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Sample records for external tank et-124

  1. Space Transportation System (STS)-117 External Tank (ET)-124 Hail Damage Repair Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Timmy R.; Gentz, Steven J.; Barth, Timothy S.; Minute, Stephen A.; Flowers, Cody P.; Hamilton, David A.; Null, Cynthia H.; Schafer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    Severe thunderstorms with associated hail and high winds struck the STS-117 stack on February 26, 2007. Peak winds were recorded at 62 knots with hail sizes ranging from 0.3 inch to 0.8 inch in diameter. As a result of the storm, the North Carolina Foam Institute (NCFI) type 24-124 Thermal Protection System (TPS) foam on the liquid oxygen (LO2) ogive acreage incurred significant impact damage. The NCFI on the ET intertank and the liquid hydrogen (LH2) acreage sustained hail damage. The Polymer Development Laboratory (PDL)-1034 foam of the LO2 ice frost ramps (IFRs) and the Super-Lightweight Ablator (SLA) of the LO2 cable tray also suffered minor damage. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was asked to assess the technical feasibility of repairing the ET TPS, the reasonableness of conducting those repairs with the vehicle in a vertical, integrated configuration at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Vehicle Assemble Building (VAB), and to address attendant human factors considerations including worker fatigue and the potential for error. The outcome of the assessment is recorded in this document.

  2. External tank space debris considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, N.; Baillif, F.; Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital debris issues associated with maintaining a Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) on orbit are presented. The first issue is to ensure that the ET does not become a danger to other spacecraft by generating space debris, and the second is to protect the pressurized ET from penetration by space debris or meteoroids. Tests on shield designs for penetration resistance showed that when utilized with an adequate bumper, thermal protection system foam on the ET is effective in preventing penetration.

  3. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  4. External Tank Program - Legacy of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilet, Jeffery C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle; Welzyn, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The largest single element of Space Shuttle is the External Tank (ET), which serves as the structural backbone of the vehicle during ascent and provides liquid propellants to the Orbiter s three Main Engines. The ET absorbs most of the seven million pounds of thrust exerted by the Solid Rocket Boosters and Main Engines. The design evolved through several block changes, reducing weight each time. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. The initial configuration, the standard weight tank, weighed 76,000 pounds and was an aluminum 2219 structure. The light weight tank weighed 66,000 pounds and flew 86 missions. The super light weight tank weighed 58,500 pounds and was primarily an aluminum-lithium structure. The final configuration and low weight enabled system level performance sufficient for assembly of the International Space Station in a high inclination orbit, vital for international cooperation. Another significant challenge was the minimization of ice formation on the cryogenic tanks. This was essential due to the system configuration and the choice of ceramic thermal protection system materials on the Orbiter. Ice would have been a major debris hazard. Spray on foam insulation materials served multiple functions including thermal insulation, conditioning of cryogenic propellants, and thermal protection for the tank structure during ascent and entry. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, and handling, and transportation operations were developed. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir

  5. 46 CFR 154.408 - Cargo tank external pressure load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank external pressure load. 154.408 Section 154... Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 154.408 Cargo tank external pressure load. For the calculation required under § 154.406 (a)(2) and (b), the external pressure load must be the difference between the...

  6. INFLUENCE OF AN EXTERNAL TANK ON AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CRYOPLAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Mikhailov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculation and experimental investigations of an external fuel tank influence on longitudinal and lateral aerodynamic characteristics of the light transport cryoplan model has been executed. Tank influence on drag coefficient and lift-drag ratio of the model is presented. It's revealed the essential decreasing the model directional stability due to tank installation. Technical solutions intended for increasing cryoplan's directional stability are developed and preliminarily investigated.

  7. External Tank Program Legacy of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzyn, Ken; Pilet, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    I.Goal: a) Extensive TPS damage caused by extreme hail storm. b) Repair plan required to restore TPS to minimize program manifest impacts. II. Challenges: a) Skeptical technical community - Concerned about interactions of damage with known/unknown failure modes. b) Schedule pressure to accommodate ISS program- Next tank still at MAF c)Limited ET resources. III. How d We Do It?: a) Developed unique engineering requirements and tooling to minimize repairs. b) Performed large amount of performance testing to demonstrate understanding of repairs and residual conditions. c) Effectively communicated results to technical community and management to instill confidence in expected performance.

  8. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  9. NDE Methods for the External Tank Spray on Foam Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Santos, Fernando E.; Ussery, W. Warren

    2007-01-01

    The foam thermal protection system (TPS) of the space shuttle External Tank (ET) has provided some unique challenges to the nondestructive testing community. Three nondestructive evaluation methods have been developed to identify defects in the foam TPS of the ET. Terahertz imaging and backscatter radiography have been developed to identify voids in thick foam regions while shearography has been developed to identify shallow delaminations, shallow voids and crush damage in the foam. The basic theory of operation along with factors, determined from a series of designed experiments, affecting the results of these methods will be described. Results from both test panels and flight tank inspections will be provided, along with predicted probability of detection estimates to show the range in defect sizes and types that can be readily detected.

  10. External Tank (ET) Foam Thermal/Structural Analysis Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David F.; Ungar, Eugene K.; Chang, Li C.; Malroy, Eric T.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2008-01-01

    An independent study was performed to assess the pre-launch thermally induced stresses in the Space Shuttle External Tank Bipod closeout and Ice/Frost ramps (IFRs). Finite element models with various levels of detail were built that included the three types of foam (BX-265, NCFI 24-124, and PDL 1034) and the underlying structure and bracketry. Temperature profiles generated by the thermal analyses were input to the structural models to calculate the stress levels. An area of high stress in the Bipod closeout was found along the aluminum tank wall near the phenolic insulator and along the phenolic insulator itself. This area of high stress might be prone to cracking and possible delamination. There is a small region of slightly increased stress in the NCFI 24-124 foam near its joint with the Bipod closeout BX-265 foam. The calculated stresses in the NCFI 24-124 acreage foam are highest at the NCFI 24-124/PDL 1034/tank wall interface under the LO2 and LH2 IFRs. The highest calculated stresses in the LH2 NCFI 24-124 foam are higher than in similar locations in the LO2 IFR. This finding is consistent with the dissection results of IFRs on ET-120.

  11. Evaluation of Aerodynamic Drag and Torque for External Tanks in Low Earth Orbit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, William C; Witzgall, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A numerical procedure is described in which the aerodynamic drag and torque in low Earth orbit are calculated for a prototype Space Shuttle external tank and its components, the "LO2" and "LH2" tanks...

  12. Photogrammetry Measurements During a Tanking Test on the Space Shuttle External Tank, ET-137

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littell, Justin D.; Schmidt, Tim; Tyson, John; Oliver, Stanley T.; Melis, Matthew E.; Ruggeri, Charles

    2012-01-01

    On November 5, 2010, a significant foam liberation threat was observed as the Space Shuttle STS-133 launch effort was scrubbed because of a hydrogen leak at the ground umbilical carrier plate. Further investigation revealed the presence of multiple cracks at the tops of stringers in the intertank region of the Space Shuttle External Tank. As part of an instrumented tanking test conducted on December 17, 2010, a three dimensional digital image correlation photogrammetry system was used to measure radial deflections and overall deformations of a section of the intertank region. This paper will describe the experimental challenges that were overcome in order to implement the photogrammetry measurements for the tanking test in support of STS-133. The technique consisted of configuring and installing two pairs of custom stereo camera bars containing calibrated cameras on the 215-ft level of the fixed service structure of Launch Pad 39-A. The cameras were remotely operated from the Launch Control Center 3.5 miles away during the 8 hour duration test, which began before sunrise and lasted through sunset. The complete deformation time history was successfully computed from the acquired images and would prove to play a crucial role in the computer modeling validation efforts supporting the successful completion of the root cause analysis of the cracked stringer problem by the Space Shuttle Program. The resulting data generated included full field fringe plots, data extraction time history analysis, section line spatial analyses and differential stringer peak ]valley motion. Some of the sample results are included with discussion. The resulting data showed that new stringer crack formation did not occur for the panel examined, and that large amounts of displacement in the external tank occurred because of the loads derived from its filling. The measurements acquired were also used to validate computer modeling efforts completed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. The Space Shuttle's first super lightweight external tank arrives in Port Canaveral, Fla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Bren Wade, chief mate of the Liberty Star, looks up at the Space Shuttle's first super lightweight external tank as it is moved on a barge to Port Canaveral, Fla. The tank is scheduled to undergo processing at Kennedy Space Center for flight on STS-91, targeted for launch in late May. The improved tank is 7,500 pounds lighter than its predecessors and was developed to increase the Shuttle payload capacity on International Space Station assembly flights. From the outside, the new orange-colored tank appears identical to tanks currently used on Shuttle flights. Major changes, however, include the use of new materials and a revised internal design. The new liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks are constructed of aluminum lithium -- a lighter, stronger material than the metal alloy currently used. The redesigned walls of the liquid hydrogen tank were machined to provide additional strength and stability as well. This photograph was taken with a wide- angle lens.

  14. Simulation of Foam Divot Weight on External Tank Utilizing Least Squares and Neural Network Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2007-01-01

    Simulation of divot weight in the insulating foam, associated with the external tank of the U.S. space shuttle, has been evaluated using least squares and neural network concepts. The simulation required models based on fundamental considerations that can be used to predict under what conditions voids form, the size of the voids, and subsequent divot ejection mechanisms. The quadratic neural networks were found to be satisfactory for the simulation of foam divot weight in various tests associated with the external tank. Both linear least squares method and the nonlinear neural network predicted identical results.

  15. Load control system. [for space shuttle external tank ground tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    The load control system developed for the shuttle external structural tests is described. The system consists of a load programming/display module, and a load control module along with the following hydraulic system components: servo valves, dump valves, hydraulic system components, and servo valve manifold blocks. One load programming/display subsystem can support multiple load control subsystem modules.

  16. Study of etchants for corrosion-resistant metals, space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Acceptable etchant concentrations and application and removal procedures for etching austenitic stainless steel, nickel base alloys, and titanium alloys (annealed) employed on the external tank were formulated. The etchant solutions were to be capable of removing a minimum of 0.4 mils of surface material in less than one hour.

  17. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Process: Its Application to the Space Shuttle External Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress in the implementation of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process at the External Tank (ET) assembly facility. Design allowable data has been developed for thicknesses up to 1.00 in. More than 24,000 in. of welding on liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen cylinders has been made without an internal defect.

  18. Integration and software for thermal test of heat rate sensors. [space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Shrider, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A minicomputer controlled radiant test facility is described which was developed and calibrated in an effort to verify analytical thermal models of instrumentation islands installed aboard the space shuttle external tank to measure thermal flight parameters during ascent. Software was provided for the facility as well as for development tests on the SRB actuator tail stock. Additional testing was conducted with the test facility to determine the temperature and heat flux rate and loads required to effect a change of color in the ET tank external paint. This requirement resulted from the review of photographs taken of the ET at separation from the orbiter which showed that 75% of the external tank paint coating had not changed color from its original white color. The paint on the remaining 25% of the tank was either brown or black, indicating that it had degraded due to heating or that the spray on form insulation had receded in these areas. The operational capability of the facility as well as the various tests which were conducted and their results are discussed.

  19. External Tank Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Prepress Regression Analysis Independent Review Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie s.

    2009-01-01

    The request to conduct an independent review of regression models, developed for determining the expected Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) External Tank (ET)-04 cycle count for the Space Shuttle ET tanking process, was submitted to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center NESC on September 20, 2005. The NESC team performed an independent review of regression models documented in Prepress Regression Analysis, Tom Clark and Angela Krenn, 10/27/05. This consultation consisted of a peer review by statistical experts of the proposed regression models provided in the Prepress Regression Analysis. This document is the consultation's final report.

  20. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external tank soil contamination for the Hanford tank closure program: application to the AX tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1998-10-12

    Mixed high-level waste is currently stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The plan is to retrieve the waste, process the water, and dispose of the waste in a manner that will provide less long-term health risk. The AX Tank Farm has been identified for purposes of demonstration. Not all the waste can be retrieved from the tanks and some waste has leaked from these tanks into the underlying soil. Retrieval of this waste could result in additional leakage. During FY1998, the Sandia National Laboratory was under contract to evaluate concepts for immobilizing the residual waste remaining in tanks and mitigating the migration of contaminants that exist in the soil column. Specifically, the scope of this evaluation included: development of a layered tank fill design for reducing water infiltration; development of in-tank getter technology; mitigation of soil contamination through grouting; sequestering of specific radionuclides in soil; and geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil interactions. A copy of the final report prepared by Sandia National Laboratory is attached.

  1. Application of Digital Radiography to Weld Inspection for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of digital radiography to inspect the welds of the external tanks used to hold the cryogenic fuels for the Space Shuttle Main Engines. NASA has had a goal of replacing a significant portion of film used to inspect the welds, with digital radiography. The presentation reviews the objectives for converting to a digital system from film, the characteristics of the digital system, the Probability of detection study, the qualification and implementation of the system.

  2. Space shuttle: An investigation of the load distribution over the SRB and external tank of a 0.004 scale model of the 049 space shuttle launch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, R. A.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted in a trisonic wind tunnel to determine the load distribution over the external tank and solid rocket boosters of the space shuttle launch configuration. The external tank was sting-supported and the solid rocket boosters and orbiter were mounted directly on the external tank. The external tank was, instrumented with 152 pressure orifices and the solid rocket boosters contained 78 orifices. The pressure data were obtained for various combinations of the three geometric components as the gap size between the external tank and the solid rocket boosters, angle of attack, and angle of sideslip were varied. Mach numbers ranged from 0.8 to 1.96.

  3. Evaluation of Aerodynamic Drag and Torque for External Tanks in Low Earth Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, William C; Witzgall, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    A numerical procedure is described in which the aerodynamic drag and torque in low Earth orbit are calculated for a prototype Space Shuttle external tank and its components, the "LO2" and "LH2" tanks, carrying liquid oxygen and hydrogen, respectively, for any given angle of attack. Calculations assume the hypersonic limit of free molecular flow theory. Each shell of revolution is assumed to be described by a series of parametric equations for their respective contours. It is discretized into circular cross sections perpendicular to the axis of revolution, which yield a series of ellipses when projected according to the given angle of attack. The drag profile, that is, the projection of the entire shell is approximated by the convex envelope of those ellipses. The area of the drag profile, that is, the drag area, and its center of area moment, that is, the drag center, are then calculated and permit determination of the drag vector and the eccentricity vector from the center of gravity of the shell to the drag center. The aerodynamic torque is obtained as the cross product of those vectors. The tanks are assumed to be either evacuated or pressurized with a uniform internal gas distribution: dynamic shifting of the tank center of mass due to residual propellant sloshing is not considered.

  4. The Evolution of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James L.; Richter, Joel D.

    2006-01-01

    Three nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed to identify defects in the foam thermal protection system (TPS) of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). Shearography is being developed to identify shallow delaminations, shallow voids and crush damage in the foam while terahertz imaging and backscatter radiography are being developed to identify voids and cracks in thick foam regions. The basic theory of operation along with factors affecting the results of these methods will be described. Also, the evolution of these methods from lab tools to implementation on the ET will be discussed. Results from both test panels and flight tank inspections will be provided to show the range in defect sizes and types that can be readily detected.

  5. Utilization of Space Shuttle External Tank materials by melting and powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    The Crucible Melt Extraction Process was demonstrated to convert scraps of aluminum alloy 2219, used in the Space Shuttle External Tank, into fibers. The cast fibers were then consolidated by cold welding. The X-ray diffraction test of the cast fibers was done to examine the crystallinity and oxide content of the fibers. The compressive stress-strain behavior of the consolidated materials was also examined. Two conceptual schemes which would adapt the as-developed Crucible Melt Extraction Process to the microgravity condition in space were finally proposed.

  6. Multispectral radiation detection of small changes in target emissivity. [ice measurements on space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, J. A.; Newton, J. M.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation into the multispectral radiation detection of small changes in target emissivity has been performed by Georgia Tech. A series of ice detection measurements on the shuttle external tank (ET) were performed using an advanced instrumentation radiometer operating at 35/95 GHz. Actual shuttle ET ice detection measurements were run at NASA's National Space Technology Laboratory (NSTL) during cryogenic fueling operations prior to orbiter engine firing tests. Investigations revealed that ET icing caused an increase in surface brightness temperature and the test results further demonstrated the usefulness of millimeter wave radiometry for the detection of ice on the ET.

  7. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Evaluation of the Space Shuttle External Tank Insulating Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S.; Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.; Hepburn, F

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia s catastrophic failure has been attributed to a piece of external fuel tank insulating SOFI (Spray On Foam Insulation) foam striking the leading edge of the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the protecting heat tiles. The accident emphasizes the growing need to develop effective, robust and life-cycle oriented methods of nondestructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) of complex conductor-backed insulating foam and protective acreage heat tiles used in the space shuttle fleet and in future multi-launch space vehicles. The insulating SOFI foam is constructed from closed-cell foam. In the microwave regime this foam is in the family of low permittivity and low loss dielectric materials. Near-field microwave and millimeter wave NDT methods were one of the techniques chosen for this purpose. To this end several flat and thick SOFI foam panels, two structurally complex panels similar to the external fuel tank and a "blind" panel were used in this investigation. Several anomalies such as voids and disbonds were embedded in these panels at various locations. The location and properties of the embedded anomalies in the "blind" panel were not disclosed to the investigating team prior to the investigation. Three frequency bands were used in this investigation covering a frequency range of 8-75 GHz. Moreover, the influence of signal polarization was also investigated. Overall the results of this investigation were very promising for detecting the presence of anomalies in different panels covered with relatively thick insulating SOFI foam. Different types of anomalies were detected in foam up to 9 in thick. Many of the anomalies in the more complex panels were also detected. When investigating the blind panel no false positives were detected. Anomalies in between and underneath bolt heads were not easily detected. This paper presents the results of this investigation along with a discussion of the capabilities of the method

  8. External tank chill effect on the space transportation system launch pad environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, R. A.; Boraas, S.

    1991-01-01

    The external tank (ET) of the STS contains liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen as oxidizer and fuel for the SSMEs. Once the cryogen have been loaded into the ET, the temperature of the air surrounding the STS is chilled by the cold outer surface of the ET. This paper describes a two-dimensional flow and thermal analysis to determine this chill effect on the STS launch pad environment subsequent to the ET loading operation. The analysis was done assuming winter conditions and a northwest wind direction. An existing CFD code, PHOENICS '81, was used in the study. The results are presented as local and average values of the heat transfer coefficient, the Nusselt number, and the surface temperature around the redesigned solid rocket motors (RSRMs) and the ET. The temperature depression caused by the ET chilling of the air in the vicinity of the RSRMs was calculated to be 3 F below the ambient. This compares with the observed 1-2 F RSRM surface temperature depression based upon measurements made prior to the winter flight of STS-29. Since the surface temperature would be expected to be slightly higher than the local air temperature, the predicted temperature depression of the air appears to be substantiated.

  9. Role of Process Control in Improving Space Vehicle Safety A Space Shuttle External Tank Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safie, Fayssal M.; Nguyen, Son C.; Burleson, Keith W.

    2006-01-01

    Developing a safe and reliable space vehicle requires good design and good manufacturing, or in other words "design it right and build it right". A great design can be hard to build or manufacture mainly due to difficulties related to quality. Specifically, process control can be a challenge. As a result, the system suffers from low quality which leads to low reliability and high system risk. The Space Shuttle has experienced some of those cases, but has overcome these difficulties through extensive redesign efforts and process enhancements. One example is the design of the hot gas temperature sensor on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), which resulted in failure of the sensor in flight and led to a redesign of the sensor. The most recent example is the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) Thermal Protection System (TPS) reliability issues that contributed to the Columbia accident. As a result, extensive redesign and process enhancement activities have been performed over the last two years to minimize the sensitivities and difficulties of the manual TPS application process.

  10. Variable polarity plasma arc welding on the Space Shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, C. S., III; Munafo, P. M.; Biddle, A. P.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) techniques used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the fabrication of the Space Shuttle External Tank are presentedd. The high plasma arc jet velocities of 300-2000 m/s are produced by heating the plasma gas as it passes through a constraining orifice, with the plasma arc torch becoming a miniature jet engine. As compared to the GTA jet, the VPPA has the following advantages: (1) less sensitive to contamination, (2) a more symmetrical fusion zone, and (3) greater joint penetration. The VPPA welding system is computerized, operating with a microprocessor, to set welding variables in accordance with set points inputs, including the manipulator and wire feeder, as well as torch control and power supply. Some other VPPA welding technique advantages are: reduction in weld repair costs by elimination of porosity; reduction of joint preparation costs through elimination of the need to scrape or file faying surfaces; reduction in depeaking costs; eventual reduction of the 100 percent-X-ray inspection requirements. The paper includes a series of schematic and block diagrams.

  11. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 2; Thermal and Mechanical Loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Warren, Jerry E.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear thermo-mechanical stress analyses are performed for the Space Shuttle external tank s intertank stringers. Detailed threedimensional finite element models are developed and used to investigate the stringer s elastic-plastic response for different thermal and mechanical loading events from assembly through flight. Assembly strains caused by initial installation on an intertank panel are accounted for in the analyses. Thermal loading due to tanking was determined to be the bounding loading event. The cryogenic shrinkage caused by tanking resulted in a rotation of the intertank chord flange towards the center of the intertank, which in turn loaded the intertank stringer feet. The analyses suggest that the strain levels near the first three fasteners remain sufficiently high that a failure may occur. The analyses also confirmed that the installation of radius blocks on the stringer feet ends results in an increase in the stringer capability.

  12. 76 FR 4847 - Hazardous Materials: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... Docket Operations Office (see ADDRESSES). Privacy Act: Anyone is able to search the electronic form of... constructed with engine, body, and cargo tank permanently mounted to the same chassis. Based on the protective... compressed air from an auxiliary tank through an air filter and regulator into the lines. The purge can be...

  13. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 238 - Requirements for External Fuel Tanks on Tier I Locomotives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... plate of the fuel tank shall support a sudden loading of one-half the weight of the car body at a... (half the bumper area) at a height of thirty inches above the rail (standard DOT bumper height). (4...

  14. Structural Verification of the Space Shuttle's External Tank Super LightWeight Design: A Lesson in Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otte, Neil

    1997-01-01

    The Super LightWeight Tank (SLWT) team was tasked with a daunting challenge from the outset: boost the payload capability of the Shuttle System by safely removing 7500 lbs. from the existing 65,400 lb. External Tank (ET). Tools they had to work with included a promising new Aluminum Lithium alloy, the concept of a more efficient structural configuration for the Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) tank, and a highly successful, mature Light Weight Tank (LWT) program. The 44 month schedule which the SLWT team was given for the task was ambitious by any measure. During this time the team had to not only design, build, and verify the new tank, but they also had to move a material from the early stages of development to maturity. The aluminum lithium alloy showed great promise, with an approximately 29% increase in yield strength, 15% increase in ultimate strength, 5 deg/O increase in modulus and 5 deg/O decrease in density when compared to the current 2219 alloy. But processes had to be developed and brought under control, manufacturing techniques perfected, properties characterized, and design allowable generated. Because of the schedule constraint, this material development activity had to occur in parallel with design and manufacturing. Initial design was performed using design allowable believed to be achievable with the Aluminum Lithium alloy system, but based on limited test data. Preliminary structural development tests were performed with material still in the process of iteration. This parallel path approach posed obvious challenges and risks, but also allowed a unique opportunity for interaction between the structures and materials disciplines in the formulation of the material.

  15. Vibration Analysis of the Space Shuttle External Tank Cable Tray Flight Data With and Without PAL Ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Bruce E.; Panda, Jayanta; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    External Tank Cable Tray vibration data for three successive Space Shuttle flights were analyzed to assess response to buffet and the effect of removal of the Protuberance Air Loads (PAL) ramp. Waveform integration, spectral analysis, cross-correlation analysis and wavelet analysis were employed to estimate vibration modes and temporal development of vibration motion from a sparse array of accelerometers and an on-board system that acquired 16 channels of data for approximately the first 2 min of each flight. The flight data indicated that PAL ramp removal had minimal effect on the fluctuating loads on the cable tray. The measured vibration frequencies and modes agreed well with predicted structural response.

  16. Nondestructive Evaluation of Foam Insulation on the Space Shuttle External Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Joel; Walker, James L.

    2006-01-01

    Foam loss on the External Tank (ET) during launch can be caused by a number of factors. Voids are the best understood mechanism of foam loss, although it is known that delaminations, cracks and crushed foam can also lead to liberation of foam. Shortly after the Columbia accident, work began on non-destructive evaluation of foam targeted at finding voids and delaminations. After several months of searching for candidate methods capable of inspecting ET foam, the five most promising techniques were taken through a blind test and narrowed down to two methods to develop and use for inspection of the ET. These methods were backscatter radiography and terahertz imaging. The backscatter radiography system measures a test part by detecting Compton backscattered x-ray energy generated by a collimated beam of x-rays directed at the test subject. This collimated beam is scanned across the subject, recording scatter intensity data one pixel at a time until the area of interest is covered. The resulting data can be used to generate an image similar to a radiograph. Some depth information can be gathered utilizing apertures or collimation on the detectors. The detectors are located around the collimated source, making this a single sided inspection. The void detection limit with the currently utilized system is around 0.5 inches in diameter by 0.2 inches high. The terahertz imaging system inspects a test part by utilizing a transceiver to emit a pulse focused at the aluminum skin of the ET, which reflects it back to the transceiver where it is analyzed. The transceiver is scanned across the area of interest until a measurement has been taken at every location. Amplitude, time delay and frequency content are examined to note any discontinuities which may be the result of a void or other type of defect. The pulse currently utilized is in the millimeter wave regime. The void detection limit with this system is around 0.5 inches in diameter by 0.2 inches high. With increased

  17. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 1; Stringer-Feet Imperfections and Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Elliott, Kenny B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear stress analyses are performed for the external hat-shaped stringers (or stiffeners) on the intertank portion of the Space Shuttle s external tank. These stringers are subjected to assembly strains when the stringers are initially installed on an intertank panel. Four different stringer-feet configurations including the baseline flat-feet, the heels-up, the diving-board, and the toes-up configurations are considered. The assembly procedure is analytically simulated for each of these stringer configurations. The location, size, and amplitude of the strain field associated with the stringer assembly are sensitive to the assumed geometry and assembly procedure. The von Mises stress distributions from these simulations indicate that localized plasticity will develop around the first eight fasteners for each stringer-feet configuration examined. However, only the toes-up configuration resulted in high assembly hoop strains.

  18. Estimation of the Unsteady Aerodynamic Load on Space Shuttle External Tank Protuberances from a Component Wind Tunnel Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayatana; Martin, Fred W.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    At the wake of the Columbia (STS-107) accident it was decided to remove the Protuberance Aerodynamic Load (PAL) Ramp that was originally intended to protect various protuberances outside of the Space Shuttle External Tank from high buffet load induced by cross-flows at transonic speed. In order to establish the buffet load without the PAL ramp, a wind tunnel test was conducted where segments of the protuberances were instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers; and power-spectra of sectional lift and drag forces at various span-wise locations between two adjacent support brackets were measured under different cross flow angles, Mach number and other conditions. Additionally, frequency-dependent spatial correlations between the sectional forces were also established. The sectional forces were then adjusted by the correlation length to establish span-averaged spectra of normal and lateral forces that can be suitably "added" to various other unsteady forces encountered by the protuberance. This paper describes the methodology used for calculating the correlation-adjusted power spectrum of the buffet load. A second part of the paper describes wind-tunnel results on the difference in the buffet load on the protuberances with and without the PAL ramp. In general when the ramp height is the same as that of the protuberance height, such as that found on the liquid Oxygen part of the tank, the ramp is found to cause significant reduction of the unsteady aerodynamic load. However, on the liquid Hydrogen part of the tank, where the Oxygen feed-line is far larger in diameter than the height of the PAL ramp, little protection is found to be available to all but the Cable Tray.

  19. Large Scale Shearography Inspection of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren; Scheurer, Phillip; Rivers, Joanna; Walker, James; Lovell, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Shearography was successfully used to inspect the damaged region of ET122 for nonvisible damage. The shearography inspection was extensive covering over 3100 square feet of foam and lasting 9 months. Most foam damage was visible and shearography results confirmed that foam damage in visibly impacted regions did not extend outside the area with visible damage. Of the 21 nonvisible defect indications detected with shearography, none were determined to be actual foam damage. Inspections were intentionally conservative since no experience base was available for debris damaged foam. Shearography results were used in conjunction with tactile and visual inspection to support the acceptance of the foam application allowing the tank to move forward for refurbishment.

  20. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) using Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J. T.; Robbins, J.; Kharkivskiy, S.; Hepburn, F.; Zoughi, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia s catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the reinforced carbodcarbon leading edge wing panels. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation methods have shown great potential for inspecting SOFI for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as small air voids that may cause separation of the SOFI from the external tank during a launch. These methods are capable of producing relatively high-resolution images of the interior of SOFI particularly when advanced imaging algorithms are incorporated into the overall system. To this end, synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT) are being developed. This paper presents some of the preliminary results of this investigation using SAFT-based methods and microwave holography at relatively low frequencies illustrating their potential capabilities for operation at millimeter wave frequencies.

  1. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Imaging of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank Spray on Foam Insulation (SOFI) Using Synthetic Aperture Focusing Techniques (SAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, J. T.; Robbins, J.; Kharkovsky, S.; Hepburn, F.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-03-01

    The Space Shuttle Columbia's catastrophic failure is thought to have been caused by a dislodged piece of external tank spray on foam insulation (SOFI) striking the left wing of the orbiter causing significant damage to some of the reinforced carbon/carbon leading edge wing panels. Microwave and millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation methods have shown great potential for inspecting SOFI for the purpose of detecting anomalies such as small air voids that may cause separation of the SOFI from the external tank during a launch. These methods are capable of producing relatively high-resolution images of the interior of SOFI particularly when advanced imaging algorithms are incorporated into the overall system. To this end, synthetic aperture focusing techniques (SAFT) are being developed. This paper presents some of the preliminary results of this investigation using SAFT-based methods and microwave holography at relatively low frequencies illustrating their potential capabilities for operation at millimeter wave frequencies.

  2. Defluoridation of drinking water by electrocoagulation/electroflotation in a stirred tank reactor with a comparative performance to an external-loop airlift reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Essadki, Abdel Hafid; Gourich, Bouchaib; Vial, Christophe; Delmas, Henri; Bennajah, Mounir

    2009-01-01

    Defluoridation using batch electrocoagulation/electroflotation (EC/EF) was carried out in two reactors for comparison purpose: a stirred tank reactor (STR) close to a conventional EC cell and an external-loop airlift reactor (ELAR) that was recently described as an innovative reactor for EC. The respective influences of current density, initial concentration and initial pH on the efficiency of defluoridation were investigated. The same trends were observed in both reactors, but the efficiency...

  3. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at least...

  4. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tank. 229.217 Section 229.217 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum...

  5. Optimization of an RSD x-ray backscatter system for detecting defects in the space shuttle external tank thermal foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Daniel; Addicott, Benjamin; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    2005-09-01

    A new Compton x-ray backscatter imaging technique, backscatter radiography by selective detection (RSD), has been used for inspection of the spray-on-foam-insulation (SOFI) on the space shuttle external tank. RSD employs detection of selected backscatter field components, by using specially designed detectors with movable detector collimators, to achieve high image contrast. The optimization study utilized test panels with simulated and natural defects in the spray-on foam insulation. Some of the test panels include structural features, stiffener-stringers and connection flanges, which were bolted to an aluminum base plate representative of the external tank. The SOFI was then layed down over the base plate and structural components with thicknesses varying from a few tens of mm up to a few hundred mm. The simulated defects range in cross-sectional size from 6 × 6 mm to 50 × 50 mm. Natural defects including roll-over voids and knit-line delaminations have a wide range of sizes, geometries, and orientations with a minimum critical cross-sectional size of 6 mm. Imaging registration is currently obtained at 0.05 seconds per 2 mm pixel, or about 19 minutes per 0.093 m2(1 ft2). The current system is being evaluated to enhance the detection of natural defects of a minimal critical size. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with MCNP5 are being used to determine the history and corresponding spectrum of the detected photons that are responsible for improving defect image contrast. The simulation results are used in combination with experimental data to select optimal detector configurations. Detector configurations are sensitive not only to the type of defect being detected, but also the defect's depth in SOFI, distance from aluminum substrate, and defect orientation. Additional parameters including detector type, detection mode, and x-ray illumination beam size were also evaluated. Both NaI and plastic (BC404) scintillation detectors in pulse and integral mode were used to

  6. Defluoridation of drinking water by electrocoagulation/electroflotation in a stirred tank reactor with a comparative performance to an external-loop airlift reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essadki, A.H., E-mail: essadki@hotmail.com [Ecole Superieure de Technologie de Casablanca, BP 8012, Oasis, Casablanca (Morocco); Gourich, B. [Ecole Superieure de Technologie de Casablanca, BP 8012, Oasis, Casablanca (Morocco); Vial, Ch. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique et Biochimique, LGCB-UBP/ENSCCF, 24 avenue des Landais, BP 206, 63174 Aubiere Cedex (France); Delmas, H. [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, ENSIACET-INPT, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, 31106 Toulouse (France); Bennajah, M. [Ecole Superieure de Technologie de Casablanca, BP 8012, Oasis, Casablanca (Morocco); Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, ENSIACET-INPT, 5 rue Paulin Talabot, 31106 Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    Defluoridation using batch electrocoagulation/electroflotation (EC/EF) was carried out in two reactors for comparison purpose: a stirred tank reactor (STR) close to a conventional EC cell and an external-loop airlift reactor (ELAR) that was recently described as an innovative reactor for EC. The respective influences of current density, initial concentration and initial pH on the efficiency of defluoridation were investigated. The same trends were observed in both reactors, but the efficiency was higher in the STR at the beginning of the electrolysis, whereas similar values were usually achieved after 15 min operation. The influence of the initial pH was explained using the analyses of sludge composition and residual soluble aluminum species in the effluents, and it was related to the prevailing mechanisms of defluoridation. Fluoride removal and sludge reduction were both favored by an initial pH around 4, but this value required an additional pre-treatment for pH adjustment. Finally, electric energy consumption was similar in both reactors when current density was lower than 12 mA/cm{sup 2}, but mixing and complete flotation of the pollutants were achieved without additional mechanical power in the ELAR, using only the overall liquid recirculation induced by H{sub 2} microbubbles generated by water electrolysis, which makes subsequent treatments easier to carry out.

  7. Defluoridation of drinking water by electrocoagulation/electroflotation in a stirred tank reactor with a comparative performance to an external-loop airlift reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essadki, A H; Gourich, B; Vial, Ch; Delmas, H; Bennajah, M

    2009-09-15

    Defluoridation using batch electrocoagulation/electroflotation (EC/EF) was carried out in two reactors for comparison purpose: a stirred tank reactor (STR) close to a conventional EC cell and an external-loop airlift reactor (ELAR) that was recently described as an innovative reactor for EC. The respective influences of current density, initial concentration and initial pH on the efficiency of defluoridation were investigated. The same trends were observed in both reactors, but the efficiency was higher in the STR at the beginning of the electrolysis, whereas similar values were usually achieved after 15min operation. The influence of the initial pH was explained using the analyses of sludge composition and residual soluble aluminum species in the effluents, and it was related to the prevailing mechanisms of defluoridation. Fluoride removal and sludge reduction were both favored by an initial pH around 4, but this value required an additional pre-treatment for pH adjustment. Finally, electric energy consumption was similar in both reactors when current density was lower than 12mA/cm(2), but mixing and complete flotation of the pollutants were achieved without additional mechanical power in the ELAR, using only the overall liquid recirculation induced by H(2) microbubbles generated by water electrolysis, which makes subsequent treatments easier to carry out.

  8. Space Transportation System (STS)-133/External Tank (ET)-137 Intertank (IT) Stringer Cracking Issue and Repair Assessment: Proximate Cause Determination and Material Characterization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Several cracks were detected in stringers located beneath the foam on the External Tank (ET) following the launch scrub of Space Transportation System (STS)-133 on November 5, 2010. The stringer material was aluminum-lithium (AL-Li) 2090-T83 fabricated from sheets that were nominally 0.064 inches thick. The mechanical properties of the stringer material were known to vary between different material lots, with the stringers from ET-137 (predominately lots 620853 and 620854) having the highest yield and ultimate stresses. Subsequent testing determined that these same lots also had the lowest fracture toughness properties. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) supported the Space Shuttle Program (SSP)-led investigation. The objective of this investigation was to develop a database of test results to provide validation for structural analysis models, independently confirm test results obtained from other investigators, and determine the proximate cause of the anomalous low fracture toughness observed in stringer lots 620853 and 620854. This document contains the outcome of the investigation.

  9. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  10. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  11. TankSIM: A Cryogenic Tank Performance Prediction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Moder, J. P.; Schnell, A. R.; Sutherlin, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the thermodynamic state of the cryogenic propellants in launch vehicle tanks is necessary for mission planning and successful execution. Cryogenic propellant storage and transfer in space environments requires that tank pressure be controlled. The pressure rise rate is determined by the complex interaction of external heat leak, fluid temperature stratification, and interfacial heat and mass transfer. If the required storage duration of a space mission is longer than the period in which the tank pressure reaches its allowable maximum, an appropriate pressure control method must be applied. Therefore, predictions of the pressurization rate and performance of pressure control techniques in cryogenic tanks are required for development of cryogenic fluid long-duration storage technology and planning of future space exploration missions. This paper describes an analytical tool, Tank System Integrated Model (TankSIM), which can be used for modeling pressure control and predicting the behavior of cryogenic propellant for long-term storage for future space missions. It is written in the FORTRAN 90 language and can be compiled with any Visual FORTRAN compiler. A thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is used to achieve tank pressure control. Utilizing TankSIM, the following processes can be modeled: tank self-pressurization, boiloff, ullage venting, and mixing. Details of the TankSIM program and comparisons of its predictions with test data for liquid hydrogen and liquid methane will be presented in the final paper.

  12. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Additional information is given in tabular form.

  13. Results of the space shuttle vehicle ascent air data system probe calibration test using a 0.07-scale external tank forebody model (68T) in the AEDC 16-foot transonic wind tunnel (IA-310), volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collette, J. G. R.

    1991-01-01

    A recalibration of the Space Shuttle Vehicle Ascent Air Data System probe was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) transonic wind tunnel. The purpose was to improve on the accuracy of the previous calibration in order to reduce the existing uncertainties in the system. A probe tip attached to a 0.07-scale External Tank Forebody model was tested at angles of attack of -8 to +4 degrees and sideslip angles of -4 to +4 degrees. High precision instrumentation was used to acquire pressure data at discrete Mach numbers ranging from 0.6 to 1.55. Pressure coefficient uncertainties were estimated at less than 0.0020. Data is given in graphical and tabular form.

  14. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  15. Heat-transfer test results for a .0275-scale space shuttle external tank with a 10 deg/40 deg double cone-ogive nose in the NASA/AMES 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (FH14), volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    A .0275 scale forebody model of the new baseline configuration of the space shuttle external tank vent cap configuration was tested to determine the flow field due to the double cone configuration. The tests were conducted in a 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel at alpha = -5 deg, -4.59 deg, 0 deg, 5 deg, and 10 deg; beta = 0 deg, -3 deg, -5.51 deg, -6 deg, -9 deg, and +6 deg; nominal freestream Reynolds numbers per foot of 1.5 x 1 million, 3.0 x 1 million, and 5.0 x 1 million; and a nominal Mach number of 5. Separation and reattached flow from thermocouple data, shadowgraphs, and oil flows indicate that separation begins about 80% from the tip of the 10 deg cone, then reattaches on the vent cap and produces fully turbulent flow over most of the model forebody. The hardware disturbs the flow over a much larger area than present TPS application has assumed. A correction to the flow disturbance was experimentally suggested from the results of an additional test run.

  16. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  17. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  18. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  19. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  20. [Study on the quantitative estimation method for VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks based on tanks 4.0.9d model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wang, Min-Yan; Zhang, Jian; He, Wan-Qing; Nie, Lei; Shao, Xia

    2013-12-01

    VOCs emission from petrochemical storage tanks is one of the important emission sources in the petrochemical industry. In order to find out the VOCs emission amount of petrochemical storage tanks, Tanks 4.0.9d model is utilized to calculate the VOCs emission from different kinds of storage tanks. VOCs emissions from a horizontal tank, a vertical fixed roof tank, an internal floating roof tank and an external floating roof tank were calculated as an example. The consideration of the site meteorological information, the sealing information, the tank content information and unit conversion by using Tanks 4.0.9d model in China was also discussed. Tanks 4.0.9d model can be used to estimate VOCs emissions from petrochemical storage tanks in China as a simple and highly accurate method.

  1. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  2. Wave turbulence in annular wave tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Miguel; Stramignoni, Ettore

    2014-05-01

    We perform experiments in an annular wind wave tank at the Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Torino. The external diameter of the tank is 5 meters while the internal one is 1 meter. The tank is equipped by two air fans which can lead to a wind of maximum 5 m/s. The present set up is capable of studying the generation of waves and the development of wind wave spectra for large duration. We have performed different tests including different wind speeds. For large wind speed we observe the formation of spectra consistent with Kolmogorv-Zakharov predictions.

  3. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  4. Regional Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, W.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The book offers practical and theoretical insights in regional externalities. Regional externalities are a specific subset of externalities that can be defined as externalities where space plays a dominant role. This class of externalities can be divided into three categories: (1) externalities

  5. Ring stability of underground toroidal tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, Asnawi; Su'udi, Ahmad

    2017-06-01

    The design of pressure vessels subjected to internal pressure is governed by its strength, while the design of pressure vessels subjected to external pressure is governed by its stability, which is for circular cross-section is called the ring stability. This paper presented the results of finite element study of ring stability of circular toroidal tank without stiffener under external pressure. The tank was placed underground and external pressure load from soil was simulated as pressure at the top of the vessel along 30° circumferentially. One might ask the reason for choosing toroidal rather than cylindrical tank. Preliminary finite element studies showed that toroidal shells can withstand higher external pressure than cylindrical shells. In this study, the volume of the tank was fixed for 15,000 litters. The buckling external pressure (pL) was calculated for radius ratio (R/r) of 2, 3, and 4. The corresponding cross-section radiuses were 724.3 mm, 632.7 mm, and 574.9 mm, respectively. The selected element type was SHELL 281 from the ANSYS element library. To obtain the buckling load, the arc-length method was used in the nonlinear analysis. Both material and geometric nonlinearities were activated during the analysis. The conclusion of this study is that short-radius and thin-walled toroidal shell produces higher buckling load.

  6. Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

  7. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    The emergence of more think tanks in recent decades has spawned some interest in how they function and impact policy-making in the European Union and its member states. So far however few empirical studies of think tanks have been carried out and think tanks have mainly been studied in their nati......The emergence of more think tanks in recent decades has spawned some interest in how they function and impact policy-making in the European Union and its member states. So far however few empirical studies of think tanks have been carried out and think tanks have mainly been studied...

  8. Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI seeks to nurture the long-term sustainability of the think tanks it funds. As such, core funding is combined with dedicated capacity development support by program officers and external experts in three broad areas: research methods and skills, policy engagement and communication, and general organizational ...

  9. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-06

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters.

  10. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  11. Tank truck purging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazin, G.R.

    1984-09-04

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for purging a vehicle tank compartment to permit access for repair, or maintenance without environmental pollution or hazard to workmen entering the tank. In accordance with the invention an elongated cylindrical storage tank is tilted about its horizontal axis, to form a reservoir for purge water. The tank is connectable as by flexible hoses to fill and drain connections for a tank compartment of a truck, rail car, or other bulk liquid vehicle. Purge water is pumped from the storage tank at a level above the lower tilted end of the elongated tank and vapor displaced from the tank compartment by the water is recovered through a vapor recovery system. Desirably, the compartment is filled until it overflows into the vapor recovery line. Water is returned to the storage tank at a position near the upwardly tilted end. The tilted arrangement permits gravity separation and accumulation of minor amounts of light hydrocarbons, such as diesel fuel or gasoline at an upper separation zone formed by the upwardly tilted end. A similar separation zone or volume for accumulation of rust particles, sludge and the like is formed at the lower tilted end. Hydrocarbons lighter than water are flushed from the tilted upper end of the reservoir tank by adding water to the reservoir tank so that it overflows through a line connected to a separator tank. Heavy particles from the lower tilted end are removed through a cleanout line entering near the lower tilted end of the reservoir tank. Water may also be removed from the tank to lower the water level at the upper tilted end to increase the surface area of the separation zone for accumulation of such lighter hydrocarbons.

  12. RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2008-02-01

    The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

  13. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......-politicization of Danish newspapers; but also that the news media as an arena of influence is only one part of the equation, since some of the corporatist political networks are still intact and working outside the media...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  14. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  15. Standard guide for three methods of assessing buried steel tanks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures to be implemented prior to the application of cathodic protection for evaluating the suitability of a tank for upgrading by cathodic protection alone. 1.2 Three procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, and C. 1.2.1 Method A—Noninvasive with primary emphasis on statistical and electrochemical analysis of external site environment corrosion data. 1.2.2 Method B—Invasive ultrasonic thickness testing with external corrosion evaluation. 1.2.3 Method C—Invasive permanently recorded visual inspection and evaluation including external corrosion assessment. 1.3 This guide presents the methodology and the procedures utilizing site and tank specific data for determining a tank's condition and the suitability for such tanks to be upgraded with cathodic protection. 1.4 The tank's condition shall be assessed using Method A, B, or C. Prior to assessing the tank, a preliminary site survey shall be performed pursuant to Section 8 and the tank shall be tightness test...

  16. Fuel tank integrity research : fuel tank analyses and test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. Fuel tank research is being performed to : determine strategies for increasing the fuel tank impact : resistance to ...

  17. Small-Scale Metal Tanks for High Pressure Storage of Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Adam (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Small scale metal tanks for high-pressure storage of fluids having tank factors of more than 5000 meters and volumes of ten cubic inches or less featuring arrays of interconnected internal chambers having at least inner walls thinner than gage limitations allow. The chambers may be arranged as multiple internal independent vessels. Walls of chambers that are also portions of external tank walls may be arcuate on the internal and/or external surfaces, including domed. The tanks may be shaped adaptively and/or conformally to an application, including, for example, having one or more flat outer walls and/or having an annular shape. The tanks may have dual-purpose inlet/outlet conduits of may have separate inlet and outlet conduits. The tanks are made by fusion bonding etched metal foil layers patterned from slices of a CAD model of the tank. The fusion bonded foil stack may be further machined.

  18. Tank 241-BX-103 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-04-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BX-103.

  19. Development of smart solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project is to develop smart solar tanks. A smart solar tank is a tank in which the domestic water can bee heated both by solar collectors and by an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply system heats up the hot-water tank from the top and the water volume heated...

  20. Ocean Technology Development Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The new SWFSC laboratory in La Jolla incorporates a large sea- and fresh-water Ocean Technology Development Tank. This world-class facility expands NOAA's ability to...

  1. Sonar Tank Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Sonar Tank Facility permits low cost initial 'wet' testing and check out prior to full scale deployment at sea. It can manage controlled conditions calibration...

  2. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic

  3. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper, theore...

  4. 49 CFR 180.407 - Requirements for test and inspection of specification cargo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... except MC 338 September 1, 1991 1 year. Pressure Test: (Hydrostatic or pneumatic) (See Notes 2 and 3) All... or pneumatic pressure-test of the cargo tank. (d) External visual inspection and testing. The... appurtenances and structural attachments on the cargo tank including, but not limited to, suspension system...

  5. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    hydrofoil shaped propellers. These two sub-processes deliver the main part of the supplied energy to the activated sludge tank, and for this reason they are important for the mixing conditions in the tank. For other important processes occurring in the activated sludge tank, existing models and measurements...... zones in mind, its special construction poses strict demands to the hydrodynamic model. In case study three the model is extended to a three-phase model where also the injection of air bubbles during the aeration process is modeled. The aeration of sludge is controlled through a simple expression...... for the reoxygenation of the wastewater phase as a function of the local volume fraction of air and the concentration of soluble oxygen. A simple model for the bulk consumption of oxygen is linked to the reoxygenation expression in order to model measured oxygen concentrations in the suspension. In the final case study...

  6. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States); Foster, G.M. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

  7. Inerting ballast tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, Gabriel L.; Bronneberg, Jos [SBM Offshore, AA Schiedam (Netherlands); Barros, Maria A.S.D. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This report expands upon the work conducted by SBM Offshore to develop a tank preservation treatment, which is intended to achieve a service life of 30 years. This work focuses on the corrosion problems, in the ballast tanks, based on new built hulls, both for the Gas Exploration Market, the FLNG - Floating Liquefied Natural Gas, and for the Oil Exploration market - FPSO's - Floating Production Storage and offloading Units. Herein, the corrosion rate input comes from the various references related to the process of nitrogen injection, which is expected to extend the vessel's time life. The essential elements of this solution comprise the deoxygenation process, corrosion models, coating effects, tests from laboratory, shipboard tests, corrosion institutes and regulations applicable to the operation. The best corrosion protection system for ballast tanks area combines a coating system and an inert gas system. The condition of the tanks will be dependent upon the level of protection applied to the steel structure, including, but not limited to coating, cathodic protection, etc. There is a need for products which extend the life time. It is not sufficient, only have good theoretical base for the corrosion and an excellent treatment system. In addition, the design of the ships structure must also eliminate the presence of local stress concentrations which can result in fatigue cracking and rupture of the protective coating barrier starting the corrosion. As a direct result of this, more problems in corrosion can be mitigated, vessels can have a better corrosion performance with less maintenance and repairs to coating systems in ballast tanks. Furthermore ships will be positively impacted operationally due to less frequent dry docking. There is a huge potential in the application of inert gas to combat the corrosion rate inside the ballast tanks, one of the most corrosive environments on earth. This application can have a direct impact on vessel structure

  8. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  9. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

    2009-08-11

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  10. Dwelling Water Tanks in Diyarbakir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ceylan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this connection, the object of this study has been to identify and compare the microbiological contamination and residue chlorine levels in the main network water that is taken from the Dicle Dam and distributed in Diyarbakir Province Centre and in the tanks of dwellings that use this water as well as the effects of the maintenance, hygiene, and physical conditions of these tanks on microbiological contamination. METHODS: Water samples were taken from both the tank input side network water and tank output side tank waters of 200 dwellings with water tanks in Diyarbakir city centre (tank entrance network side water for 200 and tank output side tank water for 200 within the framework of the research study. RESULTS: Coliform bacteria were detected in 35% of the tank entrance side network water samples and in 52.0% percent of the tank output side water samples. Faecal coliform bacteria were not detected in tank entrance side network water samples, but they existed in 2.5% of the tank output side water samples. Free residue chlorine level was found to be over 0.2 ppm in 67% of tank entrance side network water samples and in 35% of the tank output side water samples. Coliform bacteria were detected in 95.5% of the tank entrance side network water samples, of which free residue chlorine level were below 0.2 ppm. Total germ growth was detected in 52.0% of the tank entrance side network water samples and in 67.5% of the tank output side water samples. The most frequently isolated bacteria both in tank entrance side network and tank output side water samples were found to be Bacillus spp. Bacillus type bacteria were found in 48% of tank entrance side network water samples and 57.5% of the tank output side water samples. Filamentous fungi were prevalent in 8% of all the samples examined within the study and the most commonly isolated filamentous fungi were Aspergillus spp (5.5% and Penicillum spp (2.5%. Water tanks of dwellings contain more

  11. Tank plan for tank 241-C-104 retrieval testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING, D.L.

    1999-05-21

    Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document.

  12. Think Tank Initiative and Think Tank Fund Peer Exchanges | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Think Tank Initiative (TTI) and the Think Tank Fund (TTF) are partnering to support peer exchanges between think tanks in regions where the programs are active: Africa, Latin America, South Asia, and Central and Eastern Europe (the former Soviet Union). This project will help reduce cooperation barriers among ...

  13. Mathematical Modelling of Thermal Stratification in a Cryogenic Propellant Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Gagan; Joseph, Jeswin; Agarwal, Deepak; Pisharady, J. C.; Kumar, S. Sunil

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic tanks used for space applications are filled with sub-cooled cryogenic propellants, whose liquid-vapor interface remains undisturbed for long periods of time prior to launch. During this period, substantial amount of heat leaks into the tank from external sources such as solar and ambient convective fluxes, even though the tank is well insulated. This results in thermal stratification near the liquid vapour interface. A transient, two-phase, thermodynamic model of stratification in a cryogenic tank is developed, considering propellant boundary layer flow due to natural convection close to tank wall. Continuity, momentum, energy and mass transfer equations are solved using finite difference-based formulations of SINDA/FLUINT simulator. The analytical model is validated with test results reported in literature. Subsequently, studies are carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sub-cooling in propellant tank on stratified mass and liquid temperature profile. The study shows that sub-cooling of cryogenic tank leads to significant increase in stratified mass.

  14. [External otitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olina, Massimo; Cametti, Massimiliano; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Gattoni, Massimo; Leigheb, Giorgio; Pia, Francesco

    2002-02-01

    Otitis externa is one of the most common diseases in ORL practice, during summer; the treatment of otitis externa may be simple and easy or protracted and frustrating, also with fatal outcome. Many local factors may interfere with the normal defences against infections in the external auditory canal. Removing or dissolving the cerumen by water or other instruments eliminates an important barrier to infections: its acids inhibit the growth of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and fungi (Aspergillus). Also skin abrasions or irritation, allergic diseases and many systemic condition like anaemia, vitamin deficiency, endocrine disorders (diabetes) and various forms of dermatitis cause a lower resistance to infections in external auditory canal. Even if the prognosis remains benign in the majority of cases, important complications could appear like: malignant otitis externa, facial nerve paralysis, tympanic bone osteomyelitis, pericondrytis. Successful treatment depends on a proper diagnosis and therapy: the most important factor in the treatment is repeated debridement of the external auditory canal by the physician. The use of Castellani' Tintura rubra, hydroalcoholic solution of phenic fuchsin, can be very effective for bacteria and mycotic eradication. Culturing of ear canal infection could be performed on the second or third visit if the otitis externa is not responding to therapy. Complication are not frequent, but malignant otitis externa can be mortal. Dermatological consultation is often necessary for correct diagnosis.

  15. Fuel tank crashworthiness : loading scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into fuel tank crashworthiness. The breaching of fuel tanks during passenger : rail collisions and derailments increases the potential of serious injury...

  16. LIFE ESTIMATION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK STEEL FOR F-TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT - 9310

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-01-12

    High level radioactive waste (HLW) is stored in underground carbon steel storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The underground tanks will be closed by removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations, and severing/sealing external penetrations. The life of the carbon steel materials of construction in support of the performance assessment has been completed. The estimation considered general and localized corrosion mechanisms of the tank steel exposed to grouted conditions. A stochastic approach was followed to estimate the distributions of failures based upon mechanisms of corrosion accounting for variances in each of the independent variables. The methodology and results used for one-type of tank is presented.

  17. Fuel Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    material resistance to the saprophytic microorganisms is necessary. Some coatings formerly used in fuel tanks, such as the MIL-S-4383 Buna-N, were... microorganisms at bay. It can not be assumed however, that the problem will not arise again. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Existing military specifications for

  18. Competitive Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    the view that changing policy environments results in convergence of think tank strategies across Europe. As a perspective the paper shows that competitive think tanks do have a high average impact pr. staff on both mass and new media compared to other types of think tanks. This may indicate...

  19. Theoretical study of solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    . Findings - Based on the calculations it is concluded that low flow solar combisystems based on bikini tanks are promising for low energy buildings, while solar combisystems based on tank-in-tank stores are attractive for the houses with medium heating demand and old houses with high heating demand...

  20. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-11

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

  1. Do Fish Enhance Tank Mixing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Laursen, Jesper; Craig, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    potential and operational profitability. The hydrodynamic performance of tanks, therefore, represents an important parameter during the tank design process. Because there are significant complexities in combining the rigid principles of hydrodynamics with the stochastic behaviour of fish, however, most data......The design of fish rearing tanks represents a critical stage in the development of optimal aquaculture systems, especially in the context of recirculating systems. Poor hydrodynamics can compromise water quality, waste management and the physiology and behaviour of fish, and thence, production...... upon tank hydrokinetics has been derived using tanks void of fish. Clearly, the presence of randomly moving objects, such as fish, in a water column will influence not only tank volumes by displacing water, but due to their activity, water dynamics and associated in-tank processes. In order...

  2. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-04-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. It is probable that tank 241-C-112 exceeds the 1,000 g-mol inventory criteria established for the Ferrocyanide USQ; however, extensive energetic analysis of the waste has determined a maximum exothermic value of -9 cal/g dry waste. This value is substantially below any levels of concern (-75 cal/g). In addition, an investigation of potential mechanisms to generate concentration levels of radionuclides high enough to be of concern was performed. No credible mechanism was postulated that could initiate the formation of such concentration levels in the tank. Tank 241-C-112 waste is a complex material made up primarily of water and inert salts. The insoluble solids are a mixture of phosphates, sulfates, and hydroxides in combination with aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, and uranium. Disodium nickel ferrocyanide and sodium cesium nickel ferrocyanide probably exist in the tank; however, there appears to have been significant degradation of this material since the waste was initially settled in the tank.

  3. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  4. Improved Tank Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Nordseewerke Emden Hitachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Ltd. Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries Company, Ltd. Kawasaki Heavy Industries , Ltd... Harima Heavy Industries Co., LTD (U.S. office) Newport News ShipbuildingCo. Sun Shipbuildingand Dry Dock Co. Davie ShipbuildingLtd. Cargo tanks...shipbuilders listed below: American Bureau of Shipping U.S. Coast Guard Avondale Shipyards Co. General Dynamics/Quincy Shipbuilding Division 4 Ishikawajima

  5. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment for Hanford high-level waste tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacFarlane, D.R.; Bott, T.F.; Brown, L.F.; Stack, D.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kindinger, J.; Deremer, R.K.; Medhekar, S.R.; Mikschl, T.J. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is performing a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), which will include consideration of external events for the 18 tank farms at the Hanford Site. This effort is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE/EM, EM-36). Even though the methodology described herein will be applied to the entire tank farm, this report focuses only on the risk from the weapons-production wastes stored in tank number 241-SY-101, commonly known as Tank 101-SY, as configured in December 1992. This tank, which periodically releases ({open_quotes}burps{close_quotes}) a gaseous mixture of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and nitrogen, was analyzed first because of public safety concerns associated with the potential for release of radioactive tank contents should this gas mixture be ignited during one of the burps. In an effort to mitigate the burping phenomenon, an experiment is being conducted in which a large pump has been inserted into the tank to determine if pump-induced circulation of the tank contents will promote a slow, controlled release of the gases. At the Hanford Site there are 177 underground tanks in 18 separate tank farms containing accumulated liquid/sludge/salt cake radioactive wastes from 50 yr of weapons materials production activities. The total waste volume is about 60 million gal., which contains approximately 120 million Ci of radioactivity.

  7. Accountability Tanks Calibration Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, James G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, William Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Finstad, Casey Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-25

    MET-1 utilizes tanks to store plutonium in solution. The Nuclear Material Control & Accountability group at LANL requires that MET-1 be able to determine the amount of SNM remaining in solution in the tanks for accountability purposes. For this reason it is desired to determine how well various operators may read the volume of liquid left in the tank with the tank measurement device (glass column or slab). The accuracy of the measurement is then compared to the current SAFE-NMCA acceptance criteria for lean and rich plutonium solutions to determine whether or not the criteria are reasonable and may be met.

  8. Tank Characterization Report for Double Shell Tank (DST) 241-AN-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-03-23

    This report interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

  9. Tal en tanke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent F.; Stjernfelt, Frederik

    Den svenske biskop og poet Esais Tegnèr har engang sagt: "Menneskers ord og tanker fødes sammen, at tale uklart er at tænke uklart." Denne lærebog er et lynkursus i at tænke og tale klart - og i at være på vagt over for uklar tænkning og tale, hvor den end optræder.Tal en tanke er hurtigt læst og...

  10. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  11. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of the...

  12. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling standards...

  13. 49 CFR 178.275 - Specification for UN Portable Tanks intended for the transportation of liquid and solid hazardous...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... reclosing type. Such portable tanks may, in addition, have a frangible disc or fusible element in parallel...-relief or combination pressure relief and vacuum-relief devices. (h) Fusible elements. Fusible elements... external heat. Fusible elements must not be utilized on portable tanks with a test pressure which exceeds 2...

  14. 27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tank car and tank truck... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed...

  15. 27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks... Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where a shipment of distilled spirits from customs custody to the distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings affording access to the...

  16. Research Award: Think Tank Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Iniave is a global program that supports independent policy research organizaons – or "think tanks" – in ...

  17. Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.R.

    1999-06-24

    'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

  18. Surplus yeast tank failing catastrophically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2016-01-01

    GOOD REASON FOR CAUTION I A large surplus yeast tank shot into the air leaving the floor plate and the contents behind. Although not designed for overpressure, the tank was kept at “very slight overpressure” to suppress nuisance foaming. The brewery was unaware of the hazards of compressed air...

  19. Solitons in a wave tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.; Smith, H.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1984-01-01

    A wave tank experiment (first described by the nineteenth-century engineer and naval architect John Scott Russell) relates a linear eigenvalue problem from elementary quantum mechanics to a striking feature of modern nonlinear wave theory: multiple generation of solitons. The tank experiment...

  20. Cleaning Validation of Fermentation Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Satu; Friis, Alan; Wirtanen, Gun

    2008-01-01

    Reliable test methods for checking cleanliness are needed to evaluate and validate the cleaning process of fermentation tanks. Pilot scale tanks were used to test the applicability of various methods for this purpose. The methods found to be suitable for validation of the clenlinees were visula...

  1. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    One important dimension of the Initiative is to capture and share learning about strategies for supporting and managing policy research organizations. The Think Tank Initiative ... proposals could address one/some of the following research questions: •. How do think tanks communicate effectively in policy environments?

  2. Modelling of baffled stirred tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstedt, H.; Lahtinen, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The three-dimensional flow field of a baffled stirred tank has been calculated using four different turbulence models. The tank is driven by a Rushton-type impeller. The boundary condition for the impeller region has been given as a source term or by calculating the impeller using the sliding mesh technique. Calculated values have been compared with measured data. (author)

  3. Filament wound metal lined propellant tanks for future Earth-to-orbit transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macconochie, Ian O.; Davis, Robert B.; Freeman, William T., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    For future Earth-to-orbit transport vehicles, reusability and lighter weights are sought for the main propellant tanks. To achieve this, a filament wound tank with a metal liner and an intermediate layer of foam-filled honeycomb is proposed. A hydrogen tank is used as an example. To accommodate mismatches in the expansion of liner and overwrap a design is proposed wherin the liner is configured so that the extension of the liner under pressure matches the expected contraction of the same liner due to the presence of a cryogen. In operation, the liner is pressurized at a rate such that the pressure strain matches the contraction due to decrease in temperature. As an alternate approach, compressive pre-stress is placed in the liner such that it will not separate from the overwrap. A finite element program is used to show stresses in the liner and overwrap for various tank pressures for the pre-stressed liner concept. A fracture mechanics analysis is made of the liners to determine tank life. The tank concept shown has a similar weight to the Shuttle external hydrogen tank, but the filament wound tank is expected to be reusable. Integration of the propellant tanks into a future transport vehicle is discussed.

  4. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  5. STS-133/ET-137 Tanking Test Photogrammetry Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stanley T.

    2012-01-01

    Following the launch scrub of Space Shuttle mission STS-133 on November 5, 2010, an anomalous condition of cracked and raised thermal protection system (TPS) foam was observed on the External Tank (ET). Subsequent dissection of the affected TPS region revealed cracks in the feet of two Intertank (IT) metallic stringers. An extensive investigation into the cause(s) and corrective action(s) for the cracked stringers was initiated, involving a wide array of material and structural tests and nondestructive evaluations, with the intent to culminate into the development of flight rational. One such structural test was the instrumented tanking test performed on December 17, 2010. The tanking test incorporated two three-dimensional optical displacement measurement systems to measure full-field outer surface displacements of the TPS surrounding the affected region that contained the stringer cracks. The results showed that the radial displacement and rotation of the liquid oxygen (LO2) tank flange changed significantly as the fluid level of the LO2 approached and passed the LO2 tank flange.

  6. Tank farms hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  7. Science Road Map for Phase 2 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Mann, Frederick M.

    2008-08-18

    Phase 1 of the Tank-Farm Vadose Zone Program (TFVZP) developed information on the nature and extent of vadose zone contamination in the tank farms through field studies, laboratory analyses and experiments, and historical data searches; assembled data and performed tank-farm risk analysis; and initiated interim corrective actions to lessen the impacts of tank leak contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists and external collaborators at universities and U.S. Department of Energy user facilities sampled and analyzed contaminant plumes. These types of activities will continue during Phase 2 of the TFVZP to refine and expand scientific understanding of the subsurface beneath tank farms, especially of water movement, residual waste leaching, and contaminant transport.

  8. Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

  9. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  10. Tank waste remediation system risk management list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collard, L.B.

    1995-10-31

    The Tank Waste Remedation System (TWRS) Risk Management List and it`s subset of critical risks, the Critical Risk Management List, provide a tool to senior RL and WHC management (Level-1 and -2) to manage programmatic risks that may significantly impact the TWRS program. The programmatic risks include cost, schedule, and performance risks. Performance risk includes technical risk, supportability risk (such as maintainability and availability), and external risk (i.e., beyond program control, for example, changes in regulations). The risk information includes a description, its impacts, as evaluation of the likelihood, consequences and risk value, possible mitigating actions, and responsible RL and WHC managers. The issues that typically form the basis for the risks are presented in a separate table and the affected functions are provided on the management lists.

  11. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under § 154...

  12. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surge tanks. 58.218 Section 58.218 Agriculture....218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures of product including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or...

  13. Underground Storage Tanks in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Underground storage tank (UST) sites which store petroleum in Iowa. Includes sites which have been reported to DNR, and have active or removed underground storage...

  14. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original

  15. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2010-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

    2009-01-15

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al

  17. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single

  18. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  19. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  20. 241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2014-04-04

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

  1. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  2. Frequency of deflagration in the in-tank precipitation process tanks due to loss of nitrogen purge system. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.M.; Mason, C.L.; Olsen, L.M.; Shapiro, B.J.; Gupta, M.K.; Britt, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    High-level liquid wastes (HLLW) from the processing of nuclear material at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are stored in large tanks in the F- and H-Area tank farms. The In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process is one step in the processing and disposal of HLLW. The process hazards review for the ITP identified the need to implement provisions that minimize deflagration/explosion hazards associated with the process. The objective of this analysis is to determine the frequency of a deflagration in Tank 48 and/or 49 due to nitrogen purge system failures (including external events) and coincident ignition source. A fault tree of the nitrogen purge system coupled with ignition source probability is used to identify dominant system failures that contribute to the frequency of deflagration. These system failures are then used in the recovery analysis. Several human actions, recovery actions, and repair activities are identified that reduce total frequency. The actions are analyzed and quantified as part of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). The probabilities of failure of these actions are applied to the fault tree cutsets and the event trees.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A SMART SOLAR TANK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of small SDHW systems based on so-called smart solar tanks are presented. A smart solar tank is a hot water tank in which the domestic water can both be heated by solar collectors and by an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply....... The investigations showed that the yearly thermal performance of small SDHW systems can be increased by up to about 30 % if a smart solar tank is used instead of a traditional solar combi tank. The thermal increase is strongly influenced by the hot water consumption and consumption pattern. Recommendations...... for future development of smart solar tanks are given....

  4. Regulating multiple externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldo, Staffan; Jensen, Frank; Nielsen, Max

    2016-01-01

    Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory instrume......Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory...

  5. first tank of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  6. ExternE National Implementation Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingoud, K.; Maelkki, H.; Wihersaari, M.; Pirilae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Hongisto, M. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Siitonen, S. [Ekono Energy Ltd, Espoo (Finland); Johansson, M. [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    ExternE National Implementation is a continuation of the ExternE Project, funded in part by the European Commission's Joule III Programme. This study is the result of the ExternE National Implementation Project for Finland. Three fuel cycles were selected for the Finnish study: coal, peat and wood-derived biomass, which together are responsible for about 40% of total electricity generation in Finland and about 75% of the non-nuclear fuel based generation. The estimated external costs or damages were dominated by the global warming (GW) impacts in the coal and peat fuel cycles, but knowledge of the true GW impacts is still uncertain. From among other impacts that were valued in monetary terms the human health damages due to airborne emissions dominated in all the three fuel cycles. Monetary valuation for ecosystem impacts is not possible using the ExternE methodology at present. The Meri-Pori power station representing the coal fuel cycle is one of the world's cleanest and most efficient coal-fired power plants with a condensing turbine. The coal is imported mainly from Poland. The estimated health damages were about 4 mECU/kWh, crop damages an order of magnitude lower and damages caused to building materials two orders of magnitude lower. The power stations of the peat and biomass fuel cycles are of CHP type, generating electricity and heat for the district heating systems of two cities. Their fuels are of domestic origin. The estimated health damages allocated to electricity generation were about 5 and 6 mECU/kWh, respectively. The estimates were case-specific and thus an generalisation of the results to the whole electricity generation in Finland is unrealistic. Despite the uncertainties and limitations of the methodology, it is a promising tool in the comparison of similar kinds of fuel cycles, new power plants and pollution abatement technologies and different plant locations with each other. (orig.)

  7. Tank calibration; Arqueacao de tanques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Ana [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This work relates the analysis of the norms ISO (International Organization for Standardization) for calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks used in fiscal measurement, established on Joint Regulation no 1 of June 19, 2000 between the ANP (National Agency of Petroleum) and the INMETRO (National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Industrial Quality). In this work a comparison between norms ISO and norms published by the API (American Petroleum Institute) and the IP (Institute of Petroleum) up to 2001 was made. It was concluded that norms ISO are wider than norms API, IP, and INMETRO methods in the calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks. (author)

  8. 40 CFR 61.343 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or permanent deformation of the tank or cover resulting from filling or emptying the tank, diurnal... efforts at repair shall be made as soon as practicable, but not later than 45 calendar days after...

  9. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo......In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...

  10. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...... of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo...

  11. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  12. Lightweight, Composite Cryogenic Tank Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm has developed and qualified strong, all-composite LOX tanks for launch vehicles. Our new 42-inch diameter tank design weighs 486 lbs and burst without...

  13. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...... of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo-American...

  14. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  15. Spray-on foam insulations for launch vehicle cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2012-04-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex array of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of 200-260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the different

  16. 49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... design. (b) If a welded closure is used, it must be designed to allow it to be reopened by grinding or...

  17. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shine, E. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  18. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

  19. Think Tanks, Education and Elite Policy Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Glenn C.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen think tanks operate in sophisticated ways to influence the development of education policies. In this paper, I reflect upon the influence of think tanks in the formation of national reform, using the Common Core State Standards initiative in the USA as an illustrative case. In doing so, I explore how certain think tanks,…

  20. 33 CFR 183.510 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tanks. 183.510 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.510 Fuel tanks. (a) Each fuel tank in a boat must have been tested by its manufacturer under § 183.580 and not leak when...

  1. 7 CFR 58.427 - Paraffin tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paraffin tanks. 58.427 Section 58.427 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....427 Paraffin tanks. The metal tank should be adequate in size, have wood rather than metal racks to...

  2. Elevated Tank Due to Earthquake Even

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotrasová Kamila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated reservoirs are mainly used for storing of variety water. During earthquake activity the fluid exerts impulsive and convective (sloshing effects on the walls and bottom of tank. This paper provides theoretical background for analytical calculating of elevated water tank due to earthquake even and deals with simplified seismic design procedures for elevated tanks.

  3. 40 CFR 264.1084 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... is used for the primary seal, the metallic shoe seal shall be designed so that one end extends into... maximum organic vapor pressure limit for the tank's design capacity category as follows: (A) For a tank design capacity equal to or greater than 151 m3, the maximum organic vapor pressure limit for the tank is...

  4. Results of Hg speciation testing on tank 39 and 1Q16 tank 50 samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The seventeenth shipment of samples was designated to include two Tank 39 samples and the 1Q16 Tank 50 Quarterly WAC sample. The surface Tank 39 sample was pulled at 262.1” from the tank bottom, and the depth Tank 39 sample was pulled at 95” from the tank bottom. The 1Q16 Tank 50 WAC sample was drawn from the 1-L variable depth sample received by SRNL.

  5. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-02-23

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues.

  6. Fish stocking density impacts tank hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Lunger, Angela; Laursen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stocking density upon the hydrodynamics of a circular tank, configured in a recirculation system, was investigated. Red drums Sciaenops ocellatus of approximately 140 g wet weight, were stocked at five rates varying from 0 to 12 kg m-3. The impact of the presence of fish upon tank...... hydrodynamics was established using in-tank-based Rhodamine WT fluorometry at a flow rate of 0.23 l s-1 (tank exchange rate of 1.9 h-1). With increasing numbers of animals, curvilinear relationships were observed for dispersion coefficients and tank mixing times. Stocking densities of 3, 6, 9 and 12 kg m-3...

  7. External Costs of Transport

    OpenAIRE

    INFRAS, UNIVERSITAT KARLRUHE

    2014-01-01

    This study is an update of a former UIC study on external effects (IFRAS / IWW 2000). It aims at improving the empirical basis of external costs of transport based on the actual state of the art of cost estimation methodologies reflecting also recent studies on external costs of transport on a European level (especially UNITE).The following dimensions are considered:- cost categories- contries- base year- differentiation by means of transport 

  8. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  9. Flexible polyimide fuel tank sealants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.J.; Cassey, H.N.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for elastomers or compliant polymers used as integral fuel tank sealant materials and as seals in high-performance military aircraft are examined, and a polyimide system with the appropriate properties is described. The system contains methylene dianiline, 4,4'-diaminostilbene, polyethyleneoxide diamine, and bis(4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxyl)phenyl) sulfone dianhydride. Development, preparation, and applications of the polyimide sealant are discussed.

  10. Models of liquid storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Termica e Fluidos, FEM, UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil); Leal, J.F.B. [Departamento Basico, FAENQUIL, Lorena (Brazil); Zanardi, M.A. [Departamento de Energia, FEG, UNESP, Guaratingueta (Brazil)

    1997-08-01

    We present the results of a comparative study on thermally stratified tanks for hot storage. A two-dimensional model is employed. A numerical solution was obtained using the control-volume technique due to Patankar. The two-dimensional model was simplified for the pure conduction case. Results from the two models were compared with each other and with available numerical and experimental results. (Author)

  11. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  12. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  13. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  14. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  15. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  16. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2012-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

  17. In situ vitrification of radioactive underground tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, S.S.; Gibby, R.D.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-10-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a treatment process with great potential for remediating underground tanks previously used for storing radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Tests at several scales have demonstrated the utility of ISV for these tanks. An engineering-scale test vitrified a 30-cm-diameter buried steel and concrete tank that contained simulated tank sludge. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized, or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system, and the tank walls were melted or incorporated into the ISV block. A pilot-scale ISV test vitrified a 1-m simulated underground tank than contained a simulated refractory sludge. The ISV process completely vitrified the tank, its contents, and the soil below the tank to a depth of 2.4 m, producing a uniform glass and crystalline monolith with an estimated mass of 30 tons. A large-scale underground tank test is scheduled for early 1991. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  18. RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

    2006-01-20

    The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next

  19. Checklists for external validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Kidholm, Kristian; Gerke, Oke

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The quality of the current literature on external validity varies considerably. An improved checklist with validated items on external validity would aid decision-makers in judging similarities among circumstances when transferring evidence from a study setting to ...

  20. Social Agglomeration Externalities

    OpenAIRE

    Borck, Rainald

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines social agglomeration externalities. Using survey data from the German Socio-Economic Panel, I examine the link between city size and different measures of consumption, social interaction and social capital. Further, using responses to satisfaction questions, I analyse whether individuals are compensated for diseconomies of agglomeration by positive agglomeration externalities in other areas. This equilibrium hypothesis cannot be rejected.

  1. External approach to rhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Wilfred S; Charbonneau, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The technique of external rhinoplasty is outlined. Having reviewed 74 cases, its advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Reluctance to use this external approach seems to be based on emotional rather than radical grounds, for its seems to be the procedure of choice for many problems.

  2. The External Mind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The External Mind: an Introduction by Riccardo Fusaroli, Claudio Paolucci pp. 3-31 The sign of the Hand: Symbolic Practices and the Extended Mind by Massimiliano Cappuccio, Michael Wheeler pp. 33-55 The Overextended Mind by Shaun Gallagher pp. 57-68 The "External Mind": Semiotics, Pragmatism...

  3. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal......, taking into account the influences of tank volume, height to diameter ratio, tank insulation, thickness and material property of the tank and initial thermal conditions of the tank. The equation is validated for a tank volume between 150 l and 500 l, a tank height to tank diameter ratio of 1-5, a tank...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  4. Simple characterisation of solar DHW tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the project is to compare different methods used for testing small solar domestic hot water tanks. A small hot water tank is tested at three different European laboratories by means of the test methods normally used at the laboratories. The tank is marketed in Denmark.The test carried...... out at the Department for Buildings and Energy compromises determination of the heat loss coefficient for the tank and the heat transfer coefficient for the auxiliary helix. A dynamic test is performed and a simulation model of the tank is made and validated against measured energy quantities...... and temperatures. The annual thermal performance for a solar domestic hot water system based on the tested tank is calculated. Further, proposal for a future test on mixing during draw-off as well as proposal for a maximum acceptable mixing during draw-off is given....

  5. Evaluation of Settler Tank Thermal Stability during Solidification and Disposition to ERDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schmidt, Andrew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-03-30

    Ten 16-foot-long and 20-inch diameter horizontal tanks currently reside in a stacked 2×5 (high) array in the ~20,000-gallon water-filled Weasel Pit of the 105-KW Fuel Storage Basin on the US-DOE Hanford Site. These ten tanks are part of the Integrated Water Treatment System used to manage water quality in the KW Basin and are called “settler” tanks because of their application in removing particles from the KW Basin waters. Based on process knowledge, the settler tanks are estimated to contain about 124 kilograms of finely divided uranium metal, 22 kg of uranium dioxide, and another 55 kg of other radioactive sludge. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is charged with managing the settler tanks and arranging for their ultimate disposal by burial in ERDF. The presence of finely divided uranium metal in the sludge is of concern because of the potential for thermal runaway reaction of the uranium metal with water and the formation of flammable hydrogen gas as a product of the uranium-water reaction. Thermal runaway can be instigated by external heating. The STP commissioned a formal Decision Support Board (DSB) to consider options and provide recommendations to manage and dispose of the settler tanks and their contents. Decision criteria included consideration of the project schedule and longer-term deactivation, decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition (D4) of the KW Basin. The DSB compared the alternatives and recommended in-situ grouting, size-reduction, and ERDF disposal as the best of six candidate options for settler tank treatment and disposal. It is important to note that most grouts contain a complement of Portland cement as the binding agent and that Portland cement curing reactions generate heat. Therefore, concern is raised that the grouting of the settler tank contents may produce heating sufficient to instigate thermal runaway reactions in the contained uranium metal sludge.

  6. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  7. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2011-06-23

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

  8. Tank 241-A-105 leak assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    Tank 241-A-105 is one of 149 single shell tanks constructed at Hanford to contain and store highly radioactive wastes originating from the processing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Radiation detection and temperature monitoring devices installed beneath the tank indicate that several episodes of leakage of waste from the tank have occurred. The aim of this study was to evaluate the previous estimates and reanalyze the data to provide a more accurate estimate of leakage from the tank. The principal conclusions of this study are as follows: Earlier investigators estimated leakage prior to August 1968 at 5,000 to 15,000 gallons. Their estimate appears reasonable. Leakage while the tank was being sluiced (8/68--11/70) probably exceeded 5,000 gallons, but probably did not exceed 30,000 gallons. Insufficient data are available to be more precise. Cooling water added to the tank during the sprinkling phase (11/70 -- 12/78) was approximately 610,000 gallons. Sufficient heat was generated in the tank to evaporate most, and perhaps nearly all, of this water. Radionuclides escaping into the soil under the tank cannot be estimated directly because of many uncertainties. Based on a range of leakage from 10,000 to 45,000 gallons, assumed compositions, and decayed to 1/1/91, radioactivity under the tank is expected to be in the range of 85,000--760,000 curies. Measured radiation peaks were nearly all located directly below the perimeter of the tank and, except in rare cases, they showed no tendency to spread horizontally. Moreover, the maximum radiation readings detected are a very small fraction of the radiation reading in the tank. This is the basis for the conclusion that the rate of leakage and, most likely, the quantity leaked, was small. 51 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Surge Tank Atlas for Hydropower Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvåg, Simon Utseth

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this master's thesis is to describe the existing surge tank solutions and additional improvements, and to simulate the hydraulic behavior of the surge tanks and how it affects the hydropower plant. The high head hydropower plant Torpa and the low head hydropower plant Åna-Sira are used for the case study, thus the surge tanks can be simulated under different hydraulic conditions. Turbine pressures and mass oscillations after a complete turbine shutdown, and turbine regulation...

  10. Criteria: waste tank isolation and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, W.P.; Ogren, W.E.

    1976-09-01

    The crystallized Hanford high-level wastes stored in single-shell underground tanks consist of sludges and salt cakes covered with supernatural liquor. Purpose of stabilization and isolation is to reduce the releases and losses as a result of a loss of tank integrity. The tanks will be modified so that no inadvertent liquid additions can be made. Criteria for the isolation and stabilization are given and discussed briefly. (DLC)

  11. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents numerical investigations of thermal stratification in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank established by standby heat loss from the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are calculated by means of validated...... computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The measured heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is used as input to the CFD model. Parametric studies are carried out using the validated models to investigate the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow...... the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The results show that 20–55% of the side heat loss drops to layers below in the part of the tank without the presence of thermal stratification. A heat loss removal factor is introduced...

  12. Utilities:Water:Water Tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Water:tanks)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. It consists of 2 polygons representing the Tunnel Spring Division Tank and the 1/2...

  13. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  14. Tank Waste Remediation System Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robershotte, M.A.; Dirks, L.L.; Seaver, D.A.; Bothers, A.J.; Madden, M.S.

    1995-06-01

    The scope, number and complexity of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) decisions require an integrated, consistent, and logical approach to decision making. TWRS has adopted a seven-step decision process applicable to all decisions. Not all decisions, however, require the same degree of rigor/detail. The decision impact will dictate the appropriate required detail. In the entire process, values, both from the public as well as from the decision makers, play a key role. This document concludes with a general discussion of the implementation process that includes the roles of concerned parties.

  15. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-U-110 (U-110) is a Hanford Site waste tank that was ;most recently sampled in November and December 1989. Analysis of the samples obtained from tank U-110 was conducted to support the characterization of the contents of this tank and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-10-00 (Ecology, et al. 1992). Because of incomplete recovery of the waste during sampling, there may be bias in the results of this characterization report.

  16. Tank 241-C-109 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-10

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-109. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  17. Tank 241-TY-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-104. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank.

  18. Dynamic response of ground supported rectangular water tanks to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reinforced concrete rectangular water tank under earthquake excitation. A linear three-dimensional finite element analysis and SAP2000 software have been used to predict tank response. The variable analysis parameters considered are the aspect ratio (tank height to length ratio) and tank water level, while the tank wall ...

  19. 49 CFR 230.115 - Feed water tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Feed water tanks. 230.115 Section 230.115... Tenders Steam Locomotive Tanks § 230.115 Feed water tanks. (a) General provisions. Tanks shall be... water. Feed water tanks shall be equipped with a device that permits the measurement of the quantity of...

  20. 46 CFR 154.412 - Cargo tank corrosion allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank corrosion allowance. 154.412 Section 154.412... Containment Systems § 154.412 Cargo tank corrosion allowance. A cargo tank must be designed with a corrosion...) carries a cargo that corrodes the tank material. Note: Corrosion allowance for independent tank type C is...

  1. Thermodynamic optimization of heat exchanger tanks by exergy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper introduces heat exchanger tanks, detailing their dominant thermodynamic relations to obtain the exergy analysis relations of heat exchanger tanks. Heat exchanger tank is examined under various laboratory conditions, including the power of heat element inside the tank, mass flow rate of cooling water of tank ...

  2. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... tank by capillary action. (c) If the plastic is bonded to the surface of a metallic fuel tank, the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam...

  3. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tank truck. 24.230 Section 24.230 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor shall carefully examine the car or truck to see whether the seals are intact and whether there is any evidence of...

  4. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  5. Supporting document for the SW Quadrant Historical Tank Content Estimate for U-Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical characterization information gathered on U-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate of the SW Quadrant at the Hanford 200 West Area.

  6. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  7. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C H; Stroup, J L; Funk, J. W.

    1997-03-12

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  8. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the SX-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on SX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  9. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AP-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AP-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  10. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for C-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  11. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AX-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  12. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B-Tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on B-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  13. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BX-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  14. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A-Tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on A-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  15. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for BY-Tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1996-06-28

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on BY-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information,temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the northeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 East Area.

  16. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for the S-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-25

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on S-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southwest Quadrant of the Hanford 200 West Area.

  17. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AN-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AN-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  18. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AW-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H., Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information on AW-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature plots, liquid observation well plots, chemical analyte and radionuclide inventories for the Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for the Southeast Quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas.

  19. External incontinence devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. External incontinence devices are products (or appliances). These are worn on the outside of the ... us Disclaimers Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National ...

  20. Externally Verifiable Oblivious RAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gancher Joshua

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the idea of externally verifiable oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our goal is to allow a client and server carrying out an ORAM protocol to have disputes adjudicated by a third party, allowing for the enforcement of penalties against an unreliable or malicious server. We give a security definition that guarantees protection not only against a malicious server but also against a client making false accusations. We then give modifications of the Path ORAM [15] and Ring ORAM [9] protocols that meet this security definition. These protocols both have the same asymptotic runtimes as the semi-honest original versions and require the external verifier to be involved only when the client or server deviates from the protocol. Finally, we implement externally verified ORAM, along with an automated cryptocurrency contract to use as the external verifier.

  1. Catalytic pressurization of liquid hydrogen fuel tanks for unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leachman, Jacob; Street, Melissa Jean; Graham, Teira

    2012-06-01

    As the use and applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) expand, the need for a lighter weight fuel allowing for longer duration flights has become the primary limiting factor in the advancement of these vehicles. To extend the operational envelope of UAV, onboard condensed hydrogen storage for missions exceeding one week is necessary. Currently, large spherical liquid hydrogen tanks that are pressurized with external helium tanks or electronic heating elements are utilized for this purpose. However, the mass, size, and power consumption of the fuel storage tank and fuel pressurization system significantly limit the flight envelope of UAV. In an effort to alleviate these issues, this paper investigates the technological feasibility of orthohydrogen-parahydrogen catalysis as a method of fuel pressurization. Typical pressurization requirements for takeoff, cruise, and landing are reviewed. Calculations of the catalyst system mass and response time are presented.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Sloshing in 2D Rectangular Tanks Based on the Prediction of Free Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite difference method for analyzing 2D nonlinear sloshing waves in a tank has been developed based on the potential flow theory. After σ-transformation, the free surface is predicted by the kinematic condition, and nonlinear terms are approximated; the governing equation and boundary conditions are discretized to linear equations in the iterative process of time. Simulations of standing waves and sloshing in horizontally excited tanks are presented. The results are compared with analytical and numerical solutions in other literatures, which demonstrate the effectiveness and accuracy of this numerical method. The beating phenomenon of sloshing in the tank with different aspect ratios is studied. The relationship between sloshing force and aspect ratio under the same external excitation is also discussed.

  3. 9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. 316.14 Section 316.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank...

  4. Screening the Hanford tanks for trapped gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, P.

    1995-10-01

    The Hanford Site is home to 177 large, underground nuclear waste storage tanks. Hydrogen gas is generated within the waste in these tanks. This document presents the results of a screening of Hanford`s nuclear waste storage tanks for the presence of gas trapped in the waste. The method used for the screening is to look for an inverse correlation between waste level measurements and ambient atmospheric pressure. If the waste level in a tank decreases with an increase in ambient atmospheric pressure, then the compressibility may be attributed to gas trapped within the waste. In this report, this methodology is not used to estimate the volume of gas trapped in the waste. The waste level measurements used in this study were made primarily to monitor the tanks for leaks and intrusions. Four measurement devices are widely used in these tanks. Three of these measure the level of the waste surface. The remaining device measures from within a well embedded in the waste, thereby monitoring the liquid level even if the liquid level is below a dry waste crust. In the past, a steady rise in waste level has been taken as an indicator of trapped gas. This indicator is not part of the screening calculation described in this report; however, a possible explanation for the rise is given by the mathematical relation between atmospheric pressure and waste level used to support the screening calculation. The screening was applied to data from each measurement device in each tank. If any of these data for a single tank indicated trapped gas, that tank was flagged by this screening process. A total of 58 of the 177 Hanford tanks were flagged as containing trapped gas, including 21 of the 25 tanks currently on the flammable gas watch list.

  5. ADE Guide for External Reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADE Bulletin, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Helps external reviewers of academic departments draw on the experience of those who have learned by trial and error. Outlines the steps taken by an external reviewer. Considers the particular task for an external reviewer and presents some notes on self-preservation for the external reviewer. Discusses the external reviewer's responsibility of…

  6. External trade development in 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Český statistický úřad

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the external trade development of the CR in total (turnover, export, import, trade balance). Main factors, which influence the external trade development. Territorial structure (by main blocks and selected countries) and commodity structure (by SITC, rev. 4) of the external trade. Comparisons of the CR external trade development with the external trade development of the other member states of the EU.

  7. Luminit Optical Tank-level Sensing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for innovative methods to measure liquid propellant tank volume and tank fluid level with improved accuracy, repeatability, and minimal tank...

  8. 27 CFR 19.273 - Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... safety devices shall be constructed to prevent extraction of spirits or wines. (b) Scale tanks. (1) Beams... accuracy of scales used for weighing lots of spirits or denatured spirits through tests conducted at... TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Construction, Equipment and Security § 19.273 Tanks. (a) General...

  9. HANFORD WASTE TANK BUMP ACCIDENT & CONSEQUENCE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM, J.E.

    2005-02-22

    Postulated physical scenarios leading to tank bumps were examined. A combination of a substantial supernatant layer depth, supernatant temperatures close to saturation, and high sludge temperatures are required for a tank bump to occur. Scenarios postulated at various times for sludge layers lacking substantial supernatant, such as superheat within the layer and fumarole formation leading to a bump were ruled out.

  10. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM- 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B; Ruel Waltz, R

    2008-06-05

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. The 2007 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. A very small amount of material had seeped from Tank 12 from a previously identified leaksite. The material observed had dried on the tank wall and did not reach the annulus floor. A total of 5945 photographs were made and 1221 visual and video inspections were performed during 2007. Additionally, ultrasonic testing was performed on four Waste Tanks (15, 36, 37 and 38) in accordance with approved inspection plans that met the requirements of WSRC-TR-2002- 00061, Revision 2 'In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks'. The Ultrasonic Testing (UT) In-Service Inspections (ISI) are documented in a separate report that is prepared by the ISI programmatic Level III UT Analyst. Tanks 15, 36, 37 and 38 are documented in 'Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2007'; WSRC-TR-2007-00064.

  11. 14 CFR 121.316 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks. 121.316 Section 121.316 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.316 Fuel tanks. Each...

  12. A RATIONAL APPROACH TO SEPTIC TANK DESIGN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-01

    Mar 1, 2012 ... A Rational Approach to Septic Tank Design. 69. Table 1: Schedule of Septic Tank Sizing and Dimensions (PWD, 1943). ... ficiency, hence three classes of plan specifications will be included in the evolving design .... 15 people in a typical Nigerian middle class city, say Enugu. It is required to construct a ...

  13. 40 CFR 265.1085 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). If a metallic shoe seal is used for the primary seal, the metallic shoe seal shall be designed so... which is less than the maximum organic vapor pressure limit for the tank's design capacity category as follows: (A) For a tank design capacity equal to or greater than 151 m3, the maximum organic vapor...

  14. 40 CFR 63.685 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). If a metallic shoe seal is used for the primary seal, the metallic shoe seal shall be designed so... of this subpart based on the off-site material maximum HAP vapor pressure and the tank's design... subpart based on the off-site material maximum HAP vapor pressure and the tank's design capacity. The...

  15. 27 CFR 19.586 - Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Containers § 19.586 Tanks. Tanks which conform to the requirements of § 19.273 may be used on bonded premises as containers for distilled spirits, denatured spirits, articles, and wines. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat. 1360, as amended (26 U.S.C. 5206)) ...

  16. Fluoride content of tank water in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, N J; Hopcraft, M S; Tong, A C; Thean, H l; Thum, Y S; Tong, D E; Wen, J; Zhao, S C; Stanton, D P; Yuan, Y; Shen, P; Reynolds, E C

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) analyse the fluoride content of tank water; (2) determine whether the method of water collection or storage influenced fluoride content; and (3) survey participant attitudes towards water fluoridation. Plastic tubes and a questionnaire were distributed through dentists to households with water tanks in Victoria. A midstream tank water sample was collected and fluoride analysed in triplicate using ion chromatography All samples (n = 123) contained negligible amounts of fluoride, with a mean fluoride concentration of fluoride content and variables investigated such as tank material, tank age, roof material and gutter material. Most people did not know whether their tank water contained fluoride and 40.8% preferred to have access to fluoridated water. The majority thought fluoride was safe and more than half of the respondents supported fluoridation. Fluoride content of tank water was well below the optimal levels for caries prevention. People who rely solely on tank water for drinking may require additional exposure to fluoride for optimal caries prevention. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, C.J.

    2000-04-14

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1999 to evaluate these vessels and auxiliary appurtenances along with evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report.

  18. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program -- 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1994-05-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1993 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections made since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report. The 1993 inspection program revealed that the condition of the Savannah River Site waste tanks had not changed significantly from that reported in the previous annual report. No new leaksites were observed. No evidence of corrosion or materials degradation was observed in the waste tanks. However, degradation was observed on covers of the concrete encasements for the out-of-service transfer lines to Tanks 1 through 8.

  19. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 19F SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 19F closure samples. Tank 19F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 19F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 19F in April 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 19F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one Tank 19F North Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one Tank 19F South Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 19F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on detection values of 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the target detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 19F, some were not met. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TANK 18F SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Click, D.; Diprete, D.

    2009-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked by Liquid Waste Operations to characterize Tank 18F closure samples. Tank 18F slurry samples analyzed included the liquid and solid fractions derived from the 'as-received' slurry materials along with the floor scrape bottom Tank 18F wet solids. These samples were taken from Tank 18F in March 2009 and made available to SRNL in the same month. Because of limited amounts of solids observed in Tank 18F samples, the samples from the north quadrants of the tank were combined into one North Tank 18F Hemisphere sample and similarly the south quadrant samples were combined into one South Tank 18F Hemisphere sample. These samples were delivered to the SRNL shielded cell. The Tank 18F samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Where analytical methods yielded additional contaminants other than those requested by the customer, these results were also reported. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were 1E-04 {micro}Ci/g for most radionuclides and customer desired detection values of 1E-05 {micro}Ci/g for I-129, Pa-231, Np-237, and Ra-226. While many of the minimum detection limits, as specified in the technical task request and task technical and quality assurance plans were met for the species characterized for Tank 18F, some were not met due to spectral interferences. In a number of cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. SRNL, in conjunction with the plant customer, reviewed all these cases and determined that the impacts were negligible.

  2. Lifecycle Verification of Tank Liner Polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M [ORNL; Smith, Barton [ORNL

    2014-03-01

    This report describes a method that was developed for the purpose of assessing the durability of thermoplastic liners used in a Type IV hydrogen storage tank during the tank s expected service life. In the method, a thermoplastic liner specimen is cycled between the maximum and minimum expected working temperatures while it is differentially pressurized with high-pressure hydrogen gas. The number of thermal cycling intervals corresponds to those expected within the tank s design lifetime. At prescribed intervals, hydrogen permeation measurements are done in situ to assess the ability of the liner specimen to maintain its hydrogen barrier properties and to model its permeability over the tank lifetime. Finally, the model is used to assess whether the steady-state leakage rate in the tank could potentially exceed the leakage specification for hydrogen fuel cell passenger vehicles. A durability assessment was performed on a specimen of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) that is in current use as a tank liner. Hydrogen permeation measurements were performed on several additional tank liner polymers as well as novel polymers proposed for use as storage tank liners and hydrogen barrier materials. The following technical barriers from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program MYRDD were addressed by the project: D. Durability of on-board storage systems lifetime of at least 1500 cycles G. Materials of construction vessel containment that is resistant to hydrogen permeation M. Lack of Tank Performance Data and Understanding of Failure Mechanisms And the following technical targets1 for on-board hydrogen storage systems R&D were likewise addressed: Operational cycle life (1/4 tank to full) FY 2017: 1500 cycles; Ultimate: 1500 cycles Environmental health & safety Permeation and leakage: Meets or exceeds applicable standards Loss of useable H2: FY 2017: 0.05 g/h/kg H2; Ultimate: 0.05 g/h/kg H2

  3. Experimental critical parameters of enriched uranium solution in annular tank geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    A total of 61 critical configurations are reported for experiments involving various combinations of annular tanks into which enriched uranium solution was pumped. These experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory. The uranyl nitrate solution contained about 370 g of uranium per liter, but this concentration varied a little over the duration of the studies. The uranium was enriched to about 93% [sup 235]U. All tanks were typical of sizes commonly found in nuclear production plants. They were about 2 m tall and ranged in diameter from 0.6 m to 1.5 m. Annular thicknesses and conditions of neutron reflection, moderation, and absorption were such that criticality would be achieved with these dimensions. Only 13 of the entire set of 74 experiments proved to be subcritical when tanks were completely filled with solution. Single tanks of several radial thicknesses were studied as well as small line arrays (1 x 2 and 1 x 3) of annular tanks. Many systems were reflected on four sides and the bottom by concrete, but none were reflected from above. Many experiments also contained materials within and outside the annular regions that contained strong neutron absorbers. One program had such a thick external moderator/absorber combination that no reflector was used at all.

  4. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks, each...

  5. Structural Integrity of Single Shell Tanks at Hanford - 9491

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, Michael W.; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Karri, Naveen K.; Deibler, John E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Holbery, James D.; Mullen, O Dennis; Hurley, David E.

    2009-03-01

    The 149 Single Shell Tanks at the Hanford Site were constructed between the 1940’s and the 1960’s. Many of the tanks are either known or suspected to have leaked in the past. While the free liquids have been removed from the tanks, they still contain significant waste volumes. Recently, the tank farm operations contractor established a Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. Structural integrity is one aspect of the program. The structural analysis of the Single Shell Tanks has several challenging factors. There are several tank sizes and configurations that need to be analyzed. Tank capacities range from fifty-five thousand gallons to one-million gallons. The smallest tank type is approximately twenty feet in diameter, and the three other tank types are all seventy-five feet in diameter. Within each tank type there are varying concrete strengths, types of steel, tank floor arrangements, in-tank hardware, riser sizes and locations, and other appurtenances that need to be addressed. Furthermore, soil properties vary throughout the tank farms. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been conducting preliminary structural analyses of the various single shell tank types to address these parameters. The preliminary analyses will assess which aspects of the tanks will require further detailed analysis. Evaluation criteria to which the tanks will be analyzed are also being developed for the Single Shell Tank Integrity Program. This information will be reviewed by the Single Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel that has been formed to issue recommendations to the DOE and to the tank farm operations contractor regarding Single Shell Tank Integrity. This paper provides a summary of the preliminary analysis of the single shell tanks, a summary of the recommendations for the detailed analyses, and the proposed evaluation criteria by which the tanks will be judged.

  6. Productivity Change and Externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravtsova, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    on Hungary. While the country leads the group of post-socialist countries in the amount of attracted foreign direct investments (FDI) the effect of this policy on the economy remains unclear. The research finds that different externalities play a different role in productivity, technological and efficiency...... firms and the economy as a whole. The approach used in the current research accounts for different internal as well as external factors that individual firms face and evaluates the effect on changes in productivity, technology as well as the efficiency of domestic firms. The empirical analysis focuses...

  7. DETERMINATION OF ECONOMIC SIZES FOR RC CYLINDRICAL WATER STORAGE TANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güneş KOZLUCA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Water storage tanks are built in different shapes and sizes according to needs. Designs of water storage tanks with low costs are quite important for the national economy. Cylindrical and sphere tanks are the most economic types of tanks in terms of material cost. In this study several cylindrical tank designs are made. Then most economic tank radius – tank height ratio is searched by simply changing thickness, height and the radius of the tank considered. Storage capacity of these cylindrical tanks are all the same. All these reinforced tanks have cylindrical reinforced concrete walls fixed at the bottom and free top edge without roof. It is thought that tanks constructed with this optimal ratio will be beneficial.

  8. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank 241-T-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, B.D.; Jensen, L.

    1994-09-01

    Single shell tank 241-T-107 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank most recently sampled in March 1993. Analyses of materials obtained from tank T-107 were conducted to support the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-06 as well as Milestones M-44-05 and M-44-07. Characterization of the tank waste T-107 will support the ferrocyanide safety issue in order to classify the tank as safe, conditionally safe, or unsafe. This tank characterization report expands on the data found in Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Data Interpretation Report for Tank 241-T-107 Core Samples. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank T-107 strongly indicate the cyanide and oxidizer (nitrate/nitrite) concentrations in the tank waste are not significant enough to support a self-sustaining exothermic reaction. Therefore, the contents of tank T-107 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment. Because the possibility of an exothermic reaction is remote, the consequences of an accident scenario, as proposed by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  9. Physics-Based Fragment Acceleration Modeling for Pressurized Tank Burst Risk Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Ted A.; Lawrence, Scott L.

    2014-01-01

    As part of comprehensive efforts to develop physics-based risk assessment techniques for space systems at NASA, coupled computational fluid and rigid body dynamic simulations were carried out to investigate the flow mechanisms that accelerate tank fragments in bursting pressurized vessels. Simulations of several configurations were compared to analyses based on the industry-standard Baker explosion model, and were used to formulate an improved version of the model. The standard model, which neglects an external fluid, was found to agree best with simulation results only in configurations where the internal-to-external pressure ratio is very high and fragment curvature is small. The improved model introduces terms that accommodate an external fluid and better account for variations based on circumferential fragment count. Physics-based analysis was critical in increasing the model's range of applicability. The improved tank burst model can be used to produce more accurate risk assessments of space vehicle failure modes that involve high-speed debris, such as exploding propellant tanks and bursting rocket engines.

  10. Inelastic Seismic Torsional Behaviour of Elevated Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    DUTTA, S. C.; JAIN, S. K.; MURTY, C. V. R.

    2001-04-01

    Torsional failure of elevated tanks has occurred in past earthquakes. The overall axisymmetric structural geometry and mass distribution of such structures may leave only a small accidental eccentricity between centre of stiffness and centre of mass. Such a small accidental eccentricity is not expected to cause a torsional failure. This paper studies the possibility of amplified torsional behaviour of elevated water tanks due to such small accidental eccentricity in inelastic range through detailed case studies; using two simple idealized systems with two coupled lateral-torsional degrees of freedom and, strength-deteriorating and elasto-plastic hysteresis models. The systems are capable of retaining the characteristics of two extreme categories of water tanks namely, (a) tanks on staging with less number of columns and panels and (b) tanks on staging with large number of columns and panels. The study shows that the presence of a small eccentricity may lead to localized unsymmetrical yielding in some of the reinforced concrete staging elements. This may lead to progressive strength deterioration through successive yieldings in same elements under cyclic loading during earthquakes. Such localized strength drop may increasingly develop large strength eccentricity resulting in large localized inelastic displacement and ductility demand, leading to failure. These observations are also verified for a real-life example elevated tank. The tanks supported on staging with fewer columns and panels are found to have greater torsional vulnerability. The tanks located near a fault are found to be vulnerable under near-fault pulses with a large duration compared to the lateral period of tank.

  11. Network cities and externalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Boix Domènech

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of «agglomeration economies» explains the existence of advantages derived from the concentration of population and activity. However, it does not explain the existence of spatially dynamic external economies. Network economies generated in networks of cities correspond to this last type, since they are generated from the interaction between urban units, linked by a network relationship. The objective of this research is to advance in the study of the relationship between the networks of cities and the generation of external economies. The research is divided in four parts: first we expose the link between networks of cities and external economies. The second part outlines a model for the combined measuring of the concentration and network economies. The third part explains the results of applying the model to a case of study: the network of cities of Catalonia. The results suggest that there is a causal relationship between the organization of the urban units forming networks of cities and the generation of external economies that affect growth and economic development. Finally, conclusions and policy implications are drawn up.

  12. Stochastic Control - External Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    This note is devoted to control of stochastic systems described in discrete time. We are concerned with external descriptions or transfer function model, where we have a dynamic model for the input output relation only (i.e.. no direct internal information). The methods are based on LTI systems...... a section on that topic can be found in appendix....

  13. On parabolic external maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomonaco, Luna; Petersen, Carsten Lunde; Shen, Weixiao

    2017-01-01

    We prove that any C1+BV degree d ≥ 2 circle covering h having all periodic orbits weakly expanding, is conjugate by a C1+BV diffeomorphism to a metrically expanding map. We use this to connect the space of parabolic external maps (coming from the theory of parabolic-like maps) to metrically...

  14. Optimum Prestress of Tanks with Pinned Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Nielsen, Troels

    1998-01-01

    Amin Ghali and Eleanor Elliott presented in their paper an interesting suggestion for prestressing of circular tanks without sliding joints. For many prestressed tanks the following construction procedure is adopted:In order to ensure compressive hoop forces in the wall near the base, the wall...... is allowed to slide freely in the radial direction during tensioning (free base).After tensioning such displacements are prevented (pinned base). The present paper addresses the problem of prestress of such tanks.Keywords: circular prestressing; creep properties; prestressed concrete; redistribution...

  15. Thermal Stratification in Vertical Mantle Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Furbo, Simon

    2001-01-01

    are carried out to investigate how the thermal stratification is affected by different placements of the mantle inlet. The heat transfer between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the domestic water in the inner tank is analysed by CFD-simulations. Furthermore, the flow pattern in the vertical mantle......It is well known that it is important to have a high degree of thermal stratification in the hot water storage tank to achieve a high thermal performance of SDHW systems. This study is concentrated on thermal stratification in vertical mantle tanks. Experiments based on typical operation conditions...

  16. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Lambie, R.W.; Franklin, J.D.; Seymour, B.J.; Johnson, K.W.; Stevens, R.H. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Kennewick, WA (United States); Remund, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sasaki, L.M.; Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This document provides the characterization information and interprets the data for Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109. Single-Shell Tank 241-C-109 is an underground storage tank containing high-level radioactive waste. It is located in the C Tank Farm in the Hanford Site`s 200 East Area. The tank was sampled in September of 1992 to address the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question. Analyses of tank waste were also performed to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-44-08. Tank 241-C-109 went into service in 1946 and received first-cycle decontamination waste from bismuth phosphate process operations at B Plant in 1948. Other waste types added that are expected to contribute to the current contents include ferrocyanide scavenging waste and Strontium Semiworks waste. It is the last tank in a cascade with Tanks 241-C-107 and 241-C-108. The tank has a capacity of 2,010 kL (530 kgal) and currently contains 250 kL (66 kgal) of waste, existing primarily of sludge. Approximately 9.15 kL (4 kgal) of supernate remain. The sludge is heterogeneous, with significantly different chemical compositions depending on waste depth. The major waste constituents include aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, sodium, sulfate and uranium. The major radionuclides present are Cesium 137 and Strontium 90. The results of this characterization indicate that the waste in this tank is adequately described in the Dangerous Waste Permit Application of the Single-Shell Tank System.

  17. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false COW tank washing machines. 157....124 COW tank washing machines. (a) COW machines must be permanently mounted in each cargo tank. (b... allowed in paragraph (f) of this section, each cargo tank must have COW machines located to wash all...

  18. influence of tanks liner material on water quality and growth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR A O AKINWOLE

    PVC lined tanks had better growth performance when compared to other tanks liner materials. It would be beneficial with respect to fish growth and culture water quality, to use polyvinylchloride materials in lining fish culture ponds and rearing tanks. Keywords : Aquaculture, Liners, Fish Farming, Tank, Clarias gariepinus.

  19. 46 CFR 182.435 - Integral fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel tanks. 182.435 Section 182.435 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.435 Integral fuel tanks. (a) Gasoline fuel tanks must be independent of the hull. (b) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with the hull of...

  20. 46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel tanks. 119.435 Section 119.435 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.435 Integral fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with... for certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic pressure test of 35 k...

  1. 33 CFR 157.132 - Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor... § 157.132 Cargo tanks: Hydrocarbon vapor emissions. Each tank vessel having a COW system under § 157.10a... must have— (a) A means to discharge hydrocarbon vapors from each cargo tank that is ballasted to a...

  2. 46 CFR 58.50-5 - Gasoline fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline fuel tanks. 58.50-5 Section 58.50-5 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Independent Fuel Tanks § 58.50-5 Gasoline fuel tanks. (a) Construction—(1) Shape...) Installation. (1) Gasoline fuel tanks used for propulsion shall be located in water-tight compartments separate...

  3. 49 CFR 173.31 - Use of tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... puncture-resistance requirements. The following tank cars must have a tank-head puncture-resistance system... tank car equipped with a thermal protection system conforming to § 179.18 of this subchapter, or that... both directions, and the hand brakes must be set. If multiple tank cars are coupled together...

  4. Think Tanks as Policy Brokers in Partially Organized Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garsten, Christina; Sörbom, Adrienne

    As has been noted in research on think tanks it is difficult to describe what a think tank is, and to pinpoint what it is in think tank activities that generates powerful relationships towards other actors. This is even more the case when talking of transnational think tanks. In this report we gi...

  5. Evaporation analysis for Tank SX-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, C.A.

    1994-10-01

    Decreases in historical interstitial liquid level measurements in tank SX-104 were compared to predictions of a numerical model based upon diffusion of water through a porous crust. The analysis showed that observed level decreases could be explained by evaporation.

  6. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation addressed in this proposal is Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks, or STICT. This novel system could be applied in either an automated or...

  7. Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sprayable Thermal Insulation for Cryogenic Tanks (STICT) is a thermal management system applied by either an automated or manual spraying process with less...

  8. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  9. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Davis, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This topical report contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences of releases of toxic chemical and gases for the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis report (FSAR).It does not provide results for specific accident scenarios but does provide information for use in those calculations including chemicals to be considered, chemical concentrations, chemical limits and a method of summing the fractional contributions of each chemical. Tank farm composites evaluated were liquids and solids for double shell tanks, single shell tanks, all solids,all liquids, headspace gases, and 241-C-106 solids. Emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs) were used as the limits.Where ERPGs were not available for the chemicals of interest, surrogate ERPGs were developed. Revision 2 includes updated sample data, an executive summary, and some editorial revisions.

  10. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  11. Heat transfer correlations in mantle tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Knudsen, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Small solar domestic hot water systems are best designed as low flow systems based on vertical mantle tanks. Theoretical investigations of the heat transfer in differently designed vertical mantle tanks during different operation conditions have been carried out. The investigations are based...... on calculations with a CFD-model, which has earlier been validated by means of experiments. The CFD-model is used to determine the heat transfer between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the walls surrounding the mantle in all levels of the mantle as well as the heat transfer between the wall...... of the inner hot water tank and the domestic water in all levels of the tank. The heat transfer analysis showed that the heat transfer near the mantle inlet port between the solar collector fluid in the mantle and the walls surrounding the mantle is in the mixed convection regime, and as the distance from...

  12. Tank waste remediation system operational scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, M.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission is to store, treat, and immobilize highly radioactive Hanford waste (current and future tank waste and the strontium and cesium capsules) in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner (DOE 1993). This operational scenario is a description of the facilities that are necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. The TWRS Program is developing technologies, conducting engineering analyses, and preparing for design and construction of facilities necessary to remediate the Hanford Site tank wastes. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared to evaluate proposed actions of the TWRS. This operational scenario is only one of many plausible scenarios that would result from the completion of TWRS technology development, engineering analyses, design and construction activities and the TWRS EIS. This operational scenario will be updated as the development of the TWRS proceeds and will be used as a benchmark by which to evaluate alternative scenarios.

  13. Single Shell Tank (SST) Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAASS, C.C.

    2000-03-21

    This document provides an initial program plan for retrieval of the single-shell tank waste. Requirements, technical approach, schedule, organization, management, and cost and funding are discussed. The program plan will be refined and updated in fiscal year 2000.

  14. Underground storage tank management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  15. ExternE transport methodology for external cost evaluation of air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.; Berkowicz, R.; Brandt, J.

    The report describes how the human exposure estimates based on NERI's human exposure modelling system (AirGIS) can improve the Danish data used for exposure factors in the ExternE Transport methodology. Initially, a brief description of the ExternE Tranport methodology is given and it is summarised...

  16. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-02-12

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  17. Building 310 retention tanks characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sholeen, C.M.; Geraghty, D.C.

    1996-12-01

    The Health Physics Section of ANL performed a characterization of the Building 310 Service Floor Retention Tank Facility during the months of July and August, 1996. The characterization included measurements for radioactivity, air sampling for airborne particles and sampling to determine the presence and quantity of hazardous materials requiring remediation. Copies of previous lead and asbestos sampling information was obtained from ESH-IH. The facility consists of ten retention tanks located in rooms, A-062A, A-050A, A-038A, A-026A, and an entry room A-068A which contained miscellaneous pumps and other scrap material. Significant contamination was found in each room except room A-068A which had two contaminated spots on the floor and a discarded contaminated pump. Room A-062A: This room had the highest radiation background. Therefore, beta readings reflected the background readings. The floor, west wall, and the exterior of tank No. 1 had areas of alpha contamination. The piping leading from the tank had elevated gamma readings. There were low levels of smearable contamination on the west wall-Room A-050A: Alpha and Beta contamination is wide spread on the floor, west wall and the lower portion of the north wall. An area near the electrical box on the west wall had alpha and beta loose contamination. The exterior of tank No. 4 also had contaminated areas. The grate in front of tank No. 4 was contaminated. The piping leading from tanks No. 2, 3, and 4 had elevated gamma readings. There were low levels of smearable contamination on tank No. 4 and on the tar paper that is glued to the floor.

  18. Lessons Learned: M1 Abrams Tank System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-15

    coupled with an Allison X1100-3B hydrokinetic transmission to provide four forward and two reverse speeds. Turbine engine use has significant...Performance Advanced Suspension 1500 HP Turbine Engine Hydrokinetic Transmission MAINTAINABILITY Onboard Malfunction Detection System Modular Engine...features of the Ml Abrams Tank are shown in Figures 1-2 and 1-3, respectively. The tank uses a 1500 horsepower AVCO Lycoming regenerative turbine engine

  19. [Wearable Automatic External Defibrillators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huajie; Luo, Zhangyuan; Jin, Xun; Zhang, Leilei; Wang, Changjin; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan

    2015-11-01

    Defibrillation is the most effective method of treating ventricular fibrillation(VF), this paper introduces wearable automatic external defibrillators based on embedded system which includes EGG measurements, bioelectrical impedance measurement, discharge defibrillation module, which can automatic identify VF signal, biphasic exponential waveform defibrillation discharge. After verified by animal tests, the device can realize EGG acquisition and automatic identification. After identifying the ventricular fibrillation signal, it can automatic defibrillate to abort ventricular fibrillation and to realize the cardiac electrical cardioversion.

  20. Externally triggered microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Disclosed are microcapsules comprising a polymer shell enclosing one or more immiscible liquid phases in which a drug or drug precursor are contained in a liquid phase. The microparticles also contain magnetic particles that can be heated by application of an external magnetic field and thus heated to a predetermined Curie temperature. Heating of the particles melts the polymer shell and releases the drug without causing heating of surrounding tissues.

  1. Agglomeration Externalities in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Bode, Eckhardt

    2004-01-01

    Several recent econometric investigations found externalities related to the density of economic activity to account for one fifth to one half of total regional variations in average labor productivity in the U.S. and big European countries, including Germany. The present paper shows for German NUTS 3 regions, first, that this result is not robust against a more extensive control for private returns that may be correlated with economic density. The paper presents, second, evidence of various ...

  2. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  3. 49 CFR 231.8 - Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... clearance, within 30 inches of side of car, until car is shopped for work amounting to practically... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with... APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.8 Tank cars without side sills and tank cars with short side sills and end...

  4. Simulation of the Fast Filling of Hydrogen Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    HEITSCH Matthias; Baraldi, Daniele; Moretto, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    High pressure storage of hydrogen in tanks is a promising option to provide the necessary fuel for transportation purposes. The fill process of a high-pressure tank should be reasonably short but must be designed to avoid too high temperatures in the tank. The paper describes the fast filling process of hydrogen tanks by simulations based on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX. The major result of the simulations is the local temperature distribution in the tank depending on th...

  5. External Auditors and Corporate Corruption: Implications for External Audit Regulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kassem, Rasha; Higson, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

      The purpose of the current study is to examine the responsibility of external auditors in relation to corporate corruption and to highlight the implications of this for external audit regulators...

  6. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 2: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: Tank farm heel flushing/pH adjustment; Grouting experiments for immobilization of tank farm heel; Savannah River high level waste tank 20 closure; Tank farm closure information; Clean closure of tank farm; Remediation issues; Remote demolition techniques; Decision concerning EIS for debris treatment facility; CERCLA/RCRA issues; Area of contamination determination; Containment building of debris treatment facility; Double containment issues; Characterization costs; Packaging and disposal options for the waste resulting from the total removal of the tank farm; Take-off calculations for the total removal of soils and structures at the tank farm; Vessel off-gas systems; Jet-grouted polymer and subsurface walls; Exposure calculations for total removal of tank farm; Recommended instrumentation during retrieval operations; High level waste tank concrete encasement evaluation; Recommended heavy equipment and sizing equipment for total removal activities; Tank buoyancy constraints; Grout and concrete formulas for tank heel solidification; Tank heel pH requirements; Tank cooling water; Evaluation of conservatism of vehicle loading on vaults; Typical vault dimensions and approximately tank and vault void volumes; Radiological concerns for temporary vessel off-gas system; Flushing calculations for tank heels; Grout lift depth analysis; Decontamination solution for waste transfer piping; Grout lift determination for filling tank and vault voids; sprung structure vendor data; Grout flow properties through a 2--4 inch pipe; Tank farm load limitations; NRC low level waste grout; Project data sheet calculations; Dose rates for tank farm closure tasks; Exposure and shielding calculations for grout lines; TFF radionuclide release rates; Documentation of the clean closure of a system with listed waste discharge; and Documentation of the ORNL method of radionuclide concentrations in tanks.

  7. Calculation of Boil-Off Gas (BOG Generation of KC-1 Membrane LNG Tank with High Density Rigid Polyurethane Foam by Numerical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Hyeonwon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new type of LNG tank named “KC-1 membrane LNG tank” has been developed by Korean Gas Corporation (KOGAS, and Samsung Heavy Industries (SHI is currently building KC-1 membrane type LNG carriers. Unlike other LNG tanks, the KC-1 membrane LNG tank has a single-insulation structure rather than a double-insulation structure. For a given tank’s boundary condition, heat transfer analysis is performed from the external to the internal environment of the LNG tank by numerical simulation for three tanks. In each tank, the main thermally resistant layer of insulation is assembled with a High density rigid Polyurethane Foam (H-PUF, which is blown with one of three different types of hydrofluorocarbons-namely-HFC-365mfc, 245fa, and 245fa-e (enhanced. Advantage of such blowing agents is that it has a lower Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP than HCFC-141b or carbon dioxide (CO2 that has been used in the past as well as having low thermal conductivity. A Reduced Order Model is utilized to a 3-dimensional section of the insulation to calculate equivalent thermal conductivity. The equivalent thermal conductivity of the insulation is then applied to the rest of LNG tank, reducing the size of tank simulation domain as well as computation time. Tank’s two external and internal boundary conditions used are those defined by the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk (IGC and the United States Coast Guard (USCG conditions. Boil-off Rate (BOR of the tank that has the insulation with H-PUF blown with HFC-245fa resulted in 0.0927 %/day and 0.0745 %/day for IGC and USCG conditions, respectively.

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1997-05-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-T-107. This tank is listed on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  9. Think Tanks: At Work – 2010-2011 Think Tank Initiative Annual ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-11-24

    Nov 24, 2011 ... In its latest Annual Report, the Think Tank Initiative reflects on its third year of programming and showcases the institutions it supports. Learn about the valuable research these think tanks lead, the contexts under which they operate, their achievements, as well as the challenges and strategies they face.

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-S-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-29

    In July and August 1992, Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 was sampled as part of the overall characterization effort directed by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Sampling was also performed to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also presents expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background historical and surveillance tank information. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding operational safety. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics the waste in Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 (hereafter, Tank 241-S-104) based on information obtained from a variety of sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the chemical and physical properties of the waste in Tank 241-S-104, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a format useful for making management and technical decisions concerning waste tank safety and disposal issues. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are presented based on safety issues and further characterization needs.

  11. 40 CFR 280.230 - Operating an underground storage tank or underground storage tank system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... underground storage tank or underground storage tank system. (a) Operating an UST or UST system prior to...) Operating an UST or UST system after foreclosure. The following provisions apply to a holder who, through..., the purchaser must decide whether to operate or close the UST or UST system in accordance with...

  12. 49 CFR 173.315 - Compressed gases in cargo tanks and portable tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... portable tank 2,000 pounds water capacity, fusible plug) ......do See Note 6 DOT-51 225. Methyl mercaptan... water capacity, fusible plug) 125 See Note 6 DOT-51; See Note 24 225. Trimethylamine, anhydrous 57 See... or ice has disappeared. Note 6: Tanks equipped with fusible plugs must be filled by weight. Note 7...

  13. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for SY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1997-08-12

    The purpose of this historical characterization document is to present the synthesized summaries of the historical records concerning the physical characteristics, radiological, and chemical composition of mixed wastes stored in underground double-shell tanks and the physical condition of these tanks. The double-shell tanks are located on the United States Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, approximately 25 miles northwest or Richland, Washington. The document will be used to assist in characterizing the waste in the tanks in conjunction with the current program of sampling and analyzing the tank wastes. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed computer models that used the historical data to attempt to characterize the wastes and to generate estimates of each tank`s inventory. A historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that could be critical to characterization and post characterization activities. This document was developed by reviewing the operating plant process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical data from numerous resources. These resources were generated by numerous contractors from 1945 to the present. Waste characterization, the process of describing the character or quality of a waste, is required by Federal law (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA]) and state law (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303, Dangerous Waste Regulations). Characterizing the waste is necessary to determine methods to safely retrieve, transport, and/or treat the wastes.

  14. Regularization by External Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossolini, Elena; Edwards, R.; Glendinning, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Regularization was a big topic at the 2016 CRM Intensive Research Program on Advances in Nonsmooth Dynamics. There are many open questions concerning well known kinds of regularization (e.g., by smoothing or hysteresis). Here, we propose a framework for an alternative and important kind of regula...... of regularization, by external variables that shadow either the state or the switch of the original system. The shadow systems are derived from and inspired by various applications in electronic control, predator-prey preference, time delay, and genetic regulation....

  15. Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew G; Brazis, Paul W

    2002-09-01

    Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) is a descriptive term for a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by chronic, progressive, bilateral, and usually symmetric ocular motility deficit and ptosis. Significant pain, proptosis, or pupil involvement are not features of CPEO and should prompt evaluation for alternative etiologies. Mitochondrial DNA mutations are increasingly being recognized as the etiology for CPEO syndromes. Clinicians should recognize the specific syndromes associated with CPEO, characterized by variable systemic, neurologic, or other findings. Treatment is limited, but newer therapies are being investigated.

  16. Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2014, Waste Tanks 26, 27, 28 and 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Vandekamp, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-09-29

    Ultrasonic nondestructive examinations (NDE) were performed on waste storage tanks 26, 27, 28 and 33 at the Savannah River Site as a part of the “In-Service Inspection (ISI) Program for High Level Waste Tanks.” No reportable conditions were identified during these inspections. The results indicate that the implemented corrosion control program continues to effectively mitigate corrosion in the SRS waste tanks. Ultrasonic inspection (UT) is used to detect general wall thinning, pitting and interface attack, as well as vertically oriented cracks through inspection of an 8.5 inch wide strip extending over the accessible height of the primary tank wall and accessible knuckle regions. Welds were also inspected in tanks 27, 28 and 33 with no reportable indications. In a Type III/IIIA primary tank, a complete vertical strip includes scans of five plates (including knuckles) so five “plate/strips” would be completed at each vertical strip location. In FY 2014, a combined total of 79 plate/strips were examined for thickness mapping and crack detection, equating to over 45,000 square inches of area inspected on the primary tank wall. Of the 79 plate/strips examined in FY 2014 all but three have average thicknesses that remain at or above the construction minimum thickness which is nominal thickness minus 0.010 inches. There were no service induced reportable thicknesses or cracking encountered. A total of 2 pits were documented in 2014 with the deepest being 0.032 inches deep. One pit was detected in Tank 27 and one in Tank 33. No pitting was identified in Tanks 26 or 28. The maximum depth of any pit encountered in FY 2014 is 5% of nominal thickness, which is less than the minimum reportable criteria of 25% through-wall for pitting. In Tank 26 two vertical strips were inspected, as required by the ISI Program, due to tank conditions being outside normal chemistry controls for more than 3 months. Tank 28 had an area of localized thinning on the exterior wall of the

  17. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1997-05-23

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-109. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241 C-109 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices.

  18. Heat pump water heater and storage tank assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, John T.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Teagan, W. Peter; Zogg, Robert

    1999-09-07

    A water heater and storage tank assembly comprises a housing defining a chamber, an inlet for admitting cold water to the chamber, and an outlet for permitting flow of hot water from the chamber. A compressor is mounted on the housing and is removed from the chamber. A condenser comprises a tube adapted to receive refrigerant from the compressor, and winding around the chamber to impart heat to water in the chamber. An evaporator is mounted on the housing and removed from the chamber, the evaporator being adapted to receive refrigerant from the condenser and to discharge refrigerant to conduits in communication with the compressor. An electric resistance element extends into the chamber, and a thermostat is disposed in the chamber and is operative to sense water temperature and to actuate the resistance element upon the water temperature dropping to a selected level. The assembly includes a first connection at an external end of the inlet, a second connection at an external end of the outlet, and a third connection for connecting the resistance element, compressor and evaporator to an electrical power source.

  19. Organic end state analysis of tank 241-S-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER, K.D.

    1999-06-24

    This document provides a record of the organic end state analysis of tank 241-S-106. Tank 241-S-106 is one of twelve 22.9-meter (75-feet) diameter single-shell tanks in the 241-S Tank Farm in the 200 West Area of Hanford. This tank was built in 1951 and has a capacity of 2870 kiloliter (kL) (758 kilogallon [kgal]). According to Hanlon (1999), tank 241-S-106 currently contains 1813 kL (479 kgal) of waste comprised of 1613 kL (426 kgal) saltcake, 200 kL (53 kgal) supernatant. Included in those volumes is 719 kL (190 kgal) drainable interstitial liquid. The pumpable volume is estimated at 920 kL (243 kgal). The waste is designated as non-complexed (NCPLX). Tank 241-S-106 is not a Watch List tank. Tank 241-S-106 has not been declared as a leaker.

  20. Fluidic Sampler. Tanks Focus Area. OST Reference No. 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Problem Definition; Millions of gallons of radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored in underground tanks across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. To manage this waste, tank operators need safe, cost-effective methods for mixing tank material, transferring tank waste between tanks, and collecting samples. Samples must be collected at different depths within storage tanks containing various kinds of waste including salt, sludge, and supernatant. With current or baseline methods, a grab sampler or a core sampler is inserted into the tank, waste is maneuvered into the sample chamber, and the sample is withdrawn from the tank. The mixing pumps in the tank, which are required to keep the contents homogeneous, must be shut down before and during sampling to prevent airborne releases. These methods are expensive, require substantial hands-on labor, increase the risk of worker exposure to radiation, and often produce nonrepresentative and unreproducible samples. How It Works: The Fluidic Sampler manufactured by AEA Technology Engineering Services, Inc., enables tank sampling to be done remotely with the mixing pumps in operation. Remote operation minimizes the risk of exposure to personnel and the possibility of spills, reducing associated costs. Sampling while the tank contents are being agitated yields consistently homogeneous, representative samples and facilitates more efficient feed preparation and evaluation of the tank contents. The above-tank portion of the Fluidic Sampler and the replacement plug and pipework that insert through the tank top are shown.

  1. TANK 50 BATCH 0 SALTSTONE FORMULATION CONFIRMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.

    2006-06-05

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel were requested to confirm the Tank 50 Batch 0 grout formulation per Technical Task Request, SSF-TTR-2006-0001 (task 1 of 2) [1]. Earlier Batch 0 formulation testing used a Tank 50 sample collected in September 2005 and is described elsewhere [2]. The current testing was performed using a sample of Tank 50 waste collected in May 2006. This work was performed according to the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TT/QAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00594 [3]. The salt solution collected from Tank 50 in May 2006 contained approximately 3 weight percent more solids than the sample collected in September 2005. The insoluble solids took longer to settle in the new sample which was interpreted as indicating finer particles in the current sample. The saltstone formulation developed for the September 2005 Tank 50 Batch 0 sample was confirmed for the May 2006 sample with one minor exception. Saltstone prepared with the Tank 50 sample collected in May 2006 required 1.5 times more Daratard 17 set retarding admixture than the saltstone prepared with the September In addition, a sample prepared with lower shear mixing (stirring with a spatula) had a higher plastic viscosity (57 cP) than samples made with higher shear mixing in a blender (23cP). The static gel times of the saltstone slurries made with low shear mixing were also shorter ({approx}32 minutes) than those for comparable samples made in the blender ({approx}47 minutes). The addition of the various waste streams (ETP, HEU-HCAN, and GPE-HCAN) to Tank 50 from September 2005 to May 2006 has increased the amount of set retarder, Daratard 17, required for processing saltstone slurries through the Saltstone facility. If these streams are continued to be added to Tank 50, the quantity of admixtures required to maintain the same processing conditions for the Saltstone facility will probably change and additional testing is recommended to reconfirm the Tank 50 Saltstone formulation.

  2. Modeling Xenon Tank Pressurization using One-Dimensional Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Ryan P.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  3. Thermodynamic aspects of an LNG tank in fire and experimental validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulsbosch-Dam Corina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behaviour of a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG tank and the thermodynamic behaviour of its containment under extreme heat load – for instance when subjected to external fire source as might occur during an accident - are extremely important when addressing safety concerns. In a scenario where external fire is present and consequent release of LNG from pressure relief valves (PRV has occurred, escalation of the fire might occur causing difficulty for the fire response teams to approach the tank or to secure the perimeter. If the duration of the tank exposure to fire is known, the PRV opening time can be estimated based on the thermodynamic calculations. In this paper, such an accidental scenario is considered, relevant thermodynamic equations are derived and presented. Moreover, an experiment is performed with liquid nitrogen and the results are compared to the analytical ones. The analytical results match very well with the experimental observations. The resulting analytical models are suitable to be applied to other cryogenic liquids.

  4. Modeling ARRM Xenon Tank Pressurization Using 1D Thermodynamic and Heat Transfer Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Patrick; Tomsik, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    As a first step in understanding what ground support equipment (GSE) is required to provide external cooling during the loading of 5,000 kg of xenon into 4 aluminum lined composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), a modeling analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel. The goals of the analysis were to predict xenon temperature and pressure throughout loading at the launch facility, estimate the time required to load one tank, and to get an early estimate of what provisions for cooling xenon might be needed while the tanks are being filled. The model uses the governing thermodynamic and heat transfer equations to achieve these goals. Results indicate that a single tank can be loaded in about 15 hours with reasonable external coolant requirements. The model developed in this study was successfully validated against flight and test data. The first data set is from the Dawn mission which also utilizes solar electric propulsion with xenon propellant, and the second is test data from the rapid loading of a hydrogen cylindrical COPV. The main benefit of this type of model is that the governing physical equations using bulk fluid solid temperatures can provide a quick and accurate estimate of the state of the propellant throughout loading which is much cheaper in terms of computational time and licensing costs than a Computation Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis while capturing the majority of the thermodynamics and heat transfer.

  5. Sloshing effects in tanks containing liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivý Martin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic analysis of a tank containing liquid is a complex problem involving fluid-structure interaction. The tank-liquid system is simplified by an equivalent model in which the total liquid mass is divided into two zones – impulsive and convective. The paper is primary focused on the behavior of the free liquid surface (the convective portion of liquid subjected to the dynamic loading which may result in liquid spilling or tank wall damage. Therefore, the sufficient freeboard must be required to design. The paper deals with the seismic design of the open cylindrical liquid storage tank with the aim to determine convective dynamic properties (natural frequencies and modes of oscillation, maximum vertical displacements over tank radius and overall response of the liquid to an earthquake. The analysis is performed analytically by applying procedures for the determination of convective effects based on simplified equivalent spring-mass model, numerically response spectrum, and method of motion integrating equations utilizing ANSYS Multiphysics.

  6. Origin of bonebeds in Quaternary tank deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo-Júnior, Hermínio Ismael de; Porpino, Kleberson de Oliveira; Bergqvist, Lílian Paglarelli

    2017-07-01

    Tank deposits are an exceptional type of fossiliferous deposit and bear a remarkably fossil record of the Pleistocene megafauna of South America, particularly of Brazil. The taphonomy of vertebrate remains preserved in this type of environmental context was clearly driven by climate, similarly to most of the Quaternary continental fossil record. The formation of the vertebrates fossil record in tank deposits was influenced by the climate seasonality typical of arid climate. The taphonomic history of most tank deposits is a consequence of this seasonality and, as a result, the paleoecological data preserved in their fossil assemblages is reliable with respect to paleobiological and paleoenvironmental settings of the Quaternary ecosystems of the Brazilian Intertropical Region (BIR). Other tank deposits experienced an unusual taphonomic history that, besides climate, was affected by recurrent events of reworking produced by the depositional agents dominant in the surrounding alluvial plains. The conclusions obtained here concerning the main taphonomic settings and formative processes that characterize fossil vertebrate assemblages of tank deposits will help further studies aimed to recover information on the paleoecology of Quaternary fauna collected in such deposits by allowing a better understanding of their time and spatial resolutions and other potential biases.

  7. Secondary containment large fertilizer storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, E.L.; Broder, M.F.

    1991-12-31

    The large quantities of fertilizer and pesticide, which are handled by retail facilities, have made these operations the target of regulations aimed at protecting water supplies. These regulations and dealers` desire to protect water supplies have made environmental protection a primary concern. Currently, nine states have adopted regulations which require secondary containment of fertilizers and agrichemicals. An additional seven states are developing regulations. Volume requirements and performance specifications of secondary containment structures for fertilizer storage tanks are included in all regulations. Among the different containment problems presented by retail sites, the large tanks (tanks with capacities greater than 100,000 gallons) present the greatest challenge for design and cost evaluation to determine the most effective containment system. The objective of this paper is to provide secondary containment designs for large fertilizer tanks using readily available construction materials. These designs may be innovative to some extent, but they must incorporate field experience and knowledge from trials, errors, and successful installations for existing and newly constructed fertilizer storage tanks. Case studies are presented to indicate projected costs for these alternatives.

  8. Secondary containment large fertilizer storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddell, E.L.; Broder, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The large quantities of fertilizer and pesticide, which are handled by retail facilities, have made these operations the target of regulations aimed at protecting water supplies. These regulations and dealers' desire to protect water supplies have made environmental protection a primary concern. Currently, nine states have adopted regulations which require secondary containment of fertilizers and agrichemicals. An additional seven states are developing regulations. Volume requirements and performance specifications of secondary containment structures for fertilizer storage tanks are included in all regulations. Among the different containment problems presented by retail sites, the large tanks (tanks with capacities greater than 100,000 gallons) present the greatest challenge for design and cost evaluation to determine the most effective containment system. The objective of this paper is to provide secondary containment designs for large fertilizer tanks using readily available construction materials. These designs may be innovative to some extent, but they must incorporate field experience and knowledge from trials, errors, and successful installations for existing and newly constructed fertilizer storage tanks. Case studies are presented to indicate projected costs for these alternatives.

  9. Floating roof tank drainage system improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Wagner Andrade da; Holdack, Ricardo; Ruza, Adilson; Schraml, Karina Chacur; Fujikawa, Mauro Yutaka [Petrobras Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Adilson Batista da [ATP Engenharia Ltda., Parnamirim, RN (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    TRANSPETRO's tank TQ-8803 is a floating roof tank, used for storing gasoline at atmospheric pressure. This tank presented a roof movement restriction at a certain height in the receiving and sending operations, besides problems in draining the rainwater from the floating roof. The roof drain was a central articulated pipe, with a single intake spot. The tank had an anti-rotational 12-inch guide tube and a separate 8-inch gauging tube. It was verified that there were signs of friction between the tubes and their nozzles, and that both the tubes were out of plummet. The solution was removing both the tubes and installing a single anti-rotational guide tube, which received the level and temperature gauges, besides being used for manual gauging and as sampling nozzle. A new drainage system was also projected. It uses a flexible tube, supported in a spiral form on the bottom of the tank, and has a main and four auxiliary drainage boxes, positioned in the center of the roof and next to the pontoon, below the mobile stairs. These boxes were provided with elastomer duckbill check valves, substituting the swing check valves previously installed. After the maintenance conclusion, the anomalies found before were solved. (author)

  10. Smart solar tanks - Heat storage of the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Shah, Louise Jivan

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a smart solar tank concept for small SDHW-systems have been carried out. In the tank the operation of the auxiliary energy supply system is controlled by the hot water demand and by the consumption pattern. Water at the top of the tank is only heated by the auxiliary...... be selected by the owner of the system. Preliminary tests of a 175 l smart solar tank have been carried out. Finally, theoretical calculations of the yearly thermal performances of small SDHW-systems based on standard tanks and on a smart solar tank have been carried out. Based on the investigations...... recommendations for future development work are given....

  11. DETAILED MODELLING OF CHARGING BEHAVIOUR OF SMART SOLAR TANKS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The charging behaviour of smart solar tanks for solar combisystems for one-family houses is investigated with detailed Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. The smart solar tank can be charged with a variable auxiliary volume fitted...... or by an electric heating element in a side-arm mounted on the side of the tank. Detailed CFD models of the smart tanks are built with different mesh densities in the tank and in the side-arm. The thermal conditions of the tank during charging are calculated with the CFD models. The fluid flow and temperature...

  12. Teacher's Action Plan for "Shuttle External Tank and Solid Rocket Booster Math"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Mike

    2007-01-01

    My name is Mike Prince and I was one of eleven Brevard County teachers selected by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA), to work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSQ along side USA & NASA engineers during the Summer of 2007. Attached is a summary of my experience.

  13. Modification and development of the external tank hydrogen vent umbilical system for the space shuttle vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, Bemis C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The design and development of a new T-O lock and secondary release mechanism which is being introduced to the ET Hydrogen Vent Umbilical System for the next launch of the Space Shuttle Vehicle is described. Critical analysis of the system in early 1986 indicated the need for an improvement in the secondary release system. The new T-O lock increases the clearance with the vehicle during secondary disconnect and is described.

  14. Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, J.G.H.; Kurath, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.

  15. Technology development activities supporting tank waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, W.F.; Beeman, G.H.

    1994-06-01

    This document summarizes work being conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. The specific work activities are organized by the following categories: safety, characterization, retrieval, barriers, pretreatment, low-level waste, and high-level waste. In most cases, the activities presented here were identified as supporting tank remediation by EM-50 integrated program or integrated demonstration lead staff and the selections were further refined by contractor staff. Data sheets were prepared from DOE-HQ guidance to the field issued in September 1993. Activities were included if a significant portion of the work described provides technology potentially needed by TWRS; consequently, not all parts of each description necessarily support tank remediation.

  16. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  17. CORROSION TESTING IN SIMULATED TANK SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.

    2010-12-09

    Three simulated waste solutions representing wastes from tanks SY-102 (high nitrate, modified to exceed guidance limits), AN-107, and AY-102 were supplied by PNNL. Out of the three solutions tested, both optical and electrochemical results show that carbon steel samples corroded much faster in SY-102 (high nitrate) than in the other two solutions with lower ratios of nitrate to nitrite. The effect of the surface preparation was not as strong as the effect of solution chemistry. In areas with pristine mill-scale surface, no corrosion occurred even in the SY-102 (high nitrate) solution, however, corrosion occurred in the areas where the mill-scale was damaged or flaked off due to machining. Localized corrosion in the form of pitting in the vapor space of tank walls is an ongoing challenge to overcome in maintaining the structural integrity of the liquid waste tanks at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. It has been shown that the liquid waste condensate chemistry influences the amount of corrosion that occurs along the walls of the storage tanks. To minimize pitting corrosion, an effort is underway to gain an understanding of the pitting response in various simulated waste solutions. Electrochemical testing has been used as an accelerated tool in the investigation of pitting corrosion. While significant effort has been undertaken to evaluate the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in various simulated waste solutions, additional effort is needed to evaluate the effect of liquid waste supernates from six Hanford Site tanks (AY-101, AY-102, AN-102, AN-107, SY-102 (high Cl{sup -}), and SY-102 (high nitrate)) on carbon steel. Solutions were formulated at PNNL to replicate tank conditions, and in the case of SY-102, exceed Cl{sup -} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} conditions, respectively, to provide a contrast between in and out of specification limits. The majority of previous testing has been performed on pristine polished samples. To evaluate the actual tank carbon steel

  18. Complex Protection of Vertical Stainless Steel Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrislamov Radik Zakievich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the problem of fail-safe oil and oil products storage in stainless steel tanks and present the patented tank inner side protection technology. The latter provides process, ecological and fire safety and reducing soil evaporation of oil products, which is a specific problem. The above-mentioned technology includes corrosion protection and heat insulation protection providing increase of cover durability and RVS service life in general. The offered technological protection scheme is a collaboration of the author, Steel Paint GmbH firm and JSC “Koksokhimmontazhproyekt”. PU foam unicomponent materials of Steel Paint GmbH firm provide the protection of tank inner side and cover.

  19. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-02-24

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report. This report and its appendices serve as the tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-103 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with Waste Information Requirements Documents developed for 1998.''

  20. Hanford Site organic waste tanks: History, waste properties, and scientific issues. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M.; Schulz, W.W.; Reynolds, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Eight Hanford single-shell waste tanks are included on a safety watch list because they are thought to contain significant concentrations of various organic chemical. Potential dangers associated with the waste in these tanks include exothermic reaction, combustion, and release of hazardous vapors. In all eight tanks the measured waste temperatures are in the range 16 to 46{degree}C, far below the 250 to 380{degree}C temperatures necessary for onset of rapid exothermic reactions and initiation of deflagration. Investigation of the possibility of vapor release from Tank C-103 has been elevated to a top safety priority. There is a need to obtain an adequate number of truly representative vapor samples and for highly sensitive and capable methods and instruments to analyze these samples. Remaining scientific issues include: an understanding of the behavior and reaction of organic compounds in existing underground tank environments knowledge of the types and amounts of organic compounds in the tanks knowledge of selected physical and chemical properties of organic compounds source, composition, quality, and properties of the presently unidentified volatile organic compound(s) apparently evolving from Tank C-103.

  1. Case Study in Corporate Memory Recovery: Hanford Tank Farms Miscellaneous Underground Waste Storage Tanks - 15344

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, D. J.; Johnson, J. M.; Turknett, J. C.; Barnes, T. J.; Duncan, K. G.

    2015-01-07

    In addition to managing the 177 underground waste storage tanks containing 212,000 m3 (56 million gal) of radioactive waste at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site 200 Area Tank Farms, Washington River Protection Solutions LLC is responsible for managing numerous small catch tanks and special surveillance facilities. These are collectively known as “MUSTs” - Miscellaneous Underground Storage Tanks. The MUSTs typically collected drainage and flushes during waste transfer system piping changes; special surveillance facilities supported Tank Farm processes including post-World War II uranium recovery and later fission product recovery from tank wastes. Most were removed from service following deactivation of the single-shell tank system in 1980 and stabilized by pumping the remaining liquids from them. The MUSTs were isolated by blanking connecting transfer lines and adding weatherproofing to prevent rainwater entry. Over the next 30 years MUST operating records were dispersed into large electronic databases or transferred to the National Archives Regional Center in Seattle, Washington. During 2014 an effort to reacquire the historical bases for the MUSTs’ published waste volumes was undertaken. Corporate Memory Recovery from a variety of record sources allowed waste volumes to be initially determined for 21 MUSTs, and waste volumes to be adjusted for 37 others. Precursors and symptoms of Corporate Memory Loss were identified in the context of MUST records recovery.

  2. Selective crystallization of tank supernatant liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herting, D.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this task is to demonstrate the feasibility of selectively removing sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}) from Hanford Site tank waste by a large-scale fractional crystallization process. Two thirds of all the nuclear waste stored in Hanford`s underground storage tanks is sodium nitrate (mass basis, excluding water). Fractional crystallization can remove essentially nonradioactive NaNO{sub 3} and other sodium salts from the waste, thereby reducing the volume of low-level waste glass by as much as 90%.

  3. HLW Tank Space Management, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.S.; Abell, G.; Garrett, R.; d' Entremont, P.; Fowler, J.R.; Mahoney, M.; Poe, L.

    1999-09-20

    The HLW Tank Space Management Team (SM Team) was chartered to select and recommend an HLW Tank Space Management Strategy (Strategy) for the HLW Management Division of Westinghouse Savannah River Co. (WSRC) until an alternative salt disposition process is operational. Because the alternative salt disposition process will not be available to remove soluble radionuclides in HLW until 2009, the selected Strategy must assure that it safely receives and stores HLW at least until 2009 while continuing to supply sludge slurry to the DWPF vitrification process.

  4. Alternative Inspection Methods for Single Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Timothy J.; Alzheimer, James M.; Hurley, David E.

    2010-01-19

    This document was prepared to provide evaluations and recommendations regarding nondestructive evaluation methods that might be used to determine cracks and bowing in the ceiling of waste storage tanks on the Hanford site. The goal was to determine cracks as small as 1/16 in. wide in the ceiling, and bowing as small as 0.25 in. This report describes digital video camera methods that can be used to detect a crack in the ceiling of the dome, and methods for determining the surface topography of the ceiling in the waste storage tanks to detect localized movements in the surface. A literature search, combined with laboratory testing, comprised this study.

  5. Permeation Barrier for Lightweight Liquid Hydrogen Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Schultheiß, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the ins...

  6. Criticality parameters for tank waste evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, C.A.; Harris, H.

    1996-08-21

    A summary is provided of basic parameters used to evaluate criticality safety of high-level tank waste at the Hanford Site.Critical sizes and plutonium concentrations are based on a conservative waste model with reduced neutron absorption and optimized water. Figures were provided of sphere and slab minimum critical dimensions and plutonium critical masses.Minimum subcritical limit absorber/plutonium mass ratios are provided for selected waste components. Component contributions to subcriticality can be combined by adding the individual actual-to-minimum subcritical mass fractions. A discussion is provided of the margin of safety inherent in tank waste.

  7. Fuel tank for liquefied natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A storage tank is provided for storing liquefied natural gas on, for example, a motor vehicle such as a bus or truck. The storage tank includes a metal liner vessel encapsulated by a resin-fiber composite layer. A foam insulating layer, including an outer protective layer of epoxy or of a truck liner material, covers the composite layer. A non-conducting protective coating may be painted on the vessel between the composite layer and the vessel so as to inhibit galvanic corrosion.

  8. Drift Tube Linac Conditioning of Tank1

    CERN Document Server

    Shafqat, N; Toor, W A

    2014-01-01

    Tank1 of the Drift Tube Linac (DTL) of the Linac4 has been conditioned at the Linac4 tunnel. The tank was tuned for resonance at 352.2 MHz, and stable operation has been achieved with 725 µs long RF pulses at a repetition rate of 1 Hz. The maximum RF level that has been reached is 810 kW with a pulse width of 600 µs. Since this was the first RF structure exclusively conditioned in the Linac4 tunnel with the operation and control software of Linac4, some related issues and limitations had to be taken into account.

  9. Investigations of fabric stratifiers for solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2005-01-01

    The thermal performance of solar heating systems is strongly influenced by the thermal stratification in the heat storage. The higher the degree of thermal stratification is, the higher the thermal performance of the solar heating systems. Thermal stratification in water storages can be achieved...... in different ways. For instance, water heated by the solar collectors or water returning from the heating system can enter the water storage through stratification inlet devices in such a way that the water enters the tank in a level, where the tank temperature is the same as the temperature of the entering...

  10. Crack inspection on tanks using shearography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala Ochoa, Noe; Mendiola Anda, Gabriel; Mora Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez Escobedo, Luis; Escamilla, Celia

    2005-02-01

    A shearing system for crack inspection on tanks is reported. A compact device comprised of a Michelson type shearing interferometer, a diode laser, a phase shifting element, a pzt to deform the object under test and a car with magnetic wheels to move the full system. It is proved that a light car with magnetic wheels can support vertically a shearing system and obtain in real-time wrapped deformation phase without decorrelating the fields. This phase deformation system would enable us to analyze big tanks with confidence and security.

  11. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AW-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, L.M.

    1997-06-05

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for double-shell tank 241-AW-105. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-AW-105 waste; and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone Characterization. information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. While only the results of a recent sampling event will be used to fulfill the requirements of the data quality objectives (DQOs), other information can be used to support or question conclusions derived from these results. Historical information for tank 241-AW-105 is provided in Appendix A, including surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. The recent sampling event listed, as well as pertinent sample data obtained before 1996, are summarized in Appendix B along with the sampling results. The results of the 1996 grab sampling event satisfied the data requirements specified in the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for this tank. In addition, the tank headspace flammability was measured, which addresses

  12. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, J.

    1996-09-18

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste contained in double-shell underground storage tank 241-AY-101. This report supports the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). This report summarizes the collection and analysis of grab samples acquired in February 1996. The sampling was performed to satisfy requirements listed in Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995), the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farin Waste Compatibility Program (Fowler 1995), and the 242-A Evaporator Liquid Effluent Retention Facility Data Quality Objectives (Von Bargen 1995).

  13. Aerogel Insulation Applications for Liquid Hydrogen Launch Vehicle Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Sass, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aerogel based insulation systems for ambient pressure environments were developed for liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank applications. Solutions to thermal insulation problems were demonstrated for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) through extensive testing at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory. Demonstration testing was performed using a 1/10th scale ET LH2 intertank unit and liquid helium as the coolant to provide the 20 K cold boundary temperature. Cryopumping tests in the range of 20K were performed using both constant mass and constant pressure methods. Long-duration tests (up to 10 hours) showed that the nitrogen mass taken up inside the intertank is reduced by a factor of nearly three for the aerogel insulated case as compared to the un-insulated (bare metal flight configuration) case. Test results including thermal stabilization, heat transfer effectiveness, and cryopumping confirm that the aerogel system eliminates free liquid nitrogen within the intertank. Physisorption (or adsorption) of liquid nitrogen within the fine pore structure of aerogel materials was also investigated. Results of a mass uptake method show that the sorption ratio (liquid nitrogen to aerogel beads) is about 62 percent by volume. A novel liquid nitrogen production method of testing the liquid nitrogen physical adsorption capacity of aerogel beads was also performed to more closely approximate the actual launch vehicle cooldown and thermal stabilization effects within the aerogel material. The extraordinary insulating effectiveness of the aerogel material shows that cryopumping is not an open-cell mass transport issue but is strictly driven by thermal communication between warm and cold surfaces. The new aerogel insulation technology is useful to solve heat transfer problem areas and to augment existing thermal protection systems on launch vehicles. Examples are given and potential benefits for producing launch systems that are more reliable, robust, reusable, and efficient are outlined.

  14. Seal Joint Analysis and Design for the Ares-I Upper Stage LOX Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The sealing capability of the Ares-I Upper Stage liquid oxygen tank-to-sump joint is assessed by analyzing the deflections of the joint components. Analyses are performed using three-dimensional symmetric wedge finite element models and the ABAQUS commercial finite element software. For the pressure loads and feedline interface loads, the analyses employ a mixed factor of safety approach to comply with the Constellation Program factor of safety requirements. Naflex pressure-assisted seals are considered first because they have been used successfully in similar seal joints in the Space Shuttle External Tank. For the baseline sump seal joint configuration with a Naflex seal, the predicted joint opening greatly exceeds the seal design specification. Three redesign options of the joint that maintain the use of a Naflex seal are studied. The joint openings for the redesigned seal joints show improvement over the baseline configuration; however, these joint openings still exceed the seal design specification. RACO pressure-assisted seals are considered next because they are known to also be used on the Space Shuttle External Tank, and the joint opening allowable is much larger than the specification for the Naflex seals. The finite element models for the RACO seal analyses are created by modifying the models that were used for the Naflex seal analyses. The analyses show that the RACO seal may provide sufficient sealing capability for the sump seal joint. The results provide reasonable data to recommend the design change and plan a testing program to determine the capability of RACO seals in the Ares-I Upper Stage liquid oxygen tank sump seal joint.

  15. Chemical Safety Alert: Catastrophic Failure of Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboveground, atmospheric storage tanks can fail when flammable vapors in the tank explode and break either the shell-to-bottom or side seam, resulting in hazardous release accidents. Proper maintenance practices can help prevent accidents.

  16. TANK FARM INTERIM SURFACE BARRIER MATERIALS AND RUNOFF ALTERNATIVES STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLM MJ

    2009-06-25

    This report identifies candidate materials and concepts for interim surface barriers in the single-shell tank farms. An analysis of these materials for application to the TY tank farm is also provided.

  17. Solid-water interaction in liquid storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Hutchinson, G. L.

    1989-12-01

    This paper is concerned with ground-supported cylindrical storage tanks vibrating in an axisymmetric manner. A study has been made of the significance of horizontal excitations on the dynamic pressure distributions associated with the sloshing and bulging modes. These pressures have been calculated by using a previously obtained functional. Steel, aluminium and concrete tanks are included to study the effect of these typical tank materials. Only linear, elastic behaviour of the tank materials has been considered. The principal conclusions of the study are that reinforced concrete tanks are more susceptible to higher dynamic pressures than steel or aluminium tanks, and that the maximum dynamic pressure developed in partially filled tanks may be more critical than those for the same tank at maximum capacity.

  18. 14 CFR 23.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.971 Fuel.... (b) Each fuel tank must allow drainage of any hazardous quantity of water from any part of the tank...

  19. Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Underground Storage Tanks (USTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 significantly affected federal and state underground storage tank programs, required major changes to the programs, and is aimed at reducing underground storage tank releases to our environment.

  20. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-04-29

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

  1. A robotic end effector for inspection of storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Gittleman, M. [Oceaneering Space Systems, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The structural integrity of waste storage tanks is of primary importance to the DOE, and is one aspect of the High-Level Waste Tank Remediation focus area. Cracks and/or corrosion damage in the inner tank walls can lead to the release of dangerous substances into the environment. The detection and sizing of corrosion and cracking in steel tank walls through remote non destructive evaluation (NDE) is the primary focus of this work.

  2. Effect of temperature increments in septic tank efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi-Tec, M.; Caballero-Arzapalo, N.; Giacoman Vallejo, G.; Mendez-Novelo, R.; Quintal-Franco, C.

    2009-07-01

    Septic tanks are the main sewage disposal system used in Yucatan, Mexico. Septic tank content is stabilized under anaerobic conditions and is considered the temperature has a significant effect on the efficiency. This work was developed in order asses the feasibility to improve communal septic tanks efficiency by increasing content temperature. Temperatures inside the tank were increased using a hybrid heater system (solar and electricity). (Author)

  3. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  4. Treatment options for tank farms long-length contaminated equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, W.S.

    1995-10-16

    This study evaluated a variety of treatment and disposal technologies for mixed waste (MW) meeting the following criteria: 1. Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank System (tank farms) equipment and other debris; 2. length greater than 12 feet; and contaminated with listed MW from the tank farms. This waste stream, commonly referred to as tank farms long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE), poses a unique and costly set of challenges during all phases of the waste management lifecycle.

  5. Underground storage tank 431-D1U1, Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information about the decommissioning of Tank 431-D1U1. This tank was installed in 1965 for diesel fuel storage. This tank will remain in active usage until closure procedures begin. Soils and ground water around the tank will be sampled to check for leakage. Appendices include; proof of proper training for workers, health and safety briefing record, task hazard analysis summary, and emergency plans.

  6. Permitting plan for Hanford tanks initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-10

    This plan describes all the possible permitting actions that could be required to implement the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project (HTI). Since the HTI Project Plan has several decision points where possible future activities could be eliminated, not all permitting actions described will be implemented. The cost and schedule for the permitting actions are included.

  7. LOX Tank Helium Removal for Propellant Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chato, David J.

    2009-01-01

    System studies have shown a significant advantage to reusing the hydrogen and oxygen left in these tanks after landing on the Moon in fuel cells to generate power and water for surface systems. However in the current lander concepts, the helium used to pressurize the oxygen tank can substantially degrade fuel cell power and water output by covering the reacting surface with inert gas. This presentation documents an experimental investigation of methods to remove the helium pressurant while minimizing the amount of the oxygen lost. This investigation demonstrated that significant quantities of Helium (greater than 90% mole fraction) remain in the tank after draining. Although a single vent cycle reduced the helium quantity, large amounts of helium remained. Cyclic venting appeared to be more effective. Three vent cycles were sufficient to reduce the helium to small (less than 0.2%) quantities. Two vent cycles may be sufficient since once the tank has been brought up to pressure after the second vent cycle the helium concentration has been reduced to the less than 0.2% level. The re-pressurization process seemed to contribute to diluting helium. This is as expected since in order to raise the pressure liquid oxygen must be evaporated. Estimated liquid oxygen loss is on the order of 82 pounds (assuming the third vent cycle is not required).

  8. Families Talking about Ecology at Touch Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopczak, Charles; Kisiel, James F.; Rowe, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that conversations among museum, aquarium, and zoo visitors can be a clear indication of active learning, engagement, and participation in scientific reasoning. This descriptive study sought to determine the extent of talk about ecology-related topics exhibited by family groups visiting marine touch tanks at four Pacific…

  9. Tank Structural Fatigue Fracture in Hydrocarbon Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimnev Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article touches upon the reasons of cracks formation in a vertical steel tank wall used in oil transportation. Here are given the comparative research results of chemical composition and mechanical properties of steel, used in manufacture of the flat product: tensile strength, yield strength, impact strength and hardness.

  10. Program Management Officer -Think Tank Initiative | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... (i.e. research outputs, program level performance indicators) in Think Tank Initiative (TTI) systems and database; Prepares and coordinates program level documents such as (i.e. annual work plans, project information memoranda, communications strategies, evaluation plans, project reports or briefings, reports to donors, ...

  11. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2009-06-11

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2008 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report.

  12. Uncertainty and sampling issues in tank characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, A.M.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Kashporenko, D.M. [and others

    1997-06-01

    A defensible characterization strategy must recognize that uncertainties are inherent in any measurement or estimate of interest and must employ statistical methods for quantifying and managing those uncertainties. Estimates of risk and therefore key decisions must incorporate knowledge about uncertainty. This report focuses statistical methods that should be employed to ensure confident decision making and appropriate management of uncertainty. Sampling is a major source of uncertainty that deserves special consideration in the tank characterization strategy. The question of whether sampling will ever provide the reliable information needed to resolve safety issues is explored. The issue of sample representativeness must be resolved before sample information is reliable. Representativeness is a relative term but can be defined in terms of bias and precision. Currently, precision can be quantified and managed through an effective sampling and statistical analysis program. Quantifying bias is more difficult and is not being addressed under the current sampling strategies. Bias could be bounded by (1) employing new sampling methods that can obtain samples from other areas in the tanks, (2) putting in new risers on some worst case tanks and comparing the results from existing risers with new risers, or (3) sampling tanks through risers under which no disturbance or activity has previously occurred. With some bound on bias and estimates of precision, various sampling strategies could be determined and shown to be either cost-effective or infeasible.

  13. Methods for Studying Tank Armament Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogov, I. V.

    This translation from the Russian contains discussions on the most expedient sequence for presenting problems in firing training for military tank crews, methods of learning, and the practices and actions which can be recommended to training supervisors. The document is an attempt to summarize and systematize materials; it also presents advice and…

  14. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  15. Explosion proof vehicle for tank inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollinger, William T [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Bauer, Scott G [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-02-28

    An Explosion Proof Vehicle (EPV) having an interior substantially filled with an inert fluid creating an interior pressure greater than the exterior pressure. One or more flexible tubes provide the inert fluid and one or more electrical conductors from a control system to the vehicle. The vehicle is preferably used in subsurface tank inspection, whereby the vehicle is submerged in a volatile fluid.

  16. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders ... One of the Initiative's key activities is to learn and share knowledge about strategies for supporting and managing policy research organizations. The Think Tank Initiative Research ...

  17. 78 FR 63235 - Tank Vessel Oil Transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... engaged in oil transfer operations? 12. Are there conflicts or areas of improvement with regard to... SECURITY Coast Guard Tank Vessel Oil Transfers AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard announces that it is considering new measures to reduce the risks of oil...

  18. AA, vacuum tank for stochastic precooling

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The vaccum tank in which the fast stochastic precooling kicker was installed. It is clad with heating jackets for bake-out to 200 deg C, indispensable for reaching the operational vacuum of 7E-11 Torr. Alain Poncet, responsible for AA vacuum, is looking on. See also 7910268, 8002234.

  19. Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acree, C.D.

    1998-01-06

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report identifies the initial states of the system and the desired final states of the system. The Mission Analysis Report identifies target measures of success appropriate to program-level accomplishments. It also identifies program-level requirements and major system boundaries and interfaces.

  20. Tank waste remediation system program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, R.W.

    1998-01-05

    This program plan establishes the framework for conduct of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project. The plan focuses on the TWRS Retrieval and Disposal Mission and is specifically intended to support the DOE mid-1998 Readiness to Proceed with Privatized Waste Treatment evaluation for establishing firm contracts for waste immobilization.

  1. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in ship ballast tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is known to be a dangerous process in ship tanks due to its rapid and yet unpredictable occurrence, leading to extremely fast local corrosion, possibly jeopardizing the structural integrity, in a relatively short time. This project focuses on a

  2. Potential for criticality in Hanford tanks resulting from retrieval of tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, G.A.; Sterne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report assesses the potential during retrieval operations for segregation and concentration of fissile material to result in a criticality. The sluicing retrieval of C-106 sludge to AY-102 and the operation of mixer pumps in SY-102 are examined in some detail. These two tanks (C-106, SY-102) were selected because of the near term plans for retrieval of these tanks and their high plutonium inventories relative to other tanks. Although all underground storage tanks are subcritical by a wide margin if assumed to be uniform in composition, the possibility retrieval operations could preferentially segregate the plutonium and locally concentrate it sufficiently to result in criticality was a concern. This report examines the potential for this segregation to occur.

  3. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-204

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, J.M.

    1996-09-12

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-C-204. This report supports the requirements of Tri Party Agreement Milestone M 44 09.

  4. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BX-111

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1998-05-05

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste, stored in Tank 241-BX-111. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-ISB.

  5. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-B-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in tank 241-B-101. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  6. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2007-02-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global

  7. Consumption externalities and preference complementarities

    OpenAIRE

    Cleary, Rebecca; Carlson, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions can lead to a variety of phenomena including consumption externalities and complementarities. Consumption externalities arise when the choices of others have an effect on the total value of a household's purchases; complementarities arise when the choices of others have an effect on the marginal value of a household's purchases. This paper develops a conceptual model that separately identifies consumption externalities and complementarities and illustrates their significan...

  8. Household External Finance and Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Besley, Timothy J.; Meads, Neil; Surico, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses mortgage data to construct a measure of terms on which households access to external finance, and relates it to consumption at both the aggregate and cohort levels. The Household External Finance (HEF) index is based on the spread paid by risky borrowers in the mortgage market. There is evidence that the terms of access to external finance matter more for the consumption of young cohorts in U.K. data. Results are robust to a wide variety of specifications.

  9. Incumbent's Incentive under Network Externalities

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jaehong

    2001-01-01

    This paper shows that an incumbent monopolist's incentive confronting a new entrant depends on the degree of product differentiation and the strength of network externality. If products are homogeneous, the incumbent never wants to invite entry regardless of the degree of network externality. On the other hand, if products are differentiated, duopoly profit is higher than the monopoly profit when products are more differentiated and/or the network externality is weak. Conversely, the incumben...

  10. 7 CFR 58.512 - Cheese vats or tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vats or tanks. 58.512 Section 58.512 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....512 Cheese vats or tanks. (a) Cheese vats or tanks shall meet the requirements of § 58.416. When...

  11. 46 CFR 25.40-1 - Tanks and engine spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tanks and engine spaces. 25.40-1 Section 25.40-1...-1 Tanks and engine spaces. (a) All motorboats or motor vessels, except open boats and as provided in... from the bilges of every engine and fuel tank compartment. There shall be at least one exhaust duct...

  12. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-04-10

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

  13. 49 CFR 383.119 - Requirements for tank vehicle endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for tank vehicle endorsement. 383.119 Section 383.119 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR... Requirements for tank vehicle endorsement. In order to obtain a Tank Vehicle Endorsement, each applicant must...

  14. 14 CFR 25.981 - Fuel tank ignition prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank ignition prevention. 25.981 Section 25.981 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... ignition prevention. (a) No ignition source may be present at each point in the fuel tank or fuel tank...

  15. 49 CFR 229.97 - Grounding fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding fuel tanks. 229.97 Section 229.97 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 229.97 Grounding fuel tanks. Fuel tanks and related piping shall be electrically grounded. ...

  16. 46 CFR 119.440 - Independent fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent fuel tanks. 119.440 Section 119.440 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.440 Independent fuel tanks. (a) Materials and construction. Independent fuel...) capacity. 4 Acceptable only for gasoline service. 5 Gasoline fuel tanks constructed of iron or steel, which...

  17. 46 CFR 182.440 - Independent fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Independent fuel tanks. 182.440 Section 182.440 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.440 Independent fuel tanks. (a) Materials and construction. Independent fuel tanks must be designed and constructed as described in this paragraph (a). (1...

  18. 46 CFR 154.188 - Membrane tank: Inner hull steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Membrane tank: Inner hull steel. 154.188 Section 154.188... Structure § 154.188 Membrane tank: Inner hull steel. For a vessel with membrane tanks, the inner hull... “Rules for Building and Classing Steel Vessels”, 1981. ...

  19. Effect of Context on Performance of Think Tanks in Developing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In fact, stakeholders involved in the Think Tank Initiative believe a country's context influences think tank performance. This project will examine how think tanks adapt most effectively in different contexts. More specifically, it will: ... While context may add a layer of complexity, it also offers opportunities. For example, think ...

  20. 14 CFR 23.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank tests. 23.965 Section 23.965... tank tests. (a) Each fuel tank must be able to withstand the following pressures without failure or... airplanes the test frequency of vibration is 2,000 cycles per minute. (ii) If only one frequency of...

  1. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section 154.195 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its...

  2. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  3. Justification for Continued Operation for Tank 241-Z-361

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGEN, D.M.

    1999-09-01

    This justification for continued operations (JCO) summarizes analyses performed to better understand and control the potential hazards associated with Tank 241-2-361. This revision to the JCO has been prepared to identify and control the hazards associated with sampling the tank using techniques developed and approved for use in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) at Hanford.

  4. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 23.969 Section 23.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT....969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two...

  5. 33 CFR 157.10a - Segregated ballast tanks, crude oil washing systems, and dedicated clean ballast tanks for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK... perpendicular is that which is necessary to obtain full immersion of the propeller. (e) Each tank vessel that...

  6. Discovery of the First Leaking Double-Shell Tank - Hanford Tank 241-AY-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Stephanie J.; Sams, Terry L.

    2013-11-06

    A routine video inspection of the annulus space between the primary tank and secondary liner of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 was performed in August 2012. During the inspection, unexpected material was discovered. A subsequent video inspection revealed additional unexpected material on the opposite side of the tank, none of which had been observed during inspections performed in December 2006 and January 2007. A formal leak assessment team was established to review the tank's construction and operating histories, and preparations for sampling and analysis began to determine the material's origin. A new sampling device was required to collect material from locations that were inaccessible to the available sampler. Following its design and fabrication, a mock-up test was performed for the new sampling tool to ensure its functionality and capability of performing the required tasks. Within three months of the discovery of the unexpected material, sampling tools were deployed, material was collected, and analyses were performed. Results indicated that some of the unknown material was indicative of soil, whereas the remainder was consistent with tank waste. This, along with the analyses performed by the leak assessment team on the tank's construction history, lead to the conclusion that the primary tank was leaking into the annulus. Several issues were encountered during the deployment of the samplers into the annulus. As this was the first time samples had been required from the annulus of a double-shell tank, a formal lessons learned was created concerning designing equipment for unique purposes under time constraints.

  7. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-05-22

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

  8. Decision and systems analysis for underground storage tank waste retrieval systems and tank waste remediation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitz, D.A. [Independent Consultant, Kirkland, WA (United States); Berry, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Hanford`s underground tanks (USTs) pose one of the most challenging hazardous and radioactive waste problems for the Department of Energy (DOE). Numerous schemes have been proposed for removing the waste from the USTs, but the technology options for doing this are largely unproven. To help assess the options, an Independent Review Group (IRG) was established to conduct a broad review of retrieval systems and the tank waste remediation system. The IRG consisted of the authors of this report.

  9. Vented Chill / No-Vent Fill of Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, Noah O.; Foster, Lee W.; Martin, Adam K.; Stephens, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Architectures for extended duration missions often include an on-orbit replenishment of the space vehicle's cryogenic liquid propellants. Such a replenishment could be accomplished via a tank-to-tank transfer from a dedicated tanker or a more permanent propellant depot storage tank. Minimizing the propellant loss associated with transfer line and receiver propellant tank thermal conditioning is essential for mass savings. A new methodology for conducting tank-to-tank transfer while minimizing such losses has been demonstrated. Charge-Hold-Vent is the traditional methodology for conducting a tank-to-tank propellant transfer. A small amount of cryogenic liquid is introduced to chill the transfer line and propellant tank. As the propellant absorbs heat and undergoes a phase change, the tank internal pressure increases. The tank is then vented to relieve pressure prior to another charge of cryogenic liquid being introduced. This cycle is repeated until the transfer lines and tank are sufficiently chilled and the replenishment of the propellant tank is complete. This method suffers inefficiencies due to multiple chill and vent cycles within the transfer lines and associated feed system components. Additionally, this system requires precise measuring of cryogenic fluid delivery for each transfer, multiple valve cycling events, and other complexities associated with cycled operations. To minimize propellant loss and greatly simplify on-orbit operations, an alternate methodology has been designed and demonstrated. The Vented Chill / No Vent Fill method is a simpler, constant flow approach in which the propellant tank and transfer lines are only chilled once. The receiver tank is continuously vented as cryogenic liquid chills the transfer lines, tank mass and ullage space. Once chilled sufficiently, the receiver tank valve is closed and the tank is completely filled. Interestingly, the vent valve can be closed prior to receiver tank components reaching liquid saturation

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, J.G.

    1998-05-28

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-U-112. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-112 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for 1998.

  11. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BX-110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RASMUSSEN, J.H.

    1999-02-23

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-BX-110. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-BX-110 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of the waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the tank's safety status and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for 1998.''

  12. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, J.G.

    1998-06-18

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-T-105. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-T-105 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03, to ``issue characterization deliverables consistent with the waste information requirements documents developed for 1998``.

  13. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-05-12

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-TX-104. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-TX-104 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  14. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-SX-115

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HULSE, N.L.

    1999-05-13

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-SX-115. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-SX-115 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  15. Chemical compatibility of tank wastes in tanks 241-C-106, 241-AY-101, and 241-AY-102. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1994-05-04

    This report documents the chemical compatibility of waste types within tanks 241-C-106, 241-AY-101, and 241-AY-102. This information was compiled to facilitate the transfer of tank 241-C-106 waste to tank 241-AY-102 utilizing supernatant from tank 241-AY-101 as the sluicing medium. This document justifies that no chemical compatibility safety issues currently understood, or theorized from thermodynamic modeling, will result from the intended sluice transfer operation.

  16. Minutes of the Tank Waste Science Panel meeting, November 11--13, 1991. Hanford Tank Safety Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, D.M. [comp.

    1992-04-01

    The sixth meeting of the Tank Waste Science Panel was held November 11--13, 1991, in Pasco and Richland, Washington. Participating scientists presented the results of recent work on various aspects of issues relating to the generation and release of gases from Tank 241-SY-101 and the presence of ferrocyanide in other tanks at Hanford. Results are discussed.

  17. Supporting document for the North East Quandrant Historical Tank Content Estimate Report for BX-Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.

    1994-06-01

    This supporting document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered on BX-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quandrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas.

  18. Supporting document for the north east quadrant historical tank content estimate report for C-Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This Supporting Document provides historical in-depth characterization information gathered on C-Tank Farm, such as historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, sampling data, and drywell and liquid observation well data for Historical Tank Content Estimate Report of the NE Quadrant and the Hanford 200 East Areas.

  19. TANK INSPECTION NDE RESULTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2007INCLUDING WASTE TANKS 35, 36, 37, 38 AND 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elder, J

    2007-09-27

    Ultrasonic (UT) nondestructive examinations (NDE) were performed on waste storage tanks 35, 36, 37, 38 and 15 at the Savannah River Site as a part of the 'In-Service Inspection (ISI) Program for High Level Waste Tanks.' 1 The inspections were performed from the annular space of the waste storage tanks. The inspections included thickness mapping and crack detection scans on specified areas of the tanks covering all present and historic interface levels and selected welds with particular emphasis on the vapor space regions. Including the tanks in this report, all of the 27 Type III tanks at SRS have been inspected in accordance with the ISI plan. Of the four Type III tanks examined this year, all had areas of reportable thickness in either the Primary or Secondary tank. All of these areas on the primary tank are attributed to fabrication artifacts. None of the four Type III tanks examined this year showed evidence of service induced thinning on the primary wall. All four tanks had secondary wall and/or floor plates where the remaining thickness measured below the 10% wall loss criteria. Tank 15, a Type II, non-stress relieved, waste tank was also inspected this fiscal year as part of the ISI program. The same examination techniques were used on Tank 15 as on the Type III tanks. Tank 15 has been out of service due to leakage from stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Inspections were performed to validate known corrosion models and determine if crack growth occurred since the previous examination five years ago. Several cracks were found to have increased in length perpendicular to the weld seam. In the areas of the 27 Type III tanks inspected to date, ten tanks have reportable thickness in the primary wall and 17 have reportable thickness in the secondary tank walls or floor. All of the reportable thickness areas in the primary walls are from fabrication artifacts. Incipient pitting has been detected in five of the 27 Type III primary tanks. No cracking was

  20. Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-12-15

    Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

  1. Seismic Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shaft Support Water Storage Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Bharti Tekwani; Dr. Archana Bohra Gupta

    2016-01-01

    This paper compares the results of Seismic Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Shaft Support Water Storage Tank carried out in accordance with IS: 1893- 1984 and IS: 1893-2002 (Part-2) draft code. The analysis is carried out for shaft supported water tank of 500,750 and 1000 Cu.m capacity, located in four seismic zones (Zone-II, Zone -III, Zone-IV, Zone-V) and on three different soil types (Hard rock, Medium soil, Soft soil). Further, 1000 kl tank for conditions - tank full, tank empt...

  2. ExternE transport methodology for external cost evaluation of air pollution (DK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvang Jensen, S.; Berkowicz, R.; Brandt, J. [National Environmental Research Inst., Dept. of Atmospheric Environment (Denmark); Willumsen, E.; Kristensen, N.B. [COWI (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    The report describes how the human exposure estimates based on NERI's human exposure modelling system (AiGIS) can improve the Danish data used for exposure factors in the ExternE Transport methodology. Inititally, a brief description of the ExternE Transport methodology is given and it is summarised how the methodology has been applied so far in a previous Danish study. Finally, results of a case study are reported. Exposure factors have been calculated for various urban categories in the Greater Copenhagen Area. (au)

  3. Retrofitting Systems for External Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report, 9 different external and internal retrofitting systems are analyzed using numerical calculations. The analysis focuses on the thermal bridge effects in the different systems, and on this basis it is discussed whether internal or external retrofitting has the most advantages....... The different systems are evaluated using 5 different types of existing walls....

  4. External Examining: Fit for Purpose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Sue; Price, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    In a context of international concern about academic standards, the practice of external examining is widely admired for its role in defending standards. Yet a contradiction exists between this faith in examining and continuing concerns about standards. This article argues that external examining rests on assumptions about standards which are…

  5. External coating of colonic anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Colon anastomotic leakage remains both a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. External coating of colonic anastomoses has been proposed as a means to lower the rate of this complication. The aim of this review was to evaluate existing studies on external coating of colonic...

  6. Intergenerational Transmission of Externalizing Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Judith S; Balka, Elinor B; Zhang, Chenshu; Brook, David W

    2015-10-01

    This prospective longitudinal investigation examined the predictors of generation 2 (G2) parental substance use as related to their generation 3 (G3) offspring's externalizing behavior. The sample comprised 281 mother- or father- child (G2/G3) pairs. The results indicated that the G1/G2 (generations 1 and 2) parent-child relationship during G2's adolescence predicted externalizing behavior in the G2 young adults which correlated with G2 parental substance use. G2 parental substance use was related to subsequent G2 substance use disorders (SUDS), and to the G2/G3 parent-child relationship. The G2/G3 parent-child relationship and G2's SUDS each predicted G3 externalizing behavior. The results highlight the significance of breaking the chain of transmission of externalizing behavior across generations. Implications for policy and programs addressing the etiology of externalizing behavior in the offspring are discussed within a developmental framework.

  7. Status of tank 241-SY-101 data analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    The Waste Tank Flammable Gas Stabilization Program was established in 1990 to provide for resolution of a major safety issue identified for 23 of the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The safety issue involves the production, accumulation, and periodic release from these tanks of flammable gases in concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limits. This document deals primarily with tank 241-SY-101 from the SY Tank Farm. The flammable gas condition has existed for this tank since the tank was first filled in the time period from 1977 to 1980. During a general review of waste tank chemical stability in 1988--1989, this situation was re-examined and, in March 1990, the condition was declared to be an unreviewed safety question. Tank 241-SY-101 was placed under special operating restrictions, and a program of investigation was begun to evaluate the condition and determine appropriate courses of action. This report summarizes the data that have become available on tank 241-SY-101 since it was declared as an unreviewed safety question and updates the information reported in an earlier document (WHC-EP-0517). The report provides a technical basis for use in the evaluation of safety risks of the tank and subsequent resolution of the unreviewed safety question.

  8. FFTF horizontal sodium storage tank preliminary thermal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-02-21

    In the FFTF Shutdown Program, sodium from the primary and secondary heat transport loops, Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to four large storage tanks for temporary storage. Three of the drain tanks will be cylindrical vertical tanks having a diameter of 28 feet, height of 22 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The vertical tanks were the subject of a previous report and are not the subject of this report. The fourth tank is a horizontal cylindrical tank 18 feet in diameter, having an overall length of 31 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The purpose of this work is to document the thermal analyses that were performed to ensure that the FFTF horizontal sodium storage tank design is feasible from a thermal standpoint. The key criterion for this analysis is the time to heat up the storage tank containing frozen sodium at ambient temperature to 400 F. Normal operating conditions include an ambient temperature range of 32 F to 120 F. A key parameter in the evaluation of the sodium drain tank is the type of insulation. The baseline case assumed four inches of calcium silicate insulation. An alternate case assumed refractory fiber (Cerablanket) insulation also with a thickness of four inches. Both cases assumed a total electrical trace heat load of 60 kW, evenly distributed on the tank heads and on the tank side wall (cylinder).

  9. Investigation of Tank 241-AN-101 Floating Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Douglas P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, VA (United States); Meznarich, H. K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, VA (United States)

    2017-10-30

    Tank 241-AN-101 is the receiver tank for retrieval of several C-Farms waste tanks, including Tanks 241-C-102 and 241-C-111. Tank 241 C 111 received first-cycle decontamination waste from the bismuth phosphate process and Plutonium and Uranium Extraction cladding waste, as well as hydraulic fluid. Three grab samples, 1AN-16-01, 1AN-16-01A, and 1AN-16-01B, were collected at the surface of Tank 241-AN-101 on April 25, 2016, after Tank 241-C-111 retrieval was completed. Floating solids were observed in the three grab samples in the 11A hot cell after the samples were received at the 222-S Laboratory. Routine chemical analyses, solid phase characterization on the floating and settled solids, semivolatile organic analysis mainly on the aqueous phase for identification of degradation products of hydraulic fluids were performed. Investigation of the floating solids is reported.

  10. Iraq liquid radioactive waste tanks maintenance and monitoring program plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Cochran, John Russell; Sol Shamsaldin, Emad (Iraq Ministry of Science and Technology)

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop a project management plan for maintaining and monitoring liquid radioactive waste tanks at Iraq's Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center. Based on information from several sources, the Al-Tuwaitha site has approximately 30 waste tanks that contain varying amounts of liquid or sludge radioactive waste. All of the tanks have been non-operational for over 20 years and most have limited characterization. The program plan embodied in this document provides guidance on conducting radiological surveys, posting radiation control areas and controlling access, performing tank hazard assessments to remove debris and gain access, and conducting routine tank inspections. This program plan provides general advice on how to sample and characterize tank contents, and how to prioritize tanks for soil sampling and borehole monitoring.

  11. Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    class I; 35% are in class II; 25%, class III; and 5%, class IV. Surveys (8) suggest that from 5% to 15% of patients with HF have persistent severe symptoms, and that the remainder of patients with HF is evenly divided between those with mild and moderately severe symptoms. To date, the diagnosis and management of chronic HF has concentrated on patients with the clinical syndrome of HF accompanied by severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Major changes in treatment have resulted from a better understanding of the pathophysiology of HF and the results of large clinical trials. Treatment for chronic HF includes lifestyle management, drugs, cardiac surgery, or implantable pacemakers and defibrillators. Despite pharmacologic advances, which include diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-blockers, spironolactone, and digoxin, many patients remain symptomatic on maximally tolerated doses. (6) The Technology Patients are typically treated by a trained technician in a medically supervised environment for 1 hour daily for a total of 35 hours over 7 weeks. The procedure involves sequential inflation and deflation of compressible cuffs wrapped around the patient’s calves, lower thighs and upper thighs. In addition to 3 sets of cuffs, the patient has finger plethysmogram and electrocardiogram (ECG) attachments that are connected to a control and display console. External counterpulsation was used in the United States to treat cardiogenic shock after acute myocardial infarction. (9;10) More recently, an enhanced version namely “enhanced external counterpulsation” (EECP) was introduced as a noninvasive procedure for outpatient treatment of patients with severe, uncontrollable cardiac ischemia. EECP is said to increase coronary perfusion pressure and reduce the myocardial oxygen demand. Currently, EECP is not applicable for all patients with refractory angina pectoris. For example, many patients are considered ineligible for therapy due to co

  12. Safety analysis report for the North Tank Farm, Tank W-11, and the Gunite and Associated Tanks -- Treatability Study, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    The North Tank Farm (NTF) tanks consist of eight underground storage tanks which have been removed from service because of age and changes in liquid waste system needs and requirements. Tank W-11, which was constructed in 1943, has been removed from service, and contains several hundred gallons of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). The Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) Treatability Study involves the demonstration of sludge removal techniques and equipment for use in other waste storage tanks throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The hazards associated with the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study are identified in hazard identification table in Appendixes A, B, and C. The hazards identified for the NTF, Tank W-11, and the Treatability Study were analyzed in the preliminary hazards analyses (PHA) included as Appendices D and E. The PHA identifies potential accident scenarios and qualitatively estimates the consequences. Because of the limited quantities of materials present in the tanks and the types of energy sources that may result in release of the materials, none of the accidents identified are anticipated to result in significant adverse health effects to on-site or off-site personnel.

  13. Musculoskeletal disorders in main battle tank personnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Lars Ravnborg; Guldager, Bernadette; Gyntelberg, Finn

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders of personnel in the main battle tank (MBT) units in the Danish army with those of personnel in other types of army units, and to investigate associations between job function in the tank, military rank, and musculoskeletal problems....... METHOD: An epidemiologic cross-sectional questionnaire-based examination of an exposed group (MBT personnel) and a reference group (army personnel from other units than MBT units) was conducted. Outcome measures were 1-year prevalence of pain in the anatomical locations of neck, shoulder, low back, knee......, and ankle. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There were only 4 women in the MBT group; as a consequence, female personnel were excluded from the study. The participation rate was 58.0% (n = 184) in the MBT group and 56.3% (n = 333) in the reference group. The pattern of musculoskeletal disorders among personnel...

  14. Annual report of tank waste treatability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, A.G. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., NM (United States); Kirkbride, R.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    This report has been prepared as part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order* (Tri-Party Agreement) and constitutes completion of Tri-Party Agreement milestone M-04-00D for fiscal year 1993. This report provides a summary of treatment activities for newly generated waste, existing double-shell tank waste, and existing single-shell tank waste, as well as a summary of grout disposal feasibility, glass disposal feasibility, alternate methods for disposal, and safety issues which may impact the treatment and disposal of existing defense nuclear wastes. This report is an update of the 1992 report and is intended to provide traceability for the documentation by statusing the studies, activities, and issues which occurred in these areas listed above over the period of March 1, 1992, through February 28, 1993. Therefore, ongoing studies, activities, and issues which were documented in the previous (1992) report are addressed in this (1993) report.

  15. DECOUPLER DESIGN FOR AN INTERACTING TANKS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraid F. Ahmed

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model forthe two interacting tanks system was derived and the dynamic behavior of thissystem was studied by introducing a step change in inlet flow rate. In thispaper, the analysis of the interaction loops between the controlled variable(liquid level and manipulated variable (inlet flow rate was carried out usingthe relative gain array. Also decoupling technique is applied to eliminate theeffect this interaction by design suitable decouplers for the system. Theresults show that the gain of each loop is cut in half when the opposite loopis closed and the gain of other loop changes sign when the opposite loop isclosed. The decoupling method show that the liquid level of tank one isconstant when the second inlet flow changes and to keep the liquid level oftank two constant the first inlet flow must be changed.

  16. Historical tank content estimate for the southeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-14

    The Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Quadrant provides historical information on a tank-by-tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks for the Hanford 200 Areas. This report summarized historical information such as waste history, level history, temperature history, riser configuration, tank integrity, and inventory estimates on a tank- by-tank basis. Tank farm aerial photographs and interior tank montages are also provided for each tank. A description of the development of data for the document of the inventory estimates provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory are also given in this report.

  17. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Mike [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Herbert, James E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scheele, Patrick W. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-12

    The Savannah River Site Tank Farms have 45 active underground waste tanks used to store and process nuclear waste materials. There are 4 different tank types, ranging in capacity from 2839 m3 to 4921 m3 (750,000 to 1,300,000 gallons). Eighteen of the tanks are older style and do not meet all current federal standards for secondary containment. The older style tanks are the initial focus of waste removal efforts for tank closure and are referred to as closure tanks. Of the original 51 underground waste tanks, six of the original 24 older style tanks have completed waste removal and are filled with grout. The insoluble waste fraction that resides within most waste tanks at SRS requires vigorous agitation to suspend the solids within the waste liquid in order to transfer this material for eventual processing into glass filled canisters at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). SRS suspends the solid waste by use of recirculating mixing pumps. Older style tanks generally have limited riser openings which will not support larger mixing pumps, since the riser access is typically 58.4 cm (23 inches) in diameter. Agitation for these tanks has been provided by four long shafted standard slurry pumps (SLP) powered by an above tank 112KW (150 HP) electric motor. The pump shaft is lubricated and cooled in a pressurized water column that is sealed from the surrounding waste in the tank. Closure of four waste tanks has been accomplished utilizing long shafted pump technology combined with heel removal using multiple technologies. Newer style waste tanks at SRS have larger riser openings, allowing the processing of waste solids to be accomplished with four large diameter SLPs equipped with 224KW (300 HP) motors. These tanks are used to process the waste from closure tanks for DWPF. In addition to the SLPs, a 224KW (300 HP) submersible mixer pump (SMP) has also been developed and deployed within older style tanks. The SMPs are product cooled and

  18. Mixing processes in high-level waste tanks. Progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, P.F.

    1997-01-01

    'U.C. Berkeley has made excellent progress in the last year in building and running experiments and performing analysis to study mixing processes that can affect the distribution of fuel and oxygen in the air space of DOE high-level waste tanks, and the potential to create flammable concentrations at isolated locations, achieving all of the milestones outlined in the proposal. The DOE support has allowed the acquisition of key experimental equipment, and has funded the full-time efforts of one doctoral student and one postdoctoral researcher working on the project. In addition, one masters student and one other doctoral student, funded by external sources, have also contributed to the research effort. Flammable gases can be generated in DOE high-level waste tanks, including radiolytic hydrogen, and during cesium precipitation from salt solutions, benzene. Under normal operating conditions the potential for deflagration or detonation from these gases is precluded by purging and ventilation systems, which remove the flammable gases and maintain a well-mixed condition in the tanks. Upon failure of the ventilation system, due to seismic or other events, however, it has proven more difficult to make strong arguments for well-mixed conditions, due to the potential for density-induced stratification which can potentially sequester fuel or oxidizer at concentrations significantly higher than average. This has complicated the task of defining the safety basis for tank operation. The author is currently developing numerical tools for modeling the transient evolution of fuel and oxygen concentrations in waste tanks following loss of ventilation. When used with reasonable grid resolutions, standard multi-dimensional fluid dynamics codes suffer from excessive numerical diffusion effects, which strongly over predict mixing and provide nonconservative estimates, particularly after stratification occurs. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed

  19. Tank waste remediation system mission analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acree, C.D.

    1998-01-09

    This document describes and analyzes the technical requirements that the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) must satisfy for the mission. This document further defines the technical requirements that TWRS must satisfy to supply feed to the private contractors` facilities and to store or dispose the immobilized waste following processing in these facilities. This document uses a two phased approach to the analysis to reflect the two-phased nature of the mission.

  20. Tank Farm Operations Surveillance Automation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARQUEZ, D.L.

    2000-12-21

    The Nuclear Operations Project Services identified the need to improve manual tank farm surveillance data collection, review, distribution and storage practices often referred to as Operator Rounds. This document provides the analysis in terms of feasibility to improve the manual data collection methods by using handheld computer units, barcode technology, a database for storage and acquisitions, associated software, and operational procedures to increase the efficiency of Operator Rounds associated with surveillance activities.

  1. Initiative Think tank - Fondation Hewlett | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... approche qui ne leur confère pas la souplesse nécessaire pour faire des plans à long terme, établir leurs propres priorités de recherche et investir dans la création de programmes de recherche vigoureux. L'Initiative think tank vise à réunir le bon dosage d'appui financier et technique afin d'édifier des organismes stables ...

  2. Low temperature liquefied gas storage tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noma, T.; Hayakawa, K.; Nagao, O.; Okano, I.; Teramoto, R.; Kurihara, T.; Kakano, K.; Okamoto, T.

    1974-07-30

    The inner wall of Hitachi's improved liquefied gas storage tank is made up of multi-layer panels, each panel made liquid-tight by bonding a low-temperature-resistant metal sheet (such as aluminum or stainless steel or a synthetic resin film) to both sides of a plywood core consisting of numerous veneers. These veneers are then bonded to the liquid-tight membranes to serve as heat-shock-absorbing layers.

  3. CONTINUOUSLY WORKING SCREW METHANE-TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shamanskyi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Advantages and disadvantages of conventional anaerobic digester (methane-tank constructions, which are in use for sewage water sediments neutralization, were examined in this article. A new continuously working construction of the device was proposed that is based on modern conceptions about fermentation processes. It‘s principle of operation takes into consideration results of previous researches. It was shown that the device allows to reduce fermentation time significantly and to improve sanitary and hygienic characteristics of the neutralized sediment

  4. Organic Tanks Safety Program: Waste aging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Samuels, W.D.; Lenihan, B.D.; Clauss, S.A.; Wahl, K.L.; Campbell, J.A.

    1994-11-01

    The underground storage tanks at the Hanford Complex contain wastes generated from many years of plutonium production and recovery processes, and mixed wastes from radiological degradation processes. The chemical changes of the organic materials used in the extraction processes have a direct on several specific safety issues, including potential energy releases from these tanks. This report details the first year`s findings of a study charged with determining how thermal and radiological processes may change the composition of organic compounds disposed to the tank. Their approach relies on literature precedent, experiments with simulated waste, and studies of model reactions. During the past year, efforts have focused on the global reaction kinetics of a simulated waste exposed to {gamma} radiation, the reactions of organic radicals with nitrite ion, and the decomposition reactions of nitro compounds. In experiments with an organic tank non-radioactive simulant, the authors found that gas production is predominantly radiolytically induced. Concurrent with gas generation they observe the disappearance of EDTA, TBP, DBP and hexone. In the absence of radiolysis, the TBP readily saponifies in the basic medium, but decomposition of the other compounds required radiolysis. Key organic intermediates in the model are C-N bonded compounds such as oximes. As discussed in the report, oximes and nitro compounds decompose in strong base to yield aldehydes, ketones and carboxylic acids (from nitriles). Certain aldehydes can react in the absence of radiolysis to form H{sub 2}. Thus, if the pathways are correct, then organic compounds reacting via these pathways are oxidizing to lower energy content. 75 refs.

  5. Thermally resistant polymers for fuel tank sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Imide-linked perfluoroalkylene ether polymers, that were developed for the high temperature fuel tank sealant application, are discussed. Modifications of polymer structure and properties were realized through use of a new aromatic dianhydride intermediate containing an ether-linked perfluoroalkylene segment. Tests of thermal, oxidative and hydrolytic stability, fuel resistance, and adhesion are discussed along with tensile strength and elongation results. Efforts to effect a low temperature condensation of amic acid prepolymer to form imide links inside are described.

  6. Characterization of DWPF recycle condensate tank materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-01-01

    A Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Recycle Condensate Tank (RCT) sample was delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization with particular interest in the concentration of I-129, U-233, U-235, total U, and total Pu. Since a portion of Salt Batch 8 will contain DWPF recycle materials, the concentration of I-129 is important to undertand for salt batch planning purposes. The chemical and physical characterizations are also needed as input to the interpretation of future work aimed at determining the propensity of the RCT material to foam, and methods to remediate any foaming potential. According to DWPF the Tank Farm 2H evaporator has experienced foaming while processing DWPF recycle materials. The characterization work on the RCT samples has been completed and is reported here. The composition of the Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) RCT material is largely a low base solution of 0.2M NaNO2 and 0.1M NaNO3 with a small amount of formate present. Insoluble solids comprise only 0.05 wt.% of the slurry. The solids appear to be largely sludge-like solids based on elemental composition and SEM-EDS analysis. The sample contains an elevated concentration of I-129 (38x) and substantial 59% fraction of Tc-99, as compared to the incoming SB8 Tank 40 feed material. The Hg concentration is 5x, when compared to Fe, of that expected based on sludge carryover. The total U and Pu concentrations are reduced significantly, 0.536 wt.% TS and 2.42E-03 wt.% TS, respectively, with the fissile components, U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, an order of magnitude lower in concentration than those in the SB8 Tank 40 DWPF feed material. This report will be revised to include the foaming study requested in the TTR and outlined in the TTQAP when that work is concluded.

  7. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-110. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benar, C.J.

    1997-06-14

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (IWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-110. The objectives of this report are to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with 241-C-110 waste and to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendixes. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-44-05. Characterization information presented in this report originated from sample analyses and known historical sources. While only the results from recent sample events will be used to fulfill the requirements of the data quality objectives (DQOs), other information can be used to support or question conclusions derived from these results. Historical information for tank 241-C-110 are provided included surveillance information, records pertaining to waste transfers and tank operations, and1124 expected tank contents derived from a process knowledge model. The sampling events are listed, as well as sample data obtained before 1989. The results of the 1992 sampling events are also reported in the data package. The statistical analysis and numerical manipulation of data used in issue resolution are reported in Appendix C. Appendix D contains the evaluation to establish the best basis for the inventory estimate and the statistical analysis performed for this evaluation. A bibliography that resulted from an in-depth literature search of all known information sources applicable to tank 241-C-110 and its respective waste types is contained in Appendix E

  9. Radiological and toxicological analyses of tank 241-AY-102 and tank 241-C-106 ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himes, D.A.

    1998-08-11

    The high heat content solids contained in Tank 241-C-106 are to be removed and transferred to Tank 241-AY-102 by sluicing operations, to be authorized under project W320. While sluicing operations are underway, the state of these tanks will be transformed from unagitated to agitated. This means that the partition fraction which describes the aerosol content of the head space will increase from IE-10 to IE-8 (see WHC-SD-WM-CN062, Rev. 2 for discussion of partition fractions). The head spare will become much more loaded with suspended material. Furthermore, the nature of this suspended material can change significantly: sluicing could bring up radioactive solids which normally would lay under many meters of liquid supernate. It is assumed that the headspace and filter aerosols in Tank 241-AY-102 are a 90/10 liquid/solid split. It is further assumed that the sluicing line, the headspace in Tank 241-C-106, and the filters on Tank 241-C-106 contain aerosols which are a 67/33 liquid/solid split. The bases of these assumptions are discussed in Section 3.0. These waste compositions (referred to as mitigated compositions) were used in Attachments 1 through 4 to calculate survey meter exposure rates per liter of inventory in the various system components. Three accident scenarios are evaluated: a high temperature event which melts or burns the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; an overpressure event which crushes and blows out the HEPA filters and causes releases from other system components; and an unfiltered release of tank headspace air. The initiating event for the high temperature release is a fire caused by a heater malfunction inside the exhaust dust or a fire outside the duct. The initiating event for the overpressure event could be a steam bump which over pressurizes the tank and leads to a blowout of the HEPA filters in the ventilation system. The catastrophic destruction of the HEPA filters would release a fraction of the accumulated

  10. External costs related to power production technologies. ExternE national implementation for Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleisner, L.; Sieverts Nielsen, P.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the ExternE National Implementation project has been to establish a comprehensive and comparable set of data on externalities of power generation for all EU member states and Norway. The tasks include the application of the ExternE methodology to the most important fuel cycles for each country as well as to update the already existing results; to aggregate these site- and technology-specific results to more general figures. The current report covers the results of the national implementation for Denmark. Three different fuel cycles have been chosen as case studies. These are fuel cycles for an offshore wind farm and a wind farm on land, a decentralised CHP plant based on natural gas and a decentralised CHP plant based on biogas. The report covers all the details of the application of the methodology to these fuel cycles aggregation to a national level. (au) EU-JOULE 3. 59 tabs., 25 ills., 61 refs.

  11. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R. [RedZone Robotics, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites.

  12. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiyam T. Devi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Impeller submergence governs the performance of mixing tanks employed in oxygen transfer operation. Present work experimentally investigates the effect of impeller submergence depths on oxygen transfer and corresponding power consumption. It has been found that at higher range of impeller submergence, mixing tanks consume less power and gives higher values of oxygen transfer coefficient. Optimal range of submergence depth is 0.7 to 0.9 times the impeller diameter. Copyright ©2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.(Received: 4th March 2011; Revised: 12nd July 2011; Accepted: 14th July 2011[How to Cite: T.T. Devi, A.P. Sinha, M. Thakre, and B. Kumar. (2011. Impeller Submergence Depth for Stirred Tanks. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (2: 123-128. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.2.826.123-128 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/826] | View in 

  13. Hazard evaluation for transfer of waste from tank 241-SY-101 to tank 241-SY-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    1999-04-05

    Tank 241-SY-101 waste level growth is an emergent, high priority issue. The purpose of this document is to record the hazards evaluation process and document potential hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the proposed transfer of a limited quantity (approximately 100,000 gallons) of waste from Tank 241-SY-101 to Tank 241-SY-102. The results of the hazards evaluation were compared to the current Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Basis for Interim Operation (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. Comparison to LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Pump Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-SY-101, was also made in the case of transfer pump removal activities. Revision 1 of this document deletes hazardous conditions no longer applicable to the current waste transfer design and incorporates hazardous conditions related to the use of an above ground pump pit and overground transfer line. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting authorization of the activity; it is only intended to provide information about the hazardous conditions associated with this activity. The AB Control Decision process will be used to determine the adequacy of controls and whether the proposed activity is within the AB. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  14. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1997-05-21

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-104. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-C-104 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1996) milestone M-44-10.

  15. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 110AW). 179.300 Section 179.300 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300...

  16. C-106 tank process ventilation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-20

    Project W-320 Acceptance Test Report for tank 241-C-106, 296-C-006 Ventilation System Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-SD-W320-012, C-106 Tank Process Ventilation Test, was an in depth test of the 296-C-006 ventilation system and ventilation support systems required to perform the sluicing of tank C-106. Systems involved included electrical, instrumentation, chiller and HVAC. Tests began at component level, moved to loop level, up to system level and finally to an integrated systems level test. One criteria was to perform the test with the least amount of risk from a radioactive contamination potential stand point. To accomplish this a temporary configuration was designed that would simulate operation of the systems, without being connected directly to the waste tank air space. This was done by blanking off ducting to the tank and connecting temporary ducting and an inlet air filter and housing to the recirculation system. This configuration would eventually become the possible cause of exceptions. During the performance of the test, there were points where the equipment did not function per the directions listed in the ATP. These events fell into several different categories. The first and easiest problems were field configurations that did not match the design documentation. This was corrected by modifying the field configuration to meet design documentation and reperforming the applicable sections of the ATP. A second type of problem encountered was associated with equipment which did not operate correctly, at which point an exception was written against the ATP, to be resolved later. A third type of problem was with equipment that actually operated correctly but the directions in the ATP were in error. These were corrected by generating an Engineering Change Notice (ECN) against the ATP. The ATP with corrected directions was then re-performed. A fourth type of problem was where the directions in the ATP were as the equipment should operate, but the design of

  17. Evaluating Feed Delivery Performance in Scaled Double-Shell Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kearn P.; Thien, Michael G.

    2013-11-07

    The Hanford Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) and the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) contractor are both engaged in demonstrating mixing, sampling, and transfer system capability using simulated Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) formulations. This work represents one of the remaining technical issues with the high-level waste treatment mission at Hanford. The TOCs' ability to adequately mix and sample high-level waste feed to meet the WTP WAC Data Quality Objectives must be demonstrated. The tank mixing and feed delivery must support both TOC and WTP operations. The tank mixing method must be able to remove settled solids from the tank and provide consistent feed to the WTP to facilitate waste treatment operations. Two geometrically scaled tanks were used with a broad spectrum of tank waste simulants to demonstrate that mixing using two rotating mixer jet pumps yields consistent slurry compositions as the tank is emptied in a series of sequential batch transfers. Testing showed that the concentration of slow settling solids in each transfer batch was consistent over a wide range of tank operating conditions. Although testing demonstrated that the concentration of fast settling solids decreased by up to 25% as the tank was emptied, batch-to-batch consistency improved as mixer jet nozzle velocity in the scaled tanks increased.

  18. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE`s national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure.

  19. FFTF vertical sodium storage tank preliminary thermal analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-02-21

    In the FFTF Shutdown Program, sodium from the primary and secondary heat transport loops, Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to four large storage tanks for temporary storage. Three of the storage tanks will be cylindrical vertical tanks having a diameter of 28 feet, height of 22 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The fourth tank is a horizontal cylindrical tank but is not the subject of this report. The storage tanks will be located near the FFTF in the 400 Area and rest on a steel-lined concrete slab in an enclosed building. The purpose of this work is to document the thermal analyses that were performed to ensure that the vertical FFTF sodium storage tank design is feasible from a thermal standpoint. The key criterion for this analysis is the time to heat up the storage tank containing frozen sodium at ambient temperature to 400 F. Normal operating conditions include an ambient temperature range of 32 F to 120 F. A key parameter in the evaluation of the sodium storage tank is the type of insulation. The baseline case assumed six inches of calcium silicate insulation. An alternate case assumed refractory fiber (Cerablanket) insulation also with a thickness of six inches. Both cases assumed a total electrical trace heat load of 60 kW, with 24 kW evenly distributed on the bottom head and 36 kW evenly distributed on the tank side wall.

  20. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the T Tank Farm Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spatz, Robert

    2000-07-01

    This addendum to the T Tank Farm Report (GJO-99-101-TARA, GJO-HAN-27) published in September 1999 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the T Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the T Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  1. Hanford Tank Farms Vadose Zone, Addendum to the BX Tank Farm Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, A.W.

    2000-07-01

    This addendum to the BX Tank Farm Report (GJO-98-40-TARA, GJO-HAN-19) published in August 1998 incorporates the results of high-rate and repeat logging activities along with shape factor analysis of the logging data. A high-rate logging system was developed and deployed in the BX Tank Farm to measure cesium-137 concentration levels in high gamma flux zones where the spectral gamma logging system was unable to collect usable data because of high dead times and detector saturation. This report presents additional data and revised visualizations of subsurface contaminant distribution in the BX Tank Farm at the DOE Hanford Site in the state of Washington.

  2. A novel method to design water spray cooling system to protect floating roof atmospheric storage tanks against fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Alimohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocarbon bulk storage tank fires are not very common, but their protection is essential due to severe consequences of such fires. Water spray cooling system is one of the most effective ways to reduce damages to a tank from a fire. Many codes and standards set requirements and recommendations to maximize the efficiency of water spray cooling systems, but these are widely different and still various interpretations and methods are employed to design such systems. This article provides a brief introduction to some possible design methods of cooling systems for protection of storage tanks against external non-contacting fires and introduces a new method namely “Linear Density Method” and compares the results from this method to the “Average Method” which is currently in common practice. The average Method determines the flow rate for each spray nozzle by dividing the total water demand by the number of spray nozzles while the Linear Density Method determines the nozzle flow rate based on the actual flow over the surface to be protected. The configuration of the system includes a one million barrel crude oil floating roof tank to be protected and which is placed one half tank diameter from a similar adjacent tank with a full surface fire. Thermal radiation and hydraulics are modeled using DNV PHAST Version 6.53 and Sunrise PIPENET Version 1.5.0.2722 software respectively. Spray nozzles used in design are manufactured by Angus Fire and PNR Nozzles companies. Schedule 40 carbon steel pipe is used for piping. The results show that the cooling system using the Linear Density Method consumes 3.55% more water than the design using the average method assuming a uniform application rate of 4.1 liters per minute. Despite higher water consumption the design based on Linear Density Method alleviates the problems associated with the Average Method and provides better protection.

  3. External costs related to power production technologies. ExternE national implementation for Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleisner, L.; Sieverts Nielsen, P. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the ExternE National Implementation project has been to establish a comprehensive and comparable set of data on externalities of power generation for all EU member states and Norway. The tasks include the application of the ExternE methodology to the most important fuel cycles for each country as well as to update the already existing results, to aggregate these site- and technology-specific results to more general figures. The current report covers the detailed information concerning the ExternE methodology. Importance is attached to the computer system used in the project and the assessment of air pollution effects on health, materials and ecological effects. Also the assessment of global warming damages are described. Finally the report covers the detailed information concerning the national implementation for Denmark for an offshore wind farm and a wind farm on land, a decentralised CHP plant based on natural gas and a decentralised CHP plant base on biogas. (au) EU-JOULE 3. 79 tabs., 11 ills., 201 refs.

  4. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank 241-BX-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raphael, G.F.

    1994-09-01

    This study examined and assessed the status, safety issues, composition, and distribution of the wastes contained in the tank 241-BX-107. Historical and most recent information, ranging from engineering structural assessment experiments, process history, monitoring and remediation activities, to analytical core sample data, were compiled and interpreted in an effort to develop a realistic, contemporary profile for the tank BX-107 contents. The results of this is study revealed that tank BX-107, a 2,006,050 L (530,000 gal) cylindrical single-shell, dished-bottom carbon-steel tank in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, was classified as sound. It has been interim stabilized and thus contains less than 189,250 L (50,000 gal) of interstitial liquid, and less than 18,925 L (5,000 gal) of supernatant. It has also been partially interim isolated, whereby all inlets to the tank are sealed to prevent inadvertent addition of liquid. At a residual waste level of {approximately}3.07 m (120.7 {+-} 2 in. from sidewall bottom or {approximately}132.9 in. from center bottom), it is estimated that the tank BX-107 contents are equivalent to 1,305,825 L (345,000 gal). The vapor space pressure is at atmospheric. The latest temperature readings, which were taken in July 1994, show a moderate temperature value of 19{degrees}C (66{degrees}F). Two supernatant samples were collected in 1974 and 1990, prior to interim stabilization. Sludge core samples were obtained in 1979 and 1992.

  5. The dissolution of metal decontamination sludges stored in tanks and their management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopowicz, R.A.; Phillips, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The decontamination of stainless steel components is accomplished by the use of alkaline permanganate solutions, followed by an application of solutions of complexing agents such as citric acid or oxalic acid. Spent decontamination solutions comprising residues from both steps were combined in several waste storage tanks, where they have been in storage for several years. In those tanks, a reaction between residual permanganate and unreacted complexing agents produced sludges, consisting mainly of manganese dioxide, that reside in the tanks along with supernatant liquid. In a campaign that was conducted a few years ago, the accumulated waste solution was partially treated and disposed. This treatment consisted of decanting only the supernatant liquid and transporting it to a liquid waste treatment facility that employed a Thin Film Evaporator (TFE) to concentrate the liquid and ultimately produce a bitumen-encapsulated solidified waste form for storage. A study of treatment options for the remaining sludge is reported here. The requirement was to determine a simple means of treating the sludge using existing routine processes and equipment. This will be a significant step toward the decommissioning of the decontamination waste storage tanks. The available equipment at the liquid waste treatment facility was not designed to process sludge or slurries containing a large volume fraction of solids. Laboratory testing was carried out to find a means of dissolving the decontamination waste sludges, preferably in situ, and filtering undissolved solids to meet the feed requirements of the TFE in the liquid waste treatment facility. A concentrated citric acid solution was applied to sludge samples, without the use of externally applied mixing of the reagent and sludge. In all of the samples of actual decontamination waste sludge that were tested, a quantity of undissolved material remained after treatment with citric acid. The quantities were relatively small in volume, and

  6. DISTRIBUTED EXTERNAL SURFACE HARDENING OF CAR DESIGN BY WINDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fomin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves coverage of features and results of the research conducted by the authors to determine the feasibility and establishment of pre-stressed-strained state of freight cars by winding in order to improve their strength characteristics. It is also necessary to present the theoretical justification for the effectiveness of the application of this method for car designs and an appropriate example for the tank-car. Methodology. The conducted study is based on an analysis of known works on the subject, mathematical justification and computer modeling. At the calculations of rolling stock components contemporary conventional techniques were used. Findings. Authors found that the winding method for pre-stressed-strained state is effective and appropriate for use in the construction of railway rolling stock and, in particular freight cars. Freight car designs with the pre-stressed-strained state are characterized by a number of strength advantages, among which there is an improvement of the work on the perception of operational loads and resource conservation. Originality. For the first time it is proposed the improvement of bearing capacity of freight car constructions through the creation of its component in the directed stress-strained state. It is also for the first time proposed the use of distributed external surface hardening by the method of winding to create a pre-stress-strained state of structural components of freight cars. The methods for winding designs of freight cars and their implementation were considered. Practical value. The studies developed a number of technical solutions for improving the design of freight cars and tank-container, which has been patented. Corresponding solutions for the tank-car are partially presented. Practical implementation of such solutions will significantly improve the technical, economic and operational performances of car designs.

  7. Risk Based Inspection Methodology and Software Applied to Atmospheric Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalis, P.; Korneliussen, G.; Hermanrud, J.; Steo, Y.

    2012-05-01

    A new risk-based inspection (RBI) methodology and software is presented in this paper. The objective of this work is to allow management of the inspections of atmospheric storage tanks in the most efficient way, while, at the same time, accident risks are minimized. The software has been built on the new risk framework architecture, a generic platform facilitating efficient and integrated development of software applications using risk models. The framework includes a library of risk models and the user interface is automatically produced on the basis of editable schemas. This risk-framework-based RBI tool has been applied in the context of RBI for above-ground atmospheric storage tanks (AST) but it has been designed with the objective of being generic enough to allow extension to the process plants in general. This RBI methodology is an evolution of an approach and mathematical models developed for Det Norske Veritas (DNV) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The methodology assesses damage mechanism potential, degradation rates, probability of failure (PoF), consequence of failure (CoF) in terms of environmental damage and financial loss, risk and inspection intervals and techniques. The scope includes assessment of the tank floor for soil-side external corrosion and product-side internal corrosion and the tank shell courses for atmospheric corrosion and internal thinning. It also includes preliminary assessment for brittle fracture and cracking. The data are structured according to an asset hierarchy including Plant, Production Unit, Process Unit, Tag, Part and Inspection levels and the data are inherited / defaulted seamlessly from a higher hierarchy level to a lower level. The user interface includes synchronized hierarchy tree browsing, dynamic editor and grid-view editing and active reports with drill-in capability.

  8. Free vibration analysis of a tank containing two liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yu; Chang, Y.W.

    1993-05-01

    A study of the dynamic characteristics of rigidly supported upright circular cylindrical tanks containing two different liquids is presented. The governing differential equations for the tank-two liquid system are obtained by application of the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure in combination with Lagrange`s equation. The response functions examined include the fundamental natural frequency, the associated mode of vibration and hydrodynamic pressure exerted against the tank wall. Unlike the cases of tanks containing one liquid in which the dynamic response is controlled by four parameters, the dynamic response of a tank that contains two liquids is controlled by six parameters. The numerical results are presented in tabular and graphic forms, and are compared with those of the identical tank filled with one liquid. Also, a simple approximate equation for evaluating the fundamental natural frequency for preliminary design is proposed.

  9. 241-AY Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-AY double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations. are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  10. 241-AZ Double Shell Tanks (DST) Integrity Assessment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JENSEN, C.E.

    1999-09-21

    This report presents the results of the integrity assessment of the 241-A2 double-shell tank farm facility located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The assessment included the design evaluation and integrity examinations of the tanks and concluded that the facility is adequately designed, is compatible with the waste, and is fit for use. Recommendations including subsequent examinations, are made to ensure the continued safe operation of the tanks.

  11. 46 CFR 154.411 - Cargo tank thermal loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Containment Systems § 154.411 Cargo tank thermal loads. For the calculations required under § 154.406(a)(4... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo tank thermal loads. 154.411 Section 154.411... thermal loads for the cooling down periods of cargo tanks for design temperatures lower than −55 °C (−67...

  12. Geology of the 241-BY Tank Farm. [Hanford Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, W.H.; Fecht, K.R.

    1976-04-01

    A series of maps have been compiled to document the structure and stratigraphy of the sediments underlying the high-level radioactive waste storage tank farms located within the Energy Research and Development Administration Hanford Reservation. The primary purpose of these maps is to provide basic geologic information to be utilized and to evaluate the impact of suspected and confirmed tank leaks. The contents of this packet contain maps compiled only for the 241-BY Tank Farm.

  13. Analysis of embedded waste storage tanks subjected to seismic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaslawsky, M.; Sammaddar, S.; Kennedy, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    At the Savannah River Site, High Activity Wastes are stored in carbon steel tanks that are within reinforced concrete vaults. These soil-embedded tank/vault structures are approximately 80 ft. in diameter and 40 ft. deep. The tanks were studied to determine the essentials of governing variables, to reduce the problem to the least number of governing cases to optimize analysis effort without introducing excessive conservatism. The problem reduced to a limited number of cases of soil-structure interaction and fluid (tank contents) -- structure interaction problems. It was theorized that substantially reduced input would be realized from soil structure interaction (SSI) but that it was also possible that tank-to-tank proximity would result in (re)amplification of the input. To determine the governing seismic input motion, the three dimensional SSI code, SASSI, was used. Significant among the issues relative to waste tanks is to the determination of fluid response and tank behavior as a function of tank contents viscosity. Tank seismic analyses and studies have been based on low viscosity fluids (water) and the behavior is quite well understood. Typical wastes (salts, sludge), which are highly viscous, have not been the subject of studies to understand the effect of viscosity on seismic response. The computer code DYNA3D was used to study how viscosity alters tank wall pressure distribution and tank base shear and overturning moments. A parallel hand calculation was performed using standard procedures. Conclusions based on the study provide insight into the quantification of the reduction of seismic inputs for soil structure interaction for a ``soft`` soil site.

  14. Numerical investigation of hydraulic ram effects in fuel tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, C. H. M.; Sachs, G. W.; Seidel, K. G. K.

    1987-10-01

    This paper presents results from two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical simulations of projectiles striking fuel filled tanks. The calculations reproduce former measurements of velocity losses of the penetrating projectile during the shock phase. It is further shown that the damage of the tank rear wall is practically independent of the distance to the front wall but can be reduced by isolating porous material or additional walls in the tank.

  15. B11-: a moving subnanoscale tank tread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Jin; Zhao, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2015-09-01

    We present a concept that an elongated, planar boron cluster can serve as a ``tank tread'' at the sub-nanometer scale, a novel propulsion system for potential nanomachines. Density functional calculations at the PBE0/6-311+G* level for the global-minimum B11-C2v (1A1) and B11C2v (2B2) structures along the soft in-plane rotational mode allow the identification of their corresponding B11-C2v and B11C2v transition states, with small rotational energy barriers of 0.42 and 0.55 kcal mol-1, respectively. The energy barriers are refined to 0.35 and 0.60 kcal mol-1 at the single-point CCSD(T) level, suggesting that the clusters are structurally fluxional at room temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations show that B11- and B11 behave exactly like a tank tread, in which the peripheral B9 ring rotates almost freely around the B2 core. A full turn of rotation may be accomplished in around 2 ps. In contrast to molecular wheels or Wankel motors, the peripheral boron atoms in the tank tread behave as a flexible chain gliding around, rather than as a rigid wheel rotation. This finding is beyond imagination, which expands the concepts of molecular wheels and Wankel motors.We present a concept that an elongated, planar boron cluster can serve as a ``tank tread'' at the sub-nanometer scale, a novel propulsion system for potential nanomachines. Density functional calculations at the PBE0/6-311+G* level for the global-minimum B11-C2v (1A1) and B11C2v (2B2) structures along the soft in-plane rotational mode allow the identification of their corresponding B11-C2v and B11C2v transition states, with small rotational energy barriers of 0.42 and 0.55 kcal mol-1, respectively. The energy barriers are refined to 0.35 and 0.60 kcal mol-1 at the single-point CCSD(T) level, suggesting that the clusters are structurally fluxional at room temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations show that B11- and B11 behave exactly like a tank tread, in which the peripheral B9 ring rotates almost freely

  16. Tank 37H Salt Removal Batch Process and Salt Dissolution Mixing Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, K.C.

    2001-09-18

    Tank 30H is the receipt tank for concentrate from the 3H Evaporator. Tank 30H has had problems, such as cooling coil failure, which limit its ability to receive concentrate from the 3H Evaporator. SRS High Level Waste wishes to use Tank 37H as the receipt tank for the 3H Evaporator concentrate. Prior to using Tank 37H as the 3H Evaporator concentrate receipt tank, HLW must remove 50 inches of salt cake from the tank. They requested SRTC to evaluate various salt removal methods for Tank 37H. These methods include slurry pumps, Flygt mixers, the modified density gradient method, and molecular diffusion.

  17. Reduction of dissipation in a thermal engine by means of periodic changes of external constraintsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Claus; Ross, John

    1985-03-01

    We consider a thermal engine driven by chemical reactions, which take place in a continuous flow, stirred tank reactor fitted with a movable piston. Work can be produced by means of a heat engine coupled to the products and to an external heat bath, and by the piston. Two modes of operation are compared, each with fixed input rate of chemicals: one with periodic variation of an external constraint [mode (b)], in which we vary the external pressure, and one without such variation [mode (a)]. We derive equations for the total power output in each of the two modes. The power output in mode (b) can be larger than that of mode (a) for the same chemical throughput and for the same average value of the external pressure. For a particularly simple case it is shown that the total power output in mode (b) is larger than that in (a) if work is done by the piston. At the same time the entropy production is decreased and the efficiency is increased. The possibility of an increased power output is due to the proper control of the relative phase of the externally varied constraint and its conjugate variable, the external pressure and the volume. This control is achieved by the coupling of nonlinear kinetics to the externally varied constraint. Details of specific mechanisms and the occurrence of resonance phenomena are presented in the following article.

  18. Permeation barrier for lightweight liquid hydrogen tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultheiss, D.

    2007-04-16

    For the future usage of hydrogen as an automotive fuel, its on-board storage is crucial. One approach is the storage of liquid hydrogen (LH2, 20 K) in double-walled, vacuum insulated tanks. The introduction of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structural material enables a high potential of reducing the weight in comparison to the state-of-the-art stainless steel tanks. The generally high permeability of hydrogen through plastics, however, can lead to long-term degradation of the insulating vacuum. The derived objective of this dissertation was to find and apply an adequate permeation barrier (liner) on CFRP. The investigated liners were either foils adhered on CFRP specimens or coatings deposited on CFRP specimens. The coatings were produced by means of thermal spraying, metal plating or physical vapor deposition (PVD). The materials of the liners included Al, Au, Cu, Ni and Sn as well as stainless steel and diamond-like carbon. The produced liners were tested for their permeation behavior, thermal shock resistance and adherence to the CFRP substrate. Additionally, SEM micrographs were used to characterize and qualify the liners. The foils, although being a good permeation barrier, adhered weakly to the substrate. Furthermore, leak-free joining of foil segments is a challenge still to be solved. The metal plating liners exhibited the best properties. For instance, no permeation could be detected through a 50 {mu}m thick Cu coating within the accuracy of the measuring apparatus. This corresponds to a reduction of the permeation gas flow by more than factor 7400 compared to uncoated CFRP. In addition, the metal platings revealed a high adherence and thermal shock resistance. The coatings produced by means of thermal spraying and PVD did not show a sufficient permeation barrier effect. After having investigated the specimens, a 170 liter CFRP tank was fully coated with 50 {mu}m Cu by means of metal plating. (orig.)

  19. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

  20. OPTIMISATION OF MANTLE TANKS FOR LOW FLOW SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan; Furbo, Simon

    1996-01-01

    A model, describing the heat transfer coefficients in the mantle of a mantle tank has been developed. The model is validated by means of measurements with varying operational conditions for different designed mantle tanks. The model has been implemented in an existing detailed mathematical...... with the programme and by means of tests of three SDHW systems with different designed mantle tanks. Based on the investigations design rules for mantle tanks are proposed. The model, describing the heat transfer coefficients in the mantle is approximate. In addition, the measurements have revealed...

  1. Double-shell tank remaining useful life estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anantatmula, R.P., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-02

    The existing 28 double-shell tanks (DSTS) at Hanford are currently planned to continue operation through the year 2028 when disposal schedules show removal of waste. This schedule will place the DSTs in a service life window of 4O to 60 years depending on tank construction date and actual retirement date. This paper examines corrosion- related life-limiting conditions of DSTs and reports the results of remaining useful life models developed for estimating remaining tank life. Three models based on controllable parameters such as temperature, chemistry, and relative humidity are presented for estimates to the year in which a particular DST may receive a breach in the primary tank due to pitting in the liquid or vapor region. Pitting is believed to be the life-limiting condition for DSTs,however, the region of the most aggressive pitting (vapor space or liquid) requires further investigation. The results of the models presented suggest none of the existing DSTs should fail by through-wall pitting until well beyond scheduled retrieval in 2028. The estimates of tank breach years (the year in which a tank may be expected to breach the primary tank wall) range from 2056 for pitting corrosion in the liquid region of tank 104-AW to beyond the next millennium for several tanks in the vapor region.

  2. Corrosion Fatigue in District Heating Water Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maahn, Ernst Emanuel

    1996-01-01

    Three candidate materials for construction of buffer tanks for district heating water have been tested for corrosion fatigue properties in a district heating water environment. The investigation included Slow Strain Rate Testing of plain tensile specimens, crack initiation testing by corrosion...... fatigue of plain tensile specimens and crack growth rate determination for Compact Tensile Specimens under corrosion fatigue conditions. The three materials are equal with respect to stress corrosion sensibility and crack initiation. Crack growth rate is increased with a factor of 4-6 relative to an inert...

  3. Improved HPC method for nonlinear wave tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wenbo; Greco, Marilena; Shao, Yanlin

    2017-01-01

    The recently developed Harmonic Polynomial Cell (HPC) method has been proved to be a promising choice for solving potential-flow Boundary Value Problem (BVP). In this paper, a flux method is proposed to consistently deal with the Neumann boundary condition of the original HPC method and enhance t...... nonlinear 2D numerical wave tank is developed using the improved HPCmethod as a verification....... the accuracy. Moreover, fixed mesh algorithm with free surface immersed is developed to improve the computational efficiency. Finally, a two dimensional (2D) multi-block strategy coupling boundary-fitted mesh and fixed mesh is proposed. Itlimits the computational costs and preserves the accuracy. A fully...

  4. Industrial thermoforming simulation of automotive fuel tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesche, S. aus der [Kautex Textron GmbH and Co., Bonn (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    An industrial thermoforming simulation with regard to automotive plastic fuel tanks is presented including all relevant process stages. The radiative and conductive heat transfer during the reheat stage, the deformation and stress behaviour during the forming stage, and the final cooling stage are simulated. The modelling of the thermal and rheological behaviour of the involved material is investigated in greater detail. By means of experimental data it is found that modelling of the phase transition during the process is highly important for predicting correct wall thickness distributions. (author)

  5. Phosphorus removal in aerated stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghigliazza, R.; Lodi, A.; Rovatti, M. [Inst. of Chemical and Process Engineering ``G.B. Bonino``, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1999-03-01

    The possibility to obtain biological phosphorus removal in strictly aerobic conditions has been investigated. Experiments, carried out in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), show the feasibility to obtain phosphorus removal without the anaerobic phase. Reactor performance in terms of phosphorus abatement kept always higher then 65% depending on adopted sludge retention time (SRT). In fact increasing SRT from 5 days to 8 days phosphorus removal and reactor performance increase but overcoming this SRT value a decreasing in reactor efficiency was recorded. (orig.) With 6 figs., 3 tabs., 18 refs.

  6. Inner cylinder of the CMS vacuum tank.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The vacuum tank of the CMS magnet system consists of inner and outer stainless-steel cylinders and houses the superconducting coil. The inner cylinder contains all the barrel sub-detectors, which it supports via a system of horizontal rails. The cylinder is pictured here in the vertical position on a yellow platform mounted on the ferris-wheel support structure. This will allow it to be pivoted and inserted into the outer cylinder already attached to the innermost ring of the barrel yoke.

  7. 100-N Area underground storage tank closures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, C.A.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes the removal/characterization actions concerning underground storage tanks (UST) at the 100-N Area. Included are 105-N-LFT, 182-N-1-DT, 182-N-2-DT, 182-N-3-DT, 100-N-SS-27, and 100-N-SS-28. The text of this report gives a summary of remedial activities. In addition, correspondence relating to UST closures can be found in Appendix B. Appendix C contains copies of Unusual Occurrence Reports, and validated sampling data results comprise Appendix D.

  8. Tank War Using Online Reinforcement Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftgaard Andersen, Kresten; Zeng, Yifeng; Dahl Christensen, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Real-Time Strategy(RTS) games provide a challenging platform to implement online reinforcement learning(RL) techniques in a real application. Computer as one player monitors opponents'(human or other computers) strategies and then updates its own policy using RL methods. In this paper, we propose...... a multi-layer framework for implementing the online RL in a RTS game. The framework significantly reduces the RL computational complexity by decomposing the state space in a hierarchical manner. We implement the RTS game - Tank General, and perform a thorough test on the proposed framework. The results...

  9. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL ANALYSIS FOR 241-AP TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TC MACKEY; JE DEIBLER; MW RINKER; KI JOHNSON; SP PILLI; NK KARRI; FG ABATT; KL STOOPS

    2009-01-14

    The essential difference between Revision 1 and the original issue of this report is the analysis of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome. The reevaluation of the AP anchor bolts showed that (for a given temperature increase) the anchor shear load distribution did not change significantly from the initially higher stiffness to the new secant shear stiffness. Therefore, the forces and displacements of the other tank components such as the primary tanks stresses, secondary liner strains, and concrete tank forces and moments also did not change significantly. Consequently, the revised work in Revision 1 focused on the changes in the anchor bolt responses and a full reevaluation of all tank components was judged to be unnecessary.

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.M.

    1997-04-15

    One major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendixes serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-U-106. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-106 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 of this report summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling. The appendixes contain supporting data and information. This report also supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ikology et al. 1996), Milestone M-44-10.

  11. Think tanks and strategic policy-making : the contribution of think tanks to policy advisory systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraussen, B.; Halpin, D.R.

    2017-01-01

    Think tanks have proliferated in most Western democracies over the past three decades and are often considered to be increasingly important actors in public policy. Still, their precise contribution to public policy remains contested. This paper takes the existing literature in a new direction by

  12. 49 CFR 173.314 - Compressed gases in tank cars and multi-unit tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-unit tank car must be equipped with adequate pressure relief devices of the fusible plug type having a... resistant to extrusion of the fusible alloy and leak tight at 55 °C (130 °F.). A threaded solid plug must...-clad and have reclosing pressure relief devices incorporating a fusible plug having a yield temperature...

  13. Oil fired boiler/solar tank- and natural gas burner/solar tank-units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Frederiksen, Karsten Vinkler

    1999-01-01

    During the last few years new units consisting of a solar tank and either an oil fired boiler or a natural gas burner have been introduced on the Danish market. Three different marketed units - two based on a natural gas burner and one based on an oil fired boiler - have been tested in a heat...

  14. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, J.

    1998-04-14

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BY-109. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-15B.

  15. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for AZ-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunthara, T. J., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-12

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-B-110. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  16. North Tank Farm data report for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, V.A. [XL Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burks, B.L. [Providence Group, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hoesen, S.D. van [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program, has developed and demonstrated the first full-scale remotely operated system for cleaning radioactive liquid and waste from large underground storage tanks. The remotely operated waste retrieval system developed and demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is designed to accomplish both retrieval of bulk waste, including liquids, thick sludge, and scarified concrete, and final tank cleaning. This report provides a summary of the North Tank Farm (NTF) operations data and an assessment of the performance and efficiency of the waste retrieval system during NTF operations data and an assessment of the performance and efficiency of the waste retrieval system during NTF operations. The organization of this report is as follows: Section 1 provides an introduction to the report. Section 2 describes the NTF tank structures (W-3 and W-4 only) and the contents of the tanks. Section 3 outlines the objectives of the NTF testing and explains how these objectives were met. Section 4 provides a description of the various operating systems used in the NTF operations. Sections 5 and 6 present a summary of the data collected during NTF operations. Section 7 summarizes the maintenance activities performed and Section 8 summarizes the on-the-job training performed in the NTF. Section 9 summarizes the capital cost for the waste retrieval and characterization equipment and operating costs for performing the NTF work. Section 10 provides observations and lessons learned, and Section 11 provides a summary and conclusions.

  17. Leveraging External Sources of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Joel; Bogers, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    suggests several gaps in prior research. One is a tendency to ignore the importance of business models, despite their central role in distinguishing open innovation from earlier research on interorganizational collaboration in innovation. Another gap is a tendency in open innovation to use “innovation......This paper reviews research on open innovation that considers how and why firms commercialize external sources of innovations. It examines both the “outside-in” and “coupled” modes of open innovation. From an analysis of prior research on how firms leverage external sources of innovation......, it suggests a four-phase model in which a linear process—(1) obtaining, (2) integrating, and (3) commercializing external innovations—is combined with (4) interaction between the firm and its collaborators. This model is used to classify papers taken from the top 25 innovation journals, complemented by highly...

  18. Thermodynamic cost of external control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Andre C.; Seifert, Udo

    2017-07-01

    Artificial molecular machines are often driven by the periodic variation of an external parameter. This external control exerts work on the system of which a part can be extracted as output if the system runs against an applied load. Usually, the thermodynamic cost of the process that generates the external control is ignored. Here, we derive a refined second law for such small machines that include this cost, which is, for example, generated by free energy consumption of a chemical reaction that modifies the energy landscape for such a machine. In the limit of irreversible control, this refined second law becomes the standard one. Beyond this ideal limiting case, our analysis shows that due to a new entropic term unexpected regimes can occur: the control work can be smaller than the extracted work and the work required to generate the control can be smaller than this control work. Our general inequalities are illustrated by a paradigmatic three-state system.

  19. Conceptual challenges for internalising externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miguel, Brandão; Weidema, Bo Pedersen

    2013-01-01

    We analyse a number of different externalities to identify conceptual challenges for the practical implementation of their internalisation. Three issues were identified: i) The balance between compensation and technology change and the respective effects on the nominal and real GDP; ii) The relev......We analyse a number of different externalities to identify conceptual challenges for the practical implementation of their internalisation. Three issues were identified: i) The balance between compensation and technology change and the respective effects on the nominal and real GDP; ii...... geographical and especially temporal distance between the benefitting actor and the victim of the external cost, the involvement of a non-governmental intermediate actor becomes increasingly necessary to provide the short-term capital required to ensure a successful implementation....

  20. Overview of Hanford Single Shell Tank (SST) Structural Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rast, Richard S.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.

    2013-11-14

    To improve the understanding of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) integrity, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS), the USDOE Hanford Site tank contractor, developed an enhanced Single-Shell Tank Integrity Project (SSTIP) in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity, consisting of various subject matters experts in industry and academia, was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. This panel developed 33 recommendations in four main areas of interest: structural integrity, liner degradation, leak integrity and prevention, and mitigation of contamination migration, Seventeen of these recommendations were used to develop the basis for the M-45-10-1 Change Package for the Hanford Federal Agreement and Compliance Order, which is also known as the Tri-Party Agreement. The structural integrity of the tanks is a key element in completing the cleanup mission at the Hanford Site. There are eight primary recommendations related to the structural integrity of Hanford Single-Shell Tanks. Six recommendations are being implemented through current and planned activities. The structural integrity of the Hanford is being evaluated through analysis, monitoring, inspection, materials testing, and construction document review. Structural evaluation in the form of analysis is performed using modern finite element models generated in ANSYS. The analyses consider in-situ, thermal, operating loads and natural phenomena such as earthquakes. Structural analysis of 108 of 149 Hanford Single-Shell Tanks has concluded that the tanks are structurally sound and meet current industry standards. Analysis of the remaining Hanford Single-Shell Tanks is scheduled for FY2014. Hanford Single-Shell Tanks are monitored through a dome deflection program. The program looks for deflections of the tank dome greater than 1/4 inch. No such deflections have been recorded. The tanks are also subjected to visual inspection. Digital cameras record the interior surface of

  1. CEMENTITIOUS GROUT FOR CLOSING SRS HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS - #12315

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Burns, H.; Stefanko, D.

    2012-01-10

    In 1997, the first two United States Department of Energy (US DOE) high level waste tanks (Tanks 17-F and 20-F: Type IV, single shell tanks) were taken out of service (permanently closed) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In 2012, the DOE plans to remove from service two additional Savannah River Site (SRS) Type IV high-level waste tanks, Tanks 18-F and 19-F. These tanks were constructed in the late 1950's and received low-heat waste and do not contain cooling coils. Operational closure of Tanks 18-F and 19-F is intended to be consistent with the applicable requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and will be performed in accordance with South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The closure will physically stabilize two 4.92E+04 cubic meter (1.3 E+06 gallon) carbon steel tanks and isolate and stabilize any residual contaminants left in the tanks. The closure will also fill, physically stabilize and isolate ancillary equipment abandoned in the tanks. A Performance Assessment (PA) has been developed to assess the long-term fate and transport of residual contamination in the environment resulting from the operational closure of the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) waste tanks. Next generation flowable, zero-bleed cementitious grouts were designed, tested, and specified for closing Tanks 18-F and 19-F and for filling the abandoned equipment. Fill requirements were developed for both the tank and equipment grouts. All grout formulations were required to be alkaline with a pH of 12.4 and chemically reduction potential (Eh) of -200 to -400 to stabilize selected potential contaminants of concern. This was achieved by including Portland cement and Grade 100 slag in the mixes, respectively. Ingredients and proportions of cementitious reagents were selected and adjusted, respectively, to support the mass placement strategy developed by

  2. X-33 Tank Failure During Autoclave Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Munafo, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During a repair cure cycle on tank #1 of the X-33 liquid hydrogen tanks, a skin to core disbond occurred. Both the inner skin and outer skin of the lobe #1 sandwich panel was noted to have been disbonded and cracked- An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of this failure. The investigation consisted of reviewing all of the processing data and performing testing on the failed lobe #1, as well as the other lobes, which did not fail during the cure cycle. The tests consisted of residual stress measurements in one of the intact lobes and "plug-pulls" to assess skin to core strength on all of the remaining lobes. Results showed an extremely low bondline strength due to lack of proper filleting of the adhesive, in addition, tests showed a very rapid decrease in strength with increasing temperature, as well as a further decrease in strength with a larger number of cycles. Also, the honeycomb used was not vented so pressure could build up within the cells. All of these factors appeared to be contributors to the failure.

  3. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  4. Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

  5. Performance Targets and External Benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ivar; Hansen, Allan; Vámosi, Tamás S.

    Research on relative performance measures, transfer pricing, beyond budgeting initiatives, target costing, piece rates systems and value based management has for decades underlined the importance of external benchmarking in performance management. Research conceptualises external benchmarking...... of the ‘inside’ costs of the sub-component, technical specifications of the product, opportunistic behavior from the suppliers and cognitive limitation. These are all aspects that easily can dismantle the market mechanism and make it counter-productive in the organization. Thus, by directing more attention...

  6. ICCP cathodic protection of tanks with photovoltaic power supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janowski Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is the result of the electrochemical reaction between a metal or composite material usually having conducting current properties. Control of corrosion related defect is a very important problem for structural integrity in ground based structures. Cathodic protection (CP is a technique to protect metallic structures against corrosion in an aqueous environment, it is employed intense on the steel drains in oil and gas industry, specifically to protect underground tanks and pipelines. CP is commonly applied to a coated structure to provide corrosion control to areas where the coating may be damaged. It may be applied to existing structures to prolong their life. There are two types of cathodic protection systems: sacrificial (galvanic anode cathodic protection (SACP; the other system is Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP. Majority of the structures protected employ impressed current system. The main difference between the two is that SACP uses the galvanic anodes which are electrochemically more electronegative than the structure to be protected - the naturally occurring electrochemical potential difference between different metallic elements to provide protection; ICCP uses an external power source (electrical generator with D.C. with inert anodes, and this system is used for larger structures, or where electrolyte resistivity is high and galvanic anodes cannot economically deliver enough current to provide protection. The essential of CP is based on two parameters, the evolution of the potential and the current of protection. A commonly accepted protection criterion used for steel is a potential value of minus 850 mV. ICCP system consist of anodes connected to a DC power source. As power sources may be used such as solar panels, wind turbines, etc. The object of this study is analysis of the possibilities and operating parameters of ICCP system supplied with photovoltaic solar panels. Photovoltaic generator made up of the

  7. Determination of mixing characterisitics in leaching tanks using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model generated effective volumes of 64.2 % and 92.8 % res-pectively in both tanks as against experimental effective volumes of 64.5 % and 91.7 % respectively. The RTD method can be applied to determine process anomalies in mixing tanks, chemical reactors and heat exchangers. Journal of Applied Science and ...

  8. Effect of Context on Performance of Think Tanks in Developing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... context dimensions and factors influence think tank actions and effectiveness; and, - develop and pilot quantitative indicators for key context and effectiveness measures based on the case study findings. This project is expected to offer concrete and actionable recommendations for think tanks, donors, and researchers.

  9. 14 CFR 25.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS...) and (2) of this section. In addition, it must be shown by either analysis or tests, that tank surfaces... structure simulating the installation in the airplane. (d) For pressurized fuel tanks, it must be shown by...

  10. 46 CFR 151.15-1 - Tank types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Independent gravity tanks which are of normal pressure vessel configuration (i.e., bodies of revolution, in... the structural completeness of its vessel's hull. (b) Independent. A cargo containment envelope which is not a contiguous part of the hull structure. An independent tank is built and installed so as to...

  11. Supporting Research Activities through the Think Tank Initiative-End ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    26 sept. 2014 ... Supporting Research Activities through the Think Tank Initiative-End of Phase 1 Opportunity Fund. This project funding will support two Think Tank Initiative (TTI) grantee institutions in their efforts to achieve their long-term organizational goals in Latin America: the Instituto Desarrollo, Participación y ...

  12. Dynamic Response of Ground Supported Rectangular Water Tanks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Review of design Codes. Some of the structural design codes that tackle fluid tank systems are the American Concrete. Institute, ACI 350.3, the Euro Code 8 and the Standards Association of New Zealand, NZS. These codes address ground supported circular and rectangular concrete tanks having fixed or flexible bases.

  13. Glass Bubbles Insulation for Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J. P.; SaintCyr, W. W.; Barrett, T. M.; Baumgartner, R. G.; Lott, J. W.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    A full-scale field application of glass bubbles insulation has been demonstrated in a 218,000 L liquid hydrogen storage tank. This work is the evolution of extensive materials testing, laboratory scale testing, and system studies leading to the use of glass bubbles insulation as a cost efficient and high performance alternative in cryogenic storage tanks of any size. The tank utilized is part of a rocket propulsion test complex at the NASA Stennis Space Center and is a 1960's vintage spherical double wall tank with an evacuated annulus. The original perlite that was removed from the annulus was in pristine condition and showed no signs of deterioration or compaction. Test results show a significant reduction in liquid hydrogen boiloff when compared to recent baseline data prior to removal of the perlite insulation. The data also validates the previous laboratory scale testing (1000 L) and full-scale numerical modeling (3,200,000 L) of boiloff in spherical cryogenic storage tanks. The performance of the tank will continue to be monitored during operation of the tank over the coming years. KEYWORDS: Glass bubble, perlite, insulation, liquid hydrogen, storage tank.

  14. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Sloshing in Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solaas, F.

    1995-12-31

    For oil cargo ship tanks and liquid natural gas carriers, the dimensions of the tanks are often such that the highest resonant sloshing periods and the ship motions are in the same period range, which may cause violent resonant sloshing of the liquid. In this doctoral thesis, linear and non-linear analytical potential theory solutions of the sloshing problem are studied for a two-dimensional rectangular tank and a vertical circular cylindrical tank, using perturbation technique for the non-linear case. The tank is forced to oscillate harmonically with small amplitudes of sway with frequency in the vicinity of the lowest natural frequency of the fluid inside the tank. The method is extended to other tank shapes using a combined analytical and numerical method. A boundary element numerical method is used to determine the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the problem. These are used in the non-linear analytical free surface conditions, and the velocity potential and free surface elevation for each boundary value problem in the perturbation scheme are determined by the boundary element method. Both the analytical method and the combined analytical and numerical method are restricted to tanks with vertical walls in the free surface. The suitability of a commercial programme, FLOW-3D, to estimate sloshing is studied. It solves the Navier-Stokes equations by the finite difference method. The free surface as function of time is traced using the fractional volume of fluid method. 59 refs., 54 figs., 37 tabs.

  15. MODELING DISINFECTANT RESIDUALS IN DRINKING-WATER STORAGE TANKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The factors leading to the loss of disinfectant residual in well-mixed drinking-water storage tanks are studied. Equations relating disinfectant residual to the disinfectant's reation rate, the tank volume, and the fill and drain rates are presented. An analytical solution for ...

  16. Underside corrosion of above ground storage tanks (ASTs) | Rim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Underside corrosion of a failed above ground storage tank (AST) was investigated by the physio-chemical analysis of water sample that was ingress between the tank bottom plate and the concrete foundation. The results of the water sample analysis showed pH (5.8), temperature (30°C), Conductivity (4800 μs/cm), ...

  17. Permanent Closure of the TAN-664 Underground Storage Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Griffith

    2011-12-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the TAN-664 gasoline underground storage tank in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, 'Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.'

  18. Spherical Cryogenic Hydrogen Tank Preliminary Design Trade Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Collier, Craig S.; Yarrington, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    A structural analysis, sizing optimization, and weight prediction study was performed by Collier Research Corporation and NASA Glenn on a spherical cryogenic hydrogen tank. The tank consisted of an inner and outer wall separated by a vacuum for thermal insulation purposes. HyperSizer (Collier Research and Development Corporation), a commercial automated structural analysis and sizing software package was used to design the lightest feasible tank for a given overall size and thermomechanical loading environment. Weight trade studies were completed for different panel concepts and metallic and composite material systems. Extensive failure analyses were performed for each combination of dimensional variables, materials, and layups to establish the structural integrity of tank designs. Detailed stress and strain fields were computed from operational temperature changes and pressure loads. The inner tank wall is sized by the resulting biaxial tensile stresses which cause it to be strength driven, and leads to an optimum panel concept that need not be stiffened. Conversely, the outer tank wall is sized by a biaxial compressive stress field, induced by the pressure differential between atmospheric pressure and the vacuum between the tanks, thereby causing the design to be stability driven and thus stiffened to prevent buckling. Induced thermal stresses become a major sizing driver when a composite or hybrid composite/metallic material systems are used for the inner tank wall for purposes such as liners to contain the fuel and reduce hydrogen permeation.

  19. Simple test for physical stability of cryogenic tank insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossello, D.

    1968-01-01

    Qualitative test determines the ability of insulation liners used on liquid hydrogen tanks to withstand stresses produced by the thermal shocks imparted to the insulation during tank filling and drainage. Test specimens are bonded to metal plates with a low thermal expansion coefficient and are immersed in liquid hydrogen.

  20. 27 CFR 22.132 - Deposit in storage tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deposit in storage tanks. 22.132 Section 22.132 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....132 Deposit in storage tanks. (a) Recovered alcohol shall be accumulated and kept in separate storage...