybridization and extinction to identify the ecological, evolutionary, and genetic factors that critically affect extinction risk through hybridization. We find that while extinction risk is highly situation dependent, genetic swamping is much more frequent than demographic swamping. In addition, human involvement is associated with increased risk and high reproductive isolation with reduced risk. Although climate change is predicted to increase the risk of hybridization-induced extinction, we find little empirical support for this prediction. Similarly, theoretical and experimental studies imply that genetic rescue through hybridization may be equally or more probable than demographic swamping, but our literature survey failed to support this claim. We conclude that halting the introduction of hybridization-prone exotics and restoring mature and diverse habitats that are resistant to hybrid establishment should be management priorities.

  5. Ecological model of extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, G

    1997-01-01

    We present numerical results based on a simplified ecological system in evolution, showing features of extinction similar to that claimed for the biosystem on Earth. In the model each species consists of a population in interaction with the others, that reproduces and evolves in time. Each species is simultaneously a predator and a prey in a food chain. Mutations that change the interactions are supposed to occur randomly at a low rate. Extinctions of populations result naturally from the predator-prey dynamics. The model is not pinned in a fitness variable, and natural selection arises from the dynamics.

  6. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z W; Zhu, J J; Li, Z S; Aldén, M; Leipold, F; Salewski, M; Kusano, Y

    2013-03-11

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera with framing rates of tens to hundreds of kHz, showing details of ignition, motion, pulsation, short-cutting, and extinction of the plasma column. The ignition of a new discharge occurs before the extinction of the previous discharge. The developed, moving plasma column often short-cuts its current path triggered by Townsend breakdown between the two legs of the gliding arc. The emission from the plasma column is shown to pulsate at a frequency of 62.5 kHz, i.e., twice the frequency of the AC power supply. Optical emission spectra of the plasma radiation show the presence of excited N2, NO and OH radicals generated in the plasma and the dependence of their relative intensities on both the distance relative to the electrodes and the phase of the driving AC power. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of the ground-state OH radicals shows high intensity outside the plasma column rather than in the center suggesting that ground-state OH is not formed in the plasma column but in its vicinity.

  7. Context, Learning, and Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Samuel J.; Blei, David M.; Niv, Yael

    2010-01-01

    A. Redish et al. (2007) proposed a reinforcement learning model of context-dependent learning and extinction in conditioning experiments, using the idea of "state classification" to categorize new observations into states. In the current article, the authors propose an interpretation of this idea in terms of normative statistical inference. They…

  8. Unexpectedly many extinct hominins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokma, Folmer; van den Brink, Valentijn; Stadler, Tanja

    2012-09-01

    Recent studies indicate that Neanderthal and Denisova hominins may have been separate species, while debate continues on the status of Homo floresiensis. The decade-long debate between "splitters," who recognize over 20 hominin species, and "lumpers," who maintain that all these fossils belong to just a few lineages, illustrates that we do not know how many extinct hominin species to expect. Here, we present probability distributions for the number of speciation events and the number of contemporary species along a branch of a phylogeny. With estimates of hominin speciation and extincton rates, we then show that the expected total number of extinct hominin species is 8, but may be as high as 27. We also show that it is highly unlikely that three very recent species disappeared due to natural, background extinction. This may indicate that human-like remains are too easily considered distinct species. Otherwise, the evidence suggesting that Neanderthal and the Denisova hominin represent distinct species implies a recent wave of extinctions, ostensibly driven by the only survivor, H. sapiens. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. Ecology: Dynamics of Indirect Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Jose M

    2015-12-01

    The experimental identification of the mechanism by which extinctions of predators trigger further predator extinctions emphasizes the role of indirect effects between species in disturbed ecosystems. It also has deep consequences for the hidden magnitude of the current biodiversity crisis.

  10. The arc arises: The links between volcanic output, arc evolution and melt composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Hamada, Morihisa; Arculus, Richard J.; Johnson, Kyle; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Savov, Ivan P.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Li, He

    2017-03-01

    Subduction initiation is a key process for global plate tectonics. Individual lithologies developed during subduction initiation and arc inception have been identified in the trench wall of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) island arc but a continuous record of this process has not previously been described. Here, we present results from International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 351 that drilled a single site west of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), a chain of extinct stratovolcanoes that represents the proto-IBM island arc, active for ∼25 Ma following subduction initiation. Site U1438 recovered 150 m of oceanic igneous basement and ∼1450 m of overlying sediments. The lower 1300 m of these sediments comprise volcaniclastic gravity-flow deposits shed from the evolving KPR arc front. We separated fresh magmatic minerals from Site U1438 sediments, and analyzed 304 glass (formerly melt) inclusions, hosted by clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Compositions of glass inclusions preserve a temporal magmatic record of the juvenile island arc, complementary to the predominant mid-Miocene to recent activity determined from tephra layers recovered by drilling in the IBM forearc. The glass inclusions record the progressive transition of melt compositions dominated by an early 'calc-alkalic', high-Mg andesitic stage to a younger tholeiitic stage over a time period of 11 Ma. High-precision trace element analytical data record a simultaneously increasing influence of a deep subduction component (e.g., increase in Th vs. Nb, light rare earth element enrichment) and a more fertile mantle source (reflected in increased high field strength element abundances). This compositional change is accompanied by increased deposition rates of volcaniclastic sediments reflecting magmatic output and maturity of the arc. We conclude the 'calc-alkalic' stage of arc evolution may endure as long as mantle wedge sources are not mostly advected away from the zones of arc magma generation, or the rate of

  11. The outer solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encrenaz T.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The outer solar system extends beyond a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. It contains the giant planets and their systems (rings and satellites, the Kuiper belt, the comets (except those which approach episodically the inner solar system and, at its outer edge, the Oort cloud. The outer solar system physically corresponds to the region located outside the « snow line » which corresponded to the distance of ice condensation in the protodolar disk, and thus made the frontier between the terrestrial and the giant planets at the time of the planets’ formation. The outer solar system is charaterized by a very large variety of ob jects, even within a given class of ob jects. Each of the giant planet has its own properties, as well as each of the outer satellites and the ring systems ; all are the products of specific conditions which determined their formation and evolution processes. The existence of the Kuiper belt, suspected on theoretical bases since the 1940s, has been confirmed since 1992 with the observation of over 1200 trans-neptunian ob jects. Thanks to the the developments of more and more performing groundbased instrumentation and the use of large telescopes, these ob jects are now studies in a statistical way, both dynamically and physically, and these studies are precious for constraining the early formation models of the solar system.

  12. Mass Extinctions Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmon, Warren Douglas

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some parallels that seem to exist between mass extinction recognizable in the geologic record and the impending extinction of a significant proportion of the earth's species due largely to tropical deforestation. Describes some recent theories of causal factors and periodicities in mass extinction. (Author/TW)

  13. Neuronal circuits of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herry, Cyril; Ferraguti, Francesco; Singewald, Nicolas; Letzkus, Johannes J; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Lüthi, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Fear extinction is a form of inhibitory learning that allows for the adaptive control of conditioned fear responses. Although fear extinction is an active learning process that eventually leads to the formation of a consolidated extinction memory, it is a fragile behavioural state. Fear responses can recover spontaneously or subsequent to environmental influences, such as context changes or stress. Understanding the neuronal substrates of fear extinction is of tremendous clinical relevance, as extinction is the cornerstone of psychological therapy of several anxiety disorders and because the relapse of maladaptative fear and anxiety is a major clinical problem. Recent research has begun to shed light on the molecular and cellular processes underlying fear extinction. In particular, the acquisition, consolidation and expression of extinction memories are thought to be mediated by highly specific neuronal circuits embedded in a large-scale brain network including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. Moreover, recent findings indicate that the neuronal circuitry of extinction is developmentally regulated. Here, we review emerging concepts of the neuronal circuitry of fear extinction, and highlight novel findings suggesting that the fragile phenomenon of extinction can be converted into a permanent erasure of fear memories. Finally, we discuss how research on genetic animal models of impaired extinction can further our understanding of the molecular and genetic bases of human anxiety disorders.

  14. Tidal Effects of Passing Planets and Mass Extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, D; Fargion, Daniele; Dar, Arnon

    1998-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that many planetary-mass objects may be present in the outer solar system between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud. Gravitational perturbations may occasionally bring them into the inner solar system. Their passage near Earth could have generated gigantic tidal waves, large volcanic eruptions, sea regressions, large meteoritic impacts and drastic changes in global climate. They could have caused the major biological mass extinctions in the past 600 My as documented in the geological records.

  15. The evolution of forearc structures along an oblique convergent margin, central Aleutian Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, H.F.; Scholl, D. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data were used to determine the evolutionary history of the forearc region of the central Aleutian Ridge. Since at least late Miocene time this sector of the ridge has been obliquely underthrust 30?? west of orthogonal convergence by the northwestward converging Pacific plate at a rate of 80-90 km/m.y. Our data indicate that prior to late Eocene time the forearc region was composed of rocks of the arc massif thinly mantled by slope deposits. Beginning in latest Miocene or earliest Pliocene time, a zone of outer-arc structural highs and a forearc basin began to form. Initial structures of the zone of outer-arc highs formed as the thickening wedge underran, compressively deformed, and uplifted the seaward edge of the arc massive above a landward dipping backstop thrust. Forearc basin strata ponded arcward of the elevating zone of outer-arc highs. However, most younger structures of the zone of outer-arc highs cannot be ascribed simply to the orthogonal effects of an underrunning wedge. Oblique convergence created a major right-lateral shear zone (the Hawley Ridge shear zone) that longitudinally disrupted the zone of outer-arc highs, truncating the seaward flank of the forearc basin and shearing the southern limb of Hawley Ridge, an exceptionally large antiformal outer-arc high structure. Uplift of Hawley Ridge may be related to the thickening of the arc massif by westward directed basement duplexes. Great structural complexity, including the close juxtaposition of coeval structures recording compression, extension, differential vertical movements, and strike-slip displacement, should be expected, even within areas of generally kindred tectonostratigraphic terranes. -from Authors

  16. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for cranial radiosurgery using multiple noncoplanar arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audet, Chantal; Poffenbarger, Brett A.; Chang, Pauling; Jackson, Paul S.; Lundahl, Robert E.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Ray, Gordon R. [Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Neurosurgery Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Neurosurgery Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Palo Alto, California 94301 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), using multiple noncoplanar arcs, for linac-based cranial radiosurgery, as well as evaluate the combined accuracy of the VMAT dose calculations and delivery. Methods: Twelve patients with cranial lesions of variable size (0.1-29 cc) and two multiple metastases patients were planned (Eclipse RapidArc AAA algorithm, v8.6.15) using VMAT (1-6 noncoplanar arcs), dynamic conformal arc (DCA, {approx}4 arcs), and IMRT (nine static fields). All plans were evaluated according to a conformity index (CI), healthy brain tissue doses and volumes, and the dose to organs at risk. A 2D dose distribution was measured (Varian Novalis Tx, HD120 MLC, 1000 MU/min, 6 MV beam) for the {approx}4 arc VMAT treatment plans using calibrated film dosimetry. Results: The CI (0-1 best) average for all plans was best for {approx}4 noncoplanar arc VMAT at 0.86 compared with {approx}0.78 for IMRT and a single arc VMAT and 0.68 for DCA. The volumes of healthy brain receiving 50% of the prescribed target coverage dose or more (V{sub 50%}) were lowest for the four arc VMAT [RA(4)] and DCA plans. The average ratio of the V{sub 50%} for the other plans to the RA(4) V{sub 50%} were 1.9 for a single noncoplanar arc VMAT [RA(1nc)], 1.4 for single full coplanar arc VMAT [RA(1f)] and 1.3 for IMRT. The V{sub 50%} improved significantly for single isocenter multiple metastases plan when two noncoplanar VMAT arcs were added to a full single coplanar one. The maximum dose to 5 cc of the outer 1 cm rim of healthy brain which one may want to keep below nonconsequential doses of 300-400 cGy, was 2-3 times greater for IMRT, RA(1nc) and RA(1f) plans compared with the multiple noncoplanar arc DCA and RA(4) techniques. Organs at risk near (0-4 mm) to targets were best spared by (i) single noncoplanar arcs when the targets are lateral to the organ at risk and (ii) by skewed nonvertical planes of IMRT fields when the targets are not lateral to the

  17. Heat Transfer Analysis for Industrial AC Electric Arc Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (U)nal (C)amdali; Murat Tun(c)

    2005-01-01

    The heat transfer analysis was performed for an AC electric arc furnace (EAF). Heat losses by conduction, convection and radiation from outer surface, roof, bottom and electrodes of EAF were determined in detail. Some suggestions about decreasing heat losses were presented.

  18. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  19. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  20. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific......Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate...... evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending...

  1. Extinction events can accelerate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lehman

    Full Text Available Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term.

  2. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term. PMID:26266804

  3. Gas Arcs in Comet Hyakutake: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combi, M. R.; Harris, W. M.; Kabin, K.

    2000-10-01

    The recent break-up of the nucleus of Comet LINEAR S4 demonstrates that fragmentation is an important cometary process and that it is not a rare phenomenon. Comet Hyakutake (1996 B2) underwent an outburst of gas production on March 21, 1996. Subsequent to the outburst, fragments, or condensations as they have been called, were observed moving tailward from the position of the nucleus. Arc-shaped structures were seen in images of gas species (OH, CN and C2) providing clear evidence of production of gas from cometary nucleus debris also tailward of the nucleus. We have already (Harris et al. 1997, Science 277, 676) described observations taken with the WIYN telescope consisting of a 6-hour time sequence of images on March 26, 1996 of CN and dust continuum and a single OH image showing that the arc, and by inference it's source, was generally moving tailward with the visible condensations. The entire OH arc was reproduced using a kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) calculation for water and all its photodissociation products. DSMC is suited to this physical environment that is in transition from fluid conditions in the inner coma to free-expansion in the outer coma. Our model asuming a string of fragments within the apex of the arc (i.e., the intersection of the arc and the tailward sun-comet line) reproduced the arc. Here we present a more extensive parameter study of the arc using DSMC and a solution of the standard perfect-fluid Euler equations. We find that a secondary source just behind the apex of the arc can reproduce the OH arc, but the location of the source must be much closer to the apex than indicated by solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations (NSE) (Rodionov et al. 1998, Icarus 136, 232). We find that we must use unrealistically large collision cross sections to reproduce the NSE results, and that the NSE results are not substantially different from a simpler Euler equation approach. This work has been supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres

  4. WSTF electrical arc projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  5. Polyandry prevents extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Tom A R; Hurst, Greg D D; Wedell, Nina

    2010-03-09

    Females of most animal species are polyandrous, with individual females usually mating with more than one male. However, the ubiquity of polyandry remains enigmatic because of the potentially high costs to females of multiple mating. Current theory to account for the high prevalence of polyandry largely focuses on its benefits to individual females. There are also higher-level explanations for the high incidence of polyandry-polyandrous clades may speciate more rapidly. Here we test the hypothesis that polyandry may also reduce population extinction risk. We demonstrate that mating with multiple males protects populations of the fruit fly Drosophila pseudoobscura against extinction caused by a "selfish" sex-ratio-distorting element. Thus, the frequency of female multiple mating in nature may be associated not only with individual benefits to females of this behavior but also with increased persistence over time of polyandrous species and populations. Furthermore, we show that female remating behavior can determine the frequency of sex-ratio distorters in populations. This may also be true for many other selfish genetic elements in natural populations.

  6. OuterJacket

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    女子训练OuterJacket系列在面料选择方面,注入了CLIMA系列科技,保障运动过程中的舒适性。其中,个别款式更融入杜邦Tefione科技的面料,不仅防水还提供防油、防尘等多种功能,为喜欢室外运动的女生们带来全方位的保护。

  7. Circular-Arc Cartograms

    CERN Document Server

    Kämper, Jan-Hinrich; Nöllenburg, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We present a new circular-arc cartogram model in which countries are drawn with circular arcs instead of straight-line segments. Given a geographic map and values associated with each country in the map, the cartogram is a new map in which the areas of the countries represent the corresponding values. In the circular-arc cartogram model straight-line segments can be replaced with circular arcs in order to achieve the desired areas, while the corners of the polygons defining each country remain fixed. The countries in circular-arc cartograms have the aesthetically pleasing appearance of clouds or snowflakes, depending on whether their edges are bent outwards or inwards. This makes is easy to determine whether a country has grown or shrunk, just by its overall shape. We show that determining whether a given map and area-values can be realized with a circular-arc cartogram is an NP-hard problem. Next we describe a heuristic method for constructing circular-arc cartograms, which uses a max-flow computation on the...

  8. Measuring Extinction with ALE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Peter C.; McGraw, J. T.; Gimmestad, G. G.; Roberts, D.; Stewart, J.; Smith, J.; Fitch, J.

    2007-12-01

    ALE (Astronomical LIDAR for Extinction) is deployed at the University of New Mexico's (UNM) Campus Observatory in Albuquerque, NM. It has begun a year-long testing phase prior deployment at McDonald Observatory in support of the CCD/Transit Instrument II (CTI-II). ALE is designed to produce a high-precision measurement of atmospheric absorption and scattering above the observatory site every ten minutes of every moderately clear night. LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is the VIS/UV/IR analog of radar, using a laser, telescope and time-gated photodetector instead of a radio transmitter, dish and receiver. In the case of ALE -- an elastic backscatter LIDAR -- 20ns-long, eye-safe laser pulses are launched 2500 times per second from a 0.32m transmitting telescope co-mounted with a 50mm short-range receiver on an alt-az mounted 0.67m long-range receiver. Photons from the laser pulse are scattered and absorbed as the pulse propagates through the atmosphere, a portion of which are scattered into the field of view of the short- and long-range receiver telescopes and detected by a photomultiplier. The properties of a given volume of atmosphere along the LIDAR path are inferred from both the altitude-resolved backscatter signal as well as the attenuation of backscatter signal from altitudes above it. We present ALE profiles from the commissioning phase and demonstrate some of the astronomically interesting atmospheric information that can be gleaned from these data, including, but not limited to, total line-of-sight extinction. This project is funded by NSF Grant 0421087.

  9. The end-Permian mass extinction: A complex, multicausal extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most extensive in the history of life and remains one of the most complex. Understanding its causes is particularly important because it anchors the putative 26-m.y. pattern of periodic extinction. However, there is no good evidence for an impact and this extinction appears to be more complex than others, involving at least three phases. The first began with the onset of a marine regression during the Late Permian and resulting elimination of most marine basins, reduction in habitat area, and increased climatic instability; the first pulse of tetrapod extinctions occurred in South Africa at this time. The second phase involved increased regression in many areas (although apparently not in South China) and heightened climatic instability and environmental degradation. Release of gas hydrates, oxidation of marine carbon, and the eruption of the Siberian flood basalts occurred during this phase. The final phase of the extinction episode began with the earliest Triassic marine regression and destruction of nearshore continental habitats. Some evidence suggests oceanic anoxia may have developed during the final phase of the extinction, although it appears to have been insufficient to the sole cause of the extinction.

  10. Crystal structure of a conserved domain in the intermembrane space region of the plastid division protein ARC6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Su, Chih-Chia; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Yu, Edward W

    2016-02-01

    The chloroplast division machinery is composed of numerous proteins that assemble as a large complex to divide double-membraned chloroplasts through binary fission. A key mediator of division-complex formation is ARC6, a chloroplast inner envelope protein and evolutionary descendant of the cyanobacterial cell division protein Ftn2. ARC6 connects stromal and cytosolic contractile rings across the two membranes through interaction with an outer envelope protein within the intermembrane space (IMS). The ARC6 IMS region bears a structurally uncharacterized domain of unknown function, DUF4101, that is highly conserved among ARC6 and Ftn2 proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of this domain from Arabidopsis thaliana ARC6. The domain forms an α/β barrel open towards the outer envelope membrane but closed towards the inner envelope membrane. These findings provide new clues into how ARC6 and its homologs contribute to chloroplast and cyanobacterial cell division.

  11. Functional Extinctions of Species in Ecological Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Säterberg, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Current rates of extinctions are estimated to be around 1000 times higher than background rates that would occur without anthropogenic impacts. These extinction rates refer to the traditional view of extinctions, i.e. numerical extinctions. This thesis is about another type of extinctions: functional extinctions. Those occur when the abundance of a species is too small to uphold the species’ ecologically interactive role. I have taken a theoretical approach and used dynamical models to invest...

  12. Pulsed plasma arc cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙; 白钢; 李振民; 张赋升; 杨思乾

    2004-01-01

    A prototype of Pulsed Plasma Arc Cladding system was developed, in which single power source supplies both transferred plasma arc (TPA) and non-transferred plasma arc (N-TPA). Both plasmas work in turn in a high frequency controlled by an IGBT connecting nozzle and workpiece. The working frequency of IGBT ranges from 50 ~ 7000Hz, in which the plasmas can work in turn smoothly. Higher than 500 Hz of working frequency is suggested for promotion of cladding quality and protection of IGBT. Drag phenomenon of TPA intensifies as the frequency goes up, which tends to increase the current proportion of TPA and suppress N-TPA. The occupation ratio of IGBT can be regulated from 5% ~ 95%, which balances the power supplies of both plasmas. An occupation ratio higher than 50% gives adequate proportion of arc current for N-TPA to preheat powder.

  13. Filtered cathodic arc source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  14. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Classification of the Outer Coast, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains arcs representing the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) classification of the outer coast of Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and...

  15. Mass Extinctions in Earth's History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. D.

    2002-12-01

    Mass extinctions are short intervals of elevated species death. Possible causes of Earth's mass extinctions are both external (astronomical) and internal (tectonic and biotic changes from planetary mechanisms). Paleontologists have identified five "major" mass extinctions (>50 die-off in less than a million years) and more than 20 other minor events over the past 550 million years. Earlier major extinction events undoubtedly also occurred, but we have no fossil record; these were probably associated with, for example, the early heavy bombardment that cleared out the solar system, the advent of oxygen in the atmosphere, and various "snowball Earth" events. Mass extinctions are viewed as both destructive (species death ) and constructive, in that they allow evolutionary innovation in the wake of species disappearances. From an astrobiological perspective, mass extinctions must be considered as able both to reduce biodiversity and even potentially end life on any planet. Of the five major mass extinctions identified on Earth, only one (the Cretaceous/Tertiary event 65 million years ago that famously killed off the dinosaurs ) is unambiguously related to the impact of an asteroid or comet ( 10-km diameter). The Permian/Triassic (250 Myr ago) and Triassic/Jurassic (202 Myr ago) events are now the center of debate between those favoring impact and those suggesting large volume flooding by basaltic lavas. The final two events, Ordovician (440 Myr ago) and Devonian (370 Myr ago) have no accepted causal mechanisms.

  16. The learning of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furini, Cristiane; Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    Recent work on the extinction of fear-motivated learning places emphasis on its putative circuitry and on its modulation. Extinction is the learned inhibition of retrieval of previously acquired responses. Fear extinction is used as a major component of exposure therapy in the treatment of fear memories such as those of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is initiated and maintained by interactions between the hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which involve feedback regulation of the latter by the other two areas. Fear extinction depends on NMDA receptor activation. It is positively modulated by d-serine acting on the glycine site of NMDA receptors and blocked by AP5 (2-amino-5-phosphono propionate) in the three structures. In addition, histamine acting on H2 receptors and endocannabinoids acting on CB1 receptors in the three brain areas mentioned, and muscarinic cholinergic fibers from the medial septum to hippocampal CA1 positively modulate fear extinction. Importantly, fear extinction can be made state-dependent on circulating epinephrine, which may play a role in situations of stress. Exposure to a novel experience can strongly enhance the consolidation of fear extinction through a synaptic tagging and capture mechanism; this may be useful in the therapy of states caused by fear memory like PTSD.

  17. Lifting the Dusty Veil II: A Large-Scale Study of the Galactic Infrared Extinction Law

    CERN Document Server

    Zasowski, G; Indebetouw, R; Meade, M R; Nidever, D L; Patterson, R J; Babler, B; Skrutskie, M F; Watson, C; Whitney, B A; Churchwell, E

    2009-01-01

    We combine near-infrared (2MASS) and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) photometry to characterize the IR extinction law (1.2-8 microns) over nearly 150 degrees of contiguous Milky Way midplane longitude. The relative extinctions in 5 passbands across these wavelength and longitude ranges are derived by calculating color excess ratios for G and K giant red clump stars in contiguous midplane regions and deriving the wavelength dependence of extinction in each one. Strong, monotonic variations in the extinction law shape are found as a function of angle from the Galactic center, symmetric on either side of it. These longitudinal variations persist even when dense interstellar regions, known a priori to have a shallower extinction curve, are removed. The increasingly steep extinction curves towards the outer Galaxy indicate a steady decrease in the absolute-to-selective extinction ratio (R_V) and in the mean dust grain size at greater Galactocentric angles. We note an increasing strength of the 8 micron extinction infl...

  18. Simulation of the Arc Behavior in Puffer-type High Voltage Circuit Breaker Considering the Influence of Nozzle Ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xu; ZHONG Jianying; ZHANG Youpeng; ZHANG Gaochao; LI Xingwen; JIA Shenli

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of nozzle ablation to arc,a 2 D axisymmetric magneto-hydro-dynamics arc model is developed to simulate the arc behavior during the whole interruption process in a puffer type high voltage circuit breaker,considering the nozzle ablating and the mixing process of Polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) vapor with SF6.The results show that the arc radius firstly increases and then decreases as arc current varies according to its sinusoida waveform.At 3.5 ms after arc initiation the nozzle ablation starts,and 2.5 ms later the current nearly reaches its peak value and nozzle ablation develops intensely.Meanwhile the nozzle is blocked by arc at this time and consequently the vapor concentration in nozzle reaches the highest.Then while the current decreasing and open distance increaseing the vapor concentration gradually decreases.Before current zero the extinction peak of arc voltage occurs.It indicates that the PTFE vapor enhances pressure rise in arc quenching chamber and strengthens the arc blocking effect on nozzle; the arc radius is wider and arc temperature is lower when nozzle ablation is considered.

  19. Preparation and Arc Breakdown Behavior of Nanocrystalline W-Cu Electrical Contact Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenge CHEN; Zhanying KANG; Bingjun DING

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured (NS) W-Cu composite powder was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA), and nanostructured bulk of W-Cu contact material was fabricated by hot pressed sintering in an electrical vacuum furnace. The microstructure,electric conductivity, hardness, breakdown voltage and arcing time of NS W-Cu alloys were measured and compared to conventional W-Cu alloys prepared by powder metallurgy. The results show that microstructural refinement and uniformity can improve the breakdown behavior, the electric arc stability and the arc extinction ability of nanostructured W-Cu contacts materials. Also, the nanostructured W-Cu contact material shows the characteristic of spreading electric arcs, which is of benefit to electric arc erosion.

  20. Vacuum Outer-Gap Structure in Pulsar Outer Magnetospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gui-Fang; ZHANG Li

    2009-01-01

    We study the vacuum outer-gap structure in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through a pair production process. In this case, the trans-field height is limited by the photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. By solving self-consistently the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and γ-rays in a vacuum outer gap for the parameters of Vela pulsar, we obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e. the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface) and ends at the outer boundary which locates inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle.

  1. Modeling of Arc Force in Plasma Arc Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhonglin; HU Shengsun; YIN Fengliang; WANG Rui

    2008-01-01

    A three. dimensional mathematical model for the transferred-type argon arc was developed to describe arc force on the anode surface. The software ANSYS was employed to solve the model. The model includes a part of torch and tungsten electrode to achieve m ore reasonable results. The arc temperature and flow fields were derived. And the influences of welding parameters on arc force were also studied. The simulated results show that arc pressure at the anode are dependent on the welding current, plasma gas flow rate and electrode neck-in, while not sensitive to arc length.

  2. The Sixth Great Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagler, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Five past great mass extinctions have occurred during Earth's history. Humanity is currently in the midst of a sixth, human-induced great mass extinction of plant and animal life (e.g., Alroy 2008; Jackson 2008; Lewis 2006; McDaniel and Borton 2002; Rockstrom et al. 2009; Rohr et al. 2008; Steffen, Crutzen, and McNeill 2007; Thomas et al. 2004;…

  3. Extinction, relapse, and behavioral momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Previous experiments on behavioral momentum have shown that relative resistance to extinction of operant behavior in the presence of a discriminative stimulus depends upon the baseline rate or magnitude of reinforcement associated with that stimulus (i.e., the Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation). Recently, we have shown that relapse of operant behavior in reinstatement, resurgence, and context renewal preparations also is a function of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations. In this paper we present new data examining the role of baseline stimulus-reinforcer relations on resistance to extinction and relapse using a variety of baseline training conditions and relapse operations. Furthermore, we evaluate the adequacy of a behavioral momentum based model in accounting for the results. The model suggests that relapse occurs as a result of a decrease in the disruptive impact of extinction precipitated by a change in circumstances associated with extinction, and that the degree of relapse is a function of the pre-extinction baseline Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relation. Across experiments, relative resistance to extinction and relapse were greater in the presence of stimuli associated with more favorable conditions of reinforcement and were positively related to one another. In addition, the model did a good job in accounting for these effects. Thus, behavioral momentum theory may provide a useful quantitative approach for characterizing how differential reinforcement conditions contribute to relapse of operant behavior.

  4. MODELING PARAMETERS OF ARC OF ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.N. Khrestin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim is to build a mathematical model of the electric arc of arc furnace (EAF. The model should clearly show the relationship between the main parameters of the arc. These parameters determine the properties of the arc and the possibility of optimization of melting mode. Methodology. We have built a fairly simple model of the arc, which satisfies the above requirements. The model is designed for the analysis of electromagnetic processes arc of varying length. We have compared the results obtained when testing the model with the results obtained on actual furnaces. Results. During melting in real chipboard under the influence of changes in temperature changes its properties arc plasma. The proposed model takes into account these changes. Adjusting the length of the arc is the main way to regulate the mode of smelting chipboard. The arc length is controlled by the movement of the drive electrode. The model reflects the dynamic changes in the parameters of the arc when changing her length. We got the dynamic current-voltage characteristics (CVC of the arc for the different stages of melting. We got the arc voltage waveform and identified criteria by which possible identified stage of smelting. Originality. In contrast to the previously known models, this model clearly shows the relationship between the main parameters of the arc EAF: arc voltage Ud, amperage arc id and length arc d. Comparison of the simulation results and experimental data obtained from real particleboard showed the adequacy of the constructed model. It was found that character of change of magnitude Md, helps determine the stage of melting. Practical value. It turned out that the model can be used to simulate smelting in EAF any capacity. Thus, when designing the system of control mechanism for moving the electrode, the model takes into account changes in the parameters of the arc and it can significantly reduce electrode material consumption and energy consumption

  5. Thermal Transgressions and Phanerozoic Extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, T. R.; Kidder, D. L.

    2007-12-01

    A number of significant Phanerozoic extinctions are associated with marine transgressions that were probably driven by rapid ocean warming. The conditions associated with what we call thermal transgressions are extremely stressful to life on Earth. The Earth system setting associated with end-Permian extinction exemplifies an end-member case of our model. The conditions favoring extreme warmth and sea-level increases driven by thermal expansion are also conducive to changes in ocean circulation that foster widespread anoxia and sulfidic subsurface ocean waters. Equable climates are characterized by reduced wind shear and weak surface ocean circulation. Late Permian and Early Triassic thermohaline circulation differs considerably from today's world, with minimal polar sinking and intensified mid-latitude sinking that delivers sulfate from shallow evaporative areas to deeper water where it is reduced to sulfide. Reduced nutrient input to oceans from land at many of the extinction intervals results from diminished silicate weathering and weakened delivery of iron via eolian dust. The falloff in iron-bearing dust leads to minimal nitrate production, weakening food webs and rendering faunas and floras more susceptible to extinction when stressed. Factors such as heat, anoxia, ocean acidification, hypercapnia, and hydrogen sulfide poisoning would significantly affect these biotas. Intervals of tectonic quiescence set up preconditions favoring extinctions. Reductions in chemical silicate weathering lead to carbon dioxide buildup, oxygen drawdown, nutrient depletion, wind and ocean current abatement, long-term global warming, and ocean acidification. The effects of extinction triggers such as large igneous provinces, bolide impacts, and episodes of sudden methane release are more potent against the backdrop of our proposed preconditions. Extinctions that have characteristics we call for in the thermal transgressions include the Early Cambrian Sinsk event, as well as

  6. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  7. Comparative Seismotectonic Conditions Along the Sunda and Aleutian Arcs from Broadband Analysis of Earthquake Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, G. L.; Kirby, S. H.; Hayes, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    In the digital era, the Sunda arc has been the site of sixteen large and great (MW>7.0) earthquakes that generated oftimes devastating tsunamis. In contrast, the largest tsunami earthquakes along the Aleutian arc occurred in the pre-digital era. Given the tectonic and geological commonalities between the two arcs, such as oblique plate convergence and long sediment-rich sections of trench, it is natural to ask whether the numerous and well-recorded Sunda events can serve as analogs to the more sparse Aleutian events for insight into seismic and tsunami potential. The large earthquakes are examined in the context of moderate-sized earthquakes (5.5assess maturity of the faults. In the Sunda arc, energy release for moderate events was predominantly along the peripheries of the rupture zones of large events. Rather than on the slab interface, they often occurred on splay faults in the overriding plate, on perturbations of the slab interface under the outer-arc high or alongside obliquely subducted ridges and fracture zones. High strength regions (identified by high energy-release faults) resisted rupture during large earthquakes. Other splays seemed tsunami-capable. The greatest tsunamis came from earthquakes with rupture confined to the shallow forearc seaward of the outer-arc high, while greater seismic damage came from earthquakes confined to the deep forearc behind the outer-arc high. For the Aleutians, only two large events occurred during the same time period. But, like Sunda, the numerous moderate-sized events tended to demarcate the periphery of the rupture zone of past large events. Some splays with tsunami potential were observed, but the majority of events occurred at slab bends and around subducting fracture zones and seamounts, rather than about the subdued outer-arc high.

  8. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  9. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  10. The extinction of the dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusatte, Stephen L; Butler, Richard J; Barrett, Paul M; Carrano, Matthew T; Evans, David C; Lloyd, Graeme T; Mannion, Philip D; Norell, Mark A; Peppe, Daniel J; Upchurch, Paul; Williamson, Thomas E

    2015-05-01

    Non-avian dinosaurs went extinct 66 million years ago, geologically coincident with the impact of a large bolide (comet or asteroid) during an interval of massive volcanic eruptions and changes in temperature and sea level. There has long been fervent debate about how these events affected dinosaurs. We review a wealth of new data accumulated over the past two decades, provide updated and novel analyses of long-term dinosaur diversity trends during the latest Cretaceous, and discuss an emerging consensus on the extinction's tempo and causes. Little support exists for a global, long-term decline across non-avian dinosaur diversity prior to their extinction at the end of the Cretaceous. However, restructuring of latest Cretaceous dinosaur faunas in North America led to reduced diversity of large-bodied herbivores, perhaps making communities more susceptible to cascading extinctions. The abruptness of the dinosaur extinction suggests a key role for the bolide impact, although the coarseness of the fossil record makes testing the effects of Deccan volcanism difficult.

  11. Variable polarity arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  12. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  13. ALICE: ARC integration

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlik, C; Kleist, J; Peters, A; Saiz, P

    2008-01-01

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Grid middleware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The inter-operation has two aspects, one is the data management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. Therefore, we will concentrate on the second part. Solving it, was somewhat cumbersome, mainly due to the different computing models employed by AliEn and ARC. AliEN uses an Agent based pull model while ARC handles jobs through the more 'traditional' push model. The solution comes as a modu...

  14. ALICE-ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva;

    2008-01-01

    Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...

  15. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  16. Motion of polar cap arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, K.; Moen, J. I.; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.

    2011-01-01

    A statistics of motion of polar cap arcs is conducted by using 5 years of optical data from an all-sky imager at Resolute Bay, Canada (74.73°N, 265.07°E). We identified 743 arcs by using an automated arc detection algorithm and statistically examined their moving velocities as estimated by the method of Hosokawa et al. (2006). The number of the arcs studied is about 5 times larger than that in the previous statistics of polar cap arcs by Valladares et al. (1994); thus, we could expect to obtain more statistically significant results. Polar cap arcs are found to fall into two distinct categories: the By-dependent and By-independent arcs. The motion of the former arcs follows the rule reported by Valladares et al. (1994), who showed that stable polar cap arcs move in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By. About two thirds of the arcs during northward IMF conditions belong to this category. The latter arcs always move poleward irrespective of the sign of the IMF By, which possibly correspond to the poleward moving arcs in the morning side reported by Shiokawa et al. (1997). At least one third of the arcs belong to this category. The By-dependent arcs tend to move faster when the magnitude of the IMF By is larger, suggesting that the transport of open flux by lobe reconnection from one polar cap compartment to the other controls their motion. In contrast, the speed of the By-independent arcs does not correlate with the magnitude of the By. The motions of both the By-dependent and By-independent arcs are most probably caused by the magnetospheric convection. Convection in the region of By-dependent arcs is affected by the IMF By, which indicates that their sources may be on open field lines or in the closed magnetosphere adjacent to the open-closed boundary, whereas By-independent arcs seem to be well on closed field lines. Hence, the magnetospheric source of the two types of arc may be different. This implies that the mechanisms causing the

  17. The atmospheric extinction of light

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, Stephen W; Powell, Sean; Carroll, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    An experiment is described that enables students to understand the properties of atmospheric extinction due to Rayleigh scattering. The experiment requires the use of red, green and blue lasers attached to a travelling microscope or similar device. The laser beams are passed through an artificial atmosphere, made from milky water, at varying depths, before impinging on either a light meter or a photodiode integral to a Picotech Dr. DAQ ADC. A plot of measured spectral intensity verses depth reveals the contribution Rayleigh scattering has to the extinction coefficient. For the experiment with the light meter, the extinction coefficients for red, green and blue light in the milky sample of water were 0.27, 0.36 and 0.47 cm^-1 respectively and 0.032, 0.037 and 0.092 cm^-1 for the Picotech Dr. DAQ ADC.

  18. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross D. E. MacPhee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters.

  19. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Korschinek, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A nearby supernova (SN) explosion could have negatively influenced life on Earth, maybe even been responsible for mass extinctions. Mass extinction poses a significant extinction of numerous species on Earth, as recorded in the paleontologic, paleoclimatic, and geological record of our planet. Depending on the distance between the Sun and the SN, different types of threats have to be considered, such as ozone depletion on Earth, causing increased exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation, or the direct exposure of lethal x-rays. Another indirect effect is cloud formation, induced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere which result in a drop in the Earth's temperature, causing major glaciations of the Earth. The discovery of highly intensive gamma ray bursts (GRBs), which could be connected to SNe, initiated further discussions on possible life-threatening events in Earth's history. The probability that GRBs hit the Earth is very low. Nevertheless, a past interaction of Earth with GRBs and/or SNe cannot be exclude...

  20. Extinction debt on oceanic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantis, Kostas A.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Ladle, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Habitat destruction is the leading cause of species extinctions. However, there is typically a time-lag between the reduction in habitat area and the eventual disappearance of the remnant populations. These "surviving but ultimately doomed" species represent an extinction debt. Calculating...... the magnitude of such future extinction events has been hampered by potentially inaccurate assumptions about the slope of species-area relationships, which are habitat- and taxon-specific. We overcome this challenge by applying a method that uses the historical sequence of deforestation in the Azorean Islands...... in the last 45 yr, despite the extensive sampling effort, offer support to the predictions made. We argue that immediate action to restore and expand native forest habitat is required to avert the loss of numerous endemic species in the near future...

  1. Habituation, latent inhibition, and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Wesley P; Todd, Travis P; Bucci, David J; Leaton, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    In two conditioned suppression experiments with a latent inhibition (LI) design, we measured the habituation of rats in preexposure, their LI during conditioning, and then extinction over days. In the first experiment, lick suppression, the preexposed group (PE) showed a significant initial unconditioned response (UR) to the target stimulus and significant long-term habituation (LTH) of that response over days. The significant difference between the PE and nonpreexposed (NPE) groups on the first conditioning trial was due solely to the difference in their URs to the conditioned stimulus (CS)-a habituated response (PE) and an unhabituated response (NPE). In the second experiment, bar-press suppression, little UR to the target stimulus was apparent during preexposure, and no detectable LTH. Thus, there was no difference between the PE and NPE groups on the first conditioning trial. Whether the UR to the CS confounds the interpretation of LI (Exp. 1) or not (Exp. 2) can only be known if the UR is measured. In both experiments, LI was observed in acquisition. Also in both experiments, rats that were preexposed and then conditioned to asymptote were significantly more resistant to extinction than were the rats not preexposed. This result contrasts with the consistently reported finding that preexposure either produces less resistance to extinction or has no effect on extinction. The effect of stimulus preexposure survived conditioning to asymptote and was reflected directly in extinction. These two experiments provide a cautionary procedural note for LI experiments and have shown an unexpected extinction effect that may provide new insights into the interpretation of LI.

  2. Extinction risk of soil biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veresoglou, Stavros D; Halley, John M; Rillig, Matthias C

    2015-11-23

    No species lives on earth forever. Knowing when and why species go extinct is crucial for a complete understanding of the consequences of anthropogenic activity, and its impact on ecosystem functioning. Even though soil biota play a key role in maintaining the functioning of ecosystems, the vast majority of existing studies focus on aboveground organisms. Many questions about the fate of belowground organisms remain open, so the combined effort of theorists and applied ecologists is needed in the ongoing development of soil extinction ecology.

  3. Interstellar Grains: Effect of Inclusions on Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Vaidya, D B

    2011-01-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1$\\mu m$ using the extinction efficiencies of the composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  4. Interstellar grains: Effect of inclusions on extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1 μm using the extinction efficiencies of composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  5. Endangered and Extinct Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leising, M. D.

    1993-07-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual nucleosynthesis events, via observations of short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring global galactic nucleosynthesis today with detections of longer-lived radioactivity. Many of the astrophysical issues addressed by these observations are precisely those that must be understood in order to interpret observations of extinct radioactivity in meteorites. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both 56Co [1] and 57Co [2] were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions. Live 26Al in the galaxy might come from Type II supernovae and their progenitors, and if this is eventually shown to be the case, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, the galactic Type II supernova rate, and even models of the chemical evolution of the galaxy [3]. Titanium-44 is produced primarily in the alpha-rich freezeout from nuclear statistical equilibrium, possibly in Type Ia [4] and almost certainly in Type II supernovae [5]. The galactic recurrence time of these events is comparable to the 44Ti lifetime, so we expect to be able to see at most a few otherwise unseen 44Ti remnants at any given time. No such remnants have been detected yet [6]. Very simple arguments lead to the expectation that about 4 x 10^-4 M(sub)solar mass of 44Ca are produced per century. The product of the supernova frequency times the 44Ti yield per event must equal this number. Even assuming that only the latest event would be seen, rates in excess of 2 century^-1 are ruled out at >=99% confidence by the gamma ray limits. Only rates less than 0.3 century^-1 are acceptable at >5% confidence, and this means that the yield per event must be >10^-3 M(sub)solar mass to produce the requisite 44Ca. Rates this low are incompatible with current estimates for Type II supernovae and yields this high are also very

  6. A model of mass extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    1997-01-01

    A number of authors have in recent years proposed that the processes of macroevolution may give rise to self-organized critical phenomena which could have a significant effect on the dynamics of ecosystems. In particular it has been suggested that mass extinction may arise through a purely biotic mechanism as the result of so-called coevolutionary avalanches. In this paper we first explore the empirical evidence which has been put forward in favor of this conclusion. The data center principally around the existence of power-law functional forms in the distribution of the sizes of extinction events and other quantities. We then propose a new mathematical model of mass extinction which does not rely on coevolutionary effects and in which extinction is caused entirely by the action of environmental stresses on species. In combination with a simple model of species adaptation we show that this process can account for all the observed data without the need to invoke coevolution and critical processes. The model al...

  7. Extinction debt on oceanic islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantis, K.A.; Borges, Paulo A. V.; Ladle, R.J.;

    2010-01-01

    the magnitude of such future extinction events has been hampered by potentially inaccurate assumptions about the slope of species-area relationships, which are habitat- and taxon-specific. We overcome this challenge by applying a method that uses the historical sequence of deforestation in the Azorean Islands...

  8. Modeling rf breakdown arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Huang, Dazhang; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, Seth

    2010-01-01

    We describe breakdown in 805 MHz rf accelerator cavities in terms of a number of mechanisms. We devide the breakdown process into three stages: (1) we model surface failure using molecular dynamics of fracture caused by electrostatic tensile stress, (2) we model the ionization of neutrals responsible for plasma initiation and plasma growth using a particle in cell code, and (3) we model surface damage by assuming a process similar to unipolar arcing. Although unipolar arcs are strictly defined with equipotential boundaries, we find that the cold, dense plasma in contact with the surface produces very small Debye lengths and very high electric fields over a large area. These high fields produce strong erosion mechanisms, primarily self sputtering, compatible with the crater formation that we see. Results from the plasma simulation are included as a guide to experimental verification of this model.

  9. ALICE - ARC integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderlik, Csaba; Gregersen, Anders Rhod; Kleist, Josva;

    AliEn or Alice Environment is the Gridware developed and used within the ALICE collaboration for storing and processing data in a distributed manner. ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) is the Grid middleware deployed across the Nordic countries and gluing together the resources within the Nordic...... Data Grid Facility (NDGF). In this paper we will present our approach to integrate AliEn and ARC, in the sense that ALICE data management and job processing can be carried out on the NDGF infrastructure, using the client tools available in AliEn. The interoperation has two aspects, one is the data...... management part and the second the job management aspect. The first aspect was solved by using dCache across NDGF to handle data. dCache provides support for several data management tools (among them for xrootd the tools used by AliEn) using the so called "doors". Therefore, we will concentrate on the second...

  10. The ARCS radial collimator

    OpenAIRE

    Stone M.B.; Niedziela J.L.; Overbay M.A.; Abernathy D.L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. W...

  11. Circular arc structures

    KAUST Repository

    Bo, Pengbo

    2011-07-01

    The most important guiding principle in computational methods for freeform architecture is the balance between cost efficiency on the one hand, and adherence to the design intent on the other. Key issues are the simplicity of supporting and connecting elements as well as repetition of costly parts. This paper proposes so-called circular arc structures as a means to faithfully realize freeform designs without giving up smooth appearance. In contrast to non-smooth meshes with straight edges where geometric complexity is concentrated in the nodes, we stay with smooth surfaces and rather distribute complexity in a uniform way by allowing edges in the shape of circular arcs. We are able to achieve the simplest possible shape of nodes without interfering with known panel optimization algorithms. We study remarkable special cases of circular arc structures which possess simple supporting elements or repetitive edges, we present the first global approximation method for principal patches, and we show an extension to volumetric structures for truly threedimensional designs. © 2011 ACM.

  12. Interstellar Extinction by Spheroidal Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ranjan; Mukai, Tadashi; Vaidya, D. B.; Sen, Asoke K.; Okada, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Observations of interstellar extinction and polarization indicate that the interstellar medium consists of aligned non-spherical dust grains which show variation in the interstellar extinction curve for wavelengths ranging from NIR to UV. To model the extinction and polarization, one cannot use the Mie theory which assumes the grains as solid spheres. We have used a T-matrix based method for computing the extinction efficiencies of spheroidal silicate and graphite grains of different shapes (...

  13. Arc-preserving subsequences of arc-annotated sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Vladimir Yu

    2011-01-01

    Arc-annotated sequences are useful in representing the structural information of RNA and protein sequences. The longest arc-preserving common subsequence problem has been introduced as a framework for studying the similarity of arc-annotated sequences. In this paper, we consider arc-annotated sequences with various arc structures. We consider the longest arc preserving common subsequence problem. In particular, we show that the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(crossing,chain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(crossing,chain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete for some fixed alphabet $\\Sigma$ such that $|\\Sigma| = 2$. Also we show that if $|\\Sigma| = 1$, then the decision version of the 1-{\\sc fragment LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} and the decision version of the 0-{\\sc diagonal LAPCS(unlimited, plain)} are {\\bf NP}-complete.

  14. Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Rebecca Shisler; Basilakos, Alexandra; Love-Myers, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preliminary research ( Shisler, 2005) suggests that auditory extinction in individuals with aphasia (IWA) may be connected to binding and attention. In this study, the authors expanded on previous findings on auditory extinction to determine the source of extinction deficits in IWA. Method: Seventeen IWA (M[subscript age] = 53.19 years)…

  15. Determining Extinction Ratio Of A Laser Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    Improved technique to determine extinction ratio of pulsed laser diode based partly on definition of extinction ratio applicable to nonideal laser pulses. Heretofore, determinations involved assumption of ideal laser pulses, and neglected optical power from background light. Because power fluctuates during real pulse, more realistic to define extinction ratio in terms of energy obtained.

  16. Expression and Function of mARC: Roles in Lipogenesis and Metabolic Activation of Ximelagatran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne P A Neve

    Full Text Available Recently two novel enzymes were identified in the outer mitochondrial membrane, mARC1 and mARC2. These molybdenum containing enzymes can reduce a variety of N-hydroxylated compounds, such as N-hydroxy-guanidines and sulfohydroxamic acids, as well as convert nitrite into nitric oxide (NO. However, their endogenous functions remain unknown. Here we demonstrate a specific developmental pattern of expression of these enzymes. mARC1, but not mARC2, was found to be expressed in fetal human liver, whereas both, in particular mARC2, are abundant in adult liver and also expressed in omental and subcutaneous fat. Caloric diet restriction of obese patients caused a decreased expression of mARC2 in liver, similar to that seen in the livers of starved rats. Knock down of mARC2 expression by siRNA in murine adipocytes had statistically significant effect on the level of diglycerides and on the fatty acid composition of some triglycerides, concomitantly a clear trend toward the reduced formation of most of triglyceride and phospholipid species was observed. The involvement of mARC2 in the metabolism of the hepatotoxic drug ximelagatran was evaluated in hepatocytes and adipocytes. Ximelagatran was shown to cause oxidative stress and knock down of mARC2 in adipocytes prevented ximelagatran induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In conclusion, our data indicate that mARC1 and mARC2 have different developmental expression profiles, and that mARC2 is involved in lipogenesis, is regulated by nutritional status and responsible for activation of ximelagatran into a mitotoxic metabolite(s.

  17. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  18. Development of Extinction Imagers for the Determination of Atmospheric Optical Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    extinction coefficient > 0.4 km" ), the transmissometer tends to report higher values than the MSI. There are two possible reasons for this behavior ...REPORT TYPE Final Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Development of Extinction Imagers for the Determination of Atmospheric Optical Extinction 6. AUTHOR...further develop Extinction Imagers for use in the ocean environment, and to extend the capabilities into the Short Wave IR (SWIR). Extinction Imaging

  19. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) is a combination of laser welding with arc welding that overcomes many of the shortfalls of both processes. This important book gives a comprehensive account of hybrid laser-arc welding technology and applications. The first part of the book reviews...... the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  20. Nuclear fuel grid outer strap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, R.; Craver, J.E.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel assembly grid. It comprises a first outer grip strap segment end. The first end having a first tab arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the first end; a second outer grip strap end. The second end having a second slot arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the second end, with the tab being substantially disposed in the slot, defining a socket therebetween; and a fort tine interposed substantially perpendicularly in the socket.

  1. The DC06 Outer Tracker Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Amoraal, J

    2008-01-01

    This note gives an overview of the Outer Tracker simulation for the 2006 Data Challenge (DC06). It covers the Outer Tracker detector description used in Gauss/Geant to simulate hits in the Outer Tracker and the digitisation of the hits in Boole. It concludes with the expected performance of the Outer Tracker.

  2. Suppression of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated gene expression in the dorsal striatum attenuates extinction of cocaine-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearing, Matthew C; Schwendt, Marek; McGinty, Jacqueline F

    2011-07-01

    The caudate putamen (CPu) has been implicated in habit learning and neuroadaptive changes that mediate the compulsive nature of drug-seeking following chronic cocaine self-administration. Re-exposure to an operant chamber previously associated with cocaine, but not yoked-saline, increases activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) gene mRNA expression within the dorsolateral (dl) CPu following prolonged abstinence. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that antisense gene knockdown of Arc within the dlCPu would alter cocaine-seeking. Initial studies showed that a single infusion of Arc antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) into the dlCPu significantly attenuated the induction of Arc mRNA and Arc protein by a single cocaine exposure (20 mg/kg i.p.) compared to scrambled-ODN-infused controls. In cocaine self-administering rats, infusion of Arc antisense ODN into the dlCPu 3 h prior to a test of context-driven drug-seeking significantly attenuated Arc protein induction, but failed to alter responding during testing, suggesting striatal Arc does not facilitate context-induced drug-seeking following prolonged abstinence. However, Arc antisense ODN infusion blunted the decrease in responding during subsequent 1-h extinction tests 24 and 48 h later. Following re-exposure to a cocaine-paired context, surface expression of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluR1 was significantly reduced whereas GluR2 was significantly increased in the dlCPu, independent of Arc antisense ODN infusion. Together, these findings indicate an important role for Arc in neuroadaptations within brain regions responsible for drug-seeking after abstinence and direct attention to changes occurring within striatal circuitry that are necessary to break down the habitual behaviour that leads to relapse.

  3. Neanderthal extinction by competitive exclusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Banks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite a long history of investigation, considerable debate revolves around whether Neanderthals became extinct because of climate change or competition with anatomically modern humans (AMH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We apply a new methodology integrating archaeological and chronological data with high-resolution paleoclimatic simulations to define eco-cultural niches associated with Neanderthal and AMH adaptive systems during alternating cold and mild phases of Marine Isotope Stage 3. Our results indicate that Neanderthals and AMH exploited similar niches, and may have continued to do so in the absence of contact. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The southerly contraction of Neanderthal range in southwestern Europe during Greenland Interstadial 8 was not due to climate change or a change in adaptation, but rather concurrent AMH geographic expansion appears to have produced competition that led to Neanderthal extinction.

  4. Exploring co-extinction correlates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpaneto, Giuseppe Maria; Mazziotta, Adriano; Pittino, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Co-extinction is a recurring topic in conservation biology. Quantification of co-extinction has been generally restricted to parasite-host, predator-prey and herbivore-host plant interactions. The loss of detritivorous insects upon the depletion of herbivore mammals has been poorly explored. Here...... of scarab beetle communities. Rarefaction curves estimated that a 50% reduction in the number of sample units where squirrel faecal pellets are the only available food resource accounts for a reduction of 28% of all the scarab species, and of 24% of the squirrel-linked species. The current decline of ground...... that the conservation of ground squirrels and their affiliate scarab species may be ensured by a moderate livestock grazing, owing to the higher ecological success of these rodents in the presence of large herbivores keeping low the grass cover. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V....

  5. Correlation methods in cutting arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevosto, L; Kelly, H, E-mail: prevosto@waycom.com.ar [Grupo de Descargas Electricas, Departamento Ing. Electromecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Regional Venado Tuerto, Laprida 651, Venado Tuerto (2600), Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-05-01

    The present work applies similarity theory to the plasma emanating from transferred arc, gas-vortex stabilized plasma cutting torches, to analyze the existing correlation between the arc temperature and the physical parameters of such torches. It has been found that the enthalpy number significantly influence the temperature of the electric arc. The obtained correlation shows an average deviation of 3% from the temperature data points. Such correlation can be used, for instance, to predict changes in the peak value of the arc temperature at the nozzle exit of a geometrically similar cutting torch due to changes in its operation parameters.

  6. Joan of Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote-Smith, E; Bayne, L

    1991-01-01

    For centuries, romantics have praised and historians and scientists debated the mystery of Joan of Arc's exceptional achievements. How could an uneducated farmer's daughter, raised in harsh isolation in a remote village in medieval France, have found the strength and resolution to alter the course of history? Hypotheses have ranged from miraculous intervention to creative psychopathy. We suggest, based on her own words and the contemporary descriptions of observers, that the source of her visions and convictions was in part ecstatic epileptic auras and that she joins the host of creative religious thinkers suspected or known to have epilepsy, from St. Paul and Mohammed to Dostoevsky, who have changed western civilization.

  7. The ARCS radial collimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  8. The ARCS radial collimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, M. B.; Niedziela, J. L.; Overbay, M. A.; Abernathy, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    We have designed, installed, and commissioned a scattered beam radial collimator for use at the ARCS Wide Angular Range Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source. The collimator has been designed to work effectively for thermal and epithermal neutrons and with a range of sample environments. Other design considerations include the accommodation of working within a high vacuum environment and having the ability to quickly install and remove the collimator from the scattered beam. We present here characterization of the collimator's performance and methodologies for its effective use.

  9. Advances in high voltage insulation and arc interruption in SF6 and vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Maller, V N

    1982-01-01

    Advances in High Voltage Insulation and Arc Interruption in SF6 and Vacuum deals with high voltage breakdown and arc extinction in sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and high vacuum, with special emphasis on the application of these insulating media in high voltage power apparatus and devices. The design and developmental aspects of various high voltage power apparatus using SF6 and high vacuum are highlighted. This book is comprised of eight chapters and opens with a discussion on electrical discharges in SF6 and high vacuum, along with the properties and handling of SF6 gas. The following chapters fo

  10. Outer Synchronization of Complex Networks by Impulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文; 燕子宗; 陈士华; 吕金虎

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates outer synchronization of complex networks, especially, outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between the driving network and the response network. Employing the impulsive control method which is uncontinuous, simple, efficient, low-cost and easy to implement in practical applications, we obtain some sufficient conditions of outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between two complex networks. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed impulsive control scheme.

  11. Dynamics of the Outer Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    views on food, basketball , and life in general; Barbara Spiegel for the most amazing meals at the Spiegels; Steve Meacham for helping me out during my... tapered outer edge. So long as this disk is balanced, though, it remains stable (always looking like the first frame of figure 2) indefinitely. [In this

  12. Tracing the Spiral Structure of the Outer Milky Way with Dense Atomic Hydrogen Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Park, Geumsook; Kim, Woong-Tae; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Balser, Dana S.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2017-09-01

    We present a new face-on map of dense neutral atomic hydrogen ({{H}} i) gas in the outer Galaxy. Our map has been produced from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn {{H}} i 21 cm line all-sky survey by finding intensity maxima along every line of sight and then by projecting them on the Galactic plane. The resulting face-on map strikingly reveals the complex spiral structure beyond the solar circle, which is characterized by a mixture of distinct long arcs of {{H}} i concentrations and numerous “interarm” features. The comparison with more conventional spiral tracers confirms the nature of those long arc structures as spiral arms. Our map shows that the {{H}} i spiral structure in the outer Galaxy is well described by a four-arm spiral model (pitch angle of 12^\\circ ) with some deviations, and gives a new insight into identifying {{H}} i features associated with individual arms.

  13. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  14. The ethics of reviving long extinct species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Ronald

    2014-04-01

    There now appears to be a plausible pathway for reviving species that have been extinct for several decades, centuries, or even millennia. I conducted an ethical analysis of de-extinction of long extinct species. I assessed several possible ethical considerations in favor of pursuing de-extinction: that it is a matter of justice; that it would reestablish lost value; that it would create new value; and that society needs it as a conservation last resort. I also assessed several possible ethical arguments against pursuing de-extinction: that it is unnatural; that it could cause animal suffering; that it could be ecologically problematic or detrimental to human health; and that it is hubristic. There are reasons in favor of reviving long extinct species, and it can be ethically acceptable to do so. However, the reasons in favor of pursuing de-extinction do not have to do with its usefulness in species conservation; rather, they concern the status of revived species as scientific and technological achievements, and it would be ethically problematic to promote de-extinction as a significant conservation strategy, because it does not prevent species extinctions, does not address the causes of extinction, and could be detrimental to some species conservation efforts. Moreover, humanity does not have a responsibility or obligation to pursue de-extinction of long extinct species, and reviving them does not address any urgent problem. Therefore, legitimate ecological, political, animal welfare, legal, or human health concerns associated with a de-extinction (and reintroduction) must be thoroughly addressed for it to be ethically acceptable. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  15. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  16. Characteristics of Arcs Between Porous Carbon Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Carvou, Erwann; Le Garrec, Jean-Luc; Mitchell, Brian

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Arcs between carbon electrodes present some specific differences compared with metallic arcs. The arc voltage is higher, but does not attain a stable value displaying large fluctuations. Indeed, the arcs are produced by the direct sublimation of the electrodes, without passing through a molten phase. The arc production is also facilitated by both circuit breaking and electric field breakdown. In this paper, arcing has been examined under various conditions (voltage, cu...

  17. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  18. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  19. A lesson in defining "extinct"

    OpenAIRE

    Asimow, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Toni Feder’s Issues and Events news item about the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory under construction in Mexico ( Physics Today, October 2013, page 22) begins by describing the site as “nestled at 4100 m on the slopes of Sierra Negra, an extinct volcano.” However, as the picture accompanying her piece or a cursory examination in Google Earth makes clear, the site is not on the slopes of Sierra Negra. It sits in the saddle between Sierra Negra and its much larger companion ...

  20. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  1. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  2. Extinction by the long dielectric needles

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkas, Nadejda L

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic wave extinction by the very long but finite dielectric needle is compared with that by the infinite dielectric cylinder for an oblique incidence of the electromagnetic wave. It is shown that the renormalized Hankel functions without the logarithmic terms should be used for the calculation of the extinction per unit length of the infinite dielectric cylinder to apply it for extinction calculations by the finite dielectric cylinder.

  3. Resistance to extinction and behavioral momentum

    OpenAIRE

    Nevin, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, reinforcement is assumed to strengthen discriminated operant behavior in the sense of increasing its resistance to disruption, and extinction is viewed as disruption by contingency termination and reinforcer omission. In multiple schedules of intermittent reinforcement, resistance to extinction is an increasing function of reinforcer rate, consistent with a model based on the momentum metaphor. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect, which opposes ...

  4. Mass Extinctions vs. Uniformitarianism in Biological Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Bak, Per; Paczuski, Maya

    1996-01-01

    It is usually believed that Darwin's theory leads to a smooth gradual evolution, so that mass extinctions must be caused by external shocks. However, it has recently been argued that mass extinctions arise from the intrinsic dynamics of Darwinian evolution. Species become extinct when swept by intermittent avalanches propagating through the global ecology. These ideas are made concrete through studies of simple mathematical models of coevolving species. The models exhibit self-organized criti...

  5. Extinction Maps in the WFAU Archives

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    A brief set of notes about the database design for 3D maps of dust extinction in the WFAU Archives, which support data from UKIRT-WFCAM, VISTA and VST. The notes also detail typical use cases, such as getting colour-excesses, extinction-corrections, spectral energy distributions and colour-magnitude diagrams and demonstrate the SQL queries to return data, along with examples from VVV DR2 with bulge extinction maps from Chen et al. (2013).

  6. The Astronomical Pulse of Global Extinction Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F.V. Lewis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The linkage between astronomical cycles and the periodicity of mass extinctions is reviewed and discussed. In particular, the apparent 26 million year cycle of global extinctions may be related to the motion of the solar system around the galaxy, especially perpendicular to the galactic plane. The potential relevance of Milankovitch cycles is also explored in the light of current evidence for the possible causes of extinction events over a geological timescale.

  7. The astronomical pulse of global extinction events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, David F V; Dorne, Jean-Lou C M

    2006-06-23

    The linkage between astronomical cycles and the periodicity of mass extinctions is reviewed and discussed. In particular, the apparent 26 million year cycle of global extinctions may be related to the motion of the solar system around the galaxy, especially perpendicular to the galactic plane. The potential relevance of Milankovitch cycles is also explored in the light of current evidence for the possible causes of extinction events over a geological timescale.

  8. Arc Interference Behavior during Twin Wire Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingjian Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study arc interference behavior during twin wire gas metal arc welding process, the synchronous acquisition system has been established to acquire instantaneous information of arc profile including dynamic arc length variation as well as relative voltage and current signals. The results show that after trailing arc (T-arc is added to the middle arc (M-arc in a stable welding process, the current of M arc remains unchanged while the agitation increases; the voltage of M arc has an obvious increase; the shape of M arc changes, with increasing width, length, and area; the transfer frequency of M arc droplet increases and the droplet itself becomes smaller. The wire extension length of twin arc turns out to be shorter than that of single arc welding.

  9. Mass extinctions vs. uniformitarianism in biological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bak, P.; Paczuski, M.

    1995-12-31

    It is usually believed that Darwin`s theory leads to a smooth gradual evolution, so that mass extinctions must be caused by external shocks. However, it has recently been argued that mass extinctions arise from the intrinsic dynamics of Darwinian evolution. Species become extinct when swept by intermittent avalanches propagating through the global ecology. These ideas are made concrete through studies of simple mathematical models of co-evolving species. The models exhibit self-organized criticality and describe some general features of the extinction pattern in the fossil record.

  10. Enhancing Divergent Search through Extinction Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    A challenge in evolutionary computation is to create representations as evolvable as those in natural evolution. This paper hypothesizes that extinction events, i.e. mass extinctions, can significantly increase evolvability, but only when combined with a divergent search algorithm, i.e. a search...... for the capacity to evolve. This hypothesis is tested through experiments in two evolutionary robotics domains. The results show that combining extinction events with divergent search increases evolvability, while combining them with convergent search offers no similar benefit. The conclusion is that extinction...

  11. Secondary extinction in Pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurbic, Drina; Bouton, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    Pavlov (1927/1960) reported that following the conditioning of several stimuli, extinction of one conditioned stimulus (CS) attenuated responding to others that had not undergone direct extinction. However, this secondary extinction effect has not been widely replicated in the contemporary literature. In three conditioned suppression experiments with rats, we further explored the phenomenon. In Experiment 1, we asked whether secondary extinction is more likely to occur with target CSs that have themselves undergone some prior extinction. A robust secondary extinction effect was obtained with a nonextinguished target CS. Experiment 2 showed that extinction of one CS was sufficient to reduce renewal of a second CS when it was tested in a neutral (nonextinction) context. In Experiment 3, secondary extinction was observed in groups that initially received intermixed conditioning trials with the target and nontarget CSs, but not in groups that received conditioning of the two CSs in separate sessions. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that CSs must be associated with a common temporal context during conditioning for secondary extinction to occur.

  12. Dust Extinction in Compact Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, TH; Kwok, S.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust extinction on the departure from axisymmetry in the morphology of planetary nebulae (PNs) are investigated through a comparison of the radio free-free emission and hydrogen recombination line images. The dust extinction maps from five compact PNs are derived using high-resolution (̃0"1) Hα and radio maps of the HST and VLA. These extinction maps are then analyzed by an ellipsoidal shell ionization model including the effects of dust extinction to infer the nebulae's intrin...

  13. Climate predictors of late quaternary extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogués-Bravo, David; Ohlemüller, Ralf; Batra, Persaram

    2010-01-01

    Between 50,000 and 3,000 years before present (BP) 65% of mammal genera weighing over 44 kg went extinct, together with a lower proportion of small mammals. Why species went extinct in such large numbers is hotly debated. One of the arguments proposes that climate changes underlie Late Quaternary...... extinctions, but global quantitative evidence for this hypothesis is still lacking. We test the potential role of global climate change on the extinction of mammals during the Late Quaternary. Our results suggest that continents with the highest climate footprint values, in other words, with climate changes...

  14. Long-term maintenance of immediate or delayed extinction is determined by the extinction-test interval

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Justin S.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney L.

    2010-01-01

    Short acquisition-extinction intervals (immediate extinction) can lead to either more or less spontaneous recovery than long acquisition-extinction intervals (delayed extinction). Using rat subjects, we observed less spontaneous recovery following immediate than delayed extinction (Experiment 1). However, this was the case only if a relatively long extinction-test interval was used; a relatively short extinction-test interval yielded the opposite result (Experiment 2). Previous data appear co...

  15. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marcin Krzywkowski; Doost Ali Mojdeh; Maryem Raoofi

    2016-02-01

    We initiate the study of outer-2-independent domination in graphs. An outer-2-independent dominating set of a graph is a set of vertices of such that every vertex of ()\\ has a neighbor in and the maximum vertex degree of the subgraph induced by ()\\ is at most one. The outer-2-independent domination number of a graph is the minimum cardinality of an outer-2-independent dominating set of . We show that if a graph has minimum degree at least two, then its outer-2-independent domination number equals the number of vertices minus the 2-independence number. Then we investigate the outer-2-independent domination in graphs with minimum degree one. We also prove the Vizing-type conjecture for outer-2-independent domination and disprove the Vizing-type conjecture for outer-connected domination.

  16. Extinction-Optimized Volume Illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Marco; Zirr, Tobias; Dachsbacher, Carsten

    2016-05-16

    We present a novel method to optimize the attenuation of light for the single scattering model in direct volume rendering. A common problem of single scattering is the high dynamic range between lit and shadowed regions due to the exponential attenuation of light along a ray. Moreover, light is often attenuated too strong between a sample point and the camera, hampering the visibility of important features. Our algorithm employs an importance function to selectively illuminate important structures and make them visible from the camera. With the importance function, more light can be transmitted to the features of interest, while contextual structures cast shadows which provide visual cues for perception of depth. At the same time, more scattered light is transmitted from the sample point to the camera to improve the primary visibility of important features. We formulate a minimization problem that automatically determines the extinction along a view or shadow ray to obtain a good balance between sufficient transmittance and attenuation. In contrast to previous approaches, we do not require a computationally expensive solution of a global optimization, but instead provide a closed-form solution for each sampled extinction value along a view or shadow ray and thus achieve interactive performance.

  17. Phylogenetic Clustering of Origination and Extinction across the Late Ordovician Mass Extinction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Z Krug

    Full Text Available Mass extinctions can have dramatic effects on the trajectory of life, but in some cases the effects can be relatively small even when extinction rates are high. For example, the Late Ordovician mass extinction is the second most severe in terms of the proportion of genera eliminated, yet is noted for the lack of ecological consequences and shifts in clade dominance. By comparison, the end-Cretaceous mass extinction was less severe but eliminated several major clades while some rare surviving clades diversified in the Paleogene. This disconnect may be better understood by incorporating the phylogenetic relatedness of taxa into studies of mass extinctions, as the factors driving extinction and recovery are thought to be phylogenetically conserved and should therefore promote both origination and extinction of closely related taxa. Here, we test whether there was phylogenetic selectivity in extinction and origination using brachiopod genera from the Middle Ordovician through the Devonian. Using an index of taxonomic clustering (RCL as a proxy for phylogenetic clustering, we find that A both extinctions and originations shift from taxonomically random or weakly clustered within families in the Ordovician to strongly clustered in the Silurian and Devonian, beginning with the recovery following the Late Ordovician mass extinction, and B the Late Ordovician mass extinction was itself only weakly clustered. Both results stand in stark contrast to Cretaceous-Cenozoic bivalves, which showed significant levels of taxonomic clustering of extinctions in the Cretaceous, including strong clustering in the mass extinction, but taxonomically random extinctions in the Cenozoic. The contrasting patterns between the Late Ordovician and end-Cretaceous events suggest a complex relationship between the phylogenetic selectivity of mass extinctions and the long-term phylogenetic signal in origination and extinction patterns.

  18. Selectivity of terrestrial gastropod extinctions on an oceanic archipelago and insights into the anthropogenic extinction process

    OpenAIRE

    Chiba, Satoshi; Roy, Kaustuv

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic impacts have led to widespread extinctions of species on oceanic islands but the nature of many of these extinctions remains poorly known. Here we investigate extinction selectivities of terrestrial gastropods from the Ogasawara archipelago in the northwest Pacific, where anthropogenic threats have changed over time, shifting primarily from the effects of habitat loss to predation by a variety of different predators. Across all of the islands, extinct species had significantly s...

  19. Controllability of arc jet from arc horns with slits. Slit tsuki arc horn no arc jet seigyo tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunabe, K.; Inaba, T.; Fukagawa, H. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)); Kito, Y. (Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-09-20

    To improve the corona discharge characteristics, test preparation was made of hollow rod form horns with slits for the overhead power transmission line use. Two types of horn electrode were prepared. The first horn electrode is of a hollow hemisphere fitted with and divided by slits on its tip. The second horn electrode is the first one which is further fitted with rod form electrode at the center of its tip. In experiment, relation was obtained between the deflection angle of arc jet and arc current, electrode diameter, etc., through an observation of arc jet by high speed camera. Melting loss of electrode was also made clear. The following knowledge was obtained: For the first horn electrode, the deflection angle can be limited to a narrow range by a division with slits, e.g., within 30 degrees under the condition of 5kA in arc current, 4 in number of sectors and 200mm in diameter. For the second horn electrode, the deflection angle can be limited to within 20 degrees under the condition of 5kA in arc current and 4 in number of sectors. The arc current is also limited to below 5kA by an addition of 50mm diameter central electrode. As a conclusion for the first electrode, the arc jet control characteristics excels in the stronger arc current range than 5kA, while for the second electrode, they are effective in the weaker arc current range than 5kA. 6 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Convergent evolution of the arginine deiminase pathway: the ArcD and ArcE arginine/ornithine exchangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noens, Elke E E; Lolkema, Juke S

    2017-02-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and yields 1 mol of ATP per mol of L-arginine consumed. The L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger in the pathway takes up L-arginine and excretes L-ornithine from the cytoplasm. Analysis of the genomes of 1281 bacterial species revealed the presence of 124 arc gene clusters encoding the pathway. About half of the clusters contained the gene encoding the well-studied L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger ArcD, while the other half contained a gene, termed here arcE, encoding a membrane protein that is not a homolog of ArcD. The arcE gene product of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown to take up L-arginine and L-ornithine with affinities of 0.6 and 1 μmol/L, respectively, and to catalyze metabolic energy-independent, electroneutral exchange. ArcE of S. pneumoniae could replace ArcD in the ADI pathway of Lactococcus lactis and provided the cells with a growth advantage. In contrast to ArcD, ArcE catalyzed translocation of the pathway intermediate L-citrulline with high efficiency. A short version of the ADI pathway is proposed for L-citrulline catabolism and the presence of the evolutionary unrelated arcD and arcE genes in different organisms is discussed in the context of the evolution of the ADI pathway.

  1. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Shin, E-mail: kajita.shin@nagoya-u.jp [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tsventoukh, Mikhail M. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, Sergey A. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  2. Hybrid laser-arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    the characteristics of the process, including the properties of joints produced by hybrid laser-arc welding and ways of assessing weld quality. Part II discusses applications of the process to such metals as magnesium alloys, aluminium and steel as well as the use of hybrid laser-arc welding in such sectors as ship...... building and the automotive industry. With its distinguished editor and international team of contributors, Hybrid laser-arc welding, will be a valuable source of reference for all those using this important welding technology. Professor Flemming Ove Olsen works in the Department of Manufacturing...

  3. Timing of extinction relative to acquisition: A parametric analysis of fear extinction in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norrholm, S.D.; Vervliet, B.; Jovanovic, T.; Boshoven, W.; Myers, K.M.; Davis, M.; Rothbaum, B.O.; Duncan, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is a reduction in conditioned fear following repeated exposure to the feared cue in the absence of any aversive event. Extinguished fear often reappears after extinction through spontaneous recovery. Animal studies suggest that spontaneous recovery can be abolished if extinction occu

  4. Constraints on Enhanced Extinction Resulting from Extinction Treatment in the Presence of an Added Excitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Lipatova, Olga; Miller, Ralph R.

    2009-01-01

    Three Pavlovian fear conditioning experiments with rats as subjects explored the effect of extinction in the presence of a concurrent excitor. Our aim was to explore this particular treatment, documented in previous studies to deepen extinction, with novel control groups to shed light on the processes involved in extinction. Relative to subjects…

  5. On arc efficiency in gas tungsten arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Stenbacka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to review the literature on published arc efficiency values for GTAW and, if possible, propose a narrower band. Articles between the years 1955 - 2011 have been found. Published arc efficiency values for GTAW DCEN show to lie on a wide range, between 0.36 to 0.90. Only a few studies covered DCEP - direct current electrode positive and AC current. Specific information about the reproducibility in calorimetric studies as well as in modeling and simulation studies (considering that both random and systematic errors are small was scarce. An estimate of the average arc efficiency value for GTAW DCEN indicates that it should be about 0.77. It indicates anyway that the GTAW process with DCEN is an efficient welding method. The arc efficiency is reduced when the arc length is increased. On the other hand, there are conflicting results in the literature as to the influence of arc current and travel speed.

  6. New contact material for reduction of arc duration for dc application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doublet, L.; Ben Jemaa, N.; Rivoirard, S.; Bourda, C.; Carvou, E.; Sallais, D.; Givord, D.; Ramoni, P.

    2010-04-01

    The phenomenon of arcing is the major cause of electrical contact degradation in electrical switches. Degradation involves contact erosion and/or welding. The use of special contact material and that of specific material processing may permit contact erosion to be reduced, in particular by shortening the arc duration. A short review of these approaches is presented in the first part of this paper. In the second part, the development of a new self-blowing contact material is described. This material has been tested under dc voltages from 14 V to 42 V. A reduction of the arc duration by a factor of 4 approximately was obtained as was a concomitant reduction of the extinction gap to less than 2 mm. This material will contribute to achieving better reliability in high current-high voltages breaking devices, and will aid in their miniaturization, e.g. in relays.

  7. STUDY ON THE PRESSURE IN PLASMA ARC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The axial pressure in plasma arc is measured under different conditions. The effects of the parameters, such as welding current, plasma gas flow rate, electrode setback and arc length, on the pressure in plasma arc are investigated and quantitative analyzed to explain the relationship between the quality of weld and the matching of parameters in plasma arc welding process.

  8. Tectogenesis of the outer Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozikowski, H.

    1980-01-01

    The modern structure and history of development of the outer Carpathians are examined. The nature of sedimentation of the sedimentary rocks developed here is discussed in relation to the conditions of oil and gas formation and oil and gas accumulation. The conclusion is drawn that hydrocarbon formation began back in the period of sedimentation of the flysch deposits, and hydrocarbon accumulations in favorable traps could be preserved all the way to the present time. The northern part of the region where the formations of oil, gas and condensate could be found at great depths is considered highly promising.

  9. Long-Term Maintenance of Immediate or Delayed Extinction Is Determined by the Extinction-Test Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin S.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney L.

    2010-01-01

    Short acquisition-extinction intervals (immediate extinction) can lead to either more or less spontaneous recovery than long acquisition-extinction intervals (delayed extinction). Using rat subjects, we observed less spontaneous recovery following immediate than delayed extinction (Experiment 1). However, this was the case only if a relatively…

  10. Extinction-Induced Variability in Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinloch, Jennifer M.; Foster, T. Mary; McEwan, James S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Participants earned points by pressing a computer space bar (Experiment 1) or forming rectangles on the screen with the mouse (Experiment 2) under differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedules, followed by extinction. Variability in interresponse time (the contingent dimension) increased during extinction, as for Morgan and Lee (1996);…

  11. Periodicity of extinction: A 1988 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepkowski, J. John, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis that events of mass extinction recur periodically at approximately 26 my intervals is an empirical claim based on analysis of data from the fossil record. The hypothesis has become closely linked with catastrophism because several events in the periodic series are associated with evidence of extraterrestrial impacts, and terrestrial forcing mechanisms with long, periodic recurrences are not easily conceived. Astronomical mechanisms that have been hypothesized include undetected solar companions and solar oscillation about the galactic plane, which induce comet showers and result in impacts on Earth at regular intervals. Because these mechanisms are speculative, they have been the subject of considerable controversy, as has the hypothesis of periodicity of extinction. In response to criticisms and uncertainties, a data base was developed on times of extinction of marine animal genera. A time series is given and analyzed with 49 sample points for the per-genus extinction rate from the Late Permian to the Recent. An unexpected pattern in the data is the uniformity of magnitude of many of the periodic extinction events. Observations suggest that the sequence of extinction events might be the result of two sets of mechanisms: a periodic forcing that normally induces only moderate amounts of extinction, and independent incidents or catastrophes that, when coincident with the periodic forcing, amplify its signal and produce major-mass extinctions.

  12. Can Parallelingualism Save Norwegian from Extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Language extinction is one of the most pressing issues in linguistics today, and the literature is full of discussion about how to combat it. Statements that Norwegian is amongst the languages that are already extinct are merely examples of a widespread tendency in the literature towards erroneous information about Norwegian. Nonetheless, there is…

  13. Current extinction rates of reptiles and amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, John

    2015-10-20

    There is broad concern that a mass extinction of amphibians and reptiles is now underway. Here I apply an extremely conservative Bayesian method to estimate the number of recent amphibian and squamate extinctions in nine important tropical and subtropical regions. The data stem from a combination of museum collection databases and published site surveys. The method computes an extinction probability for each species by considering its sighting frequency and last sighting date. It infers hardly any extinction when collection dates are randomized and it provides underestimates when artificial extinction events are imposed. The method also appears to be insensitive to trends in sampling; therefore, the counts it provides are absolute minimums. Extinctions or severe population crashes have accumulated steadily since the 1970s and 1980s, and at least 3.1% of frog species have already disappeared. Based on these data and this conservative method, the best estimate of the global grand total is roughly 200 extinctions. Consistent with previous results, frog losses are heavy in Latin America, which has been greatly affected by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Extinction rates are now four orders-of-magnitude higher than background, and at least another 6.9% of all frog species may be lost within the next century, even if there is no acceleration in the growth of environmental threats.

  14. Arc of opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia.

  15. Synchronous extinction of North America's Pleistocene mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, J. Tyler; Surovell, Todd A.

    2009-12-01

    The late Pleistocene witnessed the extinction of 35 genera of North American mammals. The last appearance dates of 16 of these genera securely fall between 12,000 and 10,000 radiocarbon years ago (≈13,800-11,400 calendar years B.P.), although whether the absence of fossil occurrences for the remaining 19 genera from this time interval is the result of sampling error or temporally staggered extinctions is unclear. Analysis of the chronology of extinctions suggests that sampling error can explain the absence of terminal Pleistocene last appearance dates for the remaining 19 genera. The extinction chronology of North American Pleistocene mammals therefore can be characterized as a synchronous event that took place 12,000-10,000 radiocarbon years B.P. Results favor an extinction mechanism that is capable of wiping out up to 35 genera across a continent in a geologic instant.

  16. Mass extinction in poorly known taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Claire; Achaz, Guillaume; Lambert, Amaury; Cowie, Robert H; Bouchet, Philippe; Fontaine, Benoît

    2015-06-23

    Since the 1980s, many have suggested we are in the midst of a massive extinction crisis, yet only 799 (0.04%) of the 1.9 million known recent species are recorded as extinct, questioning the reality of the crisis. This low figure is due to the fact that the status of very few invertebrates, which represent the bulk of biodiversity, have been evaluated. Here we show, based on extrapolation from a random sample of land snail species via two independent approaches, that we may already have lost 7% (130,000 extinctions) of the species on Earth. However, this loss is masked by the emphasis on terrestrial vertebrates, the target of most conservation actions. Projections of species extinction rates are controversial because invertebrates are essentially excluded from these scenarios. Invertebrates can and must be assessed if we are to obtain a more realistic picture of the sixth extinction crisis.

  17. Detecting stellar-wind bubbles through infrared arcs in H ii regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Haworth, Thomas J.; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V.; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert; Harries, Tim J.

    2016-02-01

    Mid-infrared arcs of dust emission are often seen near ionizing stars within H ii regions. A possible explanations for these arcs is that they could show the outer edges of asymmetric stellar wind bubbles. We use two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of wind bubbles within H ii regions around individual stars to predict the infrared emission properties of the dust within the H ii region. We assume that dust and gas are dynamically well-coupled and that dust properties (composition, size distribution) are the same in the H ii region as outside it, and that the wind bubble contains no dust. We post-process the simulations to make synthetic intensity maps at infrared wavebands using the torus code. We find that the outer edge of a wind bubble emits brightly at 24 μm through starlight absorbed by dust grains and re-radiated thermally in the infrared. This produces a bright arc of emission for slowly moving stars that have asymmetric wind bubbles, even for cases where there is no bow shock or any corresponding feature in tracers of gas emission. The 24 μm intensity decreases exponentially from the arc with increasing distance from the star because the dust temperature decreases with distance. The size distribution and composition of the dust grains has quantitative but not qualitative effects on our results. Despite the simplifications of our model, we find good qualitative agreement with observations of the H ii region RCW 120, and can provide physical explanations for any quantitative differences. Our model produces an infrared arc with the same shape and size as the arc around CD -38°11636 in RCW 120, and with comparable brightness. This suggests that infrared arcs around O stars in H ii regions may be revealing the extent of stellar wind bubbles, although we have not excluded other explanations.

  18. 4' and 24' Shock Tubes - Electric Arc Shock Tube Facililty N-229 (East) The facility is used to

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    4' and 24' Shock Tubes - Electric Arc Shock Tube Facililty N-229 (East) The facility is used to investigate the effects of radiation and ionization during outer planetary entries as well as for air-blast simualtion which requires the strongest possible shock generation in air at loadings of 1 atm or greater.

  19. Immediate extinction causes a less durable loss of performance than delayed extinction following either fear or appetitive conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Five experiments with rat subjects compared the effects of immediate and delayed extinction on the durability of extinction learning. Three experiments examined extinction of fear conditioning (using the conditioned emotional response method), and two experiments examined extinction of appetitive conditioning (using the food-cup entry method). In all experiments, conditioning and extinction were accomplished in single sessions, and retention testing took place 24 h after extinction. In both f...

  20. Retention of perceptual generalization of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappens, Meike; Schroijen, Mathias; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2015-12-01

    Fear reduction obtained during a fear extinction procedure can generalize from the extinction stimulus to other perceptually similar stimuli. Perceptual generalization of fear extinction typically follows a perceptual gradient, with increasing levels of fear reduction the more a stimulus resembles the extinction stimulus. The current study aimed to investigate whether perceptual generalization of fear extinction can be observed also after a retention interval of 24h. Fear was acquired to three geometrical figures of different sizes (CS(+), CS1(+) and CS2(+)) by consistently pairing them with a short-lasting suffocation experience (US). Three other geometrical figures that were never followed by the US served as control stimuli (CS(-), CS1(-), CS2(-)). Next, only the CS(+) was extinguished by presenting it in the absence of the US. One day later, fear responses to all stimuli were assessed without any US-presentation. Outcome measures included startle blink EMG, skin conductance, US expectancy, respiratory rate and tidal volume. On day 2 spontaneous recovery of fear was observed in US expectancy and tidal volume, but not in the other outcomes. Evidence for the retention of fear extinction generalization was present in US expectancy and skin conductance, but a perceptual gradient in the retention of generalized fear extinction could not be observed.

  1. Resistance to extinction and behavioral momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, John A

    2012-05-01

    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, reinforcement is assumed to strengthen discriminated operant behavior in the sense of increasing its resistance to disruption, and extinction is viewed as disruption by contingency termination and reinforcer omission. In multiple schedules of intermittent reinforcement, resistance to extinction is an increasing function of reinforcer rate, consistent with a model based on the momentum metaphor. The partial-reinforcement extinction effect, which opposes the effects of reinforcer rate, can be explained by the large disruptive effect of terminating continuous reinforcement despite its strengthening effect during training. Inclusion of a term for the context of reinforcement during training allows the model to account for a wide range of multiple-schedule extinction data and makes contact with other formulations. The relation between resistance to extinction and reinforcer rate on single schedules of intermittent reinforcement is exactly opposite to that for multiple schedules over the same range of reinforcer rates; however, the momentum model can give an account of resistance to extinction in single as well as multiple schedules. An alternative analysis based on the number of reinforcers omitted to an extinction criterion supports the conclusion that response strength is an increasing function of reinforcer rate during training.

  2. Extinction as discrimination: the molar view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, William M

    2012-05-01

    The traditional molecular view of behavior explains extinction as the dissipation or inhibition of strength, formerly built up by contiguous reinforcement. In obstinate opposition to this explanation was the partial-reinforcement extinction effect: a partially reinforced response extinguishes more slowly than a continuously reinforced response. It suggests instead that extinction is discrimination. Four pigeons were exposed to daily sessions in which a variable period of food delivery, produced by pecking on a variable-interval schedule, was followed by extinction. The rate of food delivery was varied over a wide range across conditions. Varying the amount of food per delivery inversely with rate of delivery kept response rate from varying excessively. The results confirmed and extended the partial-reinforcement effect; persistence of pecking and time to extinction were inversely related to rate of obtaining food. The results support the molar view of extinction, not as loss of strength of a particular discrete response, but as a transition from one allocation of time among activities to another. Although molecular theories dismiss discrimination due to repeated training and extinction as an impurity or complication, repeated cycles of availability and privation are probably typical of the environment in which most vertebrate species evolved.

  3. Estimating extinction using unsupervised machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meingast, Stefan; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, João

    2017-05-01

    Dust extinction is the most robust tracer of the gas distribution in the interstellar medium, but measuring extinction is limited by the systematic uncertainties involved in estimating the intrinsic colors to background stars. In this paper we present a new technique, Pnicer, that estimates intrinsic colors and extinction for individual stars using unsupervised machine learning algorithms. This new method aims to be free from any priors with respect to the column density and intrinsic color distribution. It is applicable to any combination of parameters and works in arbitrary numbers of dimensions. Furthermore, it is not restricted to color space. Extinction toward single sources is determined by fitting Gaussian mixture models along the extinction vector to (extinction-free) control field observations. In this way it becomes possible to describe the extinction for observed sources with probability densities, rather than a single value. Pnicer effectively eliminates known biases found in similar methods and outperforms them in cases of deep observational data where the number of background galaxies is significant, or when a large number of parameters is used to break degeneracies in the intrinsic color distributions. This new method remains computationally competitive, making it possible to correctly de-redden millions of sources within a matter of seconds. With the ever-increasing number of large-scale high-sensitivity imaging surveys, Pnicer offers a fast and reliable way to efficiently calculate extinction for arbitrary parameter combinations without prior information on source characteristics. The Pnicer software package also offers access to the well-established Nicer technique in a simple unified interface and is capable of building extinction maps including the Nicest correction for cloud substructure. Pnicer is offered to the community as an open-source software solution and is entirely written in Python.

  4. Interstellar extinction by fractal polycrystalline graphite clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, A C; Pustovit, V N; Niklasson, G A

    2001-01-01

    Certain dust particles in space are expected to appear as clusters of individual grains. The morphology of these clusters could be fractal or compact. To determine how these structural features would affect the interpretation of the observed interstellar extinction peak at $\\sim 4.6~\\mu$m, we have calculated the extinction by compact and fractal polycrystalline graphite clusters consisting of touching identical spheres. We compare three general methods for computing the extinction of the clusters, namely, a rigorous solution and two different discrete-dipole approximation methods.

  5. A model for evolution and extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, B W; Roberts, Bruce W

    1995-01-01

    We present a model for evolution and extinction in large ecosystems. The model incorporates the effects of interactions between species and the influences of abiotic environmental factors. We study the properties of the model by approximate analytic solution and also by numerical simulation, and use it to make predictions about the distribution of extinctions and species lifetimes that we would expect to see in real ecosystems. It should be possible to test these predictions against the fossil record. The model indicates that a possible mechanism for mass extinction is the coincidence of a large coevolutionary avalanche in the ecosystem with a severe environmental disturbance.

  6. Volcanogenic Dark Matter and Mass Extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, S; Abbas, Samar; Abbas, Afsar

    1996-01-01

    The passage of the Earth through dense clumps of dark matter, the presence of which are predicted by certain cosmologies, would produce large quantities of heat in the interior of this planet through the capture and subsequent annihilation of dark matter particles. This heat can cause large-scale volcanism which could in turn have caused the extinction of the dinosaurs and other mass extinctions. The periodicity of such volcanic outbursts agrees with the frequency of palaeontological mass extinctions as well as the observed periodicity in the occurrence of the largest flood basalt provinces on the globe.

  7. A mathematical model for Neanderthal extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Flores, J C

    1997-01-01

    A simple mathematical homogeneous model of competition is used to describe Neanderthal extinction in Europe. It considers two interacting species, Neanderthals and Early Modern Men, in the same ecological niche. Using paleontological data we claim that the parameter of similarity, between both species, fluctuates between 0.992 and 0.997. An extension of the model including migration (diffusion) is also discussed nevertheless, extinction of Neanderthal seems unavoidable. Numerical analysis of travelling wave solution (fronts) comfirms the extinction. The wave-front-velocity is estimated from linear analysis and numerical simulations confirm this estimation. We conjecture a mathematical formulation for the principle of exclusion between competitive interacting species (Gause).

  8. High pressure neon arc lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  9. Extinction from a rationalist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallistel, C R

    2012-05-01

    The merging of the computational theory of mind and evolutionary thinking leads to a kind of rationalism, in which enduring truths about the world have become implicit in the computations that enable the brain to cope with the experienced world. The dead reckoning computation, for example, is implemented within the brains of animals as one of the mechanisms that enables them to learn where they are (Gallistel, 1990, 1995). It integrates a velocity signal with respect to a time signal. Thus, the manner in which position and velocity relate to one another in the world is reflected in the manner in which signals representing those variables are processed in the brain. I use principles of information theory and Bayesian inference to derive from other simple principles explanations for: (1) the failure of partial reinforcement to increase reinforcements to acquisition; (2) the partial reinforcement extinction effect; (3) spontaneous recovery; (4) renewal; (5) reinstatement; (6) resurgence (aka facilitated reacquisition). Like the principle underlying dead-reckoning, these principles are grounded in analytic considerations. They are the kind of enduring truths about the world that are likely to have shaped the brain's computations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  11. Bax assembly into rings and arcs in apoptotic mitochondria is linked to membrane pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Gallego, Raquel; Mund, Markus; Cosentino, Katia; Schneider, Jale; Unsay, Joseph; Schraermeyer, Ulrich; Engelhardt, Johann; Ries, Jonas; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2016-02-15

    Bax is a key regulator of apoptosis that, under cell stress, accumulates at mitochondria, where it oligomerizes to mediate the permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane leading to cytochrome c release and cell death. However, the underlying mechanism behind Bax function remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the spatial organization of Bax in apoptotic cells using dual-color single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy. We show that active Bax clustered into a broad distribution of distinct architectures, including full rings, as well as linear and arc-shaped oligomeric assemblies that localized in discrete foci along mitochondria. Remarkably, both rings and arcs assemblies of Bax perforated the membrane, as revealed by atomic force microscopy in lipid bilayers. Our data identify the supramolecular organization of Bax during apoptosis and support a molecular mechanism in which Bax fully or partially delineates pores of different sizes to permeabilize the mitochondrial outer membrane. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  13. Biogeographic and bathymetric determinants of brachiopod extinction and survival during the Late Ordovician mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnegan, Seth; Mac Ørum Rasmussen, Christian; Harper, David A. T.

    2016-01-01

    The Late Ordovician mass extinction (LOME) coincided with dramatic climate changes, but there are numerous ways in which these changes could have driven marine extinctions. We use a palaeobiogeographic database of rhynchonelliform brachiopods to examine the selectivity of Late Ordovician......–Early Silurian genus extinctions and evaluate which extinction drivers are best supported by the data. The first (latest Katian) pulse of the LOME preferentially affected genera restricted to deeper waters or to relatively narrow (less than 35°) palaeolatitudinal ranges. This pattern is only observed...... in the latest Katian, suggesting that it reflects drivers unique to this interval. Extinction of exclusively deeper-water genera implies that changes in water mass properties such as dissolved oxygen content played an important role. Extinction of genera with narrow latitudinal ranges suggests that interactions...

  14. Epidemic extinction and control in heterogeneous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hindes, Jason

    2016-01-01

    We consider epidemic extinction in finite networks with broad variation in local connectivity. Generalizing the theory of large fluctuations to random networks with a given degree distribution, we are able to predict the most probable, or optimal, paths to extinction in various configurations, including truncated power-laws. We find that paths for heterogeneous networks follow a limiting form in which infection first decreases in low-degree nodes, which triggers a rapid extinction in high- degree nodes, and finishes with a residual low-degree extinction. The usefulness of the approach is further demonstrated through optimal control strategies that leverage finite-size fluctuations. Interestingly, we find that the optimal control is a mix of treating both high and low-degree nodes based on large-fluctuation theoretical predictions.

  15. Protostars at Low Extinction in Orion A

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, John Arban

    2016-01-01

    In the list of young stellar objects compiled by Megeath et al. (2012) for the Orion A molecular cloud, only 44 out of 1208 sources found projected onto low extinction (Ak<0.8 mag) gas are identified as protostars. These objects are puzzling because protostars are not typically expected to be associated with extended low extinction material. Here, we use high resolution extinction maps generated from Herschel data, optical/infrared and Spitzer Space Telescope photometry and spectroscopy of the low extinction protostellar candidate sources to determine if they are likely true protostellar sources or contaminants. Out of 44 candidate objects, we determine that 10 sources are likely protostars, with the rest being more evolved young stellar objects (18), galaxies (4), false detections of nebulosity and cloud edges (9), or real sources for which more data are required to ascertain their nature (3). We find none of the confirmed protostars to be associated with recognizable dense cores and we briefly discuss po...

  16. Possible involvement of serotonin in extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninger, R J; Phillips, A G

    1979-01-01

    In Experiment 1, rats were trained to leverpress for continuous reinforcement with food; half were then intubated with the serotonin synthesis inhibitor parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA: 400 mg/kg) and half with water. In extinction the PCPA-treated rats responded at a higher rate. In Experiment 2, rats were trained on a random interval schedule and then assigned to two groups, treated as in Experiment 1, and tested in extinction. There was no significant difference in the resistance to extinction of the two groups. In Experiment 3, the responding of rats trained in a punished stepdown response paradigm and then given an intragastric injection of PCPA took longer to recover than the responding of water-injected controls. These observations suggest that serotonergic neurons might play a role in extinction processes.

  17. Calibrating the end-Permian mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shu-zhong; Crowley, James L; Wang, Yue; Bowring, Samuel A; Erwin, Douglas H; Sadler, Peter M; Cao, Chang-qun; Rothman, Daniel H; Henderson, Charles M; Ramezani, Jahandar; Zhang, Hua; Shen, Yanan; Wang, Xiang-dong; Wang, Wei; Mu, Lin; Li, Wen-zhong; Tang, Yue-gang; Liu, Xiao-lei; Liu, Lu-jun; Zeng, Yong; Jiang, Yao-fa; Jin, Yu-gan

    2011-12-09

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe biodiversity crisis in Earth history. To better constrain the timing, and ultimately the causes of this event, we collected a suite of geochronologic, isotopic, and biostratigraphic data on several well-preserved sedimentary sections in South China. High-precision U-Pb dating reveals that the extinction peak occurred just before 252.28 ± 0.08 million years ago, after a decline of 2 per mil (‰) in δ(13)C over 90,000 years, and coincided with a δ(13)C excursion of -5‰ that is estimated to have lasted ≤20,000 years. The extinction interval was less than 200,000 years and synchronous in marine and terrestrial realms; associated charcoal-rich and soot-bearing layers indicate widespread wildfires on land. A massive release of thermogenic carbon dioxide and/or methane may have caused the catastrophic extinction.

  18. Periodicity of extinctions in the geologic past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D M; Sepkoski, J J

    1984-02-01

    The temporal distribution of the major extinctions over the past 250 million years has been investigated statistically using various forms of time series analysis. The analyzed record is based on variation in extinction intensity for fossil families of marine vertebrates, invertebrates, and protozoans and contains 12 extinction events. The 12 events show a statistically significant periodicity (P less than 0.01) with a mean interval between events of 26 million years. Two of the events coincide with extinctions that have been previously linked to meteorite impacts (terminal Cretaceous and Late Eocene). Although the causes of the periodicity are unknown, it is possible that they are related to extraterrestrial forces (solar, solar system, or galactic).

  19. Three Color Particle Optical Extinction Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test a multi-color (red, green, blue) particle optical extinction monitor suitable for use in either land or airborne applications....

  20. Optical atmospheric extinction over Cerro Paranal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patat, F; Moehler, S; O'Brien, K; Pompei, E; Bensby, T; Carraro, G; Ugarte Postigo, de, A; Fox, A; Gavignaud, I; James, G; Korhonen, H; Ledoux, C; Randall, S; Sana, H.A.A; Smoker, J; Stefl, S; Szeifert, T

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The present study was conducted to determine the optical extinction curve for Cerro Paranal under typical clear-sky observing conditions, with the purpose of providing the community with a function...

  1. Extinction in the Lotka-Volterra model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew; Kamenev, Alex

    2009-08-01

    Birth-death processes often exhibit an oscillatory behavior. We investigate a particular case where the oscillation cycles are marginally stable on the mean-field level. An iconic example of such a system is the Lotka-Volterra model of predator-prey interaction. Fluctuation effects due to discreteness of the populations destroy the mean-field stability and eventually drive the system toward extinction of one or both species. We show that the corresponding extinction time scales as a certain power-law of the population sizes. This behavior should be contrasted with the extinction of models stable in the mean-field approximation. In the latter case the extinction time scales exponentially with size.

  2. Biomarker Records Associated with Mass Extinction Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Grice, Kliti

    2016-06-01

    The history of life on Earth is punctuated by a series of mass extinction episodes that vary widely in their magnitude, duration, and cause. Biomarkers are a powerful tool for the reconstruction of historical environmental conditions and can therefore provide insights into the cause and responses to ancient extinction events. In examining the five largest mass extinctions in the geological record, investigators have used biomarkers to elucidate key processes such as eutrophy, euxinia, ocean acidification, changes in hydrological balance, and changes in atmospheric CO2. By using these molecular fossils to understand how Earth and its ecosystems have responded to unusual environmental activity during these extinctions, models can be made to predict how Earth will respond to future changes in its climate.

  3. Anthropogenic stressors and riverine fish extinctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, M.S.; Tedesco, P.A.; Hugueny, B.; Jézéquel, C.; Beauchard, O.; Brosse, S.; Oberdorff, T.

    2017-01-01

    Human activities are often implicated in the contemporary extinction of contemporary species. Concerningriverine fishes, the major biotic and abiotic threats widely cited include introduction of non-nativespecies, habitat fragmentation and homogenization in stream flow dynamics due to the damming

  4. Extinction in the Galaxy from surface brightnesses of ESO-LV galaxies: testing 'standard' extinction maps

    OpenAIRE

    Choloniewski, Jacek; Valentijn, Edwin A.

    2003-01-01

    The relative extinction in the Galaxy computed with our new method (Choloniewski and Valentijn 2003, CV) is compared with three patterns: Schlegel, Finkbeiner and Davis (1998, SFD), Burstein and Heiles (1978, BH) and the cosecans law. It is shown that extinction of SFD is more reliable then that of BH since it stronger correlates with our new extinction. The smallest correlation coeffcient have been obtained for the cosecans law. Linear regression analysis show that SFD overestimate the extin...

  5. An Analysis of the Shapes of Ultraviolet Extinction Curves. IV. Extinction without Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Edward L.; Massa, Derck

    2005-01-01

    We present a new method for deriving UV-through-IR extinction curves, based on the use of stellar atmosphere models to provide estimates of the intrinsic (i.e., unreddened) stellar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), rather than unreddened (or lightly reddened) standard stars. We show that this ``extinction-without-standards'' technique greatly increases the accuracy of the derived extinction curves and allows realistic estimations of the uncertainties. An additional benefit of the techniqu...

  6. Another Explanation for Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namouni, F.; Porco, C.

    2001-11-01

    Recent HST and Earth-based observations (Dumas et al 1999, Nature 400, 733; Sicardy et al 1999, Nature 400, 731) indicate that Neptune's ring arcs are not located at the corotation resonance with Galatea thought to be responsible for the azimuthal confinement of the arc system (Porco, 1991 Science 253, 995). Although small (5x 10-3od-1), the new observed mean motion offset puts the arcs near the resonance separatrix where the particles' semimajor axes would experience chaotic motion leading to the azimuthal spreading of the arcs within months, thereby calling into question their very existence. We have found a new resonant structure, dependent on the arcs having a small fraction of the mass of Galatea, in which Galatea's 43:42 eccentric corotation resonance, located (in the massless case) ~ 3 km inside the arcs' orbit, is made coincident with the arcs' semimajor axis. The arcs are primarily confined by this resonance, which is stronger ( e Galatea) than the inclined corotation resonance ( I2 Galatea) invoked in the Porco model. Moreover, the coupling of all the resonances in the arcs' neighborhood (eccentric corotation, inclined corotation and Lindblad resonances) modifies the interaction potential, creating smaller structures at the arcs' location. Consequently, this new confinement mechanism can simultaneously explain the arcs' confinement, the general spacing of the arcs, the Fraternité arc length of ~ 10o, and smaller-scale features seen in the arc system. Finally, the possibility of non-massless arcs supports an earlier suggestion by Porco et al (1991, in Neptune and Triton, the University of Arizona Series) that the rapid expected radial migration of the arc system, due to Galatea's secular torques, can be slowed down if the arcs have substantial mass.

  7. Crustal structure and tectonic history of the Kermadec arc inferred from MANGO seismic refraction profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, D.; Kopp, H.; Sutherland, R.; Henrys, S.; Watts, A. B.; Timm, C.; Scherwath, M.; Grevemeyer, I.; de Ronde, C. E. J.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed three wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction profiles and applied spectral averaging techniques to regional grids of bathymetry and free-air gravity anomaly to place the first regional constraints on the crustal structure of the Kermadec arc. These observations are used to test contrasting tectonic models for an along-strike transition in margin structure, across which, 1) the remnant Lau-Colville and active Kermadec arc ridges narrow by >50%; 2) the backarc and forearc deepen by 1 km, and 3) the active volcanic arc is deflected west into the deepest known backarc basin. We use residual bathymetric anomalies to constrain the geometry of this boundary and propose the name Central Kermadec Discontinuity (CKD). North of the CKD, the buried Tonga Ridge occupies the forearc with VP 6.5-7.3 km s-1 and residual free-air gravity anomalies constrain its latitudinal extent (north of 30.5°S), width (110±20 km) and strike ( 005° south of 25°S). South of the CKD the forearc is structurally homogeneous down-dip with VP 5.7-7.3 km s-1. Lower crustal velocities are similar to the northern Kermadec forearc, but there is no seismic or gravimetric evidence for an extinct arc ridge within the forearc. In the Havre Trough backarc, crustal thickness south of the CKD is 8-9 km, which is up-to 4 km thinner than the northern Havre Trough and at least 1 km thinner than the southern Havre Trough. The northern Kermadec/Tonga arc preserves a substrate of the Eocene arc, the southern Kermadec forearc preserves Mesozoic forearc rocks accreted at the Gondwana margin, and the central Kermadec arc may have fomed in the Kupe Abyssal Plain. The oldest arc related rocks recovered north and south of the CKD are 52 Ma and 16.7 Ma respectively, and plate tectonic reconstruction suggest the Eocene arc was originally conjoined with the Three Kings Ridge. The separation of these ridges during the early Oligocene likely formed the CKD. In contrast to previous interpretations, we

  8. Demography and the extinction of European Neanderthals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Causes previously suggested for the sudden extinction of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) in Europe, starting around 35,000 years ago, comprise food shortage, climatic effects and violence from Modern Humans. The aim here is to formulate a demographic model with reconstructed fertility and de...... Human newcomers during the last part of the period. The conclusion is that other reasons for extinction than climate or starvation must be sought....

  9. Software fires detection and extinction for forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos García Seco

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the most usual fire detection and forest extinction application technologies at present. We will see all different methods used by these applications that can be found in the Market and some examples. Also, some basic questions about the most influent parameters when a fire must be extinct are shown. Finally, after having shown all the technologies, we will build a model about an intelligent system which not only detects, but also extinguish wildfires.

  10. Extinction rates of established spatial populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerson, Baruch; Sasorov, Pavel V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with extinction of an isolated population caused by intrinsic noise. We model the population dynamics in a “refuge” as a Markov process which involves births and deaths on discrete lattice sites and random migrations between neighboring sites. In extinction scenario I, the zero population size is a repelling fixed point of the on-site deterministic dynamics. In extinction scenario II, the zero population size is an attracting fixed point, corresponding to what is known in ecology as the Allee effect. Assuming a large population size, we develop a WKB (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) approximation to the master equation. The resulting Hamilton’s equations encode the most probable path of the population toward extinction and the mean time to extinction. In the fast-migration limit these equations coincide, up to a canonical transformation, with those obtained, in a different way, by Elgart and Kamenev [Phys. Rev. EPHYADX1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.70.041106 70, 041106 (2004)]. We classify possible regimes of population extinction with and without an Allee effect and for different types of refuge, and solve several examples analytically and numerically. For a very strong Allee effect, the extinction problem can be mapped into the overdamped limit of the theory of homogeneous nucleation due to Langer [Ann. Phys. (NY)APNYA60003-491610.1016/0003-4916(69)90153-5 54, 258 (1969)]. In this regime, and for very long systems, we predict an optimal refuge size that maximizes the mean time to extinction.

  11. Extinction as the loss of evolutionary history

    OpenAIRE

    Erwin, Douglas H.

    2008-01-01

    Current plant and animal diversity preserves at most 1–2% of the species that have existed over the past 600 million years. But understanding the evolutionary impact of these extinctions requires a variety of metrics. The traditional measurement is loss of taxa (species or a higher category) but in the absence of phylogenetic information it is difficult to distinguish the evolutionary depth of different patterns of extinction: the same species loss can encompass very different losses of evolu...

  12. Demography and the extinction of European Neanderthals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    2011-01-01

    Causes previously suggested for the sudden extinction of Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) in Europe, starting around 35,000 years ago, comprise food shortage, climatic effects and violence from Modern Humans. The aim here is to formulate a demographic model with reconstructed fertility and de...... Human newcomers during the last part of the period. The conclusion is that other reasons for extinction than climate or starvation must be sought....

  13. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  14. Late Cretaceous - Eocene evolution of the Kronotsk arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, M. N.; Khotin, M. Y.

    2004-12-01

    accretionary prism. Simultaneously with these intra-oceanic events, there was a maximum of Laramie orogeny on the nearest North American continent. A huge sequence of turbidit fans was formed along western margin of Cordilleras. The Upper Pickezh sanstones are probably a small part of one of these fan included in the Kronotsk accretionary prism. At the Late Cretaceous and beginning of the Paleogene, the Kula-Pacific Ridge moved aside Obrutchev Rise and approached the Kronotsk. Therefore, the part of Kula plate south of the Kronotsk arc was constantly diminishing. As a result, 60-55 Myr ago, the subduction zone was blocked by the ridge and the western part of Kula plate was attached to the Pacific plate. This collision is the most probable cause of the strong deformation of the accretionary prism and of the emergence of the outer nonvolcanic arc that supplied the intra-arc basin (Stolbovsk Series of the Kamchatskiy Mys peninsula) with the ofiolitoclastics. The continuation of the Kronotsk volcanism after this collision is probably caused by a new subduction zone placed north of the Kronotsk arc.

  15. How does climate change cause extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Abigail E; Aiello-Lammens, Matthew E; Fisher-Reid, M Caitlin; Hua, Xia; Karanewsky, Caitlin J; Ryu, Hae Yeong; Sbeglia, Gena C; Spagnolo, Fabrizio; Waldron, John B; Warsi, Omar; Wiens, John J

    2013-01-07

    Anthropogenic climate change is predicted to be a major cause of species extinctions in the next 100 years. But what will actually cause these extinctions? For example, will it be limited physiological tolerance to high temperatures, changing biotic interactions or other factors? Here, we systematically review the proximate causes of climate-change related extinctions and their empirical support. We find 136 case studies of climatic impacts that are potentially relevant to this topic. However, only seven identified proximate causes of demonstrated local extinctions due to anthropogenic climate change. Among these seven studies, the proximate causes vary widely. Surprisingly, none show a straightforward relationship between local extinction and limited tolerances to high temperature. Instead, many studies implicate species interactions as an important proximate cause, especially decreases in food availability. We find very similar patterns in studies showing decreases in abundance associated with climate change, and in those studies showing impacts of climatic oscillations. Collectively, these results highlight our disturbingly limited knowledge of this crucial issue but also support the idea that changing species interactions are an important cause of documented population declines and extinctions related to climate change. Finally, we briefly outline general research strategies for identifying these proximate causes in future studies.

  16. Compound Stimulus Extinction Reduces Spontaneous Recovery in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Cesar A. O.; Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Fear-related behaviors are prone to relapse following extinction. We tested in humans a compound extinction design ("deepened extinction") shown in animal studies to reduce post-extinction fear recovery. Adult subjects underwent fear conditioning to a visual and an auditory conditioned stimulus (CSA and CSB, respectively) separately…

  17. The extinction of the West African lion: whose responsibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollkaemper, A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently published study showed that the lion in West Africa is now critically endangered and faces extinction. From one angle, this would be just one of the large (though unknown) number of species that has previously faced extinction or has even become extinct. But the risk of extinction of some

  18. The extinction of the West African lion: whose responsibility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Nollkaemper

    2014-01-01

    A recently published study showed that the lion in West Africa is now critically endangered and faces extinction. From one angle, this would be just one of the large (though unknown) number of species that has previously faced extinction or has even become extinct. But the risk of extinction of some

  19. Extinction rates in North American freshwater fishes, 1900-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhead, Noel M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread evidence shows that the modern rates of extinction in many plants and animals exceed background rates in the fossil record. In the present article, I investigate this issue with regard to North American freshwater fishes. From 1898 to 2006, 57 taxa became extinct, and three distinct populations were extirpated from the continent. Since 1989, the numbers of extinct North American fishes have increased by 25%. From the end of the nineteenth century to the present, modern extinctions varied by decade but significantly increased after 1950 (post-1950s mean = 7.5 extinct taxa per decade). In the twentieth century, freshwater fishes had the highest extinction rate worldwide among vertebrates. The modern extinction rate for North American freshwater fishes is conservatively estimated to be 877 times greater than the background extinction rate for freshwater fishes (one extinction every 3 million years). Reasonable estimates project that future increases in extinctions will range from 53 to 86 species by 2050.

  20. Rotating Drive for Electrical-Arc Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransen, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rotating drive improves quality of holes made by electrical-arc machining. Mechanism (Uni-tek, rotary head, or equivalent) attached to electrical-arc system. Drive rotates electrode as though it were mechanical drill, while an arc disintegrates metal in workpiece, thereby creating hole. Rotating electrode method often used in electric-discharge machining. NASA innovation is application of technique to electrical-arc machining.

  1. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  2. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  3. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  4. Hooded arc ion-source

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    The positioning system for the hooded arc ion-source, shown prior to mounting, consists of four excentric shafts to locate the ion-source and central electrodes. It will be placed on the axis of the SC and introduced into the vacuum tank via the air locks visible in the foreground.

  5. Warm storage for arc magmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K; Harrison, T Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-06

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the "cold storage" model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  6. Immediate Extinction Causes a Less Durable Loss of Performance than Delayed Extinction following Either Fear or Appetitive Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Amanda M.; Bouton, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Five experiments with rat subjects compared the effects of immediate and delayed extinction on the durability of extinction learning. Three experiments examined extinction of fear conditioning (using the conditioned emotional response method), and two experiments examined extinction of appetitive conditioning (using the food-cup entry method). In…

  7. Trophically Unique Species Are Vulnerable to Cascading Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Petchey, Owen L.; Eklöf, Anna; Borrvall, Charlotte; Ebenman, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Understanding which species might become extinct and the consequences of such loss is critical. One consequence is a cascade of further, secondary extinctions. While a significant amount is known about the types of communities and species that suffer secondary extinctions, little is known about the consequences of secondary extinctions for biodiversity. Here we examine the effect of these secondary extinctions on trophic diversity, the range of trophic roles played by the species in a communi...

  8. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  9. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    boundary components. The main result of this paper is the determination of those arc complexes Arc(F) that are also spherical. This classification has consequences for Riemann's moduli space via its known identification with an analogous arc complex in the punctured case with no boundary. Namely...

  10. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  11. Making Conductive Polymers By Arc Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daech, Alfred F.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental technique for fabrication of electrically conductive polymeric filaments based on arc tracking, in which electrical arc creates conductive carbon track in material that initially was insulator. Electrically conductive polymeric structures made by arc tracking aligned along wire on which formed. Alignment particularly suited to high conductivity and desirable in materials intended for testing as candidate superconductors.

  12. Magnification Bias in Gravitational Arc Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caminha, G. B. [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Estrada, J. [Fermilab; Makler, M. [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2013-08-29

    The statistics of gravitational arcs in galaxy clusters is a powerful probe of cluster structure and may provide complementary cosmological constraints. Despite recent progresses, discrepancies still remain among modelling and observations of arc abundance, specially regarding the redshift distribution of strong lensing clusters. Besides, fast "semi-analytic" methods still have to incorporate the success obtained with simulations. In this paper we discuss the contribution of the magnification in gravitational arc statistics. Although lensing conserves surface brightness, the magnification increases the signal-to-noise ratio of the arcs, enhancing their detectability. We present an approach to include this and other observational effects in semi-analytic calculations for arc statistics. The cross section for arc formation ({\\sigma}) is computed through a semi-analytic method based on the ratio of the eigenvalues of the magnification tensor. Using this approach we obtained the scaling of {\\sigma} with respect to the magnification, and other parameters, allowing for a fast computation of the cross section. We apply this method to evaluate the expected number of arcs per cluster using an elliptical Navarro--Frenk--White matter distribution. Our results show that the magnification has a strong effect on the arc abundance, enhancing the fraction of arcs, moving the peak of the arc fraction to higher redshifts, and softening its decrease at high redshifts. We argue that the effect of magnification should be included in arc statistics modelling and that it could help to reconcile arcs statistics predictions with the observational data.

  13. Thermal analysis of an arc heater electrode with a rotating arc foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Frank S.; Shepard, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    A smoothly rotating arc foot and an arc foot that jumps between multiple sticking points were analyzed using analytic formulations and numerical solution procedures. For each case the temperature distribution for a copper electrode was obtained for the plausible range of operating conditions. It is shown that the smoothly rotating arc foot is an extremely safe mode of operation, whereas the jumping arc foot produces excessively high electrode surface temperatures which are not greatly alleviated by increasing the average rotational frequency of the arc foot. It is suggested to eliminate arc-foot rotation and rely on the distribution of fixed electrodes with stationary arc attachment to avoid electrode failure at high current.

  14. The Evolution of Stellar Populations in the Outer Disks of Spiral Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Alberts, Stacey; Dong, Hui; Johnson, L C; Dale, Daniel A; Bianchi, Luciana; Chandar, Rupali; Kennicutt, Robert C; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Regan, Michael; Thilker, David

    2011-01-01

    We investigate recent star formation in the extended ultraviolet (XUV) disks of five nearby galaxies (NGC 0628, NGC 2090, NGC 2841, NGC 3621, and NGC 5055) using a long wavelength baseline comprised of ultraviolet and mid-infrared imaging from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer and the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera. We identify 229 unresolved stellar complexes across targeted portions of their XUV disks and utilize spectral energy distribution fitting to measure their stellar ages and masses through comparison with Starburst99 population synthesis models of instantaneous burst populations. We find that the median age of outer disk associations in our sample is ~100 Myr with a large dispersion that spans the entire range of our models (1 Myr-1 Gyr). This relatively evolved state for most associations addresses the observed dearth of Halpha emission in some outer disks, as Halpha can only be observed in star forming regions younger than ~10 Myr. The large age dispersion is robust against variations in extinction (in...

  15. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  16. Conservation Risks: When Will Rhinos be Extinct?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Timothy C; Ferreira, Sam M

    2016-08-01

    We develop a risk intelligence system for biodiversity enterprises. Such enterprises depend on a supply of endangered species for their revenue. Many of these enterprises, however, cannot purchase a supply of this resource and are largely unable to secure the resource against theft in the form of poaching. Because replacements are not available once a species becomes extinct, insurance products are not available to reduce the risk exposure of these enterprises to an extinction event. For many species, the dynamics of anthropogenic impacts driven by economic as well as noneconomic values of associated wildlife products along with their ecological stressors can help meaningfully predict extinction risks. We develop an agent/individual-based economic-ecological model that captures these effects and apply it to the case of South African rhinos. Our model uses observed rhino dynamics and poaching statistics. It seeks to predict rhino extinction under the present scenario. This scenario has no legal horn trade, but allows live African rhino trade and legal hunting. Present rhino populations are small and threatened by a rising onslaught of poaching. This present scenario and associated dynamics predicts continued decline in rhino population size with accelerated extinction risks of rhinos by 2036. Our model supports the computation of extinction risks at any future time point. This capability can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of proposed conservation strategies at reducing a species' extinction risk. Models used to compute risk predictions, however, need to be statistically estimated. We point out that statistically fitting such models to observations will involve massive numbers of observations on consumer behavior and time-stamped location observations on thousands of animals. Finally, we propose Big Data algorithms to perform such estimates and to interpret the fitted model's output.

  17. Elevational distribution and extinction risk in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L White

    Full Text Available Mountainous regions are hotspots of terrestrial biodiversity. Unlike islands, which have been the focus of extensive research on extinction dynamics, fewer studies have examined mountain ranges even though they face increasing threats from human pressures - notably habitat conversion and climate change. Limits to the taxonomic and geographical extent and resolution of previously available information have precluded an explicit assessment of the relative role of elevational distribution in determining extinction risk. We use a new global species-level avian database to quantify the influence of elevational distribution (range, maximum and midpoint on extinction risk in birds at the global scale. We also tested this relationship within biogeographic realms, higher taxonomic levels, and across phylogenetic contrasts. Potential confounding variables (i.e. phylogenetic, distributional, morphological, life history and niche breadth were also tested and controlled for. We show that the three measures of elevational distribution are strong negative predictors of avian extinction risk, with elevational range comparable and complementary to that of geographical range size. Extinction risk was also found to be positively associated with body weight, development and adult survival, but negatively associated with reproduction and niche breadth. The robust and consistent findings from this study demonstrate the importance of elevational distribution as a key driver of variation in extinction dynamics in birds. Our results also highlight elevational distribution as a missing criterion in current schemes for quantifying extinction risk and setting species conservation priorities in birds. Further research is recommended to test for generality across non-avian taxa, which will require an advance in our knowledge of species' current elevational ranges and increased efforts to digitise and centralise such data.

  18. Early to Middle Ordovician back-arc basin in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge: characteristics, extent, and tectonic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, James; Holm-Denoma, Christopher S.; Barineau, Clinton I.

    2014-01-01

    Fault-dismembered segments of a distinctive, extensive, highly allochthonous, and tectonically significant Ordovician (ca. 480–460 Ma) basin, which contains suites of bimodal metavolcanic rocks, associated base metal deposits, and thick immature deep-water (turbiditic) metasediments, occur in parts of the southern Appalachian Talladega belt, eastern Blue Ridge, and Inner Piedmont of Alabama, Georgia, and North and South Carolina. The basin's predominantly metasedimentary strata display geochemical and isotopic evidence of a mixed provenance, including an adjacent active volcanic arc and a provenance of mica (clay)-rich sedimentary and felsic plutonic rocks consistent with Laurentian (Grenvillian) upper-crustal continental rocks and their passive-margin cover sequences. Geochemical characteristics of the subordinate intercalated bimodal metavolcanic rocks indicate formation in a suprasubduction environment, most likely a back-arc basin, whereas characteristics of metasedimentary units suggest deposition above Neoproterozoic rift and outer-margin lower Paleozoic slope and rise sediments within a marginal basin along Ordovician Laurentia's Iapetus margin. This tectonic setting indicates that southernmost Appalachian Ordovician orogenesis (Taconic orogeny) began as an extensional accretionary orogen along the outer margin of Laurentia, rather than in an exotic (non-Laurentian) arc collisional setting. B-type subduction polarity requires that the associated arc-trench system formed southeast of the palinspastic position of the back-arc basin. This scenario can explain several unique features of the southern Appalachian Taconic orogen, including: the palinspastic geographic ordering of key tectonic elements (i.e., back-arc, arc, etc.), and a lack of (1) an obducted arc sensu stricto on the Laurentian margin, (2) widespread Ordovician regional metamorphism, and (3) Taconic klippen to supply detritus to the Taconic foreland basin.

  19. Relationship between outer forearc subsidence and plate boundary kinematics along the Northeast Japan convergent margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalla, Christine; Fisher, Donald M.; Kirby, Eric; Furlong, Kevin P.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic erosion along convergent plate boundaries, whereby removal of upper plate material along the subduction zone interface drives kilometer-scale outer forearc subsidence, has been purported to explain the evolution of nearly half the world's subduction margins, including part of the history of northeast Japan. Here, we evaluate the role of plate boundary dynamics in driving forearc subsidence in northeastern Japan. A synthesis of newly updated analyses of outer forearc subsidence, the timing and kinematics of upper plate deformation, and the history of plate convergence along the Japan trench demonstrate that the onset of rapid fore-arc tectonic subsidence is contemporaneous with upper plate extension during the opening of the Sea of Japan and with an acceleration in convergence rate at the trench. In Plio-Quaternary time, relative uplift of the outer forearc is contemporaneous with contraction across the arc and a decrease in plate convergence rate. The coincidence of these changes across the forearc, arc, backarc system appears to require an explanation at the scale of the entire plate boundary. Similar observations along other western Pacific margins suggest that correlations between forearc subsidence and major changes in plate kinematics are the rule, rather than the exception. We suggest that a significant component of forearc subsidence at the northeast Japan margin is not the consequence of basal tectonic erosion, but instead reflects dynamic changes in plate boundary geometry driven by temporal variations in plate kinematics. If correct, this model requires a reconsideration of the mass balance and crustal recycling of continental crust at nonaccretionary margins.

  20. Facilitation of extinction and re-extinction of operant behavior in mice by chlordiazepoxide and D-cycloserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Julian C; Norwood, Kelly

    2013-05-01

    The aim was to compare operant extinction with re-extinction following re-acquisition and to investigate neuropharmacological mechanisms through administration of drugs potentiating GABAergic or glutamatergic systems. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were trained to lever press for food on a fixed ratio schedule, then extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine administration (15mg/kg in each case), then retrained to lever press for food, then re-extinguished with or without pre-session chlordiazepoxide or post-session d-cycloserine. Under vehicle injections, extinction and re-extinction curves were indistinguishable, but drug treatments showed that there was less resistance to extinction in the re-extinction phase. Chlordiazepoxide facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with an earlier effect during re-extinction. d-Cycloserine also facilitated extinction and re-extinction, with some evidence of an earlier effect during re-extinction. These results replicate and extend earlier findings with operant extinction, but differ from some previous reports of d-cycloserine on re-extinction of Pavlovian conditioned fear. Implications for accounts of the similarities and differences between neural mechanisms of extinction following either Pavlovian or operant conditioning, and applications of these findings, are discussed.

  1. Quantitative analysis of forest fire extinction efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel E. Castillo-Soto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Evaluate the economic extinction efficiency of forest fires, based on the study of fire combat undertaken by aerial and terrestrial means. Area of study, materials and methods: Approximately 112,000 hectares in Chile. Records of 5,876 forest fires that occurred between 1998 and 2009 were analyzed. The area further provides a validation sector for results, by incorporating databases for the years 2010 and 2012. The criteria used for measuring extinction efficiency were economic value of forestry resources, Contraction Factor analysis and definition of the extinction costs function. Main results: It is possible to establish a relationship between burnt area, extinction costs and economic losses. The method proposed may be used and adapted to other fire situations, requiring unit costs for aerial and terrestrial operations, economic value of the property to be protected and speed attributes of fire spread in free advance. Research highlights: The determination of extinction efficiency in containment works of forest fires and potential projection of losses, different types of plant fuel and local conditions favoring the spread of fire broaden the admissible ranges of a, φ and Ce considerably.

  2. Fluoxetine Facilitates Fear Extinction Through Amygdala Endocannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Flynn, Shaun; Brockway, Emma; Kaugars, Katherine; Baldi, Rita; Ramikie, Teniel S; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George; Patel, Sachin; Holmes, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacologically elevating brain endocannabinoids (eCBs) share anxiolytic and fear extinction-facilitating properties with classical therapeutics, including the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. There are also known functional interactions between the eCB and serotonin systems and preliminary evidence that antidepressants cause alterations in brain eCBs. However, the potential role of eCBs in mediating the facilitatory effects of fluoxetine on fear extinction has not been established. Here, to test for a possible mechanistic contribution of eCBs to fluoxetine's proextinction effects, we integrated biochemical, electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral techniques, using the extinction-impaired 129S1/Sv1mJ mouse strain. Chronic fluoxetine treatment produced a significant and selective increase in levels of anandamide in the BLA, and an associated decrease in activity of the anandamide-catabolizing enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase. Slice electrophysiological recordings showed that fluoxetine-induced increases in anandamide were associated with the amplification of eCB-mediated tonic constraint of inhibitory, but not excitatory, transmission in the BLA. Behaviorally, chronic fluoxetine facilitated extinction retrieval in a manner that was prevented by systemic or BLA-specific blockade of CB1 receptors. In contrast to fluoxetine, citalopram treatment did not increase BLA eCBs or facilitate extinction. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel, obligatory role for amygdala eCBs in the proextinction effects of a major pharmacotherapy for trauma- and stressor-related disorders and anxiety disorders.

  3. Determining the extragalactic extinction law with SALT

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelman, Ido; Kniazev, Alexei Y; Buckley, David; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Hashimoto, Yas; Loaring, Nicola; Romero, Encarni; Still, Martin; Vaisanen, Petri

    2008-01-01

    We present CCD imaging observations of early-type galaxies with dark lanes obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) during its performance-verification phase. We derive the extinction law by the extragalactic dust in the dark lanes in the spectral range 1.11mu m^{-1} < lambda^{-1} < 2.94 mu m^{-1} by fitting model galaxies to the unextinguished parts of the image, and subtracting from these the actual images. We find that the extinction curves run parallel to the Galactic extinction curve, which implies that the properties of dust in the extragalactic enviroment are similar to those of the Milky Way. The ratio of the total V band extinction to the selective extinction between the V and B bands is derived for each galaxy with an average of 2.82+-0.38, compared to a canonical value of 3.1 for the Milky Way. The similar values imply that galaxies with well-defined dark lanes have characteristic dust grain sizes similar to those of Galactic dust.

  4. Disease and the dynamics of extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Hamish

    2012-10-19

    Invading infectious diseases can, in theory, lead to the extinction of host populations, particularly if reservoir species are present or if disease transmission is frequency-dependent. The number of historic or prehistoric extinctions that can unequivocally be attributed to infectious disease is relatively small, but gathering firm evidence in retrospect is extremely difficult. Amphibian chytridiomycosis and Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) are two very different infectious diseases that are currently threatening to cause extinctions in Australia. These provide an unusual opportunity to investigate the processes of disease-induced extinction and possible management strategies. Both diseases are apparently recent in origin. Tasmanian DFTD is entirely host-specific but potentially able to cause extinction because transmission depends weakly, if at all, on host density. Amphibian chytridiomycosis has a broad host range but is highly pathogenic only to some populations of some species. At present, both diseases can only be managed by attempting to isolate individuals or populations from disease. Management options to accelerate the process of evolution of host resistance or tolerance are being investigated in both cases. Anthropogenic changes including movement of diseases and hosts, habitat destruction and fragmentation and climate change are likely to increase emerging disease threats to biodiversity and it is critical to further develop strategies to manage these threats.

  5. Mass Extinctions and Biosphere-Geosphere Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Daniel; Bowring, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Five times in the past 500 million years, mass extinctions have resulted in the loss of greater than three-fourths of living species. Each of these events is associated with significant environmental change recorded in the carbon-isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks. There are also many such environmental events in the geologic record that are not associated with mass extinctions. What makes them different? Two factors appear important: the size of the environmental perturbation, and the time scale over which it occurs. We show that the natural perturbations of Earth's carbon cycle during the past 500 million years exhibit a characteristic rate of change over two orders of magnitude in time scale. This characteristic rate is consistent with the maximum rate that limits quasistatic (i.e., near steady-state) evolution of the carbon cycle. We identify this rate with marginal stability, and show that mass extinctions occur on the fast, unstable side of the stability boundary. These results suggest that the great extinction events of the geologic past, and potentially a "sixth extinction" associated with modern environmental change, are characterized by common mechanisms of instability.

  6. The transition from memory retrieval to extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cammarota Martín

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory is measured by measuring retrieval. Retrieval is often triggered by the conditioned stimulus (CS; however, as known since Pavlov, presentation of the CS alone generates extinction. One-trial avoidance (IA is a much used conditioned fear paradigm in which the CS is the safe part of a training apparatus, the unconditioned stimulus (US is a footshock and the conditioned response is to stay in the safe area. In IA, retrieval is measured without the US, as latency to step-down from the safe area (i.e., a platform. Extinction is installed at the moment of the first unreinforced test session, as clearly shown by the fact that many drugs, including PKA, ERK and protein synthesis inhibitors as well as NMDA receptor antagonists, hinder extinction when infused into the hippocampus or the basolateral amygdala at the moment of the first test session but not later. Some, but not all the molecular systems required for extinction are also activated by retrieval, further endorsing the hypothesis that although retrieval is behaviorally and biochemically necessary for the generation of extinction, this last process constitutes a new learning secondary to the unreinforced expression of the original trace.

  7. Tectonomagmatism in continental arcs: evidence from the Sark arc complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Wes; Moreno, Teresa

    2002-07-01

    The island of Sark (Channel Islands, UK) exposes syntectonic plutons and country rock gneisses within a Precambrian (Cadomian) continental arc. This Sark arc complex records sequential pulses of magmatism over a period of 7 Ma (ca. 616-609 Ma). The earliest intrusion (ca. 616 Ma) was a composite sill that shows an ultramafic base overlain by a magma-mingled net vein complex subsequently deformed at near-solidus temperatures into the amphibolitic and tonalitic Tintageu banded gneisses. The deformation was synchronous with D 2 deformation of the paragneissic envelope, with both intrusion and country rock showing flat, top-to-the-south LS fabrics. Later plutonism injected three homogeneous quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets: the Creux-Moulin pluton (150-250 m; ca. 614 Ma), the Little Sark pluton (>700 m; 611 Ma), and the Northern pluton (>500 m; 609 Ma). Similar but thinner sheets in the south (Derrible-Hogsback-Dixcart) and west (Port es Saies-Brecqhou) are interpreted as offshoots from the Creux-Moulin pluton and Little Sark pluton, respectively. All these plutons show the same LS fabric seen in the older gneisses, with rare magmatic fabrics and common solid state fabrics recording syntectonic crystallisation and cooling. The cooling rate increased rapidly with decreasing crystallisation age: >9 Ma for the oldest intrusion to cool to lower amphibolite conditions, 7-8 Ma for the Creux Moulin pluton, 5-6 Ma for the Little Sark pluton, and 10 -14 s -1) that focussed extensional deformation into the Sark area. The increased rates of extension allowed ingress of the subsequent quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets, although strain rate slowly declined as the whole complex cooled during exhumation. The regional architecture of syntectonic Cadomian arc complexes includes flat-lying "Sark-type" and steep "Guernsey-type" domains produced synchronously in shear zone networks induced by oblique subduction: a pattern seen in other continental arcs such as that running from Alaska

  8. A Contribution to Arc Length Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Egerland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An investigation was raising the question: "What does 'arc length' mean?" Actually, it is considered expressing a kind of natural relationship between arc voltage and arc column shape. Statements such as "The higher the voltage the longer the arc" or "The arc voltage proves approximately proportional to the arc length", are frequently noticed in this conjunction. However, the author suggests that there is no general possibility of describing 'arc length' over the whole welding process range. Instances are represented in this paper, showing both theoretical attempts of definition and practical observations. This paper intends to contribute to a serious discussion of something trivial, indeed very well-known or used among welding experts, but actually yet hardly understood, at least as when it comes to closer examination

  9. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...... are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane....

  10. Calpain-1 deletion impairs mGluR-dependent LTD and fear memory extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guoqi; Briz, Victor; Seinfeld, Jeff; Liu, Yan; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that calpain-1 is required for the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) elicited by theta-burst stimulation in field CA1 of hippocampus. Here we determined the contribution of calpain-1 in another type of synaptic plasticity, the long-term depression (LTD) elicited by activation of type-I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR-LTD). mGluR-LTD was associated with calpain-1 activation following T-type calcium channel opening, and resulted in the truncation of a regulatory subunit of PP2A, B56α. This signaling pathway was required for both the early and late phase of Arc translation during mGluR-LTD, through a mechanism involving mTOR and ribosomal protein S6 activation. In contrast, in hippocampal slices from calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice, application of the mGluR agonist, DHPG, did not result in B56α truncation, increased Arc synthesis and reduced levels of membrane GluA1-containing AMPA receptors. Consistently, mGluR-LTD was impaired in calpain-1 KO mice, and the impairment could be rescued by phosphatase inhibitors, which also restored Arc translation in response to DHPG. Furthermore, calpain-1 KO mice exhibited impairment in fear memory extinction to tone presentation. These results indicate that calpain-1 plays a critical role in mGluR-LTD and is involved in many forms of synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. PMID:28202907

  11. Life extinctions by neutron star mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon; Shaviv, N J; Dar, Arnon; Laor, Ari; Shaviv, Nir J.

    1997-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray jets from nearby mergers or accretion induced collapse (AIC) of neutron stars (NS) that hit the atmosphere can produce lethal fluxes of atmospheric muons at ground level, underground and underwater, destroy the ozone layer and radioactivate the environment. They could have caused most of the massive life extinctions on planet Earth in the past 600 My. Biological mutations due to ionizing radiations could have caused the fast appearance of new species after the massive extinctions. An early warning of future extinctions due to NS mergers may be obtained by identifying, mapping and timing all the nearby binary neutron stars systems. A warning of an approaching cosmic ray burst from a nearby NS merger/AIC may be provided by a very intense gamma ray burst which preceeds it.

  12. Mammal extinctions, body size, and paleotemperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, T.M.; Holroyd, P.A.; Rose, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    There is a general inverse relationship between the natural logarithm of tooth area (a body size indicator) of some fossil mammals and paleotemperature during approximately 2.9 million years of the early Eocene in the Bighorn Basin of northwest Wyoming. When mean temperatures became warmer, tooth areas tended to become smaller. During colder times, larger species predominated; these generally became larger or remained the same size. Paleotemperature trends also markedly affected patterns of local (and, perhaps, regional) extinction and immigration. New species appeared as immigrants during or near the hottest (smaller forms) and coldest (larger forms) intervals. Paleotemperature trend reversals commonly resulted in the ultimate extinction of both small forms (during cooling intervals) and larger forms (during warming intervals). These immigrations and extinctions mark faunal turnovers that were also modulated by sharp increases in sediment accumulation rate.

  13. Does supplementary reinforcement of stereotypy facilitate extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Claudia L; Iwata, Brian A; Wilson, David M; Thomason-Sassi, Jessica L; Roscoe, Eileen M

    2013-01-01

    Results of several studies suggest that delivery of supplemental (social) reinforcement for stereotypy might facilitate its subsequent extinction. We examined this possibility with 9 subjects who engaged in stereotypy by including methodological refinements to ensure that (a) subjects' stereotypy was maintained in the absence of social consequences, (b) supplementary reinforcers were highly preferred and were shown to be reinforcers for some behavior, and (c) subjects were exposed to lengthy reinforcement and extinction conditions. In spite of these modifications, only 4 subjects' stereotypy increased when supplementary reinforcement was delivered contingent on stereotypy, and no subject's stereotypy decreased below initial baseline levels when social reinforcement was subsequently withheld. Decreases in stereotypy occurred with the implementation of noncontingent reinforcement. Thus, delivery of supplementary reinforcers either did not increase stereotypy or did not facilitate extinction of stereotypy maintained by automatic reinforcement. We discuss the practical and conceptual bases of these results with respect to our current understanding of function-based interventions.

  14. Opportunities and costs for preventing vertebrate extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conde, Dalia Amor; Colchero, Fernando; Güneralp, Burak

    2015-01-01

    -oriented organisations that aims to protect Critically Endangered and Endangered species restricted to single sites, has identified 920 species of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, conifers and reef-building corals in 588 ‘trigger’ sites [3] . These are arguably the most irreplaceable category of important...... causes of biodiversity loss in part by establishing protected areas (Target 11) and preventing species extinctions (Target 12). To achieve this, increased interventions will be required for a large number of sites and species. The Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) [2] , a consortium of conservation...... biodiversity conservation sites. Protected area coverage of AZE sites is a key indicator of progress towards Target 11 [1] . Moreover, effective conservation of AZE sites is essential to achieve Target 12, as the loss of any of these sites would certainly result in the global extinction of at least one species...

  15. Extinction in four species cyclic competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intoy, Ben; Pleimling, Michel

    2013-08-01

    When four species compete stochastically in a cyclic way, the formation of two teams of mutually neutral partners is observed. In this paper we study through numerical simulations the extinction processes that can take place in this system both in the well mixed case as well as on different types of lattices. The different routes to extinction are revealed by the probability distribution of the domination time, i.e. the time needed for one team to fully occupy the system. If swapping is allowed between neutral partners, then the probability distribution is dominated by very long-lived states where a few very large domains persist, each domain being occupied by a mix of individuals from species that form one of the teams. Many aspects of the possible extinction scenarios are lost when only considering averaged quantities, such as for example the mean domination time.

  16. Opportunities and costs for preventing vertebrate extinctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conde, Dalia Amor; Colchero, Fernando; Güneralp, Burak

    2015-01-01

    -oriented organisations that aims to protect Critically Endangered and Endangered species restricted to single sites, has identified 920 species of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, conifers and reef-building corals in 588 ‘trigger’ sites [3] . These are arguably the most irreplaceable category of important...... causes of biodiversity loss in part by establishing protected areas (Target 11) and preventing species extinctions (Target 12). To achieve this, increased interventions will be required for a large number of sites and species. The Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) [2] , a consortium of conservation...... biodiversity conservation sites. Protected area coverage of AZE sites is a key indicator of progress towards Target 11 [1] . Moreover, effective conservation of AZE sites is essential to achieve Target 12, as the loss of any of these sites would certainly result in the global extinction of at least one species...

  17. Abrupt climate change and extinction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    There is a growing body of theoretical and empirical support for the concept of instabilities in the climate system, and indications that abrupt climate change may in some cases contribute to abrupt extinctions. Theoretical indications of instabilities can be found in a broad spectrum of climate models (energy balance models, a thermohaline model of deep-water circulation, atmospheric general circulation models, and coupled ocean-atmosphere models). Abrupt transitions can be of several types and affect the environment in different ways. There is increasing evidence for abrupt climate change in the geologic record and involves both interglacial-glacial scale transitions and the longer-term evolution of climate over the last 100 million years. Records from the Cenozoic clearly show that the long-term trend is characterized by numerous abrupt steps where the system appears to be rapidly moving to a new equilibrium state. The long-term trend probably is due to changes associated with plate tectonic processes, but the abrupt steps most likely reflect instabilities in the climate system as the slowly changing boundary conditions caused the climate to reach some threshold critical point. A more detailed analysis of abrupt steps comes from high-resolution studies of glacial-interglacial fluctuations in the Pleistocene. Comparison of climate transitions with the extinction record indicates that many climate and biotic transitions coincide. The Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction is not a candidate for an extinction event due to instabilities in the climate system. It is quite possible that more detailed comparisons and analysis will indicate some flaws in the climate instability-extinction hypothesis, but at present it appears to be a viable candidate as an alternate mechanism for causing abrupt environmental changes and extinctions.

  18. Extinction Mapping of Nearby Galaxies Using LEGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Lauren; Walterbos, Rene A. M.; Calzetti, Daniela; Sabbi, Elena; Ubeda, Leonardo; LEGUS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Extinction by dust affects studies of star formation and stellar evolution in galaxies. There are different ways to measure the distribution of dust column densities across galaxies. Here we present work based on extinctions measured towards individual massive stars.Isochrones of massive stars lie in the same location on a color-color diagram with little dependence on metallicity and luminosity class, so the extinction can be directly derived from the observed photometry. We develop a method for generating extinction maps using photometry of massive stars from the Hubble Space Telescope for the nearly 50 galaxies observed by the Legacy Extragalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS). The derived extinction maps will allow us to correct ground-based and HST Halpha maps for extinction, and will be used to constrain changes in the dust-to-gas ratio across the galaxy sample and in different star formation, metallicity and morphological environments. Previous studies have found links between galaxy metallicity and the dust-to-gas mass ratio. Dust abundance and gas metallicity are critical constraints for chemical and galaxy evolution models. We present a study of LEGUS galaxies spanning a range of distances, metallicities, and galaxy morphologies, including metal-poor dwarfs Holmberg I and II and giant spirals NGC 6503 and NGC 628. We see clear evidence for changes in the dust-to-gas mass ratio with changing metallicity. We also examine changes in the dust-to-gas mass ratio with galactocentric radius. Ultimately, we will provide constraints on the dust-to-gas mass ratio across a wide range of galaxy environments.

  19. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically Tzrnsat [3]. A corollary is that slightly older zircon antecrysts that are common in the inner units of the TIS could be considered inherited if they are derived from remelting of slightly older intrusions. Remelting at such low temperatures in the arc would require a source of external water. Refs: [1] Sawyer, J.Pet 32:701-738; [2] Fraser et al, Geology 25:607-610; [3] Harrison et al, Geology 35:635- 638

  20. Extinction rate fragility in population dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasin, M; Dykman, M I

    2009-08-01

    Population extinction is of central interest for population dynamics. It may occur from a large rare fluctuation. We find that, in contrast to related large-fluctuation effects like noise-induced interstate switching, quite generally extinction rates in multipopulation systems display fragility, where the height of the effective barrier to be overcome in the fluctuation depends on the system parameters nonanalytically. We show that one of the best-known models of epidemiology, the susceptible-infectious-susceptible model, is fragile to total population fluctuations.

  1. History of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.; Canup, R. M.

    1997-07-01

    The recent dynamical calculations for Neptune's Adams ring arcs by Foryta and Sicardy (1996) and Hanninen and Porco (1997) determine the basic evolutionary parameters for this system. The ring evolution is dominated by stochastic events, particularly chaotic motion that causes a migration between the corotation sites (FS96) and collisions near quadrature (HP97). A basic problem is that the high velocity collisions that produce the dusty arcs at the Galatea corotation resonances rapidly depopulate these sites (Colwell and Esposito 1990). With the new results in hand for the evolution of the ring particles over periods of less than a century, we can now calculate the long-term stochastic evolution of the Adams ring. Using a finite Markov chain as a model for this stochastic process, we follow the suggestion by FS96 that corotation sites provide preferential locations for accretion. A more general conclusion is that the longitudinal concentration of material in a few nearby sites (and that the majority of the Adams ring material is residing there) requires either an exceedingly recent event (EC92) or that the corotation sites be absorbing states of the Markov chain.In the latter case, the competing processes of chaotic diffusion and frustrated accretion can provide the arc and clump features as recurrent transient events near the Roche limit. Similar phenomena would be expected for Saturn's F and G rings.

  2. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granstrom, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and

  3. Extinction space--a method for the quantification and classification of changes in morphospace across extinction boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Dieter; Hopkins, Melanie J; Walton, Sonny A

    2013-10-01

    Three main modes of extinction are responsible for reductions in morphological disparity: (1) random (caused by a nonselective extinction event); (2) marginal (a symmetric, selective extinction event trimming the margin of morphospace); and (3) lateral (an asymmetric, selective extinction event eliminating one side of the morphospace). These three types of extinction event can be distinguished from one another by comparing changes in three measures of morphospace occupation: (1) the sum of range along the main axes; (2) the sum of variance; and (3) the position of the centroid. Computer simulations of various extinction events demonstrate that the pre-extinction distribution of taxa (random or normal) in the morphospace has little influence on the quantification of disparity changes, whereas the modes of the extinction events play the major role. Together, the three disparity metrics define an "extinction-space" in which different extinction events can be directly compared with one another. Application of this method to selected extinction events (Frasnian-Famennian, Devonian-Carboniferous, and Permian-Triassic) of the Ammonoidea demonstrate the similarity of the Devonian events (selective extinctions) but the striking difference from the end-Permian event (nonselective extinction). These events differ in their mode of extinction despite decreases in taxonomic diversity of similar magnitude.

  4. First Infrared Imaging of the Neptune Ring Arcs: HST/Nicmos Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, R. J.; Dumas, C.; Smith, B. A.; Rieke, M.; Schneider, G.; Thompson, R.; Becklin, E.; Koerner, D.

    1998-09-01

    Neptune's ring arcs have not been imaged since the Voyager 2 flyby in 1989 (Smith et al. 1989, Science 246, 1422-1449). We used the HST and its near-infrared camera NICMOS to obtain the first detection at infrared wavelengths of the Neptune system of ring arcs. The faint inner satellites Proteus and Larissa were also detected. Scattered light coming from the giant planet was reduced considerably during the observations by positioning Neptune partially outside of the field of view of the camera. In addition to this, we used a filter whose bandpass is centered at 1.87mu m. This wavelength corresponds to a strong absorption by methane in Neptune's atmosphere. Two different values for the mean motion of the ring arcs (Nicholson et al. 1995, Icarus 113, 295-330) fit the ground-based and Voyager data sets. Initial results from this partially competed program indicate that the smaller value of 820.1118 deg/day for the arc motion is a better match to the data than the previously adopted value of 820.1194 deg/day. If this result is confirmed, it will call into question the close match between the semi-major axis of the arcs and the location of the 42:43 corotation resonance with Galatea (Porco 1991, Science 253, 995-1001). From the measurements made at visible wavelengths with Voyager (Thomas and Veverka 1991, JGR Supp. 96, 19253-19259) and at 1.87mu m with HST/Nicmos -- and assuming negligeable changes in the ring arcs color since 1989 -- we will be able to determine the visible/infrared color-index for the arcs and the two faint satellites detected and compare it to other primitive bodies of the outer solar system.

  5. The Outer Thames Estuary Regional Environmental Characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Sturt, Fraser; Dix, Justin K.; EMU Ltd.; University of Southampton

    2009-01-01

    The Outer Thames Estuary Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) provides an environmental reference statement defining marine and seabed conditions within the study area. Prior to this study, regional environmental assessment of the Outer Thames Estuary was based upon dispersed data acquired over several decades. The Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) has provided the opportunity to acquire and interpret an integrated physical and biological dataset for the first time in...

  6. H_2O and CO_2 in magmas from the Mariana arc and back arc systems

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Sally; Stolper, Edward; STERN, Robert

    2000-01-01

    We examined the H2O and CO2 contents of glasses from lavas and xenoliths from the Mariana arc system, an intraoceanic convergent margin in the western Pacific, which contains an active volcanic arc, an actively spreading back arc basin, and active behind-the-arc cross-chain volcanoes. Samples include (1) glass rims from Mariana arc, Mariana trough, and cross-chain submarine lavas; (2) glass inclusions in arc and trough phenocrysts; and (3) glass inclusions from a gabbro + anorthosite xenolith...

  7. Arc Root Attachment on the Anode Surface of Arc Plasma Torch Observed with a Novel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wen-Xia; LI Teng; MENG Xian; CHEN Xi; WU Cheng-Kang

    2005-01-01

    @@ The arc-root attachment on the anode surface of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch has been successfullyobserved using a novel approach. A specially designed copper mirror with a boron nitride film coated on itssurface central-region is employed to avoid the effect of intensive light emitted from the arc column upon theobservation of weakly luminous arc root. It is found that the arc-root attachment is diffusive on the anode surfaceof the argon plasma torch, while constricted arc roots often occur when hydrogen or nitrogen is added into argonas the plasma-forming gas.

  8. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  9. An outer bound for 2-receiver discrete memoryless broadcast channels

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Chandra

    2008-01-01

    An outer bound to the two-receiver discrete memoryless broadcast channel is presented. We compare it to the known outer bounds and show that the outer bound presented is at least as tight as the existing bounds.

  10. Landscape evolution within a retreating volcanic arc, Costa Rica, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey S.; Idleman, Bruce D.; Gardner, Thomas W.; Fisher, Donald M.

    2003-05-01

    Subduction of hotspot-thickened seafloor profoundly affects convergent margin tectonics, strongly affecting upper plate structure, volcanism, and landscape evolution. In southern Central America, low-angle subduction of the Cocos Ridge and seamount domain largely controls landscape evolution in the volcanic arc. Field mapping, stratigraphic correlation, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for late Cenozoic volcanic rocks of central Costa Rica provide new insights into the geomorphic response of volcanic arc landscapes to changes in subduction parameters (slab thickness, roughness, dip). Late Neogene volcanism was focused primarily along the now-extinct Cordillera de Aguacate. Quaternary migration of the magmatic front shifted volcanism northeastward to the Caribbean slope, creating a new topographic divide and forming the Valle Central basin. Stream capture across the paleo Aguacate divide led to drainage reversal toward the Pacific slope and deep incision of reorganized fluvial networks. Pleistocene caldera activity generated silicic ash flows that buried the Valle Central and descended the Tárcoles gorge to the Orotina debris fan at the coast. Growth of the modern Cordillera Central accentuated relief along the new divide, establishing the Valle Central as a Pacific slope drainage basin. Arc migration, relocation of the Pacific-Caribbean drainage divide, and formation of the Valle Central basin resulted from slab shallowing as irregular, hotspot-thickened crust entered the subduction zone. The geomorphic evolution of volcanic arc landscapes is thus highly sensitive to changes in subducting plate character.

  11. Dimensionless factors for an alternating-current non-thermal arc plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si-Yuan; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, He-Ping; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2016-12-01

    A gliding arc discharge, as a source of warm plasma combining advantages of both thermal and cold plasmas, would have promising application prospects in the fields of fuel conversion, combustion enhancement, material synthesis, surface modifications, pollution control, etc. In order to gain insight into the features of an alternating-current gliding arc discharge plasma, three dimensionless factors, i.e., the extinction span (ψ), current lag (δ), and heating lag (χ) factors are proposed in this letter based on the measured waveforms of the discharge voltage and current in an AC gliding arc discharge plasma. The influences of the driving frequency of the power supply (f) on these three dimensionless parameters are investigated experimentally with the explanations on the physical meanings of these factors. The experimental results show that a higher value of f would lead to the lower values of ψ and δ, as well as a higher value of χ. These experimental phenomena indicate a lower threshold ignition voltage of the discharges, a lower current-growth inertia of the gliding arcs and a larger relative thermal inertia of the plasmas with increase the driving frequency of the power supply in the operating parameter range studied in this letter.

  12. Optical atmospheric extinction over Cerro Paranal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patat, F.; Moehler, S.; O'Brien, K.; Pompei, E.; Bensby, T.; Carraro, G.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fox, A.; Gavignaud, I.; James, G.; Korhonen, H.; Ledoux, C.; Randall, S.; Sana, H.A.A.; Smoker, J.; Stefl, S.; Szeifert, T.

    2011-01-01

    Aims. The present study was conducted to determine the optical extinction curve for Cerro Paranal under typical clear-sky observing conditions, with the purpose of providing the community with a function to be used to correct the observed spectra, with an accuracy of 0.01 mag airmass-1.

  13. Extinction and renewal of conditioned sexual responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, M.; Laan, E.; Everaerd, W.; Spinhoven, P.; Both, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Extinction involves an inhibitory form of new learning that is highly dependent on the context for expression. This is supported by phenomena such as renewal and spontaneous recovery, which may help explain the persistence of appetitive behavior, and related problems such as

  14. Time to extinction of bird populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sæther, B-E.; Engen, S.; Møller, A.P.; Visser, M.E.; Matthysen, E.; Fiedler, W.; Lambrechts, M.M.; Becker, P.H.; Brommer, J.E.; Dickinson, J.; du Feu, C.; Gehlbach, F.R.; Merilä, J.; Rendell, W.; Robertson, R.J.; Thomson, D.L.; Török, J.

    2005-01-01

    The risk of extinction of populations has not previously been empirically related to parameters characterizing their population dynamics. To analyze this relationship, we simulated how the distribution of population dynamical characters changed as a function of time, in both the remaining and the ex

  15. Extinction and renewal of conditioned sexual responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, M.; Laan, E.; Everaerd, W.; Spinhoven, P.; Both, S.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Extinction involves an inhibitory form of new learning that is highly dependent on the context for expression. This is supported by phenomena such as renewal and spontaneous recovery, which may help explain the persistence of appetitive behavior, and related problems such as addictions

  16. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, G.K.; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.;

    2002-01-01

    ) and stearic acid (C18H36O2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement...

  17. Attentional, Associative, and Configural Mechanisms in Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrauri, Jose A.; Schmajuk, Nestor A.

    2008-01-01

    The participation of attentional and associative mechanisms in extinction, spontaneous recovery, external disinhibition, renewal, reinstatement, and reacquisition was evaluated through computer simulations with an extant computational model of classical conditioning (N. A. Schmajuk, Y. Lam, & J. A. Gray, 1996; N. A. Schmajuk & J. A. Larrauri,…

  18. Methylphenidate Enhances Extinction of Contextual Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Antony D.; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Lattal, K. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin) is a norepinephrine and dopamine transporter blocker that is widely used in humans for treatment of attention deficit disorder and narcolepsy. Although there is some evidence that targeted microinjections of MPH may enhance fear acquisition, little is known about the effect of MPH on fear extinction. Here, we show…

  19. Extinction and renewal of conditioned sexual responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirte Brom

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Extinction involves an inhibitory form of new learning that is highly dependent on the context for expression. This is supported by phenomena such as renewal and spontaneous recovery, which may help explain the persistence of appetitive behavior, and related problems such as addictions. Research on these phenomena in the sexual domain is lacking, where it may help to explain the persistence of learned sexual responses. METHOD: Men (n = 40 and women (n = 62 participated in a differential conditioning paradigm, with genital vibrotactile stimulation as US and neutral pictures as conditional stimuli (CSs. Dependent variables were genital and subjective sexual arousal, affect, US expectancy, and approach and avoid tendencies towards the CSs. Extinction and renewal of conditioned sexual responses were studied by context manipulation (AAA vs. ABA condition. RESULTS: No renewal effect of genital conditioned responding could be detected, but an obvious recovery of US expectancy following a context change after extinction (ABA was demonstrated. Additionally, women demonstrated recovery of subjective affect and subjective sexual arousal. Participants in the ABA demonstrated more approach biases towards stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the context dependency of extinction and renewal of conditioned sexual responses in humans. This knowledge may have implications for the treatment of disturbances in sexual appetitive responses such as hypo- and hypersexuality.

  20. Time to extinction of bird populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sæther, B-E.; Engen, S.; Møller, A.P.; Visser, M.E.; Matthysen, E.; Fiedler, W.; Lambrechts, M.M.; Becker, P.H.; Brommer, J.E.; Dickinson, J.; du Feu, C.; Gehlbach, F.R.; Merilä, J.; Rendell, W.; Robertson, R.J.; Thomson, D.L.; Török, J.

    2005-01-01

    The risk of extinction of populations has not previously been empirically related to parameters characterizing their population dynamics. To analyze this relationship, we simulated how the distribution of population dynamical characters changed as a function of time, in both the remaining and the

  1. Mass extinctions caused by large bolide impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, L.W.

    1987-07-01

    Evidence indicates that the collision of Earth and a large piece of Solar System derbris such as a meteoroid, asteroid or comet caused the great extinctions of 65 million years ago, leading to the transition from the age of the dinosaurs to the age of the mammals.

  2. Stressor controllability modulates fear extinction in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Catherine A; Gorun, Alyson; Reddan, Marianne C; Ramirez, Franchesca; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic events are proposed to play a role in the development of anxiety disorders, however not all individuals exposed to extreme stress experience a pathological increase in fear. Recent studies in animal models suggest that the degree to which one is able to control an aversive experience is a critical factor determining its behavioral consequences. In this study, we examined whether stressor controllability modulates subsequent conditioned fear expression in humans. Participants were randomly assigned to an escapable stressor condition, a yoked inescapable stressor condition, or a control condition involving no stress exposure. One week later, all participants underwent fear conditioning, fear extinction, and a test of extinction retrieval the following day. Participants exposed to inescapable stress showed impaired fear extinction learning and increased fear expression the following day. In contrast, escapable stress improved fear extinction and prevented the spontaneous recovery of fear. Consistent with the bidirectional controllability effects previously reported in animal models, these results suggest that one's degree of control over aversive experiences may be an important factor influencing the development of psychological resilience or vulnerability in humans.

  3. Self-extinction through optimizing selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvinen, Kalle; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary suicide is a process in which selection drives a viable population to extinction. So far, such selection-driven self-extinction has been demonstrated in models with frequency-dependent selection. This is not surprising, since frequency-dependent selection can disconnect individual-level and population-level interests through environmental feedback. Hence it can lead to situations akin to the tragedy of the commons, with adaptations that serve the selfish interests of individuals ultimately ruining a population. For frequency-dependent selection to play such a role, it must not be optimizing. Together, all published studies of evolutionary suicide have created the impression that evolutionary suicide is not possible with optimizing selection. Here we disprove this misconception by presenting and analyzing an example in which optimizing selection causes self-extinction. We then take this line of argument one step further by showing, in a further example, that selection-driven self-extinction can occur even under frequency-independent selection. PMID:23583808

  4. Subwoofer and nanotube butterfly acoustic flame extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Mayo, Nathanael K.; Baughman, Ray H.; Mills, Brent T.; Habtour, Ed

    2017-07-01

    Nonchemical flame control using acoustic waves from a subwoofer and a lightweight carbon nanotube thermoacoustic projector was demonstrated. The intent was to manipulate flame intensity, direction and propagation. The mechanisms of flame suppression using low frequency acoustic waves were discussed. Laminar flame control and extinction were achieved using a thermoacoustic ‘butterfly’ projector based on freestanding carbon nanotube sheets.

  5. Separation of the outer membrane and identification of major outer membrane proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Imai, Masashi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2002-04-01

    The outer membrane of Porphyromonas gingivalis, an oral strict anaerobe, was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The outer membrane obtained by the differential detergent extraction method, previously reported, showed an essentially similar protein pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), confirming that the latter method is suitable for the study of outer membrane proteins in this organism. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that major outer membrane proteins in this organism included Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain, RagA (a TonB-linked receptor), and putative porins that were homologous to Escherichia coli OmpA.

  6. Ocean anoxia did not cause the Latest Permian Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proemse, Bernadette C.; Grasby, Stephen E.; Wieser, Michael E.; Mayer, Bernhard; Beauchamp, Benoit

    2014-05-01

    The Latest Permian Extinction (LPE, ~252 million years ago) was a turning point in the history of life on Earth with a loss of ~96% of all marine species and ~70% of all terrestrial species. While, the event undoubtedly shaped the evolution of life its cause remains enigmatic. A leading hypothesis is that the global oceans became depleted in oxygen (anoxia). In order to test this hypothesis we investigated a proxy for marine oxygen levels (molybdenum isotopic composition) in shale across the LPE horizon located on the subtropical northwest margin of Pangea at that time. We studied two sedimentary records in the Sverdrup basin, Canadian High Arctic: Buchanan Lake (eastern Axel Heiberg Island; 79° 26.1'N, 87° 12.6'W), representing a distal deep-water slope environment, and West Blind Fiord (southwest Ellesmere Island; 78° 23.9'N, 85° 57.2'W), representing a deep outer shelf environment (below storm wave base). The molybdenum isotopic composition (δ98/95Mo) of sediments has recently become a powerful tool as a paleo-oceanographic proxy of marine oxygen levels. Sample preparation was carried out in a metal-free clean room facility in the isotope laboratory of the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Canada, that is supplied by HEPA-filtered air. Molybdenum isotope ratios were determined on a Thermo Scientific multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) with an uncertainty better than ±0.10o for δ98/95Mo values. Results from the Buchanan Lake section show a large shift in δ98/95Mo values from 2.02o to +2.23o at the extinction horizon, consistent with onset of euxinic conditions. In contrast, West Blind Fiord shales, representing the sub-storm wave base shelf environment, show little change in the molybdenum isotopic composition (1.34o to +0.05), indicating ongoing oxic conditions across the LPE (Proemse et al., 2013). Our results suggest that areas of the Pangea continental shelf (North West Pangea) experienced

  7. Modeling the Infrared Extinction toward the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Jian; Jiang, B W

    2013-01-01

    We model the ~1--19$\\mum$ infrared (IR) extinction curve toward the Galactic Center (GC) in terms of the standard silicate-graphite interstellar dust model. The grains are taken to have a power law size distribution with an exponential decay above some size. The best-fit model for the GC IR extinction constrains the visual extinction to be Av~38--42 mag. The limitation of the model, i.e., its difficulty in simultaneously reproducing both the steep ~1--3$\\mum$ near-IR extinction and the flat ~3--8$\\mum$ mid-IR extinction is discussed. We argue that this difficulty could be alleviated by attributing the extinction toward the GC to a combination of dust in different environments: dust in diffuse regions (characterized by small Rv and steep near-IR extinction), and dust in dense regions (characterized by large Rv and flat UV extinction).

  8. Preservation of Natural Diversity: The Problem of Extinction Prone Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terborgh, John

    1974-01-01

    Examines threatened extinction of birds and recommends agencies adopt policies which minimize the pace of extinctions through the setting aside of large preserves which protect natural vegetation formation and the animal life. (BR)

  9. A REMARK ON EXTINCTION OF A CLASS OF SUPERPROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOXUELEI

    1996-01-01

    The extinction of a class of superprocesses associated with general branching characteristics and underlying Markov processes is investigted, The extinction is closely associated with the branching characteristics and the recurrence and transience of underlying processes.

  10. Inferring modern extinction risk from fossil occupancy trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Wolfgang; Kocsis, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Besides providing information on ancient mass extinctions and intrinsic extinction risk, the fossil record may also provide useful data for assessing the extinction risk of extant species. Here we analyse the palaeontological trajectories of geographical occupancy in extant marine species to identify species that have been declining over geological time scales and may thus be more prone to extinction than expanding species. The slopes of these occupancy trajectories are used to categorize evolutionary extinction risk. Mapping the risk at global scale we find that low to mid latitude regions are at significantly higher risk than high latitude regions. We also find a moderate correspondence between high extinction risk on geological time scales and modern extinction risk for reef corals and propose to add fossil data to the assessment of current extinction risk, especially for the notoriously data deficient marine taxa.

  11. Stability of Neptune's ring arcs in question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Christophe; Terrile, Richard J.; Smith, Bradford A.; Schneider, Glenn; Becklin, E. E.

    1999-08-01

    Although all four of the gas-giant planets in the Solar System have ring systems, only Neptune exhibits `ring arcs'-stable clumps of dust that are discontinuous from each other. Two basic mechanisms for confining the dust to these arcs have been proposed. The firstrelies on orbital resonances with two shepherding satellites, while the second invokes a single satellite (later suggested to be Galatea) to produce the observed ring arc structures. Here we report observations of the ring arcs and Galatea, which show that there isa mismatch between the locations of the arcs and the site of Galatea's co-rotation inclined resonance. This result calls into question Galatea's sole role in confining the arcs.

  12. Triggers of Permo-Triassic boundary mass extinction in South China: The Siberian Traps or Paleo-Tethys ignimbrite flare-up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Xian-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of the synchroneity between the Siberian Traps and the Permo-Triassic boundary (PTB) mass extinction has led to the proposition that the Siberian flood volcanism was responsible for the severest biotic crisis in the Phanerozoic. However, recent studies suggest that the Siberian Traps may have postdated the main extinction horizon. In this paper, we demonstrate, using stratigraphy, a time and intensity coincidence between PTB volcanic ash and the main extinction horizon. Geochemistry of the PTB volcanic ashes in five sections in South China indicates that they were derived from continental magmatic arc. Zircons extracted from the PTB volcanic ashes have negative εHf(t) (- 12.9 to - 2.0) and δ18O (6.8 to 10.9‰), consistent with an acidic volcanism and a crustal-derived origin, and therefore exclude a genetic link between the PTB mass extinction and the Siberian Traps. On the basis of spatial variation in the number of the PTB volcanic ash layers and the thickness of the ash layers in South China, we propose that the PTB volcanic ash may be related to Paleo-Tethys continental arc magmatism in the Kunlun area. Ignimbrite flare-up related to rapid plate subduction during the final assemblage of the Pangea super-continent may have generated a volcanic winter, which eventually triggered the collapse of ecosystem and ultimately mass extinction at the end of the Permian. The Siberian Traps may have been responsible for a greenhouse effect and so have been responsible for both a second pulse of the extinction event and Early Triassic ecological evolution.

  13. Programming ArcGIS with Python cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Pimpler, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Programming ArcGIS with Python Cookbook, Second Edition, is written for GIS professionals who wish to revolutionize their ArcGIS workflow with Python. Whether you are new to ArcGIS or a seasoned professional, you almost certainly spend time each day performing various geoprocessing tasks. This book will teach you how to use the Python programming language to automate these geoprocessing tasks and make you a more efficient and effective GIS professional.

  14. Endangered Species and Natural Resource Exploitation: Extinction vs. Coexistence

    OpenAIRE

    Tsur, Yacov; Zemel, Amos

    1994-01-01

    The threat on the survival of animal species due to intensive use of natural resources is incorporated within resource management models, paying special attention to uncertainty regarding the conditions that lead to extinction. The manner in which the potential benefits forgone due to the species extinction (denoted extinction penalty) induce more conservative exploitation policies is studied in detail. When the extinction penalty is ignored, the optimal policy is to drive the resource stock ...

  15. Grey Milky Way Extinction from SDSS Stellar Photometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbikov, Evgeny; Brosch, Noah

    2009-01-01

    We report results concerning the distribution and properties of galactic extinction at high galactic latitudes derived from stellar statistics using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the classical Wolf diagram method to identify regions with extinction, and derive the extinction and the extinction law of the dust using all five SDSS spectral bands. We estimate the distance to the extinguishing medium using simple assumptions about the stellar populations in the line of sight. We rep...

  16. Statistical analysis of geographic information with ArcView GIS and ArcGIS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wong, David W. S; Lee, Jay

    2005-01-01

    ... of its capabilities for spatial-quantitative synthesis. Now, David Wong and Jay Lee update their comprehensive handbook with Statistical Analysis of Geographic Information with ArcView GIS and ArcGIS...

  17. Extinction of chained instrumental behaviors: Effects of consumption extinction on procurement responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Bouton, Mark E

    2016-03-01

    Operant behavior is typically organized into sequences of responses that eventually lead to a reinforcer. Response elements can be categorized as those that directly lead to reward consumption (i.e., a consumption response) and those that lead to the opportunity to make the consumption response (i.e., a procurement response). These responses often differ topographically and in terms of the discriminative stimuli that set the occasion for them. We have recently shown that extinction of the procurement response acts to weaken the specific associated consumption response, and that active inhibition of the procurement response is required for this effect. To expand the analysis of the associative structure of chains, in the present experiments we asked the reverse question: whether extinction of consumption behavior results in a decrease in the associated procurement response in a discriminated heterogeneous chain. In Experiment 1, extinction of consumption alone led to an attenuation of the associated procurement response only when rats were allowed to make the consumption response in extinction. Exposure to the consumption stimulus alone was not sufficient to produce weakened procurement responding. In Experiment 2, rats learned two distinct heterogeneous chains, and extinction of one consumption response specifically weakened the procurement response associated with it. The results add to the evidence suggesting that rats learn a highly specific associative structure in behavior chains, emphasizing the role of learning response inhibition in extinction.

  18. The Confinement of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C.; Namouni, F.

    2002-09-01

    The stability of the narrow ring arcs of Neptune has been a puzzle since their discovery. First detected in 1984 from the Earth in stellar occultations and imaged by the Voyager spacecraft in 1989, the 5 arcs spanning approximately 40 deg in longitude are apparently confined against the rapid azimuthal and radial spreading that results from energy dissipation in inter-particle collisions. Voyager data were used to argue in favor of an arc confinement model (Goldreich et al. AJ 1986; Porco, Science 1991) that relies on both the vertical and mean angular motions of the nearby Neptunian moon, Galatea, to produce a pair of Lindblad (LR) and corotation inclination (CIR) resonances capable of trapping ring particles into a sequence of arcs. However, HST and Earth-based observations taken in 1998 (Dumas et al. Nature 1999; Sicardy et al. Nature 1999) indicate a revised arc mean angular motion which displaces the arcs away from the CIR, leaving their stability once again unexplained. In this presentation, we will discuss the workings of a hitherto neglected resonance which relies on Galatea's orbital eccentricity and which, together with the LR, is likely responsible for the angular confinement of the arcs. The action of this resonance, which operates through the precession of Galatea's eccentric orbit forced by the arcs' inertia, will allow a determination of the arcs' mass from future measurements of Galatea's eccentricity. We acknowledge the financial support of NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and the Southwest Research Institute's Internal Research Grant program.

  19. The Team Orienteering Arc Routing Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Archetti, Claudia; Speranza, M. Grazia; Corberan, Angel; Sanchís Llopis, José María; Plana, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The team orienteering arc routing problem (TOARP) is the extension to the arc routing setting of the team orienteering problem. In the TOARP, in addition to a possible set of regular customers that have to be serviced, another set of potential customers is available. Each customer is associated with an arc of a directed graph. Each potential customer has a profit that is collected when it is serviced, that is, when the associated arc is traversed. A fleet of vehicles with a given maximum trav...

  20. Electrode Evaporation Effects on Air Arc Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xingwen; CHEN Degui; LI Rui; WU Yi; NIU Chunping

    2008-01-01

    A numerical study of the effects of copper and silver vapours on the air arc behavior is performed. The commercial software FLUENT is adapted and modified to develop a two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) models of arc with the thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients, net emission coefficient for the radiation model of 99% ai-1% Cu, 99% air-1% Ag, and pure air, respectively. The simulation result demonstrates that vaporization of the electrode material may cool the arc center region and reduce the arc velocity. The effects of Ag vapour are stronger compared to those of Cu vapour.

  1. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  2. Class `E` protective headwear: electric arc exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.

    1997-04-01

    A series of tests were conducted using electric arcs under laboratory conditions to determine what, if any, damages can be inflicted upon class `E` hard hats. Ten hard hats were subjected to different levels of arc exposure to see if the hat would ignite, melt, drip, stick to the head, etc. It was noted that there is no standard on hard hat exposure to an electric arc. It was recommended that the CSA committee revise the protective headwear standard to include a requirement for flame/arc resistance, including specification of pass/fail criteria. 1 tab., 3 figs.

  3. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Psychological and neural mechanisms of experimental extinction: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Andrew R; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-02-01

    The present review examines key psychological concepts in the study of experimental extinction and implications these have for an understanding of the underlying neurobiology of extinction learning. We suggest that many of the signature characteristics of extinction learning (spontaneous recovery, renewal, reinstatement, rapid reacquisition) can be accommodated by the standard associative learning theory assumption that extinction results in partial erasure of the original learning together with new inhibitory learning. Moreover, we consider recent behavioral and neural evidence that supports the partial erasure view of extinction, but also note shortcomings in our understanding of extinction circuits as these relate to the negative prediction error concept. Recent work suggests that common prediction error and stimulus-specific prediction error terms both may be required to explain neural plasticity both in acquisition and extinction learning. In addition, we suggest that many issues in the content of extinction learning have not been fully addressed in current research, but that neurobiological approaches should be especially helpful in addressing such issues. These include questions about the nature of extinction learning (excitatory CS-No US, inhibitory CS-US learning, occasion setting processes), especially as this relates to studies of the micro-circuitry of extinction, as well as its representational content (sensory, motivational, response). An additional understudied problem in extinction research is the role played by attention processes and their underlying neural networks, although some research and theory converge on the idea that extinction is accompanied by attention decrements (i.e., habituation-like processes).

  5. Inhibition of Estradiol Synthesis Impairs Fear Extinction in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Milad, Mohammed R.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging research has demonstrated that the sex hormone estradiol regulates fear extinction in female rodents and women. Estradiol may also regulate fear extinction in males, given its role in synaptic plasticity in both sexes. Here we report that inhibition of estradiol synthesis during extinction training, via the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole,…

  6. Slower Reacquisition after Partial Extinction in Human Contingency Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morís, Joaquín; Barberia, Itxaso; Vadillo, Miguel A.; Andrades, Ainhoa; López, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Extinction is a very relevant learning phenomenon from a theoretical and applied point of view. One of its most relevant features is that relapse phenomena often take place once the extinction training has been completed. Accordingly, as extinction-based therapies constitute the most widespread empirically validated treatment of anxiety disorders,…

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  8. Global distribution and drivers of language extinction risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amano, Tatsuya; Sandel, Brody; Eager, Heidi;

    2014-01-01

    Many of the world's languages face serious risk of extinction. Efforts to prevent this cultural loss are severely constrained by a poor understanding of the geographical patterns and drivers of extinction risk. We quantify the global distribution of language extinction risk-represented by small...

  9. Estimating how many undescribed species have gone extinct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, P A; Bigorne, R; Bogan, A E; Giam, X; Jézéquel, C; Hugueny, B

    2014-10-01

    Because both descriptions of species and modern human-driven extinctions started around the same time (i.e., eighteenth century), a logical expectation is that a large proportion of species may have gone extinct without ever having been recorded. Despite this evident and widely recognized assumption, the loss of undescribed species has never been estimated. We quantified this loss for several taxonomic groups and regions for which undescribed species extinctions are likely to have occurred. Across a wide range of taxonomic groups, we applied known extinction rates computed from recorded species losses to assumed exponential decay in the proportion of species remaining undiscovered. Because all previous modeling attempts to project total species richness implicitly assumed that undescribed species extinctions could be neglected, we also evaluated the effect of neglecting them. Finally, because we assumed constant description and extinction probabilities, we applied our model to simulated data that did not conform to this assumption. Actual species losses were severely underestimated by considering only known species extinctions. According to our estimates, the proportion of undiscovered extinct species over all extinctions ranged from 0.15 to 0.59, depending on the taxonomic group and the region considered. This means that recent extinctions may be up to twice as large as the number recorded. When species differed in their extinction or description probabilities, our model underestimated extinctions of undescribed species by up to 20%. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Boxicity of Circular Arc Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Diptendu; Chandran, L. Sunil

    2008-01-01

    A $k$-dimensional box is the cartesian product $R_1 \\times R_2 \\times ... \\times R_k$ where each $R_i$ is a closed interval on the real line. The {\\it boxicity} of a graph $G$, denoted as $box(G)$, is the minimum integer $k$ such that $G$ can be represented as the intersection graph of a collection of $k$-dimensional boxes: that is two vertices are adjacent if and only if their corresponding boxes intersect. A circular arc graph is a graph that can be represented as the intersection graph of ...

  11. Detecting stellar-wind bubbles through infrared arcs in HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Jonathan; Gvaramadze, Vasilii V; Mohamed, Shazrene; Langer, Norbert; Harries, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared arcs of dust emission are often seen near ionizing stars within HII regions. A possible explanations for these arcs is that they could show the outer edges of asymmetric stellar wind bubbles. We use two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of wind bubbles within HII regions around individual stars to predict the infrared emission properties of the dust within the HII region. We assume that dust and gas are dynamically well-coupled and that dust properties (composition, size distribution) are the same in the HII region as outside it, and that the wind bubble contains no dust. We post-process the simulations to make synthetic intensity maps at infrared wavebands using the TORUS code. We find that the outer edge of a wind bubble emits brightly at 24um through starlight absorbed by dust grains and re-radiated thermally in the infrared. This produces a bright arc of emission for slowly moving stars that have asymmetric wind bubbles, even for cases where there is no bow shock or any corresp...

  12. Feedback Linearization Based Arc Length Control for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jesper Sandberg

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a feedback linearization based arc length controller for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is described. A nonlinear model describing the dynamic arc length is transformed into a system where nonlinearities can be cancelled by a nonlinear state feedback control part, and thus, leaving only...

  13. Outer commutator words are uniformly concise

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Alcober, Gustavo A

    2009-01-01

    We prove that outer commutator words are uniformly concise, i.e. if an outer commutator word w takes m different values in a group G, then the order of the verbal subgroup w(G) is bounded by a function depending only on m and not on w or G. This is obtained as a consequence of a structure theorem for the subgroup w(G), which is valid if G is soluble, and without assuming that w takes finitely many values in G. More precisely, there is an abelian series of w(G), such that every section of the series can be generated by values of w all of whose powers are also values of w in that section. For the proof of this latter result, we introduce a new representation of outer commutator words by means of binary trees, and we use the structure of the trees to set up an appropriate induction.

  14. Transition of magma genesis estimated by change of chemical composition of Izu-bonin arc volcanism associated with spreading of Shikoku Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, S.; Ishii, T.

    2006-12-01

    Arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc is separated into first and latter term at the separate of Shikoku Basin. Middle to late Eocene early arc volcanism formed a vast terrane of boninites and island arc tholeiites that is unlike active arc systems. A following modern-style arc volcanism was active during the Oligocene, along which intense tholeiitic and calc-alkaline volcanism continued until 29Ma, before spreading of the back- arc basin. The recent arc volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara arc have started in the middle Miocene, and it is assumed that arc volcanism were decline during spreading of back-arc basin. In the northern Kyushu-Palau Ridge, submarine bottom materials were dredged during the KT95-9 and KT97-8 cruise by the R/V Tansei-maru, Ocean Research Institute, university of Tokyo, and basaltic to andesitic volcanic rocks were recovered during both cruise except for Komahashi-Daini Seamount where recovered acidic plutonic rocks. Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite show 37.5Ma of K-Ar dating, and this age indicates early stage of normal arc volcanism. These volcanic rocks are mainly cpx basalt to andesite. Two pyroxene basalt and andesite are only found from Miyazaki Seamount, northern end of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge. Volcanic rocks show different characteristics from first term volcanism in the Izu-Ogasawara forearc rise and recent arc volcanism. The most characteristic is high content of incompatible elements, that is, these volcanics show two to three times content of incompatible elements to Komahashi-Daini Seamount tonalite and former normal arc volcanism in the Izu outer arc (ODP Leg126), and higher content than recent Izu arc volcanism. This characteristic is similar to some volcanics at the ODP Leg59 Site448 in the central Kyushu- Palau Ridge. Site448 volcanic rocks show 32-33Ma of Ar-Ar ages, which considered beginning of activity of Parece Vela Basin. It is considered that the dredged volcanic rocks are uppermost part of volcanism before spreading of

  15. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias;

    2008-01-01

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and mana......The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed...... and managed by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed...... outside the worker node environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from otherGrids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data...

  16. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  17. Compound stimulus extinction reduces spontaneous recovery in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Cesar A.O.; Dunsmoor, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Fear-related behaviors are prone to relapse following extinction. We tested in humans a compound extinction design (“deepened extinction”) shown in animal studies to reduce post-extinction fear recovery. Adult subjects underwent fear conditioning to a visual and an auditory conditioned stimulus (CSA and CSB, respectively) separately paired with an electric shock. The target CS (CSA) was extinguished alone followed by compound presentations of the extinguished CSA and nonextinguished CSB. Recovery of conditioned skin conductance responses to CSA was reduced 24 h after compound extinction, as compared with a group who received an equal number of extinction trials to the CSA alone. PMID:26572649

  18. Mass Extinction in a Simple Mathematical Biological Model

    CERN Document Server

    Tokita, K; Tokita, Kei; Yasutomi, Ayumu

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the effect of extinction into the so-called replicator equations in mathematical biology, we construct a general model of ecosystems. The present model shows mass extinction by its own extinction dynamics when the system initially has a large number of species ( diversity). The extinction dynamics shows several significant features such as a power law in basin size distribution, induction time, etc. The present theory can be a mathematical foundation of the species-area effect in the paleontologic theory for mass extinction.

  19. Single-ended measurement of infrared extinction using lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, E R; Williams, M F; van der Laan, J E

    1978-01-15

    The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of single-ended measurement of the total extinction coefficient using an ir lidar system. Extinction was measured using a CO(2) laser radar system at four wavelengths near 10.3 microm. The measured results agree with theoretical estimates of extinction over a wide range. Single-ended measurements of extinction appear feasible to a horizontal range of 10 km using commercially available components. The system could potentially generate extinction data in a 3-D grid, enabling one to determine ir transmission between any two points in the field.

  20. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  1. 27 CFR 9.207 - Outer Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outer Coastal Plain. 9.207... Outer Coastal Plain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Outer Coastal Plain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Outer Coastal Plain” is a term of...

  2. Constraining the Fore-Arc Flux Along the Central America Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, D. R.; Barry, P. H.; Ramirez, C. J.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Patel, B. S.; Blackmon, K.

    2014-12-01

    The transport of carbon to the deep mantle via subduction zones is interrupted by outputs via the fore-arc, volcanic front, and back-arc regions. Whereas output fluxes for the front and back-arc locales are well constrained for Central America (CA) [1], the fore-arc flux via cold seeps and groundwaters is virtually unknown. We present new He and CO2 data for the inner fore-arc of Costa Rica and western Panama to complement our study [2] of offshore CO2fluxes on the outer-forearc. On the Nicoya Peninsula, the Costa Rica Pacific coastline (including the Oso Peninsula) and the Talamanca Mountain Range, as well as coastal seeps in Panama, coupled CO2-He studies allow recognition of mantle (3He/4He up to 6RA) and crustal inputs to the volatile inventory. We associate the crustal component with CO2 derived from limestone (L) and organic sediments (S) on the subducting slab, and see a decrease in the L/S ratio trench-ward with the lowest values akin to those of diatomaceous ooze in the uppermost sequence of the subducting sediment package. This observation is consistent with the removal of the uppermost organic-rich sediment from deep subduction by under-plating. As the input carbon fluxes of the individual sedimentary layers are well constrained [3], we can limit the potential steady-state flux of carbon loss at the subaerial fore-arc to ~ 6 × 107 gCkm-1yr-1, equivalent to ~88% of the input flux of C associated with the ooze, or mass balance studies at subduction zones. [1] De Leeuw et al., EPSL, 2007; [2] Furi et al., G-cubed, 2010; [3] Li and Bebout, JGR, 2005.

  3. Taste-immunosuppression engram: reinforcement and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Maj-Britt; Härting, Margarete; Kou, Wei; Del Rey, Adriana; Besedovsky, Hugo O; Schedlowski, Manfred; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2007-08-01

    Several Pavlovian conditioning paradigms have documented the brain's abilities to sense immune-derived signals or immune status, associate them with concurrently relevant extereoceptive stimuli, and reinstate such immune responses on demand. Specifically, the naturalistic relation of food ingestion with its possible immune consequences facilitates taste-immune associations. Here we demonstrate that the saccharin taste can be associated with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A, and that such taste-immune associative learning is subject to reinforcement. Furthermore, once consolidated, this saccharin-immunosuppression engram is resistant to extinction when avoidance behavior is assessed. More importantly, the more this engram is activated, either at association or extinction phases, the more pronounced is the conditioned immunosuppression.

  4. The role of extraterrestrial phenomena in extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, D M

    1988-01-01

    In the several years since the Alvarez report of anomalously high iridium concentrations at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, evidence for the involvement of meteorite impacts in biological extinction has increased dramatically. Much more research will be needed, however, before meteorite impact is established as a general causal factor in extinction. Of ever greater long-term interest is the possibility that other extraterrestrial forces have had important influences on the evolution of life. To recognize the effects of such forces, it will be necessary to coordinate the research of astronomy and paleontology so that testable predictions can be formulated. It is possible that known, systematic changes in the Solar System or Galaxy have had effects on global biology and that these effects have been preserved in the paleontological record.

  5. Visuomotor links in awareness: evidence from extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Raffaella; Genero, Rosanna; Colombatti, Simona; Zampieri, Daniela; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2005-05-31

    In patients with extinction, ipsilesional stimuli may abolish awareness of contralesional stimuli. Explanations of extinction often assume a serial model of processing in which sensory competition and identification precedes the selection of responses. We tested the adequacy of this assumption by examining the effects of response variables on visual awareness in six patients using signal detection analysis. Ipsilesional stimuli modulated patients' response criteria in deciding whether a contralesional stimulus was a target, and response modality (verbal or motor) modulated patients' abilities to discriminate between contralesional targets and distractors. This pattern of input variables modulating response criteria and output variables modulating discriminability indicates the extent to which attentional and intentional systems are tightly intertwined, with bi-directional effects in producing visual awareness.

  6. Cannabinoid facilitation of fear extinction memory recall in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinak, Christine A.; Angstadt, Mike; Sripada, Chandra S.; Abelson, James L.; Liberzon, Israel; Milad, Mohammed R.; Phan, K. Luan

    2012-01-01

    A first-line approach to treat anxiety disorders is exposure-based therapy, which relies on extinction processes such as repeatedly exposing the patient to stimuli (conditioned stimuli; CS) associated with the traumatic, fear-related memory. However, a significant number of patients fail to maintain their gains, partly attributed to the fact that this inhibitory learning and its maintenance is temporary and conditioned fear responses can return. Animal studies have shown that activation of the cannabinoid system during extinction learning enhances fear extinction and its retention. Specifically, CB1 receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC), can facilitate extinction recall by preventing recovery of extinguished fear in rats. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in humans. We conducted a study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design, coupling a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and simultaneous skin conductance response (SCR) recording with an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) or placebo (PBO) 2 hours prior to extinction learning in 29 healthy adult volunteers (THC = 14; PBO = 15) and tested extinction retention 24 hours after extinction learning. Compared to subjects that received PBO, subjects that received THC showed low SCR to a previously extinguished CS when extinction memory recall was tested 24 hours after extinction learning, suggesting that THC prevented the recovery of fear. These results provide the first evidence that pharmacological enhancement of extinction learning is feasible in humans using cannabinoid system modulators, which may thus warrant further development and clinical testing. PMID:22796109

  7. Predicting extinction risk of Brazilian Atlantic forest angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Tarciso C C; Fonseca, Carlos R; Peres, Carlos A; Tabarelli, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how plant life history affects species vulnerability to anthropogenic disturbances and environmental change is a major ecological challenge. We examined how vegetation type, growth form, and geographic range size relate to extinction risk throughout the Brazilian Atlantic Forest domain. We used a database containing species-level information of 6,929 angiosperms within 112 families and a molecular-based working phylogeny. We used decision trees, standard regression, and phylogenetic regression to explore the relationships between species attributes and extinction risk. We found a significant phylogenetic signal in extinction risk. Vegetation type, growth form, and geographic range size were related to species extinction risk, but the effect of growth form was not evident after phylogeny was controlled for. Species restricted to either rocky outcrops or scrub vegetation on sandy coastal plains exhibited the highest extinction risk among vegetation types, a finding that supports the hypothesis that species adapted to resource-limited environments are more vulnerable to extinction. Among growth forms, epiphytes were associated with the highest extinction risk in non-phylogenetic regression models, followed by trees, whereas shrubs and climbers were associated with lower extinction risk. However, the higher extinction risk of epiphytes was not significant after correcting for phylogenetic relatedness. Our findings provide new indicators of extinction risk and insights into the mechanisms governing plant vulnerability to extinction in a highly diverse flora where human disturbances are both frequent and widespread. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Optical diagnostics of a gliding arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Z.W.; Zhu, J.J.; Li, Z.S.;

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic processes in a gliding arc plasma generated between two diverging electrodes in ambient air driven by 31.25 kHz AC voltage were investigated using spatially and temporally resolved optical techniques. The life cycles of the gliding arc were tracked in fast movies using a high-speed camera...

  9. Characterization of Micro-arc Oxidized Titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the sparkling discharges during the micro-arc oxidation process in KOH aqueous electrolyte was achieved. The change of surface morphology was progressively observed and a plausible pore formation mechanism is proposed. Cell proliferation and ALP activity of micro-arc oxidized titanium was evaluated by human body derived osteoblasts and slightly better than those of blasted surface.

  10. Measurement of an Electric Arc Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Šimek, D.

    2015-01-01

    Article is focused on electric arc spectroscopy diagnostics related to electric low voltage apparatuses. The first attempts of spectroscopy measurements are dealt with. An example of radiation spectra of the electric arc burning between copper electrodes is presented. The problems connected with the measurements are discussed.

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical

  12. Implementing RapidArc into clinical routine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Esch, Ann; Huyskens, Dominique P; Behrens, Claus F;

    2011-01-01

    With the increased commercial availability of intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) comes the need for comprehensive QA programs, covering the different aspects of this newly available technology. This manuscript proposes such a program for the RapidArc (RA) (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto...

  13. Are the Arcs of Neptune Really Stable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanninen, J.; Porco, C.

    1994-12-01

    The Voyager mission discovered a system of rings and ring arcs around Neptune. It was later found that the arcs appear to be azimuthally and radially confined by resonant interactions with the nearby satellite, Galatea, yielding a maximum spread in ring particle semimajor axes of 0.6 km and a spread in forced eccentricities large enough to explain the arc's 15 km radial widths (Porco, 1991, Science 253, 995). We have modified an N-body simulation method (e.g. Hanninen and Salo, 1992, Icarus 97, 228) to include Neptune's second and fourth gravitational harmonics in order to be able to study the effects of collisions and self-gravity on the stability of the ring arcs. We have tested the simulation method and verified the shepherding mechanism in the collisionless and non-self-gravitational case. Preliminary simulation results with collisions over (1)/(2) a libration period indicate that collisions among putative 10-m sized source bodies within the arcs are indeed capable of arc disruption. However, whether or not collisions occur over this time scale depends, among other factors, on the number density of such bodies. We will explore the effects on arc stability of varying simulation parameters, such as the sizes and number density of the source bodies and the coefficient of restitution. Also, we will examine the effect of Galatea's previously neglected nearby vertical resonance on arc particle orbits.

  14. The structure and singularities of arc complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penner, Robert

    A classical combinatorial fact is that the simplicial complex consisting of disjointly embedded chords in a convex planar polygon is a sphere. For any surface F with non-empty boundary, there is an analogous complex Arc(F) consisting of suitable equivalence classes of arcs in F connecting its bou...

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghezzi, L.; Balestrero, A.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling and Simulation of Low Voltage Arcs is an attempt to improve the physical understanding, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation of the electric arcs that are found during current interruptions in low voltage circuit breakers. An empirical description is gained by refined electrical m

  16. The next-generation ARC middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appleton, O.; Cameron, D.; Cernak, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) is a light-weight, non-intrusive, simple yet powerful Grid middleware capable of connecting highly heterogeneous computing and storage resources. ARC aims at providing general purpose, flexible, collaborative computing environments suitable for a range of use...

  17. Copper coating specification for the RHIC arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2010-12-01

    Copper coating specifications for the RHIC arcs are given. Various upgrade scenarios are considered and calculations of resistive wall losses in the arcs are used to constrain the necessary quality and surface thickness of a copper coating. We find that 10 {mu}m of high purity copper will suffice.

  18. Simple models of evolution and extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    1999-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to the mathematical modeling of large-scale biological evolution and extinction. We give three examples of simple models in this field: the coevolutionary avalanche model of Bak and Sneppen, the environmental stress model of Newman, and the increasing fitness model of Sibani, Schmidt, and Alstrom. We describe the features of real evolution which these models are intended to explain and compare the results of simulations against data drawn from the fossil record.

  19. Clumpy cold dark matter and biological extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Collar, J I

    1995-01-01

    Cosmological models with cosmic string and texture seeded universes predict a present abundance of very dense clumps of Cold Dark Matter particles. Their crossing through the solar system would induce a non-negligible amount of radiation damage to all living tissue; the severity of such an episode is assessed. The estimated frequency of these crossings agrees with the apparent periodicity of the paleontological record of biological extinctions. (Phys. Lett. B, in press)

  20. Effects of broken affordance on visual extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Melanie; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that visual extinction can be reduced if two objects are positioned to "afford" an action. Here we tested if this affordance effect was disrupted by "breaking" the affordance, i.e., if one of the objects actively used in the action had a broken handle. We assessed the effects of broken affordance on recovery from extinction in eight patients with right hemisphere lesions and left-sided extinction. Patients viewed object pairs that were or were not commonly used together and that were positioned for left- or right-hand actions. In the unrelated pair conditions, either two tools or two objects were presented. In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006), extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs. There was no significant difference in recovery rate between action-related (object-tool) and unrelated tool pairs. In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact. There were minimal effects of breaking the handle of an object rather than a tool, and there was no effect of breaking the handle on either tools or objects on single item trials. The data suggest that breaking the handle of a tool lessens the degree to which it captures attention, with this attentional capture being strongest when the tool appears on the ipsilesional side. The capture of attention by the ipsilesional item then reduces the chance of detecting the contralesional stimulus. This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

  1. Effects of broken affordance on visual extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie eWulff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that visual extinction can be reduced if two objects are positioned to afford an action. Here we tested if this affordance effect was disrupted by breaking the affordance – if one of the objects actively used in the action had a broken handle. We assessed the effects of broken affordance on recovery from extinction in eight patients with right hemisphere lesions and left-sided extinction. Patients viewed object pairs that were or were not commonly used together and that were positioned for left- or right-hand actions. In the unrelated pair conditions, either two tools or two objects were presented. In line with previous research (e.g., Riddoch et al., 2006, extinction was reduced when action-related object pairs and when unrelated tool pairs were presented compared to unrelated object pairs. There was no significant difference in recovery rate between action-related (object-tool and unrelated tool-tool pairs. In addition, performance with action-related objects decreased when the tool appeared on the ipsilesional side compared to when it was on the contralesional side, but only when the tool handle was intact. There were minimal effects of breaking the handle of an object rather than a tool, and there was no effect of breaking the handle on either tools or objects on single item trials. The data suggest that breaking the handle of a tool lessens the degree to which it captures attention, with this attentional capture being strongest when the tool appears on the ipsilesional side. The capture of attention by the ipsilesional item then reduces the chance of detecting the contralesional stimulus. This attentional capture effect is mediated by the affordance to the intact tool.

  2. Opportunities and costs for preventing vertebrate extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Dalia A; Colchero, Fernando; Güneralp, Burak; Gusset, Markus; Skolnik, Ben; Parr, Michael; Byers, Onnie; Johnson, Kevin; Young, Glyn; Flesness, Nate; Possingham, Hugh; Fa, John E

    2015-03-16

    Despite an increase in policy and management responses to the global biodiversity crisis, implementation of the 20 Aichi Biodiversity Targets still shows insufficient progress [1]. These targets, strategic goals defined by the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), address major causes of biodiversity loss in part by establishing protected areas (Target 11) and preventing species extinctions (Target 12). To achieve this, increased interventions will be required for a large number of sites and species. The Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE) [2], a consortium of conservation-oriented organisations that aims to protect Critically Endangered and Endangered species restricted to single sites, has identified 920 species of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, conifers and reef-building corals in 588 'trigger' sites [3]. These are arguably the most irreplaceable category of important biodiversity conservation sites. Protected area coverage of AZE sites is a key indicator of progress towards Target 11 [1]. Moreover, effective conservation of AZE sites is essential to achieve Target 12, as the loss of any of these sites would certainly result in the global extinction of at least one species [2]. However, averting human-induced species extinctions within AZE sites requires enhanced planning tools to increase the chances of success [3]. Here, we assess the potential for ensuring the long-term conservation of AZE vertebrate species (157 mammals, 165 birds, 17 reptiles and 502 amphibians) by calculating a conservation opportunity index (COI) for each species. The COI encompasses a set of measurable indicators that quantify the possibility of achieving successful conservation of a species in its natural habitat (COIh) and by establishing insurance populations in zoos (COIc).

  3. Rewinding the process of mammalian extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Saragusty, J.; Diecke, S.; Drukker, M.; Durrant, B.; Friedrich Ben-Nun, I.; Galli, C; Goeritz, F.; Hayashi, K; Hermes, R.; Holtze, S.; Johnson, S.; Lazzari, G.; Loi, P; Loring, J. F.; Okita, K

    2016-01-01

    With only three living individuals left on this planet, the northern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) could be considered doomed for extinction. It might still be possible, however, to rescue the (sub)species by combining novel stem cell and assisted reproductive technologies. To discuss the various practical options available to us, we convened a multidisciplinary meeting under the name "Conservation by Cellular Technologies." The outcome of this meeting and the proposed road m...

  4. Dynamics of extinction debt across five taxonomic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, John M; Monokrousos, Nikolaos; Mazaris, Antonios D; Newmark, William D; Vokou, Despoina

    2016-07-25

    Species extinction following habitat loss is well documented. However, these extinctions do not happen immediately. The biodiversity surplus (extinction debt) declines with some delay through the process of relaxation. Estimating the time constants of relaxation, mainly the expected time to first extinction and the commonly used time for half the extinction debt to be paid off (half-life), is crucial for conservation purposes. Currently, there is no agreement on the rate of relaxation and the factors that it depends on. Here we find that half-life increases with area for all groups examined in a large meta-analysis of extinction data. A common pattern emerges if we use average number of individuals per species before habitat loss as an area index: for mammals, birds, reptiles and plants, the relationship has an exponent close to a half. We also find that the time to first determined extinction is short and increases slowly with area.

  5. Role of the hippocampus in contextual modulation of fear extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingzhi Kong; Xihong Wu; Liang Li

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is an important form of emotional learning, and affects neural plasticity. Cue fear extinction is a classical form of inhibitory learning that can be used as an exposure-based treatment for phobia, because the long-term extinction memory produced during cue fear extinction can limit the over-expression of fear. The expression of this inhibitory memory partly depends on the context in which the extinction learning occurs. Studies such as transient inhibition, electrophysiology and brain imaging have proved that the hippocampus - an important structure in the limbic system - facilitates memory retrieval by contextual cues.Mediation of the hippocampus-medial prefrontal lobe circuit may be the neurobiological basis of this process.This article has reviewed the role of the hippocampus in the learning and retrieval of fear extinction.Contextual modulation of fear extinction may rely on a neural network consisting of the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex and the amygdala.

  6. Extinction and dust properties in a clumpy medium

    CERN Document Server

    Scicluna, P

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) The dust content of the universe is primarily explored via its interaction with stellar photons, producing interstellar extinction. However, owing to the physical extension of the observing beam, observations may detect scattered photons, resulting in a change in the observed (or effective) extinction, depending on the spatial distribution of the dust and the resolution of the instrument. We investigate the influence of clumpy dust distributions on effective extinction toward embedded sources and those in the diffuse ISM. We use Monte Carlo radiative transfer to examine effective extinction for various geometries. By varying the number, optical depth and volume-filling factor of clumps in models of spherical shells and the diffuse ISM, we explore the evolution of extinction. Depending on the number of scattering events in the beam, the extinction curve steepens in homogeneous media and flattens in clumpy media. As a result, clumpy dust distributions can to reproduce extinction curves with arbitrary...

  7. Late Cretaceous Arc Initiation on the Edge of an Oceanic Plateau (Southern Central America)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, D. M.; Baumgartner, P. O.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Caribbean Plate comprises one or several late Cretaceous oceanic plateaus imbricated between the Northern and Southern Americas. Uplifted portions of plateau(s) along plate boundaries have been recognized in many sites, including that underlying the south Central American Volcanic Arc. We provide new constraints for the role of the plateau in the evolution of this arc obtained by mapping of the uplifted forearc area between southern Costa Rica and western Panama. An oceanic plateau, accreted seamounts and arc rocks were identified, and a new tectono-stratigraphy defined. The arc basement is composed of a Coniacian oceanic plateau. In the outer margin, late Cretaceous-Eocene accreted seamounts are in contact with the plateau along tectonic mélanges and active faults. Campanian-Maastrichtian primitive arc rocks are found 40-110 km to the trench on the top of -or as dykes within- the plateau. The location of these rocks correlates to previous observations and indicates that the arc front migrated away from the trench during the late Cretaceous, potentially in response to subduction erosion or slab flattening [Lissinna et al., EGU 2006]. The first island arc lavas were deposited under sea level, over a broad area. They were quickly followed by more evolved intrusives and lavas, which were emplaced along a volcanic front during the late Cretaceous-Paleocene. Detrital and volcanic records along the Central American isthmus indicate that a continuous volcanic arc extended between eastern Panama and northern Costa Rica in this time. In southern Costa Rica (Golfito complex) and western Panama (Sona-Azuero-Coiba complex), the oceanic plateau consists mainly of pillowed and massive low Fe (tholeiitic) basalts. These rocks have a highly consistent geochemistry characterized by flat, primitive upper mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns with low Pb and high Nb-Ti contents. Primitive arc igneous samples are low-medium Fe basalts to trachyandesites found as pillow

  8. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  9. Numerical Study on Arc Plasma Behavior During Arc Commutation Process in Direct Current Circuit Breaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨飞; 马瑞光; 吴翊; 孙昊; 纽春萍; 荣命哲

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the numerical investigation of arc plasma behavior during arc commutation process in a medium-voltage direct current circuit breaker (DCCB) contact system. A three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model of air arc plasma in the contact system of a DCCB is developed, based on commercial software FLUENT. Coupled electromagnetic and gas dynamic interactions are considered as usual, and a thin layer of nonlinear electrical resistance elements is used to represent the voltage drop of plasma sheath and the formation of new arc root. The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of arc plasma in arc region are calculated. The simulation results indicate that the pressure distribution related to the contact system has a strong effect on the arc commutation process, arising from the change of electrical conductivity in the arc root region. In DCCB contact system, the pressure of arc root region will be concentrated and higher if the space above the moving contact is enclosed, which is not good for arc root commutation. However, when the region is opened, the pressure distribution would be lower and more evenly, which is favorable for the arc root commutation.

  10. Minimizing extinction risk through genetic rescue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waite, T. A.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available According to the genetic rescue hypothesis, immigrants can improve population persistence through their genetic contribution alone. We investigate the potential for such rescue using small, inbred laboratory populations of the bean beetle (Callosobruchus maculatus. We ask how many migrants per generation (MPG are needed to minimize the genetic component of extinction risk. During Phase 1, population size was made to fluctuate between 6 and 60 (for 10 generations. During this phase, we manipulated the number of MPG, replacing 0, 1, 3, or 5 females every generation with immigrant females. During Phase 2, we simply set an upper limit on population size (.10. Compared with the 0-MPG treatment, the other treatments were equivalently effective at improving reproductive success and reducing extinction risk. A single MPG was sufficient for genetic rescue, apparently because effective migration rate was inflated dramatically during generations when population size was small. An analysis of quasi-extinction suggests that replicate populations in the 1-MPG treatment benefited from initial purging of inbreeding depression. Populations in this treatment performed so well apparently because they received the dual benefit of purging followed by genetic infusion. Our results suggest the need for further evaluation of alternative schemes for genetic rescue.

  11. Glucocorticoids enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Bentz, Dorothée; Michael, Tanja; Bolt, Olivia C; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Margraf, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2011-04-19

    Behavioral exposure therapy of anxiety disorders is believed to rely on fear extinction. Because preclinical studies have shown that glucocorticoids can promote extinction processes, we aimed at investigating whether the administration of these hormones might be useful in enhancing exposure therapy. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 40 patients with specific phobia for heights were treated with three sessions of exposure therapy using virtual reality exposure to heights. Cortisol (20 mg) or placebo was administered orally 1 h before each of the treatment sessions. Subjects returned for a posttreatment assessment 3-5 d after the last treatment session and for a follow-up assessment after 1 mo. Adding cortisol to exposure therapy resulted in a significantly greater reduction in fear of heights as measured with the acrophobia questionnaire (AQ) both at posttreatment and at follow-up, compared with placebo. Furthermore, subjects receiving cortisol showed a significantly greater reduction in acute anxiety during virtual exposure to a phobic situation at posttreatment and a significantly smaller exposure-induced increase in skin conductance level at follow-up. The present findings indicate that the administration of cortisol can enhance extinction-based psychotherapy.

  12. Rewinding the process of mammalian extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragusty, Joseph; Diecke, Sebastian; Drukker, Micha; Durrant, Barbara; Friedrich Ben-Nun, Inbar; Galli, Cesare; Göritz, Frank; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Hermes, Robert; Holtze, Susanne; Johnson, Stacey; Lazzari, Giovanna; Loi, Pasqualino; Loring, Jeanne F; Okita, Keisuke; Renfree, Marilyn B; Seet, Steven; Voracek, Thomas; Stejskal, Jan; Ryder, Oliver A; Hildebrandt, Thomas B

    2016-07-01

    With only three living individuals left on this planet, the northern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) could be considered doomed for extinction. It might still be possible, however, to rescue the (sub)species by combining novel stem cell and assisted reproductive technologies. To discuss the various practical options available to us, we convened a multidisciplinary meeting under the name "Conservation by Cellular Technologies." The outcome of this meeting and the proposed road map that, if successfully implemented, would ultimately lead to a self-sustaining population of an extremely endangered species are outlined here. The ideas discussed here, while centered on the northern white rhinoceros, are equally applicable, after proper adjustments, to other mammals on the brink of extinction. Through implementation of these ideas we hope to establish the foundation for reversal of some of the effects of what has been termed the sixth mass extinction event in the history of Earth, and the first anthropogenic one. Zoo Biol. 35:280-292, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Zoo Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Modelling dust extinction in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zonca, Alberto; Mulas, Giacomo; Aresu, Giambattista; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    We model the extinction profiles observed in the Small and Large Magellanic clouds with a synthetic population of dust grains consisting by core-mantle particles and a collection of free-flying polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. All different flavors of the extinction curves observed in the Magellanic Clouds can be described by the present model, that has been previously (successfully) applied to a large sample of diffuse and translucent lines of sight in the Milky Way. We find that in the Magellanic Clouds the extinction produced by classic grains is generally larger than absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Within this model, the non-linear far-UV rise is accounted for by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose presence in turn is always associated to a gap in the size distribution of classical particles. This hints either a physical connection between (e.g., a common cause for) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the absence of middle-sized dust particles, or the need for an additional component...

  14. Permo-Triassic vertebrate extinctions: A program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, E. C.

    1988-01-01

    Since the time of the Authors' study on this subject, a great deal of new information has become available. Concepts of the nature of extinctions have changed materially. The Authors' conclusion that a catastrophic event was not responsible for the extinction of vertebrates has modified to the extent that hypotheses involving either the impact of a massive extra-terrestrial body or volcanism provide plausible but not currently fully testable hypotheses. Stated changes resulted in a rapid decrease in organic diversity, as the ratio of origins of taxa to extinctions shifted from strongly positive to negative, with momentary equilibrium being reached at about the Permo-Triassic boundary. The proximate causes of the changes in the terrestrial biota appear to lie in two primary factors: (1) strong climatic changes (global mean temperatures, temperature ranges, humidity) and (2) susceptibility of the dominant vertebrates (large dicynodonts) and the glossopteris flora to disruption of the equlibrium of the world ecosystem. The following proximate causes have been proposed: (1) rhythmic fluctuations in solar radiation, (2) tectonic events as Pangea assembled, altering land-ocean relationships, patterns of wind and water circulation and continental physiography, (3) volcanism, and (4) changes subsequent to impacts of one or more massive extra terrestrial objects, bodies or comets. These hypotheses are discussed.

  15. Resurrecting extinct interactions with extant substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Christine J; Hansen, Dennis M; Jones, Carl G; Zuël, Nicolas; Harris, Stephen

    2011-05-10

    There is increasing evidence that restoration ecologists should be most concerned with restoring species interactions rather than species diversity per se [1]. Rewilding with taxon substitutes, the intentional introduction of exotic species to replace the ecosystem functions of recently extinct species, is one way to reverse ecosystem dysfunction following the loss of species interactions [2]. This is highly controversial [3], in part because of a lack of rigorous scientific studies [4]. Here we present the first empirical evidence of an in situ rewilding project undertaken as a hypothesis-driven ecosystem management option. On Ile aux Aigrettes, a 25-hectare island off Mauritius, the critically endangered large-fruited endemic ebony, Diospyros egrettarum (Ebenaceae), was seed-dispersal limited after the extinction of all native large-bodied frugivores, including giant tortoises. We introduced exotic Aldabra giant tortoises, Aldabrachelys gigantea, to disperse the ebony seeds. Not only did the tortoises ingest the large fruits and disperse substantial numbers of ebony seeds, but tortoise gut passage also improved seed germination, leading to the widespread, successful establishment of new ebony seedlings. Our results demonstrate that the introduction of these exotic frugivores is aiding the recovery of ebonies. We argue for more reversible rewilding experiments to investigate whether extinct species interactions can be restored.

  16. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  17. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  18. An explanation for Neptune's ring arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, Carolyn C.

    1991-08-01

    The Voyager mission revealed a complex system of rings and ring arcs around Neptune and uncovered six new satellites, four of which occupy orbits well inside the ring region. Analysis of Voyager data shows that a radial distortion with an amplitude of approximately 30 kilometers is traveling through the ring arcs, a perturbation attributable to the nearby satellite Galatea. Moreover, the arcs appear to be azimuthally confined by a resonant interaction with the same satellite, yielding a maximum spread in ring particle semimajor axes of 0.6 kilometer and a spread in forced eccentricities large enough to explain the arc's 15-kilometer radial widths. Additional ring arcs discovered in the course of this study give further support to this model.

  19. Metrology in arc plasmas - A new cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croche, R.

    1980-02-01

    A new radiating source consisting of an electric arc under argon pressure is described, with power varying between about 0.2 and 1.5 kW, and with the plasma furnishing a continuous spectrum between 115 and 350 nm. The arc functions from 5 to 50 A, with a voltage varying between 30 and 35 V. The cathode of the transfer arc is described in detail, including such advantages as easy igniting of the arc and the possibility of re-sharpening the tip of the cathode. Most important, the new 'knife-shaped' form of the tungsten cathode has improved the stability and reproducibility of the ultraviolet continuum emitted by the plasma of the arc, which is used at the French National Institute of Metrology as a transfer standard of spectral radiance in the vacuum ultraviolet.

  20. Localization of outer surface proteins A and B in both the outer membrane and intracellular compartments of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, J S; McDowall, A W; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1991-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi B31 with and without outer membranes contained nearly identical amounts of outer surface proteins A and B. The majority of each immunogen also was localized intracellularly by immunocryoultramicrotomy. These results are inconsistent with the widely held belief that outer surface proteins A and B are exclusively outer membrane proteins. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1744059

  1. Extinction of chained instrumental behaviors: Effects of procurement extinction on consumption responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Eric A; Bouton, Mark E

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental behavior often consists of sequences or chains of responses that minimally include procurement behaviors that enable subsequent consumption behaviors. In such chains, behavioral units are linked by access to one another and eventually to a primary reinforcer, such as food or a drug. The present experiments examined the effects of extinguishing procurement responding on consumption responding after training of a discriminated heterogeneous instrumental chain. Rats learned to make a procurement response (e.g., pressing a lever) in the presence of a distinctive discriminative stimulus; making that response led to the presentation of a second discriminative stimulus that set the occasion for a consumption response (e.g., pulling a chain), which then produced a food-pellet reinforcer. Experiment 1 showed that extinction of either the full procurement-consumption chain or procurement alone weakened the consumption response tested in isolation. Experiment 2 replicated the procurement extinction effect and further demonstrated that the opportunity to make the procurement response, as opposed to simple exposure to the procurement stimulus alone, was required. In Experiment 3, rats learned 2 distinct discriminated heterogeneous chains; extinction of 1 procurement response specifically weakened the consumption response that had been associated with it. The results suggest that learning to inhibit the procurement response may produce extinction of consumption responding through mediated extinction. The experiments suggest the importance of an associative analysis of instrumental behavior chains. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Dust properties along anomalous extinction sightlines. II. Studying extinction curves with dust models

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzei, Paola

    2010-01-01

    The large majority of extinction sight lines in our Galaxy obey a simple relation depending on one parameter, the total-to-selective extinction coefficient, Rv. Different values of Rv are able to match the whole extinction curve through different environments so characterizing normal extinction curves. In this paper more than sixty curves with large ultraviolet deviations from their best-fit one parameter curve are analyzed. These curves are fitted with dust models to shed light into the properties of the grains, the processes affecting them, and their relations with the environmental characteristics. The extinction curve models are reckoned by following recent prescriptions on grain size distributions able to describe one parameter curves for Rv values from 3.1 to 5.5. Such models, here extended down to Rv=2.0, allow us to compare the resulting properties of our deviating curves with the same as normal curves in a self-consistent framework, and thus to recover the relative trends overcoming the modeling unce...

  3. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  4. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  5. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  6. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  7. mGlu5 Receptors and Relapse to Cocaine-Seeking: The Role of Receptor Trafficking in Postrelapse Extinction Learning Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori A. Knackstedt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that MTEP, an allosteric antagonist of mGlu5, infused into the nucleus accumbens attenuates relapse after abstinence from cocaine self-administration. MTEP infused into the dorsolateral striatum (dlSTR does not alter relapse but has long-lasting effects on subsequent extinction learning. Here we tested whether systemic MTEP would prevent relapse after abstinence or alter extinction learning. We also investigated the mechanism of action by which intra-dlSTR MTEP on test day alters extinction on subsequent days. Animals self-administered cocaine for 12 days followed by abstinence for 20-21 days. MTEP (0.5–5 mg/kg IP was administered prior to placement into the operant chamber for a context-primed relapse test. A separate group of animals received intra-dlSTR MTEP prior to the relapse test and were sacrificed day later. Systemic administration of MTEP attenuated abstinent-relapse without significantly affecting extinction learning. Surface biotinylation analysis of protein expression in the dlSTR revealed that, in cocaine animals, intra-dlSTR MTEP administration decreased mGlu5 surface expression and prevented changes in Arc and GluA1/GluA2 observed in their vehicle counterparts. Thus, blockade of mGlu5 receptors may be utilized in future treatment strategies for relapse prevention in humans, although the effects of chronic blockade on extinction learning should be further evaluated.

  8. Nonlinear singularly perturbed optimal control problems with singular arcs. [flight mechanics application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    Singular perturbation techniques are studied for dealing with singular arc problems by analyzing a relatively low-order but otherwise general system. This system encompasses many flight mechanic problems including Goddard's problem and a version of the minimum time-to-climb problem. Boundary layer solutions are constructed which are stable and reach the outer solution in a finite time. A uniformly valid composite solution is then formed from the reduced and boundary layer solutions. The value of the approximate solution is that it is relatively easy to obtain and does not involve singular arcs. To illustrate the utility of the results, the technique is used to obtain an approximate solution of a simplified version of the aircraft minimum time-to-climb problem.

  9. Hybrid Visual Servoing Control for Robotic Arc Welding Based on Structured Light Vision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUDe; WANGLin-Kun; TUZhi-Guo; TANMin

    2005-01-01

    A novel hybrid visual servoing control method based on structured light vision is proposed for robotic arc welding with a general six degrees of freedom robot. It consists of a position control inner-loop in Cartesian space and two outer-loops. One is position-based visual control inCartesian space for moving in the direction of weld seam, i.e., weld seam tracking, another is imagebased visual control in image space for adjustment to eliminate the errors in the process of tracking.A new Jacobian matrix from image space of the feature point on structured light stripe to Cartesian space is provided for differential movement of the end-effector. The control system model is simplified and its stability is discussed. An experiment of arc welding protected by gas CO2 for verifying is well conducted.

  10. Optimization of arc-start performance by wire-feeding control for GMA welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jong Gu; Ryu, Gyeong Su; Rhee, Se Hun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Cheol; Kang, Mun Jin [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Whan [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The wire feeding system for gas metal arc welding usually consists of a wire feeder and a torch. In many industries, the distance between the wire feeder and the torch is generally 3 m to 5 m. In a conventional wire feeder, a direct current (DC) motor is used for wire feeding. However, a significant problem with this system is the impossibility of feedback control because of inner or outer impedance. In this paper, a digital wire feeder was developed by using a DC encoder motor and a push-pull torch. An optimized wire-feeding system was also developed by experiment. The welding process was observed using a high-speed camera. The resulting wire-feeding system exhibits low spatter generation and arc stability.

  11. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful.

  12. ATLAS DDM integration in ARC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrmann, Gerd; Cameron, David; Ellert, Mattias;

    The Nordic Data Grid Facility (NDGF) consists of Grid resources running ARC middleware in Scandinavia and other countries. These resources serve many virtual organisations and contribute a large fraction of total worldwide resources for the ATLAS experiment, whose data is distributed and managed...... by the DQ2 software. Managing ATLAS data within NDGF and between NDGF and other Grids used by ATLAS (the LHC Computing Grid and the Open Science Grid) presents a unique challenge for several reasons. Firstly, the entry point for data, the Tier 1 centre, is physically distributed among heterogeneous...... environment. Also, the service used for cataloging the location of data files is different from other Grids but must still be useable by DQ2 and ATLAS users to locate data within NDGF. This paper presents in detail how we solve these issues to allow seamless access worldwide to data within NDGF....

  13. INTERPOLATION WITH RESTRICTED ARC LENGTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petar Petrov

    2003-01-01

    For given data (ti,yi), I= 0,1,…,n,0 = t0 <t1 <…<tn = 1we study constrained interpolation problem of Favard type inf{‖f"‖∞|f∈W2∞[0,1],f(ti)=yi,i=0,…,n,l(f;[0,1])≤l0}, wherel(f";[0,1])=∫1 0 / 1+f'2(x)dx is the arc length off in [0,1]. We prove the existence of a solution f* of the above problem, that is a quadratic spline with a second derivative f"* , which coincides with one of the constants - ‖f"*‖∞,0,‖f"*‖∞ between every two consecutive knots. Thus, we extend a result ofKarlin concerning Favard problem, to the case of restricted length interpolation.

  14. Computer simulation to arc spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志芳; 李午申; 王迎娜

    2004-01-01

    The arc spraying process is divided into two stages: the first stage is atomization-spraying stream (ASS) and the second one is spraying deposition (SD). Then study status is described of both stages' physical model and corresponding controlling-equation. Based on the analysis of study status, the conclusion as follows is got. The heat and mass transfer models with two or three dimensions in ASS stage should be established to far deeply analyses the dynamical and thermal behavior of the overheat droplet. The statistics law of overheated droplets should be further studied by connecting simulation with experiments. More proper validation experiments should be designed for flattening simulation to modify the models in SD stage.

  15. Cortisol modifies extinction learning of recently acquired fear in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian Josef; Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2014-09-01

    Exposure therapy builds on the mechanism of fear extinction leading to decreased fear responses. How the stress hormone cortisol affects brain regions involved in fear extinction in humans is unknown. For this reason, we tested 32 men randomly assigned to receive either 30 mg hydrocortisone or placebo 45 min before fear extinction. In fear acquisition, a picture of a geometrical figure was either partially paired (conditioned stimulus; CS+) or not paired (CS-) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus; UCS). In fear extinction, each CS was presented again, but no UCS occurred. Cortisol increased conditioned skin conductance responses in early and late extinction. In early extinction, higher activation towards the CS- than to the CS+ was found in the amygdala, hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus. This pattern might be associated with the establishment of a new memory trace. In late extinction, the placebo compared with the cortisol group displayed enhanced CS+/CS- differentiation in the amygdala, medial frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. A change from early deactivation to late activation of the extinction circuit as seen in the placebo group seems to be needed to enhance extinction and to reduce fear. Cortisol appears to interfere with this process thereby impairing extinction of recently acquired conditioned fear.

  16. A window of vulnerability: impaired fear extinction in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kathryn D; Den, Miriam L; Graham, Bronwyn M; Richardson, Rick

    2014-09-01

    There have been significant advances made towards understanding the processes mediating extinction of learned fear. However, despite being of clear theoretical and clinical significance, very few studies have examined fear extinction in adolescence, which is often described as a developmental window of vulnerability to psychological disorders. This paper reviews the relatively small body of research examining fear extinction in adolescence. A prominent finding of this work is that adolescents, both humans and rodents, exhibit a marked impairment in extinction relative to both younger (e.g., juvenile) and older (e.g., adult) groups. We then review some potential mechanisms that could produce the striking extinction deficit observed in adolescence. For example, one neurobiological candidate mechanism for impaired extinction in adolescence involves changes in the functional connectivity within the fear extinction circuit, particularly between prefrontal cortical regions and the amygdala. In addition, we review research on emotion regulation and attention processes that suggests that developmental changes in attention bias to threatening cues may be a cognitive mechanism that mediates age-related differences in extinction learning. We also examine how a differential reaction to chronic stress in adolescence impacts upon extinction retention during adolescence as well as in later life. Finally, we consider the findings of several studies illustrating promising approaches that overcome the typically-observed extinction impairments in adolescent rodents and that could be translated to human adolescents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cortisol modifies extinction learning of recently acquired fear in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy builds on the mechanism of fear extinction leading to decreased fear responses. How the stress hormone cortisol affects brain regions involved in fear extinction in humans is unknown. For this reason, we tested 32 men randomly assigned to receive either 30 mg hydrocortisone or placebo 45 min before fear extinction. In fear acquisition, a picture of a geometrical figure was either partially paired (conditioned stimulus; CS+) or not paired (CS−) with an electrical stimulation (unconditioned stimulus; UCS). In fear extinction, each CS was presented again, but no UCS occurred. Cortisol increased conditioned skin conductance responses in early and late extinction. In early extinction, higher activation towards the CS− than to the CS+ was found in the amygdala, hippocampus and posterior parahippocampal gyrus. This pattern might be associated with the establishment of a new memory trace. In late extinction, the placebo compared with the cortisol group displayed enhanced CS+/CS− differentiation in the amygdala, medial frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. A change from early deactivation to late activation of the extinction circuit as seen in the placebo group seems to be needed to enhance extinction and to reduce fear. Cortisol appears to interfere with this process thereby impairing extinction of recently acquired conditioned fear. PMID:23945999

  18. Contribution For Arc Temperature Affected By Current Increment Ratio At Peak Current In Pulsed Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryota; Mitubori, Hironori; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding is one of the high quality welding. However, parameters of the pulsed arc welding are many and complicated. if the welding parameters are not appropriate, the welding pool shape becomes wide and shallow.the convection of driving force contributes to the welding pool shape. However, in the case of changing current waveform as the pulse high frequency TIG welding, the arc temperature does not follow the change of the current. Other result of the calculation, in particular, the arc temperature at the reaching time of peak current is based on these considerations. Thus, the accurate measurement of the temperature at the time is required. Therefore, the objective of this research is the elucidation of contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc. It should obtain a detail knowledge of the welding model in pulsed arc. The temperature in the case of increment of the peak current from the base current is measured by using spectroscopy. As a result, when the arc current increases from 100 A to 150 A at 120 ms, the transient response of the temperature didn't occur during increasing current. Thus, during the current rise, it has been verified by measuring. Therefore, the contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc was elucidated in order to obtain more knowledge of welding model of pulsed arc.

  19. Electric Arc Furnace Modeling with Artificial Neural Networks and Arc Length with Variable Voltage Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Garcia-Segura

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc furnaces (EAFs contribute to almost one third of the global steel production. Arc furnaces use a large amount of electrical energy to process scrap or reduced iron and are relevant to study because small improvements in their efficiency account for significant energy savings. Optimal controllers need to be designed and proposed to enhance both process performance and energy consumption. Due to the random and chaotic nature of the electric arcs, neural networks and other soft computing techniques have been used for modeling EAFs. This study proposes a methodology for modeling EAFs that considers the time varying arc length as a relevant input parameter to the arc furnace model. Based on actual voltages and current measurements taken from an arc furnace, it was possible to estimate an arc length suitable for modeling the arc furnace using neural networks. The obtained results show that the model reproduces not only the stable arc conditions but also the unstable arc conditions, which are difficult to identify in a real heat process. The presented model can be applied for the development and testing of control systems to improve furnace energy efficiency and productivity.

  20. Community stability and selective extinction during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, Peter D.; Angielczyk, Kenneth D.

    2015-10-01

    The fossil record contains exemplars of extreme biodiversity crises. Here, we examined the stability of terrestrial paleocommunities from South Africa during Earth's most severe mass extinction, the Permian-Triassic. We show that stability depended critically on functional diversity and patterns of guild interaction, regardless of species richness. Paleocommunities exhibited less transient instability—relative to model communities with alternative community organization—and significantly greater probabilities of being locally stable during the mass extinction. Functional patterns that have evolved during an ecosystem's history support significantly more stable communities than hypothetical alternatives.

  1. Mass extinction efficiency and extinction hygroscopicity of ambient PM2.5 in urban China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhen; Ma, Xin; He, Yujie; Jiang, Jingkun; Wang, Xiaoliang; Wang, Yungang; Sheng, Li; Hu, Jiangkai; Yan, Naiqiang

    2017-07-01

    The ambient PM2.5 pollution problem in China has drawn substantial international attentions. The mass extinction efficiency (MEE) and hygroscopicity factor (f(RH)) of PM2.5 can be readily applied to study the impacts on atmospheric visibility and climate. The few previous investigations in China only reported results from pilot studies and are lack of spatial representativeness. In this study, hourly average ambient PM2.5 mass concentration, relative humidity, and atmospheric visibility data from China national air quality and meteorological monitoring networks were retrieved and analyzed. It includes 24 major Chinese cities from nine city-clusters with the period of October 2013 to September 2014. Annual average extinction coefficient in urban China was 759.3±258.3Mm(-1), mainly caused by dry PM2.5 (305.8.2±131.0Mm(-1)) and its hygroscopicity (414.6±188.1Mm(-1)). High extinction coefficient values were resulted from both high ambient PM2.5 concentration (68.5±21.7µg/m(3)) and high relative humidity (69.7±8.6%). The PM2.5 mass extinction efficiency varied from 2.87 to 6.64m(2)/g with an average of 4.40±0.84m(2)/g. The average extinction hygroscopic factor f(RH=80%) was 2.63±0.45. The levels of PM2.5 mass extinction efficiency and hygroscopic factor in China were in comparable range with those found in developed countries in spite of the significant diversities among all 24 cities. Our findings help to establish quantitative relationship between ambient extinction coefficient (visual range) and PM2.5 & relative humidity. It will reduce the uncertainty of extinction coefficient estimation of ambient PM2.5 in urban China which is essential for the research of haze pollution and climate radiative forcing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  3. Acoustic characteristics of electric arc furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Cherednichenko, A. V.; Ognev, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the appearance and development of the noise characteristics of superpower electric arc furnaces. The noise formation is shown to be related to the pulsation of the axial plasma flows in arc discharges because of the electrodynamic pressure oscillations caused by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the current passing in an arc. The pressure in the arc axis changes at a frequency of 100 Hz at the maximum operating pressure of 66 kPa for an arc current of 80 kA. The main ac arc sound frequencies are multiples of 100 Hz, which is supported in the practice of operation of electric arc furnaces. The sound intensity in the furnace laboratory reaches 160 dB and is decreased to 115-120 dB in the working furnace area due to shielding by the furnace jacket, the molten metal, and the molten slag. The appropriateness of increasing the hermetic sealing of electric furnaces and creating furnaces operating at low currents and high transformer voltages is corroborated.

  4. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  5. A Cambrian Arc Built on the Neoproterozoic Rifted Margin of Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Cambrian convergence along the northeastern side of the Curnamona Craton, the Gondwana margin in southeastern Australia, resulted in the development of the Delamerian Orogen. A Neoproterozoic rifted margin, marked by the alkalic Mount Arrowsmith Volcanics, forms the substrate on which is built a NE-facing Cambrian arc, complete with a clearly delineated inner imbricate accretionary prism (the Wonnaminta Zone) and outer thin-skinned wedge (the Kayrunnera Zone). Arc volcanism, represented by the calc-alkaline Mount Wright Volcanics, exhibits mixed arc-rift geochemistry. Interpretation and modelling of magnetic data reveals a chain of volcanic edifices of the Mount Wright Arc, now below 3 to 7 km of Devonian sandstones in the Bancannia Trough. Remarkably, a simple rotation around an Euler pole reconstructs the Wonnaminta Zone against the craton, and aligns structural elements on the two sides of the trough. Arc volcanism evidently occupied a rift in marginal continental crust, and the geometry, geochemistry and geophysical properties of the Mount Wright Arc are closely analogous to the Taupo Zone of New Zealand. Rifting of the arc divided Delamerian structures, indicating that at least part of the Delamerian deformation developed in a subduction accretion setting, rather than in some terminal collision. Below the Wonnaminta Zone a 3 to 5 km thick body can be traced as a large magnetic source along the length of the zone. Overridden by the thrust stack of the accretionary prism, this body is mostly planar and dips towards the east, although it is deformed into a broad antiform in the central part of the zone. Physical properties suggest that this body may be a thick rift-volcanic pile equivalent to the Mount Arrowsmith Volcanics. In the southern part of the belt a re-entrant in the Wonnaminta Zone faces a large magnetic anomaly sourced in the basement of the Kayrunnera Zone. The geometry of the re-entrant, and the development of Silurian and Devonian basins over the

  6. NOAA Deepwater Exploration of the Marianas 2016: Volcanic arc and Backarc Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R. J.; Brounce, M. N.; Chadwick, B.; Fryer, P. B.; Glickson, D.; Merle, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    Legs 1 and 3 of NOAA Okeanos Explorer EX1605 devoted a total of 17 ROV dives to exploring the Mariana magmatic arc and backarc basin (BAB). Dives were carried out on 11 submarine arc volcanoes, the submerged slopes of two volcanic islands, and at 3 BAB sites along 1000 km of the Mariana arc system. Four of the studied arc volcanoes are extinct, three are dormant, and six are active. All BAB dives were on the spreading ridge between 15-17°N, which is volcanically active. Geologic highpoints of these dives include: 1) discovery of an extinct hydrothermal chimney ( 15m tall) in Fina Nagu A (Leg 1, Dive 7; L1D7); 2) observations of very fresh (<3 years old) BAB pillow basalts (L1D9); 3) discovery of a very active BAB hydrothermal field (T 340°C, active chimneys up to 30m tall; L1D11); 4) examination of Esmeralda Bank crater floor (active venting but too murky to find vents; L1D19); 5) discovery of hydrothermal vents with vent fauna on Chamorro volcano (L3D7; T 30°C, active chimneys 2m tall); and 6) examination of active venting and S degassing at 500-350 m depth on Daikoku volcano (L3D9). Video clips of some of the most exciting discoveries and examinations will be presented. We plan to compare previous bathymetry over the active volcanoes with what was collected during EX1605 to quantify how these edifices have changed since when these were previously mapped, over the past 13 years or less. These dives also provided visual evidence in support of the hypothesis that individual edifices of the Fina Nagu Volcanic Complex increase in age from NE to SW, interpreted as due to the motion of actively-extending lithosphere of the southern Mariana BAB to the SW over a relatively fixed source of arc magma above the subducting Pacific plate (Brounce et al. G3 2016). Continuous interaction between biologists and geologists on EX1605 allowed us to identify regions of high faunal density on hard substrates around some active volcanoes, for example Esmeralda Bank, presumably

  7. Acute Zonal Cone Photoreceptor Outer Segment Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S; Sandhu, Harpal S; Serrano, Leona W; Traband, Anastasia; Lau, Marisa K; Adamus, Grazyna; Avery, Robert A

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic path presented narrows down the cause of acute vision loss to the cone photoreceptor outer segment and will refocus the search for the cause of similar currently idiopathic conditions. To describe the structural and functional associations found in a patient with acute zonal occult photoreceptor loss. A case report of an adolescent boy with acute visual field loss despite a normal fundus examination performed at a university teaching hospital. Results of a complete ophthalmic examination, full-field flash electroretinography (ERG) and multifocal ERG, light-adapted achromatic and 2-color dark-adapted perimetry, and microperimetry. Imaging was performed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), near-infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength (SW) fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and NIR reflectance (REF). The patient was evaluated within a week of the onset of a scotoma in the nasal field of his left eye. Visual acuity was 20/20 OU, and color vision was normal in both eyes. Results of the fundus examination and of SW-FAF and NIR-FAF imaging were normal in both eyes, whereas NIR-REF imaging showed a region of hyporeflectance temporal to the fovea that corresponded with a dense relative scotoma noted on light-adapted static perimetry in the left eye. Loss in the photoreceptor outer segment detected by SD-OCT co-localized with an area of dense cone dysfunction detected on light-adapted perimetry and multifocal ERG but with near-normal rod-mediated vision according to results of 2-color dark-adapted perimetry. Full-field flash ERG findings were normal in both eyes. The outer nuclear layer and inner retinal thicknesses were normal. Localized, isolated cone dysfunction may represent the earliest photoreceptor abnormality or a distinct entity within the acute zonal occult outer retinopathy complex. Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy should be considered in patients with acute vision loss and abnormalities on NIR-REF imaging, especially if

  8. METHOD OF CONJUGATED CIRCULAR ARCS TRACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ageyev Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The geometric properties of conjugated circular arcs connecting two points on the plane with set directions of tan- gent vectors are studied in the work. It is shown that pairs of conjugated circular arcs with the same conditions in frontier points create one-parameter set of smooth curves tightly filling all the plane. One of the basic properties of this set is the fact that all coupling points of circular arcs are on the circular curve going through the initially given points. The circle radius depends on the direction of tangent vectors. Any point of the circle curve, named auxiliary in this work, determines a pair of conjugated arcs with given boundary conditions. One more condition of the auxiliary circle curve is that it divides the plane into two parts. The arcs going from the initial point are out of the circle limited by this circle curve and the arcs coming to the final point are inside it. These properties are the basis for the method of conjugated circular arcs tracing pro- posed in this article. The algorithm is rather simple and allows to fulfill all the needed plottings using only the divider and ruler. Two concrete examples are considered. The first one is related to the problem of tracing of a pair of conjugated arcs with the minimal curve jump when going through the coupling point. The second one demonstrates the possibility of trac- ing of the smooth curve going through any three points on the plane under condition that in the initial and final points the directions of tangent vectors are given. The proposed methods of conjugated circular arcs tracing can be applied in solving of a wide variety of problems connected with the tracing of cam contours, for example pattern curves in textile industry or in computer-aided-design systems when programming of looms with numeric control.

  9. Formation of the G-ring arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves increasing the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario in which the excitation of Mimas's eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance. This is a possible explanation for the origin of the arcs.

  10. Formation of the G-ring arc

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, N C S; Foryta, D W

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves raising the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario that the excitation of Mimas' eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance and given a possible explanation for the origin for the arcs.

  11. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding question concerns the nature of the melts forming in the subarc mantle and giving rise to arc magmatism. The global array of primitive arc melts (1180 volcanic rocks in 25 arcs extracted from the georoc database, calculated to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine) yields five principal melt types: calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg andesites, tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg andesites, and shoshonitic or alkaline arc melts; many arcs have more than one type. Primitive calc-alkaline basalts occur in 11 arcs but most strikingly, 8 continental arcs (incl. Aleutians, Cascades, Japan, Mexico, Kamtschatka) have a continuous range of calc-alkaline basalts to high-Mg andesites with mostly 48-58 wt% SiO2. In each arc, these are spatially congruent, trace element patterns overlap, and major elements form a continuum. Their Ca-Mg-Si systematics suggests saturation in olivine+opx+cpx. We hence interpret the large majority of high-Mg andesites as derived from primitive calc-alkaline basalts through fractionation and reaction in the shallower mantle. Removal of anhydrous mantle phases at lower pressures increases SiO2 and H2O-contents while Mg# and Ni remain buffered to mantle values. Primitive tholeiitic basalts (Cascades, Kermadec, Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan, Palau, Sunda) have a much lesser subduction signal (e.g. in LILE) than the calc-alkaline suite. These tholeiites have been interpreted to form through decompression melting, but also characterize young intraoceanic arcs. In the two continental arcs with both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline primitive basalts (clearly distinct in trace patterns), there is no clear spatial segregation (Casacades, Japan). Three intraoceanic arcs (Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Tonga) have primitive tholeiitic, highly depleted high-Mg andesites (boninites) with HFSE and HREE slightly above primitive mantle values. These deviate in majors from the array formed by the basalts and calc-alkaline andesites suggesting that only these formed from a

  12. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    OpenAIRE

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ion source. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials in the Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-like behavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arc triggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsec and 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially 8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150 micros...

  13. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  14. Late Pennsylvanian climate changes and palynomorph extinctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosanke, R.M.; Cecil, C.B. [US Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A major floral change occurs in the Upper Pennsylvanian strata in the Midcontinent, Illinois basin, and in the northern Appalachian basin of eastern United States. Lycospora spp. (derived from arborescent lycopsids) became extinct along with some other palynomorph taxa. This investigation is concerned with the importance of this major floral change. Samples were studied from western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, and West Virgina (from a previous study) cover the stratigraphic interval from the Upper Freeport coal bed, uppermost part of the Allegheny Formation, to the Mahoning, Mason, Brush Creek, Wilgus, and Anderson coal beds in the lower part of the Conemaugh Formation. The floral change occurs either at or below the accepted Desmoinesian-Missourian boundary in the Midcontinent and Illinois basin, whereas in the northern Appalachians this change occurs in the lower part of the Conemaugh Formation, between the Mahoning and Brush Creek coal beds, or when the Mason is present, between the Mahoning and Mason coal beds. The first coal bed above the extinction of Lycospora spp. is dominated by the palynomorph taxon Endosporites globiformis which is derived from a heterosporous, herbaceous lycopsid. However, Sigillaria, another arborescent lycopsid, did not become extinct at this time as evidenced by the presence of the palynomorph genus Crassispora which is derived from Sigillaria. The reason for the survival of Sigillaria is now known, but it may have been able to adapt, in a limited fashion, to some sort of specialized microenvironment. The ferns, based on palynomorph occurrence, become numerically more important throughout the balance of the Conemaugh Formation, and dominate the Pittsburgh No. 8 and Pomeroy coal beds in the overlying Monogahela Formation.

  15. The Outer Space as an Educational Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Melquíades; Hernández-López, Montserrat

    2017-06-01

    STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. The Outer Space is a window to the past and the future of our travel around the history of the Universe and can be used as a educational tool in primary and secondary education. This paper talks about the integration of the resources of European Space Agency, Space Awareness, Nuclio, Scientix and Schoolnet as motivation to integrate STEAM methodology in secondary education. Keywords: STEAM, outer space, motivation, methodology

  16. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  17. Rigidity of marginally outer trapped 2-spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    In a matter-filled spacetime, perhaps with positive cosmological constant, a stable marginally outer trapped 2-sphere must satisfy a certain area inequality. Namely, as discussed in the paper, its area must be bounded above by $4\\pi/c$, where $c > 0$ is a lower bound on a natural energy-momentum term. We then consider the rigidity that results for stable, or weakly outermost, marginally outer trapped 2-spheres that achieve this upper bound on the area. In particular, we prove a splitting result for 3-dimensional initial data sets analogous to a result of Bray, Brendle and Neves [10] concerning area minimizing 2-spheres in Riemannian 3-manifolds with positive scalar curvature. We further show that these initial data sets locally embed as spacelike hypersurfaces into the Nariai spacetime. Connections to the Vaidya spacetime and dynamical horizons are also discussed.

  18. Performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Arink, R; Bagaturia, Y; Band, H; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A; Farber, Ch; Bien, A; Blouw, J; Ceelie, L; Coco, V; Deckenhoff, M; Deng, Z; Dettori, F; van Eijk, D; Ekelhof, R; Gersabeck, E; Grillo, L; Hulsbergen, W D; Karbach, T M; Koopman, R; Kozlinskiy, A; Langenbruch, Ch; Lavrentyev, V; Linn, Ch; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Meissner, M; Michalowski, J; Morawski, P; Nawrot, A; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Polok, G; van Petten, O; Rovekamp, J; Schimmel, F; Schuylenburg, H; Schwemmer, R; Seyfert, P; Serra, N; Sluijk, T; Spaan, B; Spelt, J; Storaci, B; Szczekowski, M; Swientek, S; Tolk, S; Tuning, N; Uwer, U; Wiedner, D; Witek, M; Zeng, M; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5x6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The detector with its services are described together with the commissioning and calibration procedures. Based on data of the first LHC running period from 2010 to 2012, the performance of the readout electronics and the single hit resolution and efficiency are presented. The efficiency to detect a hit in the central half of the straw is estimated to be 99.2%, and the position resolution is determined to be approximately 200 um. The Outer Tracker received a dose in the hottest region corresponding to 0.12 C/cm, and no signs of gain deterioration or other ageing effects are observed.

  19. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  20. Self-Organized Criticality and Mass Extinction in Evolutionary Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krink, Thiemo; Thomsen, Rene

    2001-01-01

    niches after mass extinction events. Furthermore, paleontological studies have shown that there is a power law relationship between the frequency of species extinction events and the sue of the extinction impact. Power law relationships of this kind are typical for complex systems, which operate...... at a critical state between chaos and order, known as self-organized criticality (SOC). Based on this background, we used SOC to control the size of spatial extinction zones in a diffusion model. The SOC selection process was easy to implement and implied only negligible computational costs. Our results show...... that the SOC spatial extinction model clearly outperforms simple evolutionary algorithms (EAs) and the difffision model (CGA). Further, our results support the biological hypothesis that mass extinctions might play an important role in evolution. However, the success of simple EAs indicates that evolution...

  1. [GABA-Receptors in Modulation of Fear Memory Extinction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovina, N I

    2016-01-01

    GABA is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system determining the efficacy of neuronal interaction. GABA-receptors play a key role in different aspects of fear memory--acquisition and consolidation, retention, reconsolidation and extinction. Extinction is an important behavioural phenomenon which allows organism to adapt its behavior to a changing environment. Extinction of fear memory is a form of new inhibitory learning which interferes with expression of the initial acquired fear conditioning. Resistance to extinction is symptom of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder. The aim of the present review was to summarize own and literary data about GABAergic modulation of fear extinction and pharmacological correction of extinction impairment at influences on GABA(A)- and GABA(B)- receptors.

  2. Chemical antipredator defence is linked to higher extinction risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Many attributes of species may be linked to contemporary extinction risk, though some such traits remain untested despite suggestions that they may be important. Here, I test whether a trait associated with higher background extinction rates, chemical antipredator defence, is also associated with current extinction risk, using amphibians as a model system—a group facing global population declines. I find that chemically defended species are approximately 60% more likely to be threatened than species without chemical defence, although the severity of the contemporary extinction risk may not relate to chemical defence. The results confirm that background and contemporary extinction rates can be predicted from the same traits, at least in certain cases. This suggests that associations between extinction risk and phenotypic traits can be temporally stable over long periods. The results also provide novel insights into the relevance of antipredator defences for species subject to conservation concerns. PMID:28018657

  3. Modeling Extinction Risk of Endemic Birds of Mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The extinction risk of endemic birds of mainland China was modeled over evolutionary time. Results showed that extinction risk of endemic birds in mainland China always tended to be similar within subclades over the evolutionary time of species divergence, and the overall evolution of extinction risk of species presented a conservatism pattern, as evidenced by the disparity-through-time plot. A constant-rate evolutionary model was the best one to quantify the evolution of extinction risk of endemic birds of mainland China. Thus, there was no rate shifting pattern for the evolution of extinction risk of Chinese endemic birds over time. In a summary, extinction risk of endemic birds of mainland China is systematically quantified under the evolutionary framework in the present work.

  4. Late Devonian red tide and mass extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Molecular stratigraphical, carbonate carbon isotopic, stratigraphical and paleontological data show that algal booming, eutrophication, anoxia, hypersalinity, positive ( 13C excursion and biomass decreasing occurred in the offshore carbonate environments of the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) transition, which hints that red tide might frequently take place in the F-F transition of Guangxi, South China. We suggest that the mass extinction of the reef ecosystems and the shallow-water marine organisms in the F-F transition of the lower-middle latitudes may be related to the frequent occurrence of red tide in that time.

  5. Mass Extinctions and a Dark Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Eric David

    2016-01-01

    We consider whether the observed periodicity of mass extinctions and of comet impacts on Earth is consistent with Solar oscillation about the Galactic midplane and spiral arm crossings. It is of further interest to determine whether a hypothetical thin dark disk is necessary to give the right periodicity, and whether such a dark disk is allowed given kinematic and other observational constaints on the Galaxy's gravitational potential. We show that a dark disk consistent with recent bounds, combined with data for spiral arm crossing, can lead to the required periodicity. Moreover, we find that the best fit values correctly predict the date of the Chicxulub crater dated to 66 My ago.

  6. Extinct 244Pu in Ancient Zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Grenville; Harrison, T. Mark; Holland, Greg; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Gilmour, Jamie

    2004-10-01

    We have found evidence, in the form of fissiogenic xenon isotopes, for in situ decay of 244Pu in individual 4.1- to 4.2-billion-year-old zircons from the Jack Hills region of Western Australia. Because of its short half-life, 82 million years, 244Pu was extinct within 600 million years of Earth's formation. Detrital zircons are the only known relics to have survived from this period, and a study of their Pu geochemistry will allow us to date ancient metamorphic events and determine the terrestrial Pu/U ratio for comparison with the solar ratio.

  7. Gray Extinction in the Orion Trapezium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krełowski, J.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Strobel, A.; Mulas, G.

    2016-12-01

    We estimated distances to several Orion Trapezium stars using our CaII-method and confirm the distance recommended by Menten et al. However, we found that in the case of HD 37020 both individual distances (based on the trigonometric VLBI parallax and/or CaII-method) differ from the spectrophotometric distance by a factor of 2.5. We interpret this fact as a result of presence of gray (neutral) extinction of about 1.8 mag in front of this star. The correctness of the applied spectral type/ luminosity class, Sp/L, (based on new original spectra from HARPS-N) and measurements of color indices is discussed.

  8. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  9. CyberArc: a non-coplanar-arc optimization algorithm for CyberKnife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Vasant; Cheung, Joey P.; McGuinness, Christopher; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel non-coplanar-arc optimization algorithm (CyberArc). This method aims to reduce the delivery time of conventional CyberKnife treatments by allowing for continuous beam delivery. CyberArc uses a 4 step optimization strategy, in which nodes, beams, and collimator sizes are determined, source trajectories are calculated, intermediate radiation models are generated, and final monitor units are calculated, for the continuous radiation source model. The dosimetric results as well as the time reduction factors for CyberArc are presented for 7 prostate and 2 brain cases. The dosimetric quality of the CyberArc plans are evaluated using conformity index, heterogeneity index, local confined normalized-mutual-information, and various clinically relevant dosimetric parameters. The results indicate that the CyberArc algorithm dramatically reduces the treatment time of CyberKnife plans while simultaneously preserving the dosimetric quality of the original plans.

  10. 配电网单相接地电弧建模及仿真分析研究%Modeling and simulation analysis of arc in distribution network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许晔; 郭谋发; 陈彬; 杨耿杰

    2015-01-01

    Studies on modeling and simulation of arc help to choose arc-extinction methods and line-selection methods in distribution network. Four kinds of arc mathematical equations are given such as Cassie, Mayr, Schwarz and the cybernetic model. Mayr, Schwarz and the cybernetic model are suitable for describing the arc characteristics when the grounding current is small. The arc model of Schwarz and the cybernetics is established, and these two models are compared using a test circuit of arc characteristics. The cybernetic model can set arc length, reflect the arc fault conditions and apply to simulation of single-phase arc grounding fault in resonant earthed system. The resonance earthed system model and the cybernetic model are established by ATP-EMTP, and the effect of arc length on arc impedance, steady and transient arc characteristics is analyzed. The results show that the cybernetic model is more intuitive and accurate to simulate arc grounding fault in resonant earthed system.%为选择有效的配电网接地消弧措施及选线方法,有必要进行电弧建模及仿真研究。给出Cassie、Mayr、Schwarz、控制论等四种电弧模型的数学方程,其中Mayr、Schwarz、控制论等三种电弧模型适合描述接地电流较小的电弧的故障特征。建立Schwarz和控制论电弧仿真模型,并利用电弧特性测试电路对这两种模型做仿真对比分析。控制论模型因能直接设置弧长,直观地反映配电线路故障拉弧情况,更适用于谐振接地系统单相弧光接地故障仿真研究。采用ATP-EMTP软件建立谐振接地系统模型和控制论电弧模型,分析了不同电弧长度对电弧阻抗、接地电弧稳态和暂态特性的影响。仿真结果表明,利用控制论电弧模型可较直观且准确地仿真谐振接地系统弧光接地故障。

  11. The Upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2014-01-01

    During the high luminosity phase of the LHC starting around 2025 (HL-LHC), the machine is expected to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of $5\\cdot10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. A total of 3000~fb$^{-1}$ of data is foreseen to be delivered, hereby increasing the physics potential of the LHC experiments significantly. However, this fivefold increase in luminosity compared to the design luminosity of the LHC will lead to a higher track multiplicity in the silicon tracking detectors of the experiments, and to severe radiation levels. In order to maintain physics capability, CMS will build a completely new tracking detector comprising a pixel detector and an outer tracker. Furthermore, information from the outer tracker will be used in the first level trigger of CMS to ensure a sufficient trigger rejection. For this purpose, CMS will use so-called p$_{T}$ modules which will provide a momentum measurement at the module level. These modules consist of two back-to-back strip sensors for the outer layers, and a st...

  12. The risk of extinction - the mutational meltdown or the overpopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Malarz, K.

    2006-01-01

    The phase diagrams survival-extinction for the Penna model with parameters: (mutations rate)-(birth rate), (mutation rate)-(harmful mutations threshold), (harmful mutation threshold)-(minimal reproduction age) are presented. The extinction phase may be caused by either mutational meltdown or overpopulation. When the Verhulst factor is responsible for removing only newly born babies and does not act on adults the overpopulation is avoided and only genetic factors may lead to species extinction.

  13. Compound stimulus extinction reduces spontaneous recovery in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Cesar A.O.; Dunsmoor, Joseph E.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Fear-related behaviors are prone to relapse following extinction. We tested in humans a compound extinction design (“deepened extinction”) shown in animal studies to reduce post-extinction fear recovery. Adult subjects underwent fear conditioning to a visual and an auditory conditioned stimulus (CSA and CSB, respectively) separately paired with an electric shock. The target CS (CSA) was extinguished alone followed by compound presentations of the extinguished CSA and nonextinguished CSB. Reco...

  14. Extinction and dust properties in a clumpy medium

    OpenAIRE

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) The dust content of the universe is primarily explored via its interaction with stellar photons, producing interstellar extinction. However, owing to the physical extension of the observing beam, observations may detect scattered photons, resulting in a change in the observed (or effective) extinction, depending on the spatial distribution of the dust and the resolution of the instrument. We investigate the influence of clumpy dust distributions on effective extinction toward embed...

  15. A Comprehensive Quantitative Assessment of Bird Extinction Risk in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Nathália Machado; Rafael Dias Loyola

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to avoid species loss, scientists have focused their efforts on the mechanisms making some species more prone to extinction than others. However, species show different responses to threats given their evolutionary history, behavior, and intrinsic biological features. We used bird biological features and external threats to (1) understand the multiple pathways driving Brazilian bird species to extinction, (2) to investigate if and how extinction risk is geographically structured,...

  16. Experience with Dynamic Reinforcement Rates Decreases Resistance to Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Andrew R.; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-01-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of f...

  17. The Effect of Size and Ecology on Extinction Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, C.; Yuan, A.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    Although life on Earth first emerged as prokaryotic organisms, it eventually evolved into billions of different species. However, extinctions on Earth, especially the five mass extinctions, have decimated species. So what leads to a species survival or demise during a mass extinction? Are certain species more susceptible to extinctions based on their size and ecology? For this project, we focused on the data of marine animals. To examine the impact of size and ecology on a species's likelihood of survival, we compared the sizes and ecologies of the survivors and victims of the five mass extinctions. The ecology, or life mode, of a genus consists of the combination of tiering, motility, and feeding mechanism. Tiering refers to the animal's typical location in the water column and sediments, motility refers to its ability to move, and feeding mechanism describes the way the organism eats; together, they describe the animal's behavior. We analyzed the effect of ecology on survival using logistic regression, which compares life mode to the success or failure of a genus during each mass extinction interval. For organism size, we found the extinct organisms' mean size (both volume and length) and compared it with the average size of survivors on a graph. Our results show that while surviving genera of mass extinctions tended to be slightly larger than those that went extinct, there was no significant difference. Even though the Permian (Changhsingian) and Triassic (Rhaetian) extinctions had larger surviving species, likewise the difference was small. Ecology had a more obvious impact on the likelihood of survival; fast-moving, predatory pelagic organisms were the most likely to go extinct, while sedentary, infaunal suspension feeders had the greatest chances of survival. Overall, ecology played a greater role than size in determining the survival of a species. With this information, we can use ecology to predict which species would survive future extinctions.

  18. Evaluating the presence versus absence of the reinforcer during extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Mariana I; Borrero, John C; Mendres-Smith, Amber E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of extinction when the reinforcer was present versus absent. These effects were examined with 2 human operant procedures (i.e., a computer program and a mechanical apparatus) with college students as participants. Discriminable properties of the apparatus appeared to influence responding during extinction. In general, responding during extinction was less likely with the mechanical apparatus when the reinforcer was absent and more likely with the computer program.

  19. How humans drive speciation as well as extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Maron, M.

    2016-01-01

    A central topic for conservation science is evaluating how human activities influence global species diversity. Humanity exacerbates extinction rates. But by what mechanisms does humanity drive the emergence of new species? We review human-mediated speciation, compare speciation and known extinct...... and other metrics, risk aversion, taboo trade-offs and spatial heterogeneity. We conclude that evaluating speciation alongside extinction could result in more nuanced understanding of biosphere trends, clarifying what it is we actually value about biodiversity....

  20. Extinction in the Galaxy from surface brightnesses of ESO-LV galaxies : Testing "standard" extinction maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choloniewski, J.; Valentijn, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    A new method for the determination of the extinction in the Galaxy is proposed. The method uses surface brightnesses of external galaxies in the B and R-bands. The observational data have been taken from the ESO-LV galaxy catalog. As a first application of our model we derive the ratio of R-band to

  1. Primate extinction risk and historical patterns of speciation and extinction in relation to body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Luke J; Arnold, Christian; Machanda, Zarin; Nunn, Charles L

    2011-04-22

    Body mass is thought to influence diversification rates, but previous studies have produced ambiguous results. We investigated patterns of diversification across 100 trees obtained from a new Bayesian inference of primate phylogeny that sampled trees in proportion to their posterior probabilities. First, we used simulations to assess the validity of previous studies that used linear models to investigate the links between IUCN Red List status and body mass. These analyses support the use of linear models for ordinal ranked data on threat status, and phylogenetic generalized linear models revealed a significant positive correlation between current extinction risk and body mass across our tree block. We then investigated historical patterns of speciation and extinction rates using a recently developed maximum-likelihood method. Specifically, we predicted that body mass correlates positively with extinction rate because larger bodied organisms reproduce more slowly, and body mass correlates negatively with speciation rate because smaller bodied organisms are better able to partition niche space. We failed to find evidence that extinction rates covary with body mass across primate phylogeny. Similarly, the speciation rate was generally unrelated to body mass, except in some tests that indicated an increase in the speciation rate with increasing body mass. Importantly, we discovered that our data violated a key assumption of sample randomness with respect to body mass. After correcting for this bias, we found no association between diversification rates and mass.

  2. Prostate treatments, 1MRT o RapidArc; Tratamiento de prostata, IMART o RapidArc?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro novais, J.; Ruiz Maqueda, S.; Pardo Perez, E.; Molina Lopez, M. Y.; Cerro Penalver, E.

    2015-07-01

    Techniques that modulate the dose (as IMRT or RapidArcTM) improve dose homogeneity within the target volume decreasing the dose in healthy organs. The aim of this work is to study the dosimetric differences in prostate radiotherapy treatments with IMRT and RapidArcTM. The results of the 109 patients studied show that plans to RapidArcTM have better coverage, compliance and dose gradient outside the target volume. (Author)

  3. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  4. Palaeomagnetic constraints on the geodynamic evolution of the Gibraltar Arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijgsman, W.; Garces, M.

    2004-01-01

    Subduction zone roll-back was recently put forward as a convincing model to explain the geometry and evolution of the Gibraltar Arc. For other subduction-related arc systems of the Mediterranean, such as the Calabrian Arc and the Hellenic Arc, palaeomagnetic rotation data from Neogene extensional ba

  5. Effect of arc on radiation thermometry in welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮玉; 王燕; 武宝林

    2002-01-01

    The effect of arc on radiation thermometry is analyzed in a field close to the arc during the welding process, and the ratio of signal to noise and other factors are obtained for a small current arc .The method of the temperature measurement is feasible when the arc current is decreased to a smaller value in the welding process.

  6. Resistance Characteristics of Arc in Long Air Gap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhanqing; YU Junjie; ZENG Rong; CHEN He; PENG Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Arc resistance is an important parameter for characterizing long arcs in air,and its laboratory testing is of importance for accurate arc modeling of electromagnetic transient caused by short circuit fault.Therefore,we constructed an experimental system to study the characteristics of long AC arc in air.Driven by currents of 10 kA or 40 kA (root mean square value),the system produces arcs with different initial lengths of 1 m,2 m and 4 m,and the movement of the arcs are captured by a high-speed camera.After performing experiments using the system,we carried out analysis and comparisons of the arc resistance of arcs with different lengths and different currents,as well as a study of the relationship between the macro-morphology and the resistance of the arcs.Conclusions were drawn from the experimental results:the arc voltage had obvious saturation characteristics; the arc resistance increased with the increase of arc length and the decrease of current; the arcs bended or extended significantly in time and the peak arc voltage within a single cycle increased correspondingly; the arcs had voltage and current in the same phase.In the end,a formula of arc resistance based on the experiment results is derived.

  7. Requirement for BDNF in the reconsolidation of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiske, Andressa; Rossato, Janine I; Köhler, Cristiano A; Gonzalez, Maria Carolina; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-04-22

    Therapies based on the impairment of reconsolidation or the enhancement of extinction offer the possibility of decreasing the persistent recollection of distressing memories. However, the direct interplay between reconsolidation and extinction has rarely been considered. Previously, we reported that reactivation induces reconsolidation of fear extinction memory. Here, using a step-down inhibitory avoidance learning paradigm in rats, we show that intrahippocampus infusion of function-blocking anti-BDNF antibody immediately or 6 h after extinction memory reactivation impairs the reconsolidation of extinction. Extinction memory reactivation increases proBDNF, BDNF, and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) phosphorylation levels in dorsal CA1, while blocking BDNF maturation in the hippocampus with plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 hinders the persistence of extinction and induces the recurrence of fear. Moreover, coinfusion of recombinant BDNF (0.25 μg/side) after extinction memory reactivation impedes the recovery of the avoidance response induced by inhibiting gene expression and protein synthesis in the dorsal hippocampus. Our findings unravel a new role for BDNF, suggesting that this neurotrophin is necessary and sufficient to maintain the reactivated fear extinction engram.

  8. Extinction of Learned Fear Induces Hippocampal Place Cell Remapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Melissa E; Yuan, Robin K; Keinath, Alexander T; Ramos Álvarez, Manuel M; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2015-06-17

    The extinction of learned fear is a hippocampus-dependent process thought to embody new learning rather than erasure of the original fear memory, although it is unknown how these competing contextual memories are represented in the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated that contextual fear conditioning results in hippocampal place cell remapping and long-term stabilization of novel representations. Here we report that extinction learning also induces place cell remapping in C57BL/6 mice. Specifically, we observed cells that preferentially remapped during different stages of learning. While some cells remapped in both fear conditioning and extinction, others responded predominantly during extinction, which may serve to modify previous representations as well as encode new safe associations. Additionally, we found cells that remapped primarily during fear conditioning, which could facilitate reacquisition of the original fear association. Moreover, we also observed cells that were stable throughout learning, which may serve to encode the static aspects of the environment. The short-term remapping observed during extinction was not found in animals that did not undergo fear conditioning, or when extinction was conducted outside of the conditioning context. Finally, conditioning and extinction produced an increase in spike phase locking to the theta and gamma frequencies. However, the degree of remapping seen during conditioning and extinction only correlated with gamma synchronization. Our results suggest that the extinction learning is a complex process that involves both modification of pre-existing memories and formation of new ones, and these traces coexist within the same hippocampal representation.

  9. Hypoxia, global warming, and terrestrial late Permian extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huey, Raymond B; Ward, Peter D

    2005-04-15

    A catastrophic extinction occurred at the end of the Permian Period. However, baseline extinction rates appear to have been elevated even before the final catastrophe, suggesting sustained environmental degradation. For terrestrial vertebrates during the Late Permian, the combination of a drop in atmospheric oxygen plus climate warming would have induced hypoxic stress and consequently compressed altitudinal ranges to near sea level. Our simulations suggest that the magnitude of altitudinal compression would have forced extinctions by reducing habitat diversity, fragmenting and isolating populations, and inducing a species-area effect. It also might have delayed ecosystem recovery after the mass extinction.

  10. Experience with dynamic reinforcement rates decreases resistance to extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2016-03-01

    The ability of organisms to detect reinforcer-rate changes in choice preparations is positively related to two factors: the magnitude of the change in rate and the frequency with which rates change. Gallistel (2012) suggested similar rate-detection processes are responsible for decreases in responding during operant extinction. Although effects of magnitude of change in reinforcer rate on resistance to extinction are well known (e.g., the partial-reinforcement-extinction effect), effects of frequency of changes in rate prior to extinction are unknown. Thus, the present experiments examined whether frequency of changes in baseline reinforcer rates impacts resistance to extinction. Pigeons pecked keys for variable-interval food under conditions where reinforcer rates were stable and where they changed within and between sessions. Overall reinforcer rates between conditions were controlled. In Experiment 1, resistance to extinction was lower following exposure to dynamic reinforcement schedules than to static schedules. Experiment 2 showed that resistance to presession feeding, a disruptor that should not involve change-detection processes, was unaffected by baseline-schedule dynamics. These findings are consistent with the suggestion that change detection contributes to extinction. We discuss implications of change-detection processes for extinction of simple and discriminated operant behavior and relate these processes to the behavioral-momentum based approach to understanding extinction.

  11. Has the Earth's sixth mass extinction already arrived?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnosky, Anthony D; Matzke, Nicholas; Tomiya, Susumu; Wogan, Guinevere O U; Swartz, Brian; Quental, Tiago B; Marshall, Charles; McGuire, Jenny L; Lindsey, Emily L; Maguire, Kaitlin C; Mersey, Ben; Ferrer, Elizabeth A

    2011-03-03

    Palaeontologists characterize mass extinctions as times when the Earth loses more than three-quarters of its species in a geologically short interval, as has happened only five times in the past 540 million years or so. Biologists now suggest that a sixth mass extinction may be under way, given the known species losses over the past few centuries and millennia. Here we review how differences between fossil and modern data and the addition of recently available palaeontological information influence our understanding of the current extinction crisis. Our results confirm that current extinction rates are higher than would be expected from the fossil record, highlighting the need for effective conservation measures.

  12. Extinction and ecosystem function in the marine benthos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solan, Martin; Cardinale, Bradley J; Downing, Amy L; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Ruesink, Jennifer L; Srivastava, Diane S

    2004-11-12

    Rapid changes in biodiversity are occurring globally, yet the ecological impacts of diversity loss are poorly understood. Here we use data from marine invertebrate communities to parameterize models that predict how extinctions will affect sediment bioturbation, a process vital to the persistence of aquatic communities. We show that species extinction is generally expected to reduce bioturbation, but the magnitude of reduction depends on how the functional traits of individual species covary with their risk of extinction. As a result, the particular cause of extinction and the order in which species are lost ultimately govern the ecosystem-level consequences of biodiversity loss.

  13. Seldovia, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seldovia, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  14. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  15. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, D.; Bulgadaryan, D.; Hwangbo, D.; Kajita, S.; Kolodko, D.; Kurnaev, V.; Ohno, N.

    2016-09-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope.

  16. Asymptotic Markov inequality on Jordan arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totik, V.

    2017-03-01

    Markov's inequality for the derivative of algebraic polynomials is considered on C^2-smooth Jordan arcs. The asymptotically best estimate is given for the kth derivative for all k=1,2,\\dots . The best constant is related to the behaviour around the endpoints of the arc of the normal derivative of the Green's function of the complementary domain. The result is deduced from the asymptotically sharp Bernstein inequality for the kth derivative at inner points of a Jordan arc, which is derived from a recent result of Kalmykov and Nagy on the Bernstein inequality on analytic arcs. In the course of the proof we shall also need to reduce the analyticity condition in this last result to C^2-smoothness. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  17. Seward, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  18. Laboratory arc furnace features interchangeable hearths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J. L.; Kruger, O. L.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory arc furnace using rapidly interchangeable hearths gains considerable versatility in casting so that buttons or special shaped castings can be produced. It features a sight glass for observation.

  19. Arc -furnace Flicker Compensation in Ethiopia.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    supply system of the Ethiopian Electric Light and ... independent of the magnitude of the arc furnace load. They were intolerable ..... Weather sealing (Important in Ethi- opia). 3. .... nace currents during the worst periods of initial melt- ing down.

  20. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tony; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philp; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois; Arumugam, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H&N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used.

  1. Rapid magmatic processes accompany arc-continent collision: the Western Bismarck arc, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Heather; Gill, Jim; Turner, Simon; Caulfield, John; Edwards, Louise; Day, Simon

    2012-11-01

    New U-Th-Ra, major and trace element, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data are presented for young lavas from the New Britain and Western Bismarck arcs in Papua New Guinea. New Britain is an oceanic arc, whereas the latter is the site of an arc-continent collision. Building on a recent study of the Manus Basin, contrasts between the two arcs are used to evaluate the processes and timescales of magma generation accompanying arc-continent collision and possible slab detachment. All three suites share many attributes characteristic of arc lavas that can be ascribed to the addition of a regionally uniform subduction component derived from the subducting altered oceanic crust and sediment followed by dynamic melting of the modified mantle. However, the Western Bismarck arc lavas diverge from the Pb isotope mixing array formed by the New Britain and the Manus Basin lavas toward elevated 208Pb/204Pb. We interpret this to reflect a second and subsequent addition of sediment melt at crustal depth during collision. 238U and 226Ra excesses are preserved in all of the lavas and are greatest in the Western Bismarck arc. High-Mg andesites with high Sr/Y ratios in the westernmost arc are attributed to recent shallow mantle flux melting at the slab edge. Data for two historical rhyolites are also presented. Although these rhyolites formed in quite different tectonic settings and display different geochemical and isotopic compositions, both formed from mafic parents within millennia.

  2. Arcing flow phenomena; Visualisation des ecoulements en presence d'un arc de coupure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachard, H.; Mottet, C. [Schneider Electric, Centre de Recherches A2, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-06-01

    Optical diagnostic techniques have been used for studying electric arcing phenomena at Schneider Electric for many years now, and are integrated in new-product development practice. Studies have so far focused on electric arc behaviour, but today we are especially interested in studying the interaction of an electric arc with its immediate environment, i.e. gaseous medium and neighbouring materials. This article starts by discussing the specificities of electric arcs in low-voltage circuit-breakers, then goes on to examine diagnostic methods for viewing the physical phenomena of interest. After setting out and analysing the results obtained, we conclude with details on planned upgrades targeting enhanced diagnostic performance. (author)

  3. Influence of metal vapour on arc temperatures in gas-metal arc welding: convection versus radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-06-01

    The presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding has been shown to have two strong effects on the arc plasma: a decrease in temperature throughout the arc, and the formation of a local temperature minimum near the arc axis. These effects have been attributed, on the basis of different computational models, to either the increased radiative emission associated with the presence of metal vapour in the arc plasma, or the influence of the metal vapour influx on convective flow in the arc. This question is investigated using a three-dimensional computational model in which the production and the transport of metal vapour are taken into account self-consistently. Parameters relevant to welding of thin sheets of aluminum are examined. For these conditions, it is found that the first effect (the decrease in temperature throughout the arc) is due to both the increased radiative emission and the influence of the metal vapour influx on flow. The second effect (the local temperature minimum, which in this case occurs just below the wire electrode) is a consequence of the influence of aluminum vapour produced from the wire electrode on flow in the arc. By examining published results and the energy balance in the plasma, it is shown that for welding of steel with higher arc currents, the increased radiative emission can lead to a local temperature minimum at a greater distance from the wire electrode.

  4. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  5. Where exactly are the arcs of Neptune?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Porco, Carolyn C.

    1993-12-01

    A largely neglected secular perturbation that changes the effective mean motion is noted to occur on the osculating longitude at epoch, due to periodic close encounters between arc particles of Neptune and Galatea. This perturbation is here examined both analytically and numerically. It is shown that the confinement mechanism, based on single-satellite shepherding by Galatea, remains in force at the new position of the arc-confining resonances.

  6. Study on Ceramic Cutting by Plasma Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Engineering ceramics are typical difficult-to-machine materials because of high hardness and brittleness. PAC (Plasma Arc Cutting) is a very important thermal cutting process and has been successfully used in cutting stainless steel and other difficult-to-machine alloys. PAC's application in cutting ceramics, however, is still limited because the most ceramics are not good electronic conducts, and transferred plasma arc cannot be produced between cathode and work-piece. So we presented a method of plasma ...

  7. New method for capturing arc of moving on switching apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jiao-min; WANG Jing-hong

    2007-01-01

    The switching arc that occurs in contact gap when contact of low voltage apparatus closes or breaks in electric circuit is harmful to the contacts, insulation, and reliability of electrical gear because of its very high temperature. As arcing time is very short in switching gear, it is very difficult to observe arc phenomena directly for researchers. Therefore, visualization of switching arc is important for understanding arc phenomena, to analyze the arc features, and to improve the design and reliability of switching gear. Based on analyzing the visualization methods proposed by researchers, a new switching arc capturing approach is introduced in this paper. Arc image acquisition, and image processing techniques were studied. A switching arc image acquisition and visual simulation software based on high speed CCD camera hard ware system was designed and implemented to yield enhanced arc image with good visual effect.

  8. Science observed: The mass-extinction debates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, W.

    1994-01-01

    The upheaval triggered in 1980 by the Alvarez-Berkeley group impact hypothesis transformed the literature of mass extinctions from an unfocused, sporadic collection of papers that virtually ignored extraterrestrial causes and treated endogenous ones only sparingly better to an integrated, diverse body of literature. Research programs organized seemingly overnight spawned collaborative teams whose members, often from distant, isolated disciplines, redirected their careers in order to address the captivating, high-stakes issues. The initial, generally skeptical, cool reception of the impact hypothesis might have been predicted for any of a number of reasons: such an instantaneous catastrophe contravened earth science's reigning philosophy of uniformitarianism; it was formulated from a form of evidence - siderophile element anomalies - alien to the community charged with its appraisal; it advanced a causal mechanism that was improbable in terms of canonical knowledge; and it was proffered mainly by specialists alien to earth and biological science, especially paleobiology. Early on it became clear that irrespective of which causal hypothesis was chosen, the chosen one would be the strongest predictor of how the chooser would select and apply standards in assessing evidence bearing on all such hypothesis. Less strong correlation also appeared between disciplinary speciality and the assessment of evidence. Such correlations varied with the level of specialization; the most robust correlations appeared in the broadest areas of science practice. The gestalt (mindset) seemingly engendered by the embrace of an extinction hypothesis overrode, or was stronger than, the intellectual predispositions attributable to disciplinary specialty.

  9. Critical Multitype Branching Systems: Extinction Results

    CERN Document Server

    Kevei, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We consider a critical branching particle system in $\\R^d$, composed of individuals of a finite number of types $i\\in\\{1,...,K\\}$. Each individual of type $i$ moves independently according to a symmetric $\\alpha_i$-stable motion. We assume that the particle lifetimes and offspring distributions are type-dependent. Under the usual independence assumptions in branching systems, we prove extinction theorems in the following cases: (1) all the particle lifetimes have finite mean, or (2) there is a type whose lifetime distribution has heavy tail, and the other lifetimes have finite mean. We get a more complex dynamics by assuming in case (2) that the most mobile particle type corresponds to a finite-mean lifetime: in this case, local extinction of the population is determined by an interaction of the parameters (offspring variability, mobility, longevity) of the long-living type and those of the most mobile type. The proofs are based on a precise analysis of the occupation times of a related Markov renewal process...

  10. Patterns of species ranges, speciation, and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birand, Aysegul; Vose, Aaron; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The exact nature of the relationship among species range sizes, speciation, and extinction events is not well understood. The factors that promote larger ranges, such as broad niche widths and high dispersal abilities, could increase the likelihood of encountering new habitats but also prevent local adaptation due to high gene flow. Similarly, low dispersal abilities or narrower niche widths could cause populations to be isolated, but such populations may lack advantageous mutations due to low population sizes. Here we present a large-scale, spatially explicit, individual-based model addressing the relationships between species ranges, speciation, and extinction. We followed the evolutionary dynamics of hundreds of thousands of diploid individuals for 200,000 generations. Individuals adapted to multiple resources and formed ecological species in a multidimensional trait space. These species varied in niche widths, and we observed the coexistence of generalists and specialists on a few resources. Our model shows that species ranges correlate with dispersal abilities but do not change with the strength of fitness trade-offs; however, high dispersal abilities and low resource utilization costs, which favored broad niche widths, have a strong negative effect on speciation rates. An unexpected result of our model is the strong effect of underlying resource distributions on speciation: in highly fragmented landscapes, speciation rates are reduced.

  11. Evolutionary Catastrophes: The Science of Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Willis

    The stories behind the greatest scientific controversies are more than entertaining. They provide windows into the evolution of scientific thought, scientific method, technological achievements and their research applications, and the influence of individuals and personalities on a community's acceptance of a theory Epic controversies surround the theories for Earth's mass extinction events, and none is more spectacular than the continuing polemic over the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) mass extinctions and ultimate demise of the dinosaurs.In contrast to other great scientific debates, we tend to view the K/T event in the context of a crime scene, where the spectacularly diverse flora and fauna of a primordial Eden were unwittingly slain by one or more ruthless and efficient killers. A “foreign” suspect has been fingered; an intruder that killed suddenly and randomly has become the principal suspect. The main clues uncovered in the case include a global K/T iridium anomaly; shock-deformed minerals in K/T boundary sediments; the ˜6 5 m.y-old Deccan flood-basalt province, which covered an area roughly the size of France; and the ˜6 5 m.y-old Chicxulub impact crater in the Yucatan peninsula, which seems to be among the largest to have formed in the inner solar system over the past billion years.

  12. Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics by month and summarized annually. Outer Continental Shelf consists of Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and...

  13. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  14. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  15. Electric arc furnace models for flicker study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina González Castaño

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to evaluate voltage fluctuations or flicker of two electric arc furnace models through comparison with real data.Method: The first proposed model is founded on the energy conservation principle, which generates a non-linear differential equation modelling the electric arc voltage – current characteristics. Voltage fluctuations are generated using a chaotic circuit that modulates the amplitude of arc voltage. The second model is based on the empirical relationship between the arc diameter or length as well as voltage and electrical current on the arc. Voltage fluctuations are considered adding a random signal in the arc length. Both models are implemented in PSCADTM.Results: The results of both models are compared with real data taken at the most critical stage of the operation of the furnace, and they show that the model based on energy conservation has a lower average mean square error in the voltages and currents 5.6 V and 1.7 kA against 27,2 V y 3.38 kA obtained with the second model.Conclusions: Both models consider the nonlinearity and random behavior present in this type of load, validating their inclusion in computer models of electric power systems.

  16. Recent ARC developments: Through modularity to interoperability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnova, O; Cameron, D; Ellert, M; Groenager, M; Johansson, D; Kleist, J [NDGF, Kastruplundsgade 22, DK-2770 Kastrup (Denmark); Dobe, P; Joenemo, J; Konya, B [Lund University, Experimental High Energy Physics, Institute of Physics, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Fraagaat, T; Konstantinov, A; Nilsen, J K; Saada, F Ould; Qiang, W; Read, A [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, P. O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Kocan, M [Pavol Jozef Safarik University, Faculty of Science, Jesenna 5, SK-04000 Kosice (Slovakia); Marton, I; Nagy, Zs [NIIF/HUNGARNET, Victor Hugo 18-22, H-1132 Budapest (Hungary); Moeller, S [University of Luebeck, Inst. Of Neuro- and Bioinformatics, Ratzeburger Allee 160, D-23538 Luebeck (Germany); Mohn, B, E-mail: oxana.smirnova@hep.lu.s [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Div. of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Box 535, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-04-01

    The Advanced Resource Connector (ARC) middleware introduced by NorduGrid is one of the basic Grid solutions used by scientists worldwide. While being well-proven in daily use by a wide variety of scientific applications at large-scale infrastructures like the Nordic DataGrid Facility (NDGF) and smaller scale projects, production ARC of today is still largely based on conventional Grid technologies and custom interfaces introduced a decade ago. In order to guarantee sustainability, true cross-system portability and standards-compliance based interoperability, the ARC community undertakes a massive effort of implementing modular Web Service (WS) approach into the middleware. With support from the EU KnowARC project, new components were introduced and the existing key ARC services got extended with WS technology based standard-compliant interfaces following a service-oriented architecture. Such components include the hosting environment framework, the resource-coupled execution service, the re-engineered client library, the self-healing storage solution and the peer-to-peer information system, to name a few. Gradual introduction of these new services and client tools into the production middleware releases is carried out together with NDGF and thus ensures a smooth transition to the next generation Grid middleware. Standard interfaces and modularity of the new component design are essential for ARC contributions to the planned Universal Middleware Distribution of the European Grid Initiative.

  17. Making and breaking an Island arc: a new perspective from the Oligocene Kyushu-Palau arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, O.; Taylor, R. N.; Yuasa, M.; Ohara, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR) is a 2000km long remnant island arc that is separated from the active Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc system by a series of spreading and rift basins. In this study we present 40Ar/39Ar ages and geochemical data for new samples taken from the entire length of the Kyushu-Palau arc. As such, this data provides the first comprehensive evaluation of temporal and spatial changes that are present in an Eocene-Oligocene island arc. Kyushu-Palau arc geochemistry is evaluated alongside new data from the conjugate arc which is stranded within the IBM fore-arc. Boninitic magmatism gave way to transitional arc suites including high-Mg andesites at c. 45 Ma (Ishizuka et al., 2006). After the transitional 45-41 Ma period, a mature arc system developed through the Eocene-Oligocene time: This volcanism is now preserved as the KPR. Dating results from 33 sites indicate that the KPR was active between 25 and 43 Ma, but the majority of the exposed volcanism occurred in the final phase of this arc, between 25 and 27 Ma. Unlike the IBM, the KPR has only limited systematic along-arc trends and does not include any of the strongly HIMU lavas found to the south of Izu-Bonin. Two components found along the KPR are found to have geochemistry that suggests an origin in the supra-subduction mantle rather than from the descending ocean crust. Firstly, in the south of the arc, EM-2-like lavas are present where the West Philippine Basin was in the final stages of spreading. Secondly, EM-1-like lavas are present in a restricted section of the arc, suggesting a localised heterogeneity. Subduction flux beneath the KPR generally imparted a Pb isotope vector towards low Δ8/4 (19). This is a similar trend to the Eocene/Oligocene lavas found on the eastern side of the basins which split the arc at 25Ma. Another geochemical heterogeneity is found at the KPR-Daito Ridge intersection where arc magmatism occurred on pre-existing Daito Ridge crust: a Cretaceous remnant arc

  18. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  19. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.10 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in...

  20. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  1. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ...: 2010-119] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil... maximum daily civil penalty assessment. SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to... operations in the Outer Continental Shelf at least once every 3 years. This review ensures that the...

  2. 9 CFR 108.10 - Outer premises and stables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Outer premises and stables. 108.10 Section 108.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.10 Outer premises and stables. (a) The outer premises of...

  3. Acute stress impairs the retrieval of extinction memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raio, Candace M; Brignoni-Perez, Edith; Goldman, Rachel; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2014-07-01

    Extinction training is a form of inhibitory learning that allows an organism to associate a previously aversive cue with a new, safe outcome. Extinction does not erase a fear association, but instead creates a competing association that may or may not be retrieved when a cue is subsequently encountered. Characterizing the conditions under which extinction learning is expressed is important to enhancing the treatment of anxiety disorders that rely on extinction-based exposure therapy as a primary treatment technique. The ventromedial prefrontal cortex, which plays a critical role in the expression of extinction memory, has been shown to be functionally impaired after stress exposure. Further, recent work in rodents has demonstrated that exposure to stress leads to deficits in extinction retrieval, although this has yet to be tested in humans. To explore how stress might influence extinction retrieval in humans, participants underwent a differential aversive learning paradigm, in which one image was probabilistically paired with an aversive shock while the other image denoted safety. Extinction training directly followed, at which point reinforcement was omitted. A day later, participants returned to the lab and either completed an acute stress manipulation (i.e., cold pressor), or a control task, before undergoing an extinction retrieval test. Skin conductance responses and salivary cortisol concentrations were measured throughout each session as indices of fear arousal and neuroendocrine stress response, respectively. The efficacy of our stress induction was established by observing significant increases in cortisol for the stress condition only. We examined extinction retrieval by comparing conditioned responses during the last trial of extinction (day 1) with that of the first trial of re-extinction (day 2). Groups did not differ on initial fear acquisition or extinction, however, a day later participants in the stress group (n=27) demonstrated significantly

  4. A robust nonparametric method for quantifying undetected extinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Ryan A; Giam, Xingli; Sadanandan, Keren R; Fung, Tak; Rheindt, Frank E

    2016-06-01

    How many species have gone extinct in modern times before being described by science? To answer this question, and thereby get a full assessment of humanity's impact on biodiversity, statistical methods that quantify undetected extinctions are required. Such methods have been developed recently, but they are limited by their reliance on parametric assumptions; specifically, they assume the pools of extant and undetected species decay exponentially, whereas real detection rates vary temporally with survey effort and real extinction rates vary with the waxing and waning of threatening processes. We devised a new, nonparametric method for estimating undetected extinctions. As inputs, the method requires only the first and last date at which each species in an ensemble was recorded. As outputs, the method provides estimates of the proportion of species that have gone extinct, detected, or undetected and, in the special case where the number of undetected extant species in the present day is assumed close to zero, of the absolute number of undetected extinct species. The main assumption of the method is that the per-species extinction rate is independent of whether a species has been detected or not. We applied the method to the resident native bird fauna of Singapore. Of 195 recorded species, 58 (29.7%) have gone extinct in the last 200 years. Our method projected that an additional 9.6 species (95% CI 3.4, 19.8) have gone extinct without first being recorded, implying a true extinction rate of 33.0% (95% CI 31.0%, 36.2%). We provide R code for implementing our method. Because our method does not depend on strong assumptions, we expect it to be broadly useful for quantifying undetected extinctions. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Atmospheric extinction in simulation tools for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Natalie; Wilbert, Stefan; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Schnell, Franziska; Guevara, Diana Mancera; Buck, Reiner; Giuliano, Stefano; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric extinction causes significant radiation losses between the heliostat field and the receiver in a solar tower plants. These losses vary with site and time. State of the art is that in ray-tracing and plant optimization tools, atmospheric extinction is included by choosing between few constant standard atmospheric conditions. Even though some tools allow the consideration of site and time dependent extinction data, such data sets are nearly never available. This paper summarizes and compares the most common model equations implemented in several ray-tracing tools. There are already several methods developed and published to measure extinction on-site. An overview of the existing methods is also given here. Ray-tracing simulations of one exemplary tower plant at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) are presented to estimate the plant yield deviations between simulations using standard model equations instead of extinction time series. For PSA, the effect of atmospheric extinction accounts for losses between 1.6 and 7 %. This range is caused by considering overload dumping or not. Applying standard clear or hazy model equations instead of extinction time series lead to an underestimation of the annual plant yield at PSA. The discussion of the effect of extinction in tower plants has to include overload dumping. Situations in which overload dumping occurs are mostly connected to high radiation levels and low atmospheric extinction. Therefore it can be recommended that project developers should consider site and time dependent extinction data especially on hazy sites. A reduced uncertainty of the plant yield prediction can significantly reduce costs due to smaller risk margins for financing and EPCs. The generation of extinction data for several locations in form of representative yearly time series or geographical maps should be further elaborated.

  6. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine facilitates fear extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M B; Andero, R; Ressler, K J; Howell, L L

    2015-09-15

    Acutely administered 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') has been proposed to have long-term positive effects on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms when combined with psychotherapy. No preclinical data support a mechanistic basis for these claims. Given the persistent nature of psychotherapeutic gains facilitated by MDMA, we hypothesized that MDMA improves fear extinction learning, a key process in exposure-based therapies for PTSD. In these experiments, mice were first exposed to cued fear conditioning and treated with drug vehicle or MDMA before extinction training 2 days later. MDMA was administered systemically and also directly targeted to brain structures known to contribute to extinction. In addition to behavioral measures of extinction, changes in mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and Fos were measured after MDMA treatment and extinction. MDMA (7.8 mg kg(-1)) persistently and robustly enhanced long-term extinction when administered before extinction training. MDMA increased the expression of Fos in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), whereas increases in Bdnf expression were observed only in the amygdala after extinction training. Extinction enhancements were recapitulated when MDMA (1 μg) was infused directly into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), and enhancement was abolished when BDNF signaling was inhibited before extinction. These findings suggest that MDMA enhances fear memory extinction through a BDNF-dependent mechanism, and that MDMA may be a useful adjunct to exposure-based therapies for PTSD and other anxiety disorders characterized by altered fear learning.

  7. Late Pennsylvanian climate changes and palynomorph extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosanke, R.M.; Cecil, C.B.

    1996-01-01

    A major floral change occurs in the Upper Pennsylvanian strata in the Midcontinent, Illinois basin, and in the northern Appalachian basin of eastern United States. Lycospora spp. (derived from arborescent lycopsids) became extinct along with some other palynomorph taxa. This investigation is concerned with the importance of this major floral change. Samples were studied from western Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, and West Virginia (from a previous study) cover the stratigraphic interval from the Upper Freeport coal bed, uppermost part of the Allegheny Formation, to the Mahoning, Mason, Brush Creek, Wilgus, and Anderson coal beds in the lower part of the Conemaugh Formation. The floral change occurs either at or below the accepted Desmoinesian-Missourian boundary in the Midcontinent and Illinois basin, whereas in the northern Appalachians this change occurs in the lower part of the Conemaugh Formation, between the Mahoning and Brush Creek coal beds, or when the Mason is present, between the Mahoning and Mason coal beds. With the advent of late Middle Pennsylvanian time, the climate began to change from wet tropical to seasonal tropical. The Middle-Upper Pennsylvanian boundary is the culmination of this drying trend, which was marked by reduction of available water. The peat swamps are interpreted as having changed from the domed type of bog to the planar type under these circumstances. Thus, in general, the coals of the Conemaugh Formation are characteristically much thinner than those of the Allegheny Formation. This was caused by a number of factors including reduced or more seasonal rainfall, decline of arborescent lycopsids, and the increased dominance of herbaceous and fern plants. As a result, there are fewer minable coal beds in the Conemaugh Formation. The first coal bed above the extinction of Lycospora spp. is dominated by the palynomorph taxon Endosporites globiformis which is derived from a heterosporous, herbaceous lycopsid. However, Sigillaria, another

  8. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  9. Overview of 2008 Outer Planet Flagship Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process involved in the Phase-2 studies for the next Outer Planets Flagship (OPF). These studies will be a cooperative effort with ESA and JAXA in partnership with NASA. The annoucement of oppurtunity (AO) for the science instruments and the launch approval/planetary protection processes are reviewed. There is also discussion about capturing relevant lessons from the Cassini team, supporting international collaboration, and support for science definition teams. Some mission specific tasks are also reviewed, for the three missions being proposed: (1) Europa Explorer, (2) Jupiter System Observer and (3) Titan Explorer. A timeline for the studies is also included.

  10. Aging phenomena in the LHCb outer tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    The Outer Tracker (OT) consists of 53 760 straw tubes, covering in total an area of 360 m$^2$. The detector is foreseen to operate under large particle rates, up to 30 kHz/cm per straw in the region closest to the beam. Extensive aging tests conducted earlier on with prototype modules indicated excellent gain stability. In contrast, mass production modules show significant degradation under a rather model level of radiation. This paper presents the observed phenomenon, together with ongoing investigations to both prevent the effect, as well as to recover the gain loss.

  11. The Western Solomons Forearc: Independent Inner and Outer Forearc Paleo-Uplift Histories and Relationship to Megathrust Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F. W.; Thirumalai, K.; Lavier, L. L.; Papabatu, A. K.; Toba, T.; Shen, C. C.; Cai, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Solomons forearc has undergone repeated uplifts that probably were coseismic and similar to that during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 megathrust rupture that raised the outer forearc as much as 2.5 m. A parallel swath of the inner forearc subsided ~0.5 m during the 2007 event. The Western Solomons is ideal for crustal motion measurements because both the outer forearc above the seismogenic zone and the inner forearc are occupied by reef-fringed islands enabling land-based measurements of vertical displacements. U-series and 14C dating of uplifted corals and microatolls has provided the ages for a number of paleo-uplift events that we infer to have been coseismic. While the outer forearc has uplifted rapidly in late Holocene time at rates from ~1 to 8 mm/yr, the inner forearc has risen at only 0 - 1.1 mm/yr. It is notable that the inner and outer forearcs are separated by an arc-parallel boundary along which there is little or no net uplift. However, although both the inner and outer forearcs have late Quaternary histories of relatively rapid net uplift, they appear to have quite different uplift histories. The outer forearc has uplifted several times over the past 1000 years by as much as several meters in each event. Although the inner forearc subsided during the 2007 event and should subside during all events that ruptured the seismogenic zone beneath the outer forearc, it also has undergone abrupt late Holocene uplifts that do not correspond to those of the outer forearc. But the most surprising difference between the inner and outer forearcs is that 8-9 ka corals in growth position and emerged solution notches were found in a number of inner forearc sites adjacent to corals of the ~6 ka mid-Holocene high sea level that was a little higher than present sea level. Because sea level at 8-9 ka was 10-20 m lower than present in this region, 10-20 m of uplift is required between 8-9 ka and 6 ka during one or more tectonic events. Some of the 9 ka corals have

  12. Effects of process parameters on arc shape and penetration in twin-wire indirect arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-shan ZHANG; Mei-qing CAO; Dong-ting WU; Zeng-da ZOU

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effects of variable parameters on arc shape and depth of penetration in twin-wire indirect arc gas shielded welding were investigated. The variation of arc shape caused by changes of the parameters was recorded by a high-speed camera,and the depths of penetration of specimen were measured after bead welding by an optical microscope. Experiments indicated that proper parameters give birth to a concentrated and compressed welcimg arc, which Would increase the depth of penetration as the incensement of the arc foice Several pnncipal parameters including toe distance ot twin wires intersecting point to base metal,the included angle,and the content of shielding gas were determined. The arc turned more concentrated and the depth of penetration increased obviously as the welding current increased,the arc turned brighter while unobvlous change of penetration occurred as the arc voltage increased,and the deepest penetration was obtained when the welding speed was 10.5 mm/s..

  13. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  14. A comprehensive quantitative assessment of bird extinction risk in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Machado

    Full Text Available In an effort to avoid species loss, scientists have focused their efforts on the mechanisms making some species more prone to extinction than others. However, species show different responses to threats given their evolutionary history, behavior, and intrinsic biological features. We used bird biological features and external threats to (1 understand the multiple pathways driving Brazilian bird species to extinction, (2 to investigate if and how extinction risk is geographically structured, and (3 to quantify how much diversity is currently represented inside protected areas. We modeled the extinction risk of 1557 birds using classification trees and evaluated the relative contribution of each biological feature and external threat in predicting extinction risk. We also quantified the proportion of species and their geographic range currently protected by the network of Brazilian protected areas. The optimal classification tree showed different pathways to bird extinction. Habitat conversion was the most important predictor driving extinction risk though other variables, such as geographic range size, type of habitat, hunting or trapping and trophic guild, were also relevant in our models. Species under higher extinction risk were concentrated mainly in the Cerrado Biodiversity Hotspot and were not quite represented inside protected areas, neither in richness nor range. Predictive models could assist conservation actions, and this study could contribute by highlighting the importance of natural history and ecology in these actions.

  15. Extinction of drug seeking: Neural circuits and approaches to augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Gavan P

    2014-01-01

    Extinction training can reduce drug seeking behavior. This article reviews the neural circuits that contribute to extinction and approaches to enhancing the efficacy of extinction. Extinction of drug seeking depends on cortical-striatal-hypothalamic and cortical-hypothalamic-thalamic pathways. These pathways interface, in the hypothalamus and thalamus respectively, with the neural circuits controlling reinstatement of drug seeking. The actions of these pathways at lateral hypothalamic orexin neurons, and of perifornical/dorsomedial hypothalamic derived opioid peptides at kappa opioid receptors in the paraventricular thalamus, are important for inhibiting drug seeking. Despite effectively reducing or inhibiting drug seeking in the short term, extinguished drug seeking is prone to relapse. Three different strategies to augment extinction learning or retrieval are reviewed: pharmacological augmentation, retrieval - extinction training, and provision of extinction memory retrieval cues. These strategies have been used in animal models and with human drug users to enhance extinction or cue exposure treatments. They hold promise as novel strategies to promote abstinence from drug seeking. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  16. Deepened Extinction following Compound Stimulus Presentation: Noradrenergic Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janak, Patricia H.; Corbit, Laura H.

    2011-01-01

    Behavioral extinction is an active form of new learning involving the prediction of nonreward where reward has previously been present. The expression of extinction learning can be disrupted by the presentation of reward itself or reward-predictive stimuli (reinstatement) as well as the passage of time (spontaneous recovery) or contextual changes…

  17. Asymptotic behaviour near extinction of continuous-state branching processes

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Juan Carlos; Berzunza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we study the asymptotic behaviour near extinction of (sub-) critical continuous state branching processes. In particular, we establish an analogue of Khintchin's law of the iterated logarithm near extinction time for a continuous state branching process whose branching mechanism satisfies a given condition and its reflected process at its infimum.

  18. Late Pleistocene and Holocene mammal extinctions on continental Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, J. Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cause of late Quaternary mammal extinctions is the subject of intense debate spanning the fields of archeology and paleontology. In the global context, the losses on continental Africa have received little attention and are poorly understood. This study aims to inspire new discussion of African extinctions through a review of the extinct species and the chronology and possible causes of those extinctions. There are at least 24 large mammal (> 5 kg) species known to have disappeared from continental Africa during the late Pleistocene or Holocene, indicating a much greater taxonomic breadth than previously recognized. Among the better sampled taxa, these losses are restricted to the terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene, between 13,000 and 6000 yrs ago. The African extinctions preferentially affected species that are grazers or prefer grasslands. Where good terrestrial paleoenvironmental records are present, extinctions are associated with changes in the availability, productivity, or structure of grassland habitats, suggesting that environmental changes played a decisive role in the losses. In the broader evolutionary context, these extinctions represent recent examples of selective taxonomic winnowing characterized by the loss of grassland specialists and the establishment of large mammal communities composed of more ecologically flexible taxa over the last million years. There is little reason to believe that humans played an important role in African extinctions.

  19. Chronic Cannabinoid Administration in Vivo Compromises Extinction of Fear Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Mao, Sheng-Chun; Chen, Po-See; Gean, Po-Wu

    2008-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are critically involved in the extinction of fear memory. Here we examined the effects of repeated cannabinoid administration on the extinction of fear memory in rats and on inhibitory synaptic transmission in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) slices. Rats were treated with the CB1 receptor agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN 10 mg/kg, i.p.)…

  20. High-precision timeline for Earth's most severe extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Seth D; Bowring, Samuel; Shen, Shu-zhong

    2014-03-04

    The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe loss of marine and terrestrial biota in the last 542 My. Understanding its cause and the controls on extinction/recovery dynamics depends on an accurate and precise age model. U-Pb zircon dates for five volcanic ash beds from the Global Stratotype Section and Point for the Permian-Triassic boundary at Meishan, China, define an age model for the extinction and allow exploration of the links between global environmental perturbation, carbon cycle disruption, mass extinction, and recovery at millennial timescales. The extinction occurred between 251.941 ± 0.037 and 251.880 ± 0.031 Mya, an interval of 60 ± 48 ka. Onset of a major reorganization of the carbon cycle immediately precedes the initiation of extinction and is punctuated by a sharp (3‰), short-lived negative spike in the isotopic composition of carbonate carbon. Carbon cycle volatility persists for ∼500 ka before a return to near preextinction values. Decamillenial to millennial level resolution of the mass extinction and its aftermath will permit a refined evaluation of the relative roles of rate-dependent processes contributing to the extinction, allowing insight into postextinction ecosystem expansion, and establish an accurate time point for evaluating the plausibility of trigger and kill mechanisms.

  1. The Effects of Context Extinction on US Signal Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard Murray J.

    2007-01-01

    Two experiments with rats examined the effects of context extinction on responding to the signal value of an unconditioned stimulus (US). In Experiment 1, US signal value was first trained when a single food pellet signaled the delivery of three additional pellets. After training, rats received either context extinction (CE) or home cage (HC)…

  2. Extinction risks from climate change: macroecological and historical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Roland

    2009-06-09

    Human-induced climate change may threaten a large proportion of Earth's biota, but the uncertainties involved in projecting the future geographical distributions of species make quantitative predictions of extinction risk difficult to make. I discuss how insight from recent advances in macroecology and knowledge about species responses to past climate change can help predict extinction risks more accurately.

  3. Extinction can be estimated from moderately sized molecular phylogenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C

    2015-04-01

    Hundreds of studies have been dedicated to estimating speciation and extinction from phylogenies of extant species. Although it has long been known that estimates of extinction rates using trees of extant organisms are often uncertain, an influential paper by Rabosky (2010) suggested that when birth rates vary continuously across the tree, estimates of the extinction fraction (i.e., extinction rate/speciation rate) will appear strongly bimodal, with a peak suggesting no extinction and a peak implying speciation and extinction rates are approaching equality. On the basis of these results, and the realistic nature of this form of rate variation, it is now generally assumed by many practitioners that extinction cannot be understood from molecular phylogenies alone. Here, we reevaluated and extended the analyses of Rabosky (2010) and come to the opposite conclusion-namely, that it is possible to estimate extinction from molecular phylogenies, even with model violations due to heritable variation in diversification rate. Note that while it may be tempting to interpret our study as advocating the application of simple birth-death models, our goal here is to show how a particular model violation does not necessitate the abandonment of an entire field: use prudent caution, but do not abandon all hope. © 2015 The Author(s).

  4. GUI for studying the parameters influence of the electric arc model for a three-phase electric arc furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiormez, L.; Prostean, O.; Panoiu, M.; Panoiu, C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis regarding the modeling of the behavior for a three-phase electric arc furnace installation. Therefore, a block diagram is implemented in Simulink that represents the modeling of the entire electric arc furnace installation. This block diagram contains also the modeling of the electric arc which is the element that makes the electric arc furnace behaving as a nonlinear load. The values for the model parameters of the electric arc furnace installation are like the ones from the real installation taken into consideration. Other model parameters are the electric arc model ones. In order to study the influence of the parameters of the electric arc models, it is developed a Matlab program that contains the graphical user interfaces. These interfaces make connection with the models of the electric arc implemented in Simulink. The interfaces allow the user to modify parameters for each of the electric arc model. Current and voltage of the electric arc are the variables taken into account to study the influence of the parameters on the electric arc models. Waveforms for voltage and current of the electric arc are illustrated when a parameter of the model is modified in order to analyze the importance of this parameter on the electric arc model. Also, for each of the models is presented the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc because this characteristic gives information about the behavior of the electric arc furnace installation.

  5. Spiral structure in the outer Galactic disk. I. The Third Galactic Quadrant

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez, Ruben A; Carraro, Giovanni; Bronfman, Leonardo; Moitinho, Andre; Baume, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    We combine optical and radio observations to trace the spiral structure in the Third Quadrant of the Milky Way. The optical observations consist of a large sample of young open clusters and associations, whereas the radio observations consist of a survey of nearby and distant clouds observed in CO. Both the optical and radio samples are the largest ones insofar present in the literature. We use this unique material to analyze the behavior of interstellar extinction and to trace the detailed structure of the Third Galactic Quadrant (TGQ).We find that the Outer (Cygnus) grand design spiral arm is traced by stellar and CO components while the Perseus arm is traced solely by CO and is possibly being disrupted by the crossing of the Local (Orion) arm. The Local arm is traced by CO and young stars toward l = 240 degrees and extends for over 8 kpc along the line of sight reaching the Outer arm. Finally, we characterize the Galactic warp and compare the geometries implied by the young stellar and CO components.

  6. Molar extinction coefficients of some fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, G. K.; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B. S.; Gerward, L.

    2002-10-01

    The attenuation of gamma rays in some fatty acids, viz. formic acid (CH 2O 2), acetic acid (C 2H 4O 2), propionic acid (C 3H 6O 2), butyric acid (C 4H 8O 2), n-hexanoic acid (C 6H 12O 2), n-caprylic acid (C 8H 16O 2), lauric acid (C 12H 24O 2), myristic acid (C 14H 28O 2), palmitic acid (C 16H 32O 2), oleic acid (C 18H 34O 2) and stearic acid (C 18H 36O 2), has been measured at the photon energies 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV. Experimental values for the molar extinction coefficient, the effective atomic number and the electron density have been derived and compared with theoretical calculations. There is good agreement between experiment and theory.

  7. Carriers of the astronomical 2175 ? extinction feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, J; Dai, Z; Ernie, R; Browning, N; Graham, G; Weber, P; Smith, J; Hutcheon, I; Ishii, H; Bajt, S; Floss, C; Stadermann, F

    2004-07-20

    The 2175 {angstrom} extinction feature is by far the strongest spectral signature of interstellar dust observed by astronomers. Forty years after its discovery the origin of the feature and the nature of the carrier remain controversial. The feature is enigmatic because although its central wavelength is almost invariant its bandwidth varies strongly from one sightline to another, suggesting multiple carriers or a single carrier with variable properties. Using a monochromated transmission electron microscope and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy we have detected a 5.7 eV (2175 {angstrom}) feature in submicrometer-sized interstellar grains within interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere. The carriers are organic carbon and amorphous silicates that are abundant and closely associated with one another both in IDPs and in the interstellar medium. Multiple carriers rather than a single carrier may explain the invariant central wavelength and variable bandwidth of the astronomical 2175 {angstrom} feature.

  8. Scientists Drill for Clues to Dinosaur Extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一

    2001-01-01

    @@ [选注者言:20世纪70年代,墨西哥的Yucatan半岛的石油勘探发现了著名的Chicxulub大坑.直到20世纪90年代,科学家才认定,此大坑是由6千5百万年的一颗小行星撞击地球而形成,这次撞击导致地球上的恐龙灭绝.现在,科学家拟再次对此大坑作一番发掘研究,旨在:to determine once andfor all(一劳永逸的;彻底地)whatled to the global extinction(消灭)of the dinosaurs(恐龙)millions of years ago.

  9. [Silphium from Cyrenaica, an extinct medicinal plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Silphium was both a spice and a medicinal plant. It was regarded as "one of the most precious gifts of Nature to man" (Pliny), and was one of the main sources of revenue contributing to Cyrenaica's wealth. It was so critical to the Cyrenian economy that most of their coins bore a picture of the plant. But, by the time of Nero, the plant had become extinct, probably as a result of overgrazing and overcropping. The botanical identification of silphium is dificult, but the plant was an Umbellifera and most closely resembled Ferula tingitana. Hippocrates, Celsus, Galen and Oribasius recommended it for quartan fever, but it was also said to be useful for many other diseases.

  10. Light extinction method for solubility measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui Wang; Jingkang Wang; Qiuxiang Yin; Yongli Wang

    2005-01-01

    A novel measurement method for chemical solubility determination is brought forward, in which the advantages of two kinds of traditional methods are united. The results show that the concentration of unsolved particles suspending in the solution can be determined by measuring I/I0 (ratio of the transmission intensity to the incident intensity) of the laser beam permeating through the solution according to Lamben-Beer law. The biggest relative deviation for the solubility data determined is less than 1.5% for the sparingly soluble substances and 0.3% for the opulently soluble substances. By comparison of the experimental solubility data with previous data, the light extinction method is demonstrated to be stable and reliable.

  11. Promotion of cooperation by selective group extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Marvin A.; Nagler, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Multilevel selection is an important organizing principle that crucially underlies evolutionary processes from the emergence of cells to eusociality and the economics of nations. Previous studies on multilevel selection assumed that the effective higher-level selection emerges from lower-level reproduction. This leads to selection among groups, although only individuals reproduce. We introduce selective group extinction, where groups die with a probability inversely proportional to their group fitness. When accounting for this the critical benefit-to-cost ratio is substantially lowered. Because in game theory and evolutionary dynamics the degree of cooperation crucially depends on this ratio above which cooperation emerges, previous studies may have substantially underestimated the establishment and maintenance of cooperation.

  12. Method to reduce arc blow during DC arc welding of pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H.; Rueda-Morales, G.L.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perz-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Tabasco, (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Steel pipelines are huge ferromagnetic structures and can be easily subjected to arc blow during the DC arc welding process. The development of methods to avoid arc blow during pipeline DC arc welding is a major objective in the pipeline industry. This study developed a simple procedure to compensate the residual magnetic field in the groove during DC arc welding. A Gaussmeter was used to perform magnetic flux density measurements in pipelines in southern Mexico. These data were used to perform magnetic finite element simulations using FEMM. Different variables were studied such as the residual magnetic field in the groove or the position of the coil with respect to the groove. An empirical predictive equation was developed from these trials to compensate for the residual magnetic field. A new method of compensating for the residual magnetic field in the groove by selecting the number of coil turns and the position of the coil with respect to the groove was established.

  13. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  14. Overview of ArcGIS Engine Controls%ArcGIS Engine控件综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊

    2010-01-01

    ArcGIS Engine是ESRI公司发布的嵌入式地理信息系统软件开发包.基于ArcGIS Engine开发的应用程序一般有3类:独立非可视化应用程序、独立可视化应用程序和嵌入式应用程序,由于ArcGIS Engine提供了一套可复用、跨平台、设计良好的ArcGIS控件,因此利用控件开发可视化的GIS应用程序是一种常用的开发方式.重点探讨了ArcGIS Engine自带控件的功能、使用方法以及与伙伴控件之间的联系机制.

  15. Scientists Drill for Clues to Dinosaur Extinction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一

    2001-01-01

    20世纪70年代,墨西哥的Yucatan半岛的石油勘探发现了著名的Chicxulub大坑。直到20世纪90年代,科学家才认定,此大坑是由6千5百万年的一颗小行星撞击地球而形成,这次撞击导致地球上的恐龙灭绝。现在,科学家拟再次对此大坑作一番发掘研究,旨在:to determine once andfor all(一劳永逸的;彻底地)what led to the global extinction(消灭)of the dinosaurs(恐龙)millions of years ago。 本文为读者描绘了当年地球遭受此灭顶之灾时的可怕情景: Millions of years before humans even existed,a huge meteorite(陨星)measuring about 6 miles across and weighing perhaps billions of tons crashed intothe planet in a ball of fire,shrouding the Earth in a dense cloud of dust that blocked out sunlight and sent temperatures plummeting(垂直落下). 文中有一句话颇能引起读者的共鸣: It’s a 100 million-year event—they don’t occur that often,thank God. 文中的一个成语的使用却值得商榷: …hoping to determine once and for all(一劳永逸的;彻底地)what led to theglobal extinction(消灭)of the dinosaurs(恐龙)millions of years ago.在科学探索的道路上,once and for all也许只是一种良好

  16. Is chytridiomycosis driving Darwin's frogs to extinction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Soto-Azat

    Full Text Available Darwin's frogs (Rhinoderma darwinii and R. rufum are two species of mouth brooding frogs from Chile and Argentina that have experienced marked population declines. Rhinoderma rufum has not been found in the wild since 1980. We investigated historical and current evidence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd infection in Rhinoderma spp. to determine whether chytridiomycosis is implicated in the population declines of these species. Archived and live specimens of Rhinoderma spp., sympatric amphibians and amphibians at sites where Rhinoderma sp. had recently gone extinct were examined for Bd infection using quantitative real-time PCR. Six (0.9% of 662 archived anurans tested positive for Bd (4/289 R. darwinii; 1/266 R. rufum and 1/107 other anurans, all of which had been collected between 1970 and 1978. An overall Bd-infection prevalence of 12.5% was obtained from 797 swabs taken from 369 extant individuals of R. darwinii and 428 individuals representing 18 other species of anurans found at sites with current and recent presence of the two Rhinoderma species. In extant R. darwinii, Bd-infection prevalence (1.9% was significantly lower than that found in other anurans (7.3%. The prevalence of infection (30% in other amphibian species was significantly higher in sites where either Rhinoderma spp. had become extinct or was experiencing severe population declines than in sites where there had been no apparent decline (3.0%; x(2 = 106.407, P<0.001. This is the first report of widespread Bd presence in Chile and our results are consistent with Rhinoderma spp. declines being due to Bd infection, although additional field and laboratory investigations are required to investigate this further.

  17. Mechanisms of renewal after the extinction of instrumental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Travis P

    2013-07-01

    Four experiments with rats examined renewal of extinguished instrumental behavior when the reinforcement histories of the contexts were equated by giving complementary training and extinction of a different response (lever press and chain pull) in each context. In Experiments 1 through 3, renewal occurred when the response was tested in the acquisition context (ABA) or outside the extinction context (AAB and ABC). Further, in Experiments 1 through 3, when both responses were simultaneously available, there was a clear preference for the response that was not in its extinction context. In Experiment 4, renewal was not reduced when testing occurred in a context that had been associated with extinction of the other instrumental response. The experimental designs rule out differential context-reinforcer associations being the only contributing mechanism of renewal, and also raise questions about configural and occasion-setting accounts. The results are consistent with the idea that during extinction an inhibitory association is formed between the context and the response.

  18. Double Mass Extinctions and the Volcanogenic Dark Matter Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Abbas, S; Mohanty, S; Abbas, Samar; Abbas, Afsar; Mohanty, Shukadev

    1998-01-01

    A few of the major mass extinctions of paleontology have recently been found to consist of two distinct extinction peaks at higher resolution. A viable explanation for this remains elusive. In this paper it is shown that the recently proposed volcanogenic dark matter model can explain this puzzling characteristic of these extinctions. The accumulation and annihilation of dark matter in the center of the Earth due to the passage of a clump leads to excess heat generation with the consequent ejection of superplumes, followed by massive volcanism and attendant mass extinctions. This is preceded by an extinction pulse due to carcinogenesis arising from the direct interaction of the clumped dark matter with living organisms.

  19. Porous and Fluffy Grains in the Regions of Anomalous Extinction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. B. Vaidya; B. G. Anandarao; J. N. Desai; R. Gupta

    2000-06-01

    It has long been established that the ratio of total to selective extinction is anomalously large (≥ 5) in certain regions of the interstellar medium. In these regions of anomalous extinction the dust grains are likely to be irregular in shape and fluffy in structure. Using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) we calculate the extinction for porous and fluffy grains. We apply DDA first to solid spheroidal particles assumed to be made of a certain (large) number of dipoles. Then we systematically reduce the number of dipoles to model the porous grains. The aggregates of these particles are suggested to form the fluffy grains. We study the extinction for these particles as a function of grain size, porosity and wavelength. We apply these calculations to interpret the observed extinction data in the regions of star formation (e.g. the Orion complex).

  20. Mass Extinctions and The Sun's Encounters with Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Leitch, E M; Vasisht, Erik M. Leitch & Gautam

    1998-01-01

    The terrestrial fossil record shows that the exponential rise in biodiversity since the Precambrian period has been punctuated by large extinctions, at intervals of 40 to 140 Myr. These mass extinctions represent extremes over a background of smaller events and the natural process of species extinction. We point out that the non-terrestrial phenomena proposed to explain these events, such as boloidal impacts (a candidate for the end-Cretaceous extinction), and nearby supernovae, are collectively far more effective during the solar system's traversal of spiral arms. Using the best available data on the location and kinematics of the Galactic spiral structure (including distance scale and kinematic uncertainties), we present evidence that arm crossings provide a viable explanation for the timing of the large extinctions.