WorldWideScience

Sample records for external mass transport

  1. Mass transport model of ions within biofilms under the effect of external field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; TANG Xue-xi

    2006-01-01

    A mass transport model was developed to predict the transport rate of ions within biofilms, which was experimentally verified using the fluxes ofNH4+ and Ca2+ through the heterotrophic biofilms with the thickness varying from 230 to 1430 μm under the effect of external field in the range of-20 V/m to 60 V/m. It is found that the result predicted by the model is in agreement with the experimentally obtained one, with the error less than 5 percent for the thin biofilms. The error increases with the increase of the biofilm thickness. The transport rate of ions caused by electric migration is affected by the charges, field strength, and biofilm thickness and so on.

  2. ExternE transport methodology for external cost evaluation of air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.; Berkowicz, R.; Brandt, J.

    The report describes how the human exposure estimates based on NERI's human exposure modelling system (AirGIS) can improve the Danish data used for exposure factors in the ExternE Transport methodology. Initially, a brief description of the ExternE Tranport methodology is given and it is summaris...

  3. Bioreactor Mass Transport Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.; Begley, Cynthia M.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the proposed research efforts were to develop both a simulation tool and a series of experiments to provide a quantitative assessment of mass transport in the NASA rotating wall perfused vessel (RWPV) bioreactor to be flown on EDU#2. This effort consisted of a literature review of bioreactor mass transport studies, the extension of an existing scalar transport computer simulation to include production and utilization of the scalar, and the evaluation of experimental techniques for determining mass transport in these vessels. Since mass transport at the cell surface is determined primarily by the relative motion of the cell assemblage and the surrounding fluid, a detailed assessment of the relative motion was conducted. Results of the simulations of the motion of spheres in the RWPV under microgravity conditions are compared with flight data from EDU#1 flown on STS-70. The mass transport across the cell membrane depends upon the environment, the cell type, and the biological state of the cell. Results from a literature review of cell requirements of several scalars are presented. As a first approximation, a model with a uniform spatial distribution of utilization or production was developed and results from these simulations are presented. There were two candidate processes considered for the experimental mass transport evaluations. The first was to measure the dissolution rate of solid or gel beads. The second was to measure the induced fluorescence of beads as a stimulant (for example hydrogen peroxide) is infused into the vessel. Either technique would use video taped images of the process for recording the quantitative results. Results of preliminary tests of these techniques are discussed.

  4. ExternE transport methodology for external cost evaluation of air pollution (DK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solvang Jensen, S.; Berkowicz, R.; Brandt, J. [National Environmental Research Inst., Dept. of Atmospheric Environment (Denmark); Willumsen, E.; Kristensen, N.B. [COWI (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    The report describes how the human exposure estimates based on NERI's human exposure modelling system (AiGIS) can improve the Danish data used for exposure factors in the ExternE Transport methodology. Inititally, a brief description of the ExternE Transport methodology is given and it is summarised how the methodology has been applied so far in a previous Danish study. Finally, results of a case study are reported. Exposure factors have been calculated for various urban categories in the Greater Copenhagen Area. (au)

  5. ExternE transport methodology for external cost evaluation of air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.; Berkowicz, R.; Brandt, J.

    The report describes how the human exposure estimates based on NERI's human exposure modelling system (AirGIS) can improve the Danish data used for exposure factors in the ExternE Transport methodology. Initially, a brief description of the ExternE Tranport methodology is given and it is summaris...... how the methodology has been applied so far in a previous Danish study. Finally, results of a case study are reported. Exposure factors have been calculated for various urban categories in the Greater Copenhagen Area...

  6. Mass Transport within Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated

  7. Mass Media Orientation and External Communication Strategies: Exploring Organisational Differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonneberger, A.; Jacobs, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between mass media orientations of communication professionals in organisations and their external communication strategies. We assume that mass media orientations within an organisation may affect an organisation’s external communication strategies of bridging and

  8. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...... simulation, showing multi-species ingress with formation of new solid phases in the domain is described and calculated. It is shown that the numerical solution method is capable of solving the reactive mass transport system for the examples considered. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Monte Carlo radiation transport in external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Çeçen, Yiğit

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo in radiation transport is an effective way to predict absorbed dose distributions. Monte Carlo modeling has contributed to a better understanding of photon and electron transport by radiotherapy physicists. The aim of this review is to introduce Monte Carlo as a powerful radiation transport tool. In this review, photon and electron transport algorithms for Monte Carlo techniques are investigated and a clinical linear accelerator model is studied for external beam radiot...

  10. Design of a Typical Offshore Transportation System for External Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shittu, A. A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The external corrosion assessment of a typical offshore transportation system has been presented. Cathodic protection design was carried out for the pipeline and it was found that a bracelet square weld on anode of L = 195, G =101.6 , Thickness = 70, M = 149.75 , ∅ = 1.2235, N = 128 and s = 300was found to be satisfactory in providing secondary/ backup protection for the 48inchespipeline in the external environment provided. The external anticorrosion coating selected is the Three layer polyethylene (3LPE coating based on the dimensions of the pipeline and the design temperature of 80℃. The 3LPE external corrosioncoating will comprise of an inner layer fusion bond epoxy, a middle layer: adhesive and an outer layer: High density polyethylene (HDPE base with additives.

  11. An inventory of measures for internalising external costs in transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Essen, H.; Nelissen, D.; Smit, M.; Van Grinsven, A.; Aarnink, S. [CE Delft, Delft (Netherlands); Breemersch, T. [Transport and Mobility Leuven TML, Leuven (Belgium); Martino, A.; Rosa, C.; Parolin, R. [Trasporti e Territorio TRT, Brussels (Belgium); Harmsen, J. [Sustainable Transport and Logistics TNO, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    This study provides an overview of all existing and close to implementation pricing policies in transport. It supported the European Commission with the evaluation of existing pricing policies in the light of Article 11.4 of the revised Eurovignette Directive. The study covers all existing pricing instruments in all transport modes in all EU Member States. In addition it includes data on revenues and administrative costs and some comparisons across Member States and transport modes. The most recent data have been gathered: data for 2010 and where possible 2011. Also the link with external and infrastructure costs is discussed, and where possible, high level comparisons have been made.

  12. Atom interferometry in the presence of an external test mass

    CERN Document Server

    Dubetsky, B; Libby, S B; Berman, P R

    2016-01-01

    The influence of an external test mass on the phase of the signal of an atom interferometer is studied theoretically. Using traditional techniques in atom optics based on the density matrix equations in the Wigner representation, we are able to extract the various contributions to the phase of the signal associated with the classical motion of the atoms, the quantum correction to this motion resulting from atomic recoil that is produced when the atoms interact with Raman field pulses, and quantum corrections to the atomic motion that occur in the time between the Raman field pulses. By increasing the effective wave vector associated with the Raman field pulses using modified field parameters, we can increase the sensitivity of the signal to the point where the quantum corrections can be measured. The expressions that are derived can be evaluated numerically to isolate the contribution to the signal from an external test mass. The regions of validity of the exact and approximate expressions are determined.

  13. Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-solid Earth-core system (the "global geophysical fluids") are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, tides, hydrological water redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. With only a few exceptions on the Earth surface, the temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have the capability of monitoring certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. These techniques include the very-long-baseline interferometry, satellite laser ranging and Doppler tracking, and the Global Positioning System, all entail global observational networks. While considerable advances have been made in observing and understanding of the dynamics of Earth's rotation, only the lowest-degree gravitational variations have been observed and limited knowledge of geocenter motion obtained. New space missions, projects and initiatives promise to further improve the measurements and hence our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding and modeling capability of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as the solid Earth's response to such changes in constraining the modeling of Earth's mechanical properties.

  14. Oceanic mass transport by mesoscale eddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Wei; Qiu, Bo

    2014-07-18

    Oceanic transports of heat, salt, fresh water, dissolved CO2, and other tracers regulate global climate change and the distribution of natural marine resources. The time-mean ocean circulation transports fluid as a conveyor belt, but fluid parcels can also be trapped and transported discretely by migrating mesoscale eddies. By combining available satellite altimetry and Argo profiling float data, we showed that the eddy-induced zonal mass transport can reach a total meridionally integrated value of up to 30 to 40 sverdrups (Sv) (1 Sv = 10(6) cubic meters per second), and it occurs mainly in subtropical regions, where the background flows are weak. This transport is comparable in magnitude to that of the large-scale wind- and thermohaline-driven circulation.

  15. Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmar, Pavel; Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Zhao, Qile; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xianglin; Sun, Yu; Riva, Ricardo; Ran, Jiangjun

    2013-04-01

    Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission has enormously extended our knowledge of the Earth's system by allowing natural mass transport of various origin to be quantified. This concerns, in particular, the depletion and replenishment of continental water stocks; shrinking of polar ice sheets; deformation of the Earth's crust triggered by large earthquakes, and isostatic adjustment processes. A number of research centers compute models of temporal gravity field variations and mass transport, using GRACE data as input. One of such models - Delft Mass Transport model - is being produced at the Delft University of Technology in collaboration with the GNSS Research Center of Wuhan University. A new release of this model, DMT-2, has been produced on the basis of a new (second) release of GRACE level-1b data. This model consists of a time-series of monthly solutions spanning a time interval of more than 8 years, starting from Feb. 2003. Each solution consists of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 120. Both unconstrained and optimally filtered solutions are obtained. The most essential improvements of the DMT-2 model, as compared to its predecessors (DMT-1 and DMT-1b), are as follows: (i) improved estimation and elimination of low-frequency noise in GRACE data, so that strong mass transport signals are not damped; (ii) computation of accurate stochastic models of data noise for each month individually with a subsequent application of frequency-dependent data weighting, which allows statistically optimal solutions to be compiled even if data noise is colored and gradually changes in time; (iii) optimized estimation of accelerometer calibration parameters; (iv) incorporation of degree 1 coefficients estimated with independent techniques; (v) usage of state-of-the-art background models to de-alias GRACE data from rapid mass transport signals (this includes the EOT11a model of ocean tides and the latest release of the AOD1B product describing

  16. Calibration of mass spectrometric peptide mass fingerprint data without specific external or internal calibrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalowski Maciej

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF is a widely used mass spectrometry (MS method of analysis of proteins and peptides. It relies on the comparison between experimentally determined and theoretical mass spectra. The PMF process requires calibration, usually performed with external or internal calibrants of known molecular masses. Results We have introduced two novel MS calibration methods. The first method utilises the local similarity of peptide maps generated after separation of complex protein samples by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. It computes a multiple peak-list alignment of the data set using a modified Minimum Spanning Tree (MST algorithm. The second method exploits the idea that hundreds of MS samples are measured in parallel on one sample support. It improves the calibration coefficients by applying a two-dimensional Thin Plate Splines (TPS smoothing algorithm. We studied the novel calibration methods utilising data generated by three different MALDI-TOF-MS instruments. We demonstrate that a PMF data set can be calibrated without resorting to external or relying on widely occurring internal calibrants. The methods developed here were implemented in R and are part of the BioConductor package mscalib available from http://www.bioconductor.org. Conclusion The MST calibration algorithm is well suited to calibrate MS spectra of protein samples resulting from two-dimensional gel electrophoretic separation. The TPS based calibration algorithm might be used to correct systematic mass measurement errors observed for large MS sample supports. As compared to other methods, our combined MS spectra calibration strategy increases the peptide/protein identification rate by an additional 5 – 15%.

  17. Two-Loop Maximal Unitarity with External Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Johansson, Henrik; Larsen, Kasper J

    2013-01-01

    We extend the maximal unitarity method at two loops to double-box basis integrals with up to three external massive legs. We use consistency equations based on the requirement that integrals of total derivatives vanish. We obtain unique formulae for the coefficients of the master double-box integrals. These formulae can be used either analytically or numerically.

  18. 76 FR 4847 - Hazardous Materials: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ...: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting Flammable Liquids AGENCY... flammable liquids in unprotected external product piping on DOT specification cargo tank motor vehicles. If... specification cargo tank motor vehicle (CTMV), unless the vehicle is equipped with bottom damage...

  19. 76 FR 14643 - Hazardous Materials: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ...: Safety Requirements for External Product Piping on Cargo Tanks Transporting Flammable Liquids AGENCY... external product piping (wetlines) on a cargo tank motor vehicle (CTMV) unless the CTMV is equipped with... National Tank Truck Carriers, Inc., and the Tank Truck Manufacturers Association requesting an extension...

  20. External Costs of Road, Rail and Air Transport - a Bottom-Up Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Weinreich, Sigurd; Rennings, Klaus; Schlomann, Barbara; Geßner, Christian; Engel, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the calculation of environmental and health externalities caused by air pollutants, accidents and noise from different transport modes (road, rail, air) on the route Frankfurt-Milan. The investigation is part of the QUITS project (QUITS = Quality Indicators for Transport Systems), commissioned by the European Commission DG VII. The evaluation of the external costs is based on a bottom-up approach. The calculation involves four stages: emissions, dispersion, impacts...

  1. INTERFACIAL MASS TRANSPORT IN OXIDE CRYSTAL GROWTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ A space high temperature in situobservation instrument (SHITISOI) is dedicated to visualize and record the whole growth process of oxide crystal in high temperature melts and solutions. Model experiments using transparent liquids such as KNbO3,Li2B4O7+KNbO3 were chosen to investigate effects of interracial mass transport in oxide crystal growth. For the scaling of the coupled velocity, heat and concentration fields in KNbO3 crystal growth, a rotating crystal growth process was performed and the widths of interfacial concentration, heat and momentum transition zones (The "boundary layers") are obtained, which are 7.5×10-a, 8.6×10-2 and 4.4×10-1 cm,respectively. Hence one can expect that interfacial concentration gradient will be confined to a narrow layer and in region of major concentration change at the in terface. In order to study a mechanism based on the interfacial mass transport resulting from hydrodynamics, the growth of KNbO3 grain in high temperature Li2B4O7 and KNbO3 solutin was studied. The result shows that the pivotal feature in the KNbO3 crystal growth is the initiated by KNbO3 solute surface tension gra dient which is caused by the slow diffusion of KNbO3 solutes. Direct comparison of the model predictions and experimental observed phenomena demonstrate the predictive capability of this model.

  2. Determination of the external mass transfer coefficient and influence of mixing intensity in moving bed biofilm reactors for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Bruno L; Pérez, Julio; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Secchi, Argimiro R; Dezotti, Márcia; Biscaia, Evaristo C

    2015-09-01

    In moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBR), the removal of pollutants from wastewater is due to the substrate consumption by bacteria attached on suspended carriers. As a biofilm process, the substrates are transported from the bulk phase to the biofilm passing through a mass transfer resistance layer. This study proposes a methodology to determine the external mass transfer coefficient and identify the influence of the mixing intensity on the conversion process in-situ in MBBR systems. The method allows the determination of the external mass transfer coefficient in the reactor, which is a major advantage when compared to the previous methods that require mimicking hydrodynamics of the reactor in a flow chamber or in a separate vessel. The proposed methodology was evaluated in an aerobic lab-scale system operating with COD removal and nitrification. The impact of the mixing intensity on the conversion rates for ammonium and COD was tested individually. When comparing the effect of mixing intensity on the removal rates of COD and ammonium, a higher apparent external mass transfer resistance was found for ammonium. For the used aeration intensities, the external mass transfer coefficient for ammonium oxidation was ranging from 0.68 to 13.50 m d(-1) and for COD removal 2.9 to 22.4 m d(-1). The lower coefficient range for ammonium oxidation is likely related to the location of nitrifiers deeper in the biofilm. The measurement of external mass transfer rates in MBBR will help in better design and evaluation of MBBR system-based technologies.

  3. Internalising the Externalities of Public Transport in Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is on the economics of road pricing and the case of Singapore in the quest to solve the ... simplicity, it is assumed that public transport commuters pay the full cost of their ... In 1990, all registrations of motor vehicles, that is new registrations plus.

  4. The evaluation of the environmental impact and the external factors of urban transport in Constanta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanca, C.; Stîngă, V. G.; Georgescu, S.; Cupşa, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    Transport activities are known to have a substantial negative environmental impact especially when referring to the urban transport. Studies have shown that external costs (as accidents, congestion, air emissions, climate change or noise) are an important subject of the European Union, that is why were carried out several research projects. This paper will highlight the current requirements and methodologies used by the European Union regarding the impact of the external costs of urban transport in most of the growth poles of Europe. Taking into consideration that Constanta is considered to be one of the seven major growth poles of Romania for the 2014-2020 period, this study aims at analyzing how the results of similar studies made in others centers of the European Union can be applied in Constanta, showing different methodologies and evaluations regarding the external costs and their impact. We will analyze how the conclusions obtained in previous projects are applicable to data collected by us throughout a field research on the technical description of the means of transport used it this city. As methodology, we will use one that was adopted by the European Union regarding the estimation of urban external costs, taking into consideration that each externality has a different method for estimating it. The results of this study may be useful in developing the sustainable urban mobility plan for Constanta, as a strategic plan design to reduce the impact of urban transport for a better quality of life at present and in the future. Through this paper we will get an insight into the urban transport in Constanta, but also data on external costs generated by the urban transport, given that road transport is considered to be the most polluting transport mode.

  5. Si Nanopores Development for External Control of Transport of Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ileri, N; Tringe, J; Letant, S; Palozoglu, A; Stroeve, P; Faller, R

    2008-06-13

    Nazar Ileri has been involved in an independent, multidisciplinary effort to create a new class of molecular sieves for proteins and viruses. Her experimental work has been performed concurrently at two campuses, LLNL and UC Davis, while theoretical components have been largely accomplished at UC Davis. As will be described, the devices she is creating have great potential to improve very significantly the efficiency and selectivity of molecular transport over what is presently available from state-of-the-art membranes. Our biotechnology training program is based on an integrated study of the transport of biomolecules through conically-shaped, nanoporous silicon membranes. The overall objective of this effort is to demonstrate an efficient, highly selective membrane technology that is manufacturable for macroscopic areas and can be employed in sensing, diagnostic and biomedical applications. Our specific aims are to (1) fabricate and characterize the physical characteristics of the membranes, (2) to demonstrate their utility for molecular transport and separation, and (3) to develop models that will facilitate understanding of these devices as well as improved performance of the next generation of devices. We have proposed that the conical pores have superior performance characteristics compared to other porous filters. To study this hypothesis, complementary approaches from different disciplines, such as membrane synthesis, experiment, and molecular simulation need to be combined. This provides an ideal training environment for a future leader in biotechnology. Hence, for this study, Nazar Ileri has started to carry out a full range of experimental and theoretical investigations under our guidance. First, she has begun fabrication of filters with conical/pyramidal pores. She characterized the pores by AFM and SEM, and analyzed the images using wavelets and other mathematical tools. She has also started to conduct biomolecule transport experiments to compare the

  6. Resonance wave pumping: wave mass transport pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmigniani, Remi; Violeau, Damien; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    It has been previously reported that pinching at intrinsic resonance frequencies a valveless pump (or Liebau pump) results in a strong pulsating flow. A free-surface version of the Liebau pump is presented. The experiment consists of a closed tank with a submerged plate separating the water into a free-surface and a recirculation section connected through two openings at each end of the tank. A paddle is placed at an off-centre position at the free-surface and controlled in a heaving motion with different frequencies and amplitudes. Near certain frequencies identified as resonance frequencies through a linear potential theory analysis, the system behaves like a pump. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is performed in the near free surface region and compared with simulations using Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. The mean eulerian mass flux field (ρ) is extracted. It is observed that the flow is located in the vicinity of the surface layer suggesting Stokes Drift (or Wave Mass Transport) is the source of the pumping. A model is developped to extend the linear potential theory to the second order to take into account these observations. The authors would like to acknowledge the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation for their generous support.

  7. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  8. ‘The crab’ transporting LHC dipole cold mass

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    For the careful transport of the LHC dipole magnets a robot, called ‘the crab’ has been specially built. It transports the cold masses between the storage area and assembly hall. These cold masses contain the cooling system and container for the dipole magnet.

  9. The Mass of Kerr-Newman Black Holes in an external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Astorino, M; Oliveri, R; Vandevoorde, N

    2016-01-01

    The explicit solution for a Kerr-Newman black hole immersed in an external magnetic field, sometimes called the Melvin-Kerr-Newman black hole, has been derived by Ernst and Wild in 1976. In this paper, we clarify the first law and Smarr formula for black holes in a magnetic field. We then define the unique mass which is integrable and reduces to the Kerr-Newman mass in the absence of magnetic field. This defines the thermodynamic potentials of the black hole. Quite strikingly, the mass coincides with the standard Christodoulou-Ruffini mass of a black hole as a function of the entropy, angular momentum and electric charge.

  10. Influences of external factors on the energy conversion and productivity of Scenedesmus sp. in mass culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselius, J.C.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments about the influence of external factors on the energy conversion in mass cultures of Scenedesmus are described in this thesis. Several types of culture vessels were used in the laboratory as well as in the open. Demonstration models of Miele washing

  11. Influences of external factors on the energy conversion and productivity of Scenedesmus sp. in mass culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselius, J.C.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments about the influence of external factors on the energy conversion in mass cultures of Scenedesmus are described in this thesis. Several types of culture vessels were used in the laboratory as well as in the open. Demonstration models of Miele washing machines with a volume of 50 l were us

  12. Influences of external factors on the energy conversion and productivity of Scenedesmus sp. in mass culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselius, J.C.

    1973-01-01

    Experiments about the influence of external factors on the energy conversion in mass cultures of Scenedesmus are described in this thesis. Several types of culture vessels were used in the laboratory as well as in the open. Demonstration models of Miele washing machine

  13. Terminology for mass transport and exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassingthwaighte, J B; Chinard, F P; Crone, C

    1986-01-01

    Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers in the physiologi......Virtually all fields of physiological research now encompass various aspects of solute transport by convection, diffusion, and permeation across membranes. Accordingly, this set of terms, symbols, definitions, and units is proposed as a means of clear communication among workers...

  14. External costs of emissions to air from current maritime transport - economic consequences; Miljoekostnader foer sjoefartens avgasutslaepp - ekonomiska konsekvenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Joakim; Farelius, Johanna; Hoeoek, Charlotta (WSP Analys and Strategi, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-06-15

    An important feature of Swedish national transport policy is to base the usage of fees, charges and subsidies on the principle of economic efficiency. The implication is that marginal cost pricing should be applied, internalizing the external costs of transport. Examples of external costs of transport are the damage costs caused by emissions of pollutants to air. These costs could be internalized by imposing fees that equal the marginal external costs. A polluter-pay principle should be applied, implying that the costs to society should be borne (paid) by the ones causing them. Earlier studies indicate that heavy ships (maritime transport) typically bear the marginal costs to society caused by transports carried out in Swedish territorial water - by paying differentiated fairway dues. However, these ships typically carry out the majority of their transports outside of Swedish territorial water, implying that the ship owners normally do not pay the full marginal external costs if a wider geographic area is considered. The purpose of this study is to show to what extent the costs of transports would be affected if fees and charges were used to internalize the external costs of emissions of pollutants to air in wider geographic contexts. The study has been carried out by calculating/estimating the following: 1. Damage costs caused by emissions of pollutants to air by current maritime transports to/from Swedish ports. 2. Effects on costs of transports by internalizing the external damage costs 3. Effects on costs of transports by undertaking cost efficient emission reducing measures

  15. Real-Time Mass Passenger Transport Network Optimization Problems

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of Real-Time Mass Transport Vehicle Routing Problem (MTVRP) is to find a solution to route n vehicles in real time to pick up and deliver m passengers. This problem is described in the context of flexible large-scale mass transportation options that use new technologies for communication among passengers and vehicles. The solution of such a problem is relevant to future transportation options involving large scale real-time routing of shared-ride fleet transit vehicles. However, the g...

  16. Quantification of the influence of external vibrations on the measurement error of a Coriolis mass-flow meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, van de L.; Hakvoort, W.B.J.; Dijk, van J.; Lötters, J.C.; Boer, de A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the influence of external vibrations on the measurement value of a Coriolis mass-flow meter (CMFM) for low flows is investigated and quantified. Model results are compared with experimental results to improve the knowledge on how external vibrations affect the mass-flow measurement val

  17. External forces influence the elastic coupling effects during cargo transport by molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Florian; Keller, Corina; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Cellular transport is achieved by the cooperative action of molecular motors which are elastically linked to a common cargo. When the motors pull on the cargo at the same time, they experience fluctuating elastic strain forces induced by the stepping of the other motors. These elastic coupling forces can influence the motors' stepping and unbinding behavior and thereby the ability to transport cargos. Based on a generic single motor description, we introduce a framework that explains the response of two identical molecular motors to a constant external force. In particular, we relate the single motor parameters, the coupling strength and the external load force to the dynamics of the motor pair. We derive four distinct transport regimes and determine how the crossover lines between the regimes depend on the load force. Our description of the overall cargo dynamics takes into account relaxational displacements of the cargo caused by the unbinding of one motor. For large forces and weak elastic coupling these back-shifts dominate the displacements. To develop an intuitive understanding about motor cooperativity during cargo transport, we introduce a time scale for load sharing. This time scale allows us to predict how the regulation of single motor parameters influences the cooperativity. As an example, we show that up-regulating the single motor processivity enhances load sharing of the motor pair.

  18. Some Interesting Features for External Region of Spherical Symmetric Mass in New Theory of Gravitation VGM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu

    2006-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses some interesting features for the external region of the spherical symmetric mass in the new theory of gravitation VGM, Le. The theory of gravitation by considering the vector graviton field and the metric field, such as pseudo-singularity, curvature tensor, static limit, event horizon, and the radial motion of a particle. All these features are different from the corresponding features obtained from general relativity.

  19. Space Geodesy Monitoring Mass Transport in Global Geophysical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Mass transports occurring in the atmosphere-hydrosphere-cryosphere-solid Earth-core system (the 'global geophysical fluids') are important geophysical phenomena. They occur on all temporal and spatial scales. Examples include air mass and ocean circulations, oceanic and solid tides, hydrological water and idsnow redistribution, mantle processes such as post-glacial rebound, earthquakes and tectonic motions, and core geodynamo activities. The temporal history and spatial pattern of such mass transport are often not amenable to direct observations. Space geodesy techniques, however, have proven to be an effective tool in monitorihg certain direct consequences of the mass transport, including Earth's rotation variations, gravitational field variations, and the geocenter motion. Considerable advances have been made in recent years in observing and understanding of these geodynamic effects. This paper will use several prominent examples to illustrate the triumphs in research over the past years under a 'Moore's law' in space geodesy. New space missions and projects promise to further advance our knowledge about the global mass transports. The latter contributes to our understanding of the geophysical processes that produce and regulate the mass transports, as well as of the solid Earth's response to such changes in terms of Earth's mechanical properties.

  20. Cholesterol granuloma presenting as a mass obstructing the external ear canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psifidis Dimosthenis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholesterol granuloma (CG may involve the middle ear, the mastoid bone and the petrous apex. However, CG presenting as a mass obstructing the external ear canal (EEC is relatively rare and it can be a diagnostic challenge. Case Presentation We report a case of a CG occupying the mastoid antrum and presenting as a mass into the EEC. Temporal bone computerized tomography showed a soft tissue mass which eroded the posterior-superior bony wall of the EEC. On magnetic resonance imaging, the mass revealed a high signal on both T1 and T2-weighted images. The CG was removed by a mastoidectomy procedure and the histopathologic report confirmed the diagnosis of CG. A type III tympanoplasty was performed. Conclusions The postoperative course was uneventful.

  1. Associations between family religious practices, internalizing/externalizing behaviors, and body mass index in obese youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbers, Christine A; Young, Danielle; Bryant, William; Stephen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the associations among family religious practices, internalizing/externalizing behaviors, and body mass index in a sample of severely obese youth referred to an outpatient pediatric endocrinology clinic. The sample consisted of 43 obese youth (body mass index > 95th percentile) aged 6-16 years (mean age = 12.67 years). Approximately 93% of families endorsed their religious faith as Christian or Catholic. Parents of youth were administered a demographic questionnaire, religiosity questionnaire, and the Child Behavior Checklist. Three multiple linear regression models were examined with body mass index percentile, Child Behavior Checklist Internalizing Scale, and Child Behavior Checklist Externalizing Scale as outcome variables. A parent endorsing greater importance of religious faith in shaping family life was associated with lower child body mass index percentile (p religious services was associated with higher child body mass index percentile (p < 0.05). Our data suggest that church-based interventions may be one viable option for the delivery of lifestyle interventions in families of youth with severe obesity.

  2. Optimal urban networks via mass transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Buttazzo, Giuseppe; Stepanov, Eugene; Solimini, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Recently much attention has been devoted to the optimization of transportation networks in a given geographic area. One assumes the distributions of population and of services/workplaces (i.e. the network's sources and sinks) are known, as well as the costs of movement with/without the network, and the cost of constructing/maintaining it. Both the long-term optimization and the short-term, "who goes where" optimization are considered. These models can also be adapted for the optimization of other types of networks, such as telecommunications, pipeline or drainage networks. In the monograph we study the most general problem settings, namely, when neither the shape nor even the topology of the network to be constructed is known a priori.

  3. Integral diagnostic in the failure causes of external corrosion of a natural gas transport pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Mendoza, J.L.; Saucedo-Robles, L.C.; Rodriguez-Clemente, H. [PEMEX Gas y Petroquimica Basica, Subdireccion de Ductos; Marina Nacional 329, Edificio B-1, Piso 8, Col. Huasteca, D.F., CP 11311 (Mexico); Gonzalez-Nunez, M.A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Reforma 113, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos, CP 62490 (Mexico); Zavala-Olivares, G.; Hernandez-Gayosso, M.J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Direccion de Exploracion y Produccion, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, D.F., CP 07730 (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    The objective of this study consisted in investigating the possible causes which give rise to the presence of low wall pipe thicknesses on a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline, even though during the last 12-year period cathodic protection (CP) potentials were kept in the protection range at which external corrosion should not occur. Results from in-line inspection from a 16'' natural gas transport pipeline showed 46 indications with more than 80% wall thickness lost due to external corrosion in the second segment of the pipeline. Direct inspection at the indication locations, review of the CP system performance, pipeline maintenance programs and studies, allowed to make an integral diagnostic where it was found out that the main cause of external corrosion was an inappropriate coating application since the pipeline construction, this situation has originated the increase of CP shielding effects through time. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Mass transport through defected bentonite plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Hume, H.B

    1996-07-01

    Compacted bentonite-based materials are important barriers in many waste containment strategies. To function as effective barriers, however, these materials must maintain their low water permeability and molecular diffusivity for long periods of time under a variety of environmental conditions. Here we examine the permeability and diffusivity of compacted bentonite plugs that were either slotted, to mimic fractures, parallel to the direction of mass flow or heated at 150 and 250{sup o}C for several weeks at various moisture contents before testing. The dry density of the plugs ranged from about 0.9 to 1.3 Mg/m{sup 3}. The results show that the saturated hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity (for I{sup -} and Cs{sup +}) of the treated or 'defected' bentonite plugs are essentially the same as those of untreated plugs at similar densities. This provides confidence that compacted bentonitic materials can function effectively as barriers for long periods of time under a range of environmental conditions. (author)

  5. Theory and simulation of quasilinear transport from external magnetic field perturbations in a DIII-D plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, R. E.; Ferraro, N. M.

    2015-04-01

    The linear response profiles for the 3D perturbed magnetic fields, currents, ion velocities, plasma density, pressures, and electric potential from low-n external resonant magnetic field perturbations (RMPs) are obtained from the collisional two-fluid M3D-C1 code [N. M. Ferraro and S. C. Jardin, J. Comput. Phys. 228, 7742 (2009)]. A newly developed post-processing RMPtran code computes the resulting quasilinear E×B and magnetic (J×B) radial transport flows with respect to the unperturbed flux surfaces in all channels. RMPtran simulations focus on ion (center of mass) particle and transient non-ambipolar current flows, as well as the toroidal angular momentum flow. The paper attempts to delineate the RMP transport mechanisms that might be responsible for the RMP density pump-out seen in DIII-D [M. A. Mahdavi and J. L. Luxon, Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)]. Experimentally, the starting high toroidal rotation does not brake to a significantly lower rotation after the pump-out suggesting that convective and E×B transport mechanisms dominate. The direct J×B torque from the transient non-ambipolar radial current expected to accelerate plasma rotation is shown to cancel much of the Maxwell stress J×B torque expected to brake the plasma rotation. The dominant E×B Reynolds stress accelerates rotation at the top of the pedestal while braking rotation further down the pedestal.

  6. Bidirectional transport by molecular motors: enhanced processivity and response to external forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Melanie J I; Klumpp, Stefan; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2010-06-02

    Intracellular transport along cytoskeletal filaments is often mediated by two teams of molecular motors that pull on the same cargo and move in opposite directions along the filaments. We have recently shown theoretically that this bidirectional transport can be understood as a stochastic tug-of-war between the two motor teams. Here, we further develop our theory to investigate the experimentally accessible dynamic behavior of cargos transported by strong motors such as kinesin-1 or cytoplasmic dynein. By studying the run and binding times of such a cargo, we show that the properties of biological motors, such as the large ratio of stall/detachment force and the small ratio of superstall backward/forward velocity, are favorable for bidirectional cargo transport, leading to fast motion and enhanced diffusion. In addition, cargo processivity is shown to be strongly enhanced by transport via several molecular motors even if these motors are engaged in a tug-of-war. Finally, we study the motility of a bidirectional cargo under force. Frictional forces arising, e.g., from the viscous cytoplasm, lead to peaks in the velocity distribution, while external forces as exerted, e.g., by an optical trap, lead to hysteresis effects. Our results, in particular our explicit expressions for the cargo binding time and the distance of the peaks in the velocity relation under friction, are directly accessible to in vitro as well as in vivo experiments.

  7. Road transport: questions about a durable growth. Do we have to be afraid of the ``external effects``?; Transport routier: questions sur un developpement durable. Faut-il craindre les ``effets externes``?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salini, P. [Paris-9 Univ., 75 (France)]|[Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France)

    1997-12-31

    Pollution, noise, accidents, spoilt landscapes, towns and valleys blocked by road traffic are the negative consequences of the development of transportation systems and mobility. Road transport is considered as highly polluting and highly space and energy consuming. This books takes stock of this burning topic for all responsible and political participants in this sector: what are the `external effects` of transports and their evaluation, what can be learnt from the economic approaches, what can be expected in the future and what are our degrees of freedom. The approach used by the author consists in discussing the main questions using a critical review of recent published works. The four main chapters of this book deal successively with: the `external effects` of transports (nuisances, environmental and financial impact, financial compensations, heritage destruction, arbitration..), the evaluation of the `external effects` and its benefit, and the compatibility between our transportation system and the development of our community (risks, policy, technological solutions..). (J.S.)

  8. Optical Field-Induced Mass Transport in Soft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teteris, J.; Reinfelde, M.; Aleksejeva, J.; Gertners, U.

    The dependence of the surface relief formation in amorphous chalcogenide (As2S3 and As-S-Se) and Disperse Red 1 dye grafted polyurethane polymer films on the polarization state of holographic recording light beams was studied. It is shown that the direction of lateral mass transport on the film surface is determined by the direction of light electric vector and photoinduced anisotropy in the film. We propose a photoinduced dielectropfhoretic model to explain the photoinduced mass transport in amorphous films. Model is based on the photoinduced softening of the matrix, formation of defects with enhanced or decreased polarizability, and their drift under the electrical field gradient of light.

  9. Selected Topics on Mass Transport in Gas-solid Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion-controlled d......The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion...

  10. QCD spectroscopy and quark mass renormalisation in external magnetic fields with Wilson fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Gunnar; Endrodi, Gergely; Glaessle, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We study the change of the QCD spectrum of low-lying mesons in the presence of an external magnetic field using Wilson fermions in the quenched approximation. Motivated by qualitative differences observed in the spectra of overlap and Wilson fermions for large magnetic fields, we investigate the dependence of the additive quark mass renormalisation on the magnetic field. We provide evidence that the magnetic field changes the critical quark mass both in the free case and on our quenched ensemble. The associated change of the bare quark mass with the magnetic field affects the spectrum and is relevant for the magnetic field dependence of a number of related quantities. We derive Ward identities for lattice and continuum QCD+QED from which we can extract the current quark masses. We also report on a first test of the tuning of the quark masses with the magnetic field using the current quark masses, and show that this tuning resolves the qualitative discrepancy between the Wilson and overlap spectra.

  11. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  12. [Quality analysis by external users of the non-medical health transport unit of Alicante].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano Clemor, C; Cano, F Soriano; Gimeno, F Morant

    2011-01-01

    Non-medical health transport has great health, media and social repercussions and requires a very considerable amount of human and economic resources. To describe the quality, evaluated by external users of our Health Department, in order to know what are the most important elements for external users. Cross-sectional, descriptive observational study. Population to study: patients with a social security health card who come to the Hospital of Alicante and are non-medical health transport unit users. Waiting time to be delivered to hospital in 92.7% of the cases was less than an hour, and was between one and two hours for 7.2%. The most frequent destinations were rehabilitation service and outpatient clinics. When users were asked if the would recommend this service, 60.9% said "for sure" and 39.1% said "probably yes". This study allows us to know patient needs and expectations, as well as the factors they value the most and which of our work areas to improve. Copyright © 2009 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Hadronic matter under an external magnetic field: in medium modification of the pion mass

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, R

    2016-01-01

    The covariant propagator of a fermion with anomalous magnetic moment interacting with an uniform external magnetic field at finite temperature and baryonic density is presented . The case of a scalar boson is also considered. The final expressions are given in terms of a 4-dimensional momentum representation. These results, which take account of the full effect of the magnetic field, are used to evaluate the modification of the pion mass at zero temperature as a function of the density and the magnetic intensity. For this purpose a self-consistent calculation, including one and two pion vertices, is employed.

  14. Mass Transport Through Carbon Nanotube-Polystyrene Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rongzhou; Tran, Tuan

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been widely used as test channels to study nanofluidic transport, which has been found to have distinctive properties compared to transport of fluids in macroscopic channels. A long-standing challenge in the study of mass transport through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is the determination of flow enhancement. Various experimental investigations have been conducted to measure the flow rate through CNTs, mainly based on either vertically aligned CNT membranes or individual CNTs. Here, we proposed an alternative approach that can be used to quantify the mass transport through CNTs. This is a simple method relying on the use of carbon nanotube-polystyrene bundles, which are made of CNTs pulled out from a vertically aligned CNT array and glued together by polystyrene. We experimentally showed by using fluorescent tagging that the composite bundles allowed measureable and selective mass transport through CNTs. This type of composite bundle may be useful in various CNT research areas as they are simple to fabricate, less likely to form macroscopic cracks, and offer a high density of CNT pores while maintaining the aligned morphology of CNTs.

  15. Triple Bioaffinity Mass Spectrometry Concept for Thyroid Transporter Ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aqai, P.; Fryganas, C.; Mizuguchi, M.; Haasnoot, W.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    For the analysis of thyroid transporter ligands, a triple bioaffinity mass spectrometry (BioMS) concept was developed, with the aim at three different analytical objectives: rapid screening of any ligand, confirmation of known ligands in accordance with legislative requirements, and identification o

  16. Thermodynamically coupled mass transport processes in a saturated clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1984-11-01

    Gradients of temperature, pressure, and fluid composition in saturated clays give rise to coupled transport processes (thermal and chemical osmosis, thermal diffusion, ultrafiltration) in addition to the direct processes (advection and diffusion). One-dimensional transport of water and a solute in a saturated clay subjected to mild gradients of temperature and pressure was simulated numerically. When full coupling was accounted for, volume flux (specific discharge) was controlled by thermal osmosis and chemical osmosis. The two coupled fluxes were oppositely directed, producing a point of stagnation within the clay column. Solute flows were dominated by diffusion, chemical osmosis, and thermal osmosis. Chemical osmosis produced a significant flux of solute directed against the gradient of solute concentration; this effect reduced solute concentrations relative to the case without coupling. Predictions of mass transport in clays at nuclear waste repositories could be significantly in error if coupled transport processes are not accounted for. 14 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  17. The role of mass transport in protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Otálora, Fermín; García-Caballero, Alfonso

    2016-02-01

    Mass transport takes place within the mesoscopic to macroscopic scale range and plays a key role in crystal growth that may affect the result of the crystallization experiment. The influence of mass transport is different depending on the crystallization technique employed, essentially because each technique reaches supersaturation in its own unique way. In the case of batch experiments, there are some complex phenomena that take place at the interface between solutions upon mixing. These transport instabilities may drastically affect the reproducibility of crystallization experiments, and different outcomes may be obtained depending on whether or not the drop is homogenized. In diffusion experiments with aqueous solutions, evaporation leads to fascinating transport phenomena. When a drop starts to evaporate, there is an increase in concentration near the interface between the drop and the air until a nucleation event eventually takes place. Upon growth, the weight of the floating crystal overcomes the surface tension and the crystal falls to the bottom of the drop. The very growth of the crystal then triggers convective flow and inhomogeneities in supersaturation values in the drop owing to buoyancy of the lighter concentration-depleted solution surrounding the crystal. Finally, the counter-diffusion technique works if, and only if, diffusive mass transport is assured. The technique relies on the propagation of a supersaturation wave that moves across the elongated protein chamber and is the result of the coupling of reaction (crystallization) and diffusion. The goal of this review is to convince protein crystal growers that in spite of the small volume of the typical protein crystallization setup, transport plays a key role in the crystal quality, size and phase in both screening and optimization experiments.

  18. Mass and charge transport in micro and nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Okkels, Fridolin

    2007-01-01

    and charge transport coefficients that satisfy Onsager relations. In the limit of nonoverlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as the hydraulic radiusR ¼ 2A=P with Aand P being the cross-sectional area and perimeter......We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electroosmosis. We use aHilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the general problem of an arbitrary cross section and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass...

  19. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  20. Mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Bing; Sui, Yi; Lee, Heow Pueh; Bai, Hui Xing; Yu, Peng; Winoto, S H; Low, Hong Tong

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional flow model has been developed to simulate mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall. A two-domain approach, based on the finite volume method, was implemented. For the fluid part, the governing equation used was the Navier-Stokes equation; for the porous medium region, the generalized Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer extended model was used. For the porous-fluid interface, a stress jump condition was enforced with a continuity of normal stress, and the mass interfacial conditions were continuities of mass and mass flux. Two parameters were defined to characterize the mass transports in the fluid and porous regions. The porous Damkohler number is the ratio of consumption to diffusion of the substrates in the porous medium. The fluid Damkohler number is the ratio of the substrate consumption in the porous medium to the substrate convection in the fluid region. The concentration results were found to be well correlated by the use of a reaction-convection distance parameter, which incorporated the effects of axial distance, substrate consumption, and convection. The reactor efficiency reduced with reaction-convection distance parameter because of reduced reaction (or flux), and smaller local effectiveness factor due to the lower concentration in Michaelis-Menten type reactions. The reactor was more effective, and hence, more efficient with the smaller porous Damkohler number. The generalized results could find applications for the design of bioreactors with a porous wall.

  1. A Coupled Chemical and Mass Transport Model for Concrete Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    curves which is established from a set of mathematical criteria. The chemical degradation is modelled with the geochemical code iphreeqc, which provides a general tool for evaluating different paste compositions. The governing system of equations is solved by the finite element method with a Newton......-Raphson iteration scheme arising from the non-linearity. The overall model is a transient problem, solved using a single parameter formulation. The sorption hysteresis and chemical equilibrium is included as source or sink terms. The advantages with this formulation is that each node in the discrete system has......In this paper a general continuum theory is used to evaluate the service life of cement based materials, in terms of mass transport processes and chemical degradation of the solid matrix. The model established is a reactive mass transport model, based on an extended version of the Poisson...

  2. STM tip-mediated mass transport on Cu surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y.S.N. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Huang, R.Z., E-mail: renzhonghuang@synu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Gao, T.F. [College of Physical Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, Huanghe Street 253, Shenyang 110034 (China); Zhang, R.J. [School of Information Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Handan Road 220, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wang, Y.M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wenhua Road 72, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu (0 0 1) surface in the presence of vacancies. • Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. • The jumping and the Ehrlich–Schwoebel (E–S) diffusion barrier can be reduced by tip manipulation. - Abstract: Atomic-scale simulations are performed to study atomic motion on Cu surfaces to illustrate the effect of the scanning tunneling microscopy tip on mass transport (MT) in the surfaces and on top of the Co island in heteroepitaxial Co/Cu(0 0 1) and Co/Cu(1 1 1) systems. First we investigate tip-induced atomic motion of Co atoms embedded in the Cu(0 0 1) surface at zero bias voltage. With the help of the tip, the Co atom in the surface can freely diffuse toward its nearby vacancy site. So-called vacancy mechanism is used to interpret this phenomenon. Then tip-mediated atomic motion of Co adatoms on the Co islands supported by a Cu(1 1 1) surface is studied. It is revealed that the tip has a significant effect on the diffusion of adatoms on the islands and interlayer mass transport at the island edge. Interlayer mass transport at the island edge is found to depend strongly on the tip height and the lateral distance from the tip. By calculating the diffusion barriers, it is found that the jumping diffusion barrier on the island can be zero by the tip vertical manipulation while the Ehrlich–Schwoebel diffusion barrier at the island edge can be reduced by the tip lateral manipulation. Thus, the quality of thin films can be improved by controlling MT in and/or on the surface.

  3. Miocene mass-transport sediments, Troodos Massif, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, A.R.; Harrison, R.W.; BouDagher-Fadel, M.; Stone, B.D.; Varol, O.

    2009-01-01

    Sediment mass-transport layers of submarine origin on the northern and southern flanks of the Troodos ophiolitic massif are dated biostratigraphically as early Miocene and late Miocene, respectively and therefore represent different seismogenic events in the uplift and erosional history of the Troodos terrane. Analysis of such events has potential for documenting Miocene seismic and uplift events regionally in the context of changing stress field directions and plate vectors through time. ?? 2009 The Geologists' Association.

  4. Mass transport thermodynamics in nonisothermal molecular liquid mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, Semen N [Institute for Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schimpf, M E [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Boise State University, Boise, ID (United States)

    2009-10-31

    Mass transport in a nonisothermal binary molecular mixture is systematically discussed in terms of nonequilibrium thermodynamics, which for the first time allows a consistent and unambiguous description of the process. The thermodynamic and hydrodynamic approaches are compared, revealing that nonequilibrium thermodynamics and physicochemical hydrodynamics yield essentially the same results for molecular systems. The applicability limits for the proposed version of the thermodynamic approach are determined for large particles. (methodological notes)

  5. Numerical analysis of convective drying of a moist object with combined internal and external heat and mass transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Donghyun; Son, Gihun [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungil [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    A numerical approach is developed for computing convective drying of a moist object. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and moisture in the internal and external regions of an object are solved with the coupled heat and mass transfer conditions on the object surface, including the effect of evaporation. A numerical approach is applied to predict the internal and external temperature and moisture distributions during the convective drying with variations in the initial moisture content and the water activity. The numerical results show that the water activity is an important parameter for determining the drying rate pattern and the analogy between the heat and mass transfer on the object surface.

  6. Effects of confinement and external fields on structure and transport in colloidal dispersions in reduced dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, D; Deutschländer, S; Siems, U; Franzrahe, K; Henseler, P; Keim, P; Schwierz, N; Virnau, P; Binder, K; Maret, G; Nielaba, P

    2012-11-21

    In this work, we focus on low-dimensional colloidal model systems, via simulation studies and also some complementary experiments, in order to elucidate the interplay between phase behavior, geometric structures and transport properties. In particular, we try to investigate the (nonlinear!) response of these very soft colloidal systems to various perturbations: uniform and uniaxial pressure, laser fields, shear due to moving boundaries and randomly quenched disorder. We study ordering phenomena on surfaces or in monolayers by Monte Carlo computer simulations of binary hard-disk mixtures, the influence of a substrate being modeled by an external potential. Weak external fields allow a controlled tuning of the miscibility of the mixture. We discuss the laser induced de-mixing for the three different possible couplings to the external potential. The structural behavior of hard spheres interacting with repulsive screened Coulomb or dipolar interaction in 2D and 3D narrow constrictions is investigated using Brownian dynamics simulations. Due to misfits between multiples of the lattice parameter and the channel widths, a variety of ordered and disordered lattice structures have been observed. The resulting local lattice structures and defect probabilities are studied for various cross sections. The influence of a self-organized order within the system is reflected in the velocity of the particles and their diffusive behavior. Additionally, in an experimental system of dipolar colloidal particles confined by gravity on a solid substrate we investigate the effect of pinning on the dynamics of a two-dimensional colloidal liquid. This work contains sections reviewing previous work by the authors as well as new, unpublished results. Among the latter are detailed studies of the phase boundaries of the de-mixing regime in binary systems in external light fields, configurations for shear induced effects at structured walls, studies on the effect of confinement on the structures

  7. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica; Holt, Jason; Noy, Aleksandr; Park, Hyung Gyu

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  8. Ultrastructure of the external gill epithelium of the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum with reference to ionic transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarial, M S; Wilkins, J H

    2003-10-01

    The ultrastructure of the external gill epithelium of the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, has been examined using conventional transmission electron microscopy to elucidate its role in ionic transport. Four cell types are identified in the gill filament and primary gill bar epithelium. These are granular, ciliated, Leydig and basal cells. A fifth cell type, the flat mitochondria-rich cell is only found in the gill bar epithelium. The predominant granular cells display microvilli at their surface and their cytoplasm contains abundant mitochondria, rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, vesicles and PAS+ secretory granules that are extruded at the surface, which along with secretions from the Leydig cells form a mucous coat. The granular cells are joined apically by junctional complexes consisting of zonulae occludens, zonulae adherens and desmosomes. The lateral membranes of granular cells enclose large intercellular spaces that are closed at the apical ends but remain open at the basal ends adjoining capillaries. In AgNO3-treated axolotl, the gills become darkly stained, the silver grains penetrate apical membranes and appear in the cytoplasm, accumulating near the lateral membranes and also enter the intercellular spaces. These findings are consistent with the dual role of the gill epithelium in mucus production and active ionic transport.

  9. RWPV bioreactor mass transport: earth-based and in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Cynthia M.; Kleis, Stanley J.

    2002-01-01

    Mass transport and mixing of perfused scalar quantities in the NASA Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel bioreactor are studied using numerical models of the flow field and scalar concentration field. Operating conditions typical of both microgravity and ground-based cell cultures are studied to determine the expected vessel performance for both flight and ground-based control experiments. Results are presented for the transport of oxygen with cell densities and consumption rates typical of colon cancer cells cultured in the RWPV. The transport and mixing characteristics are first investigated with a step change in the perfusion inlet concentration by computing the time histories of the time to exceed 10% inlet concentration. The effects of a uniform cell utilization rate are then investigated with time histories of the outlet concentration, volume average concentration, and volume fraction starved. It is found that the operating conditions used in microgravity produce results that are quite different then those for ground-based conditions. Mixing times for microgravity conditions are significantly shorter than those for ground-based operation. Increasing the differential rotation rates (microgravity) increases the mixing and transport, while increasing the mean rotation rate (ground-based) suppresses both. Increasing perfusion rates enhances mass transport for both microgravity and ground-based cases, however, for the present range of operating conditions, above 5-10 cc/min there are diminishing returns as much of the inlet fluid is transported directly to the perfusion exit. The results show that exit concentration is not a good indicator of the concentration distributions in the vessel. In microgravity conditions, the NASA RWPV bioreactor with the viscous pump has been shown to provide an environment that is well mixed. Even when operated near the theoretical minimum perfusion rates, only a small fraction of the volume provides less than the required oxygen levels

  10. Obesity does not increase external mechanical work per kilogram body mass during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Raymond C; McGowan, Craig P; Kram, Rodger

    2009-10-16

    Walking is the most common type of physical activity prescribed for the treatment of obesity. The net metabolic rate during level walking (W/kg) is approximately 10% greater in obese vs. normal weight adults. External mechanical work (W(ext)) is one of the primary determinants of the metabolic cost of walking, but the effects of obesity on W(ext) have not been clearly established. The purpose of this study was to compare W(ext) between obese and normal weight adults across a range of walking speeds. We hypothesized that W(ext) (J/step) would be greater in obese adults but W(ext) normalized to body mass would be similar in obese and normal weight adults. We collected right leg three-dimensional ground reaction forces (GRF) while twenty adults (10 obese, BMI=35.6 kg/m(2) and 10 normal weight, BMI=22.1 kg/m(2)) walked on a level, dual-belt force measuring treadmill at six speeds (0.50-1.75 m/s). We used the individual limb method (ILM) to calculate external work done on the center of mass. Absolute W(ext) (J/step) was greater in obese vs. normal weight adults at each walking speed, but relative W(ext) (J/step/kg) was similar between the groups. Step frequencies were not different. These results suggest that W(ext) is not responsible for the greater metabolic cost of walking (W/kg) in moderately obese adults.

  11. A Technique to Eliminate External Transport Barriers and Stabilize Fiscal Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeter, Robert F.

    1997-11-01

    The case is made for a coordinated national effort to diffuse plasma science knowledge to the public. Like earlier "fiscal instabilities" in plasma research, the 1995-7 magnetic fusion budget disruption can be attributed to a lack of public awareness about the value of science research, as reflected in the attitude of Congress. Magnetic fusion researchers now create "internal transport barriers" to reduce plasma heat loss, but observations also reveal a problematic "external transport barrier" in all of plasma science - the inadequate diffusion of knowledge beyond the scientists. Public funding creates scientific knowledge for the public good, and now the public cares - and deserves to know - what it pays for. Eliminating the external transport barrier should suppress the fiscal instability: theory predicts that funding should stabilize - or even increase - if the value of plasma science is understood by the bulk of Congress' members before they're elected, rather than just a small population of patrons energetically lobbied in office. If the public understands the value of plasma research, Congress will too. But plasmas are poorly represented in both contemporary classrooms and public perception. To reach the "Lawson Criterion" for ignition of public understanding, we should reach out to the public and to educators nationwide. Education and outreach activities are, and ought to be, part of the professional life of a plasma scientist. Our current activities consist largely of teaching our own classes, writing papers, lobbying Congress, giving lab tours, making Web pages, and promoting education locally; these have been useful, but insufficient. Now we must do better. To stabilize fiscal instabilities for good, we should restructure not only our research programs, but our sense of what it means to be a scientist. We should coordinate our education and outreach activities on a national scale, maximizing impact while minimizing cost in time, labor, and money. To this

  12. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  13. Updated Delft Mass Transport model DMT-2: computation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Farahani, Hassan; Ditmar, Pavel; Inacio, Pedro; Klees, Roland; Guo, Jing; Guo, Xiang; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Didova, Olga; Ran, Jiangjun; Sun, Yu; Tangdamrongsub, Natthachet; Gunter, Brian; Riva, Ricardo; Steele-Dunne, Susan

    2014-05-01

    A number of research centers compute models of mass transport in the Earth's system using primarily K-Band Ranging (KBR) data from the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission. These models typically consist of a time series of monthly solutions, each of which is defined in terms of a set of spherical harmonic coefficients up to degree 60-120. One of such models, the Delft Mass Transport, release 2 (DMT-2), is computed at the Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) in collaboration with Wuhan University. An updated variant of this model has been produced recently. A unique feature of the computational scheme designed to compute DMT-2 is the preparation of an accurate stochastic description of data noise in the frequency domain using an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) model, which is derived for each particular month. The benefits of such an approach are a proper frequency-dependent data weighting in the data inversion and an accurate variance-covariance matrix of noise in the estimated spherical harmonic coefficients. Furthermore, the data prior to the inversion are subject to an advanced high-pass filtering, which makes use of a spatially-dependent weighting scheme, so that noise is primarily estimated on the basis of data collected over areas with minor mass transport signals (e.g., oceans). On the one hand, this procedure efficiently suppresses noise, which are caused by inaccuracies in satellite orbits and, on the other hand, preserves mass transport signals in the data. Finally, the unconstrained monthly solutions are filtered using a Wiener filter, which is based on estimates of the signal and noise variance-covariance matrices. In combination with a proper data weighting, this noticeably improves the spatial resolution of the monthly gravity models and the associated mass transport models.. For instance, the computed solutions allow long-term negative trends to be clearly seen in sufficiently small regions notorious

  14. Glu-311 in External Loop 4 of the Sodium/Proline Transporter PutP Is Crucial for External Gate Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Susanne; Guérin, Kamila; Polyhach, Yevhen; Jeschke, Gunnar; Dittmer, Sophie; Frey, Sabine; Böhm, Maret; Jung, Heinrich

    2016-03-04

    The available structural information on LeuT and structurally related transporters suggests that external loop 4 (eL4) and the outer end of transmembrane domain (TM) 10' participate in the reversible occlusion of the outer pathway to the solute binding sites. Here, the functional significance of eL4 and the outer region of TM10' are explored using the sodium/proline symporter PutP as a model. Glu-311 at the tip of eL4, and various amino acids around the outer end of TM10' are identified as particularly crucial for function. Substitutions at these sites inhibit the transport cycle, and affect in part ligand binding. In addition, changes at selected sites induce a global structural alteration in the direction of an outward-open conformation. It is suggested that interactions between the tip of eL4 and the peptide backbone at the end of TM10' participate in coordinating conformational alterations underlying the alternating access mechanism of transport. Together with the structural information on LeuT-like transporters, the results further specify the idea that common design and functional principles are maintained across different transport families.

  15. Glu-311 in External Loop 4 of the Sodium/Proline Transporter PutP Is Crucial for External Gate Closure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracher, Susanne; Guérin, Kamila; Polyhach, Yevhen; Jeschke, Gunnar; Dittmer, Sophie; Frey, Sabine; Böhm, Maret; Jung, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    The available structural information on LeuT and structurally related transporters suggests that external loop 4 (eL4) and the outer end of transmembrane domain (TM) 10′ participate in the reversible occlusion of the outer pathway to the solute binding sites. Here, the functional significance of eL4 and the outer region of TM10′ are explored using the sodium/proline symporter PutP as a model. Glu-311 at the tip of eL4, and various amino acids around the outer end of TM10′ are identified as particularly crucial for function. Substitutions at these sites inhibit the transport cycle, and affect in part ligand binding. In addition, changes at selected sites induce a global structural alteration in the direction of an outward-open conformation. It is suggested that interactions between the tip of eL4 and the peptide backbone at the end of TM10′ participate in coordinating conformational alterations underlying the alternating access mechanism of transport. Together with the structural information on LeuT-like transporters, the results further specify the idea that common design and functional principles are maintained across different transport families. PMID:26728461

  16. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  17. Entropic transport without external force in confined channel with oscillatory boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Huai; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai, E-mail: hzhlj@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics & Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscales, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-12-28

    The dynamics of point-like Brownian particles in a periodic confined channel with oscillating boundaries has been studied. Directional transport (DT) behavior, characterized by net displacement along the horizontal direction, is observed even without external force which is necessary for the conventional DT where the boundaries are static. For typical parameter values, the average velocity V{sub t} of DT reaches a maximum with the variation of the noise intensity D, being alike to the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. Interestingly, we find that V{sub t} shows nontrivial dependences on the particle gravity G depending on the noise level. When the noise is large, V{sub t} increases monotonically with G indicating that heavier particle moves faster, while for small noise, V{sub t} shows a bell-shape dependence on G, suggesting that a particle with an intermediate weight may move the fastest. Such results were not observed for DT in a channel with static boundaries. To understand these findings, we have adopted an effective one-dimensional coarsening description, which facilitates us to introduce an effective entropic force along the horizontal direction. The average force is apparently nonzero due to the oscillatory boundary, hence leading to the net transport, and it shows similar dependences as V{sub t} on the noise intensity D and particle gravity G. The dependences of the DT behavior on other parameters describing the oscillatory channel have also been investigated, showing that DT is more pronounced for larger oscillation amplitude and frequency, and asymmetric geometry within a channel period and phase difference between neighboring periods are both necessary for the occurrence of DT.

  18. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  19. First-principles calculation of transport property in nano-devices under an external magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jing-Zhe; Zhang Jin; Han Ru-Shan

    2008-01-01

    The mesoscopic quantum interference phenomenon (QIP) can be observed and behaves as the oscillation of conductance in nano-devices when the external magnetic field changes. Excluding the factor of impurities or defects, specific QIP is determined by the sample geometry. We have improved a first-principles method based on the matrix Green's function and the density functional theory to simulate the transport behaviour of such systems under a magnetic field. We have studied two kinds of QIP: universal conductance fluctuation (UCF) and Aharonov-Bohm effect (A-B effect). We find that the amplitude of UCF is much smaller than the previous theoretical prediction. We have discussed the origin of difference and concluded that due to the failure of ergodic hypothesis, the ensemble statistics is not applicable, and the conductance fluctuation is determined by the flux-dependent density of states (DOSs). We have also studied the relation between the UCF and the structure of sample. For a specific structure, an atomic circle, the A-B effect is observed and the origin of the oscillation is also discussed.

  20. Selected Topics on Mass Transport in Gas-solid Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    The present article is a short review containing examples of the role of mass transport in the solid state during gas-solid interactions. Examples are taken from the authors' research on the interaction of carbon and/or nitrogen with iron-based metals. Topics dealt with are diffusion......-controlled dissolution of carbon in an austenite matrix, nucleation of nitrides at an iron surface, the competition between surface reaction and solid state diffusion during iron-nitride layer growth and the evolution of the morphology of a carbonitride layer during nitrocarburizing. The work presented focuses...

  1. FLOW BEHAVIOR AND MASS TRANSFER IN THREE-PHASE EXTERNAL-LOOP AIRLIFT REACTORS WITH LARGE PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin; Liu; Tongwang; Zhang; Tiefeng; Wang; Jinfu; Wang; Yong; Jin

    2006-01-01

    The flow behavior and mass transfer in a three-phase external-loop airlift reactor can be improved by adding large particles. The mass transfer and liquid dispersion behavior for a three-phase external-loop reactor with large particles are studied in terms of the effect of the diameter and loading of the large particles on the liquid dispersion coefficient and mass transfer coefficient. The results showed that increasing the diameter or loading of the large particles tend to decrease dispersion and intensify mass transfer, and that an increase in the diameter of the large particles remarkably decreases the particle loop rate, while the effect of fine particles is much less notable.

  2. Effects of Lewis number on coupled heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subjected to external convective heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Anjun; Zhang, Yuwen; Ma, Hongbin; Critser, John

    2009-03-01

    Heat and mass transfer in a circular tube subject to the boundary condition of the third kind is investigated. The closed form of temperature and concentration distributions, the local Nusselt number based on the total external heat transfer and convective heat transfer inside the tube, as well as the Sherwood number were obtained. The effects of Lewis number and Biot number on heat and mass transfer were investigated.

  3. Estimating External Costs of Transportation in Regional Areas: Using Available Statistical Data the Case of the Region of Campania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Gallo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper simplified methods for estimating the external costs due to transportation in regional areas are proposed. The methods are based on data available by national and regional statistical sources and do not need specific surveys; they allow obtaining approximate estimates useful for a preliminary evaluation of transportation plans, policies and projects. In more detail, a negative externality is defined as a cost that is produced by subject A and is borne by subject B; moreover, subject A does not consider the effects of his/her behavior on subject B and does not compensate subject B for the costs that this last one is forced to bear. In this paper after a literature review on methodologies proposed for estimating external costs, in national and international ambits, the main external costs produced by transportation systems in the Region of Campania are estimated. The main external costs considered are: greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, noise, accidents and congestion. In the paper the secondary external costs are neglected; the main ones are: water and soil pollution; landscape and nature damages; upstream and downstream effects; visual intrusion; separation effects; soil occupancy. In this paper the external costs estimated are the ones produced not only by road traffic, that anyway is the main “culprit”, but also by rail and air transportation systems. The evaluation of external costs has required the collection of several data on the regional mobility and the estimation of veh-kms per year produced in Campania by cars and freight vehicles. The estimation of veh-kms per year is based on circulating vehicles, subdivided by the COPERT classification, and on average yearly distances covered by each vehicle class. Other regional statistical data are collected about regional rail transport and air services at the main airports of the region. Moreover, since the evaluation of some external costs is based on damages on human

  4. Mass transport-related stratal disruption and sedimentary products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Kei; Mutti, Emiliano; Tinterri, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    From an outcrop perspective, mass transport deposit are commonly represented by "chaotic" units, characterized by dismembered and internally deformed slide blocks of different sizes and shapes, embedded in a more or less abundant fine-grained matrix. The large amount of data derived from geophysical investigations of modern continental margins have permitted the characterization of the overall geometry of many of these deposits, which, however, remain still relatively poorly described from outcrop studies of collisional basins. Results of this work show that in mass-transport deposits an unsorted, strongly mixed, relatively fine-grained clastic matrix almost invariably occurs in irregularly interconnected patches and pseudo-veins, infilling space between large clasts and blocks. We interpreted the aspect of this matrix as typical of a liquefied mixture of water and sediment, characterized by an extremely high mobility due to overpressured conditions, as evidenced by both lateral and vertical injections. On a much larger scale this kind of matrix is probably represented by the seismically "transparent" facies separating slide blocks of many mass-transport deposits observed in seismic-reflection profiles. The inferred mechanism of matrix production suggests a progressive soft-sediment deformation, linked to different phases of submarine landslide evolution (i.e. triggering, translation, accumulation and post-depositional stages), leading to an almost complete stratal disruption within the chaotic units. From our data we suggest that most submarine landslides move because of the development of ductile shear zones marked by the presence of "overpressured" matrix, both internally and along the basal surface. The matrix acts as a lubricating medium, accommodating friction forces and deformation, thus permitting the differential movement of discrete internal portions and enhancing the submarine slide mobility. Based on our experience, we suggest that this kind of deposit

  5. Quantitative estimation of the influence of external vibrations on the measurement error of a coriolis mass-flow meter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, van de L.; Hakvoort, W.B.J.; Dijk, van J.; Lötters, J.C.; Boer, de A.; Dimitrovova, Z.; Almeida, de J.R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the quantitative influence of external vibrations on the measurement value of a Coriolis Mass-Flow Meter for low flows is investigated, with the eventual goal to reduce the influence of vibrations. Model results are compared with experimental results to improve the knowledge on how ext

  6. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, M. [Fermilab; Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Badgley, K. [Fermilab; Bradascio, F. [Fermilab; Brandt, J. [Fermilab; Evbota, D. [Fermilab; Hocker, A. [Fermilab; Lamm, M. [Fermilab; Lombardo, V. [Fermilab; Miller, J. [Boston U.; Nicol, T. [Fermilab; Kutschke, R. [Fermilab; Vellidis, C. [Fermilab; Wands, R. [Fermilab; Wenk, E. [Fermilab

    2016-10-01

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. The alignment of the cold-masses is critical to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. In this work, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.

  7. Specifics of heat and mass transfer in spherical dimples under the effect of external factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchukin, A. V.; Il'inkov, A. V.; Takmovtsev, V. V.; Khabibullin, I. I.

    2017-06-01

    The specifics are examined of heat transfer enhancement with spherical dimples under the effect of factors important for practice and characteristic of cooling systems of gas-turbine engines and power units. This experimental investigation deals with the effect of the following factors on the flow in a channel with hemispherical dimples: continuous air swirl in an annulus with dimples on its concave wall, dimples on the convex or concave wall of a curved rectangular channel, imposition of regular velocity fluctuations on the external flow in a straight rectangular channel, and adverse or favorable pressure gradient along the flow direction. The flow is turbulent. Reynolds numbers based on the channel hydraulic diameter are on the order of 104. Results of the investigation of a model of a two-cavity diffuser dimple proposed by the authors are presented. It has been found that results for channels with spherical dimples and for smooth channels differ not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. Thus, if the effect of centrifugal mass forces on convex and concave surfaces with hemispherical dimples and in a smooth channel is almost the same (quantitative and qualitative indicators are identical), the pressure gradient in the flow direction brings about the drastically opposite results. At the same time, the quantitative contribution to a change in heat transfer in hemispherical dimples is different and depends on the impact type. The results are discussed with the use of physical models created on the basis of the results of flow visualization studies and data on the turbulence intensity, pressure coefficient, etc. Results of the investigations suggest that application of spherical dimples under nonstandard conditions requires the calculated heat transfer to be corrected to account for one or another effect.

  8. Kinetic study on external mass transfer in high performance liquid chromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Kanji; Kawaguchi, Yuuki; Guiochon, Georges

    2010-04-30

    External mass transfer coefficients (k(f)) were measured for a column packed with fully porous C(18)-silica spherical particles (50.6 microm in diameter), eluted with a methanol/water mixture (70/30, v/v). The pulse response and the peak-parking methods were used. Profiles of elution peaks of alkylbenzene homologues were recorded at flow rates between 0.2 and 2.0 mL min(-1). Peak-parking experiments were conducted under the same conditions, to measure intraparticle and pore diffusivity, and surface diffusion coefficients. Finally, the values of k(f) for these compounds at 298 K were derived from the first and second moments of the elution peaks by subtracting the contribution of intraparticle diffusion to band broadening. As a result, the Sherwood number (Sh) was measured under such conditions that the Reynolds (Re) and the Schmidt numbers (Sc) varied from 0.004 to 0.05 and from 1.8x10(3) to 2.7x10(3), respectively. We found that Sh is proportional to Re(alpha) and Sc(beta) and that the correlation between these three nondimensional parameters is almost the same as those given by conventional literature equations. The values of alpha and beta were close to those in the literature correlations, between 0.26 and 0.41 and between 0.31 and 0.36, respectively. The use of the Wilson-Geankoplis equation to estimate k(f) values entails a relative error of ca. 15%. So, conventional literature correlations provide correct estimates of k(f) in HPLC systems, even for particle sizes of the order of a micrometer.

  9. Mass transport measurements and modeling for chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Chiang, D.Y.; Fiadzo, O.G.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    This project involves experimental and modeling investigation of densification behavior and mass transport in fiber preforms and partially densified composites, and application of these results to chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process modeling. This supports work on-going at ORNL in process development for fabrication of ceramic matrix composite (CMC) tubes. Tube-shaped composite preforms are fabricated at ORNL with Nextel{trademark} 312 fiber (3M Corporation, St. Paul, MN) by placing and compressing several layers of braided sleeve on a tubular mandrel. In terms of fiber architecture these preforms are significantly different than those made previously with Nicalon{trademark} fiber (Nippon Carbon Corp., Tokyo, Japan) square weave cloth. The authors have made microstructure and permeability measurements on several of these preforms and a few partially densified composites so as to better understand their densification behavior during CVI.

  10. Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

    important physiological functions, such as stomata aperture, cell elongation, or cellular pH regulation. It is known that the activity of plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. Therefore, we first investigated the phosphorylation profile of plant H+-ATPase by enriching...... the phosphopeptides with optimized TiO2 and IMAC enrichment methods prior to MS analysis. We further investigated the global phosphorylation profile of the whole plant plasma membrane proteins using the combination of our recently established phosphopeptide enrichment method, Calcium phosphate precipitation......  Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...

  11. Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway Modeled by Optimal Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4 min over ∼3 hrs in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. PMID:28323163

  12. Approximate energy states and thermal properties of a particle with position-dependent mass in external magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Eshghi, Mahdi; Ikhdair, Sameer M

    2016-01-01

    We solve the Schr\\"odinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse and Coulomb potentials and exposed to external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields. The non-relativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions. We also study the thermal quantities of such a system. Further, the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism. We give plots for energy as a function of various physical parameters. The behavior of the internal energy, specific heat and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown.

  13. Quantum transport of the semiconductor pump: Due to an axial external field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Yun-Chang, E-mail: phyxiaofan@163.com [College of Electrical and Information Engineering, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Changde 415000 (China); Wang, Ri-Xing, E-mail: wangrixing@sina.com [College of Electrical and Information Engineering, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Changde 415000 (China); Deng, Wei-Ying, E-mail: weiyindeng@gmail.com [Department of Physics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Parametric semiconductor pump modulated by the external field is investigated. The pump center attaching to two normal leads is driven by the potentials formed in the interfaces. With the Floquet scattering matrix method, the pumped currents modulated by the parameters are studied. Results reveal that the charge and spin currents pumped from the system can be strengthen by the external field besides the potentials. Directed spin currents can be pumped more strongly than the charge currents, and even the pure spin currents can be achieved in some external field couplings to the pump parameters.

  14. Mass and charge transport in IPMC actuators with fractal interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Longfei; Wu, Yucheng; Zhu, Zicai; Li, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) actuators have been attracting a growing interest in extensive applications, which consequently raises the demands on the accuracy of its theoretical modeling. For the last few years, rough landscape of the interface between the electrode and the ionic membrane of IPMC has been well-documented as one of the key elements to ensure a satisfied performance. However, in most of the available work, the interface morphology of IPMC was simplified with structural idealization, which lead to perplexity in the physical interpretation on its interface mechanism. In this paper, the quasi-random rough interface of IPMC was described with fractal dimension and scaling parameters. And the electro-chemical field was modeled by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set. Then, by simulation with Finite Element Method, a comprehensive analysis on he inner mass and charge transportation in IPMC actuators with different fractal interfaces was provided, which may be further adopted to instruct the performance-oriented interface design for ionic electro-active actuators. The results also verified that rough interface can impact the electrical and mechanical response of IPMC, not only from the respect of the real surface increase, but also from mass distribution difference caused by the complexity of the micro profile.

  15. Turbulence and mass-transports in stratocumulus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Virendra P.

    Boundary layer (BL) stratocumulus clouds are an important factor in the earth's radiation budget due to their high albedo and low cloud top heights. Continental BL stratocumulus clouds are closely coupled to the diurnal cycle and the turbulence in the BL affecting the surface energy and moisture budgets. In this study the turbulence and mass-transport structures in continental BL stratocumulus clouds are studied using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM)'s Southern Great Plains (SGP) observing facility located at Lamont, Oklahoma. High temporal (4 sec) and spatial (45 m) resolution observations from a vertically pointing 35 GHz cloud Doppler radar were used to obtain the in-cloud vertical velocity probability density function (pdf) in the absence of precipitation size hydrometeors. A total of 70 hours of radar data were analyzed to report half-hourly statistics of vertical velocity variance, skewness, updraft fraction, downdraft and velocity binned mass-flux at five cloud depth normalized levels. The variance showed a general decrease with increase in height in the cloud layer while the skewness is weakly positive in the cloud layer and negative near cloud top. The updraft fraction decreases with height with the decrease mainly occurring in the upper half of the cloud layer. The downdraft fraction increases with decrease in height with the increase being almost linear. The velocity of eddies responsible for maximum mass-transport decreases from of 0.4 ms-1 near cloud base to 0.2 ms-1 near cloud top. The half-hour periods were then classified based on the surface buoyancy flux as stable or unstable and it was found that the variance near cloud top is higher during the stable periods as compared to the unstable periods. Classification was also made based on the cloud depth to BL depth ratio (CBR) being greater or less than 0.3. The variance profile was similar for the classification while the skewness was almost zero during periods with CBR less 0

  16. Volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient in an external-loop airlift reactor with inserted membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Predrag S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the inserted membrane in the downcomer of an external-loop airlift reactor, the gas sparger type (single orifice and sinter plate and added alcohol (ethanol, n-butanol, or n-hexanol on the volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient (kLa were studied. Due to the presence of the membrane in the downcomer, kLa did not change significantly; the differences were smaller than 10%. The highest values of the kLa were obtained using the sinter plate. It was found that the addition of small amounts of alcohol increased the mass transfer. Using our experimental results and the data of other authors, the feed-forward back propagation neural network for prediction of kLa in external-loop airlift reactors with alcohol solutions was proposed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172025

  17. Mass transportation in diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsushima, Shigenori, E-mail: mitsushi@ynu.ac.j [Chemical Energy Laboratory, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Yoshitsugu; Matsuzawa, Koichi; Ota, Ken-ichiro [Chemical Energy Laboratory, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2010-09-01

    To use the protonic mesothermal fuel cell without humidification, mass transportation in diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([dema][TfO]), trifluoromethanesulfuric acid (TfOH)-added [dema][TfO], and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4})-added [dema][TfO] was investigated by electrochemical measurements. The diffusion coefficient and the solubility of oxygen were ca. 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and ca. 10{sup -3} M (=mol dm{sup -3}), respectively. Those of hydrogen were a factor of 10 and one-tenth compared to oxygen, respectively. The permeability, which is a product of the diffusion coefficient and solubility, of oxygen and hydrogen were almost the same for the perfluoroethylenesulfuric acid membrane and the sulfuric acid solution; therefore, these values are suitable for fuel cell applications. On the other hand, a diffusion limiting current was observed for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The current corresponded to ca. 10{sup -10} mol cm{sup -1} s{sup -1} of the permeability, and the diffusion limiting species was the hydrogen carrier species. The TfOH addition enhanced the diffusion limiting current of [dema][TfO], and the H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} addition eliminated the diffusion limit. The hydrogen bonds of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} or water-added H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} might significantly enhance the transport of the hydrogen carrier species. Therefore, [dema][TfO] based materials are candidates for non-humidified mesothermal fuel cell electrolytes.

  18. The latent fingerprint in mass transport of polycrystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2016-02-01

    Herein, a systematic investigation was carried out to reach a rational understanding and to provide information concerning the possible causes for a significant influence of pressure variation in the underlying processes of mass transport in polycrystalline materials. The authors focused their research in solid-state diffusion, a part of the subject "Mass Transport in Solids". Theories on diffusion are the subject by itself which exists as a latent fingerprint in every text of higher learning in interdisciplinary science. In this research, authors prepared sandwich samples of titanium alloy and stainless steel using nickel as an intermediate metal. The samples were processed at three different levels of bonding pressure (3, 4 and 5 MPa) while bonding temperature and bonding time was maintained at 750 °C and 1 h, respectively, throughout the experiments. It was observed that the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into Ti-alloy at TiA/Ni interface increased by ~63 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but decreased by ~40 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. At the same time, the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into stainless steel at Ni/SS interface increased by ~19 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but increased by ~17 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. Here authors showed that the pressure variations have different effects at the TiA/Ni interface and Ni/SS interface, and tried to explain the explicit mechanisms operating behind them. In general for sandwich samples processed irrespective of bonding pressure chosen, the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused into SS is greater than that of the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused in Ti-alloy matrix by four orders of magnitude. The calculated diffusivity of Ni-atoms into Ti-alloy reaches its highest value of ~5.083 × 10-19 m2/s for the sandwich sample processed using 4-MPa bonding-pressure, whereas the diffusivity of Ni

  19. Conception for enhanced mass transport in binary nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Yimin

    2009-12-01

    Besides their application in enhancing heat transfer, suspended nanoparticles have been found to improve mass transfer process inside binary nanofluids. The concepts of enhanced mass transfer in binary nanofluids are involved. By means of the heat and mass transfer analogy, the approaches for determining the mass diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient are proposed and discussed.

  20. Estimation of fluid flow and mass transport properties in a natural fracture using laboratory testing system on mass transport in fractured rock (LABROCK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshino, Naoto; Uchida, Masahiro [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Satou, Hisashi [Inspection Development Company Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The understanding of mass transport and fluid flow properties in natural rock fractures is important for safety assessment of geological disposal of high level nuclear waste. The authors developed advanced tracer test equipment in which a 50-cm cubic scale rock sample was feasible. The mass transport and fluid flow properties in a single fracture were also examined. The relation among hydraulic, transport and mass balance apertures of a natural single fracture were obtained. Heterogeneity of the aperture distribution was evident, as was the possibility of some major flow line perpendicular to the flow direction. Additionally, the relation between normal stress and each aperture was also obtained by loading normal stress on the fracture. In future, measuring the aperture distribution and establishing the model considering fluid flow and mass transport properties in natural rock fractures will be conducted. (author)

  1. Mass transport model through the skin by microencapsulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Núria; Alonso, Cristina; Martí, Meritxell; Lis, Manel J

    2015-01-01

    Skin drug delivery can be subdivided into topical and transdermal administration. Transdermal administration can take advantage of chemical and physical strategies that can improve skin permeability and allow drug penetration. In this study, the development of a skin penetration profile was carried out by an in vitro technique for a microencapsulated system of ibuprofen. Release experiments were performed using percutaneous absorption tests to determine the evolution of the principle present in each of the different skin compartments as a function of time. A general kinetic model for a microencapsulated structure as a mass transport system through the skin was applied: [Formula: see text] This model could predict the penetration profile of encapsulated substances through skin from biofunctional textiles as well as estimate the dosage profile of the active principle. The apparent diffusion coefficients found were 1.20 × 10(-7 )cm/s for the stratum corneum and higher for the rest of the skin 6.67 × 10(-6 )cm/s.

  2. First-principles calculations of mass transport in magnesium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2013-03-01

    Mg(BH4)2 is a hydrogen storage material which can decompose to release hydrogen in the following reaction: Mg(BH4)2(solid) -->1/6 MgB12H12(solid) + 5/6MgH2(solid) +13/6 H2(gas) --> MgH2(solid) + 2B(solid) + 4H2(gas). However, experiments show that hydrogen release only occurs at temperatures above 300 °C, which severely limits applications in mobile storage. Using density-functional theory calculations, we systematically study bulk diffusion of defects in the reactant Mg(BH4)2 and products MgB12H12 and MgH2 during the first step of the solid-state dehydrogenation reaction. The defect concentrations and concentration gradients are calculated for a variety of defects, including charged vacancies and interstitials. We find that neutral [BH3] vacancies have the highest bulk concentration and concentration gradient in Mg(BH4)2. The diffusion mechanism of [BH3] vacancy in Mg(BH4)2 is studied using the nudged elastic band method. Our results shows that the calculated diffusion barrier for [BH3] vacancies is ~ . 2 eV, suggesting that slow mass transport limits the kinetics of hydrogen desorption.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of mass transport and structure inside a phototrophic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Baheerathan; Holmes, William M; Sloan, William T; Phoenix, Vernon R

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to utilize magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to image structural heterogeneity and mass transport inside a biofilm which was too thick for photon based imaging. MRI was used to map water diffusion and image the transport of the paramagnetically tagged macromolecule, Gd-DTPA, inside a 2.5 mm thick cyanobacterial biofilm. The structural heterogeneity of the biofilm was imaged at resolutions down to 22 × 22 μm, enabling the impact of biofilm architecture on the mass transport of both water and Gd-DTPA to be investigated. Higher density areas of the biofilm correlated with areas exhibiting lower relative water diffusion coefficients and slower transport of Gd-DTPA, highlighting the impact of biofilm structure on mass transport phenomena. This approach has potential for shedding light on heterogeneous mass transport of a range of molecular mass molecules in biofilms.

  4. Coupling External Radiation Transport Code Results to the GADRAS Detector Response Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Thoreson, Gregory G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Horne, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection

    2014-01-01

    Simulating gamma spectra is useful for analyzing special nuclear materials. Gamma spectra are influenced not only by the source and the detector, but also by the external, and potentially complex, scattering environment. The scattering environment can make accurate representations of gamma spectra difficult to obtain. By coupling the Monte Carlo Nuclear Particle (MCNP) code with the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) detector response function, gamma spectrum simulations can be computed with a high degree of fidelity even in the presence of a complex scattering environment. Traditionally, GADRAS represents the external scattering environment with empirically derived scattering parameters. By modeling the external scattering environment in MCNP and using the results as input for the GADRAS detector response function, gamma spectra can be obtained with a high degree of fidelity. This method was verified with experimental data obtained in an environment with a significant amount of scattering material. The experiment used both gamma-emitting sources and moderated and bare neutron-emitting sources. The sources were modeled using GADRAS and MCNP in the presence of the external scattering environment, producing accurate representations of the experimental data.

  5. Coupling External Radiation Transport Code Results to the GADRAS Detector Response Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Dean J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Thoreson, Gregory G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection; Horne, Steven M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Contraband Detection

    2014-01-01

    Simulating gamma spectra is useful for analyzing special nuclear materials. Gamma spectra are influenced not only by the source and the detector, but also by the external, and potentially complex scattering environment. The scattering environment can make accurate representations of gamma spectra difficult to obtain. By coupling the Monte Carlo Nuclear Particle (MCNP) code with the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) detector response function, gamma spectrum simulations can be computed with a high degree of fidelity even in the presence of a complex scattering environment. Traditionally, GADRAS represents the external scattering environment with empirically derived scattering parameters. By modeling the external scattering environment in MCNP and using the results as input for the GADRAS detector response function, gamma spectra can be obtained with a high degree of fidelity. This method was verified with experimental data obtained in an environment with a significant amount of scattering material. The experiment used both gamma-emitting sources and moderated and bare neutron-emitting sources. The sources were modeled using GADRAS and MCNP in the presence of the external scattering environment, producing accurate representations of the experimental data.

  6. Transport properties of a charged hot spot in an external electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarenko, S., E-mail: sergeyb@ariel.ac.il; Komoshvili, K.; Prygarin, A.

    2016-06-15

    We investigate adiabatic expansion of a charged and rotating fluid element consisting of weakly interacting particles, which is initially perturbed by an external electromagnetic field. A framework for the perturbative calculation of the non-equilibrium distribution function of this fluid volume is considered and the distribution function is calculated to the first order in the perturbative expansion. This distribution function, which describes the evolution of the element with constant entropy, allows to calculate momentum flux tensor and viscosity coefficients of the expanding system. We show, that these viscosity coefficients depend on the initial angular velocity of the spot and on the strength of its initial perturbation by the external field. Obtained results are applied to the phenomenology of the viscosity to the entropy ratio calculated in lattice models.

  7. Transport properties of a charged drop in an external electromagnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S; Prygarin, A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate adiabatic expansion of a charged and rotating fireball consisting of weekly interacting particles, which is initially perturbed by an external electromagnetic field. A framework for the perturbative calculation of the non-equilibrium distribution function of the fireball is considered and the distribution function is calculated to the first order in the perturbative expansion. This distribution function, which describes the evolution of the droplet with constant entropy, allows to calculate momentum flux tensor and viscosity coefficients of the expanding system. We show, that these viscosity coefficients depend on the initial angular velocity of the fireball and on the strength of its initial perturbation by the external field. Obtained results are applied to the phenomenology of the viscosity to the entropy ratio calculated in lattice models.

  8. Masses and disease entities of the external auditory canal: Radiological and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.D., E-mail: richard.white3@nhs.net [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Ananthakrishnan, G. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); McKean, S.A. [Department of Otolaryngology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Brunton, J.N. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Hussain, S.S.M. [Department of Otolaryngology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Sudarshan, T.A. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    A wide spectrum of disease entities can affect the external auditory canal (EAC). This review describes the normal anatomy of the EAC. Congenital abnormalities, infections, neoplasms, and miscellaneous conditions, such as cholesteatoma and acquired stenosis, are shown with reference to clinical relevance and management. Cases have been histologically confirmed, where relevant. The EAC is frequently imaged - for example, on cross-sectional imaging of the brain - and this review should stimulate radiologists to include it as an important area for review.

  9. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ(4) chain, at the same kinetic temperature T(0), but at different configurational temperatures--one end hotter and the other end colder than T(0). While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  10. Investigation of charge injection and transport behavior in multilayer structure consisted of ferromagnetic metal and organic polymer under external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Meng, Wei-Feng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper a five layer organic electronic device with alternately placed ferromagnetic metals and organic polymers: ferromagnetic metal/organic layer/ferromagnetic metal/organic layer/ferromagnetic metal, which is injected a spin-polarized electron from outsides, is studied theoretically using one-dimensional tight binding model Hamiltonian. We calculated equilibrium state behavior after an electron with spin is injected into the organic layer of this structure, charge density distribution and spin polarization density distribution of this injected spin-polarized electron, and mainly studied possible transport behavior of the injected spin polarized electron in this multilayer structure under different external electric fields. We analyze the physical process of the injected electron in this multilayer system. It is found by our calculation that the injected spin polarized electron exists as an electron-polaron state with spin polarization in the organic layer and it can pass through the middle ferromagnetic layer from the right-hand organic layer to the left-hand organic layer by the action of increasing external electric fields, which indicates that this structure may be used as a possible spin-polarized charge electronic device and also may provide a theoretical base for the organic electronic devices and it is also found that in the boundaries between the ferromagnetic layer and the organic layer there exist induced interface local dipoles due to the external electric fields.

  11. Heat pump without particle transport or external work on the medium achieved by differential thermostatting of the phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Puneet Kumar; Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanism that enables heat flow from a colder region to a hotter region without necessitating either particle transport or external work on the conductor, thereby bypassing the compressor part of a classical heat pump cycle. Our mechanism relies on thermostatting the kinetic and configurational temperatures of the same particle differently. We keep the two ends of a conductor, which in the present study is a single dimensional ϕ4 chain, at the same kinetic temperature T0, but at different configurational temperatures—one end hotter and the other end colder than T0. While external energy is needed within the thermostatted regions to achieve this differential thermostatting, no external work is performed on the system itself. We show that the mechanism satisfies the statistical form of the second law of thermodynamics (the fluctuation theorem). The proposed mechanism reveals two interesting findings: (i) contrary to traditional thermodynamics where only the kinetic temperature is thought to govern heat conduction, configurational temperature can also play an important role, and (ii) the relative temperature difference between the kinetic and configurational variables governs the direction of heat flow. The challenge, however, is in developing experimental techniques to thermostat the kinetic and configurational variables of the same particle at different values.

  12. Prerequisites for flying snails: external transport potential of aquatic snails by waterbirds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leeuwen, C.H.A.; Van der Velde, G.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread distributions of aquatic species often contrast with their limited ability to disperse by their own propulsion among wetlands isolated by land. Studies of the potential role of water birds as dispersal vectors have been focused mainly on internal transport (endozoochory). However, man

  13. Mass and charge transport in micro and nanofluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger; Olesen, Laurits Højgaard; Okkels, Fridolin

    2007-01-01

    and charge transport coefficients that satisfy Onsager relations. In the limit of nonoverlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as the hydraulic radiusR ¼ 2A=P with Aand P being the cross-sectional area and perimeter...

  14. Assessment of the hydrogen external tank pressure decay anomaly on Space Transportation System (STS) 51-L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1988-01-01

    Following the Challenger tragedy, an evaluation of the integrated main propulsion system flight data revealed a premature decay in the hydrogen external tank ullage pressure. A reconstruction of predicted ullage pressure versus time indicated an inconsistency between predicted and measured ullage pressure starting at approximately 65.5 seconds into the flight and reaching a maximum value between 72 and 72.9 seconds. This discrepancy could have been caused by a hydrogen gas leak or by a liquied hydrogen leak that occurred either in the pressurization system or in the external tank. The corresponding leak rates over the time interval from 65.5 to 72.9 seconds were estimated to range from 0.28 kg/s (0.62 lbm/s) + or - 41 percent to between 0.43 and 0.51kg/s (0.94 and 1.12lbs/s) + or - 1 percent for a gas leak and from 72.9 kg/s (160.5 lbs/s) + or - 41 percent to between 111.6 and 133.2 kg/s (245.8 and 293.3 lbs/s) + or - 1 percent for a liquid leak. No speculation is made to ascertain whether the leak is liquid or gas, as this cannot be determined from the analysis performed. Four structural failures in the hydrogen external tank were considered to explain the leak rates. A break in the 5-cm (2 in) pressurization line, in the 13-cm (5 in) vent line, or in the 43-cm (17 in) feedline is not likely. A break in the 10-cm (4 in) recirculation line with a larger structural failure occurring in the 72 to 73-second time period, the time of the visibly identified premature pressure decay, does seem plausible and the most likely of the four modes considered. These modes are not all-inclusive and do not preclude the possibility of a leak elsewhere in the tank.

  15. Ion confinement and transport in a toroidal plasma with externally imposed radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.; Krawczonek, W. M.; Powers, E. J.; Kim, Y. C.; Hong, H. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Strong electric fields were imposed along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma by biasing it with electrodes maintained at kilovolt potentials. Coherent, low-frequency disturbances characteristic of various magnetohydrodynamic instabilities were absent in the high-density, well-confined regime. High, direct-current radial electric fields with magnitudes up to 135 volts per centimeter penetrated inward to at least one-half the plasma radius. When the electric field pointed radially toward, the ion transport was inward against a strong local density gradient; and the plasma density and confinement time were significantly enhanced. The radial transport along the electric field appeared to be consistent with fluctuation-induced transport. With negative electrode polarity the particle confinement was consistent with a balance of two processes: a radial infusion of ions, in those sectors of the plasma not containing electrodes, that resulted from the radially inward fields; and ion losses to the electrodes, each of the which acted as a sink and drew ions out of the plasma. A simple model of particle confinement was proposed in which the particle confinement time is proportional to the plasma volume. The scaling predicted by this model was consistent with experimental measurements.

  16. Biodegradation of Methyl Orange by alginate-immobilized Aeromonas sp. in a packed bed reactor: external mass transfer modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiravan, Mathur Nadarajan; Praveen, Siluvai Antony; Gim, Geun Ho; Han, Gui Hawn; Kim, Si Wouk

    2014-11-01

    Azo dyes are recalcitrant and xenobiotic nature makes these compounds a challenging task for continuous biodegradation up to satisfactorily levels in large-scale. In the present report, the biodegradation efficiency of alginate immobilized indigenous Aeromonas sp. MNK1 on Methyl Orange (MO) in a packed bed reactor was explored. The experimental results were used to determine the external mass transfer model. Complete MO degradation and COD removal were observed at 0.20 cm bead size and 120 ml/h flow rate at 300 mg/l of initial dye concentration. The degradation of MO decreased with increasing bead sizes and flow rates, which may be attributed to the decrease in surface of the beads and higher flux of MO, respectively. The experimental rate constants (k ps) for various beads sizes and flow rates were calculated and compared with theoretically obtained rate constants using external film diffusion models. From the experimental data, the external mass transfer effect was correlated with a model J D = K Re (-(1 - n)). The model was tested with K value (5.7) and the Colburn factor correlation model for 0.20, 0.40 and 0.60 bead sizes were J D = 5.7 Re (-0.15), J D = 5.7 Re (-0.36) and J D = 5.7 Re (-0.48), respectively. Based on the results, the Colburn factor correlation models were found to predict the experimental data accurately. The proposed model was constructive to design and direct industrial applications in packed bed reactors within acceptable limits.

  17. Dynamic Behavior and Mass Transport in Polyacrylic Acid Gel by Dynamic Light Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors on polyacrylic acid (PAA) gels and mass (small molecules) transports in the gels have been studied mainly by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cross-linking degree (fc), monomer concentration (Cm) and temperature of the gels have significant influences on its dynamic behavior and mass transport in the gels. The increase of fc leads to decrease of the mesh sizes of the gels, thus the obstacle of the gels for mass transport is increased. As a result, small molecular diffusion Dk in the gels is decreased. So even if for small molecules, the Dk also is influenced.

  18. Thickness Optimisation of Textiles Subjected to Heat and Mass Transport during Ironing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korycki Ryszard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Let us next analyse the coupled problem during ironing of textiles, that is, the heat is transported with mass whereas the mass transport with heat is negligible. It is necessary to define both physical and mathematical models. Introducing two-phase system of mass sorption by fibres, the transport equations are introduced and accompanied by the set of boundary and initial conditions. Optimisation of material thickness during ironing is gradient oriented. The first-order sensitivity of an arbitrary objective functional is analysed and included in optimisation procedure. Numerical example is the thickness optimisation of different textile materials in ironing device.

  19. External meeting: KATRIN - direct measurement of neutrino masses with sub-eV sensitivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY - ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél : 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Wednesday 18 April 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium KATRIN - direct measurement of neutrino masses with sub-eV sensitivity by Prof. Guido Drexlin, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT The major scientific objective of the international Karlsruhe Tritum Neutrino (KATRIN) Experiment is the model independent measurement of the electron neutrino mass in tritium beta decay with a sensitivity of 200 meV. In the cosmological context, this allows an investigation of whether massive relic neutrinos left over from the Big Bang play a specific role as hot dark matter in the evolution of large scale structures of the universe. In particle physics KATRIN will allow for discrimination between different neutrino mass models (either of quasi-degenerate or hierarchical pattern).The key components of KATRIN comprise...

  20. Mass transport in carbon gels with tuned porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Job

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diffusional limitations in carbon gel-supportedcatalysts are often encountered despite their openstructure. However, the analysis of mass transportis rarely taken into account in studies dealing withcatalyst preparation and test using thesenanostructured carbons as supports. Any catalyticsystem should be first subject to mass transportanalysis before any conclusion can be drawn aboutrelationships between the physico-chemicalproperties and the measured activity of the catalyst.

  1. STUDY ON THE CONTROLLED MASS TRANSPORT THROUGH POROUS MEMBRANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    l introductionMembrane Processes have been applied widely inchemical and biological separation and mass transferoperatioll. Tile mass tfansport tlimugh the membralleis driven either by pressure (sucll as ultrallltration,microfiltration and nanofiltration), or concelltration(diffusion) like dialysis, or by electric field(electrodialysis). While pressure drived Processes areiii-idel}' used for separation pmpose, diffusionprocesses is conllllon in colltrolled release and soluteexchange. Haemodialysis has been ...

  2. Effect of External Photoevaporation on the Radial Transport of Volatiles and the Water Snowline in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyaan, Anusha; Desch, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Sun was likely born in a high mass star forming region [1]. Such a birth environment with a proximity to a nearby O or B star would photoevaporate the sun’s protoplanetary disk and cause an outward mass flow from the outer edge, as well as truncation of the disk, as seen in the Orion proplyds (although not as intensely)[2]. Photoevaporation likely explains the currently observed ~47 AU edge of the Kuiper Belt in our solar system [3], and more compellingly, the origin of certain short-lived radionuclides (such as Fe60), which cannot be successfully explained by a nebular origin [4][5]. Such a mass loss mechanism should affect the radial transport processes in the snowline region and along with temperature, has the potential to alter the location of the snowline.In this context, and in the light of recent ALMA observational results indicative of non-traditional behavior of snowlines and volatile transport in disks [6][7], this work studies what effect a photoevaporative mass loss from the outer disk may have on the volatile transport around the snowline region between ~1-10 AU in the disk. We build on the model of [8] and explore the effects of a steep photoevaporated non-uniform $\\alpha$ disk on radial transport of volatiles and small icy solids by incorporating the advection-diffusion equations as in [9] and condensation/evaporation of volatiles. We present results of these simulations, including volatile mass fluxes, ice/rock ratios, and snow line locations, in protoplanetary disks like the solar nebula.References: [1] Adams, F.C., 2010, ARAA 48,47 [2] Henney, W.J., & O’Dell, C.R., 1999, AJ, 118, 2350 [3] Trujillo,C.A. & Brown,M.E., 2001, ApJL,554,L95 [4] Hester, J.J., & Desch, S.J., 2005,ASPC, 341,107 [5] Wadhwa, M. et al. , 2007, Protostars & Planets V, 835 [5 [6] Cieza, L.A., et al., 2016, Nature,535,258 [7] Huang, J, et al. et al., 2016, ApJL, 823, L18 [8] Kalyaan, A., et al., 2015, ApJ, 815, 112 [9] Desch, S.J., et al., (in review).

  3. Probing the effects of external irradiation on low-mass protostars through unbiased line surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Lindberg, Johan E; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Bisschop, Suzanne E; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: The envelopes of molecular gas around embedded low-mass protostars show different chemistries, which can be used to trace their formation history and physical conditions. The excitation of some molecular species can also be used to trace these physical conditions, making it possible to constrain e.g. sources of heating and excitation. Aims: To study the range of influence of an intermediate-mass Herbig Be protostar, and to find what chemical and physical impact feedback effects from the environment may have on embedded protostars. Methods: We follow up on an earlier line survey of the Class 0/I source R CrA IRS7B in the 0.8 mm window with an unbiased line survey of the same source in the 1.3 mm window using the APEX telescope. We also study the excitation of the key species H2CO, CH3OH, and c-C3H2 in a complete sample of the 18 embedded protostars in the Corona Australis star-forming region. Radiative transfer models are used to establish abundances of the molecular species. Results: We de...

  4. FEFLOW finite element modeling of flow, mass and heat transport in porous and fractured media

    CERN Document Server

    Diersch, Hans-Jörg G

    2013-01-01

    Placing advanced theoretical and numerical methods in the hands of modeling practitioners and scientists, this book explores the FEFLOW system for solving flow, mass and heat transport processes in porous and fractured media. Offers applications and exercises.

  5. Measurements of the transport efficiency of the fragment mass analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, B.B.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Davids, C.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Extensive calculations of the transport of reaction products were carried out during the design phase of the instrument using the computer code GIOS. These show that the energy acceptance depends strongly on the angular deviation from the optical axis of the instrument. In order to reliably measure cross sections using this instrument it is therefore necessary to verify these calculations empirically.

  6. Mass-extinction evolution and the effects of external influences on unfit species

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, M E J

    1994-01-01

    We present a new model for extinction in which species evolve in bursts or `avalanches', during which they become on average more susceptible to environmental stresses such as harsh climates and so are more easily rendered extinct. Results of simulations and analytic calculations using our model show a power-law distribution of extinction sizes which is in reasonable agreement with fossil data. e also see a number of features qualitatively similar to those seen in the fossil record. For example, we see frequent smaller extinctions in the wake of a large mass extinction, which arise because there is reduced competition for resources in the aftermath of a large extinction event, so that species which would not normally be able to compete can get a foothold, but only until the next cold winter or bad attack of the flu comes along to wipe them out.

  7. SITE-94. CAMEO: A model of mass-transport limited general corrosion of copper canisters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worgan, K.J.; Apted, M.J. [QuantiSci Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the technical basis for the CAMEO code, which models the general, uniform corrosion of a copper canister either by transport of corrodants to the canister, or by transport of corrosion products away from the canister. According to the current Swedish concept for final disposal of spent nuclear fuels, extremely long containment times are achieved by thick (60-100 mm) copper canisters. Each canister is surrounded by a compacted bentonite buffer, located in a saturated, crystalline rock at a depth of around 500 m below ground level. Three diffusive transport-limited cases are identified for general, uniform corrosion of copper: General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of sulphide to the canister surface under reducing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of oxygen to the canister surface under mildly oxidizing conditions; General corrosion rate-limited by diffusive mass-transport of copper chloride away from the canister surface under highly oxidizing conditions. The CAMEO code includes general corrosion models for each of the above three processes. CAMEO is based on the well-tested CALIBRE code previously developed as a finite-difference, mass-transfer analysis code for the SKI to evaluate long-term radionuclide release and transport in the near-field. A series of scoping calculations for the general, uniform corrosion of a reference copper canister are presented. 28 refs, 5 tabs, 6 figs.

  8. Activity-Based Costing Application in an Urban Mass Transport Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popesko Boris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide a basic overview of the application of Activity-Based Costing in an urban mass transport company which operates land public transport via buses and trolleys within the city. The case study was conducted using the Activity-Based Methodology in order to calculate the true cost of individual operations and to measure the profitability of particular transport lines. The case study analysis showed the possible effects of the application of the Activity-Based Costing for an urban mass transport company as well as the limitations of using the ABC methodology in the service industry. With regards to the application of the ABC methodology, the primary limitation of the accuracy of the conclusions is the quality of the non-financial information which had to be gathered throughout the implementation process. A basic limitation of the accurate data acquisition is the nature of the fare system of the transport company which does not allow the identification of the route that is taken by an individual passenger. The study illustrates the technique of ABC in urban mass transport and provides a real company example of information outputs of the ABC system. The users indicated that, the ABC model is very useful for profitability reporting and profit management. Also, the paper shows specific application of the Activity-Based Methodology in conditions of urban mass transport companies with regional specifics.

  9. Systematic characterization of porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Gu, Weiyong; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Huang, C-Y Charles

    2017-01-01

    One of the key challenges in porous scaffold design is to create a porous structure with desired mechanical function and mass transport properties which support delivery of biofactors and development of function tissue substitute. In recent years, polyurethane (PU) has become one of the most popular biomaterials in various tissue engineering fields. However, there are no studies fully investigating the relations between porosity and both mass transport and mechanical properties of PU porous scaffolds. In this paper, we fabricated PU scaffolds by combining phase inversion and salt (sodium chloride) leaching methods. The tensile and compressive moduli were examined on PU scaffolds fabricated with different PU concentrations (25%, 20% and 15% w/v) and salt/PU weight ratios (9/1, 6/1, 3/1 and 0/1). The mass transport properties of PU scaffolds including hydraulic permeability and glucose diffusivity were also measured. Furthermore, the relationships between the porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold were systemically investigated. The results demonstrated that porosity is a key parameter which governs both mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffolds. With similar pore sizes, the mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold can be described as single functions of porosity regardless of initial PU concentration. The relationships between scaffold porosity and properties can be utilized to facilitate porous PU scaffold fabrication with specific mass transport and mechanical properties. The systematic approach established in this study can be applied to characterization of other biomaterials for scaffold design and fabrication.

  10. Amorphous Photonic Lattices: Band Gaps, Effective Mass and Suppressed Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Rechtsman, Mikael; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-01-01

    We present, theoretically and experimentally, amorphous photonic lattices exhibiting a band-gap yet completely lacking Bragg diffraction: 2D waveguides distributed randomly according to a liquid-like model responsible for the absence of Bragg peaks as opposed to ordered lattices containing disorder, which always exhibit Bragg peaks. In amorphous lattices the bands are comprised of localized states, but we find that defect states residing in the gap are more localized than the Anderson localization length. Finally, we show how the concept of effective mass carries over to amorphous lattices.

  11. Heat- and mass-transport in aqueous silica nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanov, A. N.; Tolmachev, Yuriy V.

    2009-10-01

    Using the transient hot wire and pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance methods we determined the thermal conductivity and the solvent self-diffusion coefficient (SDC) in aqueous suspensions of quasi-monodisperse spherical silica nanoparticles. The thermal conductivity was found to increase at higher volume fraction of nanoparticles in accordance with the effective medium theory albeit with a smaller slope. On the other hand, the SDC was found to decrease with nanoparticle volume fraction faster than predicted by the effective medium theory. These deviations can be explained by the presence of an interfacial heat-transfer resistance and water retention by the nanoparticles, respectively. We found no evidence for anomalous enhancement in the transport properties of nanofluids reported earlier by other groups.

  12. Limits to Diffusive O2 Transport: Flow, Form, and Function in Nudibranch Egg Masses from Temperate and Polar Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Amy L.; Arthur Woods, H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many aquatic animals enclose embryos in gelatinous masses, and these embryos rely on diffusion to supply oxygen. Mass structure plays an important role in limiting or facilitating O2 supply, but external factors such as temperature and photosynthesis can play important roles as well. Other external factors are less well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first explored the effects of water flow on O2 levels inside nudibranch embryo masses and compared the effects of fl...

  13. Temporal variability of mass transport across Canary Islands Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero-Díaz, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Santana, Ángel; José Machín, Francisco; García-Weil, Luis; Sangrà, Pablo; Vélez-Belchí, Pedro; Fraile-Nuez, Eugenio

    2014-05-01

    The equatorward flowing Canary Current (CC) is the main feature of the circulation in the Canary Islands region. The CC flow perturbation by the Canary Islands originate the Canary Eddy Corridor which is the major pathway for long lived eddies in the subtropical North Atlantic (Sangrà et al., 2009, DSR). Therefore the variability of the CC passing through the Canary Archipelago will have both local and regional importance. Past studies on the CC variability trough the Canary Islands point out a clearly seasonal variability (Fraile-Nuez et al, 2010 (JGR); Hernández-Guerra et al, 2002 (DSR)). However those studies where focused on the eastern islands channels missing the variability through the western island channels which are the main source of long lived eddies. In order to fill this gap from November 2012 until September 2013 we conducted trimonthly surveys crossing the whole islands channels using opportunity ships (Naviera Armas Ferries). XBT and XCTD where launched along the cross channels transects. Additionally a closed box circling the Archipelago was performed on October 2013 as part of the cruise RAPROCAN-2013 (IEO) using also XBT and XCTD. Dynamical variables where derived inferring salinity from S(T,p) analytical relationships for the region updated with new XCTD data. High resolution, vertical sections of temperature, potential density, geostrophic velocity and transport where obtained. Our preliminary results suggest that the CC suffer a noticeable acceleration in those islands channels where eddy shedding is more frequent. They also indicate a clearly seasonal variability of the flows passing the islands channels. With this regard we observed significant differences on the obtained seasonal variability with respect the cited past studies on the eastern islands channel (Lanzarote / Fuerteventura - Africa coast). This work was co-funded by Canary Government (TRAMIC project: PROID20100092) and the European Union (FEDER).

  14. Mass Transport in a Thin Layer of Bi-Viscous Mud Under Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG Chiu-on; FU Sau-chung; BAI Yu-chuan(白玉川)

    2002-01-01

    The mass transport in a thin layer of non-Newtonian bed mud under surface waves is examined with a two-fluidStokes boundary layer model. The mud is assumed to be a bi-viscous fluid, which tends to resist motion for small-appliedstresses, but flows readily when the yield stress is exceeded. Asymptotic expansions suitable for shallow fluid layers areapplied, and the second-order solutions for the mass transport induced by surface progressive waves are obtained numeri-cally. It is found that the stronger the non-Newtonian behavior of the mud, the more pronounced intermittency of theflow. Consequently, the mass transport velocity is diminished in magnitude, and can even become negative (i. e., oppo-site to wave propagation) for a certain range of yield stress.

  15. Convective instability and mass transport of diffusion layers in a Hele-Shaw geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, R E

    2010-01-01

    We consider experimentally the instability and mass transport of a porous-medium flow in a Hele-Shaw geometry. In an initially stable configuration, a lighter fluid (water) is located over a heavier fluid (propylene glycol). The fluids mix via diffusion with some regions of the resulting mixture being heavier than either pure fluid. Density-driven convection occurs with downward penetrating dense fingers that transport mass much more effectively than diffusion alone. We investigate the initial instability and the quasi steady state. The convective time and velocity scales, finger width, wave number selection, and normalized mass transport are determined for 6,000

  16. Recent Developments in Graphene-Based Membranes: Structure, Mass-Transport Mechanism and Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Pengzhan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2016-03-23

    Significant achievements have been made on the development of next-generation filtration and separation membranes using graphene materials, as graphene-based membranes can afford numerous novel mass-transport properties that are not possible in state-of-art commercial membranes, making them promising in areas such as membrane separation, water desalination, proton conductors, energy storage and conversion, etc. The latest developments on understanding mass transport through graphene-based membranes, including perfect graphene lattice, nanoporous graphene and graphene oxide membranes are reviewed here in relation to their potential applications. A summary and outlook is further provided on the opportunities and challenges in this arising field. The aspects discussed may enable researchers to better understand the mass-transport mechanism and to optimize the synthesis of graphene-based membranes toward large-scale production for a wide range of applications.

  17. A development of multi-Species mass transport model considering thermodynamic phase equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a multi-species mass transport model, which can predict time dependent variation of pore solution and solid-phase composition due to the mass transport into the hardened cement paste, has been developed. Since most of the multi-species models established previously, based...... by the penetration of mineral salts during marine seawater exposure conditions. Those phenomena in concrete can be predicted using the coupled multi-species mass transport model and the thermodynamic equilibrium model described in this paper....... on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck theory, did not involve the modeling of chemical process, it has been coupled to thermodynamic equilibrium model in this study. By the coupling of thermodynamic equilibrium model, the multi-species model could simulate many different behaviours in hardened cement paste such as: (i...

  18. On the use of mass-conserving wind fields in chemistry-transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bregman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method has been developed that provides mass-conserving wind fields for global chemistry-transport models. In previous global Eulerian modeling studies a mass-imbalance was found between the model mass transport and the surface pressure tendencies. Several methods have been suggested to correct for this imbalance, but so far no satisfactory solution has been found. Our new method solves these problems by using the wind fields in a spherical harmonical form (divergence and vorticity by mimicing the physics of the weather forecast model as closely as possible. A 3-D chemistry-transport model was used to show that the calculated ozone fields with the new processing method agree remarkably better with ozone observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. In addition, the calculated age of air in the lower stratosphere show better agreement with observations, although the air remains still too young in the extra-tropical stratosphere.

  19. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law mud under surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Bai, Yuchuan; Xu, Dong

    2017-02-01

    The mass transport velocity in a two-layer system is studied theoretically. The wave motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free water surface, and mud in the lower layer is described by a power-law rheological model. Perturbation analysis is performed to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity. A numerical iteration method is employed to solve the non-linear governing equation at the leading order. The influence of rheological properties on fluid motion characteristics including the flow field, the surface displacement, the mass transport velocity, and the net discharge rates are investigated based on theoretical results. Theoretical analysis shows that under the action of interfacial shearing, a recirculation structure may appear near the interface in the upper water layer. A higher mass transport velocity at the interface does not necessarily mean a higher discharge rate for a pseudo-plastic fluid mud.

  20. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  1. Center of mass acceleration feedback control of standing balance by functional neuromuscular stimulation against external postural perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Audu, Musa L; Triolo, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the use of center of mass (COM) acceleration feedback for improving performance of a functional neuromuscular stimulation control system to restore standing function to a subject with complete, thoracic-level spinal cord injury. The approach for linearly relating changes in muscle stimulation to changes in COM acceleration was verified experimentally and subsequently produced data to create an input-output map driven by sensor feedback. The feedback gains were systematically tuned to reduce upper extremity (UE) loads applied to an instrumented support device while resisting external postural disturbances. Total body COM acceleration was accurately estimated (>89% variance explained) using 3-D outputs of two accelerometers mounted on the pelvis and torso. Compared to constant muscle stimulation employed clinically, feedback control of stimulation reduced UE loading by 33%. COM acceleration feedback is advantageous in constructing a standing neuroprosthesis since it provides the basis for a comprehensive control synergy about a global, dynamic variable and requires minimal instrumentation. Future work should include tuning and testing the feedback control system during functional reaching activity that is more indicative of activities of daily living.

  2. Intra-tumoral heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery and mass transport in human pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koay, Eugene J.; Baio, Flavio E.; Ondari, Alexander; Truty, Mark J.; Cristini, Vittorio; Thomas, Ryan M.; Chen, Rong; Chatterjee, Deyali; Kang, Ya'an; Zhang, Joy; Court, Laurence; Bhosale, Priya R.; Tamm, Eric P.; Qayyum, Aliya; Crane, Christopher H.; Javle, Milind; Katz, Matthew H.; Gottumukkala, Vijaya N.; Rozner, Marc A.; Shen, Haifa; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Yuling; Plunkett, William; Abbruzzese, James L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Maitra, Anirban; Ferrari, Mauro; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Fleming, Jason B.

    2014-12-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity in the clinical behavior of pancreatic cancer and in its response to therapy. Some of this variation may be due to differences in delivery of cytotoxic therapies between patients and within individual tumors. Indeed, in 12 patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, we previously demonstrated wide inter-patient variability in the delivery of gemcitabine as well as in the mass transport properties of tumors as measured by computed tomography (CT) scans. However, the variability of drug delivery and transport properties within pancreatic tumors is currently unknown. Here, we analyzed regional measurements of gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the tumors of the same 12 patients to understand the degree of intra-tumoral heterogeneity of drug delivery. We also developed a volumetric segmentation approach to measure mass transport properties from the CT scans of these patients and tested inter-observer agreement with this new methodology. Our results demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gemcitabine delivery within individual pancreatic tumors and across the patient cohort, with gemcitabine DNA incorporation in the inner portion of the tumors ranging from 38 to 74% of the total. Similarly, the CT-derived mass transport properties of the tumors had a high degree of heterogeneity, ranging from minimal difference to almost 200% difference between inner and outer portions of the tumor. Our quantitative method to derive transport properties from CT scans demonstrated less than 5% difference in gemcitabine prediction at the average CT-derived transport value across observers. These data illustrate significant inter-patient and intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the delivery of gemcitabine, and highlight how this variability can be reproducibly accounted for using principles of mass transport. With further validation as a biophysical marker, transport properties of tumors may be useful in patient selection for therapy and prediction of

  3. Thermo-fluidic devices and materials inspired from mass and energy transport phenomena in biological system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian XIAO; Jing LIU

    2009-01-01

    Mass and energy transport consists of one of the most significant physiological processes in nature, which guarantees many amazing biological phenomena and activ-ities. Borrowing such idea, many state-of-the-art thermo-fluidic devices and materials such as artificial kidneys, carrier erythrocyte, blood substitutes and so on have been successfully invented. Besides, new emerging technologies are still being developed. This paper is dedicated to present-ing a relatively complete review of the typical devices and materials in clinical use inspired by biological mass and energy transport mechanisms. Particularly, these artificial thermo-fluidic devices and materials will be categorized into organ transplantation, drug delivery, nutrient transport, micro operation, and power supply. Potential approaches for innovating conventional technologies were discussed, corresponding biological phenomena and physical mechan-isms were interpreted, future promising mass-and-energy-transport-based bionic devices were suggested, and prospects along this direction were pointed out. It is expected that many artificial devices based on biological mass and energy transport principle will appear to better improve vari-ous fields related to human life in the near future.

  4. The Significance of Gas-Phase Mass Transport in Assessment of kchem and Dchem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohne, Ørjan Fossmark; Søgaard, Martin; Wiik, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the validity of electrical conductivity relaxation (ECR) as a method for the assessment of chemical surface exchange, kchem, and bulk diffusion, Dchem, coefficients is investigated with respect to mass transport limitations in the gas phase. A model encompassing both the oxygen...... is evident and modeled apparent activation energies for kchem are shown to decrease significantly. A criteria for the validity of Dchem is introduced while no such measure could be introduced for kchem. The effect of experimental parameters and material properties on mass transport limitations are presented...

  5. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Joel David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ticknor, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Collins, Lee A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  6. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. Here we present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first-principles calculations. We use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find nonmonotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual crossover from acoustic-dominated to optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this crossover to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection-symmetry-based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. This work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two-dimensional materials toward targeted applications.

  7. The water mass structure and transports in the Atlantic Subpolar Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ibáñez, Maribel I.; Pardo, Paula C.; Carracedo, Lidia I.; Mercier, Herlé; Lherminier, Pascale; Ríos, Aida F.; Pérez, Fiz F.

    2014-05-01

    The water mass structure, mixing and spreading in the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre (SPG) were analyzed by means of an extended Optimum MultiParameter (eOMP) approach over the six repeats of the WOCE A25 hydrographic line located at the southern boundary of this gyre. The data includes the Fourex (4x) line taken in 1997 and the five repeat sections of the OVIDE line taken every other year from 2002 to 2010. We proposed 10 water masses, defined by their thermohaline properties (potential temperature and salinity), oxygen and nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and silicate), to resolve the water mass structure of the SPG. The eOMP enables to decompose the transports by water mass quantitatively. Our model provides water mass distributions that are able to reproduce the input data of potential temperature, salinity and silicate with r2>0.997 and of oxygen, nitrate and phosphate with r2>0.96. By combining the velocity field and the water mass structure across each section we provide the relative contribution of each water mass to the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and we evaluate the water mass transformation in the North Atlantic. The MOC upper limb during OVIDE (2002-2010) is constituted by the northward transports of the central waters (9.4 Sv; 1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), the Subarctic Intermediate Water (SAIW, 2.8 Sv) and the Subpolar Mode Water (SPMW) of the Iceland Basin (2.1 Sv). The MOC lower limb is constituted by the southward transports of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW, 2.9 Sv), the Denmark Strait Overflow Water (DSOW, 2.5 Sv), the Polar Intermediate Water (PIW, 0.8 Sv), the Labrador Sea Water (LSW, 3.6 Sv) and the SPMW of the Irminger Sea (4.7 Sv). These results contrast with those obtained for the 1997, cruise developed after a period of high NAO index. The greater MOC strength in 1997 resulted in greater northward transports of central waters (17.5 Sv), while the SAIW transports remained approximately unchanged. The increase of the northward

  8. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer analogy for vertical hydraulic transport of inert particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimovski Darko R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical liquid-solids flow, as well as in single phase flow, were studied. The aim of this investigation was to establish the analogy among those phenomena. Also, effect of particles concentration on momentum, heat and mass transfer was studied. The experiments in hydraulic transport were performed in a 25.4 mm I.D. cooper tube equipped with a steam jacket, using spherical glass particles of 1.94 mm in diameter and water as a transport fluid. The segment of the transport tube used for mass transfer measurements was inside coated with benzoic acid. In the hydraulic transport two characteristic flow regimes were observed: turbulent and parallel particle flow regime. The transition between two characteristic regimes (γ*=0, occurs at a critical voidage ε≈0.85. The vertical two-phase flow was considered as the pseudofluid, and modified mixture-wall friction coefficient (fw and modified mixture Reynolds number (Rem were introduced for explanation of this system. Experimental data show that the wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer coefficients, in vertical flow of pseudofluid, for the turbulent regime are significantly higher than in parallel regime. Wall-to-bed, mass and heat transfer coefficients in hydraulic transport of particles were much higher then in single-phase flow for lower Reynolds numbers (Re15000, there was not significant difference. The experimental data for wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical flow of pseudofluid in parallel particle flow regime, show existing analogy among these three phenomena. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  9. Diffuse hydrological mass transport through catchments: scenario analysis of coupled physical and biogeochemical uncertainty effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Persson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper quantifies and maps the effects of coupled physical and biogeochemical variability on diffuse hydrological mass transport through and from catchments. It further develops a scenario analysis approach and investigates its applicability for handling uncertainties about both physical and biogeochemical variability and their different possible cross-correlation. The approach enables identification of conservative assumptions, uncertainty ranges, as well as pollutant/nutrient release locations and situations for which further investigations are most needed in order to reduce the most important uncertainty effects. The present scenario results provide different statistical and geographic distributions of advective travel times for diffuse hydrological mass transport. The geographic mapping can be used to identify potential hotspot areas with large mass loading to downstream surface and coastal waters, as well as their opposite, potential lowest-impact areas within the catchment. Results for alternative travel time distributions show that neglect or underestimation of the physical advection variability, and in particular of those transport pathways with much shorter than average advective solute travel times, can lead to substantial underestimation of pollutant and nutrient loads to downstream surface and coastal waters. This is particularly true for relatively high catchment-characteristic product of average attenuation rate and average advective travel time, for which mass delivery would be near zero under assumed transport homogeneity but can be orders of magnitude higher for variable transport conditions. A scenario of high advection variability, with a significant fraction of relatively short travel times, combined with a relevant average biogeochemical mass attenuation rate, emerges consistently from the present results as a generally reasonable, conservative assumption for estimating maximum diffuse mass loading, when the prevailing

  10. A correction technique for the dispersive effects of mass lumping for transport problems

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the well-known dispersion effect that mass lumping induces when solving transport-like equations. A simple anti-dispersion technique based on the lumped mass matrix is proposed. The method does not require any non-trivial matrix inversion and has the same anti-dispersive effects as the consistent mass matrix. A novel quasi-lumping technique for P2 finite elements is introduced. Higher-order extensions of the method are also discussed. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Aerosol properties and radiative forcing for three air masses transported in Summer 2011 to Sopot, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, Anna; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Makuch, P.; Markowicz, K. M.; Petelski, T.; Strzałkowska, A.; Zieliński, T.

    2013-05-01

    Properties of atmospheric aerosols and solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface were measured during Summer 2011 in Sopot, Poland. Three cloudless days, characterized by different directions of incoming air-flows, which are typical transport pathways to Sopot, were used to estimate a radiative forcing due to aerosols present in each air mass.

  12. Comparison of macro- and microscopic theories describing multicomponent mass transport in microporous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benes, Nieck Edwin; Verweij, H.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed discussion is presented of three well-known macroscopic theories for describing the mass transport behavior of multicomponent mixtures; these include Fick's law, the Onsager theory of irreversible thermodynamics, and the Maxwell-Stefan theory. The merits and drawbacks of these theories ar

  13. Cerebral serotonin transporter binding is inversely related to body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, D; Frokjaer, V G; Haahr, M T

    2010-01-01

    ) in animal models is inversely related to food intake and body weight and some effective anti-obesity agents involve blockade of the serotonin transporter (SERT). We investigated in 60 healthy volunteers body mass index (BMI) and regional cerebral SERT binding as measured with [(11)C]DASB PET. In a linear...

  14. No association between striatal dopamine transporter binding and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Hesse, Swen; Caan, Matthan W A

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine is one among several neurotransmitters that regulate food intake and overeating. Thus, it has been linked to the pathophysiology of obesity and high body mass index (BMI). Striatal dopamine D(2) receptor availability is lower in obesity and there are indications that striatal dopamine...... transporter (DAT) availability is also decreased. In this study, we tested whether BMI and striatal DAT availability are associated....

  15. Next-generation satellite gravimetry for measuring mass transport in the Earth system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira Encarnação, J.

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the thesis is to identify the optimal set-up for future satellite gravimetry missions aimed at monitoring mass transport in the Earth’s system.The recent variability of climatic patterns, the spread of arid regions and associ- ated changes in the hydrological cycle, and vigorou

  16. Analysis of Entropy Generation of Combined Heat and Mass Transfer in Internal and External Flows with the Assumption of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShouguangYao

    1994-01-01

    In this paper,the control volume method is used to establish the general expression of entropy generation due to combined convective heat and mass transfer in internal and external fluid streams.The expression accounts for irreversibilities due to the presence of heat transfer across a finite temperature difference,mass transfer across a finite difference in the chemical potential of a species,and due to flow friction.Based on the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium,the generalized form of the Gibbs equation is used in this analysis.The results are applied to two fundamental problems of forced convection heat and mass transfer in internal and external flows.After minimizing the entropy generation,useful conclusions are derived that are typical of the second law viewpoint for the definition of the optimum operation conditions for the specified applications.which is a valuable criterion for optimum design of heat and fluid flow devices.

  17. Mass transport in a porous microchannel for non-Newtonian fluid with electrokinetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2013-03-01

    Quantification of mass transfer in porous microchannel is of paramount importance in several applications. Transport of neutral solute in presence of convective-diffusive EOF having non-Newtonian rheology, in a porous microchannel was presented in this article. The governing mass transfer equation coupled with velocity field was solved along with associated boundary conditions using a similarity solution method. An analytical solution of mass transfer coefficient and hence, Sherwood number were derived from first principles. The corresponding effects of assisting and opposing pressure-driven flow and EOF were also analyzed. The influence of wall permeation, double-layer thickness, rheology, etc. on the mass transfer was also investigated. Permeation at the wall enhanced the mass transfer coefficient more than five times compared to impervious conduit in case of pressure-driven flow assisting the EOF at higher values of κh. Shear thinning fluid exhibited more enhancement of Sherwood number in presence of permeation compared to shear thickening one. The phenomenon of stagnation was observed at a particular κh (∼2.5) in case of EOF opposing the pressure-driven flow. This study provided a direct quantification of transport of a neutral solute in case of transdermal drug delivery, transport of drugs from blood to target region, etc.

  18. Cosmological mass transport on galactic nuclei and the formation of high Z quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escala, A.; Prieto, J.

    2017-07-01

    By using AMR cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, we studied the mass transport processes onto galactic nuclei from high redshift up to z˜6. We were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from ˜50 kpc to ˜ few pc. We studied the BH growth at the galactic center in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds and the gravitational stress on the disc. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and SN feedback, the SMBH grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting ≍0.5 throughout its evolution. The α parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, αR, with αR»1. The gravitational part of the α parameter, αG, has an increasing trend toward the galactic center at higher redshifts, with values αG˜1 at radii &lesssim, few 101 pc contributing to the BH fueling. In terms of torques, we also found that gravity has an increasing contribution toward the galactic center at earlier epochs with a mixed contribution above ˜100 pc. This complementary work between pressure gradients and gravitational potential gradients allows an efficient mass transport on the disc with average mass accretion rates of the order ˜ few 1M⊙/yr. These level of SMBH accretion rates found in our cosmological simulations are needed in all models of SMBH growth that attempt to explain the formation of redshift 6-7 quasars.

  19. Investigating Mass Transport Limitations on Xylan Hydrolysis During Dilute Acid Pretreatment of Poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Pilath, Heid M.; Parent, Yves; Chatterjee, Siddharth G.; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Yarbrough, John M.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-04-28

    Mass transport limitations could be an impediment to achieving high sugar yields during biomass pretreatment and thus be a critical factor in the economics of biofuels production. The objective of this work was to study the mass transfer restrictions imposed by the structure of biomass on the hydrolysis of xylan during dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Mass transfer effects were studied by pretreating poplar wood at particle sizes ranging from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work showed a significant reduction in the rate of xylan hydrolysis in poplar when compared to the intrinsic rate of hydrolysis for isolated xylan that is possible in the absence of mass transfer. In poplar samples we observed no significant difference in the rates of xylan hydrolysis over more than two orders of magnitude in particle size. It appears that no additional mass transport restrictions are introduced by increasing particle size from 10 micrometers to 10 mm. This work suggests that the rates of xylan hydrolysis in biomass particles are limited primarily by the diffusion of hydrolysis products out of plant cell walls. A mathematical description is presented to describe the kinetics of xylan hydrolysis that includes transport of the hydrolysis products through biomass into the bulk solution. The modeling results show that the effective diffusion coefficient of the hydrolysis products in the cell wall is several orders of magnitude smaller than typical values in other applications signifying the role of plant cell walls in offering resistance to diffusion of the hydrolysis products.

  20. Autothermal reforming over a Pt/Gd-doped ceria catalyst: Heat and mass transport limitations in the steam reforming section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sungkwang [Center for Fuel Cell Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea); Bae, Joongmyeon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

    2010-07-15

    Autothermal reforming (ATR) has several advantages for fuel cell applications, such as a compact reactor structure and fast response. Using oxidation reactions inside the reactor, ATR does not have the external heat transfer limitations associated with steam reforming. However, mass and heat transfer limitations inside and outside the catalyst particles are still anticipated. In this study, transport limitations in the steam reforming section of ATR over a Pt/Gd-doped ceria catalyst are analyzed by numerical simulations based on a reaction rate equation in which parameters are adjusted to measured kinetic data. The simulation results show that significant transport limitations characterize the steam reforming section of packed-bed ATR reactors. The activity per catalyst bed volume is highly dependent on the particle size, and only the thin exterior layer of the particles is involved in catalyzing the reactions. Based on the results, it is shown that an eggshell type catalyst particle could reduce catalyst material significantly without a considerable decline in the activity per catalyst bed volume. (author)

  1. A mass-conserving advection scheme for offline simulation of scalar transport in coastal ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillibrand, P. A.; Herzfeld, M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a flux-form semi-Lagrangian (FFSL) advection scheme designed for offline scalar transport simulation with coastal ocean models using curvilinear horizontal coordinates. The scheme conserves mass, overcoming problems of mass conservation typically experienced with offline transport models, and permits long time steps (relative to the Courant number) to be used by the offline model. These attributes make the method attractive for offline simulation of tracers in biogeochemical or sediment transport models using archived flow fields from hydrodynamic models. We describe the FFSL scheme, and test it on two idealised domains and one real domain, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. For comparison, we also include simulations using a traditional semi-Lagrangian advection scheme for the offline simulations. We compare tracer distributions predicted by the offline FFSL transport scheme with those predicted by the original hydrodynamic model, assess the conservation of mass in all cases and contrast the computational efficiency of the schemes. We find that the FFSL scheme produced very good agreement with the distributions of tracer predicted by the hydrodynamic model, and conserved mass with an error of a fraction of one percent. In terms of computational speed, the FFSL scheme was comparable with the semi-Lagrangian method and an order of magnitude faster than the full hydrodynamic model, even when the latter ran in parallel on multiple cores. The FFSL scheme presented here therefore offers a viable mass-conserving and computationally-efficient alternative to traditional semi-Lagrangian schemes for offline scalar transport simulation in coastal models.

  2. Transport dynamics of self-consistent, near-marginal drift-wave turbulence. I. Investigation of the ability of external flows to tune the non-diffusive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, D.; Newman, D. E.; Sánchez, R.

    2017-07-01

    The reduction of turbulent transport across sheared flow regions has been known for a long time in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. However, details of the dynamics are still unclear, in particular, in what refers to the changes caused by the flow on the nature of radial transport itself. In Paper II, we have shown in a simplified model of drift wave turbulence that, when the background profile is allowed to evolve self-consistently with fluctuations, a variety of transport regimes ranging from superdiffusive to subdiffusive open up depending on the properties of the underlying turbulence [D. Ogata et al., Phys. Plasmas 24, 052307 (2017)]. In this paper, we show that externally applied sheared flows can, under the proper conditions, cause the transport dynamics to be diffusive or subdiffusive.

  3. Wave Effect on the Ocean Circulations Through Mass Transport and Wave-Induced Pumping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Fan; WU Kejian

    2014-01-01

    The wave Coriolis-Stokes-Force-modified ocean momentum equations are reviewed in this paper and the wave Stokes transport is pointed out to be part of the ocean circulations. Using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 40-year reanalysis data (ERA-40 data) and the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) version 2.2.4 data, the magnitude of this transport is compared with that of wind-driven Sverdrup transport and a 5-to-10-precent contribution by the wave Stokes transport is found. Both transports are stronger in boreal winter than in summers. The wave effect can be either contribution or cancellation in different seasons. Examination with Kuroshio transport verifies similar seasonal variations. The clarification of the efficient wave boundary condition helps to understand the role of waves in mass transport. It acts as surface wind stress and can be functional down to the bottom of the ageostrophic layer. The pumping velocities resulting from wave-induced stress are zonally distributed and are significant in relatively high latitudes. Further work will focus on the model performance of the wave-stress-changed-boundary and the role of swells in the eastern part of the oceans.

  4. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Multiscale mass transport in z~6 galactic discs: fueling black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    By using AMR cosmological hydrodynamic N-body zoom-in simulations, with the RAMSES code, we studied the mass transport processes onto galactic nuclei from high redshift up to $z\\sim6$. Due to the large dynamical range of the simulations we were able to study the mass accretion process on scales from $\\sim50$ kpc to $\\sim$pc. We studied the BH growth set on the galactic center in relation with the mass transport processes associated to both the Reynolds stress and the gravitational stress on the disc. Such methodology allowed us to identify the main mass transport process as a function of the scales of the problem. We found that in simulations that include radiative cooling and SNe feedback, the SMBH grows at the Eddington limit for some periods of time presenting a $\\langle f_{EDD}\\rangle\\approx 0.5$ through out its evolution. The $\\alpha$ parameter is dominated by the Reynolds term, $\\alpha_R$, with $\\alpha_R\\gg 1$. The gravitational part of the $\\alpha$ parameter, $\\alpha_G$, has an increasing trend toward ...

  6. Implications of anthropogenic river stage fluctuations on mass transport in a valley fill aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutt, D.F.; Fleming, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In humid regions a strong coupling between surface water features and groundwater systems may exist. In these environments the exchange of water and solute depends primarily on the hydraulic gradient between the reservoirs. We hypothesize that daily changes in river stage associated with anthropogenic water releases (such as those from a hydroelectric dam) cause anomalous mixing in the near-stream environment by creating large hydraulic head gradients between the stream and adjacent aquifer. We present field observations of hydraulic gradient reversals in a shallow aquifer. Important physical processes observed in the field are explicitly reproduced in a physically based two-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow coupled to a simplistic surface water boundary condition. Mass transport simulations of a conservative solute introduced into the surface water are performed and examined relative to a stream condition without stage fluctuations. Simulations of 20 d for both fluctuating river stage and fixed high river stage show that more mass is introduced into the aquifer from the stream in the oscillating case even though the net water flux is zero. Enhanced transport by mechanical dispersion leads to mass being driven away from the hydraulic zone of influence of the river. The modification of local hydraulic gradients is likely to be important for understanding dissolved mass transport in near-stream aquifer environments and can influence exchange zone processes under conditions of high-frequency stream stage changes. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Finite element modeling of mass transport in high-Péclet cardiovascular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Kirk; Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Mass transport plays an important role in many important cardiovascular processes, including thrombus formation and atherosclerosis. These mass transport problems are characterized by Péclet numbers of up to 108, leading to several numerical difficulties. The presence of thin near-wall concentration boundary layers requires very fine mesh resolution in these regions, while large concentration gradients within the flow cause numerical stabilization issues. In this work, we will discuss some guidelines for solving mass transport problems in cardiovascular flows using a stabilized Galerkin finite element method. First, we perform mesh convergence studies in a series of idealized and patient-specific geometries to determine the required near-wall mesh resolution for these types of problems, using both first- and second-order tetrahedral finite elements. Second, we investigate the use of several boundary condition types at outflow boundaries where backflow during some parts of the cardiac cycle can lead to convergence issues. Finally, we evaluate the effect of reducing Péclet number by increasing mass diffusivity as has been proposed by some researchers. This work was supported by the NSF GRFP and NSF Career Award #1354541.

  8. Design of New Electrode Interface to Improve Transport of Atmospheric Pressure Ions into a Mass Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Beaudry

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An intermediate electrode was developed to improve the transfer of ions in atmospheric pressure from a first location, the ion source, to a second location, the mass spectrometer. The new apparatus increase the efficiency of mass analysis of molecular constituents of liquids, including trace analysis of chemical entities, in which an electrospray (ES or IonSpray™ (IS technique is used to produce electrically charged droplets which divide and evaporate to form gaseous ions of the molecular constituents. The gas phase ions are transported to the mass spectrometer by an electric field generated by a new electrode design that separates the two fundamental functions of an electrospray or an IonSpray™, which are the nebulization of charged droplets and the transport of ions into the mass analyzer. The results suggest that the new apparatus provide a gain in signal intensity up to 10 compared with the commercial product. A significant improvement in ion transport results in higher precision and accuracy and/or reduction of the amount of material needed for analysis.

  9. The use of the dusty-gas model for the description of mass transport with chemical reaction in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Damme, R.M.J. van; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, mass transport accompanied by chemical reactions in porous media is studied according to the Fick model and the dusty-gas model. For mass transport accompanied by a chemical reaction in catalyst structures showing a plane, line, or point of symmetry, the approximate analytical

  10. Impact of internal transport on the convective mass transfer from a droplet into a submerging falling film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, Julien R.; Thomas, Amalia; McEvoy, Harry; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the convective mass transfer of dilute passive tracers contained in small viscous drops into a submerging falling film. This problem has applications in industrial cleaning, domestic dishwashers, and decontamination of hazardous material. The film Peclet number is very high, whereas the drop Peclet number varies from 0.1 to 1. The characteristic transport time in the drop is much larger than in the film. We model the mass transfer using an analogy with Newton's law of cooling. This empirical model is supported by an analytical model solving the quasi-steady two-dimensional advection-diffusion equation in the film that is coupled with a time-dependent one-dimensional diffusion equation in the drop. We find excellent agreement between our experimental data and the two models, which predict an exponential decrease in time of the drop concentration. The transport characteristic time is related to the drop diffusion time scale, as diffusion within the drop is the limiting process. Our theoretical model not only predicts the well-known relationship between the Sherwood number and the external Reynolds number in the case of a well-mixed drop Sh ~ Re1/3, it also predicts a correction in the case of a non-uniform drop concentration. The correction depends on Re, the film Schmidt number, the drop aspect ratio and the diffusivity ratio between the two phases. This prediction is in good agreement with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency under Contract No. HDTRA1-12-D-0003-0001.

  11. Approaches to Estimate Dynamical Masses of External Galaxies%河外星系动力学质量的多途径测定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵君亮

    2015-01-01

    利用伴天体(含伴星系、球状星团、晕族天体等)的运动学观测资料,可通过多种方法估测主星系的质量(动力学质量),如自转质量、位力质量、轨道质量、投影质量、示踪质量以及星流法质量等.在诸多已测得动力学质量的河外星系中,以仙女星系(M31)的相关工作为最多,对此做了简要的介绍和讨论.%Kinametic data of satellite ob jects of external galaxies, such as dwarf galaxies, globular clusters and other halo population objects, have been used to estimate the dynamic masses of the galaxies in different approaches, including rotation mass, virial mass, pro jected mass and TME mass (Tracer Mass Estimator), orbital mass, timing mass, stellar stream method etc. During the 20th century, the main methods for mass estimates of galaxies are rotation mass, pro jected mass and orbital mass. In the 21st century, the current approaches turn to TME mass and stellar stream method, while virial mass and timing mass are also used. Among the external galaxies for which the dynamical masses have been estimated, the most numerous work of mass determination is on Andromeda, M31, and the concerned results are listed in Table 1 of this paper. It can be seen from these results that the uncertainties of M31's mass estimators, MA, are usually quite big, and even bigger than MA itself in a few cases. Because of such big uncertainties of mass estimators, up to now there has not been the final conclusion for the most massive member galaxy in the Local Group, Andromeda or Milky Way Galaxy? So far as Andromeda is concerned, it can be found from the table that the reasonable estimate of its mass, MA, is likely to be MA=(11~15) × 1011 M⊙ based on the results obtained during the recent 5~10 years. The dynamic masses of some other external galaxies with different types are briefly introduced, including the cD galaxy M87, the lenticular galaxy NGC5084, the special galaxy NGC1961, the barred spiral galaxy

  12. ASH External Web Portal (External Portal) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The ASH External Web Portal is a web-based portal that provides single sign-on functionality, making the web portal a single location from which to be authenticated...

  13.   Plant Phosphoproteomics: Analysis of Plasma Membrane Transporters by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Juanying; Rudashevskaya, Elena; Young, Clifford

    phosphorylation. Due to the low abundance of phosphoprotein, the specific enrichment prior to MS analysis is necessary. Plant proton pump (H+-ATPase) is an enzyme controls the major transport processes in the plant, such as root nutrient uptake. Moreover, this pump has been proposed to be involved in other......  Phosphorylation is a key regulatory factor in all aspects of eukaryotic biology including the regulation of plant membrane-bound transport proteins. To date, mass spectrometry (MS) has been introduced as powerful technology for study of post translational modifications (PTMs), including protein...

  14. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  15. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  16. Gluon Transport Equation with Effective Mass and Dynamical Onset of Bose-Einstein Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-01-01

    We study the transport equation describing a dense system of gluons, in the small scattering angle approximation, taking into account medium-generated effective masses of the gluons. We focus on the case of overpopulated systems that are driven to Bose-Einstein condensation on their way to thermalization. The presence of a mass modifies the dispersion relation of the gluon, as compared to the massless case, but it is shown that this does not change qualitatively the scaling behavior in the vicinity of the onset.

  17. Traffic lanes for vehicles of mass public passenger transport on city streets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladović Pavle V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of the basic measures of regulating public mass passenger transport in a city network are the introduction and management of traffic lanes reserved for the public transportation. These traffic lanes are important for several reasons: faster moving and shorter travelling time for the vehicles, reducing operating costs, improving the safety, increasing passenger comfort, maintaining of the timetable quality, etc. In most cities, an intensive use of the public transport is concentrated in the morning and the afternoon peak period. The state of the public transport system during these periods is reflected in the crowds inside the vehicles, long vehicle queues at intersections and at bus stops, which cause congestion on the streets and result in delays of public transport vehicles. This paper provides an overview of the current situation on an example in the city of Belgrade. The capacity and the quality of service for the street surfaces reserved for the public transportation vehicles were analysed on the aforementioned example.

  18. Investigations on the calculation of the third moments of elution peaks: II-linear flow speed dependence of external mass transfer coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-06-14

    This work is a systematic investigation of the linear velocity dependence of the external mass transfer coefficient provided by fitting experimental results to the solution of the GR (General Rate) model that was previously derived. The second and third statistical moments of eluted peaks were measured at different flow rates, under different experimental conditions and analyzed. The results of this analysis confirm the validity of this dependence under our current experimental conditions. The other mass transfer parameters provided by the GR model were determined. The variations of these parameters with the experimental conditions were measured. The results are discussed and interpreted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Computing the time-continuous Optimal Mass Transport Problem without Lagrangian techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Besson, Olivier; Pousin, Jérôme

    2010-01-01

    This work originates from a heart's images tracking which is to generate an apparent continuous motion, observable through intensity variation from one starting image to an ending one both supposed segmented. Given two images p0 and p1, we calculate an evolution process p(t, \\cdot) which transports p0 to p1 by using the optimal extended optical flow. In this paper we propose an algorithm based on a fixed point formulation and a time-space least squares formulation of the mass conservation equation for computing the optimal mass transport problem. The strategy is implemented in a 2D case and numerical results are presented with a first order Lagrange finite element, showing the efficiency of the proposed strategy.

  20. New efficient optimal mass transport approach for single freeform surface design

    CERN Document Server

    Bösel, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a new optimal mass transport approach for the design of a continuous single freeform surface for collimated beams. By applying the law of reflection/refraction and the well-known integrability condition, it is shown that the design process in a small angle approximation can be decoupled into the calculation of a raymapping by optimal mass transport methods and the subsequent construction of the freeform surface by a steady linear advection equation. It is shown that the solution of this linear advection equation can be obtained by a decomposition into two dimensional subproblems and solving these by standard integrals. The efficiency of the method is demonstrated by applying it to two challenging design examples.

  1. Can transport peak explain the low-mass enhancement of dileptons at RHIC?

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel relation between the low-mass enhancement of dielectrons observed at PHENIX and transport coefficients of QGP such as the charge diffusion constant $D$ and the relaxation time $\\tau_{\\rm J}$. We parameterize the transport peak in the spectral function using the second-order relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics by Israel and Stewart. Combining the spectral function and the full (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamical evolution with the lattice EoS, theoretical dielectron spectra and the experimental data are compared. Detailed analysis suggests that the low-mass dilepton enhancement originates mainly from the high-temperature QGP phase where there is a large electric charge fluctuation as obtained from lattice QCD simulations.

  2. Can transport peak explain the low-mass enhancement of dileptons at RHIC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Y.; Hamagaki, H.; Hatsuda, T.; Hirano, T.

    2011-12-01

    We propose a novel relation between the low-mass enhancement of dielectrons observed at PHENIX and transport coefficients of QGP such as the charge diffusion constant D and the relaxation time τJ. We parameterize the transport peak in the spectral function using the second-order relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics by Israel and Stewart. Combining the spectral function and the full (3+1)-dimensional hydrodynamical evolution with the lattice EoS, theoretical dielectron spectra and the experimental data are compared. Detailed analysis suggests that the low-mass dilepton enhancement originates mainly from the high-temperature QGP phase where there is a large electric charge fluctuation as obtained from lattice QCD simulations.

  3. A Twophase Multirate-Mass Transfer Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; Tecklenburg, J.; Neuweiler, I.; Carrera, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an upscaled non-local model for two-phase flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media. The media under consideration are characterized by sharp contrasts in the hydraulic properties typical for fractured porous media, for example. A two-scale expansion gives an upscaled flow and transport formulation that models multiratemass transfer between mobile (fracture) and immobile (matrix) medium portions. The evolution of saturation due to viscous dominated flow in the mobile domain and mass exchange with the immobile zones through capillary countercurrent flow. The medium heterogeneity is mapped onto the mass transfer parameters, which are encoded in a memory functionthat describes the non-local flux between mobile and immobile zones. The upscaled model is parameterized by the medium heterogeneity and the distribution of hydraulic parameters. Breakthrough of the displaced fluidshows characteristic heavy tails due to fluid retention in immobile zones.

  4. Mass transport in a thin layer of power-law fluid in an Eulerian coordinate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洁; 白玉川

    2016-01-01

    The mass transport velocity in a thin layer of muddy fluid is studied theoretically. The mud motion is driven by a periodic pressure load on the free surface, and the mud is described by a power-law model. Based on the key assumptions of the shallowness and the small deformation, a perturbation analysis is conducted up to the second order to find the mean Eulerian velocity in an Eulerian coordinate system. The numerical iteration method is adopted to solve these non-linear equations of the leading order. From the numerical results, both the first-order flow fields and the second-order mass transport velocities are examined. The verifications are made by comparing the numerical results with experimental results in the literature, and a good agreement is confirmed.

  5. Upscaling momentum and mass transport under Knudsen and binary diffusion gas slip conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes-Parada, F. J.; Lasseux, D.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling of gas phase flow in porous media is relevant as it is present in a wide variety of applications ranging from nanofluidic systems to subsurface contaminant transport. In this work, we derive a macroscopic model to study slightly compressible gas flow in porous media for conditions in which the tangential fluid velocity undergoes a slip at the solid interface due to Knudsen effects and to mass diffusion in binary conditions. To this end, we use the method of volume averaging to derive the governing equations at the Darcy scale for both mass and momentum transport. The momentum transport model consists on a modification to Darcy's law due to mass dispersion and to total density gradients. For mass transport, the resulting model is the conventional convection-dispersion equation with two correction terms, one affecting convective transport and the second one affecting mass dispersion due to gas compressibility. The macroscopic model reduces to the one reported by Altevogt et al. (2003) for the case in which gas slip is only due to a concentration gradient and to the one by Lasseux et al. (2014) under Knudsen slip conditions. The model is written in terms of effective-medium coefficients that can be predicted from solving the associated closure problems in representative unit cells. For conditions in which the Péclet number is much greater than one and when the Knudsen number is not exceedingly small compared to the unity, our computations show that the predictions of the longitudinal dispersion may reach an error as high as 60% compared to the predictions obtained by ignoring gas slip. Altevogt A.S., Rolston D.E., Whitaker S. New equations for binary gas transport in porous media, Part 1: equation development. Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 26, 695-715, 2003. Lasseux D., Valdés-Parada F.J., Ochoa-Tapia J.A., Goyeau B. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media. Physics of Fluids, Vol. 26, 053102, 2014.

  6. Peroxy radicals and ozone photochemistry in air masses undergoing long-range transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Parker

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of peroxy radicals (HO2iRiO2 in addition to other trace gases were measured onboard the UK Meteorological Office/Natural Environment Research Council British Aerospace 146-300 atmospheric research aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport of Ozone and Precursors (ITOP campaign based at Horta Airport, Faial, Azores (38.58° N, 28.72° W in July/August 2004. The overall peroxy radical altitude profile displays an increase with altitude that is likely to have been impacted by the effects of long-range transport. The peroxy radical altitude profile for air classified as of marine origin shows no discernable altitude profile. A range of air-masses were intercepted with varying source signatures, including those with aged American and Asian signatures, air-masses of biomass burning origin, and those that originated from the east coast of the United States. Enhanced peroxy radical concentrations have been observed within this range of air-masses indicating that long-range transported air-masses traversing the Atlantic show significant photochemical activity. The net ozone production at clear sky limit is in general negative, and as such the summer mid-Atlantic troposphere is at limit net ozone destructive. However, there is clear evidence of positive ozone production even at clear sky limit within air masses undergoing long-range transport, and during ITOP especially between 5 and 5.5 km, which in the main corresponds to a flight that extensively sampled air with a biomass burning signature. Ozone production was NOx limited throughout ITOP, as evidenced by a good correlation (r2=0.72 between P(O3 and NO. Strong positive net ozone production has also been seen in varying source signature air-masses undergoing long-range transport, including but not limited to low-level export events, and export from the east coast of the United States.

  7. The Role of Thermal Convection in Heat and Mass Transport in the Subarctic Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    vapor diffusion have been developed (Bader et al. 1939, Yosida et al. 1955, Giddings and LaChapelle 1962, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and...not agree, other authors (Yosida et al. 1955, Yen 1963, de Quervain 1972, Palm and Tveitereid 1979, Fedoseeva and Fedoseev 1988) concluded that the...for the diffusion model to produce the measured mass transport. Yen (1963), de Quervain (1972), Palm and Tveitereid (1979), and Fedoseeva and Fedoseev

  8. Nanoparticle Traffic on Helical Tracks: Thermophoretic Mass Transport through Carbon Nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Arcidiacono, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate and quantify thermophoretic motion of solid gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes subject to wall temperature gradients ranging from 0.4 to 25 K/nm. For temperature gradients below 1 K/nm, we find that the particles move "on tracks......" in a predictable fashion as they follow unique helical orbits depending on the geometry of the carbon nanotubes. These findings markedly advance our knowledge of mass transport mechanisms relevant to nanoscale applications....

  9. Mass Transport Modelling in low permeability Fractured Rock: Eulerian versus Lagrangian approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Llopis, C.; Grisales, C.; Gomez-Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-04-01

    Modeling flow and mass transport in fractured rocks can not be always successfully addressed by means of discrete fracture models which can fail due to the difficulty to be calibrated to experimental measurements. This is due to the need of having an accurate knowledge of fractures geometry and of the bidimensional distribution of hydrodynamic parameters on them. Besides, these models tend to be too rigid in the sense of not being able to re-adapt themselves correcting deficiencies or errors in the fracture definition. An alternative approach is assuming a pseudo-continuum media in which fractures are represented by the introduction of discretization blocks of very high hydraulic conductivity (K). This kind of model has been successfully tested in some real cases where the stochastic inversion of the flow equation has been performed to obtain equally likely K fields. However, in this framework, Eulerian mass transport modeling yields numerical dispersion and oscillations that make very difficult the analysis of tracer tests and the inversion of concentration data to identify K fields. In this contribution we present flow and mass transport modelling results in a fractured medium approached by a pseudo-continuum. The case study considered is based on data from a low permeability formation and both Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches have been applied. K fields in fractures are modeled as realizations of a stochastic process conditional to piezometric head data. Both a MultiGaussian and a non-multiGaussian approches are evaluated. The final goal of this research is obtaining K fields able to reproduce field tracer tests. Results show the important numerical problems found when applying an Eurelian approach and the possibilities of avoiding them with a 3D implementation of the Lagrangian random walk method. Besides, we see how different can be mass transport predictions when Gaussian and non-Gaussian models are assumed for K fields in fractures.

  10. Mass transport phenomena during solidification in microgravity; preliminary results of the first Mephisto flight experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, J. J.; Garandet, J. P.; Rouzaud, A.; Camel, D.

    1994-06-01

    The MEPHISTO space facility flew on the Columbia space shuttle in October 1992. The preliminary scientific results, mainly based on the analysis of the Seebeck signal, are presented in this paper. Valuable information was obtained for both planar and cellular solidification regimes. It is shown that mass transfer in the melt during the flight was principally diffusive; however, even in microgravity, slow growth rates may result in significant convective transport. A tentative interpretation of the Seebeck signal for destabilized interfaces is also proposed.

  11. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C.; Lewis, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contac...

  12. Characterization of an electrochemical industrial size filterpress reactor by hydrodynamic and mass transport studies

    OpenAIRE

    Frías Ferrer, Ángel; González García, José; Conesa Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Gadea Ramos, Enrique; Expósito Rodríguez, Eduardo; García García, Vicente; Montiel Leguey, Vicente; Aldaz Riera, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Comunicación presentada en Tracers and Tracing Methods 2001, Nancy, May 2001. This work deals with the study of the influence of turbulence promoters in hydrodynamic and mass transport behaviour of a filter-press type electrolyser with 3250 cm2 of electrode area (model REIM 3300 supplied by “I.D. Electroquímica”) in undivided configuration. A simple experimental arrangement was used to generate data from electrolytic conductivity measurements in a series of impulse-response exp...

  13. Mass balance inverse modelling of methane in the 1990s using a Chemistry Transport Model

    OpenAIRE

    T. M. Butler; Simmonds, I.; Rayner, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; A mass balance inverse modelling procedure is applied with a time-dependent methane concentration boundary condition and a chemical transport model to relate observed changes in the surface distribution of methane mixing ratios during the 1990s to changes in its surface sources. The model reproduces essential features of the global methane cycle, such as the latitudinal distribution and seasonal cycle of fluxes, without using a priori knowledge of methane fluxes. A det...

  14. Mixing it up: Corals take an active role in mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Vicente; Shapiro, Orr; Brumley, Douglas; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey; Kramarski-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    The growth and health of reef-building corals are limited by corals' ability to exchange nutrients and oxygen with the surrounding, sometimes quiescent, seawater. Mass transport in coral systems has long been considered to occur passively as a result of molecular diffusion and the ambient fluid flow over the coral. Through a combination of microscale visualization experiments and numerical modeling, we demonstrate instead that motile cilia densely covering the coral surface - previously thought to serve cleaning and feeding purposes- actively stir the coral boundary layer by generating persistent vortices above the coral surface. This active mixing was observed over a variety of corals with differing surface geometries. We have quantified the contribution of ciliary surface vortices to mass transport, finding oxygen flux enhancements of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude under environmentally relevant ambient flow conditions. These results reveal a new, active role of the coral animal in regulating its mass transport by engineering its local hydrodynamic environment, an ability that may have an important role in the evolutionary success of reef corals.

  15. The Impact of Microstructure Geometry on the Mass Transport in Artificial Pores: A Numerical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Galinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of porous materials used in heterogeneous catalysis determines the mass transport inside networks, which may vary over many length scales. The theoretical prediction of mass transport phenomena in porous materials, however, is incomplete and is still not completely understood. Therefore, experimental data for every specific porous system is needed. One possible experimental technique for characterizing the mass transport in such pore networks is pulse experiments. The general evaluation of experimental outcomes of these techniques follows the solution of Fick’s second law where an integral and effective diffusion coefficient is recognized. However, a detailed local understanding of diffusion and sorption processes remains a challenge. As there is lack of proved models covering different length scales, existing classical concepts need to be evaluated with respect to their ability to reflect local geometries on the nanometer level. In this study, DSMC (Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models were used to investigate the impact of pore microstructures on the diffusion behaviour of gases. It can be understood as a virtual pulse experiment within a single pore or a combination of different pore geometries.

  16. External calibration in gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry measurements of endogenous androgenic anabolic steroids in sports doping control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioussi, Maroula K; Angelis, Yiannis S; Cawley, Adam T; Koupparis, Michalis; Kazlauskas, Rymantas; Brenna, J Thomas; Georgakopoulos, Costas G

    2011-08-19

    An alternative calibration procedure for the gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) measurements of the World Antidoping Agency (WADA) Accredited Laboratories is presented. To alleviate the need for externally calibrated CO₂ gas for GC-C-IRMS analysis of urinary steroid metabolites, calibration using an external standard mixture solution of steroids with certified isotopic composition was investigated. The reference steroids of the calibration mixture and routine samples underwent identical instrumental processes. The calibration standards bracketed the entire range of the relevant δ¹³C values for the endogenous and exogenous steroids as well as their chromatographic retention times. The certified δ¹³C values of the reference calibrators were plotted in relation to measured m/z ¹³CO₂/¹²CO₂ (i.e. R(45/44)) mass spectrometric signals of each calibrator. δ¹³C values of the sample steroids were calculated from the least squares fit through the calibration curve. The effect of the external calibration on δ¹³C values, using the same calibration standards and set of urine samples but different brands of GC-C-IRMS instruments, was assessed by an interlaboratory study in the WADA Accredited Laboratories of Sydney, Australia and Athens, Greece. Relative correspondence between the laboratories for determination of androsterone, etiocholanolone, 5β-androstane-3α,17β-diacetate, and pregnanediacetate means were SD(δ¹³C)=0.12‰, 0.58‰, -0.34‰, and -0.40‰, respectively. These data demonstrate that accurate intralaboratory external calibration with certified steroids provided by United States Antidoping Agency (USADA) and without external CO₂ calibration is feasible and directly applicable to the WADA Accredited Laboratories for the harmonization of the GC-C-IRMS measurements.

  17. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  18. Coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element models for soft tissues using ABAQUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Simon, B R; Rigby, Paul H; Newberg, Tyler P

    2011-04-01

    Finite element models (FEMs) including characteristic large deformations in highly nonlinear materials (hyperelasticity and coupled diffusive/convective transport of neutral mobile species) will allow quantitative study of in vivo tissues. Such FEMs will provide basic understanding of normal and pathological tissue responses and lead to optimization of local drug delivery strategies. We present a coupled porohyperelastic mass transport (PHEXPT) finite element approach developed using a commercially available ABAQUS finite element software. The PHEXPT transient simulations are based on sequential solution of the porohyperelastic (PHE) and mass transport (XPT) problems where an Eulerian PHE FEM is coupled to a Lagrangian XPT FEM using a custom-written FORTRAN program. The PHEXPT theoretical background is derived in the context of porous media transport theory and extended to ABAQUS finite element formulations. The essential assumptions needed in order to use ABAQUS are clearly identified in the derivation. Representative benchmark finite element simulations are provided along with analytical solutions (when appropriate). These simulations demonstrate the differences in transient and steady state responses including finite deformations, total stress, fluid pressure, relative fluid, and mobile species flux. A detailed description of important model considerations (e.g., material property functions and jump discontinuities at material interfaces) is also presented in the context of finite deformations. The ABAQUS-based PHEXPT approach enables the use of the available ABAQUS capabilities (interactive FEM mesh generation, finite element libraries, nonlinear material laws, pre- and postprocessing, etc.). PHEXPT FEMs can be used to simulate the transport of a relatively large neutral species (negligible osmotic fluid flux) in highly deformable hydrated soft tissues and tissue-engineered materials.

  19. Mass-conservative reconstruction of Galerkin velocity fields for transport simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudeler, C.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate calculation of mass-conservative velocity fields from numerical solutions of Richards' equation is central to reliable surface-subsurface flow and transport modeling, for example in long-term tracer simulations to determine catchment residence time distributions. In this study we assess the performance of a local Larson-Niklasson (LN) post-processing procedure for reconstructing mass-conservative velocities from a linear (P1) Galerkin finite element solution of Richards' equation. This approach, originally proposed for a-posteriori error estimation, modifies the standard finite element velocities by imposing local conservation on element patches. The resulting reconstructed flow field is characterized by continuous fluxes on element edges that can be efficiently used to drive a second order finite volume advective transport model. Through a series of tests of increasing complexity that compare results from the LN scheme to those using velocity fields derived directly from the P1 Galerkin solution, we show that a locally mass-conservative velocity field is necessary to obtain accurate transport results. We also show that the accuracy of the LN reconstruction procedure is comparable to that of the inherently conservative mixed finite element approach, taken as a reference solution, but that the LN scheme has much lower computational costs. The numerical tests examine steady and unsteady, saturated and variably saturated, and homogeneous and heterogeneous cases along with initial and boundary conditions that include dry soil infiltration, alternating solute and water injection, and seepage face outflow. Typical problems that arise with velocities derived from P1 Galerkin solutions include outgoing solute flux from no-flow boundaries, solute entrapment in zones of low hydraulic conductivity, and occurrences of anomalous sources and sinks. In addition to inducing significant mass balance errors, such manifestations often lead to oscillations in concentration

  20. Mass transport in morphogenetic processes: A second gradient theory for volumetric growth and material remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarletta, P.; Ambrosi, D.; Maugin, G. A.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we derive a novel thermo-mechanical theory for growth and remodeling of biological materials in morphogenetic processes. This second gradient hyperelastic theory is the first attempt to describe both volumetric growth and mass transport phenomena in a single-phase continuum model, where both stress- and shape-dependent growth regulations can be investigated. The diffusion of biochemical species (e.g. morphogens, growth factors, migration signals) inside the material is driven by configurational forces, enforced in the balance equations and in the set of constitutive relations. Mass transport is found to depend both on first- and on second-order material connections, possibly withstanding a chemotactic behavior with respect to diffusing molecules. We find that the driving forces of mass diffusion can be written in terms of covariant material derivatives reflecting, in a purely geometrical manner, the presence of a (first-order) torsion and a (second-order) curvature. Thermodynamical arguments show that the Eshelby stress and hyperstress tensors drive the rearrangement of the first- and second-order material inhomogeneities, respectively. In particular, an evolution law is proposed for the first-order transplant, extending a well-known result for inelastic materials. Moreover, we define the first stress-driven evolution law of the second-order transplant in function of the completely material Eshelby hyperstress. The theory is applied to two biomechanical examples, showing how an Eshelbian coupling can coordinate volumetric growth, mass transport and internal stress state, both in physiological and pathological conditions. Finally, possible applications of the proposed model are discussed for studying the unknown regulation mechanisms in morphogenetic processes, as well as for optimizing scaffold architecture in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  1. Measurement of fissile mass in large-size containers with a transportable linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyer Dherbey, Jacques; Lyoussi, A.; Buisson, A.

    1997-02-01

    The quantification of transuranic material (TRU) in waste packages is a common problem of countries working in the field of nuclear nondestructive inspection. The direct measurement of TRU mass inside large size closed containers is difficult due to several effects, mainly the matrix attenuation and uncertainty on the localization of the radioactive mass. The present document describes the method being developed to assay conditioned waste packages using a transportable linear accelerator which is called Mini- Linatron. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from the Mini-Linatron to produce high energy bremsstrahlung photon bursts from thin metallic converter. The transportable linear accelerator operates at 6, 9 and 11 MeV with a repetition rate between 10 to 300 Hz and a 4.5 microsecond(s) pulse duration. The maximum gamma dose rate is about 23 Gy/mn at 1 m. The photons induce fission in fissile and fertile nuclei. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse by using Sequential Photon Interrogation and Neutron Counting Signatures technique which has ben developed in this framework. Results of measurements on an experimental active gamma interrogation facility for embedded intermediate and low level wastes are presented. Finally, the advantages and performances of the photofission interrogation technique, the use of a transportable electron linear accelerator as a particle source, and the experimental and electronic details will be discussed.

  2. Oligomers Modulate Interfibril Branching and Mass Transport Properties of Collagen Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Catherine F.; Brandner, Eric; Teo, Ka Yaw; Han, Bumsoo; Nauman, Eric; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.

    2013-01-01

    Mass transport within collagen-based matrices is critical to tissue development, repair, and pathogenesis as well as the design of next generation tissue engineering strategies. This work shows how collagen precursors, specified by intermolecular cross-link composition, provide independent control of collagen matrix mechanical and transport properties. Collagen matrices were prepared from tissue-extracted monomers or oligomers. Viscoelastic behavior was measured in oscillatory shear and unconfined compression. Matrix permeability and diffusivity were measured using gravity-driven permeametry and integrated optical imaging, respectively. Both collagen types showed an increase in stiffness and permeability hindrance with increasing collagen concentration (fibril density); however, different physical property-concentration relationships were noted. Diffusivity wasn’t affected by concentration for either collagen type over the range tested. In general, oligomer matrices exhibited a substantial increase in stiffness and only a modest decrease in transport properties when compared to monomer matrices prepared at the same concentration. The observed differences in viscoelastic and transport properties were largely attributed to increased levels of interfibril branching within oligomer matrices. The ability to relate physical properties to relevant microstructure parameters, including fibril density and interfibril branching, is expected to advance the understanding of cell-matrix signaling as well as facilitate model-based prediction and design of matrix-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:23842082

  3. Mass and charge transport in micro and nano-fluidic channels

    CERN Document Server

    Mortensen, N A; Okkels, F; Bruus, H

    2006-01-01

    We consider laminar flow of incompressible electrolytes in long, straight channels driven by pressure and electro-osmosis. We use a Hilbert space eigenfunction expansion to address the general problem of an arbitrary cross section and obtain general results in linear-response theory for the mass and charge transport coefficients which satisfy Onsager relations. In the limit of non-overlapping Debye layers the transport coefficients are simply expressed in terms of parameters of the electrolyte as well as the hydraulic radius R=2A/P with A and P being the cross-sectional area and perimeter, respectively. In articular, we consider the limits of thin non-overlapping as well as strongly overlapping Debye layers, respectively, and calculate the corrections to the hydraulic resistance due to electro-hydrodynamic interactions.

  4. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Haussener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  5. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussener, Sophia; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2012-01-19

    High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  6. Particle-based simulations of steady-state mass transport at high P\\'eclet numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Thomas; Rajah, Luke; Cohen, Samuel I A; Yates, Emma V; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chrisopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2015-01-01

    Conventional approaches for simulating steady-state distributions of particles under diffusive and advective transport at high P\\'eclet numbers involve solving the diffusion and advection equations in at least two dimensions. Here, we present an alternative computational strategy by combining a particle-based rather than a field-based approach with the initialisation of particles in proportion to their flux. This method allows accurate prediction of the steady state and is applicable even at high P\\'eclet numbers where traditional particle-based Monte-Carlo methods starting from randomly initialised particle distributions fail. We demonstrate that generating a flux of particles according to a predetermined density and velocity distribution at a single fixed time and initial location allows for accurate simulation of mass transport under flow. Specifically, upon initialisation in proportion to their flux, these particles are propagated individually and detected by summing up their Monte-Carlo trajectories in p...

  7. Ion-neutral transport through quadrupole interfaces of mass-spectrometer systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugroot, M.; Groth, C.P.T. [Univ. of Toronto, Inst. for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: jugroot@utias.utoronto.ca; groth@utias.utoronto.ca; Thomson, B.A.; Baranov, V.; Collings, B.A.; French, J.B. [MDS SCIEX, Concord, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    The transport of free ions through highly under-expanded jet flows of neutral gases and in the presence of applied electric fields is investigated by continuum-based numerical simulations. In particular, numerical results are described which are relevant to ion flows occurring in quadrupole interfaces of mass spectrometer systems. A five-moment mathematical model and parallel multi-block numerical solution procedure is developed for predicting the ion transport. The model incorporates the effects of ion-neutral collision processes and is used in conjunction with a Navier-Stokes model and flow solver for the neutral gas to examine the key influences controlling the ion motion. The effects of the neutral gas flow, electric fields (both dc and rf), and flow field geometry on ion mobility are carefully assessed. The capability of controlling the charged particle motions through a combination of directed neutral flow and applied electric field is demonstrated for these high-speed, hypersonic, jet flows. (author)

  8. Numerical investigation of ion transport in the interface region of mass spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugroot, M.; Groth, C.P.T. [Univ. of Toronto, Inst. for Aerospace Studies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: jugroot@utias.utoronto.ca; groth@utias.utoronto.ca; Thomson, B.A.; Baranov, V.; Collings, B.A. [MDS SCIEX, Concord, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The transport of free ions through highly under-expanded jet flows of neutral gases and in the presence of applied electric fields is investigated by continuum-based numerical simulations. A five-moment mathematical model and parallel multi-block numerical solution procedure is developed for predicting the ion transport. The model incorporates the effects of ion-neutral collision processes and is used in conjunction with a Navier-Stokes model and flow solver for the neutral gas to examine the key features of the ion motion. The influences of the neutral gas flow, electric field, and flow field geometry on ion mobility are all carefully assessed. Numerical results are given which are relevant to the ion flows occurring in the interface regions of mass spectrometer systems. (author)

  9. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The 'minimum mass' protosolar nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual 'minimum-mass' model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula.

  10. Dynamo magnetic field-induced angular momentum transport in protostellar nebulae - The minimum mass protosolar nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Magnetic torques can produce angular momentum redistribution in protostellar nebulas. Dynamo magnetic fields can be generated in differentially rotating and turbulent nebulas and can be the source of magnetic torques that transfer angular momentum from a protostar to a disk, as well as redistribute angular momentum within a disk. A magnetic field strength of 100-1000 G is needed to transport the major part of a protostar's angular momentum into a surrounding disk in a time characteristic of star formation, thus allowing formation of a solar-system size protoplanetary nebula in the usual minimum-mass model of the protosolar nebula. This paper examines the possibility that a dynamo magnetic field could have induced the needed angular momentum transport from the proto-Sun to the protoplanetary nebula. 32 refs.

  11. ENERGY AND MASS TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THE GRANULAR BED OF AN INDIRECTLY HEATED ROTARY KILN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolfgang Klose; Arndt-Peter Schinkel

    2004-01-01

    The transport mechanisms of momentum, mass, species, and energy are investigated in detail for the rotary kiln process. The residence time prediction of the granular bed is well improved by considering different flow patterns in the drum. Introducing a mixed flow pattem of the basic slipping and slumping behaviour has the most important effect on the improvement of the residence time prediction. The granular bed is assumed to behave as a Bingham fluid in the active layer of the bed. The transport mechanisms of momentum, species, and energy are modelled on the basis of this assumption and using the kinetic gas theory. Additionally, a mathematical transformation is presented to save computational time. The model results of the temperature field are in very good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Analytical solutions for transport processes fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Brenn, Günter

    2017-01-01

    This book provides analytical solutions to a number of classical problems in transport processes, i.e. in fluid mechanics, heat and mass transfer. Expanding computing power and more efficient numerical methods have increased the importance of computational tools. However, the interpretation of these results is often difficult and the computational results need to be tested against the analytical results, making analytical solutions a valuable commodity. Furthermore, analytical solutions for transport processes provide a much deeper understanding of the physical phenomena involved in a given process than do corresponding numerical solutions. Though this book primarily addresses the needs of researchers and practitioners, it may also be beneficial for graduate students just entering the field. .

  13. A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

  14. Evaluation and optimization of mass transport of redox species in silicon microwire-array photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang; Meng, Andrew C; Lewis, Nathan S

    2012-09-25

    Physical integration of a Ag electrical contact internally into a metal/substrate/microstructured Si wire array/oxide/Ag/electrolyte photoelectrochemical solar cell has produced structures that display relatively low ohmic resistance losses, as well as highly efficient mass transport of redox species in the absence of forced convection. Even with front-side illumination, such wire-array based photoelectrochemical solar cells do not require a transparent conducting oxide top contact. In contact with a test electrolyte that contained 50 mM/5.0 mM of the cobaltocenium(+/0) redox species in CH(3)CN-1.0 M LiClO(4), when the counterelectrode was placed in the solution and separated from the photoelectrode, mass transport restrictions of redox species in the internal volume of the Si wire array photoelectrode produced low fill factors and limited the obtainable current densities to 17.6 mA cm(-2) even under high illumination. In contrast, when the physically integrated internal Ag film served as the counter electrode, the redox couple species were regenerated inside the internal volume of the photoelectrode, especially in regions where depletion of the redox species due to mass transport limitations would have otherwise occurred. This behavior allowed the integrated assembly to operate as a two-terminal, stand-alone, photoelectrochemical solar cell. The current density vs. voltage behavior of the integrated photoelectrochemical solar cell produced short-circuit current densities in excess of 80 mA cm(-2) at high light intensities, and resulted in relatively low losses due to concentration overpotentials at 1 Sun illumination. The integrated wire array-based device architecture also provides design guidance for tandem photoelectrochemical cells for solar-driven water splitting.

  15. Identification of biomolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters in living cells by inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirmohammadi Adel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of in-vivo biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters from experimental data obtained by Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP is becoming more important. Methods and results The Osborne-Moré extended version of the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm was coupled with the experimental data obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP protocol, and the numerical solution of a set of two partial differential equations governing macromolecule mass transport and reaction in living cells, to inversely estimate optimized values of the molecular diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor. The results indicate that the FRAP protocol provides enough information to estimate one parameter uniquely using a nonlinear optimization technique. Coupling FRAP experimental data with the inverse modeling strategy, one can also uniquely estimate the individual values of the binding rate coefficients if the molecular diffusion coefficient is known. One can also simultaneously estimate the dissociation rate parameter and molecular diffusion coefficient given the pseudo-association rate parameter is known. However, the protocol provides insufficient information for unique simultaneous estimation of three parameters (diffusion coefficient and binding rate parameters owing to the high intercorrelation between the molecular diffusion coefficient and pseudo-association rate parameter. Attempts to estimate macromolecule mass transport and binding rate parameters simultaneously from FRAP data result in misleading conclusions regarding concentrations of free macromolecule and bound complex inside the cell, average binding time per vacant site, average time for diffusion of macromolecules from one site to the next, and slow or rapid mobility of biomolecules in cells. Conclusion To obtain unique values for molecular diffusion coefficient and

  16. Association of central serotonin transporter availability and body mass index in healthy Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Swen; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Zientek, Franziska

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Serotonin-mediated mechanisms, in particular via the serotonin transporter (SERT), are thought to have an effect on food intake and play an important role in the pathophysiology of obesity. However, imaging studies that examined the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and SERT...... are sparse and provided contradictory results. The aim of this study was to further test the association between SERT and BMI in a large cohort of healthy subjects. METHODS: 127 subjects of the ENC DAT database (58 females, age 52 ± 18 years, range 20-83, BMI 25.2 ± 3.8 kg/m(2), range 18.2-41.1) were...

  17. BIFURCATION OF FLOW AND MASS TRANSPORT IN A CURVED BLOOD VESSEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wenchang(谭文长); WEI Lan(魏兰); ZHAO Yaohua(赵耀华); TAKASHI Masuoka

    2003-01-01

    A numerical analysis of flow and concentration fields of macromolecules in a slightly curved blood vessel was carried out. Based on these results, the effect of the bifurcation of a flow on the mass transport in a curved blood vessel was discussed. The macromolecules turned out to be easier to deposit in the inner part of the curved blood vessel near the critical Dean number. Once the Dean number is higher than the critical number, the bifurcation of the flow appears. This bifurcation can prevent macromolecules from concentrating in the inner part of the curved blood vessel. This result is helpful for understanding the possible correlations between the blood dynamics and atherosclerosis.

  18. Back to the early Universe by a Monge-Ampere-Kantorovich mass transportation method

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, U; Mohayaee, R; Sobolevski, A; Frisch, Uriel; Matarrese, Sabino; Mohayaee, Roya; Sobolevski, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    Reconstructing the minute density fluctuations in the early Universe that evolved into a highly clumpy matter distribution, as revealed by the present distribution of luminous matter, constitutes a major challenge of modern cosmology. A number of techniques have been devised in recent years which attempt to achieve this aim by using galaxy positions alone [8 refs.]. However, without knowledge of their velocities, this problem is not well-posed and its solution suffers frequently from lack of uniqueness. Here we make the hypothesis that the map from initial to present locations of mass elements is irrotational. Using recent mathematical work [Brenier], we then relate reconstruction to ``mass transportation'', a well-posed optimisation problem in engineering introduced by Monge in 1781. We propose a new powerful algorithm for unique reconstruction which, when tested against N-body simulations, gives excellent reconstruction down to scales of a few comoving megaparsecs and demonstrates the validity of our hypoth...

  19. Numerical simulation of mass and energy transport phenomena in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpino, F. [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Strutture, Ambiente e Territorio (DiMSAT), University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, Cassino (Italy); Massarotti, N. [Dipertimento per le Tecnologie (DiT), University of Naples ' ' Parthenope' ' , Centro Direzionale, isola C4, 80143 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-12-15

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) represent a very promising technology for near future energy conversion thanks to a number of advantages, including the possibility of using different fuels. In this paper, a detailed numerical model, based on a general mathematical description and on a finite element Characteristic based Split (CBS) algorithm code is employed to simulate mass and energy transport phenomena in SOFCs. The model predicts the thermodynamic quantity of interest in the fuel cell. Full details of the numerical solution obtained are presented both in terms of heat and mass transfer in the cell and in terms of electro-chemical reactions that occur in the system considered. The results obtained with the present algorithm is compared with the experimental data available in the literature for validation, showing an excellent agreement. (author)

  20. Flexibility of Freight Transport Sectors : An Exploration of Carriers’ Responses to External Pressure on Prices and Service

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runhaar, H.A.C.; Heijden, R. van der; Kuipers, Bart

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we explore how government policies in the field of transport may affect future freight rates, transit times, and delivery reliability. In particular, attention is paid to the ‘absorptive capacity’ of freight carriers, i.e. the extent to which they can reduce the effects of such polici

  1. Flux dependent MeV self-ion-induced effects on Au nanostructures: dramatic mass transport and nanosilicide formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, J; Umananda Bhatta, M; Sundaravel, B; Nair, K G M; Liou, Sz-Chian; Chen, Cheng-Hsuan; Wang, Yuh-Lin; Satyam, P V

    2008-08-13

    We report a direct observation of dramatic mass transport due to 1.5 MeV Au(2+) ion impact on isolated Au nanostructures of average size ≈7.6 nm and height ≈6.9 nm that are deposited on Si(111) substrate under high flux (3.2 × 10(10)-6.3 × 10(12) ions cm(-2) s(-1)) conditions. The mass transport from nanostructures was found to extend up to a distance of about 60 nm into the substrate, much beyond their size. This forward mass transport is compared with the recoil implantation profiles using SRIM simulation. The observed anomalies with theory and simulations are discussed. At a given energy, the incident flux plays a major role in mass transport and its redistribution. The mass transport is explained on the basis of thermal effects and the creation of rapid diffusion paths in the nanoscale regime during the course of ion irradiation. The unusual mass transport is found to be associated with the formation of gold silicide nano-alloys at subsurfaces. The complexity of the ion-nanostructure interaction process is discussed with a direct observation of melting (in the form of spherical fragments on the surface) phenomena. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy methods have been used.

  2. Origin of the mass splitting of azimuthal anisotropies in a multi-phase transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hanlin; Lin, Zi-Wei; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The mass splitting of azimuthal anisotropy ($v_n$) at low transverse momentum ($p_{\\perp}$) is considered as a hallmark of hydrodynamic collective flow. We investigate a multi-phase transport (AMPT) model where the $v_n$ is mainly generated by the escape mechanism, not of the hydrodynamic flow nature, and where the mass splitting is also observed. This paper provides extensive details to our published work on Au+Au and d+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (arXiv:1601.05390); it also includes new results on p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. We demonstrate that the mass splitting of $v_n$ in AMPT partly arises from kinematics in the quark coalescence hadronization process but more dominantly from hadronic rescatterings, even though the contribution from the latter to the overall charged hadron $v_n$ is small. It is also found that hadronic decays reduce the degree of mass splitting. These findings are qualitatively the same as those from hybrid models that combine hydrodynamics wit...

  3. Effects of Mass Fluctuation on Thermal Transport Properties in Bulk Bi2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ben; Zhai, Pengcheng; Yang, Xuqiu; Li, Guodong

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we applied large-scale molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics to study the influence of mass fluctuation on thermal transport properties in bulk Bi2Te3, namely thermal conductivity (K), phonon density of state (PDOS), group velocity (v g), and mean free path (l). The results show that total atomic mass change can affect the relevant vibrational frequency on the micro level and heat transfer rate in the macro statistic, hence leading to the strength variation of the anharmonic phonon processes (Umklapp scattering) in the defect-free Bi2Te3 bulk. Moreover, it is interesting to find that the anharmonicity of Bi2Te3 can be also influenced by atomic differences of the structure such as the mass distribution in the primitive cell. Considering the asymmetry of the crystal structure and interatomic forces, it can be concluded by phonon frequency, lifetime, and velocity calculation that acoustic-optical phonon scattering shows the structure-sensitivity to the mass distribution and complicates the heat transfer mechanism, hence resulting in the low lattice thermal conductivity of Bi2Te3. This study is helpful for designing the material with tailored thermal conductivity via atomic substitution.

  4. Geocenter motion due to surface mass transport from GRACE satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, R. E. M.; van der Wal, W.; Lavallée, D. A.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of mass redistribution from satellite gravimetry are insensitive to geocenter motions. However, geocenter motions can be constrained by satellite gravity data alone if we partition mass changes between land and oceans, under the assumption that the ocean is passive (i.e., in gravitational equilibrium with the land load and the solid earth). Here, we make use of 8 years (2003-2010) of optimally filtered monthly GRACE-based solutions produced at TU Delft to determine changes in the land load and the corresponding geocenter motion, through an iterative procedure. We pay particular attention to correcting for signal leakage caused by the limited spatial resolution of GRACE. We also investigate how the choice of a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) affects the estimated geocenter motion trend due to present-day surface mass transport. Finally, we separate the contribution of ice masses from that of land hydrology and show how they have a different sensitivity to the chosen GIA model and observational time-span.

  5. Mass-transport deposit and mélange formation in the Ligurian accretionary complex (NW-Italy) via mutual interactions of tectonic, sedimentary and diapiric processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, A.; Codegone, G.; Dilek, Y.; Ogata, K.; Pini, G.

    2011-12-01

    Slope instability and material removal from the overriding plate are common in frontal wedges of subduction-accretionary complexes, form mass-transport deposits (MTDs), and play an important role in controlling the internal dynamics of a critical taper Coulomb wedge and its slope instability. We present different examples of ancient MTDs emplaced during the late Cretaceous-Miocene evolution of the External Ligurian accretionary wedge and the related wedge-top basins (Epiligurian Units Auct.) in the NW-Apennines, Italy. These MTDs consist of sedimentary mélanges or olistostromes and display heterogeneous deformation controlled by the degree of sediment consolidation and the velocity of gravitational processes (Festa et al., 2010 IGR; Pini et al., 2011 Springer Book). Decimeter- to meter-thick shear zones associated with localized visco-plastic deformation and highly disturbed rounded and/or subangular blocks randomly distributed in a brecciated matrix form the two end-members of structures. Crosscutting relationships between MTDs and coherent successions, tectonic mélanges - broken formation and injection bodies (shaly-dykes and/or diapirs) allow us to document their time-progressive development, the correlation with tectonic and diapiric processes, and the material redistribution forming polygenic mélanges in the frontal part of the External Ligurian accretionary wedge. Out-of-sequence "megathrust" and strike-slip faulting, fluid overpressure, presence of low-permeable layers and methane-rich fluid circulation in the sedimentary column were the main factors that controlled the emplacement of various MTDs. In all the examples described, mass-transport was closely associated and had mutual interactions with tectonic and diapiric processes (Festa, 2011 GSA Sp Publ). Tectonics played the most prominent role (directly and indirectly), whereas fluid flow and overpressure strongly controlled the mechanical behavior of sediments and facilitated the emplacement of

  6. New particle formation in air mass transported between two measurement sites in Northern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Komppula

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study covers four years of aerosol number size distribution data from Pallas and Värriö sites 250 km apart from each other in Northern Finland and compares new particle formation events between these sites. In air masses of eastern origin almost all events were observed to start earlier at the eastern station Värriö, whereas in air masses of western origin most of the events were observed to start earlier at the western station Pallas. This demonstrates that particle formation in a certain air mass type depends not only on the diurnal variation of the parameters causing the phenomenon (such as photochemistry but also on some properties carried by the air mass itself. The correlation in growth rates between the two sites was relatively good, which suggests that the amount of condensable vapour causing the growth must have been at about the same level in both sites. The condensation sink was frequently much higher at the downwind station. It seems that secondary particle formation related to biogenic sources dominate in many cases over the particle sinks during the air mass transport between the sites. Two cases of transport from Pallas to Värriö were further analysed with an aerosol dynamics model. The model was able to reproduce the observed nucleation events 250 km down-wind at Värriö but revealed some differences between the two cases. The simulated nucleation rates were in both cases similar but the organic concentration profiles that best reproduced the observations were different in the two cases indicating that divergent formation reactions may dominate under different conditions. The simulations also suggested that organic compounds were the main contributor to new particle growth, which offers a tentative hypothesis to the distinct features of new particles at the two sites: Air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean typically spent approximately only ten hours over land before arriving at Pallas, and thus the time for the

  7. Transit time distributions and StorAge Selection functions in a sloping soil lysimeter with time-varying flow paths: Direct observation of internal and external transport variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minseok; Pangle, Luke A.; Cardoso, Charléne; Lora, Marco; Volkmann, Till H. M.; Wang, Yadi; Harman, Ciaran J.; Troch, Peter A.

    2016-09-01

    Transit times through hydrologic systems vary in time, but the nature of that variability is not well understood. Transit times variability was investigated in a 1 m3 sloping lysimeter, representing a simplified model of a hillslope receiving periodic rainfall events for 28 days. Tracer tests were conducted using an experimental protocol that allows time-variable transit time distributions (TTDs) to be calculated from data. Observed TTDs varied with the storage state of the system, and the history of inflows and outflows. We propose that the observed time variability of the TTDs can be decomposed into two parts: "internal" variability associated with changes in the arrangement of, and partitioning between, flow pathways; and "external" variability driven by fluctuations in the flow rate along all flow pathways. These concepts can be defined quantitatively in terms of rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) functions, which is a theory describing lumped transport dynamics. Internal variability is associated with temporal variability in the rSAS function, while external is not. The rSAS function variability was characterized by an "inverse storage effect," whereby younger water is released in greater proportion under wetter conditions than drier. We hypothesize that this effect is caused by the rapid mobilization of water in the unsaturated zone by the rising water table. Common approximations used to model transport dynamics that neglect internal variability were unable to reproduce the observed breakthrough curves accurately. This suggests that internal variability can play an important role in hydrologic transport dynamics, with implications for field data interpretation and modeling.

  8. How does the mass transport in disk galaxy models influence the character of orbits?

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    We explore the regular or chaotic nature of orbits of stars moving in the meridional (R,z) plane of an axially symmetric time-dependent disk galaxy model with a central, spherically symmetric nucleus. In particular, mass is linearly transported from the disk to the galactic nucleus, in order to mimic, in a way, the case of self-consistent interactions of an actual N-body simulation. We thus try to unveil the influence of this mass transportation on the different families of orbits of stars by monitoring how the percentage of chaotic orbits, as well as the percentages of orbits of the main regular resonant families, evolve as the galaxy develops a dense and massive nucleus in its core. The SALI method is applied to samples of orbits in order to distinguish safely between ordered and chaotic motion. In addition, a method based on the concept of spectral dynamics is used for identifying the various families of regular orbits and also for recognizing the secondary resonances that bifurcate from them. Our computat...

  9. Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan W. Nowok

    1998-02-01

    Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting (physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect).' Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solidlike skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.

  10. Task 6.7.3 - Interfacial Mass Transport Effects in Composite Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan W. Nowok

    1998-02-01

    Advanced metal-matrix composites (MMCS) consisting of titanium-based alloys possess some unique mechanical, physical, and chemical characteristics that make them highly desirable for aircraft and gas turbine engines. Tailoring MMC properties is essential for advanced product design in materials processing. The main factors that affect materials processing and, further, the nature of a metal-ceramic interface, its structure, and morphological stability is liquid surface mass transport related to adhesional wetting physical effect) and reactive wetting (chemical effect). Surfaces and interfaces dominate many of the technologically important processes in composite materials such as liquid-solid sintering and joining. The objective of this work is threefold: 1) to get insight into the role of the nonstoichiometry of chemical composition in ceramic materials used as reinforcement components in MMC processing, 2) to extend previous energetic analysis of mass transport phenomena to wetting behavior between liquid metal and the quasi-solid like skin resulting from the presolidification of liquid on nonstoichiometric solids on a scale of interatomic distance, and 3) to provide experimental verification of our concept.

  11. Mass Transport and Turbulence in Gravitationally Unstable Disk Galaxies II: The Effects of Star Formation Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, Nathan J; Forbes, John C

    2016-01-01

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre $Q$ parameters to $\\sim$ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies' star formation rates by a factor of $\\sim$ 5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular ISM. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the...

  12. Facile synthesis of mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with enhanced mass transport and catalytic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Ren, Yanqun; Gou, Jinsheng; Liu, Baoyu; Xi, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    A mesostructured ZSM-5 zeolite with multilamellar structure was successfully synthesized by employing a tetra-headgroup rigid bolaform quaternary ammonium surfactant. It was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms, amines temperature programmed desorption (amines-TPD), and computer simulation. These results indicated that the dual-functional amphiphilic surfactants play a critical role for directing the multilamellar structure with high mesoporosity. The mass transport and catalytic performances of the zeolite were investigated by zero length column (ZLC) technique and aldol condensation reactions to evaluate the structure-property relationship. These results clearly indicated that the mass transport of selected molecules in hierarchical zeolite can be accelerated by introducing mesoporous structure with mesostructure with reduced diffusion length and an overall enhanced resistance against deactivation in reactions involving large molecules. Furthermore, the dual-functional surfactant approach of making hierarchical zeolite with MFI nanosheets framework would open up new opportunities for design and synthesis of hierarchical zeolites with controllable mesoporous structures.

  13. The use of a transportable linear accelerator for fissile mass measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeyer Dherbey, J.; Lyoussi, A.; Buisson, A.

    1997-02-01

    The quantification of transuranic material (TRU) in waste packages is a common care of countries working in the field of nuclear nondestructive prospecting. The direct control of TRU mass inside large size closed containers is difficult due to several effects, mainly the matrix attenuation and uncertainty on the localization of the radioactive mass. The present document describes the method being developed to assay conditioned waste packages using a transportable linear accelerator which is called Mini-Linatron. The system uses a pulsed electron beam from the Mini-Linatron to produce high energy bremsstrahlung photon bursts from thin metallic converter. The transportable linear accelerator operates at 6, 9 and 11 MeV with a repetition rate between 10 to 300 Hz and a 4.5 μs pulse duration. The maximum gamma dose rate is about 23 Gy/mn at 1 m. The photons induce fission in fissile and fertile nuclei. We counted delayed neutrons emitted after each pulse. Results of measurements on an experimental active gamma interrogation facility for embedded intermediate and low level wastes are presented.

  14. Numerical investigation of interface region flows in mass spectrometers: ion transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugroot, Manish [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Groth, Clinton P T [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Thomson, Bruce A [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada); Baranov, Vladimir [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada); Collings, Bruce A [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada)

    2004-02-21

    The transport of free ions through highly under-expanded jet flows of neutral gases and in the presence of applied electric fields is investigated by continuum-based numerical simulations. In particular, numerical results are described that are relevant to ion flows occurring in the interface region of mass spectrometer systems. A five-moment mathematical model and parallel multi-block numerical solution procedure are developed for predicting the ion transport. The model incorporates the effects of ion-neutral collision processes and is used in conjunction with a Navier-Stokes model and flow solver for the neutral gas to examine the key features of the ion motion. The influences of the neutral gas flow, electric field, and flow field geometry on ion mobility are all carefully assessed. Several ions of varying mass and charge are considered, and the relative importance of competing effects (i.e. electric field and ion-neutral collision effects) is discussed. The capability of controlling the charged particle motions through a combination of directed neutral flow and applied electric field is demonstrated for high-speed, hypersonic jet flows.

  15. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-27

    This work deals with selected aspects of mass transport phenomena in PEFCs and DMFCs. Emphasis is placed on the implications originating from the occurrence of two-phase flow within these devices. Optimality of supply, distribution, and removal of the fuel, the oxidant, and the reaction products is of utmost importance for the stability, efficiency, and durability of the devices. Being a prerequisite for high current densities while maintaining sufficient voltage, mass transport optimization contributes to the development of cost effective as well as compact designs and hence competitive fuel cells. [German] Die Visualisierung und Quantifizierung von Fluessigwasseransammlungen in Polymerelektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen konnte mittels Neutronenradiographie erreicht werden. Dank dieser neuartigen diagnostischen Methode konnte erstmals die Fluessigwasseransammlung in den poroesen Gasdiffusionsschichten direkt nachgewiesen und quantifiziert werden. Die Kombination von Neutronenradiographie mit ortsaufgeloesten Stromdichtemessungen bzw. lokaler Impedanzspektroskopie erlaubte die Korrelation des inhomogenen Fluessigwasseranfalls mit dem lokalen elektrochemischen Leistungsverhalten. Systematische Untersuchungen an Polymerelektrolyt- und Direkt-Methanol-Brennstoffzellen verdeutlichen sowohl den Einfluss von Betriebsbedingungen als auch die Auswirkung von Materialeigenschaften auf die Ausbildung zweiphasiger Stroemungen.

  16. The synergistic effect of ultrasound and chemical penetration enhancers on chorioamnion mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Aharon; Khoury, Luai; Adato, Yair; Wolloch, Lior; Ariel, Ilana; Hallak, Mordechai; Kost, Joseph

    2015-02-28

    In our previous study we proposed the use of chemical penetration enhancers for noninvasive detection of fetus abnormalities that can also be utilized for direct fetal drug delivery. In an attempt to further increase the mass transport rate across the amniotic membrane, thus shortening the procedure and improving the applicability of the proposed procedure, the effect and mechanism of combining ultrasound exposure with chemical penetration enhancers' application were assessed. The combined effect was evaluated in vitro on post-delivery human amniotic membrane and ex vivo on rat's whole amniotic sac. Ultrasound effect has been assessed by dye experiments using a customized image analysis program. Additional insights of ultrasound effect's mechanism on biological membranes are presented. Previously we have determined that chemical penetration enhancers affect the fetal membranes via two mechanisms termed as 'extractors' and 'fluidizers'. In this study, we found that combining ultrasound with a 'fluidizer' CPE (e.g. bupivacaine) results in a synergistic enhancement (90-fold) of fetal membrane's mass transport, while combining ultrasound with 'extractors' (e.g. ethanol and NMP) results in an antagonistic effect. The combined procedure is faster and gain greater accuracy than the applications of sole chemical penetration enhancers.

  17. Circulation and water mass transports on the East Antarctic shelf in the Mertz Glacier region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Antoine; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Le Goff, Hervé; Marec, Claudie; Dausse, Denis

    2017-08-01

    The East Antarctic shelf off Adélie-George V Land is known to be an important region for Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation as a result of intense sea ice production in the Mertz Glacier Polynya during the winter season. It is also a region where the warm modified Circumpolar Deep Water (mCDW) penetrates onto the shelf during the summer. Using hydrographic observations from a summer survey in 2008 we implement a box inverse model to propose a comprehensive view of the steady state circulation on this shelf in summer. Additional information from mooring observations collected on the depression slope is used to provide context to the retrieved circulation scheme. Over the depression slope, the summer baroclinic structure of the currents is found to contrast with the almost barotropic structure in winter. The summer circulation is strongly constrained by the DSW distribution and forms a clockwise circulation primarily transporting the fresh surface waters and the warm mCDW around the dome of DSW. Over the upper flank of the Mertz Bank, the inflow branch transports the mCDW towards the Mertz Glacier, while, over the lower part of the slope, the outflow branch returns to the sill a diluted mode of the same water mass. A total of 0.19 Sv of mCDW inflows at the sill and two-third reach the Mertz Glacier and recirculate in front of it, allowing the mCDW to penetrate into the deeper part of the depression. Possible scenarios of interaction between the mCDW and the DSW with the glacier are examined. It is shown that, despite the water mass pathways and transports suggest possible ice-ocean interaction, both lateral and basal melting were likely small in summer 2008. Finally, our results suggest that, in addition to bathymetric features, the distribution of the residual DSW which is left from the preceding winter sets up regional pressure gradients which provide a seasonal control on the shelf circulation. In particular, the spring collapse of the convective patch would

  18. Critical mass flux for flaming ignition of wood as a function of external radiant heat flux and moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. McAllister; M. Finney; J. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Extreme weather often contributes to crown fires, where the fire spreads from one tree crown to the next as a series of piloted ignitions. An important aspect in predicting crown fires is understanding the ignition of fuel particles. The ignition criterion considered in this work is the critical mass flux criterion - that a sufficient amount of pyrolysis gases must be...

  19. Solvent-Induced Crystallization in Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) during Mass Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hao

    2001-03-01

    The solvent transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and related phase transformation were investigated. The data of mass sorption were analyzed according to Harmon¡¦s model for Case I (Fickian), Case II (swelling) and anomalous transport. This transport process in PET is accompanied by the induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. The transformation was studied by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), density gradient column, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR). During this process, the matrix is under a compressive strain that causes different kinetic path of crystallization as compared to that by thermal annealing. This state of strain will assist the development of the solvent-induced crystallization. It also can be explained in terms of the principle of Le Chatelier if the local equilibrium is assumed. The model regarding the crystallization was proposed in terms of the study of long period L, the crystal thickness lc and the thickness of amorphous layer la, obtained from the linear correlation function and interface distribution function.

  20. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  1. A heuristic simulation model of Lake Ontario circulation and mass balance transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, J.E.; Chalupnicki, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The redistribution of suspended organisms and materials by large-scale currents is part of natural ecological processes in large aquatic systems but can contribute to ecosystem disruption when exotic elements are introduced into the system. Toxic compounds and planktonic organisms spend various lengths of time in suspension before settling to the bottom or otherwise being removed. We constructed a simple physical simulation model, including the influence of major tributaries, to qualitatively examine circulation patterns in Lake Ontario. We used a simple mass balance approach to estimate the relative water input to and export from each of 10 depth regime-specific compartments (nearshore vs. offshore) comprising Lake Ontario. Despite its simplicity, our model produced circulation patterns similar to those reported by more complex studies in the literature. A three-gyre pattern, with the classic large counterclockwise central lake circulation, and a simpler two-gyre system were both observed. These qualitative simulations indicate little offshore transport along the south shore, except near the mouths of the Niagara River and Oswego River. Complex flow structure was evident, particularly near the Niagara River mouth and in offshore waters of the eastern basin. Average Lake Ontario residence time is 8 years, but the fastest model pathway indicated potential transport of plankton through the lake in as little as 60 days. This simulation illustrates potential invasion pathways and provides rough estimates of planktonic larval dispersal or chemical transport among nearshore and offshore areas of Lake Ontario. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  2. Limits to diffusive O2 transport: flow, form, and function in nudibranch egg masses from temperate and polar regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Moran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many aquatic animals enclose embryos in gelatinous masses, and these embryos rely on diffusion to supply oxygen. Mass structure plays an important role in limiting or facilitating O2 supply, but external factors such as temperature and photosynthesis can play important roles as well. Other external factors are less well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first explored the effects of water flow on O2 levels inside nudibranch embryo masses and compared the effects of flow on masses from temperate and polar regions. Water flow (still vs. vigorously bubbled had a strong effect on central O2 levels in all masses; in still water, masses were considerably more hypoxic than in bubbled water. This effect was stronger in temperate than in polar masses, likely due to the increased metabolic demand and O2 consumption of temperate masses. Second, we made what are to our knowledge the first measurements of O2 in invertebrate masses in the field. Consistent with laboratory experiments, O2 in Antarctic masses was high in masses in situ, suggesting that boundary-layer effects do not substantially limit O2 supply to polar embryos in the field. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: All else being equal, boundary layers are more likely to depress O2 in masses in temperate or tropical regions; thus, selection on parents to choose high-flow sites for mass deposition is likely greater in warm water. Because of the large number of variables affecting diffusive O2 supply to embryos in their natural environment, field observations are necessary to test hypotheses generated from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling.

  3. Limits to diffusive O2 transport: flow, form, and function in nudibranch egg masses from temperate and polar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Amy L; Woods, H Arthur

    2010-08-11

    Many aquatic animals enclose embryos in gelatinous masses, and these embryos rely on diffusion to supply oxygen. Mass structure plays an important role in limiting or facilitating O2 supply, but external factors such as temperature and photosynthesis can play important roles as well. Other external factors are less well understood. We first explored the effects of water flow on O2 levels inside nudibranch embryo masses and compared the effects of flow on masses from temperate and polar regions. Water flow (still vs. vigorously bubbled) had a strong effect on central O2 levels in all masses; in still water, masses were considerably more hypoxic than in bubbled water. This effect was stronger in temperate than in polar masses, likely due to the increased metabolic demand and O2 consumption of temperate masses. Second, we made what are to our knowledge the first measurements of O2 in invertebrate masses in the field. Consistent with laboratory experiments, O2 in Antarctic masses was high in masses in situ, suggesting that boundary-layer effects do not substantially limit O2 supply to polar embryos in the field. All else being equal, boundary layers are more likely to depress O2 in masses in temperate or tropical regions; thus, selection on parents to choose high-flow sites for mass deposition is likely greater in warm water. Because of the large number of variables affecting diffusive O2 supply to embryos in their natural environment, field observations are necessary to test hypotheses generated from laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling.

  4. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, David M.; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates. What supplies this mass flux and feeds this "tectonic aneurysm?" We show, using a simple 3-D model of oblique orogen convergence, that velocity/strain partitioning results in horizontal orogen-parallel (OP) crustal transport, and the same behavior is inferred for the Himalaya, with OP transport diverting converging crust toward the syntaxis. Model results also show that the OP flow rate decreases in the syntaxis, thereby thickening the crust and forming a structure like the NPHM. The additional crustal thickening, over and above that elsewhere in the Himalayan arc, sustains the rapid exhumation of this "aneurysm." Normally, velocity/strain partitioning would be minimal for the Himalayan arc where the convergence obliquity is no greater than ~40°. However, we show analytically that the Himalayan system can act both as a critical wedge and exhibit strain partitioning if both the detachment beneath the wedge and the bounding rear shear zone, which accommodates OP transport, are very weak. Corresponding numerical results confirm this requirement and demonstrate that a Nanga Parbat-type shortening structure can develop spontaneously if the orogenic wedge and bounding rear shear zone can strain rate soften while active. These results lead us to question whether the position of NPHM aneurysm is localized by river incision, as previously suggested, or by a priori focused tectonic shortening of the crust in the syntaxis region as demonstrated by our models.

  5. Non-vanishing at m -> 0 of the 1-loop self-mass of an electron of mass m propagating in a graphene-like medium in a constant external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Machet, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The 1-loop self-energy of a Dirac electron of mass m propagating in a thin medium simulating graphene in an external magnetic field B is investigated in Quantum Field Theory. Equivalence is shown with the so-called reduced QED_{3+1} on a 2-brane. Schwinger-like methods are used to calculate the self-mass \\delta m_{LLL} of the electron when it lies in the lowest Landau level. Unlike in standard QED_{3+1}, it does not vanish at the limit m -> 0 :\\delta m_{LLL} -> (\\alpha/2)\\sqrt{pi/2}sqrt{\\hbar|e|B/c^2}; all Landau levels of the virtual electron are taken into account and on mass-shell renormalization conditions are implemented. Restricting to the sole lowest Landau level of the virtual electron is explicitly shown to be inadequate. Resummations at higher orders lie beyond the scope of this work.

  6. Study of the temperature distribution on welded thin plates of duplex steel to be used for the external clad of a cask for transportation of radiopharmaceuticals products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Ceoni, Francisco C.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Politano, Rodolfo; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br, E-mail: fceoni@hotmail.com, E-mail: csmucsi@ipen.br, E-mail: politano@ipen.br, E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DFIS/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Departamento de Fisica

    2015-07-01

    The clad material for a proprietary transport device for radiopharmaceutical products is the main focus of the present work. The production of {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc transport cask requires a receptacle or cask where the UNS S32304 duplex steel sheet has shown that it meets high demands as the required mechanical strength and the spread of impact or shock waves mitigation. This work reports the experimental efforts in recording the thermal distribution on autogenous thin plates of UNS S32304 steel during welding. The UNS S32304 duplex steel is the most probable candidate for the external clad of the containment package for the transport of radioactive substances so it is highly relevant the understanding of all its physical parameters and its behavior under the thermal cycle imposed by a welding process. For the welding of the UNS S32304 autogenous plates the GTAW (gas tungsten arc welding) process was used with a pure argon arc protection atmosphere in order to simulate a butt joint weld on a thin duplex steel plate without filler metal. The thermal cycles were recorded by means of K-type thermocouples embedded by electrical spot welding near the weld region and connected to a multi-channel data acquisition system. The obtained results validate the reliability of the experimental apparatus for the future complete analysis of the welding experiment and further comparison to numerical analysis. (author)

  7. Electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for an armchair graphene-silicene-graphene heterojunction modulated by external field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benhu; Zhou, Benliang; Zeng, Yangsu; Zhou, Guanghui; Duan, Manyi

    2016-08-01

    We analytically investigate effective spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and potential energy on electronic and thermoelectric transport properties for a graphene-silicene-graphene (GSG) heterojunction with armchair-edge nanoribbons using nonequilibrium Green's function method. The calculation shows that the transmission coefficient T and the charge Seebeck coefficient SC for armchair-edge GSG junctions display the oscillatory behavior and depend sensitively on both effective SOC λSO and the potential energy V0. Compared with zigzag-edge GSG heterojunctions, armchair-edge GSG heterojunctions are found to posses superior thermoelectric performance, their charge Seebeck coefficients can be improved by one order of magnitude.

  8. Mass transport induced by internal Kelvin waves beneath shore-fast ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    StøYlen, Eivind; Weber, Jan Erik H.

    2010-03-01

    A one-layer reduced-gravity model is used to investigate the wave-induced mass flux in internal Kelvin waves along a straight coast beneath shore-fast ice. The waves are generated by barotropic tidal pumping at narrow sounds, and the ice lid introduces a no-slip condition for the horizontal wave motion. The mean Lagrangian fluxes to second order in wave steepness are obtained by integrating the equations of momentum and mass between the material interface and the surface. The mean flow is forced by the conventional radiation stress for internal wave motion, the mean pressure gradient due to the sloping surface, and the frictional drag at the boundaries. The equations that govern the mean fluxes are expressed in terms of mean Eulerian variables, while the wave forcing terms are given by the horizontal divergence of the Stokes flux. Analytical results show that the effect of friction induces a mean Eulerian flux along the coast that is comparable to the Stokes flux. In addition, the horizontal divergence of the total mean flux along the coast induces a small mass flux in the cross-shore direction. This flux changes the mean thickness of the upper layer outside the trapping region and may facilitate geostrophically balanced boundary currents in enclosed basins. This is indeed demonstrated by numerical solutions of the flux equations for confined areas larger than the trapping region. Application of the theory to Arctic waters is discussed, with emphasis on the transport of biological material and pollutants in nearshore regions.

  9. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean-René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-11-02

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative's Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident.

  10. Mechanisms of mass transport during coalescence-induced microfluidic drop dilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, William S.; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2016-10-01

    Confinement-guided coalescence of drops in microfluidic devices is an effective means to manipulate the composition of individual droplets. Recently, Sun et al. [Lab Chip 11, 3949 (2011), 10.1039/c1lc20709a] have shown that coalescence between a long moving plug and an array of parked droplets in a microfluidic network can be used to flexibly manipulate the composition of the static droplet arrays. However, the transport mechanisms underlying this complex dilution process have not been elucidated. In this study, we develop phenomenological models and perform particle-based numerical simulations to identify the key mass transfer mechanisms influencing the concentration profiles of drops during coalescence-induced drop dilution. Motivated by experimental observations, in the simulations we consider (i) advection within the moving plug, (ii) diffusion in the moving plug and parked droplets, (iii) fluid advection due to initiation of coalescence, and (iv) advection in the coalesced plug due to the continuous phase flowing through the gutters in noncircular microchannels. We find that the dilution process is dominated by diffusion, recirculation in the moving plug, and gutter-flow-induced advection, but is only weakly affected by coalescence-induced advection. We show that the control parameters regulating dilution can be divided into those influencing the duration of mass transfer (e.g., plug length and velocity) and those affecting the rate of mass transfer (e.g., diffusion and gutter-flow-induced advection). Finally, we demonstrate that our simulations are able to predict droplet concentration profiles in experiments. The results from this study will allow better design of drop dilution microfluidic devices. Furthermore, the identification of gutter-flow-induced advection as an alternative mass transfer mechanism in two-phase flows could potentially lead to more efficient means of oil recovery from droplets trapped in porous media.

  11. VOC Composition of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J.; Warneke, C.; Kuster, B.; Parrish, D.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Fehsenfeld, F.

    2002-12-01

    Airborne measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed using a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) operated onboard a NOAA WP-3 aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiment in 2002. Enhancements of acetone (CH3COCH3), methanol (CH3OH), acetonitrile (CH3CN) and in some cases benzene were observed in air masses that were impacted by outflow from Asia. The enhancement ratios with respect to carbon monoxide are compared to emission factors for fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, which gives some insight into the sources responsible for the pollution. The observed mixing ratios for acetone, methanol and in particular acetonitrile were generally reduced in the marine boundary layer, suggesting the presence of an ocean uptake sink. The ocean uptake of acetonitrile was found to be particularly efficient in a zone with upwelling water off of the U.S. west coast. Reduced mixing ratios of acetone and methanol were observed in a stratospheric intrusion. This observation gives some information about the lifetime of these VOCs in the stratosphere. Enhanced concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were observed in air masses that were impacted by urban sources in California. The ratio between the concentrations of benzene, toluene and higher aromatics indicated the degree of photochemical oxidation. PTR-MS only gives information about the mass of the ions produced by proton-transfer reactions between H3O+ and VOCs in the instrument. The identification of VOCs was confirmed by coupling a gas-chromatographic (GC) column to the instrument and post-flight GC-PTR-MS analyses of canister samples collected during the flights.

  12. External Second Gate, Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Parametric Optimization for Detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E. Tarver

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. [1] In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. [2] The problem with conventional (signal averaging IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives. With external second gate, Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters (scan time and sampling rate to increase the spectral resolution to reduce false alarms and improve the sensitivity for early warning and contamination avoidance. In addition, with FT-IMS the entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a seven-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  13. Angular momentum transport efficiency in post-main sequence low-mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Spada, F; Arlt, R; Deheuvels, S

    2016-01-01

    Context. Using asteroseismic techniques, it has recently become possible to probe the internal rotation profile of low-mass (~1.1-1.5 Msun) subgiant and red giant stars. Under the assumption of local angular momentum conservation, the core contraction and envelope expansion occurring at the end of the main sequence would result in a much larger internal differential rotation than observed. This suggests that angular momentum redistribution must be taking place in the interior of these stars. Aims. We investigate the physical nature of the angular momentum redistribution mechanisms operating in stellar interiors by constraining the efficiency of post-main sequence rotational coupling. Methods. We model the rotational evolution of a 1.25 Msun star using the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code. Our models take into account the magnetic wind braking occurring at the surface of the star and the angular momentum transport in the interior, with an efficiency dependent on the degree of internal differential rotati...

  14. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  15. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Burch, J.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Kuntz, Kip; Omidi, N.; Read, A.; Robertson, Ina; hide

    2010-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversies surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  16. Solvent-driven electron trapping and mass transport in reduced graphites to access perfect graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecera, Philipp; Holzwarth, Johannes; Edelthalhammer, Konstantin F.; Mundloch, Udo; Peterlik, Herwig; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we report on a significant discovery, namely, the quantitative discharging of reduced graphite forms, such as graphite intercalation compounds, graphenide dispersions and graphenides deposited on surfaces with the simple solvent benzonitrile. Because of its comparatively low reduction potential, benzonitrile is reduced during this process to the radical anion, which exhibits a red colour and serves as a reporter molecule for the quantitative determination of negative charges on the carbon sheets. Moreover, this discovery reveals a very fundamental physical-chemical phenomenon, namely a quantitative solvent reduction induced and electrostatically driven mass transport of K+ ions from the graphite intercalation compounds into the liquid. The simple treatment of dispersed graphenides suspended on silica substrates with benzonitrile leads to the clean conversion to graphene. This unprecedented procedure represents a rather mild, scalable and inexpensive method for graphene production surpassing previous wet-chemical approaches.

  17. The Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM) Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael; Sibeck, David G.; Porter, F. Scott; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, Thomas; Omidi, N.; Robertson, Ina; Sembay, S.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    All of the solar wind energy that powers magnetospheric processes passes through the magnetosheath and magnetopause. Global images of the magnetosheath and magnetopause boundary layers will resolve longstanding controversy surrounding fundamental phenomena that occur at the magnetopause and provide information needed to improve operational space weather models. Recent developments showing that soft X-rays (0.15-1 keV) result from high charge state solar wind ions undergoing charge exchange recombination through collisions with exospheric neutral atoms has led to the realization that soft X-ray imaging can provide global maps of the high-density shocked solar wind within the magnetosheath and cusps, regions lying between the lower density solar wind and magnetosphere. We discuss an instrument concept called the Sheath Transport Observer for the Redistribution of Mass (STORM), an X-ray imager suitable for simultaneously imaging the dayside magnetosheath, the magnetopause boundary layers, and the cusps.

  18. Mass transport and direction dependent battery modeling for accurate on-line power capability prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegman, H.L.N. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Some recent advances in battery modeling were discussed with reference to on-line impedance estimates and power performance predictions for aqueous solution, porous electrode cell structures. The objective was to determine which methods accurately estimate a battery's internal state and power capability while operating a charge and sustaining a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) over a wide range of driving conditions. The enhancements to the Randles-Ershler equivalent electrical model of common cells with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride chemistries were described. This study also investigated which impedances are sensitive to boundary layer charge concentrations and mass transport limitations. Non-linear impedances were shown to significantly affect the battery's ability to process power. The main advantage of on-line estimating a battery's impedance state and power capability is that the battery can be optimally sized for any application. refs., tabs., figs., append.

  19. A biphasic hyperelastic model for the analysis of fluid and mass transport in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, José Jaime; Smith, Joshua H

    2009-02-01

    A biphasic hyperelastic finite element model is proposed for the description of the mechanical behavior of brain tissue. The model takes into account finite deformations through an Ogden-type hyperelastic compressible function and a hydraulic conductivity dependent on deformation. The biphasic equations, implemented here for spherical symmetry using an updated Lagrangian algorithm, yielded radial coordinates and fluid velocities that were used with the convective-diffusive equation in order to predict mass transport in the brain. Results of the model were equal to those of a closed-form solution under infinitesimal deformations, however, for a wide range of material parameters, the model predicted important increments in the infusion sphere, reductions of the fluid velocities, and changes in the species content distribution. In addition, high localized deformation and stresses were obtained at the infusion sphere. Differences with the infinitesimal solution may be mainly attributed to geometrical nonlinearities related to the increment of the infusion sphere and not to material nonlinearities.

  20. Loss of cabin pressure in a military transport: a mass casualty with decompression illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Mickaila J

    2008-04-01

    Presented here is the sudden cabin depressurization of a military C-130 aircraft carrying 66 personnel. They suffered a depressurization from 2134 to 7317 m, resulting in a potential 66-person mass casualty. The aircrew were able to descend to below 3049 m in less than 5 min. They landed in the Kingdom of Bahrain--the nearest hyperbaric recompression facility. Three cases of peripheral neurologic DCS and one case of spinal DCS were identified. Limited manning, unique host nation concerns, and limited available assets led to difficulties in triage, patient transport, and asset allocation. These led to difficult decisions regarding when and for whom to initiate ground level oxygen or hyperbaric recompression therapy.

  1. Contribution of di-SIA to mass transport in Fe-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabov, V. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.; Molodtsov, V. L.; Terentyev, D.

    2016-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the diffusion characteristics of di-self interstitial atom (di-SIA) in BCC Fe-Cr alloys and corresponding mass transport of Fe and Cratoms in the temperature range 600-1000 K in the alloys with Cr content 5-25 at%, which is relevant for ferritic/martensitic steels. An original treatment is proposed in this work to account for a mixed migration mode composed of the diffusion of the cluster itself and break-up into a pair of independent SIAs. The ratio of self-diffusion coefficients of Cr and Fe is found to exceed unity in Fe-5Cr and Fe-10Cr alloys, which implies that under cascade-producing damage, 3D-migrating small SIA clusters will effectively contribute to the segregation of Cr to neutral and SIA-preferential sinks, eventually causing radiation induced segregation.

  2. Mass transport aspects of polymer electrolyte fuel cells under two-phase flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, D.

    2007-03-15

    This well-illustrated, comprehensive dissertation by Dr. Ing. Denis Kramer takes an in-depth look at polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) and the possibilities for their application. First of all, the operating principles of polymer electrolyte fuel cells are described and discussed, whereby thermodynamics aspects and loss mechanisms are examined. The mass transport diagnostics made with respect to the function of the cells are discussed. Field flow geometry, gas diffusion layers and, amongst other things, liquid distribution, the influence of flow direction and the low-frequency behaviour of air-fed PEFCs are discussed. Direct methanol fuel cells are examined, as are the materials chosen. The documentation includes comprehensive mathematical and graphical representations of the mechanisms involved.

  3. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  4. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Vadim; Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the `glymphatic pathway' plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs . It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through a network of dedicated vessels, but rather through para-vascular channels and brain parenchyma in a slower time-domain, and thus conventional fMRI or other blood-flow sensitive MRI sequences do not provide much useful information about the desired flow patterns. We have accordingly analyzed a series of MRI images, taken at different times, of the brain of a live rat, which was injected with a paramagnetic tracer into the CSF via the lumbar intrathecal space of the spine. Our goal is twofold: (a) find glymphatic (tracer) flow directions in the live rodent brain; and (b) provide a model of a (healthy) brain that will allow the prediction of tracer concentrations given initial conditions. We model the liquid flow through the brain by the diffusion equation. We then use the Optimal Mass Transfer (OMT) approach to derive the glymphatic flow vector field, and estimate the diffusion tensors by analyzing the (changes in the) flow. Simulations show that the resulting model successfully reproduces the dominant features of the experimental data. Keywords: inverse problem, optimal mass transport, diffusion equation, cerebrospinal fluid flow in brain, optical flow, liquid flow modeling, Monge Kantorovich problem, diffusion tensor estimation

  5. New insights in the velocity dependency of the external mass transfer coefficient in 2D and 3D porous media for liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2012-03-02

    Numerical calculations of the mobile zone mass transfer rate in a variety of ordered 2D and 3D structures are presented. These calculations are in line with earlier theoretical and experimental findings made in the field of chemical engineering and suggest that the Sherwood-number (Sh(m)) appearing in the mobile phase mass transfer term of the general plate height expression of liquid chromatography is not correctly predicted by the Wilson-Geankoplis--or the Kataoka--or the penetration model expression that have been used up to now to in the field of LC, and that at least more research is needed before these expressions can be continued to be used with confidence. The aforementioned expressions were obtained by neglecting the effect of axial dispersion on the mass transfer process, and it seems that they therefore underestimate the true Sh(m)-number by a factor of 2-5 around the minimum of the van Deemter-curve. New correlations describing the variation of the Sh(m)-coefficient as a function of the reduced velocity for a number of other packing geometries (tetrahedral monolith, 2D pillar array) are proposed. These correlations are in agreement with earlier theoretical and experimental studies showing that at low velocities the local-driving force-based Sh(m)-value is of the order of 10-20 in a packed bed column with an external porosity on the order of 35-40%.

  6. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M. [Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Le Roy, L. [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  7. Vertical and horizontal transport of mesospheric Na: Implications for the mass influx of cosmic dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Liu, Alan Z.; Guo, Yafang

    2017-09-01

    The mesospheric metal layers are formed by the vaporization of high-speed cosmic dust particles as they enter the Earth's upper atmosphere. We show that the downward fluxes of these metal atoms, induced locally by waves and turbulence, are related in a straightforward way to the meteoric influxes of the metals, their chemical losses and their advective transport by the large-scale vertical and horizontal motions associated with the meridional circulation system. Above the peak of the metal layers where chemical losses and large-scale vertical motions are small, the wave-induced flux is insensitive to changes in local wave activity. If the downward transport velocity increases, because wave activity increases, then in response, the metal densities will decrease to maintain a constant vertical flux. By fitting the theoretical Na flux profile to the annual mean vertical flux profile measured during the night at the Starfire Optical Range, NM, we derive improved estimates for the global influxes of both Na and cosmic dust. The mean Na influx is 22,500±1050 atoms/cm2/s, which equals 389±18 kg/d for the global input of Na vapor. If the Na composition of the dust particles is identical to CI chondritic meteorites (4990 ppm by mass), then the global influx of cosmic dust is 176±38 t/d. If the composition is identical to ordinary chondrites (7680 ppm), the global dust influx is 107±22 t/d.

  8. Passive mass transport for direct and quantitative SERS detection using purified silica encapsulated metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Binaya Kumar

    This thesis focuses on understanding implications of nanomaterial quality control and mass transport through internally etched silica coated nanoparticles for direct and quantitative molecular detection using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Prior to use, bare nanoparticles (partially or uncoated with silica) are removal using column chromatography to improve the quality of these nanomaterials and their SERS reproducibility. Separation of silica coated nanoparticles with two different diameters is achieved using Surfactant-free size exclusion chromatography with modest fractionation. Next, selective molecular transport is modeled and monitored using SERS and evaluated as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and polarity. Molecular detection is achieved when the analytes first partition through the silica membrane then interact with the metal surface at short distances (i.e., less than 2 nm). The SERS intensities of unique molecular vibrational modes for a given molecule increases as the number of molecules that bind to the metal surface increases and are enhanced via both chemical and electromagnetic enhancement mechanisms as long as the vibrational mode has a component of polarizability tensor along the surface normal. SERS signals increase linearly with molecular concentration until the three-dimensional SERS-active volume is saturated with molecules. Implications of molecular orientation as well as surface selection rules on SERS intensities of molecular vibrational modes are studied to improve quantitative and reproducible SERS detection using internally etched Ag Au SiO2 nanoparticles. Using the unique vibrational modes, SERS intensities for p-aminothiophenol as a function of metal core compositions and plasmonics are studied. By understanding molecular transport mechanisms through internally etched silica matrices coated on metal nanoparticles, important experimental and materials design parameters are learned, which can be subsequently applied

  9. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  10. Interpolation of longitudinal shape and image data via optimal mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Liang-Jia; Bouix, Sylvain; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-03-01

    Longitudinal analysis of medical imaging data has become central to the study of many disorders. Unfortunately, various constraints (study design, patient availability, technological limitations) restrict the acquisition of data to only a few time points, limiting the study of continuous disease/treatment progression. Having the ability to produce a sensible time interpolation of the data can lead to improved analysis, such as intuitive visualizations of anatomical changes, or the creation of more samples to improve statistical analysis. In this work, we model interpolation of medical image data, in particular shape data, using the theory of optimal mass transport (OMT), which can construct a continuous transition from two time points while preserving "mass" (e.g., image intensity, shape volume) during the transition. The theory even allows a short extrapolation in time and may help predict short-term treatment impact or disease progression on anatomical structure. We apply the proposed method to the hippocampus-amygdala complex in schizophrenia, the heart in atrial fibrillation, and full head MR images in traumatic brain injury.

  11. Numerical investigation of interface region flows in mass spectrometers: neutral gas transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugroot, Manish [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Groth, Clinton P T [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ontario, M3H 5T6 (Canada); Thomson, Bruce A [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada); Baranov, Vladimir [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada); Collings, Bruce A [MDS SCIEX, 71 Four Valley Drive, Concord, Ontario, L4K 4V8 (Canada)

    2004-04-21

    The supersonic jet flows of neutral gas from atmospheric to near-vacuum conditions in the interface region of mass-spectrometer systems is investigated by continuum-based (fluid) numerical simulations. An enhanced understanding of the neutral gas transport is of paramount importance to fully understand flows in the interface region of mass spectrometers, for it is the neutral dynamics that governs and drives the ions from the high pressure ion source through the interface orifice towards the ion optics and detector subsystems. The key features and structure of the complex neutral gas flow are examined and the influence of large pressure differences imposed across the interface region, orifice geometry, and gas skimmer configuration used for flow control are assessed. The flow structure is shown to be that of a classical under-expanded free jet for 'skimmer-absent' cases and very good agreement between the numerical predictions and empirical and experimental values is demonstrated. For the 'skimmer-present' cases, the shock structure downstream of the orifice and skimmer is identified and fully described and its influences on the flow skimming and focusing processes are discussed.

  12. Back to the primordial universe by a monge-ampere-kantorovich mass transportation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, U.

    2003-04-01

    The Monge-Kantorovich mass transportation problem dates back to work by Monge in 1781 on how to optimally move earth from one place to another, knowing only the initial and final landscapes, the cost being a prescribed function of the distance travelled by "molecules" of earth. We solve the cosmological reconstruction problem of mapping the present locations of (mostly dark) matter, to their primordial locations, knowing only the current field of mass density, e.g. from a full-sky galaxy catalogue or a numerical simulation. Under the assumption that the map is close to potential, we reduce the problem to solving a nonlinear partial differential equation, originally written by Ampere in 1820, now known as the Monge-Ampere equation. Thanks to recent work by Y. Brenier, this becomes a Monge-Kantorovich problem with quadratic cost function and, in discretised form, an assignment problem: find the pairing between N departure and N arrival points which minimises the sum of the squared distances between paired points. The latter can be solved very efficiently by the auction algorithm of Bertsekas. When tested against N-body cosmological simulations, excellent reconstruction is obtained above a few megaparsecs. Based on the paper Frisch-Matarrese-Mohayaee-Sobolevski Nature 417, 260-262 (16 May 2002).

  13. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Kretzschmar, H.J. [DBI Gas- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Feiberg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  14. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leplat, N; Rossi, M J

    2013-11-01

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300-630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10(11) and 5.0 × 10(11) molecule s(-1) cm(-3) of C2H5(●) (ethyl) and t-C4H9(●) (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  15. Mass Transport Deposits in the Santaren Channel: Distribution, Characteristics, and Potential Triggering Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, J.

    2015-12-01

    Submarine slope failures are a likely cause for tsunami generation along the East U.S. coast. A possible source are the large slope failures along western Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Numerical models simulate tsunami generation and propagation through the Straits of Florida, caused by these Pleistocene mass wasting events. In order to estimate the likelihood and extent of future landslides, distribution, characteristics, and possible triggering mechanisms of previous failures and their associated mass transport deposits (MTD) have to be investigated. In 2013, the University of Hamburg acquired 2D high-resolution multichannel seismic data, multibeam data, and subbottom profiles inside the Santaren Channel, along the slopes of western GBB and Cay Sal Bank (CSB). The two platforms are different in two ways. CSB is part of the Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt while GBB is situated in a tectonically quiet zone. In addition, the slopes of western GBB are on the leeward side of the bank, while the eastern slopes of CSB are in a windward position. Differences in nature and size of mass wasting events between the Cay Sal side and the western GBB side of the dataset show how influential the tectonically active Cuban Fold and Thrust Belt is to the generation of large MTDs in this area. In the study area, the slope failures can be divided in two categories; small-scale in situ failures with high frequencies on the slopes, dominant on the western GBB side, and large landslides with a lower frequency, but higher volumes and transport distances on the toe of the slope and in the basin, dominant on the Cay Sal side. The distribution of in situ failures, such as slump and debris flow alternation, shows the interplay between high and low inner strength of the sediment, respectively. On the other hand, large MTDs caused by submarine landslides suggest movement in an unconfined manner. Internal sediment preconditions derived from sea level oscillations are suggested as triggering mechanisms

  16. 49 CFR 195.108 - External pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External pressure. 195.108 Section 195.108 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.108 External pressure. Any external pressure that will be exerted on the...

  17. 41 CFR 102-34.210 - May I use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities? 102-34.210... of employment and mass transit facilities? Yes, you may use a Government motor vehicle for transportation between places of employment and mass transit facilities under the following conditions: (a)...

  18. Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain

  19. Mass Conservation in a Chemical Transport Model and its Effect on CO2 and SF6 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Weaver, C.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Chemical transport models (CTMs) must conserve mass to be useful for applications involving assessment of the effect of various pollutants on the troposphere and stratosphere. Furthermore, calculations of the evolution of constituents such as SF6 are used to evaluate overall model transport, and interpretation of such simulations is clouded if mass conservation is not assured. For realistic simulations or predictions, it is crucial that constituents are not produced or lost by transport or other processes in the CTMs. Analysis of CO2 and SF6 experiments using a CTM shows that problems with mass conservation can seriously degrade the simulations. Failure to conserve mass results from inconsistency of the surface pressure tendency and the divergence of horizontal mass flux when the model is forced by assimilated meteorological data. We have developed an effective method to eliminate the inconsistency by modifying the divergent part of the wind field. The changes in the wind fields are quite small but the impact on mass conservation is large. Parameterizations of physical processes such as convection or turbulent transport can also affect mass conservation. The lack of conservation is small but accumulates when integrations are lengthy such as required for SF6. This lack of conservation is found using winds from either a GCM or from an assimilation system. A simple adjustment removes much of the inaccuracy in the convective parameterization. A CO2 simulation using assimilated winds from the most recent version of the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System will be used to illustrate the impact of these transport improvements.

  20. Using mass spectrometry for identification of ABC transporters from Xanthomonas citri and mutants expressed in different growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, J.N.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paes Leme, A.F. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Xanthomonas citri is a phytopathogenic bacterium that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. In our group, we have focused on the identification and characterization of ABC transport proteins of this bacterium, in order to determinate their function for growth in vitro and in vivo, during infection. ABC transporters represent one of the largest families of proteins, which transport since small molecules as ions up to oligopeptides and sugars. In prokaryotic cells many works have reported the ABC transport function in pathogenesis, resistance, biofilm formation, infectivity and DNA repair, but until our knowledge, there is no data related to these transporters and X. citri. So, In order to determinate which transporters are expressed in X. citri, we started a proteomic analysis based on mono and bi-dimensional gels associated to mass spectrometry analyses. After growing X. citri and two different mutants deleted for ssuA and nitA genes in LB and minimum media, cellular extracts were obtained and used for preparation of mono and bi-dimensional gels. Seven bands covering the expected mass of ABC transporter components (20 kDa to 50 kDa) in SDS-PAGE were cut off the gel, treated with trypsin and submitted to the MS for protein identification. The results of 2D gels were good enough and will serve as a standard for development of similar experiments in large scale. (author)

  1. Mass transfer model of nanoparticle-facilitated contaminant transport in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Wan Lutfi Wan; Diamessis, Peter J; Lion, Leonard W

    2010-02-01

    A one-dimensional model has been evaluated for transport of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, facilitated by synthetic amphiphilic polyurethane (APU) nanoparticles in porous media. APU particles synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol)-modified urethane acrylate (PMUA) precursor chains have been shown to enhance the desorption rate and mobility of phenanthrene (PHEN) in soil. A reversible process governed by attachment and detachment rates was considered to describe the PMUA binding in soil in addition to PMUA transport through advection and dispersion. Ultimately, an irreversible second-order PMUA attachment rate in which the fractional soil saturation capacity with PMUA was a rate control was found to be adequate to describe the retention of PMUA particles. A gamma-distributed site model (GS) was used to describe the spectrum of physical/chemical constraints for PHEN transfer from solid to aqueous phases. Instantaneous equilibrium was assumed for PMUA-PHEN interactions. The coupled model for PMUA and PHEN behavior successfully described the enhanced elution profile of PHEN by PMUA. Sensitivity analysis was performed to analyze the significance of model parameters on model predictions. The adjustable parameter alpha in the gamma-distribution shapes the contaminant desorption distribution profile as well as elution and breakthrough curves. Model simulations show the use of PMUA can be also expected to improve the release rate of PHEN in soils with higher organic carbon content. The percentage removal of PHEN mass over time is shown to be influenced by the concentration of PMUA added and this information can be used to optimize cost and time require to accomplish a desired remediation goal.

  2. Improved performance of porous bio-anodes in microbial electrolysis cells by enhancing mass and charge transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Lodder, R.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    To create an efficient MEC high current densities and high coulombic efficiencies are required. The aim of this study was to increase cur-rent densities and coulombic efficiencies by influencing mass and charge transport in porous electrodes by: (i) introduction of a forced flow through the anode to

  3. Interactions of androgens, green tea catechins and the antiandrogen flutamide with the external glucose-binding site of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter GLUT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftalin, Richard J; Afzal, Iram; Cunningham, Philip; Halai, Mansur; Ross, Clare; Salleh, Naguib; Milligan, Stuart R

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of androgens, the antiandrogen flutamide and green tea catechins on glucose transport inhibition in human erythrocytes. These effects may relate to the antidiabetogenic effects of green tea. Testosterone, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA-3-acetate inhibit glucose exit from human erythrocytes with half-maximal inhibitions (Ki) of 39.2±8.9, 29.6±3.7, 48.1±10.2 and 4.8±0.98 μM, respectively. The antiandrogen flutamide competitively relieves these inhibitions and of phloretin. Dehydrotestosterone has no effect on glucose transport, indicating the differences between androgen interaction with GLUT1 and human androgen receptor (hAR). Green tea catechins also inhibit glucose exit from erythrocytes. Epicatechin 3-gallate (ECG) has a Ki ECG of 0.14±0.01 μM, and epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) has a Ki EGCG of 0.97±0.13 μM. Flutamide reverses these effects. Androgen-screening tests show that the green tea catechins do not act genomically. The high affinities of ECG and EGCG for GLUT1 indicate that this might be their physiological site of action. There are sequence homologies between GLUT1 and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of hAR containing the amino-acid triads Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 288, and Arg 126, Thr 30 and Asn 29, with similar 3D topology to the polar groups binding 3-keto and 17-β OH steroid groups in hAR LBD. These triads are appropriately sited for competitive inhibition of glucose import at the external opening of the hydrophilic pore traversing GLUT1. PMID:12970085

  4. Can a reduction in mass transport occur at invariant segmental time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Simone; Sferrazza, Michele

    2015-03-01

    The glassy dynamics of polymer melts adsorbed onto solid substrates shows a peculiar confinement effect: a severe reduction in mass transport occurs without a corresponding increase in segmental relaxation time. This phenomenon provides a ``negative violation'' of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) relation, not observed in bulk melts or confined water. Explaining those findings in analogy to the large drop of thermal expansion reported in polymers under 1D confinement, we considered the presence of an interfacial dead layer where tracer diffusivity assumes negligible values. To verify this hypothesis, we performed an extensive investigation of the diffusion of styrene oligomers, acting as tracers, into matrices of high molecular weight polystyrene, irreversibly adsorbed onto aluminum oxide. We demonstrate that the reduced interfacial diffusion is due to larger residence times of the tracers inside the dead layer, tDL. In particular, we show that tDL is directly proportional to the amount of irreversibly adsorbed monomers, a quantity limiting the available space for diffusion. We thus discuss of a dynamic dead layer evolving within the adsorbed layer, and of its role on the dynamics of glassy polymers under confinement and the ``negative violation'' the SE relation.

  5. Mass Transport in Surface Diffusion of van der Waals Bonded Systems: Boosted by Rotations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgeland, Holly; Sacchi, Marco; Singh, Pratap; McIntosh, Andrew J; Jardine, Andrew P; Alexandrowicz, Gil; Ward, David J; Jenkins, Stephen J; Allison, William; Ellis, John

    2016-12-01

    Mass transport at a surface is a key factor in heterogeneous catalysis. The rate is determined by excitation across a translational barrier and depends on the energy landscape and the coupling to the thermal bath of the surface. Here we use helium spin-echo spectroscopy to track the microscopic motion of benzene adsorbed on Cu(001) at low coverage (θ ∼ 0.07 ML). Specifically, our combined experimental and computational data determine both the absolute rate and mechanism of the molecular motion. The observed rate is significantly higher by a factor of 3.0 ± 0.1 than is possible in a conventional, point-particle model and can be understood only by including additional molecular (rotational) coordinates. We argue that the effect can be described as an entropic contribution that enhances the population of molecules in the transition state. The process is generally relevant to molecular systems and illustrates the importance of the pre-exponential factor alongside the activation barrier in studies of surface kinetics.

  6. Mass transport phenomena between bubbles and dissolved gases in liquids under reduced gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Brockwell, Jonathan L.; Yung, Chain-Nan; Chai, An-Ti; Mcquillen, John B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Neumann, Eric S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the experimental and analytical work that has been done to establish justification and feasibility for a Shuttle mid-deck experiment involving mass transfer between a gas bubble and a liquid. The experiment involves the observation and measurement of the dissolution of an isolated, immobile gas bubble of specified size and composition in a thermostatted solvent liquid of known concentration in the reduced gravity environment of earth orbit. Methods to generate and deploy the bubble have been successful both in normal gravity using mutually buoyant fluids and under reduced gravity conditions in the NASA Lear Jet. Initialization of the experiment with a bubble of a prescribed size and composition in a liquid of known concentration has been accomplished using the concept of unstable equilibrium. Subsequent bubble dissolution or growth is obtained by a step increase or decrease in the liquid pressure. A numerical model has been developed which simulates the bubble dynamics and can be used to determine molecular parameters by comparison with the experimental data. The primary objective of the experiment is the elimination of convective effects that occur in normal gravity. The results will yield information on transport under conditions of pure diffusion.

  7. Extracellular mass transport considerations for space flight research concerning suspended and adherent in vitro cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, David M.; Benoit, Michael R.; Nelson, Emily S.; Hammond, Timmothy G.

    2004-01-01

    Conducting biological research in space requires consideration be given to isolating appropriate control parameters. For in vitro cell cultures, numerous environmental factors can adversely affect data interpretation. A biological response attributed to microgravity can, in theory, be explicitly correlated to a specific lack of weight or gravity-driven motion occurring to, within or around a cell. Weight can be broken down to include the formation of hydrostatic gradients, structural load (stress) or physical deformation (strain). Gravitationally induced motion within or near individual cells in a fluid includes sedimentation (or buoyancy) of the cell and associated shear forces, displacement of cytoskeleton or organelles, and factors associated with intra- or extracellular mass transport. Finally, and of particular importance for cell culture experiments, the collective effects of gravity must be considered for the overall system consisting of the cells, their environment and the device in which they are contained. This does not, however, rule out other confounding variables such as launch acceleration, on orbit vibration, transient acceleration impulses or radiation, which can be isolated using onboard centrifuges or vibration isolation techniques. A framework is offered for characterizing specific cause-and-effect relationships for gravity-dependent responses as a function of the above parameters.

  8. Mass transport phenomena between bubbles and dissolved gases in liquids under reduced gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Kenneth J.; Brockwell, Jonathan L.; Yung, Chain-Nan; Chai, An-Ti; Mcquillen, John B.; Sotos, Raymond G.; Neumann, Eric S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the experimental and analytical work that has been done to establish justification and feasibility for a Shuttle mid-deck experiment involving mass transfer between a gas bubble and a liquid. The experiment involves the observation and measurement of the dissolution of an isolated, immobile gas bubble of specified size and composition in a thermostatted solvent liquid of known concentration in the reduced gravity environment of earth orbit. Methods to generate and deploy the bubble have been successful both in normal gravity using mutually buoyant fluids and under reduced gravity conditions in the NASA Lear Jet. Initialization of the experiment with a bubble of a prescribed size and composition in a liquid of known concentration has been accomplished using the concept of unstable equilibrium. Subsequent bubble dissolution or growth is obtained by a step increase or decrease in the liquid pressure. A numerical model has been developed which simulates the bubble dynamics and can be used to determine molecular parameters by comparison with the experimental data. The primary objective of the experiment is the elimination of convective effects that occur in normal gravity. The results will yield information on transport under conditions of pure diffusion.

  9. Mass-conserving tracer transport modelling on a reduced latitude-longitude grid with NIES-TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Belikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The need to perform long-term simulations with reasonable accuracy has led to the development of mass-conservative and efficient numerical methods for solving the transport equation in forward and inverse models. We designed and implemented a flux-form (Eulerian tracer transport algorithm in the National Institute for Environmental Studies Transport Model (NIES TM, which is used for simulating diurnal and synoptic-scale variations of tropospheric long-lived constituents, as well as their seasonal and inter-annual variability. Implementation of the flux-form method requires the mass conservative wind fields. However, the model is off-line and is driven by datasets from a global atmospheric model or data assimilation system, in which vertically integrated mass changes are not in balance with the surface pressure tendency and mass conservation is not achieved. To rectify the mass-imbalance, a flux-correction method is employed. To avoid a singularity near the poles, caused by the small grid size arising from the meridional convergence problem, the proposed model uses a reduced latitude–longitude grid scheme, in which the grid size is doubled several times approaching the poles. This approach overcomes the Courant condition in the Polar Regions, maintains a reasonably high integration time-step, and ensures adequate model performance during simulations. To assess the model performance, we performed global transport simulations for SF6, 222Rn, and CO2. The results were compared with observations available from the World Data Centre for Greenhouse Gases, GLOBALVIEW, and the Hateruma monitoring station, Japan. Overall, the results show that the proposed flux-form version of NIES TM can produce tropospheric tracer transport more realistically than previously possible. The reasons for this improvement are discussed.

  10. Space Transportation System (STS)-133/External Tank (ET)-137 Intertank (IT) Stringer Cracking Issue and Repair Assessment: Proximate Cause Determination and Material Characterization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Several cracks were detected in stringers located beneath the foam on the External Tank (ET) following the launch scrub of Space Transportation System (STS)-133 on November 5, 2010. The stringer material was aluminum-lithium (AL-Li) 2090-T83 fabricated from sheets that were nominally 0.064 inches thick. The mechanical properties of the stringer material were known to vary between different material lots, with the stringers from ET-137 (predominately lots 620853 and 620854) having the highest yield and ultimate stresses. Subsequent testing determined that these same lots also had the lowest fracture toughness properties. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) supported the Space Shuttle Program (SSP)-led investigation. The objective of this investigation was to develop a database of test results to provide validation for structural analysis models, independently confirm test results obtained from other investigators, and determine the proximate cause of the anomalous low fracture toughness observed in stringer lots 620853 and 620854. This document contains the outcome of the investigation.

  11. Development of a multi-species mass transport model for concrete with account to thermodynamic phase equilibriums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a coupled multi-species transport and chemical equilibrium model has been established. The model is capable of predicting time dependent variation of pore solution and solid-phase composition in concrete. Multi-species transport approaches, based on the Poisson–Nernst–Planck (PNP......) theory alone, not involving chemical processes, have no real practical interest since the chemical action is very dominant for cement based materials. Coupled mass transport and chemical equilibrium models can be used to calculate the variation in pore solution and solid-phase composition when using...... by using the PHREEQC program. The coupling between the transport part and chemical part of the problem is tackled by using a sequential operator splitting technique and the calculation results are verified by comparing the elemental spacial distribution in concrete measured by the electron probe...

  12. Internal deformation and kinematic indicators within a tripartite mass transport deposit, NW Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiesiak, Matheus S.; Kneller, Ben; Alsop, G. Ian; Milana, Juan Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The role of mass transport deposits (MTDs) in redistributing sediment from the shelf-break to deep water is becoming increasingly apparent and important in the study of basins. While seismic analysis may reveal the general morphology of such deposits, it is unable to provide information on the detailed geometry and kinematics of gravity-driven transport owing to the limits of seismic resolution. Outcrop analysis of ancient MTDs may therefore provide critical observations and data regarding the internal deformation and behavior during slope failure. One such field area where geometry and kinematics are clearly exposed is Cerro Bola in the Paganzo Basin of northwestern Argentina. This 8 km strike section exposes a mid to late Carboniferous succession, comprising fluvio-deltaic sediments, turbidites and MTDs. Our work focuses on the main MTD that is up to 180 m thick and is characterized by a silty matrix, containing sandstone blocks and siltstone rafts. Although we consider a single slope failure as the most likely scenario, a possible double failure might also explain the occurrence of a folded turbidite marker in the upper zone of the MTD. The MTD is host to a variety of deformational features such as folding, boudinage, shear zones, allochthonous strata, and secondary fabrics among others. These deformational features vary in intensity, scale and style, both vertically and laterally across the deposit. The vertical variation is the most notable, and the entire deposit can be subdivided into lower, middle and upper zones according to variations in texture and structures, including sandstone blocks, sand streaks and blebs in the matrix, folding on a variety of scales, and shear zones. The middle part of the MTD is characterized by the abundance of siltstone rafts. Various models are proposed for the origin of blocks and rafts within the MTD: erosion of underlying strata; fragmentation of the original protolith; or a mixture of both. Significantly, specific strain

  13. Rating mass concentration of airborne dust in the road transport depending on the type of pollution transport routes.

    OpenAIRE

    PÁVEK, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    In the thesis the values of air pollution re-suspended solid pollutants on the diameter of 10 micrometres (PM10) during the movement of vehicles of different categories of polluted roads routes. Measurements were carried out on three lines of transport operation of various vehicle categories as diverse weight and the type of pollution road. Measured values and analysis results show that the resulting air pollution in the vicinity of the road affects several factors. The main factors include t...

  14. Determination of As, Cd, Pb and Tl in coal by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using slurry sampling and external calibration against aqueous standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, D.L.G.; Welz, B.; Curtius, A.J. [University of Federal Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2007-06-15

    A method was developed for the determination of As, Cd, Pb and Tl by electrothermal vaporization inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS) with slurry sample introduction using certified reference coal samples. The As-75, Cd-111, Pb-208 and Tl-205 isotopes were monitored, considering the lower probabilities of these isotopes in suffering interferences. The carrier and modifier effect of Ru added in solution was evaluated, demonstrating that sensitivity for all elements is considerably improved by the addition of 15 mg of Ru to each individual measurement. This confirms its ability to act as a physical carrier particularly for the analytes in aqueous solution. After optimization of the operational parameters, the determination of the four elements in six certified reference coal samples was carried out by external calibration against aqueous standards in 5% v= v HNO{sub 3}, resulting in good agreement between the certified or given values and the determined ones. For Tl, due to the absence of certified values, a comparison was established considering previously published data using solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Detection limits ({mu} g g{sup -1}) of 0.1, 0.004, 0.045 and 0.001 were achieved for As, Cd, Pb and Tl, respectively, and the precision was typically better than 10%.

  15. The fabric of Mass Transport Deposits in the Ursa Basin, Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Strong, H. E.; Schneider, J.; Sawyer, D. E.; Schleicher, A. M.; Germaine, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) in the Ursa Basin, Gulf of Mexico, are densified relative to surrounding, undeformed, sediments. MTDs form a large fraction of the stratigraphic record. Their properties control basin fluid flow, impact seismic imaging, and are important for the development of subsea infrastructure. MTD-2 is one outstanding ~50m thick example where at a depth of 104.5mbsf, the porosity is 35%, while the immediate undeformed sediment below has a porosity of 47%. We analyzed the fabric of sediment within and outside, both above and below, of the MTD’s at Ursa. High-resolution x-ray texture goniometry (HRXTG) quantifies the alignment of clay minerals and shows greater basal plane alignment of smectite and illite within the MTDs relative to sediment outside the MTDs. A non-MTD sample immediately below MTD-2 has a weak fabric (m.r.d. = 2.5) whereas samples within the MTD have moderate fabrics (m.r.d. = 3-3.5). Pore throat analysis illustrates that the increase in alignment and the decrease in porosity is associated with a shift in mode pore throat size from 121 to 52 nanometers in the MTD vs. outside of the MTD. SEM images on ion-milled surfaces confirm that large pore throats are lost within the MTD. We interpret that the densification within MTDs is due to sediment remolding during debris flow. Remolding reorients the original clay mineral fabric, resulting in grains that have closer packing, lower porosity, and greater alignment than non-remolded sediments at the same effective stress.

  16. Mass transport of direct methanol fuel cell species in sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, V.S.; Boaventura, M.; Mendes, A.M.; Madeira, L.M. [LEPAE, Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Ruffmann, B.; Vetter, S.; Nunes, S.P. [GKSS Research Centre, Max-Planck Str., 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2006-05-05

    Homogeneous membranes based on sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (sPEEK) with different sulfonation degrees (SD) were prepared and characterized. In order to perform a critical analysis of the SD effect on the polymer barrier and mass transport properties towards direct methanol fuel cell species, proton conductivity, water/methanol pervaporation and nitrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide pressure rise method experiments are proposed. This procedure allows the evaluation of the individual permeability coefficients in hydrated sPEEK membranes with different sulfonation degrees. Nafion{sup (R)} 112 was used as reference material. DMFC tests were also performed at 50{sup o}C. It was observed that the proton conductivity and the permeability towards water, methanol, oxygen and carbon dioxide increase with the sPEEK sulfonation degree. In contrast, the SD seems to not affect the nitrogen permeability coefficient. In terms of selectivity, it was observed that the carbon dioxide/oxygen selectivity increases with the sPEEK SD. In contrast, the nitrogen/oxygen selectivity decreases. In terms of barrier properties for preventing the DMFC reactants loss, the polymer electrolyte membrane based on the sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) with SD lower or equal to 71%, although having slightly lower proton conductivity, presented much better characteristics for fuel cell applications compared with the well known Nafion{sup (R)} 112. In terms of the DMFC tests of the studied membranes at low temperature, the sPEEK membrane with SD=71% showed to have similar performance, or even better, as that of Nafion{sup (R)} 112. However, the highest DMFC overall efficiency was achieved using sPEEK membrane with SD=52%. (author)

  17. Flow field design and optimization based on the mass transport polarization regulation in a flow-through type vanadium flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiong; Xing, Feng; Li, Xianfeng; Ning, Guiling; Zhang, Huamin

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium flow battery holds great promise for use in large scale energy storage applications. However, the power density is relatively low, leading to significant increase in the system cost. Apart from the kinetic and electronic conductivity improvement, the mass transport enhancement is also necessary to further increase the power density and reduce the system cost. To better understand the mass transport limitations, in the research, the space-varying and time-varying characteristic of the mass transport polarization is investigated based on the analysis of the flow velocity and reactant concentration in the bulk electrolyte by modeling. The result demonstrates that the varying characteristic of mass transport polarization is more obvious at high SoC or high current densities. To soften the adverse impact of the mass transport polarization, a new rectangular plug flow battery with a plug flow and short flow path is designed and optimized based on the mass transport polarization regulation (reducing the mass transport polarization and improving its uniformity of distribution). The regulation strategy of mass transport polarization is practical for the performance improvement in VFBs, especially for high power density VFBs. The findings in the research are also applicable for other flow batteries and instructive for practical use.

  18. Chemical mass transport between fluid fine tailings and the overlying water cover of an oil sands end pit lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee; North, Rebecca L.; Carey, Sean K.; Lindsay, Matthew B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Fluid fine tailings (FFT) are a principal by-product of the bitumen extraction process at oil sands mines. Base Mine Lake (BML)—the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL)—contains approximately 1.9 × 108 m3 of FFT stored under a water cover within a decommissioned mine pit. Chemical mass transfer from the FFT to the water cover can occur via two key processes: (1) advection-dispersion driven by tailings settlement; and (2) FFT disturbance due to fluid movement in the water cover. Dissolved chloride (Cl) was used to evaluate the water cover mass balance and to track mass transport within the underlying FFT based on field sampling and numerical modeling. Results indicated that FFT was the dominant Cl source to the water cover and that the FFT is exhibiting a transient advection-dispersion mass transport regime with intermittent disturbance near the FFT-water interface. The advective pore water flux was estimated by the mass balance to be 0.002 m3 m-2 d-1, which represents 0.73 m of FFT settlement per year. However, the FFT pore water Cl concentrations and corresponding mass transport simulations indicated that advection rates and disturbance depths vary between sample locations. The disturbance depth was estimated to vary with location between 0.75 and 0.95 m. This investigation provides valuable insight for assessing the geochemical evolution of the water cover and performance of EPLs as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  19. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  20. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Walker, H.F. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  1. Residual Stress Relaxation Induced by Mass Transport Through Interface of the Pd/SrTiO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarpour S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metal interconnections having a small cross-section and short length can be subjected to very large mass transport due to the passing of high current densities. As a result, nonlinear diffusion and electromigration effects which may result in device failure and electrical instabilities may be manifested. Various thicknesses of Pd were deposited over SrTiO3 substrate. Residual stress of the deposited film was evaluated by measuring the variation of d-spacing versus sin2ψ through conventional X-ray diffraction method. It has been found that the lattice misfit within film and substrate might be relaxed because of mass transport. Besides, the relation between residual intrinsic stress and oxygen diffusion through deposited film has been expressed. Consequently, appearance of oxide intermediate layer may adjust interfacial characteristics and suppress electrical conductivity by increasing electron scattering through metallic films.

  2. Optical conductivity and optical effective mass in a high-mobility organic semiconductor: Implications for the nature of charge transport

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yuan

    2014-12-03

    We present a multiscale modeling of the infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal. The results are in very good agreement with the experimental data that point to nonmonotonic features in the optical conductivity spectrum and small optical effective masses. We find that, in the static-disorder approximation, the nonlocal electron-phonon interactions stemming from low-frequency lattice vibrations can decrease the optical effective masses and lead to lighter quasiparticles. On the other hand, the charge-transport and infrared optical properties of the rubrene crystal at room temperature are demonstrated to be governed by localized carriers driven by inherent thermal disorders. Our findings underline that the presence of apparently light carriers in high-mobility organic semiconductors does not necessarily imply bandlike transport.

  3. Mass Transport Complexes in bacini confinati a controllo strutturale: l'Unità Epiligure di Specchio (Appennino Settentrionale)

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Kei

    2010-01-01

    Il recente incremento dell’esplorazione geofisica dei margini continentali e il concomitante sviluppo di tecnologie d’indagine, sismiche ed acustiche, sempre più accurate, hanno rivelato la comune presenza di vasti accumuli di sedimenti rimobilizzati a causa di franamenti sottomarini, e comunemente identificati con il termine di Mass Transport Deposit o Complex (MTD e MTC, rispettivamente). Attualmente, queste unità sono intensamente studiate non solo per ragioni strettamente scientifiche,...

  4. Predictive data-derived Bayesian statistic-transport model and simulator of sunken oil mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echavarria Gregory, Maria Angelica

    -processing tasks proper of a basic GIS-like software. The result is a predictive Bayesian multi-modal Gaussian model, SOSim (Sunken Oil Simulator) Version 1.0rcl, operational for use with limited, randomly-sampled, available subjective and numeric data on sunken oil concentrations and locations in relatively flat-bottomed bays. The SOSim model represents a new approach, coupling a Lagrangian modeling technique with predictive Bayesian capability for computing unconditional probabilities of mass as a function of space and time. The approach addresses the current need to rapidly deploy modeling capability without readily accessible information on ocean bottom currents. Contributions include (1) the development of the apparently first pollutant transport model for computing unconditional relative probabilities of pollutant location as a function of time based on limited available field data alone; (2) development of a numerical method of computing concentration profiles subject to curved, continuous or discontinuous boundary conditions; (3) development combinatorial algorithms to compute unconditional multimodal Gaussian probabilities not amenable to analytical or Markov-Chain Monte Carlo integration due to high dimensionality; and (4) the development of software modules, including a core module containing the developed Bayesian functions, a wrapping graphical user interface, a processing and operating interface, and the necessary programming components that lead to an open-source, stand-alone, executable computer application (SOSim -- Sunken Oil Simulator). Extensions and refinements are recommended, including the addition of capability for accepting available information on bathymetry and maybe bottom currents as Bayesian prior information, the creation of capability of modeling continuous oil releases, and the extension to tracking of suspended oil (3-D). Keywords: sunken oil, Bayesian, Gaussian, model, stochastic, emergency response, recovery, statistical model, multimodal.

  5. In-situ TEM-investigations of mass transport in ``near-bamboo'' Al-interconnects due to electromigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Dirk; Schroeder, Herbert; Schilling, Werner

    1998-01-01

    Electromigration (EM)-driven mass transport in "near-bamboo" Al-lines, which consist mostly of "blocking grains," is an important topic of research on ULSI-metallizations. Because the most easy diffusion path, i.e. grain boundaries parallel to the line, is suppressed in bamboo-like Al-lines other paths have to be considered. In this work two other possible paths of diffusion were examined by in-situ observations in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). For these experiments a special sample holder had to be constructed. One path is EM-driven intragranular diffusion in Al-lines. In this experiment, inert gas-filled voids with a mean diameter of about 10 nm, so-called bubbles, which were created after gas implantation and annealing of the Al-lines, serve as indicators of mass (or vacancy) transport. The in-situ EM-tests reveal no intragranular void motion over a period of more than 100 h at current densities of 1-1.75 MA/cm2 and temperatures of 150-225 °C. This leads to an estimation of the maximum void diffusion velocity which was compared with calculated values of surface and volume diffusion controlled void motion, respectively. The second point of interest was the behavior of dislocations in Al-lines under an applied EM-force. The importance of their observed motion for intragranular mass transport will be discussed.

  6. Sedimentary and structural controls on seismogenic slumping within mass transport deposits from the Dead Sea Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Weinberger, R.; Levi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Comparatively little work has been undertaken on how sedimentary environments and facies changes can influence detailed structural development in slump sheets associated with mass transport deposits (MTDs). The nature of downslope deformation at the leading edge of MTDs is currently debated in terms of frontally emergent, frontally confined and open-toed models. An opportunity to study and address these issues occurs within the Dead Sea Basin, where six individual slump sheets (S1-S6) form MTDs in the Late Pleistocene Lisan Formation. All six slumps, which are separated from one another by undeformed beds, are traced towards the NE for up to 1 km, and each shows a change in sedimentary facies from detrital-rich in the SW, to more aragonite-rich in the NE. The detrital-rich facies is sourced predominantly from the rift margin 1.5 km further SW, while the aragonite-rich facies represents evaporitic precipitation in the hyper saline Lake Lisan. The stacked system of MTDs translates downslope towards the NE and follows a pre-determined sequence controlled by the sedimentary facies. Each individual slump roots downwards into underlying detrital-rich layers and displays a greater detrital content towards the SW, which is marked by increasing folding, while increasing aragonite content towards the NE is associated with more discrete thrusts. The MTDs thin downslope towards the NE, until they pass laterally into undeformed beds at the toe. The amount of contraction also reduces downslope from a maximum of 50% to < 10% at the toe, where upright folds form diffuse 'open-toed' systems. We suggest that MTDs are triggered by seismic events, facilitated by detrital-rich horizons, and controlled by palaeoslope orientation. The frequency of individual failures is partially controlled by local environmental influences linked to detrital input and should therefore be used with some caution in more general palaeoseismic studies. We demonstrate that MTDs display 'open toes' where

  7. Experimental and theoretical aspects of studying themodynamics and mass transport in polymer-solvent systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Peter Kennedy

    Mass transport and thermodynamics in polymer-solvent systems are two key areas of importance to the polymer industry. Numerous processes including polymerization reactors, membrane separations, foam production, devolatilization processes, film and coating drying, supercritical extractions, drug delivery, and even nano-technology require fundamental phase equilibria and diffusion information. Although such information is vital in equipment design and optimization, acquisition and modeling of these data are still in the research and development stages. This thesis is rather diverse as it addresses many realms of this broad research area. From high pressure to low pressure, experimental to theoretical, and infinite dilution to finite concentration, the thesis covers a wide range of topics that are of current importance to the industrial and academic polymer community. Chapter 1 discusses advances in the development of a new volumetric sorption pressure decay technique to make phase equilibrium and diffusion measurements in severe temperature-pressure environments. Chapter 2 provides the derivations and results of a new completely predictive Group Contribution Lattice Fluid Equation of State for multi-component polymer-solvent systems. The remaining four chapters demonstrate advances in the modeling of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) experiments. IGC has been used extensively of the last 50 years to make low pressure sorption and diffusion measurements at infinitely dilute and finite solvent concentrations. Chapter 3 proposes a new IGC experiment capable of obtaining ternary vapor-liquid equilibria in polymer-solvent-solvent systems. Also in that chapter, an extensive derivation is provided for a continuum model capable of describing the results of such an experiment. Chapter 4 presents new data collected on a packed column IGC experiment and a new model that can be used with those experimental data to obtain diffusion and partition coefficients. Chapter 5 addresses a

  8. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  9. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  10. Co-transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by motile microorganisms leads to enhanced mass transfer under diffusive conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorothea; Jakobsen, Hans H; Winding, Anne; Mayer, Philipp

    2014-04-15

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement with hydrophobicity indicated PAH co-transport with the motile organisms. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed such transport. The effective diffusivity of T. pyriformis, determined by video imaging microscopy, was found to exceed molecular diffusivities of the PAHs up to four-fold. Cell-bound PAH fractions were determined to range from 28% (naphthalene) to 92% (pyrene). Motile microorganisms can therefore function as effective carriers for HOCs under diffusive conditions and might significantly enhance mobility and availability of HOCs.

  11. Thermocline circulation and ventilation of the East/Japan Sea, part I: Water-mass characteristics and transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuzhu; Chang, Kyung-Il; Yun, Jae-Yul; Kim, Kyung-Ryul

    2010-07-01

    three other major convection sites of the world's oceans, the Gulf of Lions, Labrador Sea and Greenland Sea, showing some common and distinctive features, especially the extremely low salinity of the EJS. Water-mass properties on neutral density surfaces are analyzed with the water-mass Turner angle (WTu) and circulation and transport are deducted from geostrophic calculations. From the 15-year mean hydrography, a basin-wide net annual mean transport of about 2.10±0.29 Sv (1 Sv=10 6 m 3 s -1) is estimated with summer and winter transports of 2.56±0.36 and 1.63±0.23 Sv, respectively. This transport is slightly less than the annual mean transport of the Tsushima Current at the KTS, 2.4 Sv from cable and 2.3 Sv from other direct current meter and geostrophic methods but matches the ±14% error bar of ±0.29 Sv adjusted by ±150 dbar from the reference level of 800 dbar. This error bar is close to the error of ±0.34 Sv determined from water-mass conservation residual in a separated study. Three mechanisms are discovered to explain the seasonal difference in the Tsushima Current transports: the stronger winter Ekman pumping, outcropping and southward crossing flow. During winter, the Tsushima Current branches are imposed under strong wind stress curl in the Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin, showing a doubling Ekman downwelling transport, partly weakening the Tsushima Current flow in the eastern boundary. Meanwhile the thermocline isopycnal surfaces outcrop in winter, reducing volume transport due to reduced space and thickness. The southward currents in the southern Ulleung Basin and Yamato Basin are perpendicular to the Tsushima Current branches west of Japan, which weakens the eastern boundary current in winter.

  12. Sintering kinetics and mass transport in ceramic engobes; Cinetica de sinterizacion y transporte de masa en engobes ceramicos por el metodo Pechini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Bo, M.; Boschi, A. O.; Hotza, D.

    2013-10-01

    This work is concerned to study the sintering rate and mass transport mechanism in ceramic engobes. Specimens of engobes were prepared from a determined formulation by slip casting. Sintering was carried in two steps: (i) at constant heating rate of 7.5 degree centigrade/min and (ii) with an isothermal treatment, during 120 min. According to the dilatometric curves obtained with the engobe sintering during isothermal treatment, the dominant sintering mechanism and the rate of reactions, between the 775 and 975 degree centigrade, were determined. The results showed that between 775 and 800 degree centigrade, the sintering rate can be described by ln[d({Delta}L/L{sub 0})/dt] = -5.64 + 1.77.E10{sup -}3T. At higher temperatures, from 850 to 975 degree centigrade, this rate can be expressed by ln[d({Delta}L/L{sub 0})/ dt] = -30.73 + 3.E10{sup -}2T. The dominant transport mass mechanisms were the grain rearrangement, solution-precipitation and grain boundaries reaction. (Author)

  13. Mass transport deposits as witness of Holocene seismic activity on the Ligurian margin, Western Mediterranean (ASTARTE project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalens, Kevin; Cattaneo, Antonio; Migeon, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    The Ligurian Margin (Western Mediterranean) is at the transition between the Southern Alpes and the Liguro-Provençal margin and it is one of the most seismic areas of France. Several historic earthquakes have been indexed; the strongest, on February 23rd, 1887, occurred offshore Menton and Imperia and also caused a tsunami wave. Its equivalent magnitude has been estimated between 6 and 6.5. In addition, a moderate recurrent seismicity shakes the margin. The aim of this study is to understand the link between seismic activity and slope destabilization, and to identify the sedimentary deposits resulting from mass transport or turbidity currents. During Malisar (Geoazur laboratory), Prisme 2 and Prisme 3 (Ifremer) cruises, bathymetry, seafloor imagery (SAR), geophysics data (CHIRP SYSIF and high resolution seismics), and sediment cores have been acquired on the continental slope, focussing on canyons and submarine landslides, and in the basin. These data record numerous mass transport deposits (slump, debrites) in the different physiographic areas of the margin. To search for evidences of past Ligurian margin seismicity during the Holocene, we focused on the northeast part of the margin, the Finale area. We identified and sampled acoustically transparent Mass Transport Deposits up to 20-m thick in the bottom of three coaleshing canyons: Noli, Pora and Centa canyons from W to E in the area offshore Finale Ligure. We also recovered an MTD in the collecting deeper canyon system. MTDs in cores appear as sediment with different degrees of deformation (tilted blocks, slump, debrites) and are topped by hemipelagites. The radiocarbon age of the top of MTDs can be considered synchronous and centered around 4900 yr BP. Mass wasting occurring over more than 50 km of the Ligurian margin could indicate that an earthquake stroke the Finale area sector at that time.

  14. The relative importance of real-time in-cab and external feedback in managing fatigue in real-world commercial transport operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzharris, Michael; Liu, Sara; Stephens, Amanda N; Lenné, Michael G

    2017-05-29

    Real-time driver monitoring systems represent a solution to address key behavioral risks as they occur, particularly distraction and fatigue. The efficacy of these systems in real-world settings is largely unknown. This article has three objectives: (1) to document the incidence and duration of fatigue in real-world commercial truck-driving operations, (2) to determine the reduction, if any, in the incidence of fatigue episodes associated with providing feedback, and (3) to tease apart the relative contribution of in-cab warnings from 24/7 monitoring and feedback to employers. Data collected from a commercially available in-vehicle camera-based driver monitoring system installed in a commercial truck fleet operating in Australia were analyzed. The real-time driver monitoring system makes continuous assessments of driver drowsiness based on eyelid position and other factors. Data were collected in a baseline period where no feedback was provided to drivers. Real-time feedback to drivers then occurred via in-cab auditory and haptic warnings, which were further enhanced by direct feedback by company management when fatigue events were detected by external 24/7 monitors. Fatigue incidence rates and their timing of occurrence across the three time periods were compared. Relative to no feedback being provided to drivers when fatigue events were detected, in-cab warnings resulted in a 66% reduction in fatigue events, with a 95% reduction achieved by the real-time provision of direct feedback in addition to in-cab warnings (p company on driver fatigue events in real time provides greater benefit than feedback to the driver alone has implications for companies seeking to mitigate risks associated with fatigue. Having fewer fatigue events is likely a reflection of the device itself and the accompanying safety culture of the company in terms of how the information is used. Data were analysed on a per-truck trip basis, and the findings are indicative of fatigue events in a

  15. Mass flux into the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif: Orogen-parallel transport, lower crustal flow, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, D. M.; Beaumont, C.; Braun, J.

    2011-12-01

    Relative to most of the Himalaya, the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif requires an additional mass flux into its base to balance extreme rates of surface denudation (>10 mm/a) over the last ~2-3 Ma. One proposed source is middle to lower crustal flow into the massif (e.g., Zeitler et al., 2001), which while likely inactive elsewhere along strike, may be sustainable by very rapid surface denudation, a high geothermal gradient, and thermal weakening of rocks beneath the syntaxes. An alternative source is orogen-parallel (OP) transport due to oblique convergence and strain partitioning along the Himalayan arc (e.g., Seeber and Pêcher, 1998). Several observations including (1) predominantly orogen-normal slip on the frontal thrusts deduced from seismic events, (2) OP extension accommodated on orogen-normal structures, and (3) distributed and segmented strike-slip faulting trending parallel to the arc are consistent with strain partitioning and OP mass transport. A key question is can this mechanism supply sufficient mass to the Nanga Parbat syntaxis, or is local channel flow required? We explore mass transport into the western Himalayan syntaxis region using lithospheric-scale 3D mechanical and coupled thermo-mechanical models of an arcuate orogen. The crust is either frictional plastic or power-law viscous, with a constant low viscosity lower crust present in some experiments. Applied velocity boundary conditions are transmitted to the base of the crust by a strong frictional plastic mantle lithosphere, and mantle detachment/subduction drives formation of a bivergent, arcuate orogen. To assess the magnitude of mass transport from strain partitioning, we first explore purely mechanical experiments featuring a 5-km-high Tibet-like plateau above a weak lower crust and with a frictional plastic decollement that dips at 10° beneath the incipient orogen, similar to the Himalayan basal detachment. Preliminary results show gravitational feedback from the plateau drives

  16. Gradual conditioning of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields to flow and mass transport data: 2. Demonstration on a synthetic aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis-Albert, Carlos; Capilla, José E.

    2009-06-01

    SummaryIn the first paper of this series a methodology for the generation of non-Gaussian transmissivity fields conditional to flow, mass transport and secondary data was presented. This methodology, referred to as the gradual conditioning (GC) method, constitutes a new and advanced powerful approach in the field of stochastic inverse modelling. It is based on gradually changing an initial transmissivity ( T) field, conditioned only to T and secondary data, to honour flow and transport measured data. The process is based on combining the initial T field with other seed T fields in successive iterations maintaining the stochastic structure of T, previously inferred from data. The iterative procedure involves the minimization of a penalty function which depends on one parameter, and is made up by the weighted summation of the square deviations among flow and/or transport variables, and the corresponding known measurements. The GC method leads gradually to a final simulated field, uniformly converging to a better reproduction of conditioning data as more iterations are performed. The methodology is now demonstrated on a synthetic aquifer in a non-multi-Gaussian stochastic framework. First, an initial T field is simulated, and retained as reference T field. With prescribed head boundary conditions, transient flow created by an abstraction well and a mass solute plume migrating through the formation, a long-term and large scale hypothetical tracer experiment is run in this reference synthetic aquifer. Then T, piezometric head ( h), solute concentration ( c) and travel time ( τ) are sampled at a limited number of points, and for different time steps where applicable. Using this limited amount of information the GC method is applied, conditioning to different sets of these sampled data and model results are compared to those from the reference synthetic aquifer. Results demonstrate the ability and robustness of the GC method to include different types of data without

  17. Commuter exposure to black carbon, carbon monoxide, and noise in the mass transport khlong boats of Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, A. D.; Velasco, E.; Ho, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Khlong (canal) boats are a unique mass transport alternative in the congested city of Bangkok. Canals and rivers provide exclusive transit-ways for reducing the commuting time of thousands of city residents daily. However, as a consequence of the service characteristics and boats design and state of repair, they can represent a potential public health risk and an important source of black carbon and greenhouse gases. This work quantifies commuter exposure to black carbon, CO and noise when waiting for and travelling in these diesel fueled boats. Exposure to toxic pollutants and acute noise is similar or worse than for other transportation modes. Mean black carbon concentrations observed at one busy pier and along the main canal were much higher than ambient concentrations at sites impacted by vehicular traffic. Concentrations of CO were similar to those reported for roadside areas of Bangkok. The equivalent continuous sound levels registered at the landing pier were similar to those reported for roadsides, but values recorded inside the boats were significantly higher. We believe that the boat service is a viable alternative mode of mass transport, but public safety could be improved to provide a high quality service, comparable to modern rail systems or emerging bus rapid transit systems. These investments would also contribute to reduce the emission of black carbon and other greenhouse and toxic pollutants.

  18. Mass spectrometry-based method to investigate the natural selectivity of sucrose as the sugar transport form for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hang; Wu, Yile; Liu, Wu; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xiang; Lin, Jinming; Zhao, Yufen

    2015-04-30

    Sucrose is the carbon skeletons and energy vector for plants, which is important for plants growth. Among thousands of disaccharides in Nature, why chose sucrose for plants? In this paper, we analyzed the intrinsic structural characteristics of four sucrose isomers with different glycosidic linkage by mass spectrometry (MS) technique. Our results show that sucrose has the most labile glycosidic bond compared with other three isomers, which is helpful for releasing glucose and fructose unit. Besides, sucrose has the most stable integral structure, which is hard to dehydrate and degrade into fragments through losing one or three even four-carbon units, just as its three isomers. In other words, sucrose is more easily holds an integral structure during the transport process, whenever it is necessary, and sucrose can be cleaved into glucose and fructose easily. Besides, we also investigate the internal relationship of sucrose with K(+) by tandem mass spectrometry and viscosity measurement. The related results have shown that the K(+) can stabilize sucrose to a greater extent than the Na(+). Furthermore, under the same conditions, K(+) ions reduce the viscosity of sucrose-water system much more than Na(+). These results suggest that K(+) is a better co-transporter for sucrose. Of course, the transport of sucrose in plants is a very complicated process, which is involved in many proteins. This paper directly accounts for the basic structure feature of sucrose, and the results discovered could provide the novel insight for the answer why Nature chose sucrose for plants.

  19. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praphairaksit, Narong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at ~70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of ~4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression of signal for even the most

  20. Development and Evaluation of an Externally Air-Cooled Low-Flow torch and the Attenuation of Space Charge and Matrix Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praphairaksit, N.

    2000-09-12

    An externally air-cooled low-flow torch has been constructed and successfully demonstrated for applications in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The torch is cooled by pressurized air flowing at {approximately}70 L/min through a quartz air jacket onto the exterior of the outer tube. The outer gas flow rate and operating RF forward power are reduced considerably. Although plasmas can be sustained at the operating power as low as 400 W with a 2 L/min of outer gas flow, somewhat higher power and outer gas flows are advisable. A stable and analytical useful plasma can be obtained at 850 W with an outer gas flow rate of {approximately}4 L/min. Under these conditions, the air-cooled plasma produces comparable sensitivities, doubly charged ion ratios, matrix effects and other analytical merits as those produced by a conventional torch while using significantly less argon and power requirements. Metal oxide ion ratios are slightly higher with the air-cooled plasma but can be mitigated by reducing the aerosol gas flow rate slightly with only minor sacrifice in analyte sensitivity. A methodology to alleviate the space charge and matrix effects in ICP-MS has been developed. A supplemental electron source adapted from a conventional electron impact ionizer is added to the base of the skimmer. Electrons supplied from this source downstream of the skimmer with suitable amount and energy can neutralize the positive ions in the beam extracted from the plasma and diminish the space charge repulsion between them. As a result, the overall ion transmission efficiency and consequent analyte ion sensitivities are significantly improved while other important analytical aspects, such as metal oxide ion ratio, doubly charged ion ratio and background ions remain relatively unchanged with the operation of this electron source. This technique not only improves the ion transmission efficiency but also minimizes the matrix effects drastically. The matrix-induced suppression

  1. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David M Whipp; Christopher Beaumont; Jean Braun

    2014-01-01

    The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates...

  2. Feeding the "aneurysm": Orogen-parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David M Whipp; Christopher Beaumont; Jean Braun

    2014-01-01

      The Nanga Parbat-Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates...

  3. Climatology of wintertime long-distance transport of surface-layer air masses arriving urban Beijing in 2001-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Xiang-De, XU

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the FLEXPART-WRF coupled modeling system is used to conduct 12-year Lagrangian modeling over Beijing, China, for the winters of 2001-2012. Based on large trajectory tracking ensembles, the long-range air transport properties, in terms of geographic source regions within the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) and large-scale ventilation, and its association with air quality levels were quantified from a climatological perspective. The results show the following: (1) The air masses residing in the near-surface layer over Beijing potentially originate from broader atmospheric boundary-layer regions, which cover vast areas with the backward tracking time elapsed. However, atmospheric transport from northeastern China and, to a lesser extent, from the surrounding regions of Beijing is important. (2) The evolution of air quality over Beijing is negatively correlated with large-scale ventilation conditions, particularly at a synoptic timescale. Thus, the simple but robust backward-trajectory ventilation (BV) index defined in this study could facilitate operational forecasting of severe air pollution events. (3) By comparison, the relatively short-range transport occurring over transport timescales of less than 3 days from southern and southeastern Beijing and its surrounding areas plays a vital role in the formation of severe air pollution events during the wintertime. (4) Additionally, an interannual trend analysis suggests that the geographic sources and ventilation conditions also changed, at least over the last decade, corresponding to the strength variability of the winter East Asian monsoon.

  4. Numerical simulations of water flow and contaminants transport near mining wastes disposed in a fractured rock mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ben Abdelghani Farouk; Aubertin Michel; Simon Richard; Therrien René

    2015-01-01

    A numerical tool, called Hydro-Geosphere, was used to simulate unsaturated water flow and contami-nants migration around an open pit filled with mining wastes. Numerical simulations had been carried out to assess the influence of various factors on water flow and solute transport in and around the surface openings including recharge, properties of the waste material and presence of fractures in the surround-ing rock mass. The effect of the regional hydraulic gradient was also investigated. The analyses were con-ducted by simulating various 2D cases using experimentally obtained material properties and controlled boundary conditions. The effects of the hydrogeological properties of the filling material (i.e., water reten-tion curve and hydraulic conductivity function), fracture network characteristics and conductivity of the joints were assessed. The results illustrate that fractures control water flow and contaminants transport around the waste disposal area. A fracture network can desaturate the system and improve the regional gradient effect.

  5. Interfacing 3D micro/nanochannels with a branch-shaped reservoir enhances fluid and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prasoon; Gandhi, Prasanna S.; Majumder, Mainak

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) micro/nanofluidic devices can accelerate progress in numerous fields such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, self-healing and cooling devices. However, efficient connections between networks of micro/nanochannels and external fluidic ports are key to successful applications of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices. Therefore, in this work, the extent of the role of reservoir geometry in interfacing with vascular (micro/nanochannel) networks, and in the enabling of connections with external fluidic ports while maintaining the compactness of devices, has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A statistical modelling suggested that a branch-shaped reservoir demonstrates enhanced interfacing with vascular networks when compared to other regular geometries of reservoirs. Time-lapse dye flow experiments by capillary action through fabricated 3D micro/nanofluidic devices confirmed the connectivity of branch-shaped reservoirs with micro/nanochannel networks in fluidic devices. This demonstrated a ~2.2-fold enhancement of the volumetric flow rate in micro/nanofluidic networks when interfaced to branch-shaped reservoirs over rectangular reservoirs. The enhancement is due to a ~2.8-fold increase in the perimeter of the reservoirs. In addition, the mass transfer experiments exhibited a ~1.7-fold enhancement in solute flux across 3D micro/nanofluidic devices that interfaced with branch-shaped reservoirs when compared to rectangular reservoirs. The fabrication of 3D micro/nanofluidic devices and their efficient interfacing through branch-shaped reservoirs to an external fluidic port can potentially enable their use in complex applications, in which enhanced surface-to-volume interactions are desirable.

  6. Real-time monitoring of mass-transport-related enzymatic reaction kinetics in a nanochannel-array reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Juan; Wang, Chen; Wu, Zeng-Qiang; Xu, Jing-Juan; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-09-01

    To understand the fundamentals of enzymatic reactions confined in micro-/nanosystems, the construction of a small enzyme reactor coupled with an integrated real-time detection system for monitoring the kinetic information is a significant challenge. Nano-enzyme array reactors were fabricated by covalently linking enzymes to the inner channels of a porous anodic alumina (PAA) membrane. The mechanical stability of this nanodevice enables us to integrate an electrochemical detector for the real-time monitoring of the formation of the enzyme reaction product by sputtering a thin Pt film on one side of the PAA membrane. Because the enzymatic reaction is confined in a limited nanospace, the mass transport of the substrate would influence the reaction kinetics considerably. Therefore, the oxidation of glucose by dissolved oxygen catalyzed by immobilized glucose oxidase was used as a model to investigate the mass-transport-related enzymatic reaction kinetics in confined nanospaces. The activity and stability of the enzyme immobilized in the nanochannels was enhanced. In this nano-enzyme reactor, the enzymatic reaction was controlled by mass transport if the flux was low. With an increase in the flux (e.g., >50 microL min(-1)), the enzymatic reaction kinetics became the rate-determining step. This change resulted in the decrease in the conversion efficiency of the nano-enzyme reactor and the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant with an increase in substrate flux. This nanodevice integrated with an electrochemical detector could help to understand the fundamentals of enzymatic reactions confined in nanospaces and provide a platform for the design of highly efficient enzyme reactors. In addition, we believe that such nanodevices will find widespread applications in biosensing, drug screening, and biochemical synthesis.

  7. Convective mass transport dominates surfactant adsorption in a microfluidic Y-junction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muijlwijk, Kelly; Huang, Wenqian; Vuist, Jan Eise; Berton-Carabin, Claire; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Surfactant adsorption during emulsification can be quantified by measuring the acting interfacial tension using a Y-junction microfluidic device. To obtain insight into the surfactant transport mechanism to the interface, the effect of shear force on the acting interfacial tension was assessed by

  8. Final Report: Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications (2012-2016)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Brian David [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Huya-Kouadio, Jennie Moton [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Houchins, Cassidy [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); DeSantis, Daniel Allen [Strategic Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes project activities for Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) Contract Number DE-EE0005236 to the U.S. Department of Energy titled “Transportation Fuel Cell System Cost Assessment”. The project defined and projected the mass production costs of direct hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell power systems for light-duty vehicles (automobiles) and 40-foot transit buses. In each year of the five-year contract, the fuel cell power system designs and cost projections were updated to reflect technology advances. System schematics, design assumptions, manufacturing assumptions, and cost results are presented.

  9. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full thickness skin, including subcutaneous tissue, for skin metabolism studies.

  10. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  11. CFD assessment of the effect of convective mass transport on the intracellular clearance of intracellular triglycerides in macrosteatotic hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmush, Gabriel; Santos, Lucas; Yarmush, Joshua; Koundinyan, Srivathsan; Saleem, Mubasher; Nativ, Nir I; Yarmush, Martin L; Berthiaume, Francois; Maguire, Timothy J; Guaghan, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Donor livers available to transplant for patients with end-stage liver disease are in severe shortage. One possible avenue to expand the donor pool is to recondition livers that would be otherwise discarded due to excessive fat content. Severely steatotic livers (also known as fatty livers) are highly susceptible to ischemia-reperfusion injury and as a result, primary liver non-function post-transplantation. Prior studies in isolated perfused rat livers suggest that "defatting" may be possible in a timeframe of a few hours; thus, it is conceivable that fatty liver grafts could be recovered by machine perfusion to clear stored fat from the organ prior to transplantation. However, studies using hepatoma cells and adult hepatocytes made fatty in culture report that defatting may take several days. Because cell culture studies were done in static conditions, we hypothesized that the defatting kinetics are highly sensitive to flow-mediated transport of metabolites. To investigate this question, we experimentally evaluated the effect of increasing flow rate on the defatting kinetics of cultured HepG2 cells and developed an in silico combined reaction-transport model to identify possible rate-limiting steps in the defatting process. We found that in cultured fatty HepG2 cells, the time required to clear stored fat down to lean control cells can be reduced from 48 to 4-6 h by switching from static to flow conditions. The flow required resulted in a fluid shear of .008 Pa, which did not adversely affect hepatic function. The reaction-transport model suggests that the transport of L-carnitine, which is the carrier responsible for taking free fatty acids into the mitochondria, is the key rate-limiting process in defatting that was modulated by flow. Therefore, we can ensure higher levels of L-carnitine uptake by the cells by choosing flow rates that minimize the limiting mass transport while minimizing shear stress.

  12. COMPUTER SIMULATION OF NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW AND MASS TRANSPORT THROUGH CORONARY ARTERIAL STENOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新宇; 温功碧; 李丁

    2001-01-01

    A numerical analysis of Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow in an axi-symmetric tube with a local constriction simulating a stenosed artery under steady and pulsatile flow conditions was carried out. Based on these results, the concentration fields of LDL ( low density lipoprotein ) and Albumin were discussed. According to the results, in great details the macromolecule transport influences of wall shear stress, non-Newtonian fluid character and the scale of the molecule etc are given. The results of Newtonian fluid flow and non Newtonian fluid flow , steady flow and pulsatile flow are compared. These investigations can provide much valuable information about the correlation between the flow properties, the macromolecule transport and the development of atherosclerosis.

  13. Mass and Momentum Transport in Microcavities for Diffusion-Dominant Cell Culture Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Alvin G.; Pinero, Daniel; Hsieh, Adam H.; Atencia, Javier

    2012-01-01

    For the informed design of microfluidic devices, it is important to understand transport phenomena at the microscale. This letter outlines an analytically-driven approach to the design of rectangular microcavities extending perpendicular to a perfusion microchannel for microfluidic cell culture devices. We present equations to estimate the spatial transition from advection- to diffusion-dominant transport inside cavities as a function of the geometry and flow conditions. We also estimate the time required for molecules, such as nutrients or drugs to travel from the microchannel to a given depth into the cavity. These analytical predictions can facilitate the rational design of microfluidic devices to optimize and maintain long-term, physiologically-based culture conditions with low fluid shear stress.

  14. Optimal-mass-transfer-based estimation of glymphatic transport in living brain

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    It was recently shown that the brain-wide cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid exchange system designated the ‘glymphatic pathway’ plays a key role in removing waste products from the brain, similarly to the lymphatic system in other body organs1,2. It is therefore important to study the flow patterns of glymphatic transport through the live brain in order to better understand its functionality in normal and pathological states. Unlike blood, the CSF does not flow rapidly through ...

  15. The Role of Angular Momentum Transport in Establishing the Accretion Rate--Protostellar Mass Correlation

    CERN Document Server

    DeSouza, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    We model the mass accretion rate $\\dot{M}$ to stellar mass $M_*$ correlation that has been inferred from observations of intermediate to upper mass T Tauri stars---that is $\\dot{M} \\propto M_*^{1.3 \\pm 0.3}$. We explain this correlation within the framework of quiescent disk evolution, in which accretion is driven largely by gravitational torques acting in the bulk of the mass and volume of the disk. Stresses within the disk arise from the action of gravitationally driven torques parameterized in our 1D model in terms of Toomre's $Q$ criterion. We do not model the hot inner sub-AU scale region of the disk that is likely stable according to this criterion, and appeal to other mechanisms to remove or redistribute angular momentum and allow accretion onto the star. Our model has the advantage of agreeing with large-scale angle-averaged values from more complex nonaxisymmetric calculations. The model disk transitions from an early phase (dominated by initial conditions inherited from the burst mode of accretion) ...

  16. The role of angular momentum transport in establishing the accretion rate-protostellar mass correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2017-02-01

    We model the mass accretion rate M˙ to stellar mass M* correlation that has been inferred from observations of intermediate to upper mass T Tauri stars-that is M˙ ∝ M*1.3±0.3. We explain this correlation within the framework of quiescent disk evolution, in which accretion is driven largely by gravitational torques acting in the bulk of the mass and volume of the disk. Stresses within the disk arise from the action of gravitationally driven torques parameterized in our 1D model in terms of Toomre's Q criterion. We do not model the hot inner sub-AU scale region of the disk that is likely stable according to this criterion, and appeal to other mechanisms to remove or redistribute angular momentum and allow accretion onto the star. Our model has the advantage of agreeing with large-scale angle-averaged values from more complex nonaxisymmetric calculations. The model disk transitions from an early phase (dominated by initial conditions inherited from the burst mode of accretion) into a later self-similar mode characterized by a steeper temporal decline in M˙. The models effectively reproduce the spread in mass accretion rates that have been observed for protostellar objects of 0.2 M⊙ ≤ M* ≤ 3.0 M⊙, such as those found in the ρ Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions. We then compare realistically sampled populations of young stellar objects produced by our model to their observational counterparts. We find these populations to be statistically coincident, which we argue is evidence for the role of gravitational torques in the late time evolution of quiescent protostellar disks.

  17. A micro-fluidic sub-microliter sample introduction system for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using external aqueous calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Heyong [Institute of Microanalytical Systems, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, 310036 (China); Liu, Jinhua [College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, 310036 (China); Xu, Zigang [Institute of Analytical and Applied Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Yin, Xuefeng, E-mail: yinxf@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Microanalytical Systems, Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); College of Material Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, 310036 (China)

    2012-07-15

    A microfluidic sub-microliter sample introducing system was developed for direct analysis of Chinese rice wine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It consisted of a microfluidic chip integrating variable-volume sampling channels (0.1-0.8 {mu}L), an eight-way multi-functional valve used in flow injection analysis (FIA), a syringe pump and a peristaltic pump of the Ar ICP-MS instrument. Three solutions, i.e., 15, 40 and 100 g L{sup -1} glucose in 20% ethanol were used to simulate Chinese rice wine of the dry type, the semidry type and the semisweet type, each. The effects of their volume introduced into ICP-MS on the plasma stability and ICP-MS intensities were studied. The experimental results showed that neither alteration of plasma stability nor carbon deposition was observed when the sampling volume of 20% ethanol containing 100 g L{sup -1} glucose was downscaled to 0.8 {mu}L. Further reducing the sampling volume to 0.4 {mu}L, no significant difference between the intensities of multi-element standard prepared in three simulated Chinese rice wine matrices and those in aqueous solution was observed. It indicated no negative effect of Chinese rice wine matrix on the ICP-MS intensities. A sampling volume of 0.4 {mu}L was considered to be a good compromise between sensitivity and matrix effect. The flow rate of the carrier was chosen as 20 {mu}L min{sup -1} for obtaining peaks with the highest peak height within the shortest time. Based on these observations, a microflow injection ({mu}FI) method for the direct determination of cadmium and lead in Chinese rice wine by ICP-MS using an external aqueous calibration was developed. The sample throughput was 45 h{sup -1} with the detection limit of 19.8 and 10.4 ng L{sup -1} for Cd and Pb, respectively. The contents of Cd and Pb in 10 Chinese rice wine samples were measured. The results agreed well with those determined by ICP-MS with the conventional sampling system after microwave assisted digestion

  18. Turbulent coherent-structure dynamics in a natural surface storage zone: Mechanisms of mass and momentum transport in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escauriaza, Cristian; Sandoval, Jorge; Mignot, Emmanuel; Mao, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows developed in surface storage zones (SSZ) in rivers control many physical and biogeochemical processes of contaminants in the water. These regions are characterized by low velocities and long residence times, which favor particle deposition, nutrient uptake, and flow interactions with reactive sediments. The dynamics of the flow in SSZ is driven by a shear layer that induces multiple vortical structures with a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. In this work we study the flow in a lateral SSZ of the Lluta River, a high-altitude Andean stream (4,000 masl), with a Re=45,800. We describe the large-scale turbulent coherent structures using field measurements and 3D numerical simulations. We measure the bed topography, instantaneous 3D velocities at selected points, the mean 2D free-surface velocity field, and arsenic concentration in the sediment. Numerical simulations of the flow are also performed using a DES turbulence model. We focus on the mass and momentum transport processes, analyzing the statistics of mass exchange and residence times in the SSZ. With this information we provide new insights on the flow and transport processes between the main channel and the recirculating region in natural conditions. Supported by Fondecyt 1130940.

  19. Characterization of an electrochemical pilot-plant filter-press reactor by hydrodynamic and mass transport studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, J.; Frias, A.; Exposito, E.; Montiel, V.; Aldaz, A.; Conesa, J.A.

    2000-05-01

    This work deals with the study of the influence of turbulence promoters in the hydrodynamic and mass transport behavior of a pilot-plant filter-press electrolyzer (a homemade UA200.08 with a 200 cm{sup 2} electrode area) in an undivided configuration. A simple experimental arrangement was used to generate data from electrolytic conductivity measurements in a series of impulse-response experiments. The presence and type of turbulence promoters influence the flow distribution inside the reactor. A new design of a model (presented in a previous work) has been used to analyze the residence time distributions. In this study a new parameter, the turbulence factor, given as N{sub {alpha}}{Phi}{sub {beta}}, was employed to classify the turbulence promoters. The optimization of the parameters indicates that the correct model is dispersed plug-flow behavior with a low axial dispersion that considers exchange between the dead and main zones of the reactor. It is also very interesting to highlight that the information obtained by means of the turbulence factors is similar to that obtained from the values of the mass transport coefficients measured using the limiting current technique.

  20. Basic coaxial mass driver construction and testing. [for eventual moon-space manufacturing site magnetic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, K.

    1977-01-01

    A basic coaxial mass driver has been constructed by a group of students to verify performance predictions in the acceleration range envisaged for the first lunar device. The bucket is guided by four copper tubes which also supply direct current excitation for its single aluminum coil, and is accelerated by twenty coaxial coils along a 2 m track, followed by a deceleration section. The coils are individually energized by electrolytic photoflash capacitors triggered by solid state switches on the basis of bucket position.

  1. Modeling mass transport in aquifers: The distributed-source problem. Research report, July 1988-June 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, S.E.

    1990-08-01

    A new methodology to model the time and space evolution of groundwater variables in a system of acquifers when certain components of the model, such as the geohydrologic information, the boundary conditions, the magnitude and variability of the sources or physical parameters are uncertain and defined in stochastic terms. This facilitates a more realistic statistical representation of groundwater flow and groundwater pollution forecasting for either the saturated or the unsaturated zone. The method is based on applications of modern mathematics to the solution of the resulting stochastic transport equations. The procedure exhibits considerable advantages over the existing stochastic modeling techniques.

  2. Transport and diffusion using a diagnostic mesoscale model employing mass and total energy conservation constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, R E; Cederwall, R T; Ohmstede, W D; aufm Kampe, W

    1976-01-01

    Several steps are described that have been taken to advance the method of ''interpolation'' associated with meteorological measurements. These newer methods incorporate some physical constraints into the interpolation. It is the intent of this paper to qualitatively describe early fruits of a joint project at Brookhaven National Laboratory and White Sands Missile Range which has as its objective the formulation of a numerical objective methodology for reconstructing the meteorological fields suitable for the exercise of meso/regional scale transport, chemical and radioactive transformation, and diffusion models.

  3. Mass Transport Vehicle Routing Problem (MTVRP) and the Associated Network Design Problem (MTNDP)

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This research studies a new class of dynamic problem MTVRP where n vehicles are routed in real time in a fast varying environment to pickup and deliver m passengers when both n and m are big. The problem is very relevant to future transportation options involving large scale real-time routing of shared-ride fleet transit vehicles. Traditionally, dynamic routing solutions were found as static approximations for smaller-scale problems or using local heuristics for the larger-scale ones. General...

  4. Dispersive Mixing? Mass Transfer? Microbial Dynamics? Potential Controls of Bioreactive Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Loschko, M.; Eckert, D.; Mellage, A.

    2016-12-01

    Mixing-controlled reactive transport, in which compounds A and B must come together to react, has gained significant attention in the past years. The goal is to formulate upscaled, effective equations of reactive transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous media without fully resolving the heterogeneity. Towards this end, it is important to analyze which processes control the overall reactive behavior. The presentation classifies potential controls of (bio)reactive transport into several categories, for which different effective transport equations may be derived. The replacement scenario (solution of B replaces the solution of A) has become a popular target to study fundamental aspects of dispersive mixing. In most cases, it s assumed that neither A nor B sorb. Under such conditions, the reaction is controlled by macroscopic longitudinal dispersive mixing, which is controlled by variability of velocity and micro-scale transverse mixing. However, in most practical applications, at least one of the two compounds sorbs. If A sorbs more strongly than B, chromatographic mixing will always dominate over dispersive mixing at late times. A second popular scenario is a continuously released plume of A, reacting with B provided by ambient flow. This system is controlled by macroscopic transverse dispersion, which increases much less than longitudinal mixing in heterogeneous domains. Transient flow leads to some additional enhancement, but not very much. If the compounds sorb differently, transient flow causes alternating chromatographic mixing and separation. Many contaminants react with the aquifer matrix. In these cases, dispersive mixing is merely a nuisance, and the controling factor is the release of the reaction partner from the matrix. Here, travel-time based approaches work if chemical heterogeneity can be excluded. To account for the latter, one can integrate the time of exposure to reactive materials, eventually scaled by the intensity of the reaction, to

  5. How AGN and SN Feedback Affect Mass Transport and Black Hole Growth in High-redshift Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Escala, Andrés; Volonteri, Marta; Dubois, Yohan

    2017-02-01

    Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we study the effect of supernova (SN) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the mass transport (MT) of gas onto galactic nuclei and the black hole (BH) growth down to redshift z∼ 6. We study the BH growth in relation to the MT processes associated with gravity and pressure torques and how they are modified by feedback. Cosmological gas funneled through cold flows reaches the galactic outer region close to freefall. Then torques associated with pressure triggered by gas turbulent motions produced in the circumgalactic medium by shocks and explosions from SNe are the main source of MT beyond the central ∼100 pc. Due to high concentrations of mass in the central galactic region, gravitational torques tend to be more important at high redshift. The combined effect of almost freefalling material and both gravity and pressure torques produces a mass accretion rate of order ∼ 1 {M}ȯ yr‑1 at approximately parsec scales. In the absence of SN feedback, AGN feedback alone does not affect significantly either star formation or BH growth until the BH reaches a sufficiently high mass of ∼ {10}6 {M}ȯ to self-regulate. SN feedback alone, instead, decreases both stellar and BH growth. Finally, SN and AGN feedback in tandem efficiently quench the BH growth, while star formation remains at the levels set by SN feedback alone, due to the small final BH mass, ∼few times {10}5 {M}ȯ . SNe create a more rarefied and hot environment where energy injection from the central AGN can accelerate the gas further.

  6. Evaluation of oscillatory integrals for analytical groundwater flow and mass transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledder, Glenn; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.

    2017-06-01

    Modeling of transient dynamics of an interface between fluids of identical density and viscosity, but different otherwise, is of great interest in aquifer hydraulic, and advective contaminant transport, and has broad application. Closed-form solutions are often available for problems with simple, practically important geometry, but the integrals that appear in such solutions often have integrands with two or more oscillatory factors. Such integrals pose difficulties for numerical evaluation because the positive and negative contributions of the integrand largely cancel and the integrands decay very slowly in the integration domain. Some problems with integrands with a single oscillatory factor were tackled in the past with an integration/summation/extrapolation (ISE) method: breaking the integrand at consecutive zeros to obtain an alternating series and then using the Shanks algorithm to accelerate convergence of the series. However, this technique is ineffective for problems with multiple oscillatory factors. We present a comprehensive strategy for evaluation of such integrals that includes a better ISE method, an interval truncation method, and long-time asymptotics; this strategy is applicable to a large class of integrals with either single or multiple oscillatory factors that arise in modeling of groundwater flow and transport. The effectiveness of this methodology is illustrated by examples of integrals used in well hydraulics, groundwater recharge design, and particle tracking.

  7. Large-Eddy Simulation of pollutant dispersion around a cubical building: analysis of the turbulent mass transport mechanism by unsteady concentration and velocity statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gousseau, P; Blocken, B; van Heijst, G J F

    2012-08-01

    Pollutant transport due to the turbulent wind flow around buildings is a complex phenomenon which is challenging to reproduce with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In the present study we use Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) to investigate the turbulent mass transport mechanism in the case of gas dispersion around an isolated cubical building. Close agreement is found between wind-tunnel measurements and the computed average and standard deviation of concentration in the wake of the building. Since the turbulent mass flux is equal to the covariance of velocity and concentration, we perform a detailed statistical analysis of these variables to gain insight into the dispersion process. In particular, the fact that turbulent mass flux in the streamwise direction is directed from the low to high levels of mean concentration (counter-gradient mechanism) is explained. The large vortical structures developing around the building are shown to play an essential role in turbulent mass transport.

  8. Scalar arguments of the mathematical functions defining molecular and turbulent transport of heat and mass in compressible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Andrew S.; Argüeso, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    The advection-diffusion equations defining control volume conservation laws in micrometeorological research are analysed to resolve discrepancies in their appropriate scalar variables for heat and mass transport. A scalar variable that is conserved during vertical motions enables the interpretation of turbulent mixing as ‘diffusion’. Gas-phase heat advection is shown to depend on gradients in the potential temperature (θ), not the temperature (T). Since conduction and radiation depend on T, advection-diffusion of heat depends on gradients of both θ and T. Conservation of θ (the first Law of Thermodynamics) requires including a pressure covariance term in the definition of the turbulent heat flux. Mass advection and diffusion are universally agreed to depend directly on gradients in the gas ‘concentration’ (c), a nonetheless ambiguous term. Depending upon author, c may be defined either as a dimensionless proportion or as a dimensional density, with non-trivial differences for the gas phase. Analyses of atmospheric law, scalar conservation and similarity theory demonstrate that mass advection-diffusion in gases depends on gradients, not in density but rather in a conserved proportion. Flux-tower researchers are encouraged to respect the meteorological tradition of writing conservation equations in terms of scalar variables that are conserved through simple air motions.

  9. Columnar aerosol optical and radiative properties according to season and air mass transport pattern over East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young M; Müller, Detlef; Lee, Hanlim; Lee, Kwonho; Kim, Young Joon

    2012-08-01

    The column-integrated optical and radiative properties of aerosols in the downwind area of East Asia were investigated based on sun/sky radiometer measurements performed from February 2004 to June 2005 at Gwangju (35.23° N, 126.84° E) and Anmyeon (36.54° N, 126.33° E), Korea. The observed aerosol data were analyzed for differences among three seasons: spring (March-May), summer (June-August), and autumn/winter (September-February). The data were also categorized into five types depending on the air mass origin in arriving in the measurement sites: (a) from a northerly direction in spring (S(N)), (b) from a westerly direction in spring (S(W)), (c) cases with a low Ångström exponent (air mass origin. The forcing efficiency in summer was -131.7 and -125.6 W m(-2) at the surface in Gwangju and Anmyeon, respectively. These values are lower than those under the atmospheric conditions of spring and autumn/winter. The highest forcing efficiencies in autumn/winter were -214.3 and -255.9 W m(-2) at the surface in Gwangju and Anmyeon, respectively, when the air mass was transported from westerly directions.

  10. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in

  11. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a. variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions, This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solution with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. And the literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  12. A CONSERVATIVE COUPLED FLOW/TRANSPORT MODEL WITH ZERO MASS ERROR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Lu-hai; JIN Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A fully conservative form applied to a coupled system of two-dimensional water flow and solute motion is presented. A cell-centred finite volume method based on Roe's approximate Riemann solver with unstructured grids is formulated. The bed slope source terms are discretized following an upwind approach and a semi-implicit treatment is used for the friction source terms. The centered discretization of the diffusion terms is in an implicit way. It is shown that this numerical technique reproduces almost exactly the steady state of still water and enables to achieve zero numerical errors in unsteady flow over configurations with strong variations on bed slope. The model ensures a global conservation and positive values of both water level and solute concentration. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the model in solute transport over real complex geometries.

  13. The Transport of Mass, Energy, and Entropy in Cryogenic Support Struts for Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elchert, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Engineers working to understand and reduce cryogenic boil-off must solve a variety of transport problems. An important class of nonlinear problems involves the thermal and mechanical design of cryogenic struts. These classic problems are scattered about the literature and typically require too many resources to obtain. So, to save time for practicing engineers, the author presents this essay. Herein, a variety of new, old, and revisited analytical and finite difference solutions of the thermal problem are covered in this essay, along with commentary on approach and assumptions. This includes a few thermal radiation and conduction combined mode solutions with a discussion on insulation, optimum emissivity, and geometrical phenomenon. Solutions to cooling and heat interception problems are also presented, including a discussion of the entropy generation. The literature on the combined mechanical and thermal design of cryogenic support struts is reviewed with an introduction to the associated numerical methods.

  14. Quantifying the contribution of long-range transport to Particulate Matter (PM mass loadings at a suburban site in the North-Western Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Pawar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many sites in the densely populated Indo Gangetic Plain (IGP frequently exceed the national ambient air quality standard (NAAQS of 100 μg m−3 for 24 h average PM10 and 60 μg m−3 for 24 h average PM2.5 mass loadings, exposing residents to hazardous levels of PM throughout the year. We quantify the contribution of long range transport to elevated PM levels and the number of exceedance events through a back trajectory climatology analysis of air masses arriving at the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry facility (30.667° N, 76.729° E; 310 m a.m.s.l. for the period August 2011–June 2013. Air masses arriving at the receptor site were classified into 6 clusters, which represent synoptic scale air mass transport patterns and the average PM mass loadings and number of exceedance events associated with each air mass type were quantified for each season. Long range transport from the west leads to significant enhancements in the average coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. The contribution of long range transport from the west and south west (Source region: Arabia, Thar desert, Middle East and Afghanistan to coarse mode PM varied between 9 and 57% of the total PM10−2.5 mass. Local pollution episodes (wind speed −1 contributed to enhanced coarse mode PM only during winter season. South easterly air masses (Source region: Eastern IGP were associated with significantly lower coarse mode PM mass loadings during all seasons. For fine mode PM too, transport from the west usually leads to increased mass loadings during all seasons. Local pollution episodes contributed to enhanced PM2.5 mass loadings during winter and summer season. South easterly air masses were associated with significantly lower PM2.5 mass loadings during all seasons. Using simultaneously measured gas phase tracers we demonstrate that most PM2.5 originated from combustion sources. The fraction of days in each season during which the PM mass loadings exceeded the

  15. Nanofluidic Transport over a Curved Surface with Viscous Dissipation and Convective Mass Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E. N.

    2017-03-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  16. Nanofluidic transport over a curved surface with viscous dissipation and convective mass flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehmood, Zaffar; Iqbal, Z.; Azhar, Ehtsham; Maraj, E.N. [HITEC Univ., Taxila (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics

    2017-06-01

    This article is a numerical investigation of boundary layer flow of nanofluid over a bended stretching surface. The study is carried out by considering convective mass flux condition. Contribution of viscous dissipation is taken into the account along with thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are employed to simplify the system of nonlinear partial differential equations into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Computational results are extracted by means of a shooting method embedded with a Runge-Kutta Fehlberg technique. Key findings include that velocity is a decreasing function of curvature parameter K. Moreover, Nusselt number decreases with increase in curvature of the stretching surface while skin friction and Sherwood number enhance with increase in K.

  17. Distinct synoptic patterns and air masses responsible for long-range desert dust transport and sea spray in Palermo, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, K.; Paschalidou, A. K.; Kassomenos, P. A.

    2016-09-01

    Undoubtedly, anthropogenic emissions carry a large share of the risk posed on public health by particles exposure in urban areas. However, natural emissions, in the form of desert dust and sea spray, are well known to contribute significantly to the PM load recorded in many Mediterranean environments, posing an extra risk burden on public health. In the present paper, we examine the synoptic climatology in a background station in Palermo, Italy, through K-means clustering of the mean sea-level pressure (MSLP) maps, in an attempt to associate distinct synoptic patterns with increased PM10 levels. Four-day backward trajectory analysis is then applied, in order to study the origins and pathways of air masses susceptible of PM10 episodes. It is concluded that a number of atmospheric patterns result in several kind of flows, namely south, west, and slow-moving/stagnant flows, associated with long-range dust transport and sea spray.

  18. EHD-driven mass transport enhancement in surface dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglioli, M.; Shaw, A.; Wright, A.; FitzPatrick, B.; Neretti, G.; Seri, P.; Borghi, C. A.; Iza, F.

    2016-12-01

    Surface dielectric barrier discharges (S-DBDs) have received renewed attention in recent years for their potential application in emerging biomedical, environmental and agricultural applications. In most of these applications, the plasma is not in direct contact with the substrate being treated and the transport of reactive species from the plasma to the substrate is typically assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Here, we demonstrate that generally this is not the case and that electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces can produce jets that enhance the delivery of these species, thereby influencing the efficacy of the S-DBD device. In particular, we have studied the degradation of potassium indigotrisulfonate solutions exposed to S-DBDs generated in devices with annular electrodes of diameters varying between 10 mm and 50 mm. All the devices were driven at constant linear power density (watts per cm of plasma length) and although local plasma properties remained the same in all the devices, a three-fold efficacy enhancement was observed for devices of diameter ~30 mm due to EHD effects.

  19. Investigating the Effects of Anisotropic Mass Transport on Dendrite Growth in High Energy Density Lithium Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jinwang; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Ferris, Kim F.; Ryan, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendrite formation on the electrode surface of high energy density lithium (Li) batteries causes safety problems and limits their applications. Suppressing dendrite growth could significantly improve Li battery performance. Dendrite growth and morphology is a function of the mixing in the electrolyte near the anode interface. Most research into dendrites in batteries focuses on dendrite formation in isotropic electrolytes (i.e., electrolytes with isotropic diffusion coefficient). In this work, an anisotropic diffusion reaction model is developed to study the anisotropic mixing effect on dendrite growth in Li batteries. The model uses a Lagrangian particle-based method to model dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte solution. The model is verified by comparing the numerical simulation results with analytical solutions, and its accuracy is shown to be better than previous particle-based anisotropic diffusion models. Several parametric studies of dendrite growth in an anisotropic electrolyte are performed and the results demonstrate the effects of anisotropic transport on dendrite growth and morphology, and show the possible advantages of anisotropic electrolytes for dendrite suppression.

  20. Water injection into vapor- and liquid-dominated reservoirs: Modeling of heat transfer and mass transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.; Moridis, G.; Finsterle, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper summarizes recent advances in methods for simulating water and tracer injection, and presents illustrative applications to liquid- and vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. High-resolution simulations of water injection into heterogeneous, vertical fractures in superheated vapor zones were performed. Injected water was found to move in dendritic patterns, and to experience stronger lateral flow effects than predicted from homogeneous medium models. Higher-order differencing methods were applied to modeling water and tracer injection into liquid-dominated systems. Conventional upstream weighting techniques were shown to be adequate for predicting the migration of thermal fronts, while higher-order methods give far better accuracy for tracer transport. A new fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator is described which allows a more accurate description of geofluids, and includes mineral dissolution and precipitation effects with associated porosity and permeability change. Comparisons between numerical simulation predictions and data for laboratory and field injection experiments are summarized. Enhanced simulation capabilities include a new linear solver package for TOUGH2, and inverse modeling techniques for automatic history matching and optimization.

  1. Small Body GN and C Research Report: G-SAMPLE - An In-Flight Dynamical Method for Identifying Sample Mass [External Release Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M., III; Bayard, David S.

    2006-01-01

    G-SAMPLE is an in-flight dynamical method for use by sample collection missions to identify the presence and quantity of collected sample material. The G-SAMPLE method implements a maximum-likelihood estimator to identify the collected sample mass, based on onboard force sensor measurements, thruster firings, and a dynamics model of the spacecraft. With G-SAMPLE, sample mass identification becomes a computation rather than an extra hardware requirement; the added cost of cameras or other sensors for sample mass detection is avoided. Realistic simulation examples are provided for a spacecraft configuration with a sample collection device mounted on the end of an extended boom. In one representative example, a 1000 gram sample mass is estimated to within 110 grams (95% confidence) under realistic assumptions of thruster profile error, spacecraft parameter uncertainty, and sensor noise. For convenience to future mission design, an overall sample-mass estimation error budget is developed to approximate the effect of model uncertainty, sensor noise, data rate, and thrust profile error on the expected estimate of collected sample mass.

  2. High energy efficiency and high power density proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Velev, Omourtag A.; Parthasathy, Arvind; Manko, David J.; Appleby, A. John

    1991-01-01

    The development of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power plants with high energy efficiencies and high power densities is gaining momentum because of the vital need of such high levels of performance for extraterrestrial (space, underwater) and terrestrial (power source for electric vehicles) applications. Since 1987, considerable progress has been made in achieving energy efficiencies of about 60 percent at a current density of 200 mA/sq cm and high power densities (greater than 1 W/sq cm) in PEM fuel cells with high (4 mg/sq cm) or low (0.4 mg/sq cm) platinum loadings in electrodes. The following areas are discussed: (1) methods to obtain these high levels of performance with low Pt loading electrodes - by proton conductor impregnation into electrodes, localization of Pt near front surface; (2) a novel microelectrode technique which yields electrode kinetic parameters for oxygen reduction and mass transport parameters; (3) demonstration of lack of water transport from anode to cathode; (4) modeling analysis of PEM fuel cell for comparison with experimental results and predicting further improvements in performance; and (5) recommendations of needed research and development for achieving the above goals.

  3. Moving beyond the limits of mass transport in liquid absorbent microfilms through the implementation of surface-induced vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, S; Yu, DZ; Chugh, D; Moghaddam, S

    2014-02-01

    The slow diffusion of an absorbate molecule into an absorbent often makes the absorption process a rate-limiting step in many applications. In cases involving an absorbate with a high heat of phase change, such as water absorption into a LiBr (lithium bromide) solution, the absorption rate is further slowed due to significant heating of the absorbent. Recently, it has been demonstrated that constraining a LiBr solution film by a hydrophobic porous structure enables manipulation of the solution flow thermohydraulic characteristics. Here, it is shown that mass transport mode in a constrained laminar solution flow can be changed from diffusive to advective. This change in mode is accomplished through stretching and folding the laminar streamlines within the solution film via the implementation of micro-scale features on the flow channel surface. The process induces vortices within the solution film, which continuously bring concentrated solution from the bottom and middle of the solution channel to its interface with the vapor phase, thus leading to a significant enhancement in the absorption rate. The detailed physics of the involved transport processes is elucidated using the LBM (Lattice Boltzmann Method). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Long-term climatology of air mass transport through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL during NH winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Krüger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A long-term climatology of air mass transport through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL is presented, covering the period from 1962–2005. The transport through the TTL is calculated with a Lagrangian approach using radiative heating rates as vertical velocities in an isentropic trajectory model. We demonstrate the improved performance of such an approach compared to previous studies using vertical winds from meteorological analyses. Within the TTL, the averaged diabatic ascent is 0.5 K/day during Northern Hemisphere (NH winters 1992–2001, close to observations from the tape recorder. Climatological maps show a cooling and strengthening of this part of the residual circulation during the late 1990s and early 2000s compared to the long-term mean. Lagrangian cold point (LCP fields show systematic differences for varying time periods and natural forcing components. The interannual variability of LCP temperature and density fields are found to be influenced by volcanic eruptions, ENSO, QBO and the solar cycle. The coldest and driest TTL is reached during QBOE and La Niña over the western Pacific, whereas during volcanic eruptions, El Niño and QBOW it is warmer and less dry.

  5. Long-term climatology of air mass transport through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL during NH winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Krüger

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A long-term climatology of air mass transport through the tropical tropopause layer (TTL is presented, covering the period from 1962–2005. The transport through the TTL is calculated with a Lagrangian approach using radiative heating rates as vertical velocities in an isentropic trajectory model. We demonstrate the improved performance of such an approach compared to previous studies using vertical winds from meteorological analyses. Within the upper part of the TTL, the averaged diabatic ascent is 0.5 K/day during Northern Hemisphere (NH winters 1992–2001. Climatological maps show a cooling and strengthening of this part of the residual circulation during the 1990s and early 2000s compared to the long-term mean. Lagrangian cold point (LCP fields show systematic differences for varying time periods and natural forcing components. The interannual variability of LCP temperature and density fields is found to be influenced by volcanic eruptions, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO, Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO and the solar cycle. The coldest and driest TTL is reached during QBO easterly phase and La Niña over the western Pacific, whereas during volcanic eruptions, El Niño and QBO westerly phase it is warmer and less dry.

  6. Phosphorescent OLEDs: Sky-Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with 34.1% External Quantum Efficiency Using a Low Refractive Index Electron Transporting Layer (Adv. Mater. 24/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Huh, Jin-Suk; Sim, Bomi; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-06-01

    J.-J. Kim and co-workers achieve highly efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using a low-refractive-index layer. As described on page 4920, an external quantum efficiency over 34% is achieved, owing to the low refractive index of the materials. A milepost and a shining entrance of the castle are the metaphor indicating the way to highly efficient blue OLEDs. On the way to the castle, the depicted chemical structures serve as the light-emitting layer. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. An air-mass trajectory study of the transport of radioactivity from Fukushima to Thessaloniki, Greece and Milan, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, A.; Giannakaki, E.; Manolopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Vagena, E.; Papastefanou, C.; Gini, L.; Manenti, S.; Groppi, F.

    2013-08-01

    Analyses of 131I, 137Cs and 134Cs in airborne aerosols were carried out in daily samples at two different sites of investigation: Thessaloniki, Greece (40° N) and Milan, Italy (45° N) after the Fukushima accident during the period of March-April, 2011. The radionuclide concentrations were determined and studied as a function of time. The 131I concentration in air over Milan and Thessaloniki peaked on April 3-4, 2011, with observed activities 467 μBq m-3 and 497 μBq m-3, respectively. The 134Cs/137Cs activity ratio values in air were around 1 in both regions, related to the burn-up history of the damaged nuclear fuel of the destroyed nuclear reactor. The high 131I/137Cs ratio, observed during the first days after the accident, followed by lower values during the following days, reflects not only the initial release ratio but also the different volatility, attachment and removal of the two isotopes during transportation due to their different physico-chemical properties. No artificial radionuclides could be detected in air after April 28, 2011 in both regions of investigation. The different maxima of airborne 131I and 134,137Cs in these two regions were related to long-range air mass transport from Japan, across the Pacific and to Central Europe. Analysis of backward trajectories was used to confirm the arrival of artificial radionuclides following atmospheric transport and processing. HYSPLIT backward trajectories were applied for the interpretation of activity variations of measured radionuclides.

  8. Decadal Arctic surface atmosphere/ocean heat budgets and mass transport estimates from several atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepurin, gennaday; Carton, James

    2017-04-01

    The Arctic is undergoing dramatic changes associated with the loss of seasonal and permanent ice pack. By exposing the surface ocean to the atmosphere these changes dramatically increase surface exchange processes. In contrast, increases in freshwater and heat input decreases turbulent exchanges within the ocean. In this study we present results from an examination of changing ocean heat flux, storage, and transport during the 36 year period 1980-2015. To identify changes in the surface atmosphere we examine three atmospheric reanalyses: MERRA2, ERA-I, and JRA55. Significant differences in fluxes from these reanalyses arise due to the representation of clouds and water vapor. These differences provide an indication of the uncertainties in the historical record. Next we turn to the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation version 3 (SODA3) global ocean/sea ice reanalysis system to allow us to infer the full ocean circulation from the limited set of historical record of ocean observations. SODA3 has 10 km horizontal resolution in the Arctic and assimilates the full suite of historical marine temperature and salinity observations. To account for the uncertainties in atmospheric forcing, we repeat our analysis with each of the three atmospheric reanalyses. In the first part of the talk we review the climatological seasonal surface fluxes resulting from our reanalysis system, modified for consistency with the ocean observations, and the limits of what we can learn from the historical record. Next we compare the seasonal hydrography, heat, and mass transports with direct estimates from moorings. Finally we examine the impact on the Arctic climate of the changes in sea ice cover and variability and trends of ocean/sea ice heat storage and transport and their contributions to changes in the seasonal stratification of the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Models of Mass Transport During Microgravity Crystal Growth of Alloyed Semiconductors in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Alloyed semiconductor crystals, such as germanium-silicon (GeSi) and various II-VI alloyed crystals, are extremely important for optoelectronic devices. Currently, high-quality crystals of GeSi and of II-VI alloys can be grown by epitaxial processes, but the time required to grow a certain amount of single crystal is roughly 1,000 times longer than the time required for Bridgman growth from a melt. Recent rapid advances in optoelectronics have led to a great demand for more and larger crystals with fewer dislocations and other microdefects and with more uniform and controllable compositions. Currently, alloyed crystals grown by bulk methods have unacceptable levels of segregation in the composition of the crystal. Alloyed crystals are being grown by the Bridgman process in space in order to develop successful bulk-growth methods, with the hope that the technology will be equally successful on earth. Unfortunately some crystals grown in space still have unacceptable segregation, for example, due to residual accelerations. The application of a weak magnetic field during crystal growth in space may eliminate the undesirable segregation. Understanding and improving the bulk growth of alloyed semiconductors in microgravity is critically important. The purpose of this grant to to develop models of the unsteady species transport during the bulk growth of alloyed semiconductor crystals in the presence of a magnetic field in microgravity. The research supports experiments being conducted in the High Magnetic Field Solidification Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and future experiments on the International Space Station.

  10. Quantum statistical effects in the mass transport of interstitial solutes in a crystalline solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C. H.; Wen, Haohua

    2017-09-01

    The impact of quantum statistics on the many-body dynamics of a crystalline solid at finite temperatures containing an interstitial solute atom (ISA) is investigated. The Mori-Zwanzig theory allows the many-body dynamics of the crystal to be formulated and solved analytically within a pseudo-one-particle approach using the Langevin equation with a quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) based on the Debye model. At the same time, the many-body dynamics is also directly solved numerically via the molecular dynamics approach with a Langevin heat bath based on the quantum FDR. Both the analytical and numerical results consistently show that below the Debye temperature of the host lattice, quantum statistics significantly impacts the ISA transport properties, resulting in major departures from both the Arrhenius law of diffusion and the Einstein-Smoluchowski relation between the mobility and diffusivity. Indeed, we found that below one-third of the Debye temperature, effects of vibrations on the quantum mobility and diffusivity are both orders-of-magnitude larger and practically temperature independent. We have shown that both effects have their physical origin in the athermal lattice vibrations derived from the phonon ground state. The foregoing theory is tested in quantum molecular dynamics calculation of mobility and diffusivity of interstitial helium in bcc W. In this case, the Arrhenius law is only valid in a narrow range between ˜300 and ˜700 K. The diffusivity becomes temperature independent on the low-temperature side while increasing linearly with temperature on the high-temperature side.

  11. Concentration Dependent Speciation and Mass Transport Properties of Switchable Polarity Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron D. Wilson; Christopher J. Orme

    2014-12-01

    Tertiary amine switchable polarity solvents (SPS) consisting of predominantly water, tertiary amine, and tertiary ammonium and bicarbonate ions were produced at various concentrations for three different amines: N,N-dimethylcyclohexylamine, N,N-dimethyloctylamine, and 1 cyclohexylpiperidine. For all concentrations, physical properties were measured including viscosity, molecular diffusion coefficients, freezing point depression, and density. Based on these measurements a variation on the Mark Houwink equation was developed to predict the viscosity of any tertiary amine SPS as a function of concentration using the amine’s molecular mass. The observed physical properties allowed the identification of solution state speciation of non-osmotic SPS, where the amine to carbonic acid ratio is significantly greater than one. These results indicate that at most concentrations the stoichiometric excess amine is involved in solvating a proton with two amines. The physical properties of osmotic SPS have consistent concentration dependence behavior over a wide range of concentrations; this consistence suggests osmotic pressures based on low concentrations freezing point studies can be reliably extrapolated to higher concentrations.

  12. Convective Instability and Mass Transport of the Diffusion Layer in CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, S.

    2011-12-01

    The long-term fate of supercritical (sc) CO2 in saline aquifers is critical to the security of carbon sequestration, an important option for eliminating or reducing the emissions of this most prevalent greenhouse gas. scCO2 is less dense than brine and floats to the top of the aquifer where it is trapped in a metastable state by a geologic feature such as a low permeability cap rock. Dissolution into the underlying brine creates a CO2-brine mixture that is denser than brine, eliminating buoyancy and removing the threat of CO2 escaping back to the atmosphere. If molecular diffusion were the only dissolution mechanism, the CO2 waste stream from a typical large coal-fired electrical power plant may take upward of 10,000 years to no longer pose a threat, however, a convective instability of the dense diffusion boundary layer between the scCO2 and the brine can dramatically increase the dissolution rates, shortening the lifetime of the scCO2 waste pool. We present results of 2D and 3D similitude-correct, laboratory-scale experiments using an analog fluid system. The experiments and flow visualization reveal the onset of the convective instability, the dynamics of the fluid flows during the convective processes, and the long-term mass transfer rates.

  13. Thermal transport in a 2D stressed nanostructure with mass gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Barreto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by some recent molecular dynamics (MD simulations and experiments on suspended graphene nanoribbons, we study a simplified model where the atoms are disposed in a rectangular lattice coupled by nearest neighbor interactions which are quadratic in the interatomic distance. The system has a mechanical strain, and the border atoms are coupled to Langevin thermal baths. Atom masses vary linearly in the longitudinal direction, modeling an isotope or doping distribution. This asymmetry and tension modify thermal properties. Although the atomic interaction is quadratic, the potential is anharmonic in the coordinates. By direct MD simulations and solving Fokker-Planck equations at low temperatures, we can better understand the role of anharmonicities in thermal rectification. We observe an increasing thermal current with an increasing applied mechanical tension. The temperatures and thermal currents vary along the transverse direction. This effect can be useful to establish which parts of the system are more sensitive to thermal damage. We also study thermal rectification as a function of strain and system size. Received: 20 Novembre 2014, Accepted: 17 April 2015; Edited by: C. A. Condat, G. J. Sibona; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.070008 Cite as: R Barreto, M F Carusela, A Mancardo Viotti, A G Monastra, Papers in Physics 7, 070008 (2015

  14. Numerical Studies of the Heat and Mass Transport in the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, M. J.; Bodavarsson, G. S.

    1983-06-01

    Numerical simulation techniques are employed in studies of the natural flow of heat and mass through the Cerro Prieto reservoir, Mexico and of the effects of exploitation on the field's behavior. The reservoir model is a two-dimensional vertical east to west-southwest cross section, which is based on a recent hydrogeologic model of this geothermal system. The numerical code MULKOM is used in the simulation studies. The steady state pressure and temperature distributions are computed and compared against observed preproduction pressures and temperatures; a reasonable match is obtained. A natural hot water recharge rate of about 1×10-2 kg/s per meter of field length (measured in a north-south direction) is obtained. The model is then used to simulate the behavior of the field during the 1973-1978 production period. The response of the model to fluid extraction agrees to what has been observed in the field or postulated by other authors. There is a decrease in temperatures and pressures in the produced region. No extensive two-phase zone develops in the reservoir because of the strong fluid recharge. Most of the fluid recharging the system comes from colder regions located above and west of the produced reservoir.

  15. The influence of mass-transport conditions on the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) mechanism of Pt/C electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach Delpeuch, Antoine; Jacquot, Marjorie; Chatenet, Marian; Cremers, Carsten

    2016-09-14

    This study aims to provide further understanding of the influence of different parameters that control mass-transport (the revolution rate of the rotating disk electrode and the potential scan rate) on the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The experiments were conducted on a home-made carbon-supported 20 wt% Pt/C electrocatalyst, synthesized using a modified polyol method, and characterized in terms of physicochemical properties by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The EOR at the thin active layer of this electrocatalyst was characterized using both differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) in a flow cell configuration and the rotating disc electrode (RDE). The results demonstrate that operating under stationary conditions (low scan rate and high RDE speed) hinders complete ethanol electrooxidation into CO2 and favors the poisoning of the electrocatalyst surface by hydroxide and strong ethanol adsorbates. As such, the EOR appears to be more efficient and faster under dynamic conditions than in near steady-state.

  16. External Heat Flux on Manned Transport Spacecraft with Multiple Modes and Attitudes%载人运输飞船多模式和姿态的外热流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢威; 黄家荣; 钟奇

    2011-01-01

    External heat flux analysis is not only the foundation of thermal control design and thermal analysis, but also the significant thermal boundary condition for ground thermal test.Based on theoretical analysis, a spacecraft external heat flux model was developed and the heat flux was calculated in different flight modes and attitudes.In addition, the heat flux characteristics was obtained in the extreme case.The results show that heat flux increases with the augmentation of percent time in sunlight when the spacecraft is in three-axis stabilized attitude, but decreases abruptly when it turns into the yaw maneuver, and then the heat flux will decrease with the augmentation of percent time in sunlight reversely.%在理论分析的基础上,建立了飞船外热流分析模型,解算出不同飞行姿态和模式下的外热流,分析得到外热流变化规律,得出极端外热流工况.分析结果表明:当姿态为三轴稳定时,外热流随受硒因子增大而增加;由三轴稳定转为偏航机动后外热流突然减小,且随受硒因子增大而减小.

  17. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalaya into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    The Himalayan syntaxes have been the focus of much previous research, in part owing to the extreme rates of rock exhumation observed within the core of the syntaxes, the powerful river systems cutting across them, and the resulting spectacular relief produced. Quaternary rates of rock exhumation in the western Himalayan syntaxis, for example, exceed 10 mm/a. Combined with mountain peak elevations comparable to the central Himalaya, these high rates require a source of rock flux greater than that added to the Himalayan orogenic wedge elsewhere along strike to compensate for rapid denudation. One potential source of mass is along-strike translation of the orogenic wedge toward the western Himalayan syntaxis as a result of strain partitioning across the thrust front. Where convergence across the thrust front is oblique, strain partitioning can partially or completely divert the component of convergence parallel to the frontal thrust into an orogen-parallel velocity in the orogenic wedge. This results in mass being driven along strike into the syntaxis where the convergence obliquity decreases and the crustal mass accumulates. Active faults like the Karakoram Fault and Western Nepal Fault system provide evidence of strain partitioning in the western Himalaya, but the rate of orogen-parallel wedge transport is debated. This rate is central to a test of the viability of strain partitioning as a source of crustal mass into the western Himalayan syntaxis. Preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic modelling experiments demonstrate that moderate strain partitioning can be expected in some cases for a geometry similar to the Himalayan arc, though the uplift rate in the model syntaxis as a result of strain partitioning is lower than observed in the western Himalayan syntaxis. We consider a 1600 × 1600 × 80km crustal block corresponding to the western half of the Himalayan arc with pre-defined zones where frictional material strengths can be varied. The two main zones

  18. Mechanisms of material removal and mass transport in focused ion beam nanopore formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Kallol, E-mail: das7@illinois.edu; Johnson, Harley T., E-mail: htj@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Freund, Jonathan B., E-mail: jbfreund@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, MC-244, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 306 Talbot Laboratory, MC-236, 104 South Wright Street Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-02-28

    Despite the widespread use of focused ion beam (FIB) processing as a material removal method for applications ranging from electron microscope sample preparation to nanopore processing for DNA sequencing, the basic material removal mechanisms of FIB processing are not well understood. We present the first complete atomistic simulation of high-flux FIB using large-scale parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanopore fabrication in freestanding thin films. We focus on the root mechanisms of material removal and rearrangement and describe the role of explosive boiling in forming nanopores. FIB nanopore fabrication is typically understood to occur via sputter erosion. This can be shown to be the case in low flux systems, where individual ion impacts are sufficiently separated in time that they may be considered as independent events. But our detailed MD simulations show that in high flux FIB processing, above a threshold level at which thermal effects become significant, the primary mechanism of material removal changes to a significantly accelerated, thermally dominated process. Under these conditions, the target is heated by the ion beam faster than heat is conducted away by the material, leading quickly to melting, and then continued heating to nearly the material critical temperature. This leads to explosive boiling of the target material with spontaneous bubble formation and coalescence. Mass is rapidly rearranged at the atomistic scale, and material removal occurs orders of magnitude faster than would occur by simple sputtering. While the phenomenology is demonstrated computationally in silicon, it can be expected to occur at lower beam fluxes in other cases where thermal conduction is suppressed due to material properties, geometry, or ambient thermal conditions.

  19. Robotic transport complex of automotive vehicles for handling of rock mass at the process of open cast mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly KOLGA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the applicability of the robotic transportation complex of automotive barrows for haulage transportation along various transport routes of mining enterprises. The simultaneous application of robotic transport and telemetry links makes the door-to-door transportation possible, i.e. direct transportation from the starting to the final point avoiding intermediate storage and a considerable part of auxiliary equipment.

  20. Critical mass flux for flaming ignition of dead, dry wood as a function of external radiant heat flux and oxidizer flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sara McAllister; Mark Finney; Jack Cohen

    2010-01-01

    Extreme weather often contributes to crown fires, where the fire spreads from one tree crown to the next as a series of piloted ignitions. An important aspect in predicting crown fires is understanding the ignition of fuel particles. The ignition criterion considered in this work is the critical mass flux criterion – that a sufficient amount of pyrolysis gases must be...

  1. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Pneumococcal Vaccine Additional Content Medical News External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) By Bradley W. Kesser, MD, Associate ... the Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis External otitis ...

  2. A Methodology Proposal to Calculate the Externalities of Liquid Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Varela, M. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    The aim of the survey is to propose a methodology to calculate the externalities associated with the liquid bio fuels cycle. The report defines the externalities from a theoretical point of view and classifies them. The reasons to value the externalities are explained as well as the existing methods. Furthermore, an evaluation of specific environmental and non-environmental externalities is also presented. The report reviews the current situation of the transport sector, considering its environmental effects and impacts. The progress made by the ExternE and ExternE-transport projects related the externalities of transport sector is assessed. Finally, the report analyses the existence of different economic instruments to internalize the external effects of the transport sector as well as other aspects of this internalization. (Author) 58 refs.

  3. Additively manufactured metallic porous biomaterials based on minimal surfaces: A unique combination of topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, F S L; Lietaert, K; Eftekhari, A A; Pouran, B; Ahmadi, S M; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2017-04-15

    Porous biomaterials that simultaneously mimic the topological, mechanical, and mass transport properties of bone are in great demand but are rarely found in the literature. In this study, we rationally designed and additively manufactured (AM) porous metallic biomaterials based on four different types of triply periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) that mimic the properties of bone to an unprecedented level of multi-physics detail. Sixteen different types of porous biomaterials were rationally designed and fabricated using selective laser melting (SLM) from a titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). The topology, quasi-static mechanical properties, fatigue resistance, and permeability of the developed biomaterials were then characterized. In terms of topology, the biomaterials resembled the morphological properties of trabecular bone including mean surface curvatures close to zero. The biomaterials showed a favorable but rare combination of relatively low elastic properties in the range of those observed for trabecular bone and high yield strengths exceeding those reported for cortical bone. This combination allows for simultaneously avoiding stress shielding, while providing ample mechanical support for bone tissue regeneration and osseointegration. Furthermore, as opposed to other AM porous biomaterials developed to date for which the fatigue endurance limit has been found to be ≈20% of their yield (or plateau) stress, some of the biomaterials developed in the current study show extremely high fatigue resistance with endurance limits up to 60% of their yield stress. It was also found that the permeability values measured for the developed biomaterials were in the range of values reported for trabecular bone. In summary, the developed porous metallic biomaterials based on TPMS mimic the topological, mechanical, and physical properties of trabecular bone to a great degree. These properties make them potential candidates to be applied as parts of orthopedic implants and/or as bone

  4. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber Part II : Use of fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Norde, Willem; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-01-01

    Using a new phase-contrast microscopy-based method of analysis, sedimentation has recently been demonstrated to be the major mass transport mechanism of bacteria towards substratum surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber (J. Li, H.J. Busscher, W. Norde, J. Sjollema, Colloid Surf. B. 84 (2011)76).

  5. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber Part II: Use of fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.Y.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.; Norde, W.; Krom, B.P.; Sjollema, J.

    2011-01-01

    Using a new phase-contrast microscopy-based method of analysis, sedimentation has recently been demonstrated to be the major mass transport mechanism of bacteria towards substratum surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber (J. Li, H.J. Busscher, W. Norde, J. Sjollema, Colloid Surf. B. 84 (2011)76).

  6. Mass-transport-controlled, large-area, uniform deposition of carbon nanofibers and their application in gas diffusion layers of fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian; Xie, Zhiyong; Huang, Qizhong; Chen, Guofen; Hou, Ming; Yi, Baolian

    2015-05-07

    The effect of mass transport on the growth characteristics of large-area vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated by adjusting the substrate deposition angle (α). The catalyst precursor solution was coated onto one side of a 2D porous carbon paper substrate via a decal printing method. The results showed that the CNFs were grown on only one side of the substrate and α was found to significantly affect the growth uniformity. At α = 0°, the growth thickness, the density, the microstructure and the yield of the CNF film were uniform across the substrate surface, whereas the growth uniformity decreased with increasing α, suggesting that the large-area CNF deposition processes were mass-transport-controlled. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the gas diffusion processes revealed the homogeneous distributions of the carbon-source-gas concentration, pressure, and velocity near the substrate surface at α = 0°, which were the important factors in achieving the mass-transport-limited uniform CNF growth. The homogeneity of the field distributions decreased with increasing α, in accordance with the variation in the growth uniformity with α. When used as a micro-porous layer, the uniform CNF film enabled higher proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in comparison with commercial carbon black by virtue of its improved electronic and mass-transport properties confirmed by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results.

  7. Mass-transport deposits and reservoir quality of Upper Cretaceous Chalk within the German Central Graben, North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfai, Jashar; Lutz, Rüdiger; Franke, Dieter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Kley, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The architecture of intra-chalk deposits in the `Entenschnabel' area of the German North Sea is studied based on 3D seismic data. Adapted from seismic reflection characteristics, four types of mass-transport deposits (MTDs) are distinguished, i.e. slumps, slides, channels and frontal splay deposits. The development of these systems can be linked to inversion tectonics and halotectonic movements of Zechstein salt. Tectonic uplift is interpreted to have caused repeated tilting of the sea floor. This triggered large-scale slump deposition during Turonian-Santonian times. Slump deposits are characterised by chaotic reflection patterns interpreted to result from significant stratal distortion. The south-eastern study area is characterised by a large-scale frontal splay complex. This comprises a network of shallow channel systems arranged in a distributive pattern. Several slide complexes are observed near the Top Chalk in Maastrichtian and Danian sediments. These slides are commonly associated with large incisions into the sediments below. Best reservoir properties with high producible porosities are found in the reworked chalk strata, e.g. Danish North Sea, therefore MTDs detected in the study area are regarded as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs and considered as exploration targets.

  8. Mass transport deposits and processes in the north slope of the Xisha Trough, northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Zhiliang; WU Shiguo; WANG Dawei; LI Wei; GONG Shaojun; MI Lijun; SPENCE George

    2015-01-01

    Triple mass-transport deposits (MTDs) with areas of 625, 494 and 902 km2, respectively, have been identified on the north slope of the Xisha Trough, northern South China Sea margin. Based on high-resolution seismic reflection data and multi-beam bathymetric data, the Quaternary MTDs are characterized by typical geometric shapes and internal structures. Results of slope analysis showed that they are developed in a steep slope ranging from 5° to 35°. The head wall scarps of the MTDs arrived to 50 km in length (from headwall to termination). Their inner structures include well developed basal shear surface, growth faults, stepping lateral scarps, erosion grooves, and frontal thrust deformation. From seismic images, the central deepwater channel system of the Xisha Trough has been filled by interbedded channel-levee deposits and thick MTDs. Therefore, we inferred that the MTDs in the deepwater channel system could be dominated by far-travelled slope failure deposits even though there are local collapses of the trough walls. And then, we drew the two-dimensional process model and three-dimensional structure model diagram of the MTDs. Combined with the regional geological setting and previous studies, we discussed the trigger mechanisms of the triple MTDs.

  9. Investigation of the shape change of bio-flocs and its influence on mass transport using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, T T; Xiao, F; Sun, W J; Sun, F Y; Lam, K M; Li, X Y

    2014-01-01

    In this laboratory study, an advanced flow visualization technique - particle image velocimetry (PIV) - was employed to investigate the change of shape of activated sludge flocs in water and its influence on the material transport characteristics of the flocs. The continuous shape change of the bio-flocs that occurred within a very short period of time could be captured by the PIV system. The results demonstrate that the fluid turbulence caused the shift of parts of a floc from one side to the other in less than 200 ms. During the continuous shape change, the liquid within the floc was forced out of the floc, which was then refilled with the liquid from the surrounding flow. For the bio-flocs saturated with a tracer dye, it was shown that the dye could be released from the flocs at a faster rate when the flocs were swayed around in water. The experimental results indicate that frequent shape change of bio-flocs facilitates the exchange of fluid and materials between the floc interior and the surrounding water. This mass transfer mechanism can be more important than molecular diffusion and internal permeation to the function and behavior of particle aggregates, including bio-flocs, in natural waters and treatment systems.

  10. Laser-perforated carbon paper electrodes for improved mass-transport in high power density vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayrhuber, I.; Dennison, C. R.; Kalra, V.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we demonstrate up to 30% increase in power density of carbon paper electrodes for vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFB) by introducing perforations into the structure of electrodes. A CO2 laser was used to generate holes ranging from 171 to 421 μm diameter, and hole densities from 96.8 to 649.8 holes cm-2. Perforation of the carbon paper electrodes was observed to improve cell performance in the activation region due to thermal treatment of the area around the perforations. Results also demonstrate improved mass transport, resulting in enhanced peak power and limiting current density. However, excessive perforation of the electrode yielded a decrease in performance due to reduced available surface area. A 30% increase in peak power density (478 mW cm-2) was observed for the laser perforated electrode with 234 μm diameter holes and 352.8 holes cm-2 (1764 holes per 5 cm2 electrode), despite a 15% decrease in total surface area compared to the raw un-perforated electrode. Additionally, the effect of perforation on VRFB performance was studied at different flow rates (up to 120 mL min-1) for the optimized electrode architecture. A maximum power density of 543 mW cm-2 was achieved at 120 mL min-1.

  11. Espectacularidad y comportamientos de masa: El problema de la autoría (externa Spectacular and mass behavior: The problem of authorship (external

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Gutiérrez Brito

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se aborda la autoría política y social de los comportamientos colectivos espontáneos y la facultad que tienen las masas y/o las multitudes para actuar responsablemente por iniciativa propia y al margen de influencias o manipulaciones externas. El análisis realizado aborda los problemas formales que entraña el hecho de asumir comportamientos colectivos del tipo señalado, pero también algunas dificultades relacionadas con la explicación de la imitación y su potencial autorreflexivo. El objetivo final de este análisis lleva a presentar el concepto de espectacularidad como instrumento para replantear y avanzar nuevas soluciones al problema de la desautorización en estas formaciones sociales históricamente calificadas como irracionales y/o instintivas.This article discusses the problem of the political and social authorship in the collective spontaneous behaviors, and the facul-ty that the crowds and/or multitudes have to perform on own initiative responsibly and without influence or external manipulation. The current analysis approaches the formal problems than entails to the fact to assume this type of collective behaviors, but also some difficulties related with the explanation of theimitation and his auto-reflexive potential. The end purpose of this analysis leads to present espectacularidad"s concept like instrument to redefine and to advance new solutions to the problem of the disavowal in these social formations once historically were regarded as irrationalists and/or instinctive.

  12. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  13. Mass transport in fracture media: impact of the random function model assumed for fractures conductivity; Transporte de masa en medio fracturado: impacto del modelo estocastico de conductividad en las fracturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capilla, J. E.; Rodrigo, J.; Gomez Hernandez, J. J.

    2003-07-01

    Characterizing the uncertainty of flow and mass transport models requires the definition of stochastic models to describe hydrodynamic parameters. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity (K) are two of these parameters that exhibit a high degree of spatial variability. K is usually the parameter whose variability influence to a more extended degree solutes movement. In fracture media, it is critical to properly characterize K in the most altered zones where flow and solutes migration tends to be concentrated. However, K measurements use to be scarce and sparse. This fact calls to consider stochastic models that allow quantifying the uncertainty of flow and mass transport predictions. This paper presents a convective transport problem solved in a 3D block of fractured crystalline rock. the case study is defined based on data from a real geological formation. As the scarcity of K data in fractures does not allow supporting classical multi Gaussian assumptions for K in fractures, the non multi Gaussian hypothesis has been explored, comparing mass transport results for alternative Gaussian and non-Gaussian assumptions. The latter hypothesis allows reproducing high spatial connectivity for extreme values of K. This feature is present in nature, might lead to reproduce faster solute pathways, and therefore should be modeled in order to obtain reasonably safe prediction of contaminants migration in a geological formation. The results obtained for the two alternative hypotheses show a remarkable impact of the K random function model in solutes movement. (Author) 9 refs.

  14. Atomic structure under external confinement: effect of plasma on the spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for hydrogen-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Supriya K.; Mukherjee, Prasanta K.; Fricke, Burkhard

    2017-03-01

    The effect of Debye and quantum plasma environment on the structural properties such as spin orbit splitting, relativistic mass correction and Darwin term for a few iso-electronic members of hydrogen viz. C5 +, O7 +, Ne9 +, Mg11 +, Si13 +, S15 +, Ar17 +, Ca19 + and Ti21 + has been analysed systematically for the first time for a range of coupling strengths of the plasma. The Debye plasma environment has been treated under a standard screened Coulomb potential (SCP) while the quantum plasma has been treated under an exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential (ECSCP). Estimation of the spin orbit splitting under SCP and ECSCP plasma is restricted to the lowest two dipole allowed states while for the other two properties, the ground state as well as the first two excited states have been chosen. Calculations have been extended to nuclear charges for which appreciable relativistic corrections are noted. In all cases calculations have been extended up to such screening parameters for which the respective excitation energies tend towards their stability limit determined by the ionisation potential at that screening parameter. Interesting behavior of the respective properties with respect to the plasma coupling strength has been noted.

  15. Effect of coal combustion fly ash use in concrete on the mass transport release of constituents of potential concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrabrants, Andrew C; Kosson, David S; DeLapp, Rossane; van der Sloot, Hans A

    2014-05-01

    Concerns about the environmental safety of coal combustion fly ash use as a supplemental cementitious material have necessitated comprehensive evaluation of the potential for leaching concrete materials containing fly ash used as a cement replacement. Using concrete formulations representative of US residential and commercial applications, test monoliths were made without fly ash replacement (i.e., controls) and with 20% or 45% of the portland cement fraction replaced by fly ash from four coal combustion sources. In addition, microconcrete materials were created with 45% fly ash replacement based on the commercial concrete formulation but with no coarse aggregate and an increased fine aggregate fraction to maintain aggregate-paste interfacial area. All materials were cured for 3 months prior to mass transport-based leach testing of constituents of potential concern (i.e., Sb, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Mo, Pb, Se, Tl and V) according to EPA Method 1315. The cumulative release results were consistent with previously tested samples of concretes and mortars from international sources. Of the 11 constituents tested, only Sb, Ba, B, Cr and V were measured in quantifiable amounts. Microconcretes without coarse aggregate were determined to be conservative surrogates for concrete in leaching assessment since cumulative release from microconcretes were only slightly greater than the associated concrete materials. Relative to control materials without fly ash, concretes and microconcretes with fly ash replacement of cement had increased 28-d and 63-d cumulative release for a limited number 10 comparison cases: 2 cases for Sb, 7 cases for Ba and 1 case for Cr. The overall results suggest minimal leaching impact from fly ash use as a replacement for up to 45% of the cement fraction in typical US concrete formulations; however, scenario-specific assessment based on this leaching evaluation should be used to determine if potential environmental impacts exist.

  16. The ASTARTE Mass Transport Deposits data base - a web-based reference for submarine landslide research around Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, D.; De Martini, P. M.; Lastras, G.; Patera, A.; Hunt, J.; Terrinha, P.; Noiva, J.; Gutscher, M. A.; Migeon, S.

    2015-12-01

    EU project ASTARTE (Assessment, STrategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe, Project number: 603839) aims at reaching a higher level of tsunami resilience in the North East Atlantic and Mediterranean (NEAM) region by a combination of field work, experimental work, numerical modeling and technical development. The project is a cooperative work of 26 institutes from 16 countries and links together the description of past tsunamigenic events, the characterization of tsunami sources, the calculation of the impact of such events, and the development of adequate resilience strategies (www.astarte.eu). Within ASTARTE a web-based data base on Mass Transport Deposit (MTD) in the NEAM areas is being created that claims to be the future reference source for this kind of research in Europe. The aim is to integrate every existing scientific reference on the topic and update on new entries every 3 months, hosting information and detailed data, that are crucial e.g for tsunami modeling. A relational database managed by ArcGIS for Desktop 10.3 software has been implemented to allow all partners to collaborate through a common platform for archiving and exchanging data and interpretations, such as MTD typology (slide, slump, debris, turbidite, etc), geometric characteristcs (location, depth, thickness, volume, slope, etc), but also age and dating method and eventually tsunamigenic potential. One of the final goals of the project is the sharing of the archived datasets through a web-based map service that will allow to visualize, question, analyze, and interpret all datasets. The interactive map service will be hosted by ArcGIS Online and will deploy the cloud capabilities of the portal. Any interested users will be able to access the online GIS resources through any Internet browser or ad hoc applications that run on desktop machines, smartphones, or tablets and will be able to use the analytical tools, key tasks, and workflows of the service.

  17. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencs, László; Laczai, Nikoletta; Ajtony, Zsolt

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective-diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass - m0) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m0 values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm3 min- 1) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m0(mini-flow)-to-m0(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m0 data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m0 values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology.

  18. Biomass Burning versus Fossil Fuel Combustion Signatures of Air Masses Transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast during ITCT2k2

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J.; Cooper, O.; Warneke, C.; Hudson, P.; Brock, C.; Fehsenfeld, F.; Holloway, J.; Huebler, G.; Murphy, D.; Nowak, J.; Parrish, D.; Ryerson, T.; Trainer, M.; Atlas, E.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation experiment in 2002 (ITCT2k2) was to study the transport of air pollution from Asia across the Pacific Ocean, and the implications for the background atmospheric composition at the surface in North America. During research flights of the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft on May 5 and 17, strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO) and other species were observed in air masses that had been transported from Asia in the free troposphere to North America. The hydrocarbon composition of the air masses indicated that the highest CO levels were related to fossil fuel use. During the flights on May 5, 17 and other days, the levels of several biomass-burning indicators increased with altitude. This was true for acetonitrile (CH3CN), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), the ratio of acetylene (C2H2) versus propane (C3H8), and the percentage of particles measured by the PALMS (particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry) instrument that were attributed to biomass burning based on their carbon and potassium content. An ensemble of back-trajectories, calculated from the U.S. west coast at various latitudes and pressures during the entire ITCT2k2 period, showed that air masses from South-East Asia and China were generally transported at higher altitudes than air from Japan and Korea. Emission inventories estimate the contribution of biomass burning to the total emissions to be low for Japan and Korea, higher for China, and the highest for South-East Asia. Combined with the origin of the air masses versus altitude determined by the back-trajectories, this explains the measured altitude profiles of the biomass burning indicators.

  19. 49 CFR 192.463 - External corrosion control: Cathodic protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Cathodic protection. 192.463 Section 192.463 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS...

  20. Chemical composition of air masses transported from Asia to the U.S. West Coast during ITCT 2K2: Fossil fuel combustion versus biomass-burning signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Cooper, O. R.; Warneke, C.; Hudson, P. K.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Hübler, G.; Nicks, D. K., Jr.; Nowak, J. B.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. B.; Atlas, E. L.; Donnelly, S. G.; Schauffler, S. M.; Stroud, V.; Johnson, K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Streets, D. G.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation experiment in 2002 (ITCT 2K2), a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft was used to study the long-range transport of Asian air masses toward the west coast of North America. During research flights on 5 and 17 May, strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO) and other species were observed in air masses that had been transported from Asia. The hydrocarbon composition of the air masses indicated that the highest CO levels were related to fossil fuel use. During the flights on 5 and 17 May and other days, the levels of several biomass-burning indicators increased with altitude. This was true for acetonitrile (CH3CN), methyl chloride (CH3Cl), the ratio of acetylene (C2H2) to propane (C3H8), and, on May 5, the percentage of particles measured by the particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) instrument that were attributed to biomass burning based on their carbon and potassium content. An ensemble of back-trajectories, calculated from the U.S. west coast over a range of latitudes and altitudes for the entire ITCT 2K2 period, showed that air masses from Southeast Asia and China were generally observed at higher altitudes than air from Japan and Korea. Emission inventories estimate the contribution of biomass burning to the total emissions to be low for Japan and Korea, higher for China, and the highest for Southeast Asia. Combined with the origin of the air masses versus altitude, this qualitatively explains the increase with altitude, averaged over the whole ITCT 2K2 period, of the different biomass-burning indicators.

  1. Origin and development of ablator for Space Shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, L.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) represents the largest element of the Space Shuttle transportation system. The ET is the fuel tank which contains cryogenic propellants, including liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The task of providing a suitable Thermal Protection System (TPS) which is mass producible for the ET represented a challenge for the aerospace industry. The difficulties were compounded by stringent insulation and ablation requirements for the materials to maintain their integrity over a wide range of operating temperatures during prelaunch and ascent. Attention is given to the configuration of the Space Shuttle system, the configuration of the external tank, the initial ET TPS concept, TPS materials and processes concepts, design rationale, TPS materials structural considerations, material and processes development, development tests, material/process verification, and flight results.

  2. 在用对二甲苯(PX)输送埋地管道的外腐蚀检测%External Corrosion Testing of In-Service Buried Pipeline for PX Transportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明阳; 孔令昌; 丛成龙

    2012-01-01

    将外腐蚀直接评价方法应用于对二甲苯(PX)输送埋地管道的外腐蚀检测。分别对其进行敷设环境调查、土壤腐蚀性检测、阴极保护检测和防腐层检测,并对检测结果进行评级。防腐层检测中,应用C扫描检测防腐层绝缘电阻率,综合运用Pearson法和密间隔电位法(CIPS)确定防腐层破损点位置。通过开挖,验证了该组合检测方法的有效性,为埋地管道防腐层检漏提供高效、准确的新方法。%External corrosion direct assessment method was applied to PX transportation pipeline External Corrosion Testing. The buried pipeline testing consisted of environmental investigation, soil corrosion detection, cathodic protection testing and detection of anticorrosive coating. The testing results were rated. In the detection of anticorrosive coating, C-scan was applied to test coating insulation resistance, and Pearson method and the closeinterval potential survey(CIPS) were used to determine coating damage point. The excavation confirmed that the combination of detection methods was effective. Efficient and accurate new method was provided for underground leak detection of pipeline coatings.

  3. MASS TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF A FLOW-THROUGH ELECTROLYTIC REACTOR USING A POROUS ELECTRODE: PERFORMANCE AND FIGURES OF MERIT FOR Pb(II REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertazzoli R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of lead from an acid borate-nitrate solution containing Pb(II was used to characterize the mass transport properties of an electrolytic reactor with reticulated vitreous carbon cathodes, operated in the flow-through mode. Current potential curves recorded at a rotating vitreous carbon disc electrode were used to determine the diffusion coefficient for Pb(II under the conditions of the experiments. The performance and figures of merit of the electrolytic reactor were investigated by using different flowrates and cathode porosities. Dimensionless Sherwood and Reynolds numbers were correlated to characterize the mass transport properties of the reactor, and they were fitted to the equation Sh=24Re0.32Sc0.33.

  4. The External Effects Model of Diesel Consumption of Transport Trucks in Open-pit Mine%露天矿运输卡车柴油消耗的外部影响模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温廷新; 戚磊; 邵良杉

    2015-01-01

    To establish a nonlinear model between the diesel consumption of transport trucks in open-pit mine and its main external influence factors,the support vector regression ( SVR) method is adopted,and the statistical data of actual pro-duction and dispatcher in a domestic open-pit coal mine are taken as original samples. With selection of output,volume,dis-tance,height,loading time,fuel up amount,rock volume as seven main external indexes,and by using the factor analysis meth-od to extract common factors as the input of the model,the training process of diesel consumption model is analyzed to make the simulation training through programming the corresponding program in MATLAB and finally get the diesel consumption model based on SVR. The training and testing results show that:the model can meet the precision requirement,and work well on the diesel consumption calculation and prediction of transportation truck in open-pit mine;This model can provide decision support for reasonable production schedule and guide to reduce the diesel consumption.%为建立露天矿运输卡车柴油消耗与其主要外部影响因素之间的非线性模型,采用回归型支持向量机( SVR)方法,并以国内某露天煤矿实际生产调度统计的数据作为原始样本,选取产量、运量、运距、高差、装车时间、加油量、岩量等7个主要外部影响指标,使用因子分析方法提取公共因子作为模型的输入,分析柴油消耗模型的训练过程,通过在MATLAB上编写相应程序并进行仿真训练,最终得出基于SVR的柴油消耗模型。训练和测试结果表明:该模型满足精度要求,能够很好地对露天矿运输卡车的柴油消耗进行计算和预测,可以为进行合理的生产调度提供决策支持,同时也为降低柴油消耗提供指导作用。

  5. Understanding the structure, dynamics, and mass transport properties of self assembling peptide hydrogels for injectable, drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Monica Cristina

    hydrogels as a function of peptide sequence and concentration. Changes in nanoscale dynamics and structure inherently lead to substantial differences in bulk properties, such as the elastic modulus and network mesh size. Learning how the material properties of the gels influence the transport rate of therapeutics through the hydrogel is essential to the development of delivery vehicles. The remainder of the thesis focuses on correlating the mesh sizes of MAX1 and MAX8 gels to the diffusion and mass transport properties of model dextran and protein probes. Here, work is centered on how peptide charge and concentration, as well as probe structure, in particular hydrodynamic diameter and charge, dictate the temporal release of model probes from the peptide hydrogels. Experiments include self diffusion studies and bulk release experiments with model dextrans and proteins from gels before and after syringe delivery. Overall, this thesis will demonstrate the importance of understanding material properties from the nanoscale up to the macroscale for application based design. With this approach, better and specific development of self-assembling peptide materials can be achieved, allowing for the rational engineering of peptide sequences to form hydrogels appropriate for specific drug delivery applications.

  6. Effects of cold-girdling on flows in the transport phloem in Ricinus communis: is mass flow ihibited?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peuke, A.D.; Windt, C.W.; As, van H.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold girdling of the transport phloem at the hypocotyl of Ricinus communis on solute and water transport were investigated. Effects on the chemical composition of saps of phloem and xylem as well as of stem tissue were studied by conventional techniques and the water flow in the phloe

  7. Effects of cold-girdling on flows in the transport phloem in Ricinus communis: is mass flow ihibited?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peuke, A.D.; Windt, C.W.; As, van H.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold girdling of the transport phloem at the hypocotyl of Ricinus communis on solute and water transport were investigated. Effects on the chemical composition of saps of phloem and xylem as well as of stem tissue were studied by conventional techniques and the water flow in the

  8. Evidences for redox reaction driven charge transfer and mass transport in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingyu; Dasgupta, Binayak; Ren, Yi; Mohseni, Parsian K.; Hong, Minghui; Li, Xiuling; Chim, Wai Kin; Chiam, Sing Yang

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the transport processes governing the metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) of silicon (Si). We show that in the oxidation of Si during the MacEtch process, the transport of the hole charges can be accomplished by the diffusion of metal ions. The oxidation of Si is subsequently governed by a redox reaction between the ions and Si. This represents a fundamentally different proposition in MacEtch whereby such transport is understood to occur through hole carrier conduction followed by hole injection into (or electron extraction from) Si. Consistent with the ion transport model introduced, we showed the possibility in the dynamic redistribution of the metal atoms that resulted in the formation of pores/cracks for catalyst thin films that are ≲30 nm thick. As such, the transport of the reagents and by-products are accomplished via these pores/cracks for the thin catalyst films. For thicker films, we show a saturation in the etch rate demonstrating a transport process that is dominated by diffusion via metal/Si boundaries. The new understanding in transport processes described in this work reconcile competing models in reagents/by-products transport, and also solution ions and thin film etching, which can form the foundation of future studies in the MacEtch process.

  9. The effect of coupled mass transport and internal reforming on modeling of solid oxide fuel cells part II: Benchmarking transient response and dynamic model fidelity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.; Braun, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    One- and 'quasi' two-dimensional (2-D) dynamic, interface charge transport models of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) developed previously in a companion paper, are benchmarked against other models and simulated to evaluate the effects of coupled transport and chemistry. Because the reforming reaction can distort the concentration profiles of the species within the anode, a 'quasi' 2-D model that captures porous media mass transport and electrochemistry is required. The impact of a change in concentration at the triple-phase boundary is twofold wherein the local Nernst potential and anode exchange current densities are influenced, thereby altering the current density and temperature distributions of the cell. Thus, the dynamic response of the cell models are compared, and benchmarked against previous channel-level models to gauge the relative importance of capturing in-situ reforming phenomena on cell performance. Simulation results indicate differences in the transient electrochemical response for a step in current density where the 'quasi' 2-D model predicts a slower rise and fall in cell potential due to the additional volume of the porous media and mass transport dynamics. Delays in fuel flow rate are shown to increase the difference observed in the electrochemical response of the cells.

  10. Model calculation of the characteristic mass for convective and diffusive vapor transport in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencs, László, E-mail: bencs.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Laczai, Nikoletta [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ajtony, Zsolt [Institute of Food Science, University of West Hungary, H-9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Lucsony utca 15–17 (Hungary)

    2015-07-01

    A combination of former convective–diffusive vapor-transport models is described to extend the calculation scheme for sensitivity (characteristic mass — m{sub 0}) in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). This approach encompasses the influence of forced convection of the internal furnace gas (mini-flow) combined with concentration diffusion of the analyte atoms on the residence time in a spatially isothermal furnace, i.e., the standard design of the transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA). A couple of relationships for the diffusional and convectional residence times were studied and compared, including in factors accounting for the effects of the sample/platform dimension and the dosing hole. These model approaches were subsequently applied for the particular cases of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, V and Zn analytes. For the verification of the accuracy of the calculations, the experimental m{sub 0} values were determined with the application of a standard THGA furnace, operating either under stopped, or mini-flow (50 cm{sup 3} min{sup −1}) of the internal sheath gas during atomization. The theoretical and experimental ratios of m{sub 0}(mini-flow)-to-m{sub 0}(stop-flow) were closely similar for each study analyte. Likewise, the calculated m{sub 0} data gave a fairly good agreement with the corresponding experimental m{sub 0} values for stopped and mini-flow conditions, i.e., it ranged between 0.62 and 1.8 with an average of 1.05 ± 0.27. This indicates the usability of the current model calculations for checking the operation of a given GFAAS instrument and the applied methodology. - Highlights: • A calculation scheme for convective–diffusive vapor loss in GFAAS is described. • Residence time (τ) formulas were compared for sensitivity (m{sub 0}) in a THGA furnace. • Effects of the sample/platform dimension and dosing hole on τ were assessed. • Theoretical m{sub 0} of 18 analytes were

  11. Left ventricular mass in dialysis patients, determinants and relation with outcome. Results from the COnvective TRansport STudy (CONTRAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira M Mostovaya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Left ventricular mass (LVM is known to be related to overall and cardiovascular mortality in end stage kidney disease (ESKD patients. The aims of the present study are 1 to determine whether LVM is associated with mortality and various cardiovascular events and 2 to identify determinants of LVM including biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS & MEASUREMENTS: Analysis was performed with data of 327 ESKD patients, a subset from the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST. Echocardiography was performed at baseline. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the relation of LVM tertiles with clinical events. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify factors associated with LVM. RESULTS: Median age was 65 (IQR: 54-73 years, 203 (61% were male and median LVM was 227 (IQR: 183-279 grams. The risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.11-2.99, cardiovascular death (HR = 3.66, 95% CI: 1.35-10.05 and sudden death (HR = 13.06; 95% CI: 6.60-107 was increased in the highest tertile (>260 grams of LVM. In the multivariable analysis positive relations with LVM were found for male gender (B = 38.8±10.3, residual renal function (B = 17.9±8.0, phosphate binder therapy (B = 16.9±8.5, and an inverse relation for a previous kidney transplantation (B = -41.1±7.6 and albumin (B = -2.9±1.1. Interleukin-6 (Il-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, hepcidin-25 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were not related to LVM. CONCLUSION: We confirm the relation between a high LVM and outcome and expand the evidence for increased risk of sudden death. No relationship was found between LVM and markers of inflammation and fibrosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN38365125.

  12. Transport Regimes of Air Masses Affecting the Tropospheric Composition of the Canadian and European Arctic During RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2014/2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Koellner, F.; Kunkel, D.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Thomas, J. L.; Abbatt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic is warming much faster than any other place in the world and undergoes a rapid change dominated by a changing climate in this region. The impact of polluted air masses traveling to the Arctic from various remote sources significantly contributes to the observed climate change, in contrast there are additional local emission sources contributing to the level of pollutants (trace gases and aerosol). Processes affecting the emission and transport of these pollutants are not well understood and need to be further investigated. We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories we analyze the transport regimes prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014) in the observed region. Whereas the eastern part of the Canadian Arctic is affected by air masses with their origin in Asia, in the central and western parts of the Canadian and European Arctic air masses from North America are predominant at the time of the measurement. In general the more northern parts of the Arctic were relatively unaffected by pollution from mid-latitudes since air masses mostly travel within the polar dome, being quite isolated. Associated mixing ratios of CO and CO2 fit into the seasonal cycle observed at NOAA ground stations throughout the Arctic, but show a more mid-latitudinal characteristic at higher altitudes. The transition is remarkably sharp and allows for a chemical definition of the polar dome. At low altitudes, synoptic disturbances transport polluted air masses from mid-latitudes into regions of the polar dome. These air masses contribute to the Arctic pollution background, but also

  13. Lattice Planar QED in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Cea, Paolo; Giudice, Pietro; Papa, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We investigate planar Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED) with two degenerate staggered fermions in an external magnetic field on the lattice. Our preliminary results indicate that in external magnetic fields there is dynamical generation of mass for two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions in the weak coupling region. We comment on possible implications to the quantum Hall effect in graphene.

  14. The External Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  15. Evidences for redox reaction driven charge transfer and mass transport in metal-assisted chemical etching of silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Lingyu Kong; Binayak Dasgupta; Yi Ren; Parsian K. Mohseni; Minghui Hong; Xiuling Li; Wai Kin Chim; Sing Yang Chiam

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the transport processes governing the metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) of silicon (Si). We show that in the oxidation of Si during the MacEtch process, the transport of the hole charges can be accomplished by the diffusion of metal ions. The oxidation of Si is subsequently governed by a redox reaction between the ions and Si. This represents a fundamentally different proposition in MacEtch whereby such transport is understood to occur through hole carrier...

  16. Mixed convective heat and mass transfer analysis for peristaltic transport in an asymmetric channel with Soret and Dufour effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F M Abbasi; A Alsaedi; T Hayat

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation addresses the simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer in the mixed convection peristaltic flow of viscous fluid in an asymmetric channel. The channel walls exhibit the convective boundary conditions. In addition, the effects due to Soret and Dufour are taken into consideration. Resulting problems are solved for the series solutions. Numerical values of heat and mass transfer rates are displayed and studied. Results indicate that the concentration and temperature of the fluid increase whereas the mass transfer rate at the wall decreases with increase of the mass transfer Biot number. Furthermore, it is observed that the temperature decreases with the increase of the heat transfer Biot number.

  17. Coupled Chemical and Thermal Processes During Contact Metamorphism: Constraining Rates and Duration with Time-Dependent 3-D Heat and Mass Transport Modeling of Fluid-Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrow, B. L.; Henry, D.; Gable, C. W.; Heydari, E.; Travis, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal, metamorphic and metasomatic rocks develop through a complex set of coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical processes that contain non-linear feedbacks. The integrated outcome results in a mineral assemblage with a specific texture that records the rates, magnitude and duration of the controlling processes. However, it is often difficult to extract this coupled information from the rock record due to the competing and time-integrated nature of the final product. A particularly problematic case arises when advective metasomatism accompanies thermal energy transport. Advective transport of reactive components by thermally driven flowing fluids can dramatically alter the original bulk rock chemistry. In some instances, these chemical transformations are slow but in others, these alterations can occur over short time scales (yrs). To facilitate investigations of coupled, complex systems and to constrain the rates, duration and relative importance of governing processes during a thermal event, high-resolution 3-D time dependent computational modeling is used. An example of the integrated effects of thermal and chemical transport is found in subsurface Louisiana. Here, an 11m alkali igneous dike intruded Late Jurassic sandy limestones transforming these into new mineral assemblages rich in alkali, alkaline earth elements and F; hydrogrossular, diopside, pectolite (pct), apophyllite, fluorite, and feldspars. Increased temperatures (Ts) and significant mass transport of components from the dike into the host rocks are required. A series of coupled heat and mass transport calculations constrain the rates and duration of the thermal pulse and provide insights into the time-scale of mass transport within this system. For example, calculations incorporating silica transport indicate that at the pct zone (1.5m), thermal conditions remained above 150oC for 2.8 yrs assuming anisotropic permeability (K) and 4.2 yrs (layered K) reaching Tmax at 0.36 (aniso) or 0.53 yr

  18. Regulating multiple externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldo, Staffan; Jensen, Frank; Nielsen, Max

    2016-01-01

    Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory instrume......Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory...

  19. ExternE National Implementation Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingoud, K.; Maelkki, H.; Wihersaari, M.; Pirilae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Hongisto, M. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Siitonen, S. [Ekono Energy Ltd, Espoo (Finland); Johansson, M. [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    ExternE National Implementation is a continuation of the ExternE Project, funded in part by the European Commission's Joule III Programme. This study is the result of the ExternE National Implementation Project for Finland. Three fuel cycles were selected for the Finnish study: coal, peat and wood-derived biomass, which together are responsible for about 40% of total electricity generation in Finland and about 75% of the non-nuclear fuel based generation. The estimated external costs or damages were dominated by the global warming (GW) impacts in the coal and peat fuel cycles, but knowledge of the true GW impacts is still uncertain. From among other impacts that were valued in monetary terms the human health damages due to airborne emissions dominated in all the three fuel cycles. Monetary valuation for ecosystem impacts is not possible using the ExternE methodology at present. The Meri-Pori power station representing the coal fuel cycle is one of the world's cleanest and most efficient coal-fired power plants with a condensing turbine. The coal is imported mainly from Poland. The estimated health damages were about 4 mECU/kWh, crop damages an order of magnitude lower and damages caused to building materials two orders of magnitude lower. The power stations of the peat and biomass fuel cycles are of CHP type, generating electricity and heat for the district heating systems of two cities. Their fuels are of domestic origin. The estimated health damages allocated to electricity generation were about 5 and 6 mECU/kWh, respectively. The estimates were case-specific and thus an generalisation of the results to the whole electricity generation in Finland is unrealistic. Despite the uncertainties and limitations of the methodology, it is a promising tool in the comparison of similar kinds of fuel cycles, new power plants and pollution abatement technologies and different plant locations with each other. (orig.)

  20. Non-equilibrium and equilibrium sorption with a linear-sorption isotherm during mass transport through an infinite, porous medium: some analytical solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnahan, C.L.; Remer, J.S.

    1981-04-01

    Analytical solutions have been developed for the problem of solute transport in a steady, three dimensional field of groundwater flow with non-equilibrium mass transfer of a radioactive species between fluid and solid phases and with anisotropic hydrodynamic dispersion. Interphase mass transport is described by a linear rate expression. Solutions are presented also for the case of equilibrium distribution of solute between fluid and solid phases. Three types of release from a point source were considered: instantaneous release of a finite mass of solute, continuous release at an exponentially decaying rate, and release for a finite period of time. Graphical displays of computational results for point-source solutions show the expected variation of sorptive retardation effects progressing from the case of no sorption, through several cases of non-equilibrium sorption, to the case of equilibrium sorption. The point-source solutions can be integrated over finite regions of a space to provide analytical solutions for regions of solute release having finite spatial extents and various geometrical shapes, thus considerably extending the utility of the point-source solutions.

  1. Ambient air particle transport into the effluent of a cold atmospheric-pressure argon plasma jet investigated by molecular beam mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dünnbier, M.; Schmidt-Bleker, A.; Winter, J.; Wolfram, M.; Hippler, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-10-01

    Ambient air species, which are transported into the active effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet result in highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Especially for the envisaged application field of plasma medicine, these RONS are responsible for strong biological responses. In this work, the effect of ambient air transport into the effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma argon jet on the on-axis densities of nitrogen, oxygen and argon was investigated by means of absolutely calibrated molecular beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). According to biomedical experiments a (bottomless) Petri dish was installed in front of the MBMS. In the following, the near flow field is referring to the region close to the nozzle exit and the far flow field is referring to the region beyond that. The absolute on-axis densities were obtained by three different methods, for the near flow field with VUV-absorption technique, for the far flow field with the MBMS and the total flow field was calculated with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The results of the ambient air particle densities of all independent methods were compared and showed an excellent agreement. Therefore the transport processes of ambient air species can be measured for the whole effluent of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet. Additionally, with the validation of the simulation it is possible in future to calculate the ambient species transport for various gas fluxes in the same turbulent flow regime. Comparing the on-axis densities obtained with an ignited and with a non-ignited plasma jet shows that for the investigated parameters, the main influence on the ambient air species transport is due to the increased temperature in the case when the jet is switched on. Moreover, the presence of positive ions (e.g. ArN_{2}^{+} ) formed due to the interaction of plasma-produced particles and ambient air species, which are transported into the effluent, is shown.

  2. Feeding the “aneurysm”: Orogen‐parallel mass transport into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whipp, David M; Beaumont, Christopher; Braun, Jean

    2014-01-01

    The Nanga Parbat‐Haramosh massif (NPHM; western Himalayan syntaxis) requires an influx of mass exceeding that in the adjacent Himalayan arc to sustain high topography and rapid erosional exhumation rates...

  3. Co-Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Motile Microorganisms Leads to Enhanced Mass Transfer under Diffusive Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Dorthea; Jakobsen, Hans H.; Winding, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The environmental chemodynamics of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) are often rate-limited by diffusion in stagnant boundary layers. This study investigated whether motile microorganisms can act as microbial carriers that enhance mass transfer of HOCs through diffusive boundary layers. A new...... experimental system was developed that allows (1) generation of concentration gradients of HOCs under the microscope, (2) exposure and direct observation of microorganisms in such gradients, and (3) quantification of HOC mass transfer. Silicone O-rings were integrated into a Dunn chemotaxis chamber to serve...... as sink and source for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This resulted in stable concentration gradients in water (>24 h). Adding the model organism Tetrahymena pyriformis to the experimental system enhanced PAH mass transfer up to hundred-fold (benzo[a]pyrene). Increasing mass transfer enhancement...

  4. Measurement of Membrane Characteristics Using the Phenomenological Equation and the Overall Mass Transport Equation in Ion-Exchange Membrane Electrodialysis of Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall membrane pair characteristics included in the overall mass transport equation are understandable using the phenomenological equations expressed in the irreversible thermodynamics. In this investigation, the overall membrane pair characteristics (overall transport number , overall solute permeability , overall electro-osmotic permeability and overall hydraulic permeability were measured by seawater electrodialysis changing current density, temperature and salt concentration, and it was found that occasionally takes minus value. For understanding the above phenomenon, new concept of the overall concentration reflection coefficient ∗ is introduced from the phenomenological equation. This is the aim of this investigation. ∗ is defined for describing the permselectivity between solutes and water molecules in the electrodialysis system just after an electric current interruption. ∗ is expressed by the function of and . ∗ is generally larger than 1 and is positive, but occasionally ∗ becomes less than 1 and becomes negative. Negative means that ions are transferred with water molecules (solvent from desalting cells toward concentrating cells just after an electric current interruption, indicating up-hill transport or coupled transport between water molecules and solutes.

  5. Fate of mass-transport deposits in convergent margins: Super- or sub-critical state in accretionary- or non-accretionary slope toes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y.; Kawamura, K.; Anma, R.

    2011-12-01

    Co-seismic mass-transportation is evidenced by voluminous bathymetric change during subduction type earthquakes of magnitude 8 or 9 class, exemplified by the March 11 2011 Tohoku earthquake in the Japan trench, where 50 m horizontal dislocation with 10 m vertical uplift was detected for the large tsunami(Kawamura et al., this session). On account of such successive mass transportation in the trench slope toe being slid into the grabens at the trench axis of the Pacific plate side lead the continuous migration of the trench slope toward the Honshu arc since the middle Miocene, playing the efficient role for the tectonic erosion (Hilde, 1983 Tectonophysics; von Huene & Lallemand, 1990 GSAB). Previously accreted materials of the former prism are largely exposed in the inner slope along the Japan trench, and the present slope is composed of brecciated, calcareous cemented mudstone and sandstone of middle Miocene age according to the submersible observation and sampling (Ogawa, 2011 Springer Book). Due to this trench migration landward, the island volcanic arc front vastly retreated to the west since the middle Miocene for more than 100 km. Such mass transportation occurred compensating the slope instability due to super-critical state of the slope angle. However, the tectonic erosion process is apt not to be preserved in ancient prisms (or "terranes") because they are entirely lost from the surface by erosion and subduction. On the other hand, many examples of such gravitational mass transportation deposits, slid-slumped deposits, liquefied and injected bodies, which are totally classified as mélanges or chaotic deposits, or olistostromes are preserved in ancient on-land prisms such as in the Shimanto and Miura-Boso accretionary complexes(Yamamoto et al., 2009 Island Arc), because they are preserved by offscraping process during plate subduction. Similar processes are known from the present Nankai prism surface and were observed by submersible and bathymetric survey

  6. Computational methods for reactive transport modeling: An extended law of mass-action, xLMA, method for multiphase equilibrium calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Allan M. M.; Kulik, Dmitrii A.; Kosakowski, Georg; Saar, Martin O.

    2016-10-01

    We present an extended law of mass-action (xLMA) method for multiphase equilibrium calculations and apply it in the context of reactive transport modeling. This extended LMA formulation differs from its conventional counterpart in that (i) it is directly derived from the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) problem (i.e., the fundamental problem that describes the state of equilibrium of a chemical system under constant temperature and pressure); and (ii) it extends the conventional mass-action equations with Lagrange multipliers from the Gibbs energy minimization problem, which can be interpreted as stability indices of the chemical species. Accounting for these multipliers enables the method to determine all stable phases without presuming their types (e.g., aqueous, gaseous) or their presence in the equilibrium state. Therefore, the here proposed xLMA method inherits traits of Gibbs energy minimization algorithms that allow it to naturally detect the phases present in equilibrium, which can be single-component phases (e.g., pure solids or liquids) or non-ideal multi-component phases (e.g., aqueous, melts, gaseous, solid solutions, adsorption, or ion exchange). Moreover, our xLMA method requires no technique that tentatively adds or removes reactions based on phase stability indices (e.g., saturation indices for minerals), since the extended mass-action equations are valid even when their corresponding reactions involve unstable species. We successfully apply the proposed method to a reactive transport modeling problem in which we use PHREEQC and GEMS as alternative backends for the calculation of thermodynamic properties such as equilibrium constants of reactions, standard chemical potentials of species, and activity coefficients. Our tests show that our algorithm is efficient and robust for demanding applications, such as reactive transport modeling, where it converges within 1-3 iterations in most cases. The proposed xLMA method is implemented in Reaktoro, a

  7. Quantifying the loss of methane through secondary gas mass transport (or 'slip') from a micro-porous membrane contactor applied to biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2013-07-01

    Secondary gas transport during the separation of a binary gas with a micro-porous hollow fibre membrane contactor (HMFC) has been studied for biogas upgrading. In this application, the loss or 'slip' of the secondary gas (methane) during separation is a known concern, specifically since methane possesses the intrinsic calorific value. Deionised (DI) water was initially used as the physical solvent. Under these conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) absorption were dependent upon liquid velocity (V(L)). Whilst the highest CO2 flux was recorded at high V(L), selectivity towards CO2 declined due to low residence times and a diminished gas-side partial pressure, and resulted in slip of approximately 5.2% of the inlet methane. Sodium hydroxide was subsequently used as a comparative chemical absorption solvent. Under these conditions, CO2 mass transfer increased by increasing gas velocity (VG) which is attributed to the excess of reactive hydroxide ions present in the solvent, and the fast conversion of dissolved CO2 to carbonate species reinitiating the concentration gradient at the gas-liquid interface. At high gas velocities, CH4 slip was reduced to 0.1% under chemical conditions. Methane slip is therefore dependent upon whether the process is gas phase or liquid phase controlled, since methane mass transport can be adequately described by Henry's law within both physical and chemical solvents. The addition of an electrolyte was found to further retard CH4 absorption via the salting out effect. However, their applicability to physical solvents is limited since electrolytic concentration similarly impinges upon the solvents' capacity for CO2. This study illustrates the significance of secondary gas mass transport, and furthermore demonstrates that gas-phase controlled systems are recommended where greater selectivity is required.

  8. Highly porous PEM fuel cell cathodes based on low density carbon aerogels as Pt-support: Experimental study of the mass-transport losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Julien; Chenitz, Regis; Chatenet, Marian; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Cornet, Nathalie; Achard, Patrick

    Carbon aerogels exhibiting high porous volumes and high surface areas, differentiated by their pore-size distributions were used as Pt-supports in the cathode catalytic layer of H 2/air-fed PEM fuel cell. The cathodes were tested as 50 cm 2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The porous structure of the synthesized catalytic layers was impacted by the nanostructure of the Pt-doped carbon aerogels (Pt/CAs). In this paper thus we present an experimental study aiming at establishing links between the porous structure of the cathode catalytic layers and the MEAs performances. For that purpose, the polarization curves of the MEAs were decomposed in 3 contributions: the kinetic loss, the ohmic loss and the mass-transport loss. We showed that the MEAs made with the different carbon aerogels had similar kinetic activities (low current density performance) but very different mass-transport voltage losses. It was found that the higher the pore-size of the initial carbon aerogel, the higher the mass-transport voltage losses. Supported by our porosimetry (N 2-adsorption and Hg-porosimetry) measurement, we interpret this apparent contradiction as the consequence of the more important Nafion penetration into the carbon aeorogel with larger pore-size. Indeed, the catalytic layers made from the larger pore-size carbon aerogel had lower porosities. We thus show in this work that carbon aerogels are materials with tailored nanostructured structure which can be used as model materials for experimentally testing the optimization of the PEM fuel cell catalytic layers.

  9. Calculation of freight externality costs for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefaan Swarts

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to quantify the marginal external costs associated with freight transport in South Africa. Six cost elements are included as externality cost items, namely, costs related to accidents, emissions, roadway land availability, policing, noise and congestion. Inputs in the calculations were a gravity-oriented freight flow model, a road transport cost model, actual transport costs for other modes, a warehousing cost survey, an inventory delay calculation and various national sources of information such as accident statistics and government budgets. Estimation techniques resulted in advances for externality cost measurement in South Africa. The quantification of the cost elements will be used to update the South African Freight Demand Model. The results show that the cost of transportation would have been 20% more if external factors were taken into account. The marginal rates of externalities can be used to develop scenarios based on alternative choices for South Africa's freight transport infrastructure configuration.

  10. Transport Phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  11. A random walk solution for modeling solute transport with network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer in heterogeneous systems: Impact of biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Christopher V.; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between the spatial variability of the aquifer hydraulic properties, mass transfer due to sub-grid heterogeneity and chemical reactions often complicates reactive transport simulations. It is well documented that hydro-biochemical properties are ubiquitously heterogeneous and that diffusion and slow advection at the sub-grid scale typically leads to the conceptualization of an aquifer as a multi-porosity system. Within this context, chemical reactions taking place in mobile/immobile water regions can be substantially different between each other. This paper presents a particle-based method that can efficiently simulate heterogeneity, network reactions and multi-rate mass transfer. The approach is based on the development of transition probabilities that describe the likelihood that particles belonging to a given species and mobile/immobile domain at a given time will be transformed into another species and mobile/immobile domain afterwards. The joint effect of mass transfer and sequential degradation is shown to be non-trivial. A characteristic rebound of degradation products can be observed. This late rebound of concentrations is not driven by any change in the flow regime (e.g., pumping ceases in the pump-and-treat remediation strategy) but due to the natural interplay between mass transfer and chemical reactions. To illustrate that the method can simultaneously represent mass transfer, spatially varying properties and network reactions without numerical problems, we have simulated the degradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in a three-dimensional fully heterogeneous aquifer subjected to rate-limited mass transfer. Two types of degradation modes were considered to compare the effect of an active biofilm with that of clay pods present in the aquifer. Results of the two scenarios display significantly differences. Biofilms that promote the degradation of compounds in an immobile region are shown to significantly enhance degradation, rapidly producing

  12. IMPORTANCE OF DELIVERY CONDITIONS IN THE EXTERNAL PRICE CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta ISAI

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The delivery conditions of the merchandise at export, established by the rules INCOTERMS2000, influence the external price structure. There are some conditions in which the external priceincludes only the value of the merchandise and other conditions in which, besides the value of themerchandise, the price includes also the external transport and insurance. In the case of the exportson commercial credit, when it appears the notion of external interest, this one may be included in theprice or may be invoiced separately, thus defining gross external prices and net external prices.

  13. A Combined Approach Using Transporter-Flux Assays and Mass Spectrometry to Examine Psychostimulant Street Drugs of Unknown Content

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenauer, Rudolf; Luf, Anton; Holy, Marion; Freissmuth, Michael; SCHMID, RAINER; Sitte, Harald H

    2012-01-01

    The illicit consumption of psychoactive compounds may cause short and long-term health problems and addiction. This is also true for amphetamines and cocaine, which target monoamine transporters. In the recent past, an increasing number of new compounds with amphetamine-like structure such as mephedrone or 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) entered the market of illicit drugs. Subtle structural changes circumvent legal restrictions placed on the parent compound. These novel drugs are effec...

  14. The effect of coupled mass transport and internal reforming on modeling of solid oxide fuel cells part I: Channel-level model development and steady-state comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.; Braun, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    Dynamic modeling and analysis of solid oxide fuel cell systems can provide insight towards meeting transient response application requirements and enabling an expansion of the operating envelope of these high temperature systems. SOFC modeling for system studies are accomplished with channel-level interface charge transfer models, which implement dynamic conservation equations coupled with additional submodels to capture the porous media mass transport and electrochemistry of the cell. Many of these models may contain simplifications in order to decouple the mass transport, fuel reforming, and electrochemical processes enabling the use of a 1-D model. The reforming reactions distort concentration profiles of the species within the anode, where hydrogen concentration at the triple-phase boundary may be higher or lower than that of the channel altering the local Nernst potential and exchange current density. In part one of this paper series, the modeling equations for the 1-D and 'quasi' 2-D models are presented, and verified against button cell electrochemical and channel-level reforming data. Steady-state channel-level modeling results indicate a 'quasi' 2-D SOFC model predicts a more uniform temperature distribution where differences in the peak cell temperature and maximum temperature gradient are experienced. The differences are most prominent for counter-flow cell with high levels of internal reforming. The transient modeling comparison is discussed in part two of this paper series.

  15. Specifications for the development of a fully three-dimensional numerical groundwater model for regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prickett, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Specifications are given which are necessary to develop a three-dimensional numerical model capable of simulating regional mass transport of radionuclides from a deep waste repository. The model to be developed will include all of the significant mass transport processes including flow, chemical, and thermal advection, mechanical dispersion, molecular diffusion, ion exchange reactions, and radioactive decay. The model specifications also include that density and viscosity fluid properties be functions of pressure, temperature, and concentration and take into account fluid and geologic heterogenieties by allowing possible assignment of individual values to every block of the model. The model specifications furthermore include the repository shape, input/output information, boundary conditions, and the need for documentation and a user's manual. Model code validation can be accomplished with the included known analytical or laboratory solutions. It is recommended that an existing finite-difference model (developed by INTERCOMP and INTERA, Inc.) be used as a starting point either as an acceptable basic code for modification or as a pattern for the development of a completely different numerical scheme. A ten-step plan is given to outline the general procedure for development of the code.

  16. Heat, Salt, and Mass Transports in the Eastern Eurasian Basin of the Arctic Ocean: an Insight from Two Years of Mooring Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnyushkov, A.

    2016-12-01

    In the recent decade, the Arctic Ocean (AO) has experienced dramatic changes evident in all components of the climate system, e.g., in sea ice cover, thermohaline state, and freshwater budget; and there is no indication that they will discontinue in the near future. The role of deep ocean processes in these changes is still poorly understood. For instance, the peculiarities of Arctic Circumpolar Boundary Current (ACBC) - the topographically-controlled current that carries Atlantic Water (AW) around the AO and transports a vast amount of mass, heat, and salt from the Nordic Seas around the polar basin - may play a crucial role in these changes in the Eurasian Basin (EB). Using observations collected in 2013-15 at six moorings distributed at the continental slope of the Laptev Sea we quantify the volume, heat and salt transports of the AW in the eastern EB of the Arctic Ocean. The utilized moorings were deployed in September 2013 as a part of the Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System (NABOS) program along the 125°E meridian, providing a detailed picture of structure and variability of the ACBC in this region. Collected 2013-15 observations suggest that at the central Laptev Sea slope the ACBC carries 5.1 Sv of water in the upper 800 m layer; 3.1 Sv of this volumetric water transport is associated with the AW. The mean heat transport carried by the AW was as high as 9.6±0.4 TW, estimated using a zero degree reference temperature (the lower temperature limit of the AW), and 32.7±1.3 TW relative to the freezing point (-1.8 °C). At the Laptev Sea slope, the AW heat transport constitutes 71% of the net heat transport in the entire layer spanned by NABOS mooring instruments (46.0±1.7 TW), confirming the dominant role of AW heat in the thermal balance of the EB. According to the mooring records, the water, heat and salt transports across the Laptev Sea slope experienced strong annual changes and demonstrated significant negative trends in 2013-15.

  17. Testing the accuracy of correlations for multicomponent mass transport of adsorbed gases in metal-organic frameworks: diffusion of H2/CH4 mixtures in CuBTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Seda; Liu, Jinchen; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2008-08-05

    Mass transport of chemical mixtures in nanoporous materials is important in applications such as membrane separations, but measuring diffusion of mixtures experimentally is challenging. Methods that can predict multicomponent diffusion coefficients from single-component data can be extremely useful if these methods are known to be accurate. We present the first test of a method of this kind for molecules adsorbed in a metal-organic framework (MOF). Specifically, we examine the method proposed by Skoulidas, Sholl, and Krishna (SSK) ( Langmuir, 2003, 19, 7977) by comparing predictions made with this method to molecular simulations of mixture transport of H 2/CH 4 mixtures in CuBTC. These calculations provide the first direct information on mixture transport of any species in a MOF. The predictions of the SSK approach are in good agreement with our direct simulations of binary diffusion, suggesting that this approach may be a powerful one for examining multicomponent diffusion in MOFs. We also use our molecular simulation data to test the ideal adsorbed solution theory method for predicting binary adsorption isotherms and a method for predicting mixture self-diffusion coefficients.

  18. Modeling of mass and charge transport in a solid oxide fuel cell anode structure by a 3D lattice Boltzmann approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Hedvig; Andersson, Martin; Sundén, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    A 3D model at microscale by the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed for part of an anode of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) to analyze the interaction between the transport and reaction processes and structural parameters. The equations of charge, momentum, heat and mass transport are simulated in the model. The modeling geometry is created with randomly placed spheres to resemble the part of the anode structure close to the electrolyte. The electrochemical reaction processes are captured at specific sites where spheres representing Ni and YSZ materials are present with void space. This work focuses on analyzing the effect of structural parameters such as porosity, and percentage of active reaction sites on the ionic current density and concentration of H2 using LBM. It is shown that LBM can be used to simulate an SOFC anode at microscale and evaluate the effect of structural parameters on the transport processes to improve the performance of the SOFC anode. It was found that increasing the porosity from 30 to 50 % decreased the ionic current density due to a reduction in the number of reaction sites. Also the consumption of H2 decreased with increasing porosity. When the percentage of active reaction sites was increased while the porosity was kept constant, the ionic current density increased. However, the H2 concentration was slightly reduced when the percentage of active reaction sites was increased. The gas flow tortuosity decreased with increasing porosity.

  19. Measurement of transport activities of bile acids in human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kana; Murai, Tsuyoshi; Yabuuchi, Hikaru; Kurosawa, Takao

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for the measurement of transport activities in membrane vesicles obtained from human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3-expressing Sf9 cells for 1beta-hydroxy-, 6alpha-hydroxy- and unsaturated bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Calibration curves for the bile acids were linear over the range of 10 to 2000 pmol/mL, and the detection limit was less than 2 pmol/mL for all bile acids using selected reaction monitoring analysis. The method was applied to measurements of adenosine triphosphate-dependent transport activities of the membrane vesicles for the above-mentioned hydroxylated and unsaturated bile acids. The present study demonstrated that the human multidrug resistance-associated protein 3 vesicles accepted 1beta-, 6alpha-hydroxylated and unsaturated bile acids along with common bile acids, such as glycocholic acid and taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate. The developed method is useful for measurements of bile acid transport activities.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulation on liquid flow and mass transport in a bioreactor with cylinder bundle for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qiang; Yang, Yan-Xia; Zhu, Xun; Wang, Hong; Ding, Yu-Dong

    2015-06-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method is adopted to simulate hydrodynamics and mass transfer accompanying with biochemical reaction in a channel with cylinder bundle, which is the scenario of biohydrogen production by photosynthetic bacteria in the biofilm attached on the surface of cylinder bundle in photobioreactor. The effects of cylinder spacing, Reynolds number and cylinder arrangement are investigated. The numerical results reveal that highest glucose concentration and the lowest hydrogen concentration are obtained at the front of the first row cylinders for all cases. The staggered arrangement leads to an increment in average drag coefficient, Sherwood number and consumption efficiency of substrate under a given condition, and the increment in Sherwood number reaches up to 30 %, while that in drag coefficient is around 1 %, moreover, the increment in consumption efficiency reaches the maximum value of 12 %. The results indicate that the staggered arrangement is beneficial to the mass transfer and biochemical reaction.

  1. Spring 2009 Water Mass Distribution, Mixing and Transport in the Southern Adriatic after a Low Production of Winter Dense Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    the southern Adriatic basin and meets warm and salty Modified Levantine Intermediate Water (MLIW) coming from the Ionian Sea. This study examine...and fresh intermediate water enters the southern Adriatic basin and meets warm and salty Modified Levantine Intermediate Water (MLIW) coming from the...Spring of 2009 can be observed in T–S space (Triangle 2) in Fig. 2. The saltiness of ADW compared to other Adriatic water masses is heavily influenced by

  2. Determining transport efficiency for the purpose of counting and sizing nanoparticles via single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Heather E.; Rogers, Nicola J.; Jarolimek, Chad; Coleman, Victoria A.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Ranville, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Currently there are few ideal methods for the characterization of nanoparticles in complex, environmental samples, leading to significant gaps in toxicity and exposure assessments of nanomaterials. Single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (spICP-MS) is an emerging technique that can both size and count metal-containing nanoparticles. A major benefit of the spICP-MS method is its ability to characterize nanoparticles at concentrations relevant to the environment. This paper...

  3. Impact of heat and mass transfer during the transport of nitrogen in coal porous media on coal mine fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bobo; Zhou, Fubao

    2014-01-01

    The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf porous medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal porous media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of "gravity settling" in porous media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in porous media in the field of thermal physics and engineering.

  4. Fabrication of a Carbon Nanotube-Embedded Silicon Nitride Membrane for Studies of Nanometer-Scale Mass Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, J K; Noy, A; Huser, T; Eaglesham, D; Bakajin, O

    2004-08-25

    A membrane consisting of multiwall carbon nanotubes embedded in a silicon nitride matrix was fabricated for fluid mechanics studies on the nanometer scale. Characterization by tracer diffusion and scanning electron microscopy suggests that the membrane is free of large voids. An upper limit to the diffusive flux of D{sub 2}O of 2.4x10-{sup 8} mole/m{sup 2}-s was determined, indicating extremely slow transport. By contrast, hydrodynamic calculations of water flow across a nanotube membrane of similar specifications predict a much higher molar flux of 1.91 mole/m{sup 2}-s, suggesting that the nanotubes produced possess a 'bamboo' morphology. The carbon nanotube membranes were used to make nanoporous silicon nitride membranes, fabricated by sacrificial removal of the carbon. Nitrogen flow measurements on these structures give a membrane permeance of 4.7x10{sup -4} mole/m{sup 2}-s-Pa at a pore density of 4x10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. Using a Knudsen diffusion model, the average pore size of this membrane is estimated to be 66 nm, which agrees well with TEM observations of the multiwall carbon nanotube outer diameter. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications inseparations and chemical sensing.

  5. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  6. Comparing Theory and Experiment for Analyte Transport in the First Vacuum Stage of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachreson, Matthew R.

    The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) has been used in laboratories for many years. The majority of the improvements to the instrument have been done empirically through trial and error. A few fluid models have been made, which have given a general description of the flow through the mass spectrometer interface. However, due to long mean free path effects and other factors, it is very difficult to simulate the flow details well enough to predict how changing the interface design will change the formation of the ion beam. Towards this end, Spencer et al. developed FENIX, a direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm capable of modeling this transitional flow through the mass spectrometer interface, the transitional flow from disorganized plasma to focused ion beam. Their previous work describes how FENIX simulates the neutral ion flow. While understanding the argon flow is essential to understanding the ICP-MS, the true goal is to improve its analyte detection capabilities. In this work, we develop a model for adding analyte to FENIX and compare it to previously collected experimental data. We also calculate how much ambipolar fields, plasma sheaths, and electron-ion recombination affect the ion beam formation. We find that behind the sampling interface there is no evidence of turbulent mixing. The behavior of the analyte seems to be described simply by convection and diffusion. Also, ambipolar field effects are small and do not significantly affect ion beam formation between the sampler and skimmer cones. We also find that the plasma sheath that forms around the sampling cone does not significantly affect the analyte flow downstream from the skimmer. However, it does thermally insulate the electrons from the sampling cone, which reduces ion-electron recombination. We also develop a model for electron-ion recombination. By comparing it to experimental data, we find that significant amounts of electron-ion recombination occurs just downstream from the

  7. Universal temperature dependence, flux extinction, and the role of 3He impurities in superfluid mass transport through solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekhov, Ye; Mullin, W J; Hallock, R B

    2014-07-18

    The mass flux, F, carried by as-grown solid (4)He in the range 25.6-26.3 bar rises with falling temperature, and at a concentration-dependent temperature, T(d), the flux decreases sharply within a few mK. We study F as a function of (3)He impurity concentration, χ. We find that T(d) is an increasing function of increasing χ. At temperatures above T(d) the flux has a universal temperature dependence and the flux terminates in a narrow window near a characteristic temperature T(h) ≈ 625 mK, which is independent of χ.

  8. Leiomyosarcoma of the external iliac vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Wakako; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2012-06-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of the iliac vein is an uncommon tumor. We report a case of a 63-year-old Japanese woman with leiomyosarcoma of the right external iliac vein. The patient complained of right inguinal pain and swelling. Computed tomography demonstrated a mass surrounding the right external iliac artery and vein. Metastases in the lungs and liver were found. Complete resection of the tumor along with the involved vessels was performed. Polytetrafluoroethylene grafts were used to reconstruct the vessels. Pathological examination revealed leiomyosarcoma of the external iliac vein. Although the prognosis of leiomyosarcoma is poor, en bloc tumor resection is the treatment of choice.

  9. Mass transport of carbon in one and two phase iron-nickel alloys in a temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, I.C.I.; Carlson, O.N.; Martin, D.M.

    1983-10-01

    The flux of carbon atoms induced by an applied temperature gradient on a specimen was investigated for an Fe-32.5 wt pct Ni alloy for six carbon concentrations. Carbon was found to migrate to the higher temperature region in the low carbon single phase alloys. However, in the higher carbon alloys an abrupt jump in carbon concentrations results when a portion of the specimen is in a two-phase region while the portion in the one-phase region exhibits the usual solute migration toward the higher temperature. A value of -12.2 + or - 0.4 kJ mol/sup -1/ was obtained for the heat of transport of carbon in the ..gamma..-phase Fe-Ni alloys for a wide range of carbon concentrations. A model for diffusion and thermotransport in multiphase systems is presented to explain the observed results.

  10. Soft matter beats hard matter: rupturing of thin metallic films induced by mass transport in photosensitive polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadavalli, Nataraja Sekhar; Linde, Felix; Kopyshev, Alexey; Santer, Svetlana

    2013-08-28

    The interface between thin films of metal and polymer materials play a significant role in modern flexible microelectronics viz., metal contacts on polymer substrates, printed electronics and prosthetic devices. The major emphasis in metal-polymer interface is on studying how the externally applied stress in the polymer substrate leads to the deformation and cracks in metal film and vice versa. Usually, the deformation process involves strains varying over large lateral dimensions because of excessive stress at local imperfections. Here we show that the seemingly random phenomena at macroscopic scales can be rendered rather controllable at submicrometer length scales. Recently, we have created a metal-polymer interface system with strains varying over periods of several hundred nanometers. This was achieved by exploiting the formation of surface relief grating (SRG) within the azobenzene containing photosensitive polymer film upon irradiation with light interference pattern. Up to a thickness of 60 nm, the adsorbed metal film adapts neatly to the forming relief, until it ultimately ruptures into an array of stripes by formation of highly regular and uniform cracks along the maxima and minima of the polymer topography. This surprising phenomenon has far-reaching implications. This is the first time a direct probe is available to estimate the forces emerging in SRG formation in glassy polymers. Furthermore, crack formation in thin metal films can be studied literally in slow motion, which could lead to substantial improvements in the design process of flexible electronics. Finally, cracks are produced uniformly and at high density, contrary to common sense. This could offer new strategies for precise nanofabrication procedures mechanical in character.

  11. Review article number 50 - The Maxwell-Stefan approach to mass transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; Wesselingh, J.A

    1997-01-01

    The limitations of the Fick's law for describing diffusion are discussed. It is argued that the Maxwell-Stefan formulation provides the most general, and convenient, approach for describing mass transport which takes proper account of thermodynamic non-idealities and influence of external force fiel

  12. Review article number 50 - The Maxwell-Stefan approach to mass transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; Wesselingh, J.A

    1997-01-01

    The limitations of the Fick's law for describing diffusion are discussed. It is argued that the Maxwell-Stefan formulation provides the most general, and convenient, approach for describing mass transport which takes proper account of thermodynamic non-idealities and influence of external force fiel

  13. Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Alexander; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 $\\mu$m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results fro...

  14. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, XF; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-04-15

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JIVIAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H-2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Insight in the transport behavior of copper glycinate complexes through the porcine gastrointestinal membrane using an Ussing chamber assisted by mass spectrometry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tastet, Laure; Schaumlöffel, Dirk; Yiannikouris, Alexandros; Power, Ronan; Lobinski, Ryszard

    2010-04-01

    An Ussing chamber study was conducted in order to investigate the transport behavior of copper glycinate complexes through a porcine gastrointestinal membrane. Organic copper complexes such as copper tri- and tetraglycinates (GGG-Cu(II) and GGGG-Cu(II)) were used as model system. In a novel analytical approach the Ussing chamber was combined with mass spectrometry. Therefore, relevant analytical methods based on MALDI-MS and a coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ICP-MS and ESI-MS were developed for the determination of copper complexes in the mucosal and serosal half-chambers. It was found that 86.1+/-8.5% of copper triglycinate but only 20.8+/-9.9% of copper tetraglycinate penetrated the digestive membrane without modification. Furthermore, inorganic copper species were not detected but a new copper complex (m/z 442) was found to be formed in both compartments of the Ussing chamber. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Holographic Thermodynamics and Transport of Flavor Fields

    CERN Document Server

    O'Bannon, Andy

    2008-01-01

    We use gauge-gravity duality to study a strongly-coupled non-Abelian gauge theory with flavor fields, i.e. fields transforming in the fundamental representation of the gauge group. We first study the thermodynamics of the flavor fields. In the grand canonical ensemble at zero temperature, we find a second-order transition when the mass of the flavor fields equals the chemical potential. We then study the transport properties of the flavor fields at finite temperature and density. We introduce external electric and magnetic fields and compute the resulting current of flavor charge. From this current we extract the conductivity, using Ohm's law. In addition, we compute the drag force on the flavor fields at large mass, in the presence of a finite baryon density and external electric and magnetic fields.

  17. Holographic thermodynamics and transport of flavor fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, Andrew Hill

    We use gauge-gravity duality to study a strongly-coupled non-Abelian gauge theory with flavor fields, i.e. fields transforming in the fundamental representation of the gauge group. We first study the thermodynamics of the flavor fields. In the grand canonical ensemble at zero temperature, we find a second-order transition when the mass of the flavor fields equals the chemical potential. We then study the transport properties of the flavor fields at finite temperature and density. We introduce external electric and magnetic fields and compute the resulting current of flavor charge. From this current we extract the conductivity, using Ohm's law. In addition, we compute the drag force on the flavor fields at large mass, in the presence of a finite baryon density and external electric and magnetic fields.

  18. Environmental externalities related to power production on biogas and natural gas based on the EU ExternE methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Sieverts; Ibsen, Liselotte Schleisner

    1998-01-01

    This paper assesses the environmental impacts and external costs from selected electricity generation systems in Denmark. The assessment is carried out as part of the ExternE National Implementation, which is the second phase of the ExternE project and involves case studies from all Western Europ...... show that estimated damages due to the greenhouse effect are predominant, however, the uncertainty is high. The predominant damage at the local and regional level is related to emission of NOx, which results in effects on public health....... European countries. The project use a “bottom-up” methodology to evaluate the external costs associated with a wide range of different fuel cycles. The project has identified priority impacts, where most are impacts from air emissions. Externalities due to atmospheric emissions are calculated through...... the use of a software package, EcoSence, having an environmental database at both a local and regional level including population, crops, building materials and forest. The system also incorporates two air transport models, allowing local and regional scale modelling. The results of the Danish case study...

  19. Impact of the loss of caveolin-1 on lung mass and cholesterol metabolism in mice with and without the lysosomal cholesterol transporter, Niemann-Pick type C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Dorothy I; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Ramirez, Charina M; Scherer, Philipp E; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-07-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is a major structural protein in caveolae in the plasma membranes of many cell types, particularly endothelial cells and adipocytes. Loss of Cav-1 function has been implicated in multiple diseases affecting the cardiopulmonary and central nervous systems, as well as in specific aspects of sterol and lipid metabolism in the liver and intestine. Lungs contain an exceptionally high level of Cav-1. Parameters of cholesterol metabolism in the lung were measured, initially in Cav-1-deficient mice (Cav-1(-/-)), and subsequently in Cav-1(-/-) mice that also lacked the lysosomal cholesterol transporter Niemann-Pick C1 (Npc1) (Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-)). In 50-day-old Cav-1(-/-) mice fed a low- or high-cholesterol chow diet, the total cholesterol concentration (mg/g) in the lungs was marginally lower than in the Cav-1(+/+) controls, but due to an expansion in their lung mass exceeding 30%, whole-lung cholesterol content (mg/organ) was moderately elevated. Lung mass (g) in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) mice (0.356±0.022) markedly exceeded that in their Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(+/+) controls (0.137±0.009), as well as in their Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(+/+) (0.191±0.013) and Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(-/-) (0.213±0.022) littermates. The corresponding lung total cholesterol contents (mg/organ) in mice of these genotypes were 6.74±0.17, 0.71±0.05, 0.96±0.05 and 3.12±0.43, respectively, with the extra cholesterol in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) and Cav-1(+/+):Npc1(-/-) mice being nearly all unesterified (UC). The exacerbation of the Npc1 lung phenotype and increase in the UC level in the Cav-1(-/-):Npc1(-/-) mice imply a regulatory role of Cav-1 in pulmonary cholesterol metabolism when lysosomal sterol transport is disrupted.

  20. Characterization of physical mass transport through oil sands fluid fine tailings in an end pit lake: a multi-tracer study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A.; Barbour, S. Lee

    2016-06-01

    Soft tailings pose substantial challenges for mine reclamation due to their high void ratios and low shear strengths, particularly for conventional terrestrial reclamation practices. Oil sands mine operators have proposed the development of end pit lakes to contain the soft tailings, called fluid fine tailings (FFT), generated when bitumen is removed from oil sands ore. End pit lakes would be constructed within mined-out pits with FFT placed below the lake water. However, the feasibility of isolating the underlying FFT has yet to be fully evaluated. Chemical constituents of interest may move from the FFT into the lake water via two key processes: (1) advective-diffusive mass transport with upward pore water flow caused by settling of the FFT; and (2) mixing created by wind events or unstable density profiles through the lake water and upper portion of the FFT. In 2013 and 2014, temperature and stable isotopes of water profiles were measured through the FFT and lake water in the first end pit lake developed by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Numerical modelling was undertaken to simulate these profiles to identify the key mechanisms controlling conservative mass transport in the FFT. Shallow mixing of the upper 1.1 m of FFT with lake water was required to explain the observed temperature and isotopic profiles. Following mixing, the re-establishment of both the temperature and isotope profiles required an upward advective flux of approximately 1.5 m/year, consistent with average FFT settling rates measured at the study site. These findings provide important insight on the ability to sequester soft tailings in an end pit lake, and offer a foundation for future research on the development of end pit lakes as an oil sands reclamation strategy.

  1. Orogen-parallel mass transport along the arcuate Himalayan front into Nanga Parbat and the western Himalayan syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipp, David; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Along the length of the Himalayan arc, Quaternary rock exhumation rates are highest in the Himalayan syntaxes at the lateral ends of the arc. In the western Himalayan syntaxis, these rates may exceed 10 mm/a over the past 2 Ma, requiring an additional source of crustal mass into this region to maintain the high-elevation topography. We have previously demonstrated that strain partitioning of oblique convergence can produce a significant orogen-parallel mass flux into the syntaxis of a Himalaya-like orogen and balance the rapid rates of surface denudation. However, the magnitude of this orogen parallel mass flux and whether strain is partitioned across the Himalayan thrust front is affected by the strength of the material bounding and within the Himalayan orogenic wedge, the dip angle of the basal detachment and the convergence obliquity angle γ. Strain partitioning is expected for a finite-length Himalaya-like segmented linear orogen with an obliquity of γ = 30 - 40°, but the obliquity angle in the Himalayan arc varies from 0 at the center of the arc to ˜ 40° in the western Himalayan syntaxis region. Thus, the conditions in which strain partitioning will occur may not be met along much of the length of the arc. Though there is clear evidence of strain partitioning in the Himalaya, preliminary results from 3D numerical geodynamic models of an orogen with an arcuate geometry based on the Himalaya suggest strain partitioning does not occur for the same conditions observed in earlier models of segmented linear orogens or orogens with a smaller arc radius. In those models, the proportion of the orogen length with a high obliquity angle was greater, which favors strain partitioning. In numerical experiments of an arcuate Himalayan orogen with weak material (friction angle φ ≤ 5°) at the back of the orogenic wedge, strain partitioning is only observed in the toe of the orogenic wedge (10-15 km from the thrust front) at the western end of the arc, rather than for

  2. A huge renormalization of transport effective mass in the magnetic-polaronic state of EuB{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glushkov, V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: glushkov@lt.gpi.ru; Bogach, A.; Demishev, S.; Gon' kov, K.; Ignatov, M.; Khayrullin, Eu.; Samarin, N.; Shubin, A. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Shitsevalova, N. [Institute for Problems of Materials Science NAS, 3 Krzhizhanovsky Street, 03680 Kiev (Ukraine); Flachbart, K. [Centre of Low Temperature Physics, IEP SAS and IPS FS UPJS, SK-04001 Kosice (Slovakia); Sluchanko, N. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2008-04-01

    The comprehensive study of galvanomagnetic, thermoelectric and magnetic properties was carried out on the single crystals of low carrier density ferromagnetic metal EuB{sub 6} (T{sub C}{approx}13.9 K, T{sub m}=15.8 K) in a wide range of temperatures (1.8-300 K) and magnetic fields (up to 80 kOe). The analysis of the microscopic characteristics estimated from the data revealed a giant renormalization of the charge carriers' effective mass m{sub eff}, which is observed in the paramagnetic state of this compound with strong electron correlations. The gradual decrease of m{sub eff} from the maximum of m{sub eff}{approx}30m{sub eff} detected at T*{approx}80 K to the low temperature values of m{sub eff} (T{<=}T{sub C}){approx}0.2-1m{sub 0} is discussed in terms of the phase separation with the formation of low resistive ferromagnetic nano-sized regions (ferrons) in the dielectric magnetic polaronic state (T>T{sub m}). The observed unusual behavior of m{sub eff} favors recent explanation of the genesis of the metal-insulator transition scenario proposed for La-doped EuB{sub 6} systems [U. Yu, B.I. Min, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 117202.].

  3. A huge renormalization of transport effective mass in the magnetic-polaronic state of EuB 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, V.; Bogach, A.; Demishev, S.; Gon'kov, K.; Ignatov, M.; Khayrullin, Eu.; Samarin, N.; Shubin, A.; Shitsevalova, N.; Flachbart, K.; Sluchanko, N.

    2008-04-01

    The comprehensive study of galvanomagnetic, thermoelectric and magnetic properties was carried out on the single crystals of low carrier density ferromagnetic metal EuB 6 ( TC≈13.9 K, Tm=15.8 K) in a wide range of temperatures (1.8-300 K) and magnetic fields (up to 80 kOe). The analysis of the microscopic characteristics estimated from the data revealed a giant renormalization of the charge carriers’ effective mass meff, which is observed in the paramagnetic state of this compound with strong electron correlations. The gradual decrease of meff from the maximum of meff∼30 meff detected at T*≈80 K to the low temperature values of meff ( T⩽ TC)∼0.2-1 m0 is discussed in terms of the phase separation with the formation of low resistive ferromagnetic nano-sized regions (ferrons) in the dielectric magnetic polaronic state ( T> Tm). The observed unusual behavior of meff favors recent explanation of the genesis of the metal-insulator transition scenario proposed for La-doped EuB 6 systems [U. Yu, B.I. Min, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 117202.].

  4. An intravascular bioartificial pancreas device (iBAP) with silicon nanopore membranes (SNM) for islet encapsulation under convective mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shang; Blaha, Charles; Moses, Willieford; Park, Jaehyun; Wright, Nathan; Groszek, Joey; Fissell, William; Vartanian, Shant; Posselt, Andrew M; Roy, Shuvo

    2017-05-16

    Diffusion-based bioartificial pancreas (BAP) devices are limited by poor islet viability and functionality due to inadequate mass transfer resulting in islet hypoxia and delayed glucose-insulin kinetics. While intravascular ultrafiltration-based BAP devices possess enhanced glucose-insulin kinetics, the polymer membranes used in these devices provide inadequate ultrafiltrate flow rates and result in excessive thrombosis. Here, we report the silicon nanopore membrane (SNM), which exhibits a greater hydraulic permeability and a superior pore size selectivity compared to polymer membranes for use in BAP applications. Specifically, we demonstrate that the SNM-based intravascular BAP with ∼10 and ∼40 nm pore sized membranes support high islet viability (>60%) and functionality (insulin response to glucose stimulation) at clinically relevant islet densities (5700 and 11 400 IE per cm(2)) under convection in vitro. In vivo studies with ∼10 nm pore sized SNM in a porcine model showed high islet viability (>85%) at clinically relevant islet density (5700 IE per cm(2)), c-peptide concentration of 144 pM in the outflow ultrafiltrate, and hemocompatibility under convection. These promising findings offer insights on the development of next generation of full-scale intravascular devices to treat T1D patients in the future.

  5. Fluvial Transport Model from Spatial Distribution Analysis of Libyan Desert Glass Mass on the Great Sand Sea (Southwest Egypt: Clues to Primary Glass Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Jimenez-Martinez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Libyan Desert Glass (LDG is a natural silica-rich melted rock found as pieces scattered over the sand and bedrock of the Western Desert of Egypt, northeast of the Gilf Kebir. In this work, a population mixture analysis serves to relate the present spatial distribution of LDG mass density with the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene fluvial dynamics in the Western Desert of Egypt. This was verified from a spatial distribution model that was predicted from the log-normal kriging method using the LDG–mass-dependent transformed variable, Y(x. Both low- and high-density normal populations (–9.2 < Y(x < –3.5 and –3.8 < Y(x < 2.1, respectively were identified. The low-density population was the result of an ordinary fluvial LDG transport/deposition sequence that was active from the time of the melting process, and which lasted until the end of activity of the Gilf River. The surface distribution of the high-density population allowed us to restrict the source area of the melting process. We demonstrate the importance of this geostatistical study in unveiling the probable location of the point where the melting of surficial material occurred and the role of the Gilf River in the configuration of the observed strewn field.

  6. 正渗透原理及分离传质过程浅析%Forward osmosis membrane process and its mass transport mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚琴; 徐铜文; 王焕庭

    2013-01-01

    正渗透是一种新兴的膜分离技术,因其低能耗、抗污染、对污染物截留能力广等的潜力,在脱盐、废水处理、农业和电力等领域的应用前景备受瞩目.本文介绍了正渗透概念和原理,通过正渗透传递过程的现象学模型,对浓差极差极化与质量传递的关系作出分析,提出了强化正渗透传质过程的一些建议.%Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging technology that has attracted numerous attention for its potential applications in many areas, such as desalination, waste water treatment, agriculture, and power generation. FO has shown many advantages over reverse osmosis process in terms of low energy consumption, high rejection of a wide range of contaminants and lower fouling tendency. In this paper the concept and mechanism of FO are presented, and the calculation and determination of the osmotic pressure of solution are discussed. The relationship between concentration polarization and mass transport through the FO membrane on the phenomenological model is analyzed. Some strategies about the enhancement of mass transfer processes of FO operation are suggested. The opportunities and challenges exist side by side in the development of FO technology.

  7. The Leo Archipelago: A System of Earth-Rings for Communications, Mass-Transport to Space, Solar Power, and Control of Global Warming

    CERN Document Server

    Meulenberg, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    A multi-purpose low-earth-orbit system of rings circling the earth - the "LEO ARCHIPELAGO" - is proposed as a means of solving or bypassing many major problems hindering man's quest to get into space. A fiber-optic ring about the earth would be an initial testing and developmental stage for the ring systems, while providing cash-flow through a LEO-based, high-band-width, world-wide communication system. A Low-Earth-Orbit-based space-elevator system, "Sling-on-a-Ring," is proposed as the crucial developmental stage of the LEO Archipelago. Being a LEO-based heavy-mass lifter, rather than earth- or GEO-based, it is much less massive and therefore less costly than other proposed space-elevators. With the advent of lower-cost, higher-mass transport to orbit, the options for further space development (e.g., communications, space solar power, radiation dampers, sun shades, and permanent LEO habitation) are greatly expanded. This paper provides an update of the Sling-on-a-Ring concept in terms of new materials, poten...

  8. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  9. Heat and mass transport during microwave heating of mashed potato in domestic oven--model development, validation, and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajia; Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy; Birla, Sohan; Negahban, Mehrdad; Jones, David; Subbiah, Jeyamkondan

    2014-10-01

    A 3-dimensional finite-element model coupling electromagnetics and heat and mass transfer was developed to understand the interactions between the microwaves and fresh mashed potato in a 500 mL tray. The model was validated by performing heating of mashed potato from 25 °C on a rotating turntable in a microwave oven, rated at 1200 W, for 3 min. The simulated spatial temperature profiles on the top and bottom layer of the mashed potato showed similar hot and cold spots when compared to the thermal images acquired by an infrared camera. Transient temperature profiles at 6 locations collected by fiber-optic sensors showed good agreement with predicted results, with the root mean square error ranging from 1.6 to 11.7 °C. The predicted total moisture loss matched well with the observed result. Several input parameters, such as the evaporation rate constant, the intrinsic permeability of water and gas, and the diffusion coefficient of water and gas, are not readily available for mashed potato, and they cannot be easily measured experimentally. Reported values for raw potato were used as baseline values. A sensitivity analysis of these input parameters on the temperature profiles and the total moisture loss was evaluated by changing the baseline values to their 10% and 1000%. The sensitivity analysis showed that the gas diffusion coefficient, intrinsic water permeability, and the evaporation rate constant greatly influenced the predicted temperature and total moisture loss, while the intrinsic gas permeability and the water diffusion coefficient had little influence. This model can be used by the food product developers to understand microwave heating of food products spatially and temporally. This tool will allow food product developers to design food package systems that would heat more uniformly in various microwave ovens. The sensitivity analysis of this study will help us determine the most significant parameters that need to be measured accurately for reliable

  10. Mass transport of low density lipoprotein in reconstructed hemodynamic environments of human carotid arteries: the role of volume and solute flux through the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Giddens, Don P

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the arterial intima is a critical step in the initiation and progression of atheromatous lesions. In this study we examine subject-specific LDL transport into the intima of carotid bifurcations in three human subjects using a three-pore model for LDL mass transfer. Subject-specific carotid artery computational models were derived using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain the geometry and phase-contract MRI (PC-MRI) to acquire pulsatile inflow and outflow boundary conditions for each subject. The subjects were selected to represent a wide range of anatomical configurations and different stages of atherosclerotic development from mild to moderate intimal thickening. A fluid-solid interaction (FSI) model was implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach in order to consider the effects of a compliant vessel on wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS-dependent response of the endothelium to LDL mass transfer was modeled by multiple pathways to include the contributions of leaky junctions, normal junctions, and transcytosis to LDL solute and plasma volume flux from the lumen into the intima. Time averaged WSS (TAWSS) over the cardiac cycle was computed to represent the spatial WSS distribution, and wall thickness (WTH) was determined from black blood MRI (BBMRI) so as to visualize intimal thickening patterns in the bifurcations. The regions which are exposed to low TAWSS correspond to elevated WTH and higher mass and volume flux via the leaky junctions. In all subjects, the maximum LDL solute flux was observed to be immediately downstream of the stenosis, supporting observations that existing atherosclerotic lesions tend to progress in the downstream direction of the stenosis.

  11. Significant variations of trace gas composition and aerosol properties at Mt. Cimone during air mass transport from North Africa – contributions from wildfire emissions and mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cristofanelli

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available High levels of trace gas (O3 and CO and aerosol (BC, fine and coarse particles concentrations, as well as high scattering coefficient (σs values, were recorded at the regional GAW-WMO station of Mt. Cimone (MTC, 2165 m a.s.l., Italy during the period 26–30 August 2007. Analysis of air-mass circulation, aerosol chemical characterization and trace gas and aerosol emission ratios (ERs, showed that high O3 and aerosol levels were likely linked to (i the transport of anthropogenic pollution from Northern Italy, and (ii the advection of air masses rich in mineral dust and biomass burning (BB products from North Africa. In particular, during the advection of air masses from North Africa, the CO and aerosol levels (CO: 175 ppbv, BC: 1015 ng/m3, fine particle: 83.8 cm−3, σs: 84.5 Mm−1 were even higher than during the pollution event (CO: 138 ppbv, BC: 733 ng/m3, fine particles: 41.5 cm−3, σs: 44.9 Mm−1. Moreover, despite the presence of mineral dust able to significantly affect the O3 concentration, the analysis of ERs showed that the BB event represented an efficient source of fine aerosol particles (e.g. BC, but also of the O3 recorded at MTC. The results suggest that events of mineral dust mobilization and wildfire emissions over North Africa could significantly influence radiative properties (as deduced from σs observations at MTC and air quality over the Mediterranean basin and Northern Italy. Since in the future it is expected that wildfire and Saharan dust transport frequency could increase in the Mediterranean basin due to more frequent and severe droughts, similar events will possibly play an important role in influencing the climate and the tropospheric composition over South Europe.

  12. Externally Verifiable Oblivious RAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gancher Joshua

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the idea of externally verifiable oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our goal is to allow a client and server carrying out an ORAM protocol to have disputes adjudicated by a third party, allowing for the enforcement of penalties against an unreliable or malicious server. We give a security definition that guarantees protection not only against a malicious server but also against a client making false accusations. We then give modifications of the Path ORAM [15] and Ring ORAM [9] protocols that meet this security definition. These protocols both have the same asymptotic runtimes as the semi-honest original versions and require the external verifier to be involved only when the client or server deviates from the protocol. Finally, we implement externally verified ORAM, along with an automated cryptocurrency contract to use as the external verifier.

  13. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Why is ... Radiation Oncology) Breast Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Images related to External Beam Therapy (EBT) Sponsored ...

  14. MALIGNANT EXTERNAL OTITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Massoud Moghaddam

    1993-01-01

    Two case reports of malignant external otitis in the elderly diabetics and their complications and management with regard to our experience at Amir Alam Hospital, Department of ENT will be discussed here.

  15. Checklists for external validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Kidholm, Kristian; Gerke, Oke;

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The quality of the current literature on external validity varies considerably. An improved checklist with validated items on external validity would aid decision-makers in judging similarities among circumstances when transferring evidence from a study setting...... to an implementation setting. In this paper, currently available checklists on external validity are identified, assessed and used as a basis for proposing a new improved instrument. METHOD: A systematic literature review was carried out in Pubmed, Embase and Cinahl on English-language papers without time restrictions....... The retrieved checklist items were assessed for (i) the methodology used in primary literature, justifying inclusion of each item; and (ii) the number of times each item appeared in checklists. RESULTS: Fifteen papers were identified, presenting a total of 21 checklists for external validity, yielding a total...

  16. The "RTR" medical response system for nuclear and radiological mass-casualty incidents: a functional TRiage-TReatment-TRansport medical response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdina, Chad M; Coleman, C Norman; Bogucki, Sandy; Bader, Judith L; Hayhurst, Robert E; Forsha, Joseph D; Marcozzi, David; Yeskey, Kevin; Knebel, Ann R

    2009-01-01

    Developing a mass-casualty medical response to the detonation of an improvised nuclear device (IND) or large radiological dispersal device (RDD) requires unique advanced planning due to the potential magnitude of the event, lack of warning, and radiation hazards. In order for medical care and resources to be collocated and matched to the requirements, a [US] Federal interagency medical response-planning group has developed a conceptual approach for responding to such nuclear and radiological incidents. The "RTR" system (comprising Radiation-specific TRiage, TReatment, TRansport sites) is designed to support medical care following a nuclear incident. Its purpose is to characterize, organize, and efficiently deploy appropriate materiel and personnel assets as close as physically possible to various categories of victims while preserving the safety of responders. The RTR system is not a medical triage system for individual patients. After an incident is characterized and safe perimeters are established, RTR sites should be determined in real-time that are based on the extent of destruction, environmental factors, residual radiation, available infrastructure, and transportation routes. Such RTR sites are divided into three types depending on their physical/situational relationship to the incident. The RTR1 sites are near the epicenter with residual radiation and include victims with blast injuries and other major traumatic injuries including radiation exposure; RTR2 sites are situated in relationship to the plume with varying amounts of residual radiation present, with most victims being ambulatory; and RTR3 sites are collection and transport sites with minimal or no radiation present or exposure risk and a victim population with a potential variety of injuries or radiation exposures. Medical Care sites are predetermined sites at which definitive medical care is given to those in immediate need of care. They include local/regional hospitals, medical centers, other

  17. Migration with fiscal externalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercowitz, Z; Pines, D

    1991-11-01

    "This paper analyses the distribution of a country's population among regions when migration involves fiscal externalities. The main question addressed is whether a decentralized decision making [by] regional governments can produce an optimal population distribution...or a centralized intervention is indispensable, as argued before in the literature.... It turns out that, while with costless mobility the fiscal externality is fully internalized by voluntary interregional transfers, with costly mobility, centrally coordinated transfers still remain indispensable for achieving the socially optimal allocation."

  18. Sen cycles and externalities

    OpenAIRE

    Piggins, Ashley; Salerno, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    It has long been understood that externalities of some kind are responsible for Sen’s (1970) theorem on the impossibility of a Paretian liberal. However, Saari and Petron (2006) show that for any social preference cycle generated by combining the weak Pareto principle and individual decisiveness, every decisive individual must suffer at least one strong negative externality. We show that this fundamental result only holds when individual preferences are strict. Building on their contribution,...

  19. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe...

  20. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control...

  1. The non-Newtonian heat and mass transport of He 2 in porous media used for vapor-liquid phase separation. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S. W. K.

    1985-01-01

    This investigation of vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) of He 2 is related to long-term storage of cryogenic liquid. The VLPS system utilizes porous plugs in order to generate thermomechanical (thermo-osmotic) force which in turn prevents liquid from flowing out of the cryo-vessel (e.g., Infrared Astronomical Satellite). An apparatus was built and VLPS data were collected for a 2 and a 10 micrometer sintered stainless steel plug and a 5 to 15 micrometer sintered bronze plug. The VLPS data obtained at high temperature were in the nonlinear turbulent regime. At low temperature, the Stokes regime was approached. A turbulent flow model was developed, which provides a phenomenological description of the VLPS data. According to the model, most of the phase separation data are in the turbulent regime. The model is based on concepts of the Gorter-Mellink transport involving the mutual friction known from the zero net mass flow (ZNMF) studies. The latter had to be modified to obtain agreement with the present experimental VLPS evidence. In contrast to the well-known ZNMF mode, the VLPS results require a geometry dependent constant (Gorter-Mellink constant). A theoretical interpretation of the phenomenological equation for the VLPS data obtained, is based on modelling of the dynamics of quantized vortices proposed by Vinen. In extending Vinen's model to the VLPS transport of He 2 in porous media, a correlation between the K*(GM) and K(p) was obtained which permits an interpretation of the present findings. As K(p) is crucial, various methods were introduced to measure the permeability of the porous media at low temperatures. Good agreement was found between the room temperature and the low temperature K(p)-value of the plugs.

  2. Diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of inborn errors of creatine metabolism and transport using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in urine, plasma and CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Dorothea; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Anninos, Alexandros; Haege, Gisela; Burgard, Peter; Schulze, Andreas; Hoffmann, Georg F; Okun, Jürgen G

    2014-03-15

    Biochemical detection of inborn errors of creatine metabolism or transport relies on the analysis of three main metabolites in biological fluids: guanidinoacetate (GAA), creatine (CT) and creatinine (CTN). Unspecific clinical presentation of the diseases might be the cause that only few patients have been diagnosed so far. We describe a LC-MS/MS method allowing fast and reliable diagnosis by simultaneous quantification of GAA, CT and CTN in urine, plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and established reference values for each material. For quantification deuterated stable isotopes of each analyte were used as internal standards. GAA, CT and CTN were separated by reversed-phase HPLC. The characterization was carried out by scanning the ions of each compound by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Butylation is needed to achieve sufficient signal intensity for GAA and CT but it is not useful for analyzing CTN. The assay is linear in a broad range of analyte concentrations usually found in urine, plasma and CSF. Comparison of the "traditional" cation-exchange chromatography and LC-MS/MS showed proportional differences but linear relationships between the two methods. The described method is characterized by high speed and linearity over large concentration ranges comparable to other published LC-MS methods but with higher sensitivity for GAA and CT. In addition, we present the largest reference group ever published for guanidino compounds in all relevant body fluids. Therefore this method is applicable for high-throughput approaches for diagnosis and follow-up of inborn errors of creatine metabolism and transport.

  3. Environmental external effects from wind power based on the EU ExternE methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Liselotte Schleisner; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    1998-01-01

    The European Commission has launched a major study project, ExternE, to develop a methodology to quantify externalities. A “National Implementation Phase”, was started under the Joule II programme with the purpose of implementing the ExternE methodology in all member states. The main objective...

  4. Development of an aerosol chemical transport model RAQM2 and predictions of Northeast Asian aerosol mass, size, chemistry, and mixing type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kajino

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new aerosol chemical transport model, Regional Air Quality Model 2 (RAQM2, was developed to simulate Asian air quality. We implemented a simple version of a modal-moment aerosol dynamics model (MADMS and achieved a completely dynamic (non-equilibrium solution of a gas-to-particle mass transfer over a wide range of aerosol diameters from 1 nm to super μm. To consider a variety of atmospheric aerosol properties, a category approach was utilized, in which the aerosols were distributed into 4 categories: Aitken mode (ATK, soot-free accumulation mode (ACM, soot aggregates (AGR, and coarse mode (COR. Condensation, evaporation, and Brownian coagulations for each category were solved dynamically. A regional-scale simulation (Δ x = 60 km was performed for the entire year of 2006 covering the Northeast Asian region. Statistical analyses showed that the model reproduced the regional-scale transport and transformation of the major inorganic anthropogenic and natural air constituents within factors of 2 to 5. The modeled PM1/bulk ratios of the chemical components were consistent with the observations, indicating that the simulations of aerosol mixing types were successful. Non-sea salt SO42- mixed with ATK + ACM was the largest at Hedo in summer, whereas it mixed with AGR was substantial in cold seasons. Ninety-eight percent of the modeled NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Hedo, whereas 53.7% of the NO3- was mixed with sea salt at Gosan, located upwind toward the Asian continent. The condensation of HNO3 onto sea salt particles during transport over the ocean makes the difference in the NO3- mixing type at the two sites. Because the aerosol mixing type alters optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei activity, its accurate prediction and evaluation are indispensable for aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction studies.

  5. Library screening by means of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays-exemplarily demonstrated for a pseudostatic library addressing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Miriam; Wanner, Klaus T

    2012-09-01

    In the present study, the application of mass spectrometry (MS) binding assays as a tool for library screening is reported. For library generation, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) was used. These libraries can be screened by means of MS binding assays when appropriate measures are taken to render the libraries pseudostatic. That way, the efficiency of MS binding assays to determine ligand binding in compound screening with the ease of library generation by DCC is combined. The feasibility of this approach is shown for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter 1 (GAT1) as a target, representing the most important subtype of the GABA transporters. For the screening, hydrazone libraries were employed that were generated in the presence of the target by reacting various sets of aldehydes with a hydrazine derivative that is delineated from piperidine-3-carboxylic acid (nipecotic acid), a common fragment of known GAT1 inhibitors. To ensure that the library generated is pseudostatic, a large excess of the nipecotic acid derivative is employed. As the library is generated in a buffer system suitable for binding and the target is already present, the mixtures can be directly analyzed by MS binding assays-the process of library generation and screening thus becoming simple to perform. The binding affinities of the hits identified by deconvolution were confirmed in conventional competitive MS binding assays performed with single compounds obtained by separate synthesis. In this way, two nipecotic acid derivatives exhibiting a biaryl moiety, 1-{2-[2'-(1,1'-biphenyl-2-ylmethylidene)hydrazine]ethyl}piperidine-3-carboxylic acid and 1-(2-{2'-[1-(2-thiophenylphenyl)methylidene]hydrazine}ethyl)piperidine-3-carboxylic acid, were found to be potent GAT1 ligands exhibiting pK(i) values of 6.186 ± 0.028 and 6.229 ± 0.039, respectively. This method enables screening of libraries, whether generated by conventional chemistry or DCC, and is applicable to all kinds of targets including

  6. Externality or sustainability economics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M. van den [ICREA, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Economics and Economic History and Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    In an effort to develop 'sustainability economics' Baumgaertner and Quaas (2010) neglect the central concept of environmental economics-'environmental externality'. This note proposes a possible connection between the concepts of environmental externality and sustainability. In addition, attention is asked for other aspects of 'sustainability economics', namely the distinction weak/strong sustainability, spatial sustainability and sustainable trade, distinctive sustainability policy, and the ideas of early 'sustainability economists'. I argue that both sustainability and externalities reflect a systems perspective and propose that effective sustainability solutions require that more attention is given to system feedbacks, notably other-regarding preferences and social interactions, and energy and environmental rebound. The case of climate change and policy is used to illustrate particular statements. As a conclusion, a list of 20 insights and suggestions for research is offered. (author)

  7. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  8. [Robbers on board: exposure to violence, insecurity, and other health hazards among mass transportation workers and passengers in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes-Machado, Eduardo; Levenstein, Charles

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of violent crime on working conditions, health, and security for bus drivers and ticket takers in the mass transportation system in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The research included 195 interviews with workers, labor union officials, passengers, management, and police. In the last ten years there have been 20,572 robberies in a fleet of 2,400 buses operated by 10,151 workers, with 67 deaths and more than US$500,000 in company losses. Perpetrators are typically poor, unemployed youths, the majority of whom first offenders, seeking easy money primarily for leisure pursuits. The average "take" from such robberies is minimal. The authors observed a pattern of bus robberies as a psychological power game which, for bus workers, apart from physical injuries and fatalities, generates fear, identity conflicts, tense relations with passengers, and labor conflicts involving the recovery of stolen fares and worker and passenger security issues. The article also outlines and evaluates the efficiency of security measures including the use of lethal force by police.

  9. Case study of quasi-steady reconnection in Saturn's magnetotail, and update on our current understanding of mass transport and loss in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Sergis, N.; Arridge, C. S.; Felici, M.; Badman, S. V.; Paranicas, C.; Jia, X.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Andriopoulou, M.; Khurana, K. K.; Smith, A. W.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a case study of an event from August20th (day 232) of 2006, as viewed by magnetic field, plasma, energetic particle and plasma wave sensors (MAG/CAPS/MIMI/RPWS) when the Cassini spacecraft was sampling the region near 32 Rs and 22 hours LT in Saturn's magnetotail. Cassini observed a strong northward-to-southward turning of the magnetic field, which is interpreted as the signature of dipolarization of the field as seen by the spacecraft planetward of the reconnection x-line. This event was accompanied by very rapid (up to ~1500 km s-1) thermal plasma flow toward the planet. At energies above 28 keV, energetic hydrogen and oxygen ion flow bursts were observed to stream planetward from a reconnection site downtail of the spacecraft. Meanwhile a strong field-aligned beam of energetic hydrogen was also observed to stream tailward, likely from an ionospheric source. Saturn Kilometric Radiation emissions were stimulated shortly after the observation of the dipolarization. We discuss the field, plasma, energetic particle and radio observations in the context of the impact this reconnection event had on global magnetospheric dynamics.We also discuss this event in terms of other recent studies of reconnection in Saturn's tail and update on the emerging picture concerning our understanding of how mass is transported and lost within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  10. Mass transport in a PEMFC fuel battery using combinations of monopolar plates and reaction-diffusion medium; Transporte de masa en una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC utilizando combinaciones de platos monopolares y medios de difusion de reactivos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas Paleta, M. G. Araceli [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Bautista Rodriguez, C. Moises [Alter-Energias Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)] email: celso.bautista@thyssenkrupp.com; Rivera Marquez, J. Antonio; Tepale Ochoa, Nancy [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The efficiency of a PEMFC fuel battery is limited due to a variety of mass transport-related phenomena that take place while it is operating. The electromotive force of the PEM fuel battery is related to the generation of concentration gradients resulting from the distribution of the reactants on the active sites of the electrode. The reactant gases supplied to the PEMFC are distributed over the diffusion layer of the electrodes through the channels of the polar plates. They then spread toward the active layer where the semi-reactions take place. Another important aspect is the presence of water molecules, a product of the reaction. When they accumulate, they cover the porosity of the electrodes, involving the reduction in the flow of reactants, even at high current density values and, combined with the diffusion phenomena involved, cause the PEMFC to complete cease functioning. The critical parameters for the transport phenomena are porosity, the diameter of the pore in the diffusion layer and the characteristics of the distribution of the reactants. The present works includes an experimental design of two distribution media and two diffusion media of the reactant gases in a PEMFC, involving three case studies. The results show significantly notable interactions between the diameter of the pore, the type of diffusion layer applied and the type of distributor applied. The combination in the second case significantly reduces the ohmic resistance and moderately reduces the diffusion resistances. While the combination in case three notably increases the ohmic resistance, diffusion resistance is significantly reduced. [Spanish] La eficiencia de una pila a combustible tipo PEMFC es limitada por diversos fenomenos de transporte de masa presentes durante su funcionamiento. La fuerza electromotriz de la pila a combustible tipo PEM esta relacionada con la generacion de gradientes de concentracion los cuales se dan como resultado de la distribucion de los reactivos sobre los

  11. Stochastic Control - External Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    This note is devoted to control of stochastic systems described in discrete time. We are concerned with external descriptions or transfer function model, where we have a dynamic model for the input output relation only (i.e.. no direct internal information). The methods are based on LTI systems...

  12. Productivity Change and Externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravtsova, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    firms and the economy as a whole. The approach used in the current research accounts for different internal as well as external factors that individual firms face and evaluates the effect on changes in productivity, technology as well as the efficiency of domestic firms. The empirical analysis focuses...... change in different types of firms and sectors of the economy...

  13. Multiple external root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, W Z; Ghazali, M N

    1989-04-01

    Presented is an unusual case of multiple external root resorption. Although the cause of this resorption was not determined, several possibilities are presented. Trauma from occlusion, periodontal and pulpal inflammation, and resorption of idiopathic origin are all discussed as possible causes.

  14. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle component-based factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Stroud

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007 in Southern Ontario, Canada, were used to evaluate predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA and two other carbonaceous species, black carbon (BC and carbon monoxide (CO, made for this summertime period by Environment Canada's AURAMS regional chemical transport model. Particle component-based factor analysis was applied to aerosol mass spectrometer measurements made at one urban site (Windsor, ON and two rural sites (Harrow and Bear Creek, ON to derive hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA factors. A novel diagnostic model evaluation was performed by investigating model POA bias as a function of HOA mass concentration and indicator ratios (e.g. BC/HOA. Eight case studies were selected based on factor analysis and back trajectories to help classify model bias for certain POA source types. By considering model POA bias in relation to co-located BC and CO biases, a plausible story is developed that explains the model biases for all three species.

    At the rural sites, daytime mean PM1 POA mass concentrations were under-predicted compared to observed HOA concentrations. POA under-predictions were accentuated when the transport arriving at the rural sites was from the Detroit/Windsor urban complex and for short-term periods of biomass burning influence. Interestingly, the daytime CO concentrations were only slightly under-predicted at both rural sites, whereas CO was over-predicted at the urban Windsor site with a normalized mean bias of 134%, while good agreement was observed at Windsor for the comparison of daytime PM1 POA and HOA mean values, 1.1 μg m−3 and 1.2 μg m−3, respectively. Biases in model POA predictions also trended from positive to negative with increasing HOA values. Periods of POA over-prediction were most evident at the urban site on calm nights due to an overly-stable model surface layer

  15. Externally Wetted Ionic Liquid Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, P.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Lopez-Urdiales, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents initial developments of an electric propulsion system based on ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS). Propellants are ionic liquids, which are organic salts with two important characteristics; they remain in the liquid state at room temperature and have negligible vapor pressure, thus allowing their use in vacuum. The working principles of ILIS are similar to those of liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), in which a Taylor cone is electrostatically formed at the tip of an externally wetted needle while ions are emitted directly from its apex. ILIS have the advantage of being able to produce negative ions that have similar masses than their positive counterparts with similar current levels. This opens up the possibility of achieving plume electrical neutrality without electron emitters. The possible multiplexing of these emitters is discussed in terms of achievable thrust density for applications other than micro-propulsion.

  16. Evaluation of chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol for air masses classified by particle-component-based factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Stroud

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the 2007 Border Air Quality and Meteorology Study (BAQS-Met 2007 in southern Ontario (ON, Canada, were used to evaluate Environment Canada's regional chemical transport model predictions of primary organic aerosol (POA. Environment Canada's operation