WorldWideScience

Sample records for external ankle supports

  1. Effect of External Ankle Support on Ankle and Knee Biomechanics During the Cutting Maneuver in Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Nardia-Rose; Wild, Catherine Y; Williams, Sian A; Ng, Leo

    2017-03-01

    basketball population during a cutting task. Compared with the lace-up brace, the hinged brace may be a better choice of prophylactic ankle support for female basketball players from a biomechanical perspective. However, both braces increased knee internal rotation and knee abduction angles, which may be problematic for a population that already has a high prevalence of knee injuries.

  2. Design of a simple, lightweight, passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton supporting ankle joint stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seyoung; Son, Youngsu; Choi, Sangkyu; Ham, Sangyong; Park, Cheolhoon

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a passive-elastic ankle exoskeleton (PEAX) with a one-way clutch mechanism was developed and then pilot-tested with vertical jumping to determine whether the PEAX is sufficiently lightweight and comfortable to be used in further biomechanical studies. The PEAX was designed to supplement the function of the Achilles tendon and ligaments as they passively support the ankle torque with their inherent stiffness. The main frame of the PEAX consists of upper and lower parts connected to each other by tension springs (N = 3) and lubricated hinge joints. The upper part has an offset angle of 5° with respect to the vertical line when the springs are in their resting state. Each spring has a slack length of 8 cm and connects the upper part to the tailrod of the lower part in the neutral position. The tailrod freely rotates with low friction but has a limited range of motion due to the stop pin working as a one-way clutch. Because of the one-way clutch system, the tension springs store the elastic energy only due to an ankle dorsiflexion when triggered by the stop pin. This clutch mechanism also has the advantage of preventing any inconvenience during ankle plantarflexion because it does not limit the ankle joint motion during the plantarflexion phase. In pilot jumping tests, all of the subjects reported that the PEAX was comfortable for jumping due to its lightweight (approximately 1 kg) and compact (firmly integrated with shoes) design, and subjects were able to nearly reach their maximum vertical jump heights while wearing the PEAX. During the countermovement jump, elastic energy was stored during dorsiflexion by spring extension and released during plantarflexion by spring restoration, indicating that the passive spring torque (i.e., supportive torque) generated by the ankle exoskeleton partially supported the ankle joint torque throughout the process.

  3. False negative rate of syndesmotic injury in pronation-external rotation stage IV ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Soon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate false negative rate in the diagnosis of diastasis on initial static anteroposterior radiograph and reliability of intraoperative external rotational stress test for detection of concealed disruption of syndesmosis in pronation external rotation (PER stage IV (Lauge-Hansen ankle fractures. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 34 PER stage IV ankle fractures between September 2001 and September 2008. Twenty (59% patients show syndesmotic injury on initial anteroposterior radiographs. We performed an intraoperative external rotation stress test in other 14 patients with suspicious PER stage IV ankle fractures, which showed no defined syndesmotic injury on anteroposterior radiographs inspite of a medial malleolar fracture, an oblique fibular fracture above the syndesmosis and fracture of the posterior tubercle of the tibia. Results: All 14 fractures showed different degrees of tibiofibular clear space (TFCS and tibiofibular overlapping (TFO on the external rotation stress test radiograph compared to the initial plain anteroposterior radiograph. It is important to understand the fracture pattern characterstic of PER stage IV ankle fractures even though it appears normal on anteroposterior radiographs, it is to be confirmed for the concealed syndesmotic injury through a routine intraoperative external rotational stress radiograph.

  4. Ankle fusion stability: a biomechanical comparison of external versus internal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Justin R; Santrock, Robert D; James, William C

    2011-04-11

    This biomechanical study compares bimalleolar external fixation to conventional crossed-screw construct in terms of stability and compression for ankle arthrodesis. The goals of the study were to determine which construct is more stable with bending and torsional forces, and to determine which construct achieves more compression.Fourth-generation bone composite tibia and talocalcaneal models were made to 50th percentile anatomic specifications. Fourteen ankle fusion constructs were created with bimalleolar external fixators and 14 with crossed-screw constructs. Ultimate bend, torque, and compression testing were completed on the external fixator and crossed-screw constructs using a multidirectional Materials Testing Machine (MTS Systems Corp, Eden Prairie, Minnesota). Ultimate bend testing revealed a statistically significant difference (P=.0022) with the mean peak load to failure for the external fixator constructs of 973.2 N compared to 612.5 N for the crossed-screw constructs. Ultimate torque testing revealed the mean peak torque to failure for the external fixator construct was 80.2 Nm and 28.1 Nm for the crossed-screw construct, also a statistically significant difference (P=.0001). The compression testing yielded no statistically significant difference (P=.9268) between the average failure force of the external fixator construct (81.6 kg) and the crossed-screw construct (81.2 kg).With increased stiffness in both bending and torsion and comparable compressive strengths, bimalleolar external fixation is an excellent option for tibiotalar ankle arthrodesis.

  5. Emergency department external fixation for provisional treatment of pilon and unstable ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R Lareau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable ankle fractures and impacted tibial pilon fractures often benefit from provisional external fixation as a temporizing measure prior to definitive fixation. Benefits of external fixation include improved articular alignment, decreased articular impaction, and soft tissue rest. Uniplanar external fixator placement in the Emergency Department (ED ex-fix is a reliable and safe technique for achieving ankle reduction and stability while awaiting definitive fixation. This procedure involves placing transverse proximal tibial and calcaneal traction pins and connecting the pins with two external fixator rods. This technique is particularly useful in austere environments or when the operating room is not immediately available. Additionally, this bedside intervention prevents the patient from requiring general anesthesia and may be a cost-effective strategy for decreasing valuable operating time. The ED ex-fix is an especially valuable procedure in busy trauma centers and during mass casualty events, in which resources may be limited.

  6. Gravity versus manual external rotation stress view in evaluating ankle stability: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBa, Thu-Ba; Gugala, Zbigniew; Morris, Randal P; Panchbhavi, Vinod K

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine whether gravity versus manual external rotation stress testing effectively detects widening of the medial clear space in isolated ankle fractures when compared with the uninjured contralateral side. Manual external rotation stress and gravity stress tests were performed on injured and uninjured ankles of ankle fracture patients in a clinic setting. Medial clear space measurements were recorded and differences between gravity and manual stress views were determined. Twenty consecutive patients with ankle injury were enrolled in the study. When compared with the uninjured side, gravity stress views showed a statistically significant (P = .017) increase in medial clear space widening (1.85 ± 1.07 mm) compared with manual stress view widening (1.35 ± 1.04 mm). This study suggests that gravity stress views are as effective as manual external rotation stress views in detecting medial clear space widening in isolated fibular fractures. Diagnostic, Level II: Prospective, comparative trial. © 2014 The Author(s).

  7. Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cusimano

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs. A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM. The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36, as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37. Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

  8. Treatment of a Fracture-dislocation of the Ankle Using RALCA® External Fixator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffin Rodriguez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The association of ankle fractures with a dislocation modifies their therapeutic management since the joint must not remain in such abnormal position for more than six hours and therefore, urgent surgical treatment is needed. The case of a 30-year-old woman treated at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. The patient presented with a severe fracture-dislocation of the right ankle with a supra-syndesmotic fibular fracture, a syndesmotic injury, a deltoid ligament injury and a tibial plafond fracture resulting from a bicycle fall. The fracture-dislocation was stabilized by using a RALCA® external mini-fixator. Full recovery was achieved five months after surgery. In our service, we may not have the devices most commonly used for fixation of ankle injuries at a given moment; therefore, external fixation becomes a viable option to correct this type of fractures. For this reason, we decided to present this case that demonstrates the effectiveness of the RALCA® external fixator.

  9. Ilizarov External Fixator Versus Retrograde Intramedullary Nailing for Ankle Joint Arthrodesis in Diabetic Charcot Neuroarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElAlfy, Barakat; Ali, Ayman M; Fawzy, Sallam I

    Charcot neuroarthropathy of the ankle joint is a destructive process that leads to instability and significant morbidity that can end with amputation. Surgical arthrodesis in Charcot neuroarthropathy has a high failure rate. The aim of the present prospective study was to compare the outcomes of an Ilizarov external fixator and retrograde intramedullary nailing (IMN) for tibiotalar arthrodesis in Charcot neuroarthropathy. From February 2010 to October 2013, 27 patients (16 males and 11 females) with Charcot neuropathy of the ankle joint were treated in our department. Their ages ranged from 32 to 75 (average 54) years. Of the 27 patients, 14 received an Ilizarov external fixator and 13 underwent IMN. A preoperative clinical and radiologic assessment of all patients was performed. The outcomes were measured for bone union, development of complications, and clinical follow-up. The mean score of modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle hindfoot scale was 80 ± 2.7 points in the Ilizarov group and 75 ± 1.9 points in the IMN group. In the Ilizarov group, 12 of 14 patients achieved union, and in the IMN group, 10 of 13 patients achieved union. The complication rate was significantly greater in the external fixator group than in the IMN group. The complications in the Ilizarov group included nonunion in 2 patients (14%), pin tract infection in 8 (57%), pin tract loosening in 3 (21%), surgical wound infection in 3 (21%), and wound breakdown in 1 patient (7%). In the IMN group, nonunion occurred in 3 patients (23.1%), back-out of a distal locking bolt in 2 (15.4 %), and a superficial wound infection that resolved with antibiotics in 1 patient (7.7%). In conclusion, retrograde IMN and the Ilizarov external fixator both yielded better union for tibiotalar arthrodesis in Charcot neuroarthropathy. The Ilizarov external fixator resulted in a greater union rate than IMN but the complications with external fixation were significantly greater than those

  10. Supination external rotation ankle fractures A simpler pattern with better outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C Tejwani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotational injuries are the most common and usually classified as per the Lauge Hansen classification; with the most common subgroup being the supination external rotation (SER mechanism. Isolated fractures of the distal fibula (SE2 without associated ligamentous injury are usually treated with a splint or brace and the patient may be allowed to weight bear as tolerated. This study reports the functional outcomes following a stable, low energy, rotational ankle fracture supination external rotation (SER2 when compared to unstable SER4 fractures treated operatively. Materials and Methods: 64 patients who were diagnosed and treated nonoperatively for a stable SER2 ankle fracture were followed prospectively. In the comparison group, 93 operatively treated fibular fractures were extracted from a prospectively collected database and evaluated comparison. Baseline characteristics obtained by trained interviewers at the time of injury included: Patient demographics, short form-36, short musculoskeletal functional assessment (SMFA and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS questionnaires. Patients were followed at 3, 6 and 12 months postsurgery. Additional information obtained at each followup point included any complications or evidence on fracture healing. Data were analyzed by the Student′s t-test and theFisher′s Exact Test to compare demographic and functional outcomes between the two cohorts. P < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: The average of patients′ age in the stable fracture cohort was 43 versus 45 in the SER4 group. Nearly 64% of the patient population was female when compared with 37% in the operative group. In the SER2 by 6 months all patients had returned to baseline functional status. There were 18 delayed unions (all healed by 6 months. Based on the functional outcome scores all patients had returned to preoperative level. In comparison, SE4 patients had less functional recovery at 3 and 6

  11. Arthrodesis with external fixation in the unstable or misaligned Charcot ankle in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrin, Jesper; Larsen, Kirsten; Holstein, Per E

    2007-06-01

    The unstable or misaligned Charcot ankle with or without chronic foot ulceration is a major clinical challenge. When it cannot be accommodated with an ankle foot orthosis, surgical treatment is indicated in order to avoid leg amputation. This requires extensive soft tissue release and bony resection to realign the foot and arthrodesis with internal or external fixation. The guidance in the literature favors internal fixation. This article reports results with external fixation in 11 patients (12 feet) over a period of 12 years. External fixation was chosen as the surgical option because of the presence of foot ulcers with the attendent risk of infection. There were 7 tibio-talar and 5 tibio-calcaneal fusions. Compression was applied for 6 weeks with an external frame according to Charnley, followed by 6 weeks with total-contact cast. Weight bearing with a rigid leather brace was allowed after 12 weeks. In one case, transtibial amputation was required due to loosening of the distal pins from osteopenic disintegrating bone. In 11 cases (92%), the foot was successfully realigned and independent walking with a brace retained during the follow-up of median 48 months (10-102 months). Bony union took place in 5 out of 7 cases with tibio-talar fusion and in 1 out of 5 with tibio-calcaneal fusion. The functional result in cases with fibrous union was, however, satisfactory. Although meaningful comparisons of series are difficult to conduct and interpret from, the limb salvage rate was similar to results with internal fixation. The authors consider the results to be encouraging and to be used to develop a higher level of evidence.

  12. Evaluation of the integrity of the deltoid ligament in supination external rotation ankle fractures: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Mutsaerts, Eduard L A R; van Dijk, C Niek

    2009-02-01

    Review the literature concerning modalities to evaluate the integrity of the deltoid ligament in patients with supination external rotation ankle fractures. The electronic databases Pubmed/Medline, CINAHL and Embase were searched from 1987 to November 2007 to identify all published original studies concerning diagnostic modalities to evaluate the integrity of the deltoid ligament in adult ankle fractures. This review included nine studies involving 423 ankle fractures. Three trails investigated medial tenderness; two studies, ecchymosis; two studies, swelling; one study, an injury radiograph; six studies, a type of radiographic stress view; one study, the Lauge-Hansen classification; one study, MRI; and one article studied arthroscopy in the evaluation of the deltoid ligament integrity. Swelling, ecchymosis, medial tenderness, initial injury radiographs and the Lauge-Hansen classification are less adequate predictors of the integrity of the deltoid ligament. Manual or the less painful variant, the gravity external rotation stress radiographs are considered the gold standard. The amount of medial clear space widening indicative of a positive external rotation stress test has been somewhat variable in the literature but > or =5 mm is generally regarded as most reliable. Achieving adequate external rotation of the foot when obtaining stress radiographs is more important than positioning the ankle in the appropriate degree of ankle flexion. The amount of applied force necessary when performing an external rotation stress radiograph is not well defined and mainly determined by the patient's pain level. The indication for surgery should not be based on the absolute value of one parameter but on the combination of several parameters. If nonoperative treatment is chosen despite a positive stress radiograph, close follow-up is critical because subluxation of the ankle joint is still possible. MRI could be useful in individual cases.

  13. Evaluation of the integrity of the deltoid ligament in supination external rotation ankle fractures: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M.P.J.; Mutsaerts, E.L.A.R.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Review the literature concerning modalities to evaluate the integrity of the deltoid ligament in patients with supination external rotation ankle fractures. METHODS: The electronic databases Pubmed/Medline, CINAHL and Embase were searched from 1987 to November 2007 to

  14. Evaluation of the integrity of the deltoid ligament in supination external rotation ankle fractures: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, M.P.J.; Mutsaerts, E.L.A.R.; van Dijk, C.N.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Review the literature concerning modalities to evaluate the integrity of the deltoid ligament in patients with supination external rotation ankle fractures. METHODS: The electronic databases Pubmed/Medline, CINAHL and Embase were searched from 1987 to November 2007 to identif

  15. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool in assessing deltoid ligament injury in supination external rotation fractures of the ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henari, Shwan

    2011-10-01

    The medial deltoid ligament is the primary stabilizing structure in the ankle joint following lateral malleolar fracture. However, medial deltoid ligament ruptures are difficult to diagnose using current imaging modalities. We hypothesized that ultrasonography can be used to accurately allow early clinical assessment of ankle fracture stability, thereby negating the need to perform plain film stress views of the acutely injured ankle. This prospective study included 12 patients (age range, 18-72) with supination external rotation fractures requiring operative fixation. Following induction of anesthesia, ultrasonography examination was performed, followed by an arthrogram under fluoroscopic screening. Radiographs, ultrasonography, and arthrographic findings were compared. There was 100% correlation between ultrasonography and arthrogram findings. Ultrasonography accurately diagnosed medial deltoid rupture with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Plain film radiographs of the ankle had a sensitivity of 57.1% and a specificity of 60%. The difference between these was significant (χ(2)=.0091). This study demonstrates diagnostic ultrasonography to be an accurate diagnostic modality in assessing medial deltoid ligament integrity in patients with supination external rotation fractures. It offers the same sensitivity and specificity as arthrography without the need for additional invasive procedures. Its relative ease of use and lack of ionizing radiation make it a potentially useful tool, particularly in a busy trauma service.

  16. Determination of ankle external fixation stiffness by expedited interactive finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jonathan K; Saltzman, Charles L; Brown, Thomas D

    2005-11-01

    Interactive finite element analysis holds the potential to quickly and accurately determine the mechanical stiffness of alternative external fixator frame configurations. Using as an example Ilizarov distraction of the ankle, a finite element model and graphical user interface were developed that provided rapid, construct-specific information on fixation rigidity. After input of specific construct variables, the finite element software determined the resulting tibial displacement for a given configuration in typically 15s. The formulation was employed to investigate constructs used to treat end-stage arthritis, both in a parametric series and for five specific clinical distraction cases. Parametric testing of 15 individual variables revealed that tibial half-pins were much more effective than transfixion wires in limiting axial tibial displacement. Factors most strongly contributing to stiffening the construct included placing the tibia closer to the fixator rings, and mounting the pins to the rings at the nearest circumferential location to the bone. Benchtop mechanical validation results differed inappreciably from the finite element computations.

  17. Combined circular external fixation and open reduction internal fixation with pro-syndesmotic screws for repair of a diabetic ankle fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharia Facaros

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of ankle fractures among the diabetic population is associated with higher complication rates compared to the general population. Efforts toward development of better methods in prevention and treatment are continuously evolving for these injuries. The presence of peripheral neuropathy and the possible development of Charcot neuroarthropathy in this high risk patient population have stimulated much surgical interest to create more stable osseous constructs when open reduction of an ankle fracture/dislocation is required. The utilization of multiple syndesmotic screws (pro-syndesmotic screws to further stabilize the ankle mortise has been reported by many foot and ankle surgeons. In addition, transarticular Steinmann pins have been described as an adjunct to traditional open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF of the ankle to better stabilize the talus, thus minimizing risk of further displacement, malunion, and Charcot neuroarthropathy. The authors present a unique technique of ORIF with pro-syndesmotic screws and the application of a multi-plane circular external fixator for management of a neglected diabetic ankle fracture that prevented further deformity while allowing a weight-bearing status. This technique may be utilized for the management of complex diabetic ankle fractures that are prone to future complications and possible limb loss.

  18. Effect of medial arch-heel support in inserts on reducing ankle eversion: a biomechanics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Patrick SH

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive pronation (or eversion at ankle joint in heel-toe running correlated with lower extremity overuse injuries. Orthotics and inserts are often prescribed to limit the pronation range to tackle the problem. Previous studies revealed that the effect is product-specific. This study investigated the effect of medial arch-heel support in inserts on reducing ankle eversion in standing, walking and running. Methods Thirteen pronators and 13 normal subjects participated in standing, walking and running trials in each of the following conditions: (1 barefoot, and shod condition with insert with (2 no, (3 low, (4 medium, and (5 high medial arch-heel support. Motions were captured and processed by an eight-camera motion capture system. Maximum ankle eversion was calculated by incorporating the raw coordinates of 15 anatomical positions to a self-compiled Matlab program with kinematics equations. Analysis of variance with repeated measures with post-hoc Tukey pairwise comparisons was performed on the data among the five walking conditions and the five running conditions separately. Results Results showed that the inserts with medial arch-heel support were effective in dynamics trials but not static trials. In walking, they successfully reduced the maximum eversion by 2.1 degrees in normal subjects and by 2.5–3.0 degrees in pronators. In running, the insert with low medial arch support significantly reduced maximum eversion angle by 3.6 and 3.1 degrees in normal subjects and pronators respectively. Conclusion Medial arch-heel support in inserts is effective in reducing ankle eversion in walking and running, but not in standing. In walking, there is a trend to bring the over-pronated feet of the pronators back to the normal eversion range. In running, it shows an effect to restore normal eversion range in 84% of the pronators.

  19. Osteonecrosis of the distal tibia after a pronation external rotation ankle fracture: literature review and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, S; Lloyd, J; Upadhyay, Vishal; Sangar, A; Taylor, H P

    2011-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteonecrosis of the distal tibia is a rare but recognized complication of Weber C ankle fractures. To our knowledge, we report the first documented case managed with early percutaneous drilling of the defect. The patient noticed an improvement in symptoms, and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed resolution of the avascular area. The previously reported complication of secondary periarticular collapse and subsequent osteoarthritis was avoided. We advocate that a high index of suspicion, early detection, and drilling can encourage neovascularisation and prevent secondary joint destruction.

  20. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  1. [Long-term results of active-passive ligament repair of the external lateral ligament of the ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farizon, F; Paris, D; Azoulai, J J; Bousquet, G

    1996-03-01

    We reviewed 95 ankles at an average of 9 years after an "activo-passive" operation performed for chronic lateral instability. All the patients had suffered recurrent ankle sprain or instability, with pain in 67 patients. Ten ankles showed a subtalar injury at operation. Degenerative changes were noted in 11 ankle joints. On review, 81 ankles (85%) were stable. The 14 cases with persistent instability had developed the problem one to five years after operation. Two cases presented with limitation in mobility. Osteoarthritis, found in 15 ankles, was severe in only two, and had been present on preoperative films. We found no correlation between functional results (talar tilt, anterior-drawer test) and radiological evaluation. The "activo-passive" operation provides long-term stabilization with preservation of the ankle and of subtalar mobility without severe osteoarthritis.

  2. Ankle Cheilectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your primary doctor. Treatments of the Ankle Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Achilles Tendon Rupture Surgery Ankle Arthrodesis Ankle ... for Osteochondral Lesions of the Talus Insertional Achilles Tendinosis Surgery Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction Lateral Ankle Stabilization ...

  3. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  4. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Niu, Tienan Feng, Lejun Wang, Chenghua Jiang, Ming Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2 and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2 during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1 the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2 the subject number and trial number were known; 3 the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4 the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5 the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6 the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject’s body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05 and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71 and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65 with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane.

  5. Observation on the Therapeutic Effect of External Application of Detumescence Ointment on Early Local Swollen Ankle Sprains%观察消肿膏外敷对早期踝关节扭伤局部肿胀的疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史志良

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the therapeutic effect of external application of swelling paste on early ankle swelling.Methods A total of 80 patients with local swelling of ankle joint were treated in our hospital,and the patients were randomly divided into groups. Control group of 40 patients with ice treatment. Observation group (40 cases) to detumescence ointment in the treatment of and U type resin bandage for external fixation support,compared two groups of patients with clinical curative effect.ResultsThe total effective rate of the observation group and the control group were 95% and 75%,there were significant differences between the two groups(P<0.05). Conclusion The external application of swelling cream has a better effect on early ankle sprain swelling,ice treatment is better than the traditional treatment.%目的:观察消肿膏外敷对早期踝关节扭伤局部肿胀的治疗效果。方法选取我院收治的早期踝关节扭伤局部肿胀患者共80例,随机分组处理。对照组40例进行冰敷治疗;观察组40例以消肿膏外敷治疗,且以U型树脂绷带进行托外固定,比较两组患者的临床疗效。结果观察组与对照组患者的治疗总有效率分别为95%及75%,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论消肿膏外敷对早期踝关节扭伤局部肿胀具有较好的效果,优于传统的冰敷治疗。

  6. Comparative analysis of uniplanar external fixator and retrograde intramedullary nailing for ankle arthrodesis in diabetic Charcot′s neuroarthropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakul S Shah

    2011-01-01

    Results: All five (100% patients treated by intramedullary nailing achieved radiological union on an average follow-up of 16 weeks. The external fixation group had significantly higher rate of complications with one amputation, four non unions (66.7% and a delayed union which went on to full osseous union. Conclusion: The retrograde intramedullary nailing for tibio-talar arthrodesis in Charcot′s neuroarthropathy yielded significantly better outcomes as compared to the use of uniplanar external fixator.

  7. 骨外固定支架技术在踝关节融合与矫形中的应用%Application of external fixation in ankle joint arthrodesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢鸣; 黄若昆; 方真华; 赵晶晶; 李静; 肖凯; 勘武生

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨骨外固定支架技术在踝关节融合与矫形中的疗效.方法 2001年1月至2009年6月采用外固定支架技术治疗27例踝关节创伤性患者,男18例,女9例;年龄32~68岁,平均41岁.其中创伤性关节炎13例,地方性大骨节病3例,骨关节炎5例,结核性踝关节炎2例,踝关节置换术后失败3例,骨髓炎1例.为保证骨对骨加压接触行外固定支架固定.结果 所有患者术后获6~38个月(平均10个月)随访.随访发现关节无肿胀和疼痛,行走步态和功能明显改善,X线片示关节均获骨性融合.结论 外固定支架技术用于踝关节融合率高,对踝关节感染及复合足踝关节畸形有一定优势性.%Objective To study the curative effect of external fixation in ankle joint arthrodesis.Methods From January 2001 to June 2009, we used external fixation in arthrodesis for 27 cases of traumatic ankle joint They were 18 males and 9 females, with an average age of 41 years (range, 32 to 68 years) . There were 13 cases of traumatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, 3 cases of local kaschin beck disease, 5 cases of ankle osteoarthritis, 2 cases of tuberculous ankle arthritis, 3 cases of ankle replacement failure, one case of osteomyelitis. Fibular flap grafts were used in 8 cases, bone autografts in 11 cases, bone allografts in 2 cases,and combined bone grafts in 11 cases. External fixation was applied for all cases to ensure compressive contact between bone ends. Results The patients were followed up for 6 to 38 months (average, 10 months). No pain or swelling was found at the ankle joint. Significant improvements were made in walking gait and function of the ankle. X-ray films verified bony fusion in all cases. Conclusion External fixation can lead to a high rate of bony fusion of the ankle joint, and is advantageous for treatment of ankle infection and combined deformity of the ankle and foot.

  8. Evaluating Postural Control and Ankle Laxity between Taping and High-Top Cleats in Interscholastic Football Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizac, Douglas Arthur; Swanik, Charles Buz; Glutting, Joseph; Kaminski, Thomas

    2016-12-19

    Lateral ankle sprains are the most common injuries in high school sports. While ankle taping is a preferred method of external prophylactic support, its restrictive properties decline during exercise. The Under Armour® Highlight cleat is marketed on the premise that itprovides added support without the need for additional ankle taping. To determine if differences in ankle joint laxity and postural control exist between football players wearing the Under Armour® Highlight cleat (Baltimore, MD) as compared to a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape. Crossover trial. Athletic training room and football practice field sideline. Thirty-two interscholastic football players (15.8±1.0 yrs.; 178.9±7.4 cm; 87.1±21.4 kg). Ankle laxity was assessed using an instrumented ankle arthrometer (Blue Bay Research Inc., Milton, FL), while postural control testing was performed on the Tekscan MobileMat™ Balanced Error Scoring System (BESS) (South Boston, MA). The two treatments included Under Armour® Highlight cleats and a low/mid-top cleat with ankle tape applied to the non-dominant ankle only. Measurements were taken before and immediately after practice. The independent variable was treatment (Highlight vs low/mid with ankle tape). Dependent variables included ankle arthrometry measures of anterior displacement (mm), inversion/eversion rotation (deg); and the modified BESS error scores. A linear mixed-effects model was used for analysis. The mid/low-cut cleat with tape condition had significantly higher inversion range-of-motion (ROM) and inversion/eversion rotation post-exercise when compared to the Highlight cleat (pUnder Armour® Highlight cleat restricts ankle ROM following a training session better than the taped low/mid-top cleat. Further study is warranted to determine if this high-top style of football cleat can reduce the incidence of ankle sprains and how it might compare to spat taping.

  9. Ankle pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which cushions joints) Infection in the ankle joint Osteoarthritis , gout , rheumatoid arthritis , Reiter syndrome , and other types ... Ma, MD, assistant professor, chief, sports medicine and shoulder service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  10. External Influences on an Internal Process: Supporting Preservice Teacher Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Ann; Klipfel, Lyndsay Halpin

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to better understand how participating in teacher research as a student teacher compares to conducting it as a practicing teacher, a teacher educator and her former teacher education student engaged in a collaborative dialogue. They focus their reflections in this article on the impact of external forces on the process of teacher…

  11. Supporting an Externally Developed Model of Education in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the adaptation process of an externally developed model of reform in Greenland's educational system. Under investigation was how reform leaders responded to the needs of the community after implementing an educational model developed in the United States by researchers at the Center for Research on Education, Diversity, and…

  12. Chinese Massage Therapy for Ankle Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming-xia; LI Nian-qun; HUANG Guo-qi

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the therapeutic methods and effects in the treatment of acute and chronic injuries of the ankle joint by Chinese massage therapy in combination with external application of Chinese herbal drugs and functional exercises. Methods: Totally, 36 cases of the patients with acute soft tissue injury, chronic soft tissue injury and post-fracture sequelae of the ankle joint were treated by Chinese massage therapy, external application or external wash of Chinese herbal drugs, and exercises of dorsal flexion and extension of the ankle joint, to observe the restoration of the ankle functions.Results: In 36 cases of the patients, the results showed remarkable effect in 18 cases, effect in 16 cases, failure in 2 cases and the effective rate in 94.4%. Conclusion: The combined use of Chinese massage therapy, external application of Chinese herbal drugs and functional exercises can produce precise effect in the treatment of soft tissue injury of the ankle joint.

  13. Drawing to Remember: External Support of Older Adults’ Eyewitness Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Coral J.

    2013-01-01

    Although healthy aging is accompanied by a general decline in memory functioning, environmental support at retrieval can improve older adults’ (+65 years) episodic remembering. Despite those over the age of 65years representing a growing proportion of the population, few environmental retrieval support methods have been empirically evaluated for use with older witnesses and victims of crime. Here, the efficacy of a novel retrieval technique, the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context, is compared with a standard Mental Reinstatement of Context and a no support control (Control). Fifty-one participants witnessed an unexpected live event, and 48 hours later were interviewed using one of three aforementioned techniques. In line with predictions emanating from cognitive theories of aging and the environmental support hypothesis, participants in the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context condition recalled significantly more correct information and fewer inaccurate items. The Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context technique appears to scaffold memory retrieval in an age-appropriate manner during a post-event interview, possibly by encouraging more effortful retrieval and reducing dual-task load. As such, this procedure offers an effective alternative to current approaches, adding to the toolbox of techniques available to forensic and other interviewers. PMID:23922863

  14. Drawing to remember: external support of older adults' eyewitness performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coral J Dando

    Full Text Available Although healthy aging is accompanied by a general decline in memory functioning, environmental support at retrieval can improve older adults' (+65 years episodic remembering. Despite those over the age of 65 years representing a growing proportion of the population, few environmental retrieval support methods have been empirically evaluated for use with older witnesses and victims of crime. Here, the efficacy of a novel retrieval technique, the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context, is compared with a standard Mental Reinstatement of Context and a no support control (Control. Fifty-one participants witnessed an unexpected live event, and 48 hours later were interviewed using one of three aforementioned techniques. In line with predictions emanating from cognitive theories of aging and the environmental support hypothesis, participants in the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context condition recalled significantly more correct information and fewer inaccurate items. The Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context technique appears to scaffold memory retrieval in an age-appropriate manner during a post-event interview, possibly by encouraging more effortful retrieval and reducing dual-task load. As such, this procedure offers an effective alternative to current approaches, adding to the toolbox of techniques available to forensic and other interviewers.

  15. Drawing to remember: external support of older adults' eyewitness performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Coral J

    2013-01-01

    Although healthy aging is accompanied by a general decline in memory functioning, environmental support at retrieval can improve older adults' (+65 years) episodic remembering. Despite those over the age of 65 years representing a growing proportion of the population, few environmental retrieval support methods have been empirically evaluated for use with older witnesses and victims of crime. Here, the efficacy of a novel retrieval technique, the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context, is compared with a standard Mental Reinstatement of Context and a no support control (Control). Fifty-one participants witnessed an unexpected live event, and 48 hours later were interviewed using one of three aforementioned techniques. In line with predictions emanating from cognitive theories of aging and the environmental support hypothesis, participants in the Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context condition recalled significantly more correct information and fewer inaccurate items. The Sketch Mental Reinstatement of Context technique appears to scaffold memory retrieval in an age-appropriate manner during a post-event interview, possibly by encouraging more effortful retrieval and reducing dual-task load. As such, this procedure offers an effective alternative to current approaches, adding to the toolbox of techniques available to forensic and other interviewers.

  16. External Mentoring Support for Early Career Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Ian; Christenson-Foggett, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The special education teaching profession has experienced longstanding problems with shortages of qualified teaching staff and with high turnover rates of these staff. A variety of issues are related to these problems, including the nature of the support that early career special education teachers receive. In this case study research, the use of…

  17. External Technical Support for School Improvement: Critical Issues from the Chilean Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osses, Alejandra; Bellei, Cristián; Valenzuela, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    To what extent school improvement processes can be initiated and sustained from the outside has been a relevant question for policy-makers seeking to increase quality in education. Since 2008, the Chilean Government is strongly promoting the use of external technical support (ETS) services to support school improvement processes, as part of the…

  18. Chronic ankle instability: evaluation with stress radiography, CT and CT arthrography; Instabilite chronique externe de la cheville. Apport des radiographies dynamiques, de la tomodensitometrie et de l`arthro-tomodensitometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Ch.; Deplus, F.; Bochu, M. [Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Besse, J.L.; Moyen, B. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 69 -Pierre-Benite (France)

    1997-09-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the anterior talo-fibular ligament and the tarsal sinus of 17 patients who had complained of chronic ankle external instability. This study based on both surgery and CT-arthrography findings shows the pathologic or normal aspects of the talo-fibular anterior ligament (normal, lax, fibrosis residue, ruptured). It confirms the good anatomic analysis of the tarsal sinus, i particular the anterior talo-calcaneal interosseous ligament and the search for fibrosis. We underline that capsular distension due to subtalar laxity is not detected with medical imaging. Compared with surgery (all patients), CT arthrography demonstrated the different aspects of the anterior talo fibular ligament injuries (normal, lax, discontinuous). (authors). 12 refs.

  19. Primary ankle arthrodesis for neglected open weber B ankle fracture dislocation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Thomason, Katherine

    2014-07-01

    Primary ankle arthrodesis used to treat a neglected open ankle fracture dislocation is a unique decision. A 63-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a 5-day-old open fracture dislocation of his right ankle. After thorough soft tissue debridement, primary arthrodesis of the tibiotalar joint was performed using initial Kirschner wire fixation and an external fixator. Definitive soft tissue coverage was later achieved using a latissimus dorsi free flap. The fusion was consolidated to salvage the limb from amputation. The use of primary arthrodesis to treat a compound ankle fracture dislocation has not been previously described.

  20. Experience in surgical treatment of patients with grade Ⅳ pronation - external rotation ankle fractures.%Ⅳ度旋前外旋型踝关节骨折的手术治疗体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海龙; 张斌; 陈刚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the method and clinical effect of surgical treatment in patients with grade Ⅳ pronation - external rotation ankle fractures. Methods The clinical data of thirty - five cases of grade Ⅳ pronation - external rotation ankle fractures were retrospectively analysed. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation from January 2006 to December 2009. The reduction and internal fixation were started from posterior malleolus, then lateral and medial malleoli and distal tibiofibular syndesmosis in sequence was carried out. Results After follow -up for 6 to 24 months ( 18 months on average ), all cases had osseous union after 12 weeks on average. The rates of clinical effectiveness were excellent in 31, good in 3, fair in 1 and no case with poor result respectively and total excellent and good rates reached 97.1%. However,joint motion had been restricted in one case associated with obvious symptom of pain at long distance walk. Conclusion The best clinical effect can be obtained by open reduction and internal fixation, and it may ensure anatomical joint restoration and union for grade Ⅳ pronation - external rotation ankle fractures, thus it may achieve most satisfactory kinematics of ankle joint.%目的 探讨Ⅳ度旋前外旋型踝关节骨折的手术治疗方法及临床效果.方法 回顾分析自2006年1月至2009年12月采用手术治疗的Ⅳ度旋前外旋型踝关节骨折35例.Ⅳ度旋前外旋型踝关节骨折则采用改良的腓骨后外侧弧形联合切口,按后踝-外踝-内踝-下胫腓联合顺序进行复位固定.结果 所有患者随访6~24个月,平均18个月,平均骨性愈合时间12周,根据Baird-Jackson系统评分:优31例,良3例,可1例,差0例,优良率97.1%.本组1例踝关节活动轻度受限,长距离行走时出现疼痛症状.结论 通过切开复位内固定可使Ⅳ度旋前外旋型踝关节骨折的踝关节恢复正常解剖关系,最大限度恢复踝关节功能,获得最佳临床效果.

  1. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  2. Tic-Tac: Accelerating a Skateboard from Rest without Touching an External Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunesch, M.; Usunov, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the solution that the Team of Austria found to problem number 7, "skateboarder", presented in the finals of the 22nd International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) in Tianjin, China. We investigated how a skateboarder can accelerate from rest on a horizontal surface without touching an external support. The focus was laid on…

  3. The Transfer of Local Authority School Support Services to External Social Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores an emerging and largely unresearched sector of the school education market, the transfer of local authority support services to external social enterprises. It locates these new social enterprises as a consequence of government strategies to reduce public spending, shrink local government and create competitive markets in…

  4. External support and bank behaviour in the international syndicated loan market

    OpenAIRE

    Tsatsaronis, Kostas; Gadanecz, Blaise; Altunbas, Yener

    2015-01-01

    Banks that enjoyed generous external financial support tended to under-price risk in the international syndicated loan market and did not show signs of innovation in their loan participations. Loans arranged by such banks had on average lower spreads (controlling for risk and other characteristics) and these banks retained loans that were on average priced below market. When supported banks' investment strategy differed materially from that of the average bank it was in holding less specialis...

  5. Governance reform, external support, and environmental regulation enforcement in rural China: the case of Guangdong province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shui-Yan; Lo, Carlos Wing-Hung; Fryxell, Gerald E

    2010-10-01

    This paper examines how configurations of external support factors have evolved alongside governance reform in recent years and how these evolving configurations have affected regulatory enforcement in four counties in Guangdong Province in China. Based on in-depth interviews with leading officials in the local environmental protection bureaus (EPBs), we show that there have been increases in government and societal support for local EPBs in their regulatory work, thanks partly to a number of recent governance reform efforts, but many problems have remained. Based on a questionnaire survey of enforcement officials, we examine how the perceptions of government and societal support are related to EPB officials' self-perception of effectiveness. It is found that both local government support and societal support have an influence on enforcement officials' self-assessment of effectiveness, but the relationships varied considerably depending on various dimensions of effectiveness and the patterns of interactions between government and societal support.

  6. Internal and External Regulation to Support Knowledge Construction and Convergence in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Margarida; Lambropoulos, Niki

    2011-01-01

    Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) activities aim to promote collaborative knowledge construction and convergence. During the CSCL activity, the students should regulate their learning activity, at the individual and collective level. This implies an organisation cost related to the coordination of the activity with the team-mates…

  7. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  8. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  9. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuangli; Huang Zhang; Xiong Gaoxin; Chen Guang; Yin Zhongxiang; Jiang Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis.Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012,28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated,among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity,and 17 were almost normal in appearance.There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range,23-67 years).The main symptoms included swelling,pain,and a limited range of motion of the ankles.The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS) preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up.Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range,1-2 years).Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases,and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications.All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation.The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure,or nonunion.The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76,showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21,P<0.01).VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05).Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity,less cost and rigid fixation.It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness.

  10. Posterior Ankle Structure Injury During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reb, Christopher W; McAlister, Jeffrey E; Hyer, Christopher F; Berlet, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    Total ankle replacement studies have focused on reporting complications that are directly observed clinically or radiographically, including wound problems, technical errors, implant loosening, subsidence, infection, bone fractures, and heterotopic ossification. However, patients can still experience unresolved pain even when these problems have been ruled out. We initiated a study to more clearly define the relative risk of injury to the anatomic structures in the posterior ankle during total ankle replacement using a third-generation implant system. Ten fresh-frozen adult cadaveric below-the-knee specimens were positioned in the intraoperative positioning frame of an approved total ankle replacement system and adjusted to achieve proper foot alignment using fluoroscopic imaging. The relationship between the tibial cutting guide pins and the posterior neurovascular and tendon structures was measured using digital calipers. High rates of posterior structural injury were found. Nearly all proximal-medial pins encountered a posteromedial neurovascular structure, most commonly the tibial nerve. The distal-medial pins mainly encountered posteromedial tendinous structures, in particular, the flexor digitorum longus tendon. The proximal lateral pins were highly likely to encounter the Achilles tendon and the sural nerve. Our results support our hypothesis that the tibial neurovascular structures are at the greatest risk when preparing for and completing the bony resection, particularly with the medial and proximal cuts. Posterior ankle soft tissue structure injuries can occur during implantation but currently with unknown frequency and undetermined significance. Further study of posterior structural injuries could result in a more informed approach to post-total ankle replacement complications and management.

  11. Externally-resident daughters, social capital, and support for the elderly in rural Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Geoff; Goldstein, Melvyn C; Wangdui, Puchung

    2011-03-01

    This paper focuses on assistance that externally-resident daughters provide for their aging parents in rural Tibet, China, to challenge the notion that rapid modernization invariably threatens family-based care systems for the elderly. The authors discuss social and economic changes associated with modernization that have created new opportunities for parents to send daughters out of their natal households in ways that can benefit them in old age. By investing in a daughter's education so she can secure salaried employment, or by helping a daughter establish a small business so she can earn an independent livelihood, the authors demonstrate how some externally-resident daughters represent a novel form of social capital that parents can draw on for social support. Daughters with income and freedom from extended family obligations are now providing elderly parents with (1) leverage against co-resident children who do not treat them well, (2) temporary places of refuge from ill-treatment at home, (3) caretaking services and financial support when they require hospitalization, and (4) financial resources independent of their household which they can use to pursue age-appropriate activities like pilgrimage. The authors conclude that this new form of social capital vested in externally-resident daughters is having a positive impact on the lives of the elderly in rural Tibet.

  12. SUPPORTED CATALYST WITHOUT EXTERNAL ELECTRON DONOR FOR PROPYLENE POLYMERIZATION Ⅱ. TACTICITY DISTRIBUTION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF POLYPROPYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Propylene was polymerized with a novel supported Ziegler-Natta catalyst containing 2,2-di-iso-butyl-1,3-dimethoxy-propane (DIBDMP) as internal donor and in the absence of external donor. The tacticity distribution of polypropylene was obtained by using temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF) technique and microstructure of fractions was studied with 13C-NMR. Compared with the catalyst without electron donor, this catalyst gives a considerably narrower tacticity distribution. Fractionation data demonstrate that DIBDMP shows better performance than aromatic diester DNBP (di-n-butyl phthalate). Chemically inverted propylene units and less stereoblockiness are found in the first fraction. Possible reasons for these were presented.

  13. Triple play: Additive contributions of enhanced expectancies, autonomy support, and external attentional focus to motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Gabriele; Lewthwaite, Rebecca; Cardozo, Priscila; Chiviacowsky, Suzete

    2017-01-24

    In the OPTIMAL theory of motor learning [Wulf, G., & Lewthwaite, R. (2016). Optimizing performance through intrinsic motivation and attention for learning: The OPTIMAL theory of motor learning. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review. doi:10.3758/s13423-015-0999-9], 3 factors are postulated to facilitate learning: enhanced expectancies (EE) for performance, autonomy support (AS), and an external focus (EF) of attention. In 3 recent studies, combinations 2 of these variables resulted in superior learning relative to the presence of only 1 variable, or none. We examined whether the combination of all 3 factors would enhance learning relative to combinations of 2 factors. Our design included EE-AS, EE-EF, AS-EF, and AS-EE-EF groups. Participants threw balls at a target with their non-dominant arm. In the EE conditions, they received positive social-comparative feedback. In the AS conditions, they were allowed to throw with their dominant arm on trial blocks chosen by them. In the EF conditions, participants were asked to focus on the target. On a delayed retention test, the AS-EE-EF group outperformed all other groups. The findings provide evidence that enhanced expectancies, autonomy support, and an external focus can contribute in an additive fashion to optimize motor learning.

  14. Study of Internal and External Leaks in Tests of Anode-Supported SOFCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens Foldager Bregnballe; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Hagen, Anke

    2008-01-01

    A planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been tested to investigate gas tightness of the electrolyte and the applied seals. Gas leaks reduce the efficiency of the SOFC and it is thus important to determine and minimise them. Probe gases (He and Ar) and a Quadrupole Mass Spectrome......A planar anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been tested to investigate gas tightness of the electrolyte and the applied seals. Gas leaks reduce the efficiency of the SOFC and it is thus important to determine and minimise them. Probe gases (He and Ar) and a Quadrupole Mass...... Spectrometer were used to detect both internal (through electrolyte) and external (through seals) gas leaks. The internal gas leak through the electrolyte was quantified under different conditions, as was the external leak from the surroundings to the anode. The internal gas leak did not depend on the pressure...... and pressure gradients. The measured gas leaks deduced from the probe gas experiments and the total leak calculated from the deviation between the Emf defined by the gases and the cell OCV (which contains all gas leaks as well as effects of electronic leaks) were compared. Good agreement between the two...

  15. Technology as Teammate: Examining the Role of External Cognition in Support of Team Cognitive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Stephen M.; Wiltshire, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we advance team theory by describing how cognition occurs across the distribution of members and the artifacts and technology that support their efforts. We draw from complementary theorizing coming out of cognitive engineering and cognitive science that views forms of cognition as external and extended and integrate this with theorizing on macrocognition in teams. Two frameworks are described that provide the groundwork for advancing theory and aid in the development of more precise measures for understanding team cognition via focus on artifacts and the technologies supporting their development and use. This includes distinctions between teamwork and taskwork and the notion of general and specific competencies from the organizational sciences along with the concepts of offloading and scaffolding from the cognitive sciences. This paper contributes to the team cognition literature along multiple lines. First, it aids theory development by synthesizing a broad set of perspectives on the varied forms of cognition emerging in complex collaborative contexts. Second, it supports research by providing diagnostic guidelines to study how artifacts are related to team cognition. Finally, it supports information systems designers by more precisely describing how to conceptualize team-supporting technology and artifacts. As such, it provides a means to more richly understand process and performance as it occurs within sociotechnical systems. Our overarching objective is to show how team cognition can both be more clearly conceptualized and more precisely measured by integrating theory from cognitive engineering and the cognitive and organizational sciences. PMID:27774074

  16. Technology as Teammate: Examining the Role of External Cognition in Support of Team Cognitive Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Stephen M; Wiltshire, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we advance team theory by describing how cognition occurs across the distribution of members and the artifacts and technology that support their efforts. We draw from complementary theorizing coming out of cognitive engineering and cognitive science that views forms of cognition as external and extended and integrate this with theorizing on macrocognition in teams. Two frameworks are described that provide the groundwork for advancing theory and aid in the development of more precise measures for understanding team cognition via focus on artifacts and the technologies supporting their development and use. This includes distinctions between teamwork and taskwork and the notion of general and specific competencies from the organizational sciences along with the concepts of offloading and scaffolding from the cognitive sciences. This paper contributes to the team cognition literature along multiple lines. First, it aids theory development by synthesizing a broad set of perspectives on the varied forms of cognition emerging in complex collaborative contexts. Second, it supports research by providing diagnostic guidelines to study how artifacts are related to team cognition. Finally, it supports information systems designers by more precisely describing how to conceptualize team-supporting technology and artifacts. As such, it provides a means to more richly understand process and performance as it occurs within sociotechnical systems. Our overarching objective is to show how team cognition can both be more clearly conceptualized and more precisely measured by integrating theory from cognitive engineering and the cognitive and organizational sciences.

  17. Do Ankle Orthoses Improve Ankle Proprioceptive Thresholds or Unipedal Balance in Older Persons with Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jaebum; Ashton-Miller, James A.; Richardson, James K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether ankle orthoses that provide medial and lateral support, and have been found to decrease gait variability in older persons with peripheral neuropathy, decrease (improve) frontal plane ankle proprioceptive thresholds or increase unipedal stance time in that same population. Design Observational study in which unipedal stance time was determined with a stopwatch, and frontal plane ankle (inversion and eversion) proprioceptive thresholds were quantified during bipedal stance with and without the ankle orthoses, in 11 older diabetic subjects with peripheral neuropathy (8 men; age 72 ± 7.1 years) using a foot cradle system which presented a series of 100 rotational stimuli. Results The subjects demonstrated no change in combined frontal plane (inversion + eversion) proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time with versus without the orthoses (1.06 ± 0.56 versus 1.13 ± 0.39 degrees, respectively; p = 0.955 and 6.1 ± 6.5 versus 6.2 ± 5.4 seconds, respectively; p = 0.922). Conclusion Ankle orthoses which provide medial-lateral support do not appear to change ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds or unipedal stance time in older persons with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Previously identified improvements in gait variability using orthoses in this population are therefore likely related to an orthotically-induced stiffening of the ankle rather than a change in ankle afferent function. PMID:20407302

  18. Total ankle arthroplasty in end-stage ankle arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Demetracopoulos, Constantine A.; Halloran, James P.; Maloof, Paul; Samuel B Adams; Parekh, Selene G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in ankle prosthesis design, combined with improved surgical techniques for correction of coronal plane deformity and ligamentous balancing, have led to a resurgence of interest in total ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Although ankle arthrodesis has long been considered the gold standard treatment for ankle arthritis, recent studies have shown that patients who undergo total ankle replacement have equivalent pain relief and improved functi...

  19. Posterior ankle impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Mosca, Massimiliano; Parma, Alessandro; Di Caprio, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Posterior ankle impingement is a common cause of chronic ankle pain and results from compression of bony or soft tissue structures during ankle plantar flexion. Bony impingement is most commonly related to an os trigonum or prominent trigonal process. Posteromedial soft tissue impingement generally arises from an inversion injury, with compression of the posterior tibiotalar ligament between the medial malleolus and talus. Posterolateral soft tissue impingement is caused by an accessory ligament, the posterior intermalleolar ligament, which spans the posterior ankle between the posterior tibiofibular and posterior talofibular ligaments. Finally, anomalous muscles have also been described as a cause of posterior impingement.

  20. Histology of a Marfan aorta 4.5 years after personalized external aortic root support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, John; Goddard, Martin; Mohiaddin, Raad; Treasure, Tom

    2015-09-01

    In 2008, a 26-year old man had personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh. He was the 16th of 46 patients to have this operation. He had a typical Marfan habitus. His mother died of this disease as did his brother, with an aortic dissection. The patient himself died suddenly 4.5 years after his PEARS operation. At autopsy, there was no blood in the pericardium. The coronary orifices and proximal arteries were normal. His bicuspid aortic valve was minimally regurgitant as it was prior to operation and remained throughout follow-up. Macroscopically the implanted mesh was embedded in the adventitia and not separable from the aortic wall. Microscopically it was fully incorporated with collagen fibres as has been seen in our animal studies. The unsupported aortic arch showed some focal fragmentation of elastic fibres and a mild increase in mucopolysaccharides consistent with Marfan syndrome. These appearances were not present in the supported aortic root, which had the histological appearance of a normal aorta. He was the first patient to die with an implant. The histological appearances suggest the possibility that the incorporated support of the aortic root allowed recovery of the microstructure of the media.

  1. Closed reduction and Kirschner wire and cannulated screws fixation for grade Ⅳ supination-external rotation ankle fractures%闭合复位克氏针及空心钉内固定治疗旋后外旋型Ⅳ度踝关节骨折

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥标; 李铭雄; 张细祥

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the less damage surgical methods and efficacy in treating grade Ⅳ supinationextenal rotation ankle fractures.Methods 22 patients of grade Ⅳ supination-external rotation ankle fractures were treated by closed reduction and Kirschner wire and cannulated screws fixation.Results 18 cases were followed up ranged from 4 to 10 months.The wound got primary healing without infection.All fracture were healed without obvious aching.According to the ankle-hindfoot scale of AOFAS: the results were excellent in 12 cases, good in 7 , and fair in 3.Conclusions This method is effective for grade Ⅳ supination-external rotation ankle fractures with small incision, less infection rate and good result.%目的 探讨旋后外旋型Ⅳ度踝关节骨折的微创治疗方法及疗效.方法 对22例旋后外旋型Ⅳ度踝关节骨折患者采用闭合复位克氏针及空心钉内固定治疗.结果 18例患者获得随访,时间4~10个月.伤口均一期愈合,无感染.骨折均愈合,无明显疼痛不适.采用 AOFAS踝关节-后足评分标准:优 12例,良7例,一般3例.结论 闭合复位经皮克氏针及空心钉固定治疗旋后外旋型Ⅳ度踝关节骨折,切口小,感染率低,疗效良好.

  2. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  3. Muscle recruitment and coordination with an ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Katherine M; Jackson, Rachel W; Shuman, Benjamin R; Collins, Steven H

    2017-07-05

    Exoskeletons have the potential to assist and augment human performance. Understanding how users adapt their movement and neuromuscular control in response to external assistance is important to inform the design of these devices. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in muscle recruitment and coordination for ten unimpaired individuals walking with an ankle exoskeleton. We evaluated changes in the activity of individual muscles, cocontraction levels, and synergistic patterns of muscle coordination with increasing exoskeleton work and torque. Participants were able to selectively reduce activity of the ankle plantarflexors with increasing exoskeleton assistance. Increasing exoskeleton net work resulted in greater reductions in muscle activity than increasing exoskeleton torque. Patterns of muscle coordination were not restricted or constrained to synergistic patterns observed during unassisted walking. While three synergies could describe nearly 95% of the variance in electromyography data during unassisted walking, these same synergies could describe only 85-90% of the variance in muscle activity while walking with the exoskeleton. Synergies calculated with the exoskeleton demonstrated greater changes in synergy weights with increasing exoskeleton work versus greater changes in synergy activations with increasing exoskeleton torque. These results support the theory that unimpaired individuals do not exclusively use central pattern generators or other low-level building blocks to coordinate muscle activity, especially when learning a new task or adapting to external assistance, and demonstrate the potential for using exoskeletons to modulate muscle recruitment and coordination patterns for rehabilitation or performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quality of basic life support education and automated external defibrillator setting in schools in Ishikawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Akiteru; Ito, Sayori; Maruyama, Kaori; Ryo, Yusuke; Saito, Manami; Fujimura, Shuhei; Ishiura, Yuna; Hori, Ariyuki

    2017-03-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AED) have been installed in schools in Japan since 2004, and the government strongly recommends teaching basic life support (BLS). We therefore examined the quality of BLS education and AED installation in schools. We conducted a prefecture-wide questionnaire survey of all primary and junior high schools in 2016, to assess BLS education and AED installation against the recommendations of the Japan Circulation Society. The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. In total, 195 schools out of 315 (62%) responded, of which 38% have introduced BLS education for children. BLS training was held in a smaller proportion of primary schools (18%) than junior high schools (86%). More than 90% of primary school staff had undergone BLS training in the previous 2 years. The most common locations of AED were the gymnasium (32%) followed by entrance hall (28%), staffroom (25%), and infirmary (12%). The reasons given for location were that it was obvious (34%), convenient for staff (32%), could be used out of hours (17%), and the most likely location for a heart attack (15%). Approximately 18% of schools reported that it takes >5 min to reach the AED from the furthest point. BLS training, AED location, and understanding of both are not sufficient to save children's lives efficiently. Authorities should make recommendations about the correct number of AED, and their location, and provide more information to improve the quality of BLS training in schools. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  5. Pipeline integrity management in an urban environment supported by an External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dus, Pedro Luiz; Valente, Antonio Carlos Rodrigues [Companhia de Gas de Sao Paulo (COMGAS), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Valdes, Alberto [GE Oil and Gas-PII Pipeline Solutions, Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    COMGAS is the largest natural gas distributing company in Brazil, having more than 700,000 costumers. Gas delivery to this customer base is achieved through a network of high-pressure steel pipelines (17 and 35 bar) with around 1,100 km (690 miles) in length, the majority operating inside urban areas. The Integrity Management of this network is a particularly difficult task since neither pigging nor hydrostatic testing can be used to inspect the existing pipelines. Direct Assessment (DA) is the only assessment technique available at the moment. As an initial stage COMGAS has implemented an innovative project called SIA (Sistema de Integridade de Ativos). SIA combines functionality targeted for guiding and implementing an External Corrosion Assessment (ECDA) procedure, with full data alignment and integration, corporate policies on safety and dedicated reporting capabilities. Seamless interaction between SIA and the existing Operations GIS system was a key specification requirement for the construction of the system. This paper describes the lessons learned during the implementation of the ECDA module of the SIA, the first application experiences of the ECDA process with the support of the module and the initial benefits obtained from the use of the new Integrity Management System. (author)

  6. Properties of Neurons in External Globus Pallidus Can Support Optimal Action Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Bogacz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The external globus pallidus (GPe is a key nucleus within basal ganglia circuits that are thought to be involved in action selection. A class of computational models assumes that, during action selection, the basal ganglia compute for all actions available in a given context the probabilities that they should be selected. These models suggest that a network of GPe and subthalamic nucleus (STN neurons computes the normalization term in Bayes' equation. In order to perform such computation, the GPe needs to send feedback to the STN equal to a particular function of the activity of STN neurons. However, the complex form of this function makes it unlikely that individual GPe neurons, or even a single GPe cell type, could compute it. Here, we demonstrate how this function could be computed within a network containing two types of GABAergic GPe projection neuron, so-called 'prototypic' and 'arkypallidal' neurons, that have different response properties in vivo and distinct connections. We compare our model predictions with the experimentally-reported connectivity and input-output functions (f-I curves of the two populations of GPe neurons. We show that, together, these dichotomous cell types fulfil the requirements necessary to compute the function needed for optimal action selection. We conclude that, by virtue of their distinct response properties and connectivities, a network of arkypallidal and prototypic GPe neurons comprises a neural substrate capable of supporting the computation of the posterior probabilities of actions.

  7. Reasons for changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting external treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, K.; Ilska, A.; Kłonowska, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents the basics of modelling compression products with intended values of unit pressure for body circumferences with fixed and variable radius of curvature. The derived relationships referring to the dimensions of the fabric's circumferences in a relaxed state of the product were based on Laplace law, local values of the radius of curvature, and the characteristics of stretching and relaxing (deformation) of the knitted fabric, described by experimental relation for the stress and relaxation phase for the 6th hysteresis loop, taking into account confidence intervals. The article indicates the possibilities of using 3D scanning techniques of the human body to identify the radius of curvature of various circumference of the human silhouette, for which the intended value of the unit pressure is designed, and quantitative changes in the body deformation due to compression. Classic method of modelling and design of compression products, based on a cylindrical model of the human body does not provide in each case the intended value of unit pressure, according to specific normative requirements, because it neglects the effect of different values of the radius of curvature of the body circumference and the properties of the viscoelastic knitted fabrics. The model and experimental research allowed for a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the reasons for the changes in the value of unit pressure of compression products supporting the process of external treatment.

  8. Modified Evans peroneus brevis lateral ankle stabilization for balancing varus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    Lateral ankle instability is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, I have described a modification of the Evans peroneus brevis tendon lateral ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis is then transferred either to the anterior distal tibia concomitantly with total ankle replacement or through the tibia when performed after total ankle replacement and secured with plate and screw fixation. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon is useful in providing lateral ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  9. Recycling energy to restore impaired ankle function during human walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven H Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is necessary for steady gait, in which mechanical energy is constant on average, external dissipation is negligible, and no net work is performed over a stride. However, dissipation and replacement by muscles might not be necessary if energy were instead captured and reused by an assistive device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a microprocessor-controlled artificial foot that captures some of the energy that is normally dissipated by the leg and "recycles" it as positive ankle work. In tests on subjects walking with an artificially-impaired ankle, a conventional prosthesis reduced ankle push-off work and increased net metabolic energy expenditure by 23% compared to normal walking. Energy recycling restored ankle push-off to normal and reduced the net metabolic energy penalty to 14%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that reduced ankle push-off contributes to the increased metabolic energy expenditure accompanying ankle impairments, and demonstrate that energy recycling can be used to reduce such cost.

  10. 21 CFR 890.3420 - External limb prosthetic component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... total prosthesis. Examples of external limb prosthetic components include the following: Ankle, foot... shoulder joint components; and cable and prosthesis suction valves. (b) Classification. Class I...

  11. Early intra-articular complement activation in ankle fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Salzmann, Gian M; Niemeyer, Philipp;

    2014-01-01

    osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1 β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture...... and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures....

  12. The Association of Maternal Depressive Symptoms with Child Externalizing Problems: The Role of Maternal Support Following Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Aaron; Smith, Daniel; Begle, Angela M.; Ayer, Lynsay

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of abuse-specific maternal support in the association between parent depressive symptoms and child externalizing problems in a sample of children with a history of sexual abuse. In total, 106 mother-child dyads were studied. The association between maternal depressive symptoms and child delinquency behaviors was found…

  13. [Revision arthroplasty of the ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermann, B; Barg, A; Knupp, M

    2011-11-01

    In the last 20 years total ankle replacement has become a viable alternative to arthrodesis for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle. Numerous ankle prosthesis designs have appeared on the market in the past and attracted by the encouraging intermediate results reported in the literature, many surgeons have started to perform this procedure. With increased availability on the market the indications for total ankle replacement have also increased in recent years. In particular, total ankle replacement may now be considered even in younger patients. Therefore, despite progress in total ankle arthroplasty the number of failures may increase. Up to now, arthrodesis was considered to be the gold standard for salvage of failed ankle prostheses. Because of extensive bone loss on the talar side, in most instances tibiocalcaneal fusion is the only reliable solution. An alternative to such extended hindfoot fusions would be revision arthroplasty. To date, however, there are no reported results of revision arthroplasty for salvage of a failed ankle replacement.Based on our experience prosthetic components with a flat undersurface are most likely to be able to find solid support on remaining bone stock. The first 83 cases (79 patients, 46 males, 33 females, average age 58.9 years, range 30.6-80.7 years) with a average follow-up of 5.4 years (range 2-11 years) showed excellent to good results in 69 cases (83%), a satisfactory result in 12 cases (15%) and a fair result in 2 cases (2%) and 47 patients (56%) were pain free. Primary loosening was noted in three cases and of these two cases were successfully revised by another total ankle replacement and in one case with arthrodesis. Another case with hematogenous infection was also revised by arthrodesis. At the last follow-up control two components were considered to be loose and the overall loosening rate was thus 6%.This series has proven that revision arthroplasty can be a promising option for patients with failed total

  14. What Is a Foot and Ankle Surgeon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Foot & Ankle Surgeon? A A A | Print | Share What is a Foot & Ankle Surgeon? Foot and ankle ... of conditions that affect people of every age. What education has a foot and ankle surgeon received? ...

  15. Stresses in the ankle joint and total ankle replacement design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Rahul; Siddique, M S

    2011-06-01

    The ankle is a highly congruent joint with a surface area of 11-13 cm(2). Total ankle replacements have been attempted since the early 1970s and design has continually evolved as the early designs were a failure. This was because the stresses involved and the mutiaxial motion of the ankle has not been understood until recently. It has been shown that the talus slides as well as rolls during the ankle arc of motion from plantarflexion to dorsiflexion. Furthermore, the articular surfaces and the calcaneofibular and tibiocalcaneal ligaments have been shown to form a four bar linkage dictating ankle motion. A new design ankle replacement has been suggested recently which allows multiaxial motion at the ankle while maintaining congruency throughout the arc of motion. The early results of this ankle replacement have been encouraging without any reported failures due to mechanical loosening.

  16. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle A A A What's in ... español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test that ...

  17. External communication FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.10.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiting, W.P.

    1994-09-01

    External Communications activities provide value to the company, its projects, and DOE by achieving compliance to more than 30 DOE orders, DOE directives, policies, state and federal laws. Through the systematic development of informed consent involving Hanford management, stakeholders, the general public and regulators, Hanford cleanup is better able to proceed in concert with involved parties. External Communications provides further efficiencies as the single point of contact for media interactions which otherwise would be scattered throughout WHC programs. Enhanced efficiency is expected from the realignment of multi-purpose communication teams which are dedicated to five key programmatic areas: TWRS Communications, Transition Facilities Communications, Spent Fuels Communications, Waste, Analytical and Environmental Services Communications, and Program Communications Services.

  18. Footballer's ankle: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ Footballer' s ankle is anterior bony spur or anterior impingement symptom of the ankle with anterior ankle pain, limited and painful dorsiflexion. The cause is commonly seen in athletes and dancers, and is probably due to repetitive minor trauma. The condition was firstly described by Morris;1 McMurray2 reported good results from excision of the spurs, naming it footballer's ankle. Opening resection of osteophytes of the anterior tibial and superior talar is an effective treatment for anterior impingement of the ankle.

  19. Supporting Dictation Speech Recognition Error Correction: The Impact of External Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongmei; Zhou, Lina

    2011-01-01

    Although speech recognition technology has made remarkable progress, its wide adoption is still restricted by notable effort made and frustration experienced by users while correcting speech recognition errors. One of the promising ways to improve error correction is by providing user support. Although support mechanisms have been proposed for…

  20. Supporting Dictation Speech Recognition Error Correction: The Impact of External Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yongmei; Zhou, Lina

    2011-01-01

    Although speech recognition technology has made remarkable progress, its wide adoption is still restricted by notable effort made and frustration experienced by users while correcting speech recognition errors. One of the promising ways to improve error correction is by providing user support. Although support mechanisms have been proposed for…

  1. The role of series ankle elasticity in bipedal walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelik, Karl E; Huang, Tzu-Wei P; Adamczyk, Peter G; Kuo, Arthur D

    2014-04-07

    The elastic stretch-shortening cycle of the Achilles tendon during walking can reduce the active work demands on the plantarflexor muscles in series. However, this does not explain why or when this ankle work, whether by muscle or tendon, needs to be performed during gait. We therefore employ a simple bipedal walking model to investigate how ankle work and series elasticity impact economical locomotion. Our model shows that ankle elasticity can use passive dynamics to aid push-off late in single support, redirecting the body's center-of-mass (COM) motion upward. An appropriately timed, elastic push-off helps to reduce dissipative collision losses at contralateral heelstrike, and therefore the positive work needed to offset those losses and power steady walking. Thus, the model demonstrates how elastic ankle work can reduce the total energetic demands of walking, including work required from more proximal knee and hip muscles. We found that the key requirement for using ankle elasticity to achieve economical gait is the proper ratio of ankle stiffness to foot length. Optimal combination of these parameters ensures proper timing of elastic energy release prior to contralateral heelstrike, and sufficient energy storage to redirect the COM velocity. In fact, there exist parameter combinations that theoretically yield collision-free walking, thus requiring zero active work, albeit with relatively high ankle torques. Ankle elasticity also allows the hip to power economical walking by contributing indirectly to push-off. Whether walking is powered by the ankle or hip, ankle elasticity may aid walking economy by reducing collision losses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. External longitudinal titanium support for the repair of complex pectus excavatum in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Francesco; Vannucci, Jacopo; Santoprete, Stefano

    2012-12-01

    Several techniques exist for the repair of complex pectus excavatum. The placement of retrosternal metal bars improves the results by reducing the recurrence rate, but entails several possible risks, complications and disadvantages. A new method, specifically conceived for the repair of severe, asymmetric forms in adult patients, is reported. The corrected bone is fixed in the proper position by two, patient-customized, titanium struts, externally screwed to the manubrium and sternal body. Any retrosternal bar is thus avoided, reducing possible complications, without hampering the chest wall dynamic. In this particularly difficult issue, this technique provides long-term good functional, mechanical and cosmetic results and does not entail a second surgery for struts removal.

  3. Integrating internal and external bioanalytical support to deliver a diversified pharmaceutical portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Scott G; Evans, Christopher; Spooner, Neil; Dunn, John A; Szapacs, Matthew E; Yang, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The portfolios of pharmaceutical companies have diversified substantially over recent years in recognition that monotherapies and/or small molecules are less suitable for modulating many complex disease etiologies. Furthermore, there has been increased pressure on drug-development budgets over this same period. This has placed new challenges in the path of bioanalytical scientists, both within the industry and with contract research organizations (CROs). Large pharmaceutical, biotechnology and small-medium healthcare enterprises have had to make important decisions on what internal capabilities they wish to retain and where CROs offers a significant strategic benefit to their business model. Our journey has involved asking where we believe an internal bioanalytical facility offers the greatest benefit to progressing drug candidates through the drug-development cycle and where externalization can help free up internal resources, adding flexibility to our organization in order to deal with the inevitable peaks and troughs in workload.

  4. Meta-Language Support for Type-Safe Access to External Resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hills, M.A.; Klint, P.; Vinju, J.J.; Czarnecki, K.; Hedin, G.

    2012-01-01

    Meta-programming applications often require access to heterogeneous sources of information, often from different technological spaces (grammars, models, ontologies, databases), that have specialized ways of defining their respective data schemas. Without direct language support, obtaining typed acce

  5. Supporting Beginner Teacher Identity Development: External Mentors and the Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Joanna; Hobson, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a study of support provided by non-school-based mentors of secondary science teachers in England. It focuses on the identity development of beginning teachers of physics, some of the recipients of the mentoring. Drawing on the analysis of interview and case study data, and utilising third space theory, the authors…

  6. Forces predicted at the ankle during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, R G

    1982-01-01

    A biomechanical model of the ankle joint was developed and was used to predict the forces at the ankle during the stance phase of running. Measurements from five cadavers were averaged to obtain insertion points and directions of pull of equivalent tendons with respect to the assumed center of the ankle joint. A minimum joint force solution was obtained by assuming that only two equivalent muscle groups could exert force at one time. Three subjects ran at 4.47 m/s across a force platform that recorded the external forces and moments acting on the foot. Cinematography was used to measure the foot and leg positions during stance. Peak resultant joint forces ranging from 9.0 to 13.3 times body weight and peak Achilles tendon forces ranging from 5.3 to 10.0 times body weight were predicted. Small variations in some cases resulted in large differences in predicted forces. The highest tendon forces predicted exceeded those reported to cause damage to cadaver tendons in other studies.

  7. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Statements Publications Foot & Ankle International (FAI) Foot & Ankle Orthopaedics (FAO) In~Stride Newsletter News Center Press Releases ... the best possible care, see a foot & ankle ORTHOPAEDIC surgeon. Find one in your area here. Having ...

  8. Treatment of unilateral composite external fixator for fracture-dislocation of ankle joint with soft tissue defect%单侧组合式外固定架治疗踝关节骨折脱位并软组织缺损

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴浩俊; 陈航; 陈光华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the outcome of unilateral composite external fixator for the treatment of fracture-dislocation of ankle joint with soft tissue defect. Methods From July 2008 to July 2012, 15 patients suffered from fracture-dislocation of ankle joint with soft tissue defect were treated in the Affiliated Hospital of Guangdong Medical College. All patients received emergency surgery of debridement and external fixation with unilateral composite external fixator after admission, and the open wound achieved two-stage repair. X-ray were taken for follow-up after the surgery, and at the last follow-up, function of ankle joint was evaluated by American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scoring. Results The average operative time was (79 ± 24) min (40-120 min). There were stamp skin grafting in 13 cases and flap transplantation in 2 cases, and skin graft survived in all patients. The average wound healing time was(23 ± 7)d ( 17-42 d), and the average follow-up was (20 ± 6) months (12-36 months). No necrosis of skin, osteomyelitis, pin loosening or external fixation failure occurred. There were only 3 patients of mild infection of pin site or Kirschner wire who were cured shortly after symptomatic therapy. The average bone union time was (8.2 ± 1.8) months (5-11 months). According to AOFAS scoring, there were excellent in 9 cases, good in 4 cases and fair in 2 cases at the last follow-up. Conclusion For fracture-dislocation of ankle joint with soft tissue defect, unilateral composite external fixator allows for transarticular fixation, rapid wound repair, as well as early weight-bearing and functional excise..%目的:探讨单侧组合式外固定架治疗踝关节骨折脱位并软组织缺损的疗效。方法回顾性分析2008年7月至2012年7月广东医学院附属医院收治的15例踝关节骨折脱位并软组织缺损患者的临床资料。入院行急诊清创、单侧组合式外固定架固定,创面二期修复,术后定期复

  9. Advantages of multiple algorithm support in treatment planning system for external beam dose calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of interactions and the nature of the approximations made in the formulation of the algorithm require that the user be familiar with the limitations of various models. As computer power keeps growing, calculation algorithms are tending more towards physically based models. The nature and quantity of the data required varies according to the model which may be either measurement based models or physical based models. Multiple dose calculation algorithm support found in XiO Treatment Planning System can be used to advantage when choice is to be made between speed and accuracy. Thus XiO allows end users generate plans accurately and quickly to optimize the delivery of radiation therapy.

  10. Total Ankle Replacement for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis in Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintermann, Beat; Knupp, Markus; Zwicky, Lukas; Barg, Alexej

    2012-01-01

    End-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle is a disabling problem, particularly in elderly patients who experience an overall loss of mobility and functional impairment and who then need compensatory adaption. Ankle arthrodesis, which has been demonstrated to provide postoperative pain relief and hindfoot stability, leaves the patient with a stiff foot and gait changes. For elderly patient, these changes may be more critical than generally believed. Additionally, the long duration of healing and rehabilitation process needed for ankle arthrodesis may be problematic in the elderly. In contrast to ankle arthrodesis, total ankle replacement has significant advantages including a less strenuous postoperative rehabilitation and preservation of ankle motion which supports physiological gait. Recently, total ankle replacement has evolved as a safe surgical treatment in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis with reliable mid- to long-term results. Total ankle replacement needs less immobilization than arthrodesis and does allow for early weight-bearing and should be considered as a treatment option of first choice in many elderly patients with end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle, especially in elderly patients with lower expectations and physical demands. PMID:22720158

  11. Total Ankle Replacement for Treatment of End-Stage Osteoarthritis in Elderly Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Hintermann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available End-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle is a disabling problem, particularly in elderly patients who experience an overall loss of mobility and functional impairment and who then need compensatory adaption. Ankle arthrodesis, which has been demonstrated to provide postoperative pain relief and hindfoot stability, leaves the patient with a stiff foot and gait changes. For elderly patient, these changes may be more critical than generally believed. Additionally, the long duration of healing and rehabilitation process needed for ankle arthrodesis may be problematic in the elderly. In contrast to ankle arthrodesis, total ankle replacement has significant advantages including a less strenuous postoperative rehabilitation and preservation of ankle motion which supports physiological gait. Recently, total ankle replacement has evolved as a safe surgical treatment in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis with reliable mid- to long-term results. Total ankle replacement needs less immobilization than arthrodesis and does allow for early weight-bearing and should be considered as a treatment option of first choice in many elderly patients with end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle, especially in elderly patients with lower expectations and physical demands.

  12. Total ankle replacement or ankle fusion in painful advanced hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-12-01

    In advanced painful hemophilic arthropathy of the ankle, the last resort is surgical treatment (ankle arthrodesis [AA] or total ankle replacement [TAR]). There is a controversy in the literature on which of the two procedures is more appropriate. A review of the literature was performed to clarify such a controversy. The first search engine was MedLine (keywords: total ankle replacement, ankle arthrodesis). Seventy articles were found in MedLine. Of these, only 16 were selected and reviewed because they were strictly focused on the topic of this article. The second search engine was the Cochrane Library, where only nine systematic reviews were found on the role of TAR and AA in non-hemophilia patients. TAR and AA provide pain relief and patient satisfaction in hemophilia patients in the short term. The available non-hemophilia literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. My current view is that AA may be preferable in most hemophilia patients.

  13. Reverse Evans peroneus brevis medial ankle stabilization for balancing valgus ankle contracture during total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Medial ankle instability secondary to deltoid ligament insufficiency is frequently encountered when performing total ankle replacement and remains a challenge. In the present techniques report, we describe a "reverse" Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction for medial ankle stabilization harvested through limited incisions using simple topographic anatomic landmarks. The harvested peroneus brevis tendon is brought through a drill hole in the talus from laterally to medially, aiming for the junction of the talar neck and body plantar to the midline. The tendon is the brought superiorly and obliquely to the anterior medial aspect of the distal tibia where it is secured under a plate and screw construct. This modified Evans peroneus brevis tendon nonanatomic deltoid ligament reconstruction is useful in providing medial ankle stability during or after primary and revision total ankle replacement.

  14. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P<0.001. Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P<0.001. Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P<0.01 and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P<0.05. Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P<0.02. Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P<0.01. Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures.

  15. Can Chronic Ankle Instability be Prevented? Rethinking Management of Lateral Ankle Sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegar, Craig R.; Miller, Sayers J., III

    2002-01-01

    Investigates whether chronic ankle instability can be prevented, discussing: the relationship between mechanical and functional instability; normal ankle mechanics, sequelae to lateral ankle sprains, and abnormal ankle mechanics; and tissue healing, joint dysfunction, and acute lateral ankle sprain management. The paper describes a treatment model…

  16. Treatment of Unstable Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffín Rodríguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with unstable ankle fractures frequently attend the emergency rooms. It is estimated that there are 122 ankle fractures per 100 000 people a year. Surgical treatment of those that are unstable is inevitable since they can not be corrected in a conservative way. Several surgical procedures for repair of such lesions have been described and all of them constitute important tools for the orthopedic surgeon. Therefore, we conducted a literature review to discuss the current management of unstable ankle fractures based on the analysis of the published literature and the experiences in the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital of Cienfuegos.

  17. Dimensional structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress symptoms: support for a hybrid Anhedonia and Externalizing Behaviors model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Tsai, Jack; Durham, Tory A; Charak, Ruby; Biehn, Tracey L; Elhai, Jon D; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Several revisions to the symptom clusters of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been made in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). Central to the focus of this study was the revision of PTSD's tripartite structure in DSM-IV into four symptom clusters in DSM-5. Emerging confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) studies have suggested that DSM-5 PTSD symptoms may be best represented by one of two 6-factor models: (1) an Externalizing Behaviors model characterized by a factor which combines the irritability/anger and self-destructive/reckless behavior items; and (2) an Anhedonia model characterized by items of loss of interest, detachment, and restricted affect. The current study conducted CFAs of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms assessed using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) in two independent and diverse trauma-exposed samples of a nationally representative sample of 1484 U.S. veterans and a sample of 497 Midwestern U.S. university undergraduate students. Relative fits of the DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model, the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model, the two 6-factor models, and a newly proposed 7-factor Hybrid model, which consolidates the two 6-factor models, were evaluated. Results revealed that, in both samples, both 6-factor models provided significantly better fit than the 4-factor DSM-5 model, the DSM-5 Dysphoria model and the DSM-5 Dysphoric Arousal model. Further, the 7-factor Hybrid model, which incorporates key features of both 6-factor models and is comprised of re-experiencing, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, and anxious and dysphoric arousal symptom clusters, provided superior fit to the data in both samples. Results are discussed in light of theoretical and empirical support for the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms.

  18. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains--A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Wilson

    Full Text Available To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies.A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of "kinesiotape" and "ankle" in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science.Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included.Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings.Most studies (n=7 had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants.It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely.

  19. In vivo kinematics and articular surface congruency of total ankle arthroplasty during gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Banks, Scott; Kosugi, Shinichi; Sasho, Takahisa; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2012-08-09

    Relatively high rates of loosening and implant failure have been reported after total ankle arthroplasty. Abnormal kinematics and incongruency of the articular surface may cause increased contact pressure and rotational torque applied to the implant, leading to loosening and implant failure. We measured in vivo kinematics of two-component total ankle arthroplasty (TNK ankle), and assessed congruency of the articular surface during the stance phase of gait. Eighteen ankles of 15 patients with a mean age of 75±6 years (mean±standard deviation) and follow-up of 44±38 months were enrolled. Lateral fluoroscopic images were taken during the stance phase of gait. 3D-2D model-image registration was performed using the fluoroscopic image and the implant models, and three-dimensional kinematics of the implant and incongruency of the articular surface were determined. The mean ranges of motion were 11.1±4.6°, 0.8±0.4°, and 2.6±1.5° for dorsi-/plantarflexion, inversion/eversion, and internal/external rotation, respectively. At least one type of incongruency of the articular surface occurred in eight of 18 ankles, including anterior hinging in one ankle, medial or lateral lift off in four ankles, and excessive axial rotation in five ankles. Among the four ankles in which lift off occurred during gait, only one ankle showed lift off in the static weightbearing radiograph. Our observations will provide useful data against which kinematics of other implant designs, such as three-component total ankle arthroplasty, can be compared. Our results also showed that evaluation of lift off in the standard weightbearing radiograph may not predict its occurrence during gait.

  20. Improvement in gait following combined ankle and subtalar arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, Shay; Coleman, Scott C; Brodsky, James W

    2014-11-19

    This study assessed the hypothesis that arthrodesis of both the ankle and the hindfoot joints produces an objective improvement of function as measured by gait analysis of patients with severe ankle and hindfoot arthritis. Twenty-one patients with severe ankle and hindfoot arthritis who underwent unilateral tibiotalocalcaneal arthrodesis with an intramedullary nail were prospectively studied with three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis at a minimum of one year postoperatively. The mean age at the time of the operation was fifty-nine years, and the mean duration of follow-up was seventeen months (range, twelve to thirty-one months). Temporospatial measurements included cadence, step length, walking velocity, and total support time. The kinematic parameters were sagittal plane motion of the ankle, knee, and hip. The kinetic parameters were sagittal plane ankle power and moment and hip power. Symmetry of gait was analyzed by comparing the step lengths on the affected and unaffected sides. There was significant improvement in multiple parameters of postoperative gait as compared with the patients' own preoperative function. Temporospatial data showed significant increases in cadence (p = 0.03) and walking speed (p = 0.001) and decreased total support time (p = 0.02). Kinematic results showed that sagittal plane ankle motion had decreased, from 13.2° preoperatively to 10.2° postoperatively, in the operatively treated limb (p = 0.02), and increased from 22.2° to 24.1° (p = 0.01) in the contralateral limb. Hip motion on the affected side increased from 39° to 43° (p = 0.007), and knee motion increased from 56° to 60° (p = 0.054). Kinetic results showed significant increases in ankle moment (p < 0.0001) of the operatively treated limb, ankle power of the contralateral limb (p = 0.009), and hip power on the affected side (p = 0.005) postoperatively. There was a significant improvement in gait symmetry (p = 0.01). There was a small loss of sagittal plane motion in the

  1. Broken Ankle/Broken Foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so that your doctor can examine your gait. Imaging tests Not all foot and ankle injuries require ... an orthopedic surgeon may need to use pins, plates or screws to maintain proper position of your ...

  2. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter DA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David A Porter, Ryan R Jaggers, Adam Fitzgerald Barnes, Angela M Rund Methodist Sports Medicine/The Orthopedic Specialists, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains, and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on

  3. Optimal management of ankle syndesmosis injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David A; Jaggers, Ryan R; Barnes, Adam Fitzgerald; Rund, Angela M

    2014-01-01

    Syndesmosis injuries occur when there is a disruption of the distal attachment of the tibia and fibula. These injuries occur commonly (up to 18% of ankle sprains), and the incidence increases in the setting of athletic activity. Recognition of these injuries is key to preventing long-term morbidity. Diagnosis and treatment of these injuries requires a thorough understanding of the normal anatomy and the role it plays in the stability of the ankle. A complete history and physical examination is of paramount importance. Patients usually experience an external rotation mechanism of injury. Key physical exam features include detailed documentation about areas of focal tenderness (syndesmosis and deltoid) and provocative maneuvers such as the external rotation stress test. Imaging workup in all cases should consist of radiographs with the physiologic stress of weight bearing. If these images are inconclusive, then further imaging with external rotation stress testing or magnetic resonance imaging are warranted. Nonoperative treatment is appropriate for stable injuries. Unstable injuries should be treated operatively. This consists of stabilizing the syndesmosis with either trans-syndesmotic screw or tightrope fixation. In the setting of a concomitant Weber B or C fracture, the fibula is anatomically reduced and stabilized with a standard plate and screw construct. Proximal fibular fractures, as seen in the Maisonneuve fracture pattern, are not repaired operatively. Recent interest is moving toward repair of the deltoid ligament, which may provide increased stability, especially in rehabilitation protocols that involve early weight bearing. Rehabilitation is focused on allowing patients to return to their pre-injury activities as quickly and safely as possible. Protocols initially focus on controlling swelling and recovery from surgery. The protocols then progress to restoration of motion, early protected weight bearing, restoration of strength, and eventually a

  4. The Effect of the Duration of Basic Life Support Training on the Learners’ Cardiopulmonary and Automated External Defibrillator Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Hyuck Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Basic life support (BLS training with hands-on practice can improve performance during simulated cardiac arrest, although the optimal duration for BLS training is unknown. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of various BLS training durations for acquiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and automated external defibrillator (AED skills. Methods. We randomised 485 South Korean nonmedical college students into four levels of BLS training: level 1 (40 min, level 2 (80 min, level 3 (120 min, and level 4 (180 min. Before and after each level, the participants completed questionnaires regarding their willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs, and their psychomotor skills for CPR and AED use were assessed using a manikin with Skill-Reporter™ software. Results. There were no significant differences between levels 1 and 2, although levels 3 and 4 exhibited significant differences in the proportion of overall adequate chest compressions (p<0.001 and average chest compression depth (p=0.003. All levels exhibited a greater posttest willingness to perform CPR and use AEDs (all, p<0.001. Conclusions. Brief BLS training provided a moderate level of skill for performing CPR and using AEDs. However, high-quality skills for CPR required longer and hands-on training, particularly hands-on training with AEDs.

  5. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability. PMID:26311206

  6. Effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape for a patient with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Jo; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Chang-Tae; Lee, Sun-Min

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] To report the effects of ankle balance taping for a patient with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subject] A 33-year-old man with a 10 year history of chronic ankle stability. [Methods] ABT with kinesiology tape was performed for 2 months (average, 16 h/day) around the right ankle. [Results] At the end of two months, no ankle instability was noted when ascending and descending the stairs, jumping, turning, operating the pedals while driving, and lifting heavy objects. [Conclusion] The repeated use of kinesiology tape in ankle balance taping may be an effective treatment for recovering the ankle stability of patients with chronic ankle instability.

  7. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  8. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R; Nickel, Eric A; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users.

  9. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data were collected on seven subjects with a transtibial amputation walking on an instrumented treadmill set at various slopes. Overall, this study was unable to find significant differences in the torque at the distal end of the prosthetic socket between an ankle-foot prosthesis with a hydraulic range-of-motion and other related ankle-foot prosthesis designs (rigid ankle, multiaxial ankle) during the single-support phase of walking. In addition, socket comfort and perceived exertion were not significantly different for any of the ankle-foot prostheses tested in this study. These results suggest the need for further work to determine if more advanced designs (e.g., those with microprocessor control of hydraulic features, powered ankle-foot designs) can provide more biomimetic function to prosthesis users. PMID:28278172

  10. Ankle Brachial Index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem, J.; Hansen, T.; Johansson, L.; Lind, L.; Ahlstroem, H. (Dept. of Radiology and Dept. of Medical Sciences, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (SE))

    2008-03-15

    Background: Whole-body magnetic resonance angiography (WBMRA) permits noninvasive vascular assessment, which can be utilized in epidemiological studies. Purpose: To assess the relation between a low ankle brachial index (ABI) and high-grade stenoses in the pelvic and leg arteries in the elderly. Material and Methods: WBMRA was performed in a population sample of 306 subjects aged 70 years. The arteries below the aortic bifurcation were graded after the most severe stenosis according to one of three grades: 0-49% stenosis, 50-99% stenosis, or occlusion. ABI was calculated for each side. Results: There were assessable WBMRA and ABI examinations in 268 (right side), 265 (left side), and 258 cases (both sides). At least one >=50% stenosis was found in 19% (right side), 23% (left side), and 28% (on at least one side) of the cases. The corresponding prevalences for ABI <0.9 were 4.5%, 4.2%, and 6.6%. An ABI cut-off value of 0.9 resulted in a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 20%, 99%, 83%, and 84% on the right side, and 15%, 99%, 82%, and 80% on the left side, respectively, for the presence of a >= 50% stenosis in the pelvic or leg arteries. Conclusion: An ABI <0.9 underestimates the prevalence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the general elderly population

  11. Effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support on shoulder and scapular muscle activity and maximum strength during isometric shoulder abduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-jeong; Kim, Suhn-yeop; Oh, Duck-won

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of augmented trunk stabilization with external compression support (ECS) on the electromyography (EMG) activity of shoulder and scapular muscles and shoulder abductor strength during isometric shoulder abduction. Twenty-six women volunteered for the study. Surface EMG was used to monitor the activity of the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and middle deltoid (MD), and shoulder abductor strength was measured using a dynamometer during three experimental conditions: (1) no external support (condition-1), (2) pelvic support (condition-2), and (3) pelvic and thoracic supports (condition-3) in an active therapeutic movement device. EMG activities were significantly lower for UT and higher for MD during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p Shoulder abductor strength was significantly higher during condition 3 than during condition 1 (p muscle effort of the UT during isometric shoulder abduction and increasing shoulder abductor strength. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and retention of Basic Life Support education including Automated External Defibrillator usage during a physical education period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Watanabe

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The American Heart Association (AHA advocates for CPR education as a requirement of secondary school curriculum. Unfortunately, many states have not adopted CPR education. Our aim was to investigate a low-cost, time effective method to educate students on Basic Life Support (BLS, including reeducation. This is a prospective, randomized study. Retention was assessed at 4 months post-initial education. Education was performed by AHA-certified providers during a 45-minute physical education class in a middle school in Florida. This age provides opportunities for reinforcement through high school, with ability for efficient learning. The study included 41 Eighth grade students. Students were randomized into two groups; one group received repeat education 2 months after the first education, the second group did not. All students received BLS education limited to chest compressions and usage of an Automated External Defibrillator. Students had skills and knowledge tests administered pre- and post-education after initial education, and repeated 2 and 4 months later to assess retention. There was a significant increase in CPR skills and knowledge when comparing pre- and post-education results for all time-points (p < 0.001. When assessing reeducation, a significant improvement was noted in total knowledge scores but not during the actual steps of CPR. Our study indicates significant increase in CPR knowledge and skills following a one-time 45-minute session. Reeducation may be useful, but the interval needs further investigation. If schools across the United States invested one 45–60-minute period every school year, this would ensure widespread CPR knowledge with minimal cost and loss of school time.

  13. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brendan; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and Web of Science. Study Selection Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 107 database hits, 8 quantitative studies were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological rigour of the studies using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. Data were extracted on participant characteristics, kinesiotape parameters, comparison interventions, outcome measures and findings. Data Syntheses Most studies (n=7) had good to very good methodological rigour. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity in participants, interventions and outcome measures. No adverse events were reported. Kinesiotape may produce different effects in healthy and injured ankles. In healthy ankles, kinesiotape may increase postural control, whereas in injured ankles it may improve proprioception, plantarflexor endurance and the performance of activities. These trends were identified from a small body of evidence including 276 participants. Conclusions It is recommended that kinesiotape may be used in clinical practice to prevent lateral ankle injuries (through its effects on postural control) and manage lateral ankle injuries due to its positive effects on proprioception, muscle endurance and activity performance. It appears that kinesiotape may not provide sufficient mechanical support to improve postural control in unstable ankles. Adverse events associated with kinseiotape are unlikely. PMID

  14. The trAPP-study: Cost-effectiveness of an unsupervised e-health supported neuromuscular training program for the treatment of acute ankle sprains in general practice: Design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.K.E. Mailuhu (Adinda); E.A.L.M. Verhagen (Evert); J.M. van Ochten (John); P.J.E. Bindels (Patrick); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); M. van Middelkoop (Marienke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Ankle sprains are one of the most frequent injuries of the musculoskeletal system, with yearly around 680.000 new sprains in the Netherlands. Of these, about 130.000 people will visit the general practitioner (GP) each year. In addition, patients have an increased risk of a r

  15. Reconstructive foot and ankle surgeries in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit Kumar Varma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot and ankle deformities are secondary to long-standing diabetes and neglected foot care. The concept of surgical correction for these deformities is quite recent. The primary objective of reconstructive foot and ankle surgery is the reduction of increased plantar pressures, reduction of pain and the restoration of function, stability and proper appearance. Foot and ankle deformities can result in significant disability, loss of life style, employment and even the loss of the lower limb. Therefore, restoration of normal, problem free foot function and activities will have a significant impact on peoples′ lives. Reconstructive surgical procedures are complex and during reconstruction, internal and external fixation devices, including pins, compression screws, staples, and wires, may be used for repair and stabilization. The surgeries performed depend on the type and severity of the condition. Surgery can involve any part of the foot and ankle, and may involve tendon, bone, joint, tissue or skin repair. Corrective surgeries can at times be performed on an outpatient basis with minimally invasive techniques. Recovery time depends on the type of condition being treated.

  16. Effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with ankle inversion sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to report the effects of ankle eversion taping using kinesiology tape on ankle inversion sprain. [Subject] The subject was a 21-year-old woman with Grade 2 ankle inversion sprain. [Methods] Ankle eversion taping was applied to the sprained left ankle using kinesiology tape for 4 weeks (average, 15 h/day). [Results] Ankle instability and pain were reduced, and functional dynamic balance was improved after ankle eversion taping for 4 weeks. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool score and reach distances in the Y-Balance and lunge tests were increased. [Conclusion] Repeated ankle eversion taping may be an effective treatment intervention for ankle inversion sprain.

  17. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  18. The Incidence of Ankle Sprains in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Jan; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Investigates relationship between ankle sprains and participation time in competitive orienteering. Examined 15,474 competitors in races in the Swedish O-ringen 5-day event in 1987. Injuries requiring medical attention were analyzed, showing 137 (23.9 percent) ankle sprains. Injury incidence was 8.4/10,000 hours. Incidence of ankle sprains was…

  19. Acute Ankle Sprains in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOf all injuries of the musculoskeletal system, 25% are acute lateral ankle sprains.1 In the USA and the UK there are about 23,000 and 5000 ankle sprains, respectively, each day. In the Netherlands approximately 600,000 people sustain an ankle injury each year, of those 120,000 occur duri

  20. Outcome of unilateral ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement in terms of bilateral gait mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Swati; Rouhani, Hossein; Assal, Mathieu; Aminian, Kamiar; Crevoisier, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies assessed the outcome of ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR) surgeries; however, the extent of postoperative recovery towards bilateral gait mechanics (BGM) is unknown. We evaluated the outcome of the two surgeries at least 2 years post rehabilitation, focusing on BGM. 36 participants, including 12 AA patients, 12 TAR patients, and 12 controls were included. Gait assessment over 50 m distance was performed utilizing pressure insoles and 3D inertial sensors, following which an intraindividual comparison was performed. Most spatiotemporal and kinematic parameters in the TAR group were indicative of good gait symmetry, while the AA group presented significant differences. Plantar pressure symmetry among the AA group was also significantly distorted. Abnormality in biomechanical behavior of the AA unoperated, contralateral foot was observed. In summary, our results indicate an altered BGM in AA patients, whereas a relatively fully recovered BGM is observed in TAR patients, despite the quantitative differences in several parameters when compared to a healthy population. Our study supports a biomechanical assessment and rehabilitation of both operated and unoperated sides after major surgeries for ankle osteoarthrosis.

  1. Mobility of the ankle joint: recording of rotatory movements in the talocrural joint in vitro with and without the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, O; Tovborg-Jensen, I

    1982-02-01

    A method for graphic recording of rotatory movements in osteoligamentous ankle preparations is described. By this method it is possible to record characteristic mobility patterns in two planes at the same time. The ankle is affected by a known torque, so that the individual mobility patterns are reproducible with unchanged condition of the ligaments. Six amputated legs were investigated in the sagittal and horizontal planes and another six in the sagittal and frontal planes. Mobility patterns were recorded with intact ligaments and after successive cutting of the lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle in the anteroposterior direction. In the sagittal plane increased dorsiflexion was observed after total cutting of the lateral ligaments, while plantar flexion remained unchanged. In the horizontal plane the internal rotation of the talus increased in step with increasing injury to the ligament, particularly when the ankle was plantar flexed. When all collateral ligaments had been cut, an increase in external rotation occurred, especially in dorsiflexion. In the frontal plane the talar tilt increased gradually with increasing injury to the ligaments. Talar tilt was at a maximum in the neutral position of the ankle or in plantar flexion. After total severing of the collateral ligaments, however, talar tilt was most marked in dorsiflexion of the ankle.

  2. A review on the mechanical design elements of ankle rehabilitation robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Yusuf M; Gouwanda, Darwin; Parasuraman, Subramanian

    2015-06-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots are developed to enhance ankle strength, flexibility and proprioception after injury and to promote motor learning and ankle plasticity in patients with drop foot. This article reviews the design elements that have been incorporated into the existing robots, for example, backdrivability, safety measures and type of actuation. It also discusses numerous challenges faced by engineers in designing this robot, including robot stability and its dynamic characteristics, universal evaluation criteria to assess end-user comfort, safety and training performance and the scientific basis on the optimal rehabilitation strategies to improve ankle condition. This article can serve as a reference to design robot with better stability and dynamic characteristics and good safety measures against internal and external events. It can also serve as a guideline for the engineers to report their designs and findings.

  3. Contribution of ankle dorsiflexor strength to walking endurance in people with spastic hemiplegia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S; Hui-Chan, Christina W

    2012-06-01

    (1) To determine the relationships of ankle dorsiflexor strength, ankle plantarflexor strength, and spasticity of the ankle plantarflexors with walking endurance; (2) to determine whether affected ankle dorsiflexor strength makes an independent contribution to walking endurance; and (3) to quantify its relative contribution to the walking endurance of people with spastic hemiplegia after stroke. A cross-sectional study. University-based rehabilitation center. Subjects (N=62) with spastic hemiplegia. Not applicable. Walking endurance was measured by the distance covered in the six-minute walk test (6MWT). Ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor strength were measured using a load-cell mounted on a custom-built foot support. Plantarflexor spasticity was measured using the Composite Spasticity Scale. The six-minute walk distances showed stronger positive correlation with affected dorsiflexor strength (r=.793, P≤.000) when compared with affected plantarflexor strength (r=.349, P=.005). Results of the regression model showed that after adjusting for basic demographic and stroke-related impairments, affected ankle dorsiflexor strength remained independently associated with six-minute walk distance, accounting for 48.8% of the variance. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to document the importance of ankle dorsiflexor strength as an independent determinant of walking endurance in stroke survivors with spastic plantarflexors. Our findings suggest that stroke rehabilitation programs aiming to improve walking endurance should include strengthening exercises for the ankle dorsiflexors. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  5. Ankle and hip postural strategies defined by joint torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two discrete strategies for the control of posture in the sagittal plane based on EMG activations, body kinematics, and ground reaction forces. The ankle strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a single-segment-inverted pendulum and was elicited on flat support surfaces. In contrast, the hip strategy was characterized by body sway resembling a double-segment inverted pendulum divided at the hip and was elicited on short or compliant support surfaces. However, biomechanical optimization models have suggested that hip strategy should be observed in response to fast translations on a flat surface also, provided the feet are constrained to remain in contact with the floor and the knee is constrained to remain straight. The purpose of this study was to examine the experimental evidence for hip strategy in postural responses to backward translations of a flat support surface and to determine whether analyses of joint torques would provide evidence for two separate postural strategies. Normal subjects standing on a flat support surface were translated backward with a range of velocities from fast (55 cm/s) to slow (5 cm/s). EMG activations and joint kinematics showed pattern changes consistent with previous experimental descriptions of mixed hip and ankle strategy with increasing platform velocity. Joint torque analyses revealed the addition of a hip flexor torque to the ankle plantarflexor torque during fast translations. This finding indicates the addition of hip strategy to ankle strategy to produce a continuum of postural responses. Hip torque without accompanying ankle torque (pure hip strategy) was not observed. Although postural control strategies have previously been defined by how the body moves, we conclude that joint torques, which indicate how body movements are produced, are useful in defining postural control strategies. These results also illustrate how the biomechanics of the body can transform discrete control

  6. Subtalar arthrodesis alignment: the effect on ankle biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastifer, James R; Gustafson, Peter A; Gorman, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    The position, axis, and control of each lower extremity joint intimately affect adjacent joint function as well as whole-limb performance. A review of the literature finds little describing the biomechanics of subtalar arthrodesis and the effect on ankle biomechanics. The purpose of the current study was to establish this effect on sagittal plane ankle biomechanics. A study was performed using a 3-dimensional, validated, computational model of the lower extremity. A subtalar arthrodesis was simulated from 20 degrees of varus to 20 degrees of valgus. At each arthrodesis position, the ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles' fiber force, moment arm, and moments were calculated throughout a physiologic range of motion. Throughout ankle range of motion, plantarflexion and dorsiflexion strength varied with subtalar arthrodesis position. When the ankle joint was in neutral sagittal alignment, plantarflexion strength was maximized in 10 degrees of subtalar valgus, and strength varied by a maximum of 2.6% from the peak 221 Nm. In a similar manner, with the ankle joint in neutral position, dorsiflexion strength was maximized with a subtalar joint arthrodesis in 5 degrees of valgus, and strength varied by a maximum of 7.5% from the peak 46.8 Nm. The change in strength was due to affected muscle fiber force generating capacities and muscle moment arms. The significance of this study is that subtalar arthrodesis in a position of 5 to 10 degrees of subtalar valgus has a biomechanical advantage. This supports previous clinical outcome studies and offers a biomechanical rationale for their generally favorable outcomes.

  7. Possible factors for ankle fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabaković Dejan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Classification of ankle fractures is commonly used for selecting an appropriate treatment and prognosing an outcome of definite management. One of the most used classifications is the Danis-Weber classification. To the best of our knowledge, in the available literature, there are no parameters affecting specific types of ankle fractures according to the Danis-Weber classification. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the following parameters: age, body weight, body mass index (BMI, height, osteoporosis, osteopenia and physical exercises with specific types of ankle fractures using the Danis-Weber classification. Methods. A total of 85 patients grouped by the Danis-Weber classification fracture types were analyzed and the significance of certain parameters for specific types of ankle fractures was established. Results. The proportion of females was significantly higher (p < 0.001 with a significantly higher age (59.9 years, SD ± 14.2 in relation to males (45.1 years, SD ± 12.8 (p < 0.0001. Type A fracture was most frequent in the younger patients (34.2 years, SD ± 8.6, and those with increased physical exercises (p = 0.020. In type B fracture, the risk factor was osteoporosis (p = 0.0180, while in type C fracture, body weight (p = 0.017 and osteoporosis (p = 0.004 were significant parameters. Conclusion. Statistical analysis using the Danis-Weber classification reveals that there are certain parameters suggesting significant risk factors for specific types of ankle fractures.

  8. 有效教师培训外部支持系统的建立%Establishment of the Effective External Supporting System for Teacher's Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄玉昆

    2012-01-01

    有效教师培训外部支持系统是教师培训中支持、促进教师有效参与培训的外部保障机制,也是促进教师实现终身教育的重要因素。它包括教师培训机构、教师培训者队伍、培训评估机制和培训制度等方面内容。%The effective external supporting system for teacherls training is an external security mechanism to support and promote teacher's effective training and also an important factor to motivate teacher's life-long education. The system includes teacher's training organizations, trainers, evaluation mechanism and training system.

  9. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  10. Which Are the Most Frequently Used Outcome Instruments in Studies on Total Ankle Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impellizzeri, Franco M.; Rippstein, Pascal F.

    2009-01-01

    The number of studies reporting on outcomes after total ankle arthroplasty is continuously increasing. As the use of valid outcome measures represents the cornerstone for successful clinical research, we aimed to identify the most frequently used outcome instruments in ankle arthroplasty studies and to analyze the evidence to support their use in terms of different quality criteria. A systematic review of the literature identified 15 outcome instruments reported in 79 original studies. The most commonly used measures were the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score (n = 41), the Kofoed ankle score (n = 21), a visual analog scale assessing pain (n = 15), and the generic SF-36 (n = 6). Eight additional instruments were used only once or twice. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and Kofoed instruments include a clinical examination and score up to 100 points. Evidence to support their use in terms of validity, reliability, responsiveness, and interpretability is limited, raising the question whether their use is justified. Self-reported questionnaires related to ankle osteoarthritis or arthroplasty are rather disregarded in the current literature, and only the Foot Function Index is associated with evidence in terms of the above-mentioned quality criteria. Future research is warranted to improve the outcome assessment after total ankle arthroplasty. PMID:19672670

  11. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  12. Effects of Ankle Braces Upon Agility Course Performance in High School Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Beriau, Mark R.; Cox, William B.; Manning, James

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of wearing the AircastTM Sports Stirrup, AircastTM Training brace, Swede-OTM brace, and DonJoyTM Ankle Ligament Protector while running an agility course. Eighty-five high school athletes with no history of ankle injury and no experience in wearing any ankle support served as subjects. Each subject participated in four separate testing sessions. During sessions 1 and 4, subjects ran the agility course under the control (unbraced) conditions...

  13. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Muchin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for the recovery process was developed. Conclusions: the specially designed hydrokinesomechanotherapeutic device and monolasts are allow strictly controlled movement in all planes of the ankle joint, which contributes to the acceleration of the recovery; the conducted anthropometric and goniometric studies were indicate more rapid elimination of edema, increase movement amplitude, carries opposition to the development of contractures and muscle atrophy.

  14. Annular lipoatrophy of the ankles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimson, Otobia G; Esterly, Nancy B

    2006-02-01

    Lipoatrophic panniculitis likely represents a group of disorders characterized by an inflammatory panniculitis followed by lipoatrophy. It occurs locally in a variety of settings and has been reported in the literature under various terms, including annular atrophic connective tissue panniculitis of the ankles, annular and semicircular lipoatrophy, abdominal lipoatrophy, and connective tissue panniculitis. Herein, a case of annular lipoatrophy of the ankles is described in a 6-year-old girl with autoimmune thyroid disease. Histologically, a mixed lobular panniculitis with lipophages was present. This pattern resembles that seen in lipoatrophic panniculitis. After a single, acute episode of an inflammatory process with subsequent lipoatrophy, her skin lesions have stabilized for 2 years requiring no treatment.

  15. Hydrocolonotherapy ankle joints after injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Muchin; Oleksandr Zviriaka

    2016-01-01

    Muchin V., Zviriaka O. Purpose: to improve efficiency of gydrokinesitherapy by means of specially designed devices and monolasts for patients after ankle joint injuries. Material & Methods: there are pedagogical methods, clinical and radiological methods, anthropometric measurements and goniometry were used. Results: the author's technique of hydrokinesitherapy with application hydrokinesimechanotherapy device in the program of physical rehabilitation which provides optimum conditions for...

  16. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger A. Mann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and experience are necessary to achieve a successful result. We have been treating ankle arthritis with the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR ankle replacement prosthesis for over ten years. We believe that arthroplasty will surpass arthrodesis as the standard of care for severe ankle arthritis.

  17. Outcome of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Narayana Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis is still a gold standard salvage procedure for the management of ankle arthritis. There are several functional and mechanical benefits of ankle arthrodesis, which make it a viable surgical procedure in the management of ankle arthritis. The functional outcomes following ankle arthrodesis are not very well known. The purpose of this study was to perform a clinical and radiographic evaluation of ankle arthrodesis in posttraumatic arthritis performed using Charnley′s compression device. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and December 2009 a functional assessment of 15 patients (10 males and 5 females who had undergone ankle arthrodesis for posttraumatic arthritis and/or avascular necrosis (AVN talus (n=6, malunited bimalleolar fracture (n=4, distal tibial plafond fractures (n=3, medial malleoli nonunion (n=2. All the patients were assessed clinically and radiologically after an average followup of 2 years 8 months (range 1-5.7 years. Results: All patients had sound ankylosis and no complications related to the surgery. Scoring the patients with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot scale, we found that 11 of the 15 had excellent results, two had good, and two showed fair results. They were all returned to their preinjury activities. Conclusion: We conclude that, the ankle arthrodesis can still be considered as a standard procedure in ankle arthritis. On the basis of these results, patients should be counseled that an ankle fusion will help to relieve pain and to improve overall function. Still, one should keep in mind that it is a salvage procedure that will cause persistent alterations in gait with a potential for deterioration due to the development of subtalar arthritis.

  18. Ankle dorsiflexor, not plantarflexor strength, predicts the functional mobility of people with spastic hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shamay S M; Hui-Chan, Chistina W Y

    2013-06-01

    To determine the relationships between affected ankle dorsiflexion strength, other ankle muscle strength measurements, plantarflexor spasticity, and Timed "Up & Go" (TUG) times in people with spastic hemiplegia after stroke. A cross-sectional study. A university-based rehabilitation centre. Seventy-three subjects with spastic hemiplegia. Functional mobility was assessed using TUG times. Plantarflexor spasticity was measured using the Composite Spasticity Scale. Affected and unaffected ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength were recorded using a load-cell mounted on a foot support with the knee bent at 50º and subjects in supine lying. TUG times demonstrated strong negative correlation with affected ankle dorsiflexion strength (r = -0.67, p ≤ 0.001) and weak negative correlations with other ankle muscle strength measurements (r = -0.28 to -0.31, p ≤ 0.05), but no significant correlation with plantarflexor spasticity. A linear regression model showed that affected ankle dorsiflexion strength was independently associated with TUG times and accounted for 27.5% of the variance. The whole model explained 47.5% of the variance in TUG times. Affected ankle dorsiflexion strength is a crucial component in determining the TUG performance, which is thought to reflect functional mobility in subjects with spastic hemiplegia.

  19. Total ankle arthroplasty: An imaging overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Da Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Chun, Ka Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji Hospital, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Potter, Hollis G.; Li, Angela E. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York (United States)

    2016-06-15

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  20. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Imaging Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Rae; Choi, Yun Sun; Potter, Hollis G; Li, Angela E; Chun, Ka-Young; Jung, Yoon Young; Kim, Jin-Su; Young, Ki-Won

    2016-01-01

    With advances in implant technology, total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has become an increasingly popular alternative to arthrodesis for the management of end-stage ankle arthritis. However, reports in the literature do not focus on the imaging features of TAA. Through a literature review, we demonstrate basic design features of the current ankle arthroplasty system, and the normal and abnormal postoperative imaging features associated with such devices. Pre- and postoperative evaluations of ankle arthroplasty mainly include radiography; in addition, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging provide further characterization of imaging abnormalities. Familiarization with multimodal imaging features of frequent procedural complications at various postoperative intervals is important in radiological practice.

  1. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  2. Maisonneuve-hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Richard M; Tran, Wesley H; Lorich, Dean G

    2014-11-01

    Maisonneuve fractures are rare ankle injuries, accounting for up to 7% of all ankle fractures. They consist of a proximal third fibula fracture, syndesmotic disruption, and medial ankle injury (either a deltoid ligament disruption or a medial malleolus fracture), and are often successfully managed with nonoperative treatment of the proximal fibula fracture and open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the medial ankle injury and syndesmotic disruption. The hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture comprises approximately 7% of all ankle fractures and features dual posterior tibial lip fractures featuring a posterolateral fragment and a posteromedial fragment. Good functional results have been reported in the literature after ORIF of both the posterolateral and posteromedial fragments of this variant fracture that is not described by the Lauge-Hansen classification. In this report, the authors present the unique case of an isolated ankle fracture demonstrating characteristics of both a Maisonneuve fracture and a hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. They also highlight the diagnostic imaging characteristics, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and preoperative radiograph findings, surgical treatment, and postoperative clinical outcome for this patient with a Maisonneuve-hyperplantarflexion variant ankle fracture. To the authors' knowledge, this unique fracture pattern has not been reported previously in the literature. The authors conclude that although good results were seen postoperatively in this case, the importance of ORIF of both the posteromedial and posterolateral fragments of variant fractures cannot be overstated. They also found MRI to be a particularly helpful adjunct in formulating the correct diagnosis and treatment plan.

  3. An Unusual Ankle Injury: The Bosworth-Pilon Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Nicholas D; Shah, Feisal; Narayan, Badri

    2015-01-01

    The Bosworth injury occurs when the distal fibula becomes entrapped posterior to the posterior tibial tubercle, usually as a result of a supination external rotation injury. This uncommon occurrence is a recognized cause of an irreducible ankle dislocation. A pilon fracture is usually a high-energy injury caused by the talus being driven upward into the tibial plafond. The resulting bone and soft tissue injuries often require a staged approach to management. The present report is the first in the medical data to describe a Bosworth injury complicating a pilon fracture. We also discuss a management approach for this rare fracture.

  4. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find an Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeon Page Content The Orthopaedic Distinction Who are Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Surgeons? Orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons ...

  5. Effects of ankle braces upon agility course performance in high school athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriau, M R; Cox, W B; Manning, J

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of wearing the Aircast(TM) Sports Stirrup, Aircast(TM) Training brace, Swede-O(TM) brace, and DonJoy(TM) Ankle Ligament Protector while running an agility course. Eighty-five high school athletes with no history of ankle injury and no experience in wearing any ankle support served as subjects. Each subject participated in four separate testing sessions. During sessions 1 and 4, subjects ran the agility course under the control (unbraced) conditions. Sessions 2 and 3 consisted of randomly wearing the ankle braces while running the agility course. A questionnaire concerning support, comfort, and restriction was completed by each subject after wearing each of the braces. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures revealed that a significant difference existed between the agility times. Tukey's post hoc test indicated that a significant difference existed between each ankle brace and the control 2 agility times as well as a control 1 and control 2 time difference. The control time difference was attributed to a learning effect. An ANOVA with repeated measures of only the four braces revealed that a significant difference existed between the agility times. Tukey's post hoc test showed the only difference was between the DonJoy Ankle Ligament Protector and the Aircast Training brace. We concluded: 1) there is limited practical performance effect upon agility while wearing an ankle brace; and 2) an athlete's perceived comfort, support, and performance restriction are contributing factors that may directly influence the effectiveness of ankle bracing.

  6. External support to local institutions: providing political leverage to weaker groups, or sustaining traditional relations of power?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    leverage for weaker groups, while others may sustain existing or traditional relations of power. The aim of this study of three cases of donor-supported institutions in Burkina Faso is to understand why close relatives of traditional chiefs invest in gaining control over a municipality, while showing only...... economic resources. The study thus enhances our understanding of mechanisms for access to local donor-supported institutions. Il existe tout un pan de la littérature qui montre que les institutions appuyées par les bailleurs de fonds en Afrique Subsaharienne (ASS) sont accaparées par les élites locales...

  7. Current concepts review: ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arastu, M H; Demcoe, R; Buckley, R E

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fractures are common injuries that require meticulous technique in order to optimise outcome. The Lauge-Hansen and Danis-Weber classifications in addition to careful evaluation of the injury mechanism can help guide treatment but surgeons must be aware that there are injury patterns that will not always fit the afore mentioned patterns. The principles of atraumatic soft tissue handling, rigid internal fixation and early range of motion exercises are critical for successfully treating these injuries. There are still areas of treatment uncertainty and future directed research is needed in order to address some of these questions.

  8. Haemophilic arthropathy of the ankle treated by total ankle replacement: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, A; Elsner, A; Hefti, D; Hintermann, B

    2010-07-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint in haemophilic patients has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is still controversial as a treatment option. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the mid-term outcome in patients treated with total ankle replacement using an unconstrained three-component ankle implant. Ten haemophilic ankles in eight patients (mean age: 43.2 years, range 26.7-57.5) treated with total ankle replacement were followed up for a minimum of 2.7 years (mean: 5.6, range 2.7-7.6). The outcome was measured with clinical and radiological evaluations. There were no intra- or peri-operative complications. The AOFAS-hindfoot-score increased from 38 (range 8-57) preoperatively to 81 (range 69-95) postoperatively. All patients were satisfied with the results. Four patients became pain free; in the whole patient cohort pain level decreased from 7.1 (range 4-9) preoperatively to 0.8 (range 0-3) postoperatively. All categories of SF-36 score showed significant improvements in quality of life. In one patient, open ankle arthrolysis was performed because of painful arthrofibrosis. For patients with haemophilic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint, total ankle replacement is a valuable alternative treatment to ankle fusion.

  9. An EMG-to-force processing approach for determining ankle muscle forces during normal human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogey, R A; Perry, J; Gitter, A J

    2005-09-01

    Muscle forces move our limbs. These forces must be estimated with indirect techniques, as direct measurements are neither generally possible nor practical. An electromyography (EMG)-to-force processing technique was developed. Ankle joint moments and, by extension, ankle muscle forces were calculated. The ankle moment obtained by inverse dynamics was calculated for ten normal adults during free speed gait. There was close correlation between inverse dynamics ankle moments and moments determined by the EMG-to-force processing approach. Muscle forces were determined. The gait peak Achilles tendon force occurred in late single limb support. Peak force observed (2.9 kN) closely matched values obtained where force transducers were used to obtain in vivo muscle forces (2.6 kN). The EMG-to-force processing model presented here appears to be a practical means to determine in vivo muscle forces.

  10. Radiological aspects of sprained ankle syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijbrandij, E.S.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis addresses several problems related to sprained ankle syndrome. The purpose of this thesis is to evaluate the imaging features of sprained ankles, found on new radiological modalities, and to assess the additional diagnostic understanding and treatment planning of helical CT as well as M

  11. Assessment of acute foot and ankle sprains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Louise

    2006-07-01

    Acute ankle and foot trauma is a regular emergency presentation and prompt strategic assessment skills are required to enable nurses to categorise and prioritise these injuries appropriately. This article provides background information on the anatomy and physiology of the lower limb to help nurses to identify various grades of ankle sprain as well as injuries that are limb threatening

  12. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; Reilingh, M.L.; Zengerink, M.; van Bergen, C.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone pl

  13. Osteochondral defects in the ankle: why painful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; Reilingh, M.L.; Zengerink, M.; van Bergen, C.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Osteochondral defects of the ankle can either heal and remain asymptomatic or progress to deep ankle pain on weight bearing and formation of subchondral bone cysts. The development of a symptomatic OD depends on various factors, including the damage and insufficient repair of the subchondral bone pl

  14. Ankle Training With a Robotic Device Improves Hemiparetic Gait After a Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Task-oriented therapies such as treadmill exercise can improve gait velocity after stroke, but slow velocities and abnormal gait patterns often persist, suggesting a need for additional strategies to improve walking. Objectives To determine the effects of a 6-week visually guided, impedance controlled, ankle robotics intervention on paretic ankle motor control and gait function in chronic stroke. Methods This was a single-arm pilot study with a convenience sample of 8 stroke survivors with chronic hemiparetic gait, trained and tested in a laboratory. Subjects trained in dorsiflexion–plantarflexion by playing video games with the robot during three 1-hour training sessions weekly, totaling 560 repetitions per session. Assessments included paretic ankle ranges of motion, strength, motor control, and overground gait function. Results Improved paretic ankle motor control was seen as increased target success, along with faster and smoother movements. Walking velocity also increased significantly, whereas durations of paretic single support increased and double support decreased. Conclusions Robotic feedback training improved paretic ankle motor control with improvements in floor walking. Increased walking speeds were comparable with reports from other task-oriented, locomotor training approaches used in stroke, suggesting that a focus on ankle motor control may provide a valuable adjunct to locomotor therapies. PMID:21115945

  15. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  16. Task-specific ankle robotics gait training after stroke: a randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Hafer-Macko, Charlene; Krebs, Hermano I; Macko, Richard F

    2016-06-02

    An unsettled question in the use of robotics for post-stroke gait rehabilitation is whether task-specific locomotor training is more effective than targeting individual joint impairments to improve walking function. The paretic ankle is implicated in gait instability and fall risk, but is difficult to therapeutically isolate and refractory to recovery. We hypothesize that in chronic stroke, treadmill-integrated ankle robotics training is more effective to improve gait function than robotics focused on paretic ankle impairments. Participants with chronic hemiparetic gait were randomized to either six weeks of treadmill-integrated ankle robotics (n = 14) or dose-matched seated ankle robotics (n = 12) videogame training. Selected gait measures were collected at baseline, post-training, and six-week retention. Friedman, and Wilcoxon Sign Rank and Fisher's exact tests evaluated within and between group differences across time, respectively. Six weeks post-training, treadmill robotics proved more effective than seated robotics to increase walking velocity, paretic single support, paretic push-off impulse, and active dorsiflexion range of motion. Treadmill robotics durably improved gait dorsiflexion swing angle leading 6/7 initially requiring ankle braces to self-discarded them, while their unassisted paretic heel-first contacts increased from 44 % to 99.6 %, versus no change in assistive device usage (0/9) following seated robotics. Treadmill-integrated, but not seated ankle robotics training, durably improves gait biomechanics, reversing foot drop, restoring walking propulsion, and establishing safer foot landing in chronic stroke that may reduce reliance on assistive devices. These findings support a task-specific approach integrating adaptive ankle robotics with locomotor training to optimize mobility recovery. NCT01337960. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01337960?term=NCT01337960&rank=1.

  17. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the contralateral limb: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David; Herr, Hugh

    2013-06-01

    Lower-extremity amputees encounter a series of stress-related challenges. Among them is an increased risk of chronic joint disorders. For unilateral, transtibial amputees, we hypothesize that increasing the power output of the trailing, ankle-foot prosthesis during powered plantar flexion could mitigate kinetic loading applied to the leading, contralateral leg during walking. Here, we present a case series that analyzes kinetic factors of unilateral, transtibial amputee gait and forms a comparison between two types of ankle prostheses with varying power outputs. The factors examined here are impact resultant force, peak foot pressure at heel-strike, step-to-step transition work, and knee external adduction moment. The two prostheses are the amputee participant's daily-use passive ankle-foot prosthesis and the BiOM powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of biologically accurate powered plantar flexion during late stance. In a preliminary study on two transtibial amputees walking over level terrain at a controlled speed (1.25 m/s), we observed average reductions of 8% in peak impact resultant force, 18% in impact resultant force loading rate, 8% in peak heel-strike foot pressure, and 15% in the 1(st) peak knee external adduction moment when the powered ankle-foot prosthesis was compared to the conventional passive prosthesis. Overall, our preliminary results suggest that more biomimetic prosthetic ankle-foot push-off during late stance may limit leading-leg musculoskeletal stress in walking.

  18. Characterization of Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System (TPS) Materials in Support of the Columbia Accident Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    2004-01-01

    NASA suffered the loss of the seven-member crew of the Space Shuttle Columbia on February 1, 2003 when the vehicle broke apart upon re-entry to the Earth's atmosphere. The final report of the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) determined that the accident was caused by a launch ascent incident-a suitcase-sized chunk of insulating foam on the Shuttle's External Tank (ET) broke off, and moving at almost 500 mph, struck an area of the leading edge of the Shuttle s left wing. As a result, one or more of the protective Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) panels on the wing leading edge were damaged. Upon re-entry, superheated air approaching 3,000 F breached the wing damage and caused the vehicle breakup and loss of crew. The large chunk of insulating foam that broke off during the Columbia launch was determined to come from the so-called bipod ramp area where the Shuttle s orbiter (containing crew) is attached to the ET. Underneath the foam in the bipod ramp area is a layer of TPS that is a cork-filled silicone rubber composite. In March 2003, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama received cured samples of the foam and composite for testing from the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans, Louisiana. The MAF is where the Shuttle's ET is manufactured. The foam and composite TPS materials for the ET have been well characterized for mechanical property data at the super-cold temperatures of the liquid oxygen and hydrogen fuels used in the ET. However, modulus data on these materials is not as well characterized. The TA Instruments 2980 Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) was used to determine the modulus of the two TPS materials over a range of -145 to 95 C in the dual cantilever bending mode. Multi-strain, fixed frequency DMA tests were followed by multi-frequency, fixed strain tests to determine the approximate bounds of linear viscoelastic behavior for the two materials. Additional information is included in the original extended

  19. [Clinical features in the diagnosis and treatment of ankle fracture with Wagsaffe fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongyu; Xin, Jingyi; Liang, Jun

    2014-02-25

    To explore the methods in the diagnosis and treatment of ankle fracture with Wagsaffe fragment. Among 1 201 patients, there were 18 cases of concurrent Wagstaffe fractures at our hospital between January 2009 to January 2012. There were 11 males and 7 females with an average of 37.4 (17-54) years. The causes of injuries were fall (n = 10), sports-related injury (n = 4), traffic injury (n = 3) and high-altitude fall (n = 1). All of them had lateral malleolar fracture. Other injuries included internal malleolar fracture (n = 16), posterior malleolar fracture (n = 8) and disruption of medial deltoid ligament (n = 3). According to the Lauge-Hansen system, all fractures were of supination-external rotation type. The fractures of fibula and Wagstaffe were explored through an anterolateral approach. The lateral malleolar fracture was fixed with plate While Wagstaffe fragment secured with lag screw or thread. Disrupted anterior tibiofibular ligament was restored. Other treatments included open reduction and internal fixation of medial and posterior malleolus, repair of medial deltoid ligament and screw fixation of disrupted tibiofibular syndesmosis. Ankle function was evaluated by the Baird-Jackson criteria. Wagstaffe fracture occurred at a rate of 1.5% in ankle fractures. Wagstaffe fracture was found in 4.4% of ankle fracture of supination-external rotation type. Seventeen patients were followed up over an average follow-up period of 16.8 (12-25) months. All radiographs showed union of all fractures and normal mortise. Baird-Jackson ankle functional score was from 81 to 99. In all 17 patients, 9 were rated as excellent, 5 as good and 3 as fair. The excellent and good rate was 87.4%. At the latest follow-up, 14 patients resumed their preinjury activities. As an easily misdiagnosed condition, Wagstaffe fracture is associated with ankle diastase and prone to occur in ankle fracture of supination-external rotation type. Accurate reduction and stable fixation facilitate the

  20. On Ecological Design of the External Support for Climbing Plants%攀援植物支持物的生态设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 杨云峰

    2011-01-01

    国内对攀援植物的应用缺乏创新,对支持物欠缺考虑是其重要原因之一.首先分析了国内外攀援植物支持物的演变过程,比较中西方支持物应用的差异,在园林设计要素中的地位以及演变的动因,并通过分析南京中山陵音乐台的紫藤花廊的重要作用与影响,阐释“廊架”形式在国内出现的原因;其次从攀援植物生态学研究成果出发,归纳攀援植物园林应用中不同于乔木等其他植物类群的特点与要求,并阐明支持物相应的设计原则与方法;最后介绍国外最新的设计案例,分析其设计思路与技术手段,表明如何运用攀援植物造景“面”的基本形式.%The domestic application of climbing plants has the problem of lacking innovation ability which is because little consideration is given to external support. Firstly, this paper analyzes the foreign and domestic historical changes about the external support for climbing plants which has great differences in application, position of the garden factors and evolution power, and gives the reason why the "veranda-frame" appeared in China by analyzing the wisteria veranda in Nanjing Zhongshan Scenic Area Music Stage. Secondly, the paper induces the characteristics and requirements in the application of climbing plants based on the results of ecological research, which is different from tree and other groups, and gives the principle and method of design about external support. Finally, the paper introduces the cases of newest foreign design and analyzes their ideas and technologies, showing how to use climbing plants by the basic form of "plane".

  1. Perceptions of the usefulness of external support to immunization coverage in Chad: an analysis of the GAVI-Alliance cash-based support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrinho, Paulo; Dramé, Mohammed; Tumusiime, Prosper

    2013-01-01

    Chad is one of the countries supported by the GAVI-Alliance that remains with unsatisfactory vaccination coverage. This paper tries to understand the main barriers to better coverage. These barriers were categorised as up or downstream against the health system building blocks as proposed by WHO and compared with barriers and activities identified by the country in its health system's strengthening grant proposal as approved by the GAVI Alliance in 2007. Data were collected using a modified Delphi system and by analysis of grant and annual report documents. Most of the activities anticipated under the GAVI health system's strengthening proposal are activities targeting downstream barriers (the neglect of upstream issues is of major importance in a decentralised state like Chad) and aligned with, not complementary to, immunization services strengthening activities. Further, both set of cash grants are blind to important recommendations such as the need to address barriers at the level of leadership and governance and at the level of the financing system and also about initiatives to promote community demand of vaccination services. IN CHAD SLOW VACCINATION PROGRESS IS AGGRAVATED BY SEVERAL CONTEXTUAL BARRIERS: the size of the country, the low population density, the nomadic nature of a significant part of its peoples, the recent civil war, associated with civil unrest and political instability and its geographical localization. In this situation it would be important to sustain downstream operations (the major focus of the ISS grant) while taking a long term view of the needs of the health system. The GAVI effectively supports downstream operations, but neglects the long term view.

  2. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  3. Personalised External Aortic Root Support (PEARS Compared with Alternatives for People with Life-Threatening Genetically Determined Aneurysms of the Aortic Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Treasure

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Personalised external aortic support was first proposed in 2000 by Tal Golesworthy, an engineer with familial Marfan syndrome and an aortic root aneurysm. After putting together a research and development team, and finding a surgeon to take on the challenge to join him in this innovative approach, he was central to the manufacture of the device, custom made for his own aorta. He was the patient for the ‘first in man’ operation in 2004. Ten years later he is well and 45 other people have had their own personalised device implanted. In this account, the stepwise record of proof of principle, comparative quantification of the surgical and perioperative requirements, 10 years of results, and development and research plans for the future are presented.

  4. FATIGUE DEVICE FOR TESTING ANKLE JOINT ENDOPROSTHESES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian TOADER-PASTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a model of a fatigue device for testing dedicated to ankle prostheses. The concept of the testing device relies on two aspects: almost any type of ankle prosthesis can be tested on it and it has to work on INSTRON axial-torsion testing machine. Starting from these requirements, a 3D functional assembly that reproduces the real movement of the ankle joint during gait cycle has been designed. The device is based on a cam-follower mechanism.

  5. Foot and ankle injuries in theatrical dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardaker, W T; Margello, S; Goldner, J L

    1985-10-01

    The theatrical dancer is a unique combination of athlete and artist. The physical demands of dance class, rehearsal, and performance can lead to injury, particularly to the foot and ankle. Ankle sprains are the most common acute injury. Chronic injuries predominate and relate primarily to the repeated impact loading of the foot and ankle on the dance floor. Contributing factors include anatomic variation, improper technique, and fatigue. Early and aggressive conservative management is usually successful and surgery is rarely indicated. Orthotics play a limited but potentially useful role in treatment. Following treatment, a structured rehabilitation program is fundamental to the successful return to dance.

  6. Conversion of ankle autofusion to total ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Emilie R C; Demetracopoulos, Constantine A; Ellis, Scott J

    2016-09-01

    Few reports in the literature have described the conversion of a surgically fused ankle to a total ankle replacement. The takedown of an autofusion and conversion to a prosthesis has not been described. We report the case of a patient with severe rheumatoid arthritis with an ankle autofusion fixed in equinus and severe talonavicular arthritis that was converted to ankle replacement using the Salto XT revision system. We describe the reasons why the decision was made to perform total ankle arthroplasty while concomitantly fusing the talonavicular joint, and discuss the rationale of the various surgical treatment options considered. We describe the clinical and radiographic outcomes achieved in this case. At 12 months post-operatively the patient reported significant reduction of pain, increased FAOS scores and had increased ankle range of motion.

  7. Biomechanics of the ankle joint and clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Junitha M; Golshani, Ashkahn; Gargac, Shawn; Goswami, Tarun

    2008-10-01

    Until the 1970s ankle arthrodesis was considered to be the "gold-standard" to treat arthritis. But the low fusion rate of ankle arthrodeses along with the inability to achieve normal range of motion led to the growing interest in the development of total ankle replacements. Though the short-term outcomes were good, their long-term outcomes were not as promising. To date, most models do not exactly mimic the anatomical functionality of a natural ankle joint. Therefore, research is being conducted worldwide to either enhance the existing models or develop new models while understanding the intricacies of the joint more precisely. This paper reviews the anatomical and biomechanical aspects of the ankle joint. Also, the evolution and comparison of clinical outcomes of various total ankle replacements are presented.

  8. Position versus force control: using the 2-DOF robotic ankle trainer to assess ankle's motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadian, Amir B; Nabian, Mohsen; Hartman, Amber; Corsino, Johnathan; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Holden, Maureen K

    2014-01-01

    An estimated of 2,000,000 acute ankle sprains occur annually in the United States. Furthermore, ankle disabilities are caused by neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and stroke. The virtually interfaced robotic ankle and balance trainer (vi-RABT) was introduced as a cost-effective platform-based rehabilitation robot to improve overall ankle/balance strength, mobility and control. The system is equipped with 2 degrees of freedom (2-DOF) controlled actuation along with complete means of angle and torque measurement mechanisms. Vi-RABT was used to assess ankle strength, flexibility and motor control in healthy human subjects, while playing interactive virtual reality games on the screen. The results suggest that in the task with 2-DOF, subjects have better control over ankle's position vs. force.

  9. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion - A short term retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Muthukumar Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years. The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100% progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3-6 months. All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34. The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42. We found that twenty patients (68.96% out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13% had good, and 2 (6.89% showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup.

  10. Transfibular ankle arthrodesis: A novel method for ankle fusion – A short term retrospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, S Muthukumar; Selvaraj, V; Devadoss, Sathish; Devadoss, Annamalai

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ankle arthrodesis has long been the traditional operative treatment for posttraumatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, infection, neuromuscular conditions, and salvage of failed ankle arthroplasty. It remains the treatment of choice for patients in whom heavy and prolonged activity is anticipated. We present our short term followup study of functional outcome of patients who underwent transfibular ankle arthrodesis for arthritis of ankle due to various indications. Materials and Methods: 29 transfibular ankle arthrodesis in 29 patients performed between April 2009 and April 2014 were included in this study. The mean age was 50 years (range 22-75 years). The outcome analysis with a minimum of 1-year postoperative followup were included. All the patients were assessed with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Hindfoot scale. Results: All cases of ankle fusions (100%) progressed to solid union in a mean postoperative duration of 3.8 months (range 3–6 months). All patients had sound arthrodesis. The mean followup period was 32.52 months (standard deviation ± 10.34). The mean AOFAS score was 74 (pain score = 32, functional score = 42). We found that twenty patients (68.96%) out of 29, had excellent results, 7 (24.13%) had good, and 2 (6.89%) showed fair results. Conclusion: Transfibular ankle arthrodesis is a simple and effective procedure for ankle arthritis. It achieves a high rate of union and good functional outcome on midterm followup. PMID:28216754

  11. Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichen simplex chronicus on the ankle: Lichen simplex chronicus is also known as neurodermatitis. A minor itch may encourage scratching which increases the irritation, leading to more scratching. This ...

  12. Glossary of Foot and Ankle Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Charcot fractures in the foot and ankle. Orthopaedics/Orthopedics - The medical and surgical specialty focused on treating, repairing and reconstructing the human musculoskeletal system. Orthopaedist /Orthopaedic Surgeon - A surgeon whose specialty is treating, repairing ...

  13. Compression therapy after ankle fracture surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winge, R; Bayer, L; Gottlieb, H

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The main purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of compression treatment on the perioperative course of ankle fractures and describe its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, length of stay (LOS) and time to surgery (TTS). The aim...... undergoing surgery, testing either intermittent pneumatic compression, compression bandage and/or compression stocking and reporting its effect on edema, pain, ankle joint mobility, wound healing complication, LOS and TTS. To conclude on data a narrative synthesis was performed. RESULTS: The review included...... eight studies (451 patients). Seven studies found a significant effect on edema, two studies described a significant reduction in pain, one a positive effect on ankle movement, two a positive effect on wound healing, one a reduction in LOS and finally two studies reported reduction in TTS. A systematic...

  14. American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Practice Management Education Opportunities Practice Management e-Learning e-Learning CME Transcripts Corporate Relations Faculty Application Research & Publications Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery ACFAS Update Read ...

  15. Postoperative infection in the foot and ankle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Victoria O

    2012-07-01

    Our discussion highlights the commonly performed surgical procedures in the foot and ankle and reviews the various imaging modalities available for the detection of infection with graphic examples to better enable radiologists to approach the radiological evaluation of postoperative infection in the foot and ankle. Discrimination between infectious and noninfectious inflammation remains a diagnostic challenge usually needing a combination of clinical assessment, laboratory investigations, and imaging studies to increase diagnostic accuracy.

  16. Salvage arthrodesis for failed total ankle arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürcher, Arthur W

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) has gained popularity in recent years. If it fails, however, salvage arthrodesis must be reliable as a rescue procedure. We therefore investigated the clinical, radiographic, and subjective outcome after salvage arthrodesis in a consecutive group of patients, and concentrated on the influence of the method of fixation on union rate and on salvage in inflammatory joint disease. Patients and methods Between 1994 and 2005, salvage arthrodesis was performed on 18 ankles (18 patients). Diagnosis was inflammatory joint disease (IJD) in 15 cases and osteoarthritis (OA) in 3. Tibio-talar fusion was performed in 7 ankles, and tibio-talocalcaneal fusion in 11. Serial radiographs were studied for time to union. Clinical outcome at latest follow-up was measured by the AOFAS score, the foot function index (FFI) and by VAS scores for pain, function, and satisfaction. Results Blade plates were used in 7 ankles (4 IJD, 3 OA); all united. Nonunion developed in 7 of the 11 rheumatic ankles stabilized by other methods. 11 patients (8 fused ankles, 3 nonunions) were available for clinical evaluation. Their mean AOFAS score was 62 and mean overall FFI was 70. VAS score for pain was 20, for function 64, and for satisfaction 74. The scores were similar in united and non-united ankles. Interpretation Blade plate fixation is successful in salvage arthrodesis for failed TAA. A high nonunion rate was found after salvage ankle arthrodesis in IJD with other methods of fixation. Clinical results were fair to good. PMID:20175648

  17. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: A Brief Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Roger A.; Harrison, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle fusion has long been the standard of treatment for end-stage ankle arthritis, and a successful arthroplasty has been a long sought alternative. It is a motion sparing procedure and may greatly reduce the potential for adjacent level degeneration as seen with arthrodesis. The typical candidate for arthroplasty is a healthy low demand patient, although the indications are widening as the success of the procedure has increased. Nevertheless, it is not fail-safe, technical expertise and exp...

  18. An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain.

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, M S; Chan, K. M.; So, C H; Yuan, W Y

    1994-01-01

    Ankle sprain is a common sports injury and is often regarded as trivial by athletes and coaches. This epidemiological study was conducted among three categories of Hong Kong Chinese athletes: national teams, competitive athletes and recreational athletes. This study shows that as much as 73% of all athletes had recurrent ankle sprain and 59% of these athletes had significant disability and residual symptoms which led to impairment of their athletic performance. This study indicates that a pro...

  19. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  20. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  1. Evolution of an International External Quality Assurance Model To Support Laboratory Investigation of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Developed for the SIREVA Project in Latin America, from 1993 to 2005▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovgren, Marguerite; Talbot, James A.; Brandileone, Maria Cristina; Casagrande, Silvana T.; Agudelo, Clara Inés; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Regueira, Mabel; Corso, Alejandra; Heitmann, Ingrid; Maldonado, Aurora; Echániz-Avilés, Gabriela; Soto-Noguerón, Araceli; Hortal, María; Camou, Teresa; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Fabio, José Luis Di

    2007-01-01

    In 1993 the Pan American Health Organization initiated a laboratory-based surveillance system, called the SIREVA project, to learn about Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive disease in Latin American children. In 1994, National Laboratories in six countries were trained to perform serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility testing using broth microdilution to determine the MIC for specified antibiotics. An international External Quality Assurance (EQA) program was developed to monitor and support ongoing laboratory performance. The EQA program was coordinated by the National Centre for Streptococcus (NCS), Edmonton, Canada, and included external proficiency testing (EPT) and a validation process requiring regular submission of a sample of isolates from each laboratory to the NCS for verification of the serotype and MIC. In 1999, the EQA program was decentralized to use three of the original laboratories as regional quality control centers to address operational concerns and to accommodate the growth of the laboratory network to more than 20 countries including the Caribbean region. The overall EPT serotyping accuracies for phase I (1993 to 1998) and phase II (1999 to 2005) were 88.0 and 93.8%, respectively; the MIC correlations within ±1 log2 dilution of the expected result were 83.0 and 91.0% and the interpretive category agreements were 89.1 and 95.3%. Overall, the validation process serotyping accuracies for phases I and II were 81.9 and 88.1%, respectively, 80.4 and 90.5% for MIC agreement, and 85.8 and 94.3% for category agreement. These results indicate a high level of testing accuracy in participating National Laboratories and a sustained increase in EQA participation in Latin America and the Caribbean. PMID:17687007

  2. Measurement of blood pressure, ankle blood pressure and calculation of ankle brachial index in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Damsbo, Bent; Lund, Jens Otto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values......BACKGROUND: Low ankle brachial index (ABI) is a sensitive measure of 'burden' of atherosclerosis, indicating cardiovascular risk of the asymptomatic patient. Conventionally, ABI values...

  3. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis to assist level-ground and stair-descent gaits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Samuel; Berniker, Max; Herr, Hugh

    2008-05-01

    The human ankle varies impedance and delivers net positive work during the stance period of walking. In contrast, commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive during stance, causing many clinical problems for transtibial amputees, including non-symmetric gait patterns, higher gait metabolism, and poorer shock absorption. In this investigation, we develop and evaluate a myoelectric-driven, finite state controller for a powered ankle-foot prosthesis that modulates both impedance and power output during stance. The system employs both sensory inputs measured local to the external prosthesis, and myoelectric inputs measured from residual limb muscles. Using local prosthetic sensing, we first develop two finite state controllers to produce biomimetic movement patterns for level-ground and stair-descent gaits. We then employ myoelectric signals as control commands to manage the transition between these finite state controllers. To transition from level-ground to stairs, the amputee flexes the gastrocnemius muscle, triggering the prosthetic ankle to plantar flex at terminal swing, and initiating the stair-descent state machine algorithm. To transition back to level-ground walking, the amputee flexes the tibialis anterior muscle, triggering the ankle to remain dorsiflexed at terminal swing, and initiating the level-ground state machine algorithm. As a preliminary evaluation of clinical efficacy, we test the device on a transtibial amputee with both the proposed controller and a conventional passive-elastic control. We find that the amputee can robustly transition between the finite state controllers through direct muscle activation, allowing rapid transitioning from level-ground to stair walking patterns. Additionally, we find that the proposed finite state controllers result in a more biomimetic ankle response, producing net propulsive work during level-ground walking and greater shock absorption during stair descent. The results of this study highlight the

  4. The results of ankle arthrodesis with screws for end stage ankle arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torudom, Yingyong

    2010-02-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the results of ankle arthrodesis with screws in patients with ankle arthrosis. The author studied 19 patients (20 feet) who had been treated by ankle arthrodesis with screws from 2003 to 2008. Ten patients were men (11 feet) and nine (9 feet) were women. Their mean age was 56 years (30 to 65), and the average duration of follow-up was four years (2 to 6). Two compression screws were used in all feet. Union was achieved in 19 of the 20 feet (95%). Average scores for pain and clinical condition are increase after operation. One re-operation was performed for nonunion. Author conclude that ankle arthrodesis with screws was effective treatment for ankle arthrosis.

  5. Arthroscopic Management of Complications Following Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing; Roukis, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    There is great potential of managing the complications of total ankle replacement arthroscopically and endoscopically, and these procedures can be summarized into 3 groups. Group 1 includes procedures of the ankle joint proper with close proximity to the articular components of the total ankle replacement. Group 2 includes procedures of the tibia and talus with close proximity to the nonarticular parts of the total ankle replacement. Group 3 includes procedures that are away from the total ankle replacement. However, these remain master arthroscopist procedures and should be performed by foot and ankle surgeons who perform them with regularity.

  6. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  7. Prospective study of ankle and foot fractures in elderly women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadagiri Surender Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of ankle fractures in old people is changing as time passes on. The incidence of ankle fractures increases with advancing age. The study conducted was among a rural popula-tion which comprised of 68 women (32 women with ankle fractures & 36 women with foot fractures. Patients studied were in the age group more than 50 years. The study highlights the etiological & risk factors for fractures of ankle & foot. The commonest ankle fracture was the lateral malleolar fracture & the commonest foot fracture was the 5th Metatarsal fracture. Diabetes is a risk factor which increases the occurrence of ankle and foot injuries.

  8. Quality of research and level of evidence in foot and ankle publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barske, Heather L; Baumhauer, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The quality of research and evidence to support medical treatments is under scrutiny from the medical profession and the public. This study examined the current quality of research and level of evidence (LOE) of foot and ankle surgery papers published in orthopedic and podiatric medical journals. Two independent evaluators performed a blinded assessment of all foot and ankle clinical research articles (January 2010 to June 2010) from seven North American orthopedic and podiatric journals. JBJS-A grading system was used for LOE. Articles were assessed for indicators of study quality. The data was stratified by journal and medical credentials. A total of 245 articles were published, 128 were excluded based on study design, leaving 117 clinical research articles. Seven (6%) were Level I, 14 (12%) Level II, 18 (15%) Level III, and 78 (67%) Level IV. The orthopedic journals published 78 studies on foot and ankle topics. Of the podiatric journals, the Journal of the American Podiatric Medical Association (JAPMA) published 12 clinical studies and the Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery (JFAS) published 27, 21 (78%) of which were Level IV studies. When the quality of research was examined, few therapeutic studies used validated outcome measures and only 38 of 96 (40%) gathered data prospectively. Thirty (31%) studies used a comparison group. Eighty-seven articles (74%) were authored by a MD and 22 (19%) by a DPM. Foot & Ankle International (FAI) published higher quality studies with a higher LOE as compared to podiatry journals. Regardless of the journal, MDs produced the majority of published clinical foot and ankle research. Although improvements have been made in the quality of some clinical research, this study highlights the need for continued improvement in methodology within foot and ankle literature.

  9. Complications after ankle and hindfoot arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez Martín, T; Iglesias Durán, E; San Miguel Campos, M

    To evaluate the percentage of complications associated with ankle and hindfoot arthroscopy in our hospital and to compare the results with those reported in the literature. A retrospective descriptive review was conducted on the complications associated with ankle and hindfoot arthroscopy performed between May 2008 and April 2013. A total of 257 arthroscopy were performed, 23% on subtalar joint, and 77% of ankle joint. An anterior approach was used in 69%, with 26% by a posterior approach, and the remaining 5% by combined access. A total of 31 complications (12.06%) were found. The most common complication was neurological damage (14 cases), with the most affected nerve being the superficial peroneal nerve (8 cases). Persistent drainage through the portals was found in 10 cases, with 4 cases of infection, and 3 cases of complex regional pain syndrome type 1. There have been substantial advances in arthroscopy of ankle and hindfoot in recent years, expanding its indications, and also the potential risk of complications. The complication rate (12.06%) found in this study is consistent with that described in the literature (0-17%), with neurological injury being the most common complication. Ankle and hindfoot arthroscopy is a safe procedure. It is important to make a careful preoperative planning, to use a meticulous technique, and to perform an appropriate post-operative care, in order to decrease the complication rates. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiographic Evaluation of the Ankle Mortise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Mirbagheri

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The ankle joint is the most frequently injured joint in adults. Decisions on management are usually based on clinical examination and interpretation of the x-rays. Stability of the ankle mortise relies on the configuration of the osseous structures and the ligaments. A basic radiographic examination consists of a mortise-view and a lateral view. Some add the AP-view. The Mortise view is an AP-view with 15-25 degrees endorotation of the foot. "nThe view clearly demonstrates both lateral and medial joint spaces. On a true AP-view the talus overlaps a portion of the lateral malleolus obscuring the lateral aspect of the ankle joint. However, the AP-view will give you an extra view on both malleoli from a different angle. The lateral radiograph of the ankle should include the base of the fifth metatarsal because of the frequency of fractures at this side that clinically mimic a fracture of the ankle.

  11. Measurement device for ankle joint kinematic and dynamic characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomozzi, C; Cesinaro, S; Basile, F; De Angelis, G; Giansanti, D; Maccioni, G; Masci, E; Panella, A; Paolizzi, M; Torre, M; Valentini, P; Macellari, V

    2003-07-01

    The paper describes a measurement device for obtaining the kinematic characterisation and isometric loading of ankle joints under different working conditions. Non-invasive, in vivo experiments can be conducted with this experimental apparatus, the potential of which could be usefully exploited in basic biomedical research, prosthesis design, clinical applications, sports medicine and rehabilitation. The device determines the 3D movement of the foot with respect to the shank and evaluates the torques and moments around the three articular axes in relation to any desired angular position of the ankle complex. When integrated with superficial electromyographic techniques and electrical stimulation, it allows the assessment of the functionality of the lower leg in both mechanical and myo-electrical terms. The paper reports the main mechanical and electronic features of the device (high linearity; maximum moment ranges +/- 300 Nm for flexion-extension, +/- 35 Nm for both pronation-supination and internal-external rotation; angular ranges: +/- 100 degrees of dorsi-plantar flexion, +/- 50 degrees of internal-external rotation and prono-supination; linear ranges: +/- 25 mm along each axis). Results from a healthy volunteer, under voluntary or stimulated conditions, helped in testing its operatability, reliability, robustness, repeatability and effectiveness. Preliminary simplified protocols have been also applied to 20 healthy volunteers, and the main results were 80.8 +/- 11.9 degrees of internalexternal rotation, 46.2 +/- 9.1 degrees of prono-supination and 74.6 +/- 13.1 degrees of flexion-extension. Torques and moments were normalised with respect to a body mass index of 30. The maximum plantar flexion moment (57.5 + 21.3 Nm) was measured with the foot at 150 of dorsal flexion; the maximum dorsal flexion moment (50.2 + 20.3 Nm) was measured with the foot at 150 of plantar flexion.

  12. Influence of ankle injury on muscle activation and postural control during ballet grand plié.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-02-01

    Ballet deep squat with legs rotated externally (grand plié) is a fundamental movement for dancers. However, performing this task is a challenge to ankle control, particularly for those with ankle injury. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate how ankle sprains affect the ability of postural and muscular control during grand plié in ballet dancers. Thirteen injured dancers and 20 uninjured dancers performed a 15 second grand plié consisting of lowering, squatting, and rising phases. The lower extremity motion patterns and muscle activities, pelvic orientation, and center of pressure (COP) excursion were measured. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied to analyze waveforms of muscle activity in bilateral medial gastrocnemius, peroneus longus, and tibialis anterior. Our findings showed that the injured dancers had smaller pelvic motions and COP excursions, greater maximum angles of knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion as well as different temporal activation patterns of the medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior. These findings suggested that the injured dancers coped with postural challenges by changing lower extremity motions and temporal muscle activation patterns.

  13. Supervised exercises for adults with acute lateral ankle sprain: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van Rijn (Rogier); A.G. van Os (Anton); G.J. Kleinrensink (Gert Jan); R.M.D. Bernsen (Roos); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); B.W. Koes (Bart); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: During the recovery period after acute ankle sprain, it is unclear whether conventional treatment should be supported by supervised exercise. AIM: To evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of conventional treatment combined with supervised exercises compared with con

  14. Single leg balance test to identify risk of ankle sprains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trojian, T H; McKeag, D B

    2006-01-01

    .... The association between a positive SLB test and future ankle sprains was significant. Controlling for confounding variables, the relative risk for an ankle sprain with a positive SLB test was 2.54 (95...

  15. Bilateral ankle edema with bilateral iritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil

    2007-07-01

    I report two patient presented to me with bilateral symmetrical ankle edema and bilateral acute iritis. A 42-year-old female of Indian origin and 30-year-old female from Somalia both presented with bilateral acute iritis. In the first patient, bilateral ankle edema preceded the onset of bilateral acute iritis. Bilateral ankle edema developed during the course of disease after onset of ocular symptoms in the second patient. Both patients did not suffer any significant ocular problem in the past, and on systemic examination, all clinical parameters were within normal limit. Lacrimal gland and conjunctival nodule biopsy established the final diagnosis of sarcoidosis in both cases, although the chest x-rays were normal.

  16. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...... of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle...

  17. A kinetic model for describing effect of the external surface concentration of TiO2 on the reactivity of egg-shell activated carbon supported TiO2 photocatalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The porous support supported TiO2 is considered to be the promising photocatalyst due to the fact that it is easily recovered from water and has high capacity to mineralize pollutants. Obviously, the expected structure of this kind of photocatalyst is egg-shell, that is, TiO2 is mainly on the external surface of the porous support. The reactivity of the supported photocatalyst strongly depends on the concentration of TiO2 on the external surface of the porous support. In this study, a kinetic model was developed to describe the effect of the external surface concentration of TiO2 (CESC) on the reactivity of egg-shell activated carbon (AC) supported TiO2 photocatalysts. It was found that the obtained model precisely described the effect of CESC, on the reactivity of TiO2/AC photocatalysts. This study can be used to deeply understand the performance of TiO2/AC catalysts and to provide valuable information on designing efficient supported TiO2 photocatalysts.

  18. Management of Osseous and Soft-Tissue Ankle Equinus During Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Simonson, Devin C

    2015-10-01

    Obtaining functional alignment of a total ankle replacement, including physiologic sagittal plane range of motion, is paramount for a successful outcome. This article reviews the literature on techniques available for correction of osseous and soft-tissue equinus at the time of index total ankle replacement. These techniques include anterior tibiotalar joint cheilectomy, posterior superficial muscle compartment lengthening, posterior ankle capsule release, and release of the posterior portions of the medial and lateral collateral ligament complexes. The rationale for these procedures and the operative sequence of events for these procedures are presented.

  19. Foot and Ankle Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Anderson, Robert B

    Physicians need to be aware of a variety of foot and ankle injuries that commonly occur in American football, including turf toe, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, syndesmotic and deltoid disruption, and Achilles ruptures. These injuries are often complex and require early individual tailoring of treatment and rehabilitation protocols. Successful management and return to play requires early diagnosis, a thorough work-up, and prompt surgical intervention when warranted with meticulous attention to restoration of normal foot and ankle anatomy. Physicians should have a high suspicion for subtle injuries and variants that can occur via both contact and noncontact mechanisms.

  20. Characterization of ankle function during stair ambulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Deanna H.; Lelas, Jennifer L.; Della Croce, Ugo; Herr, Hugh; Bonato, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the ankle joint during level walking, stair ascent, and stair descent to determine models for use in the design of prosthetic and orthotic systems. Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk (1) across a level walkway, (2) up, and (3) down an instrumented stairway. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic data were analyzed to obtain ankle biomechanics during the stance phase of each task. Each stance phase was broken down into sub-phases based on the power traje...

  1. Shoe collar height effect on athletic performance, ankle joint kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated maximum-effort side-cutting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Gilbert Wing Kai; Park, Eun Jung; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man

    2015-01-01

    Side-step cutting manoeuvres comprise the coordination between planting and non-planting legs. Increased shoe collar height is expected to influence ankle biomechanics of both legs and possibly respective cutting performance. This study examined the shoe collar height effect on kinematics and kinetics of planting and non-planting legs during an unanticipated side-step cutting. Fifteen university basketball players performed maximum-effort side-step cutting to the left 45° direction or a straight ahead run in response to a random light signal. Seven successful cutting trials were collected for each condition. Athletic performance, ground reaction force, ankle kinematics and kinetics of both legs were analysed using paired t-tests. Results indicated that high-collar shoes resulted in less ankle inversion and external rotation during initial contact for the planting leg. The high-collar shoes also exhibited a smaller ankle range of motion in the sagittal and transverse planes for both legs, respectively. However, no collar effect was found for ankle moments and performance indicators including cutting performance time, ground contact time, propulsion ground reaction forces and impulses. These findings indicated that high-collar shoes altered ankle positioning and restricted ankle joint freedom movements in both legs, while no negative effect was found for athletic cutting performance.

  2. Ankle fusion using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Hendrickx; G.M.M.J. Kerkhoffs; S.A.S. Stufkens; C.N. van Dijk; R.K. Marti

    2011-01-01

    Reliable fusion and optimal correction of the alignment of the ankle joint using a 2-incision, 3-screw technique. Symptomatic osteoarthritis of the ankle joint after insufficient other treatment, severe deformity of the osteoarthritic ankle joint, or salvation procedure after failed arthroplasty. Ac

  3. Review of SKB's Safety Assessment SR-Can: Contributions in Support of SKI's and SSI's Review by External Consultants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-03-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) plans to submit a license application for the construction of a repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden 2010. In support of this application SKB will present a safety report, SR-Site, on the repository's long-term safety and radiological consequences. As a preparation for SR-Site, SKB published the preliminary safety assessment SR-Can in November 2006. The purposes were to document a first evaluation of long-term safety for the two candidate sites at Forsmark and Laxemar and to provide feedback to SKB's future programme of work. An important objective of the authorities' review of SR-Can is to provide guidance to SKB on the complete safety reporting for the license application. The authorities have engaged external experts for independent modelling, analysis and review, with the aim to provide a range of expert opinions related to the sufficiency and appropriateness of various aspects of SR-Can. The conclusions and judgments in this report are those of the authors and may not necessarily coincide with those of SKI and SSI. The authorities own review will be published separately (SKI Report 2008:23, SSI Report 2008:04 E). This report compiles contributions from several specific research projects. The separate reviews cover topics regarding the engineered barrier system, the quality assurance, the climate evolution and its effects, and the ecosystems and environmental impacts. All contributions are in English apart from the review concerning ecosystems and environmental impacts, which is presented in Swedish

  4. Basic life support and automated external defibrillator skills among ambulance personnel: a manikin study performed in a rural low-volume ambulance setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Anne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ambulance personnel play an essential role in the ‘Chain of Survival’. The prognosis after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest was dismal on a rural Danish island and in this study we assessed the cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance of ambulance personnel on that island. Methods The Basic Life Support (BLS and Automated External Defibrillator (AED skills of the ambulance personnel were tested in a simulated cardiac arrest. Points were given according to a scoring sheet. One sample t test was used to analyze the deviation from optimal care according to the 2005 guidelines. After each assessment, individual feedback was given. Results On 3 consecutive days, we assessed the individual EMS teams responding to OHCA on the island. Overall, 70% of the maximal points were achieved. The hands-off ratio was 40%. Correct compression/ventilation ratio (30:2 was used by 80%. A mean compression depth of 40–50 mm was achieved by 55% and the mean compression depth was 42 mm (SD 7 mm. The mean compression rate was 123 per min (SD 15/min. The mean tidal volume was 746 ml (SD 221 ml. Only the mean tidal volume deviated significantly from the recommended (p = 0.01. During the rhythm analysis, 65% did not perform any visual or verbal safety check. Conclusion The EMS providers achieved 70% of the maximal points. Tidal volumes were larger than recommended when mask ventilation was applied. Chest compression depth was optimally performed by 55% of the staff. Defibrillation safety checks were not performed in 65% of EMS providers.

  5. Effects of introducing a voluntary virtual patient module to a basic life support with an automated external defibrillator course: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kononowicz Andrzej A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of virtual patients (VPs encompasses a great variety of predominantly case-based e-learning modules with different complexity and fidelity levels. Methods for effective placement of VPs in the process of medical education are sought. The aim of this study was to determine whether the introduction of a voluntary virtual patients module into a basic life support with an automated external defibrillator (BLS-AED course improved the knowledge and skills of students taking the course. Methods Half of the students were randomly assigned to an experimental group and given voluntary access to a virtual patient module consisting of six cases presenting BLS-AED knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-course knowledge tests and skills assessments were performed, as well as a survey of students' satisfaction with the VP usage. In addition, time spent using the virtual patient system, percentage of screen cards viewed and scores in the formative questions in the VP system throughout the course were traced and recorded. Results The study was conducted over a six week period and involved 226 first year medical students. The voluntary module was used by 61 (54% of the 114 entitled study participants. The group that used VPs demonstrated better results in knowledge acquisition and in some key BLS-AED action skills than the group without access, or those students from the experimental group deliberately not using virtual patients. Most of the students rated the combination of VPs and corresponding teaching events positively. Conclusions The overall positive reaction of students and encouraging results in knowledge and skills acquisition suggest that the usage of virtual patients in a BLS-AED course on a voluntary basis is feasible and should be further investigated.

  6. 外界支持物对绞股蓝种群觅养行为和繁殖对策的影响%Effects of external support on the foraging behavior and reproductive strategies in Gynostemma pentaphylum populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何维明; 钟章成

    2001-01-01

    G.Pentaphyllum,as a climbing plant,utilizes its surrounding plants as external support for upright growth under natural conditions.To examine the effects of the external support on foraging behavior and reproductive strategies in the G.pentaphyllum populations,two types of treatments,i.e.erect growth with external support,and prostrate growth without external support,were created to simulate their success and failure in encountering support using experimental ecological methods.The results showed as follows:(1)External support could significantly affect blade biomass ratio,tendril biomass ratio,branching ratio,specific leaf area,blade biomass/support biomass,and petiole angle.The influences can embody the ecological adaptation of G.pentaphyllum populations to heterogeneous light environments,and reflect the “research” of the population with prostrate growth for support as well.(2)External support could significantly influence reproductive allocation,reproductive index,reproductive efficiency index,reproductive ratio,and reproductive output.It implies that external support may significantly affect reproductive strategies of the populations.(3)The different characteristics of the populations had various sensitivity to external support.(4)It was through changing their light resource environments and growth means that external support affected foraging behavior and reproductive strategies in the G.pentaphyllum populations.%绞股蓝(Gynostemma pentaphyllum)是一种攀援植物,自然条件下攀附其它植物向上生长。利用实验生态学方法,设置两种处理,即有外界支持物(简称支持物)的直立生长和无支持物的伏地生长(模拟绞股蓝寻找到和找不到支持物的两种生长情况),以探讨支持物对绞股蓝种群觅养行为和繁殖对策的影响。结果表明:(1)支持物能显著影响叶片生物量比、卷须生物量比、分枝率、比叶面积、叶生物量/支持结构生物量比和叶柄角度

  7. Recalcitrant Lateral Premalleolar Bursitis of the Ankle Associated with Lateral Ankle Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Naito

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle is a rarely reported disorder in the English literature although it is not uncommon in Asian countries where people commonly sit on their feet. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old woman with recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis associated with lateral ankle instability which was successfully treated with surgical resection of the bursa and repair of the anterior talofibular ligament. Operative findings revealed a communication between the bursa and articular cavity of the ankle joint via the sheath of the extensor digitorum longus tendon, which was considered to act as a check valve leading to a large and recalcitrant bursitis. This report provides a novel concept about the etiology of recalcitrant lateral premalleolar bursitis of the ankle.

  8. Therapeutic Interventions for Increasing Ankle Dorsiflexion After Ankle Sprain: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Masafumi; Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Clinicians perform therapeutic interventions, such as stretching, manual therapy, electrotherapy, ultrasound, and exercises, to increase ankle dorsiflexion. However, authors of previous studies have not determined which intervention or combination of interventions is most effective. Objective: To determine the magnitude of therapeutic intervention effects on and the most effective therapeutic interventions for restoring normal ankle dorsiflexion after ankle sprain. Data Sources: We performed a comprehensive literature search in Web of Science and EBSCO HOST from 1965 to May 29, 2011, with 19 search terms related to ankle sprain, dorsiflexion, and intervention and by cross-referencing pertinent articles. Study Selection: Eligible studies had to be written in English and include the means and standard deviations of both pretreatment and posttreatment in patients with acute, subacute, or chronic ankle sprains. Outcomes of interest included various joint mobilizations, stretching, local vibration, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, electrical stimulation, and mental-relaxation interventions. Data Extraction: We extracted data on dorsiflexion improvements among various therapeutic applications by calculating Cohen d effect sizes with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and evaluated the methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. Data Synthesis: In total, 9 studies (PEDro score = 5.22 ± 1.92) met the inclusion criteria. Static-stretching interventions with a home exercise program had the strongest effects on increasing dorsiflexion in patients 2 weeks after acute ankle sprains (Cohen d = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.12, 2.42). The range of effect sizes for movement with mobilization on ankle dorsiflexion among individuals with recurrent ankle sprains was small (Cohen d range = 0.14 to 0.39). Conclusions: Static-stretching intervention as a part of standardized care yielded the strongest effects on dorsiflexion after acute ankle sprains. The

  9. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindo; Forrester, Larry W; Macko, Richard F

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (stroke) often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot ("anklebot") training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7) who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/- 8.0 to 31.4 +/- 4.8, p = 0.05), higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/- 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/- 2.6 degrees/s, p 0.05) at 48 hours in both groups. Robust maintenance of motor adaptation in the robot-trained paretic ankle over 48 hours may be indicative of short-term motor learning. Our initial results suggest that the anklebot may be a flexible motor learning platform with the potential to detect rapid changes in ankle motor performance poststroke.

  10. Short-term ankle motor performance with ankle robotics training in chronic hemiparetic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindo Roy, PhD

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accident (stroke often results in impaired motor control and persistent weakness that may lead to chronic disability, including deficits in gait and balance function. Finding ways to restore motor control may help reduce these deficits; however, little is known regarding the capacity or temporal profile of short-term motor adaptations and learning at the hemiparetic ankle. Our objective was to determine the short-term effects of a single session of impedance-controlled ankle robot (“anklebot” training on paretic ankle motor control in chronic stroke. This was a double-arm pilot study on a convenience sample of participants with chronic stroke (n = 7 who had residual hemiparetic deficits and an equal number of age- and sex-matched nondisabled control subjects. Training consisted of participants in each group playing a target-based video game with the anklebot for an hour, for a total of 560 movement repetitions in dorsiflexion/plantar flexion ranges followed by retest 48 hours later. Task difficulty was adjusted to ankle range of motion, with robotic assistance decreased incrementally across training. Assessments included robotic measures of ankle motor control on unassisted trials before and after training and at 48 hours after training. Following exposure to the task, subjects with stroke improved paretic ankle motor control across a single training session as indexed by increased targeting accuracy (21.6 +/– 8.0 to 31.4 +/– 4.8, p = 0.05, higher angular speeds (mean: 4.7 +/– 1.5 degrees/s to 6.5 +/– 2.6 degrees/s, p 0.05 at 48 hours in both groups. Robust maintenance of motor adaptation in the robot-trained paretic ankle over 48 hours may be indicative of short-term motor learning. Our initial results suggest that the anklebot may be a flexible motor learning platform with the potential to detect rapid changes in ankle motor performance poststroke.

  11. An examination of ankle, knee, and hip torque production in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Phillip A; Robinson, Richard H

    2009-03-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether strength deficits exist at the ankle in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Additionally, there is evidence to suggest that knee and hip performance is altered in those with CAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether CAI is associated with deficits in ankle, knee, and hip torque. Fifteen subjects with unilateral CAI and fifteen subjects with healthy ankles participated. Subjects reported to the laboratory for one session during which the torque production of ankle plantar flexion/dorsiflexion, knee flexion/extension, and hip flexion/extension were measured with an isokinetic device. Subjects performed 5 maximum-effort repetitions of a concentric/concentric protocol at 60 degrees .s for both extremities. Average peak torque (APT) values were calculated. The subjects with CAI demonstrated significantly less APT production for knee flexion (F1,28 = 5.40; p = 0.03) and extension (F1,28 = 5.34; p = 0.03). Subjects with CAI exhibited significantly less APT for ankle plantar flexion in the injured limb compared with their noninjured limb (F1,28 = 6.51; p = 0.02). No significant difference in ankle dorsiflexion or hip flexion/extension APT production existed between the 2 groups. Individuals with CAI, in addition to deficits in ankle plantar flexion torque, had deficits in knee flexor and extensor torque, suggesting that distal joint instability may lead to knee joint neuromuscular adaptations. There were no similar deficits at the hip. Future research should determine what implications this has for prevention and rehabilitation of lower-extremity injury. Clinicians may need to consider including rehabilitation efforts to address these deficits when rehabilitating patients with CAI.

  12. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2013-07-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased cutaneous sensory function as evidenced by increased touch threshold. Absolute dorsiflexion force error increased without visual feedback during peroneal nerve stimulation. This was not a general effect of stimulation because force error did not increase during plantar nerve stimulation. The effects of transient stimulation on force error were greater when compared to continuous stimulation and lidocaine injection. Position-matching performance was unaffected by peroneal nerve or plantar nerve stimulation. Our results show that cutaneous feedback plays a role in the control of force output at the ankle joint. Understanding how the nervous system normally uses cutaneous feedback in motor control will help us identify which functional aspects are impaired in aging and neurological diseases.

  13. Osteoarthritis of the Foot and Ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that creates an increased risk of arthritis. Symptoms People with osteoarthritis in the foot or ankle experience, in varying degrees, one or more of the following: Pain and stiffness in the joint Swelling in or near the joint Difficulty walking or bending the joint Some patients with osteoarthritis ...

  14. Malignant melanoma of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, K J; Hayes, D W; Green, D R; Dickerson, J

    2000-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is a serious and devastating skin disease that podiatrists may be called upon to treat. It is pertinent that delays in diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma be avoided. Some of the topics discussed in this article are causes, clinical features, classification, and treatment of malignant melanoma, focusing on the foot and ankle.

  15. Finite element analysis of a total ankle replacement during the stance phase of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiani, B; Leardini, A; Corazza, F; Taylor, M

    2006-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) designs have still several important issues to be addressed before the treatment becomes fully acceptable clinically. Very little is known about the performance, in terms of the contact pressures and kinematics of TAR when subjected to daily activities such as level gait. For this purpose, an explicit finite element model of a novel 3-component TAR was developed, which incorporated a previously validated mechanical model of the ankle ligament apparatus. The intermediate mobile polyethylene meniscal bearing was modelled as an elastic-plastic continuum while the articulating surfaces of the tibial and talar metal components as rigid bodies. Overall kinematics, contact pressures and ligament forces were analysed during passive, i.e. virtually unloaded, and active, i.e. stance phase of gait, conditions. Simulation of passive motion predicted similar kinematics as reported previously in an analytical four-bar linkage model. The meniscal bearing was observed to move 5.6 mm posteriorly during the simulated stance and the corresponding antero-posterior displacement of the talar component was 8.3 mm. The predicted pattern and the amount (10.6 degrees ) of internal-external rotation of the ankle complex were found to be in good agreement with corresponding in vivo measurements on normal ankles. A peak contact pressure of 16.8 MPa was observed, with majority of contact pressures below 10 MPa. For most ligaments, reaction forces remain within corresponding physiological ranges. A first realistic representation of the biomechanical behaviour of the human ankle when replaced by prosthetic joints is provided. The applied methodology can potentially be applied to other TAR designs.

  16. Hip-ankle coordination during gait in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Sheng-Che; Chui, Kevin K; Corkery, Marie B; Allen, Elizabeth A; Cloonan, Caitlin M

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) may have sensorimotor impairments that affect control at the hip in addition to the ankle. The purpose of this study was to compare hip-ankle coordination and coordination variability between individuals with CAI and healthy individuals during walking. Ten healthy subjects and 10 subjects with CAI were recruited to walk on a treadmill. Hip-ankle coordination was quantified using vector coding, and coordination variability was quantified using coefficient of correspondence. We found significant between-group differences in hip-ankle coordination in the frontal plane around loading response (Control: 165.9±18.4°; CAI: 127.6±48.6°, p=0.04) and in the sagittal plane around the first half of mid stance (Control: 307.2±9.8°; CAI: 291.8±11.4°, pcoordination variability in the frontal plane around the second half of mid stance (Control: 0.54±0.06; CAI: 0.45±0.07, Pcoordination and coordination variability in stance phase during walking. Gait training is important in CAI rehabilitation, and the training should address altered hip-ankle coordination to reduce the risk of recurrent injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Within-socket myoelectric prediction of continuous ankle kinematics for control of a powered transtibial prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Samuel; Silver-Thorn, Barbara; Voglewede, Philip; Beardsley, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Powered robotic prostheses create a need for natural-feeling user interfaces and robust control schemes. Here, we examined the ability of a nonlinear autoregressive model to continuously map the kinematics of a transtibial prosthesis and electromyographic (EMG) activity recorded within socket to the future estimates of the prosthetic ankle angle in three transtibial amputees. Approach. Model performance was examined across subjects during level treadmill ambulation as a function of the size of the EMG sampling window and the temporal ‘prediction’ interval between the EMG/kinematic input and the model’s estimate of future ankle angle to characterize the trade-off between model error, sampling window and prediction interval. Main results. Across subjects, deviations in the estimated ankle angle from the actual movement were robust to variations in the EMG sampling window and increased systematically with prediction interval. For prediction intervals up to 150 ms, the average error in the model estimate of ankle angle across the gait cycle was less than 6°. EMG contributions to the model prediction varied across subjects but were consistently localized to the transitions to/from single to double limb support and captured variations from the typical ankle kinematics during level walking. Significance. The use of an autoregressive modeling approach to continuously predict joint kinematics using natural residual muscle activity provides opportunities for direct (transparent) control of a prosthetic joint by the user. The model’s predictive capability could prove particularly useful for overcoming delays in signal processing and actuation of the prosthesis, providing a more biomimetic ankle response.

  18. Treatment of ankle fracture and biomechanics of talus%踝部骨折治疗效果与距骨生物力学的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁庆威; 范广宇; 吕刚

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The anatomical structure of ankle joint is not complicated, but its biomechanics is very important. The talus has participated in consisting of three joints and played very important role in supporting the functions of ankle. Therefore, it is very important to stabilize the position of talus in order to restore the anatomical structure of ankle.OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between treatment of ankle fracture and the biomechanics of the talus.DESIGN: A non-randomized case controlled study was conducted.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: There were 95 patients with fracture of ankle joints during January 1985 to October 2000 from the First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. Three specimens of amputating legs due to malignant tumor were collected.INTERVENTIONS: The biomechanics of talus in ankle fracture was observed by amputated leg specimens and the clinical manifestation and Xray examinations were analyzed in the 95 fracture patients after treatment.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Forces acting on different fracture types,relationship between therapeutic effects and biomechanics of talus.RESULTS: Sixty-five cases were followed up. There were 41 cases with very good therapeutic effects, 12 cases with good effects, 7 cases with fair effects and 5 cases with poor effects. Biomechanics results: the neck was compressed 0.48 cm when both ankles were broken. The lateral malleolar facet got more pressure than medial malleolar facet when vertical pressure acted in external facet fracture. When fracture happened in the lower 1/3 of fibula, the pressure acted on lateral malleolar facet was less than that on medial malleolar facet when in inversion position.CONCLUSION: It should pay more attention to the anatomical relations of talus in ankle cavity and the gap of lower tibiofibular joint no matter external fixation or internal fixation of manual reposition to ankle fracture was used. It is a very important treatment standard to restore the biomechanical

  19. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of healthy paediatric ankles and knees: a baseline for comparison with haemophilic joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshava, S N; Gibikote, S V; Mohanta, A; Poonnoose, P; Rayner, T; Hilliard, P; Lakshmi, K M; Moineddin, R; Ignas, D; Srivastava, A; Blanchette, V; Doria, A S

    2015-05-01

    The study was undertaken to document cartilage and soft tissue changes/findings in ankles and knees of normal children of different age groups to be used for comparison in the assessment of children with haemophilia. Cartilage thickness and soft tissue changes were recorded at predetermined sites of ankles/knees on both US and MRI in healthy boys in three age groups: 7-9; 10-14; and 15-18 years. To assess the validity of the ultrasound and MRI measurements, an ex vivo study was done using agar phantoms with techniques and scanners similar to those applied in vivo. Twenty (48%) knees and 22 (52%) ankles of 42 boys, were evaluated. There was a reduction in the thickness of joint cartilage with age. A difference in cartilage measurements was noted in most sites between the age groups on both US and MRI (P ankles or knees (P = 0.20, P = 0.68 or P = 0.75, P = 0.63 for US, MRI, respectively). Although cartilage measurements were smaller on US than on MRI for both ankles and knees (P US measurements were smaller than corresponding phantom's measurements, P = 0.02. Age-related measurements were noted for cartilage thickness on US and MRI in ankles and knees. US measurements were smaller than corresponding MRI measurements at most joint sites, which were supported by results on small-diameter phantoms.

  20. Chronic ankle instability: Arthroscopic anatomical repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Hernández, M; Mellado-Romero, M; Páramo-Díaz, P; García-Lamas, L; Vilà-Rico, J

    Ankle sprains are one of the most common injuries. Despite appropriate conservative treatment, approximately 20-40% of patients continue to have chronic ankle instability and pain. In 75-80% of cases there is an isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. A retrospective observational study was conducted on 21 patients surgically treated for chronic ankle instability by means of an arthroscopic anatomical repair, between May 2012 and January 2013. There were 15 men and 6 women, with a mean age of 30.43 years (range 18-48). The mean follow-up was 29 months (range 25-33). All patients were treated by arthroscopic anatomical repair of anterior talofibular ligament. Four (19%) patients were found to have varus hindfoot deformity. Associated injuries were present in 13 (62%) patients. There were 6 cases of osteochondral lesions, 3 cases of posterior ankle impingement syndrome, and 6 cases of peroneal pathology. All these injuries were surgically treated in the same surgical time. A clinical-functional study was performed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score. The mean score before surgery was 66.12 (range 60-71), and after surgery it increased up to a mean of 96.95 (range 90-100). All patients were able to return to their previous sport activity within a mean of 21.5 weeks (range 17-28). Complications were found in 3 (14%) patients. Arthroscopic anatomical ligament repair technique has excellent clinical-functional results with a low percentage of complications, and enables patients to return to their previous sport activity within a short period of time. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Total Ankle Arthroplasty: An Overview of the Canadian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Warren C W; Lau, Johnny T C

    2016-06-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty use has increased across Canada over the last two decades. Multiple implant designs are readily available and implanted across Canada. Although arthrodesis is a reliable procedure for treating end-stage ankle arthritis, ankle replacement is often the preferred surgical treatment by patients. A recent prospective study evaluated intermediate-term outcomes of ankle replacement and arthrodesis at multiple centers across Canada, with variability in prosthesis type, surgeon, and surgical technique. Intermediate-term clinical outcomes of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis were comparable in a diverse cohort in which treatment was tailored to patient presentation; however, rates of reoperation and major complications were higher after ankle replacement.

  2. Measuring Ankle Instability in Pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandarakas, Melissa; Hiller, Claire E; Rose, Kristy J; Burns, Joshua

    2013-11-01

    Children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease frequently suffer ankle sprain and experience chronic ankle instability; however, no pediatric self-reported measures of chronic ankle instability exist. The aim was to modify and validate the most reliable measure of chronic ankle instability in adults: the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool. The Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool-Youth was tested for reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to discriminate between 104 children aged 8 to 16 years: 31 children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, 31 unaffected children with a history of ankle sprains, and 42 controls. Children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease had lower scores compared to unaffected children with a history of sprains (χ(2) = 15.10; P Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  3. Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Alena M; D'Andrea, Susan

    2013-06-07

    People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders. Specifically, people with a unilateral transtibial amputation have an increased susceptibility to knee osteoarthritis, especially in their unaffected leg. Previous studies have hypothesized that the development of this disorder is linked to the abnormally high peak knee external adduction moments encountered during walking. An ankle-foot prosthesis that supplies biomimetic power could potentially mitigate the forces and knee adduction moments applied to the unaffected leg of a person with a transtibial amputation, which could, in turn, reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis. We hypothesized that compared to using a passive-elastic prosthesis, people with a transtibial amputation using a powered ankle-foot prosthesis would have lower peak resultant ground reaction forces, peak external knee adduction moments, and corresponding loading rates applied to their unaffected leg during walking over a wide range of speeds. We analyzed ground reaction forces and knee joint kinetics of the unaffected leg of seven participants with a unilateral transtibial amputation and seven age-, height- and weight-matched non-amputees during level-ground walking at 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75 m/s. Subjects with an amputation walked while using their own passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive mechanical work and powered ankle plantar flexion during late stance. Use of the powered prosthesis significantly decreased unaffected leg peak resultant forces by 2-11% at 0.75-1.50 m/s, and first peak knee external adduction moments by 21 and 12% at 1.50 and 1.75 m/s, respectively. Loading rates were not significantly different

  4. Immediate effect of walking with talus-stabilizing taping on ankle kinematics in subjects with limited ankle dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Choung, Sung-Dae; Park, Kyue-Nam; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-08-01

    To determine the effects of walking with talus-stabilizing taping (TST) on ankle dorsiflexion (DF) and heel-off time in the stance phase of gait and ankle DF passive range of motion (PROM). Pre- and post-intervention study. University motion analysis laboratory. Ten subjects participated in this study. Sixteen ankles with limited ankle DF PROM were tested. Ankle DF PROM was measured using a goniometer, and maximum ankle DF before heel-off and time to heel-off in the stance phase of gait were measured using a 3D motion analysis system before and after walking with TST. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test. Ankle maximum DF before heel-off (p = 0.001), time to heel-off during the stance phase of gait (p = 0.005), and ankle DF PROM (p Walking with TST is an effective self-exercise for improving ankle kinematics during gait and increasing ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The management of Charcot joint disease affecting the ankle and foot by arthrodesis controlled by an Ilizarov frame: early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gafary, K A M; Mostafa, K M; Al-Adly, W Y

    2009-10-01

    Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot is a chronic and progressive disease of bone and joint associated with a risk of amputation. The main problems encountered in this process are osteopenia, fragmentation of the bones of the foot and ankle, joint subluxation or even dislocation, ulceration of the skin and the development of deep sepsis. We report our experience of a series of 20 patients with Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot and ankle treated with an Ilizarov external fixator. The mean age of the group was 30 years (21 to 50). Diabetes mellitus was the underlying cause in 18 patients. Five had chronic ulcers involving the foot and ankle. Each patient had an open lengthening of the tendo Achillis with excision of all necrotic and loose bone from the ankle, subtalar and midtarsal joints when needed. The resulting defect was packed with corticocancellous bone graft harvested from the iliac crest and an Ilizarov external fixator was applied. Arthrodesis was achieved after a mean of 18 weeks (15 to 20), with healing of the skin ulcers. Pin track infection was not uncommon, but no frame had to be removed before the arthrodesis was sound. Every patient was able to resume wearing regular shoes after a mean of 26.5 weeks (20 to 45).

  6. Musculoskeletal Conditions of the Foot and Ankle: Assessments and Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Smita; Riskowski, Jody; Hannan, Marian T.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle are an important public health challenge due to their increasing incidence combined with their substantial negative impact on patients’ quality of life. Non-pharmacological treatments serve as the first line of treatment and are frequently used for patients with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle. This review provides a summary of the assessments and non-invasive treatment options based upon available evidence. Recent studies show that individuals with foot and ankle pain have multiple co-existing impairments in alignment, motion, load distribution and muscle performance that may be evident in static and/or dynamic tasks. Additionally, both clinical and epidemiological studies support the inter-dependence between the foot and proximal joints. For instance, aberrant foot structure has been linked to foot osteoarthritis (OA), as well as OA and pain at the knee and hip. Most recently, advances in motion capture technology and plantar load distribution measurement offer opportunities for precise dynamic assessments of the foot and ankle. In individuals with musculoskeletal conditions of the foot and ankle, the chief objectives of treatment are to afford pain relief, restore mechanics (alignment, motion and/or load distribution) and return the patient to their desired level of activity participation. Given that most patients present with multiple impairments, combinational therapies that target foot-specific as well as global impairments have shown promising results. In particular, in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases, comprehensive rehabilitation strategies including early detection, foot-based interventions (such as orthoses) and wellness-based approaches for physical activity and self-management have been successful. While significant improvements have been made in the last decade to the assessment and treatment of foot and ankle conditions, few randomized clinical

  7. A multimodal approach to ankle instability: Interrelations between subjective and objective assessments of ankle status in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golditz, Tobias; Welsch, Goetz H; Pachowsky, Milena; Hennig, Friedrich F; Pfeifer, Klaus; Steib, Simon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective cohort study is to investigate the association between different subjective and objective assessments of ankle function in a population of athletes with or without functional ankle instability (FAI). 29 athletes with a history of ankle spraining were divided into two groups according to their ankle status: 16 with FAI (initial ankle sprain with residual functional instability) (age 24.6 ± 3.1 years), and 13 COPERS (initial ankle sprain without residual instability) (age 25.3 ± 4.4 years). The assessment of each individual's ankle function was based on three approaches: The "functional-ankle-ability-measure" (FAAM) assessing subjective ankle functionality, measures of sensorimotor control as objective functional measurements and MRI-based T2-mapping as a quantitative marker of compositional joint status. Pearson's product-moment-correlation coefficient, student's t-test and analysis-of-variance were used for statistical analysis. Significant group differences existed for subjective ankle function (FAAM, p = 0.04) and MRI-data mainly in the medial compartment of the ankle joint (p ≤ 0.05). We found unique associations between T2-mapping results and sensorimotor scores in the COPER (r = -0.756-0.849), and "FAI"-group (r = 0.630-0.657). The location and magnitude differed between groups. No correlations existed between these measures and the FAAM. This exploratory study provides preliminary evidence for potential interrelations between various diagnostic measures of ankle function and structure in individuals with and without FAI. We found associations between MRI-results and selected measures of sensorimotor control, indicating a potential link between loss of ankle function and early joint degeneration. Despite these interrelations, each of the different assessment options appears to contain unique information on ankle functionality important in a clinical assessment. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley

  8. A modified mobilization-with-movement to treat a lateral ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Heather; Baker, Russell T

    2014-08-01

    Lateral ankle sprains (LAS) are common in sports medicine and can result in a high rate of re-injury and chronic ankle instability (CAI). Recent evidence supports the use on mobilizations directed at the ankle in patients who have suffered a LAS. The Mulligan Concept of Mobilization-with-Movement (MWM) provides an intervention strategy for LASs, but requires pain-free mobilization application and little literature exists on modifications of these techniques. To present the use of a modified MWM to treat LASs when the traditional MWM technique could not be performed due to patient reported pain and to assess outcomes of the treatment. The subject of this case report is a 23 year-old female collegiate basketball player who had failed to respond to initial conservative treatments after being diagnosed with a lateral ankle sprain. The initial management and subsequent interventions are presented. After re-examination, the addition of a modification of a MWM technique produced immediate and clinically significant changes in patient symptoms. The use of the modified-MWM resulted in full resolution of symptoms and a rapid return to full athletic participation. After the initial application of the modified-MWM, the patient reported immediate pain-free ankle motion and ambulation. Following a total of 5 treatments, using only the modified MWM and taping technique, the patient was discharged with equal range of motion (ROM) bilaterally, a decreased Disablement in the Physically Active (DPA) Scale score, and an asymptomatic physical exam. Follow-up exam 6 weeks later indicated a full maintenance of these results. Recent evidence has been presented to support the use of mobilization techniques to treat patient limitations following ankle injury; however, the majority of evidence is associated with addressing the talar and dorsiflexion limitations. Currently, little evidence is available regarding the use of the MWM technique designed for LASs and the expected outcomes. This

  9. Predicting functional recovery after acute ankle sprain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R O'Connor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ankle sprains are among the most common acute musculoskeletal conditions presenting to primary care. Their clinical course is variable but there are limited recommendations on prognostic factors. Our primary aim was to identify clinical predictors of short and medium term functional recovery after ankle sprain. METHODS: A secondary analysis of data from adult participants (N = 85 with an acute ankle sprain, enrolled in a randomized controlled trial was undertaken. The predictive value of variables (age, BMI, gender, injury mechanism, previous injury, weight-bearing status, medial joint line pain, pain during weight-bearing dorsiflexion and lateral hop test recorded at baseline and at 4 weeks post injury were investigated for their prognostic ability. Recovery was determined from measures of subjective ankle function at short (4 weeks and medium term (4 months follow ups. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association between the aforementioned variables and functional recovery. RESULTS: Greater age, greater injury grade and weight-bearing status at baseline were associated with lower function at 4 weeks post injury (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.34. Greater age, weight-bearing status at baseline and non-inversion injury mechanisms were associated with lower function at 4 months (p<0.01; adjusted R square=0.20. Pain on medial palpation and pain on dorsiflexion at 4 weeks were the most valuable prognostic indicators of function at 4 months (p< 0.01; adjusted R square=0.49. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study provide further evidence that ankle sprains have a variable clinical course. Age, injury grade, mechanism and weight-bearing status at baseline provide some prognostic information for short and medium term recovery. Clinical assessment variables at 4 weeks were the strongest predictors of recovery, explaining 50% of the variance in ankle function at 4 months. Further

  10. Examining the Impact of a Positive Behavior Support Program and Direct Instruction of Social and Emotional Learning Skills on the Externalizing Behaviors of Disruptive Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Darla Renee

    2014-01-01

    Many adolescent disruptive youth in Pennsylvania are removed from traditional school settings for externalizing behaviors including aggression, defying authority, poor relationships with peers and adults, disruptive behaviors, and bullying. Post-school outcomes of adolescent disruptive youth remain dismal, and these students are the most…

  11. Diminished Foot and Ankle Muscle Volumes in Young Adults With Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feger, Mark A.; Snell, Shannon; Handsfield, Geoffrey G.; Blemker, Silvia S.; Wombacher, Emily; Fry, Rachel; Hart, Joseph M.; Saliba, Susan A.; Park, Joseph S.; Hertel, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI) have demonstrated altered neuromuscular function and decreased muscle strength when compared with healthy counterparts without a history of ankle sprain. Up to this point, muscle volumes have not been analyzed in patients with CAI to determine whether deficits in muscle size are present following recurrent sprain. Purpose: To analyze intrinsic and extrinsic foot and ankle muscle volumes and 4-way ankle strength in young adults with and without CAI. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Five patients with CAI (mean age, 23.0 ± 4 years; 1 male, 4 females) and 5 healthy controls (mean age, 23.8 ± 4.5 years; 1 male, 4 females) volunteered for this study. Novel fast-acquisition magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to scan from above the femoral condyles through the foot and ankle. The perimeter of each muscle was outlined on each axial slice and then the 2-dimensional area was multiplied by the slice thickness (5 mm) to calculate the muscle volume. Plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion isometric strength were measured using a handheld dynamometer. Patients with CAI were compared with healthy controls on all measures of muscle volume and strength. Extrinsic muscle volumes of patients with CAI were also compared with a normative database of healthy controls (n = 24) by calculating z scores for each muscle individually for each CAI subject. Results: The CAI group had smaller total shank, superficial posterior compartment, soleus, adductor hallucis obliqus, and flexor hallucis brevis muscle volumes compared with healthy controls as indicated by group means and associated 90% CIs that did not overlap. Cohen d effect sizes for the significant group differences were all large and ranged from 1.46 to 3.52, with 90% CIs that did not cross zero. The CAI group had lower eversion, dorsiflexion, and 4-way composite ankle strength, all with group means and associated 90

  12. The effects of ankle Kinesio taping on ankle stiffness and dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayson, Shirleeah D; Needle, Alan R; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of Kinesio® taping on static restraint and dynamic postural control of the ankle joint. Thirty female subjects with no history of ankle injury participated in this study. Subjects were tested for passive ankle laxity and stiffness, and time to stabilization following forward, backward, medial, and lateral hops. Subjects were tested prior to tape application, immediately following application, and following 24 hours of use. Differences between taping conditions were investigated using analyses of variance and pairwise comparisons. Stiffness increased following initial application and 24 hours of Kinesio® tape use (F = 6.99, p = .003), despite no observed changes in ankle laxity (F = 0.77, p = .49); however, no changes were observed in time-to-stabilization (F = 0.03, p = .97). Our results suggest that Kinesio® tape may improve static restraint in the ankle joint without altering peak motion or dynamic postural control. A future investigation into Kinesio® tape efficacy in injury prevention or rehabilitation is warranted.

  13. A Systematic Review on the Treatment of Acute Ankle Sprain Brace versus Other Functional Treatment Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kemler; I. van de Port; F. Backx; C.N. van Dijk

    2011-01-01

    Ankle injuries, especially ankle sprains, are a common problem in sports and medical care. Ankle sprains result in pain and absenteeism from work and/or sports participation, and can lead to physical restrictions such as ankle instability. Nowadays, treatment of ankle injury basically consists of ta

  14. Weight transfer analysis in adults with hemiplegia using ankle foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Karen J; Yarossi, Mathew

    2011-03-01

    Identifying and understanding the changes in transfer of momentum that are directly affected by orthotic intervention are significant factors related to the improvement of mobility in individuals with hemiplegia. The purpose of this investigation was to use a novel analysis technique to objectively measure weight transfer during double support (DS) in healthy individuals and individuals with hemiplegia secondary to stroke with and without an ankle foot orthosis. Prospective, Repeated measures, case-controlled trial. Participants included 25 adults with stroke-related hemiplegia >6 months using a prescribed ankle foot orthosis and 12 age-matched healthy controls. Main outcome measures included the weight transfer point timing (WTP, %DS), maximum total force timing (MTF, %DS), timing difference between WTP and MTF (MTF-WTP, %DS) and the linearity of loading (LOL, R(2)) during the DS phase of the gait cycle. The WTP and LOL were significantly different between conditions with and without the ankle foot orthosis for the affected and unaffected limb in post-stroke individuals, p ≤ 0.01. The MTF and difference in timing between MTF-WTP were significantly different during affected limb loading with and without the ankle foot orthosis in the stroke group, p ≤ 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively. MTF, MTF-WTP and LOL were significantly different between individuals with stroke (during affected limb loading) and healthy controls (during right limb loading). This research established a systematic method for analysing weight transfer during walking to evaluate the effect of an ankle foot orthosis on loading during double support in hemiplegic gait. This novel method can be used to elucidate biomechanical mechanisms behind orthosis-mediated changes in gait patterns and quantify functional mobility outcomes in rehabilitation. This novel approach to orthotic assessment will provide the clinician with needed objective evidence to select the most effective orthotic

  15. Charcot foot and ankle with osteomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Donegan, Ryan; Sumpio, Bauer; Peter A. Blume

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the current literature discussing topics of Charcot osteoarthropathy, osteomyelitis, diagnosing osteomyelitis, antibiotic management of osteomyelitis, and treatment strategies for management of Charcot osteoarthropathy with concurrent osteomyelitis.Keywords: Charcot foot; osteomyelitis; diabetes mellitus; infection; neuropathy(Published: 1 October 2013)Citation: Diabetic Foot & Ankle 2013, 4: 21361 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/dfa.v4i0.21361

  16. [Ankle joint prosthesis for bone defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, C

    2011-11-01

    Large defects of the talus, i.e. due to tumors, large areas of osteolysis in total ankle replacement (TAR) and posttraumatic talus body necrosis are difficult to manage. The gold standard in these circumstances is still tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis with all the negative aspects of a completely rigid hindfoot. We started 10 years ago to replace the talus by a custom-made, all cobalt-chrome implant (laser sintering). The first patient with a giant cell tumor did very well but the following patients showed all subsidence of the metal talus into the tibia due to missing bony edges. Therefore, we constructed a custom-made talus (mirrored from the healthy side) and combined it with a well functioning total ankle prosthesis (Hintegra). So far we have implanted this custom-made implant into 3 patients: the first had a chondrosarcoma of the talus (1 year follow-up), the second had massive osteolysis/necrosis of unknown origin (6 months follow-up) and the third massive osteolysis following a correct TAR (2 months follow-up). The results are very encouraging as all of the patients are practically pain free and have a good range of movement (ROM): D-P flexion 15°-0-20° but less motion in the lower ankle joint: ROM P-S 5°-0-5°. No subsidence was detected in the tibia or the calcaneus. The custom-made talus combined with the Hintegra total ankle replacement will probably be an interesting alternative to a tibiocalcaneal arthrodesis in selected cases with massive defects of the talus.

  17. Symptomatic anterior subtalar arthrosis after ankle arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-05-13

    A 76-year-old man reported right lateral heel pain 11 years after ankle arthrodesis. Clinically, there was tenderness in the right sinus tarsi and over the junction point between the talonavicular and calcaneocuboid joints. Radiographs showed that the joint spaces of the posterior subtalar joint and the talonavicular joint were preserved although there were osteophytes at both joints. Arthroscopic findings showed degeneration of the anterior subtalar and talonavicular joints. The symptoms subsided after arthroscopic debridement. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Biomechanics of uphill walking using custom ankle-foot orthoses of three different stiffnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Derek J; Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can provide support and improve walking ability in individuals with plantarflexor weakness. Passive-dynamic AFO stiffness can be optimized for over-ground walking, however little research exists for uphill walking, when plantarflexor contributions are key. Compare uphill walking biomechanics (1) between dynamic AFO users and able-bodied control subjects. (2) between injured and sound limbs (3) across different AFO stiffnesses. Twelve patients with unilateral limb-salvage and twelve matched, able-bodied controls underwent biomechanical gait analysis when walking up a 10° incline. Three AFO stiffnesses were tested in the patient group: Nominal (clinically prescribed), Compliant (20% less stiff), and Stiff (20% more stiff). AFO users experienced less ankle motion and power generation, lower knee extensor moments, and greater hip flexion and power generation than controls during uphill walking. Despite these deviations, they walked at equivalent self-selected velocities and stride lengths. Asymmetries were present at the ankle and knee with decreased ankle motion and power, and lower knee extensor moments on the AFO limb. Stiffer AFOs increased knee joint flexion but a 40% range in AFO stiffness had few other effects on gait. Therefore, a wide range of clinically prescribed AFO stiffnesses may adequately assist uphill walking. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Total ankle replacement. Early experiences with STAR prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murnaghan, J. M.; Warnock, D. S.; Henderson, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Early designs of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) had a high failure rate. More recent experience with the 3-piece, meniscal bearing, total ankle replacement has been more promising. We report a review of the early results of our first 22 prostheses in 20 patients undergoing Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement (STAR) in Northern Ireland. There was a mean follow-up time of 26 months. Seventeen patients are pain-free at the ankle joint during normal daily activities. Two of the early cases have required revision surgery due to technical errors. Other complications have included malleolar fractures, poor wound healing and postoperative stiffness. These early results show high levels of patient satisfaction, and we are encouraged to continue with total ankle arthroplasty. There is a steep initial learning curve and use of TAR should be restricted to foot and ankle surgeons. Images Fig 1 Figs 2a and b Figs 2 c and d PMID:16022128

  20. Control method for exoskeleton ankle with surface electromyography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen; WANG Zhen; JIANG Jia-xin; QIAN Jin-wu

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a control method for an exoskeleton ankle with clectromyography (EMG) signals.The EMG signals of human ankle and the exoskeleton ankle are introduced.Then a control method is proposed to control the exoskeleton ankle using the EMG signals.The feed-forward neural network model applied here is composed of four layers and uses the back-propagation training algorithm.The output signals from neural network are processed by the wavelet transform.Finally the control orders generated from the output signals are passed to the motor controller and drive the exoskeleton to move.Through experiments,the equality of neural network prediction of ankle movement is evaluated by giving the correlation coefficient.It is shown from the experimental results that the proposed method can accurately control the movement of ankle joint.

  1. Talar Osteochondroma Fracture Presenting as Posterior Ankle Impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercin, Ersin; Bilgili, Mustafa Gokhan; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2016-05-01

    Osteochondromas are the most common benign bone tumors. They are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. When symptomatic, the symptoms are usually due to its location and size. Fracture of an osteochondroma presenting as posterior ankle impingement is a rare condition. We describe a 22-year-old man with solitary exostosis who presented with a posterior ankle mass and posterior ankle impingement with 2 years of follow-up. Surgical intervention was the treatment of choice in this patient, and histologic examination revealed a benign osteochondroma. Osteochondromas found in the posterior aspect of the talus can be complicated by fracture due to persistent motion of the ankle. Talar osteochondroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of posterior ankle impingement causes. Posterior talar osteochondromas, especially when a stalk is present, should be treated surgically before it is more complicated by a fracture and posterior ankle impingement.

  2. Finite element stress analysis of some ankle joint prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falsig, J; Hvid, I; Jensen, N C

    1986-05-01

    A three-dimensional finite element stress analysis was employed to calculate stresses in a distal tibia modelled with three simple total ankle joint replacement tibial components. The bone was modelled as a composite structure consisting of cortical and trabecular bone in which the trabecular bone was either homogeneous with a constant modulus of elasticity or heterogenous with experimentally determined heterogeneity. The results were sensitive to variations in trabecular bone material property distributions, with lower stresses being calculated in the heterogeneous model. An anterolateral application of load, which proved the least favourable, was used in comparing the prosthetic variants. Normal and shear stresses at the trabecular bone-cement interface and supporting trabecular bone were slightly reduced by addition of metal backing to the polyethylene articular surface, and a further reduction to very low values was obtained by addition of a long intramedullary peg bypassing stresses to the cortical bone.

  3. Design, modelling and simulation aspects of an ankle rehabilitation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racu, C. M.; Doroftei, I.

    2016-08-01

    Ankle injuries are amongst the most common injuries of the lower limb. Besides initial treatment, rehabilitation of the patients plays a crucial role for future activities and proper functionality of the foot. Traditionally, ankle injuries are rehabilitated via physiotherapy, using simple equipment like elastic bands and rollers, requiring intensive efforts of therapists and patients. Thus, the need of robotic devices emerges. In this paper, the design concept and some modelling and simulation aspects of a novel ankle rehabilitation device are presented.

  4. External-Memory Multimaps

    CERN Document Server

    Angelino, Elaine; Mitzenmacher, Michael; Thaler, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many data structures support dictionaries, also known as maps or associative arrays, which store and manage a set of key-value pairs. A \\emph{multimap} is generalization that allows multiple values to be associated with the same key. For example, the inverted file data structure that is used prevalently in the infrastructure supporting search engines is a type of multimap, where words are used as keys and document pointers are used as values. We study the multimap abstract data type and how it can be implemented efficiently online in external memory frameworks, with constant expected I/O performance. The key technique used to achieve our results is a combination of cuckoo hashing using buckets that hold multiple items with a multiqueue implementation to cope with varying numbers of values per key. Our external-memory results are for the standard two-level memory model.

  5. Benign and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Adam D.; Datir, Abhijit; Langley, Travis [Emory University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Atlanta, GA (United States); Tresley, Jonathan [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Clifford, Paul D.; Jose, Jean; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Pain and focal masses in the foot and ankle are frequently encountered and often initiate a workup including imaging. It is important to differentiate benign lesions from aggressive benign or malignant lesions. In this review, multiple examples of osseous and soft tissue tumors of the foot and ankle will be presented. Additionally, the compartmental anatomy of the foot and ankle will be discussed in terms of its relevance for percutaneous biopsy planning and eventual surgery. Finally, a general overview of the surgical management of benign, benign aggressive and malignant tumors of the foot and ankle will be discussed. (orig.)

  6. Energetics and passive dynamics of the ankle in downhill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jonathan K; Contakos, Jonas; Lee, Sang-Wook; Jang, John

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the energetics of the human ankle during the stance phase of downhill walking with the goal of modeling ankle behavior with a passive spring and damper mechanism. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected on eight male participants while walking down a ramp with inclination varying from 0° to 8°. The ankle joint moment in the sagittal plane was calculated using inverse dynamics. Mechanical energy injected or dissipated at the ankle joint was computed by integrating the power across the duration of the stance phase. The net mechanical energy of the ankle was approximately zero for level walking and monotonically decreased (i.e., became increasingly negative) during downhill walking as the slope decreased. The indication is that the behavior of the ankle is energetically passive during downhill walking, playing a key role in dissipating energy from one step to the next. A passive mechanical model consisting of a pin joint coupled with a revolute spring and damper was fit to the ankle torque and its parameters were estimated for each downhill slope using linear regression. The passive model demonstrated good agreement with actual ankle dynamics as indicated by low root-mean-square error values. These results indicate the stance phase behavior of the human ankle during downhill walking may be effectively duplicated by a passive mechanism with appropriately selected spring and damping characteristics.

  7. Joint mobilization acutely improves landing kinematics in chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Eamonn; Cusack, Kim; Wilson, Laura; Doherty, Cailbhe

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the acute effect of ankle joint mobilizations akin to those performed in everyday clinical practice on sagittal plane ankle joint kinematics during a single-leg drop landing in participants with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Fifteen participants with self-reported CAI (defined as mobilizations performed included Mulligan talocrural joint dorsiflexion mobilization with movement, Mulligan inferior tibiofibular joint mobilization, and Maitland anteroposterior talocrural joint mobilization. Three CODA cx1 units (Charnwood Dynamics Ltd., Leicestershire, UK) were used to provide information on ankle joint sagittal plane angular displacement. The dependent variable under investigation was the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at the point of initial contact during the drop landing. There was a statistically significant acute decrease in the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion from premobilization (34.89° ± 4.18°) to postmobilization (31.90° ± 5.89°), t(14) = 2.62, P mobilization was 2.98° with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 0.54 to 5.43. The eta squared statistic (0.32) indicated a large effect size. These results indicate that mobilization acted to acutely reduce the angle of ankle joint plantarflexion at initial contact during a single-leg drop landing. Mobilization applied to participants with CAI has a mechanical effect on the ankle joint, thus facilitating a more favorable positioning of the ankle joint when landing from a jump.

  8. Subtalar Fusion Rate in Patients With Previous Ipsilateral Ankle Arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolli, Diego H; Nunley, James A; Easley, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    Isolated subtalar arthrodesis is generally successful, with reported fusion rates of 84% to 100%. However, alteration of subtalar joint mechanics and talar body vasculature after ankle fusion may negatively influence subsequent ipsilateral subtalar joint fusion. Because there is very limited information on the subtalar fusion rate in patients with previous ipsilateral ankle fusion, the purpose of this study was to describe fusion rates in subtalar joint arthrodesis with and without preexisting ankle fusion in a large consecutive series of primary subtalar arthrodesis cases. All primary subtalar fusions performed between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Thirteen of 151 consecutive cases were in patients with existing ipsilateral ankle fusions. All patients were evaluated for clinical and radiographic evidence of nonunion at follow-up, and fusion rates in the groups with and without previous ipsilateral ankle fusion were compared. Five nonunions occurred in the 13 cases with prior ipsilateral ankle arthrodesis, a 61.5% fusion rate. Twelve nonunions were identified in the 138 cases without prior ankle arthrodesis, a significantly higher fusion rate of 91.3% (P = .007). In our series, the subtalar fusion rate in patients with previous ipsilateral ankle arthrodesis was significantly lower than that for subtalar arthrodesis in the absence of ipsilateral ankle arthrodesis. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Comparison of total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis in patients with haemophilia using gait analysis: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Dauty, Marc; Gross, Raphael; Leboeuf, Fabien; Trossaert, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe hemophilia is an inherited, lifelong bleeding disorder characterized by spontaneous bleeding, which results in painful joint deformities. Currently two surgical treatments are available to treat haemophilia-related ankle joint destruction: ankle arthrodesis and total ankle replacement. The aim of the present study was to compare these two surgical procedures in haemophiliac subjects. Case presentation Kinematic and dynamic parameters were quantified using a three-dimensional...

  10. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Anna Chapman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must ...

  11. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: diagnosis and follow-up of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the ankle region. A descriptive interventional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boesen Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ankle region is frequently involved in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA but difficult to examine clinically due to its anatomical complexity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US of the ankle and midfoot (ankle region in JIA. Doppler-US detected synovial hypertrophy, effusion and hyperemia and US was used for guidance of steroid injection and to assess treatment efficacy. Methods Forty swollen ankles regions were studied in 30 patients (median age 6.5 years, range 1-16 years with JIA. All patients were assessed clinically, by US (synovial hypertrophy, effusion and by color Doppler (synovial hyperemia before and 4 weeks after US-guided steroid injection. Results US detected 121 compartments with active disease (joints, tendon sheaths and 1 ganglion cyst. Multiple compartments were involved in 80% of the ankle regions. The talo-crural joint, posterior subtalar joint, midfoot joints and tendon sheaths were affected in 78%, 65%, 30% and 55% respectively. Fifty active tendon sheaths were detected, and multiple tendons were involved in 12 of the ankles. US-guidance allowed accurate placement of the corticosteroid in all 85 injected compartments, with a low rate of subcutaneous atrophy (4,7%. Normalization or regression of synovial hypertrophy was obtained in 89%, and normalization of synovial hyperemia in 89%. Clinical resolution of active arthritis was noted in 72% of the ankles. Conclusions US enabled exact anatomical location of synovial inflammation in the ankle region of JIA patients. The talo-crural joint was not always involved. Disease was frequently found in compartments difficult to evaluate clinically. US enabled exact guidance of steroid injections, gave a low rate of subcutaneous atrophy and was proved valuable for follow-up examinations. Normalization or regression of synovial hypertrophy and hyperemia was achieved in most cases, which supports the notion that US is an important

  12. A finite element model of the foot and ankle for automotive impact applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaeho; Yue, Neng; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2012-12-01

    A finite element (FE) model of the foot and leg was developed to improve understanding of injury mechanisms of the ankle and subtalar joints during vehicle collisions and to aid in the design of injury countermeasures. The FE model was developed based on the reconstructed geometry of a male volunteer close to the anthropometry of a 50th percentile male and a commercial anatomical database. While the forefoot bones were defined as rigid bodies connected by ligament models, the surrounding bones of the ankle and subtalar joints and the leg bones were modeled as deformable structures. The material and structural properties were selected based on a synthesis of current knowledge of the constitutive models for each tissue. The whole foot and leg model was validated in different loading conditions including forefoot impact, axial rotation, dorsiflexion, and combined loadings. Overall results obtained in the model validation indicated improved biofidelity relative to previous FE models. The developed model was used to investigate the injury tolerance of the ankle joint under brake pedal loading for internally and externally rotated feet. Ligament failures were predicted as the main source of injury in this loading condition. A 12% variation of failure moment was observed in the range of axial foot rotations (±15°). The most vulnerable position was the internally rotated (15°) posture among three different foot positions. Furthermore, the present foot and ankle model will be coupled together with other body region FE models into the state-of-art human FE model to be used in the field of automotive safety.

  13. Leaf allocation patterns and 13C and 15N natural abundances of tropical lianas (Passiflora sp.) as dependent on external climbing support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Martin; Spiegel, Ann-Kathrin; Kazda, Marian

    2013-01-01

    The transformation from self-supporting lianas to host-supported climbing lianas is related to re-allocation of biomass and nutrients among plant organs. Therefore, first, variations in leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf carbon and nitrogen allocation and (13)C and (15)N natural abundances were analysed among three tropical Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. ligularis, and P. tripartita) in a greenhouse study. Second, the influence of a climbing support was considered for each species and parameter. P. ligularis leaves were most enriched in (13)C in both treatments when compared with the other two species. This enrichment was caused by a high LMA, which is related to a high internal resistance to CO(2) diffusion. For P. edulis and P. tripartita, δ(13)C was additionally increasing with nitrogen content per area. Generally, there were no differences when considering carbon and nitrogen allocation to leaves of host-supported and self-supporting lianas. The only hints towards increased investment into leaves after the transition from self-supporting to host-supported stages could be seen by a trend to increased leaf areas and masses. δ(13)C values of supported P. edulis or P. tripartita plants were significantly increasing faster than those of non-supported plants once the interactions of leaf mass or nitrogen content per area were accounted for. Hence, the offer of a climbing support had only a minor impact on δ(13)C or δ(15)N values in vitro, but this could be different with increasing age of lianas in vivo.

  14. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Pneumococcal Vaccine Additional Content Medical News External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) By Bradley W. Kesser, MD, Associate ... the Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis External otitis ...

  15. Walking cycle control for an active ankle prosthesis with one degree of freedom monitored from a personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Andrés, Guzhñay; Arévalo Luis, Calle; Abad Julio, Zambrano

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a fuzzy control algorithm for human walking cycle of an active ankle prosthesis for people who have suffered amputation of the lower limb, the system has one degree of freedom in the sagittal plane. Also, a biomechanical analysis of foot and ankle is shown to define the phases of plantar support and swinging. The used actuator is an intelligent servomotor, Dynamixel MX-106T which has torque, current and position feedback, among others, allowing real-time telemetry of the prototype implemented in a microcontroller system.

  16. Clinical measurement of mechanical ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasher, Raju K; Nagy, Dawn R; Em, April L; Phillips, Howard J; Mc Donough, Andrew L

    2012-10-01

    Clinicians commonly use the anterior draw test (ligament laxity) and distal fibular position (lateral malleolus displacement), to measure ankle instability. The purpose of this study was to establish intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for the anterior draw test and distal fibular position in a clinical setting. The anterior draw test (AD) was measured with a plastic Goniometer, and was defined as the linear displacement of the foot as it is drawn anteriorly with the ankle held in 20 degrees of plantar-flexion. Distal fibular position (DFP) was measured in standing using a digital vernier caliper and was the relative linear distance between the lateral and the medial malleoli. 20 participants aged 21-28 volunteered for the study and were measured on both ankles. It was found that Intra-tester reliability (ICC) ranged from 0.88 to 0.97 for AD and DFP; while inter-tester reliability (ICC) was 0.6 for AD and 0.77 for DFP. In addition for measures across trials, the standard error of the measurement (SEM) was, on average 0.66 mm for AD and 1.7 mm for DFP. While the limits of agreement (LOA) was ±0.17 mm for AD and ±4.03 mm for DFP. However, the SEM and LOA between testers was 2.27 mm and ±2.27 mm respectively for AD; and for 3.1 mm and ±10.4 mm for DFP. Overall the results suggest that both measures, as defined in this study exhibit moderate to good reliability and low standard error of measurement, suggesting a high degree of repeatability across trials.

  17. Total ankle prostheses in rheumatoid arthropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Bernard; Louwerens, Jan Willem K; van den Hoogen, Frank H J; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The first generations of total ankle replacements (TARs) showed a high rate of early failure. In the last decades, much progress has been made in the development of TARs, with the newer generation showing better results. We evaluated TARs implanted with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or juvenile inflammatory arthritis (JIA) as indication. Patients and methods 58 total ankle prostheses (Buechel-Pappas and STAR type) were implanted in patients with RA (n = 53) or JIA (n = 5) in 54 patients (4 bilateral). After a mean follow-up of 2.7 (1–9) years, all patients were reviewed by two orthopedic surgeons who were not the surgeons who performed the operation. Standard AP and lateral radiographs were taken and a Kofoed ankle score was obtained; this is a clinical score ranging from 0–100 and consists of sub-scores for pain, disability, and range of motion. Results 2 patients died of unrelated causes. Of the 52 patients who were alive (56 prostheses), 51 implants were still in place and showed no signs of loosening on the most recent radiographs. The mean Kofoed score at follow-up was 73 points (SD 16, range 21–92). 4 patients showed a poor result (score < 50) with persistent pain for which no obvious reason could be found. 5 implants were removed, 4 because of infection and 1 because of aseptic loosening. Interpretation Medium-term results of the STAR and BP types of TAR in RA were satisfactory. The main reason for failure of the implant was infection. PMID:19634020

  18. 10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis. Patients and methods Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint—excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus. Results Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79–0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67–0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons. Interpretation The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements—even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results. PMID:22066551

  19. Tendinopathies of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael R; Howard, Thomas M

    2009-11-15

    Because our understanding of tendinopathy has evolved in recent years, the condition is now considered a degenerative process; this affects the approach to treatment. Initial therapy should always involve relative rest and modification of physical activity, use of rehabilitative exercises, and evaluation of intrinsic and extrinsic causes of injury. The posterior tibial tendon is a dynamic arch stabilizer; injury to this tendon can cause a painful flat-footed deformity with hindfoot valgus and midfoot abduction (characterized by the too many toes sign). Treatment of posterior tibial tendinopathy is determined by its severity and can include immobilization, orthotics, physical therapy, or subspecialty referral. Because peroneal tendinopathy is often misdiagnosed, it can lead to chronic lateral ankle pain and instability and should be suspected in a patient with either of these symptoms. Treatment involves physical therapy and close monitoring for surgical indications. Achilles tendinopathy is often caused by overtraining, use of inappropriate training surfaces, and poor flexibility. It is characterized by pain in the Achilles tendon 4 to 6 cm above the point of insertion into the calcaneus. Evidence from clinical trials shows that eccentric strengthening of the calf muscle can help patients with Achilles tendinopathy. Flexor hallucis longus tendinopathy is most common among ballet dancers. Patients may complain of an insidious onset of pain in the posteromedial aspect of the ankle; treatment involves correcting physical training errors, focusing on body mechanics, and strengthening the body's core. Anterior tibial tendinopathy is rare, but is typically seen in patients older than 45 years. It causes weakness in dorsiflexion of the ankle; treatment involves short-term immobilization and physical therapy.

  20. Joint stiffness of the ankle and the knee in running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Michael; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2002-11-01

    The spring-mass model is a valid fundament to understand global dynamics of fast legged locomotion under gravity. The underlying concept of elasticity, implying leg stiffness as a crucial parameter, is also found on lower motor control levels, i.e. in muscle-reflex and muscle-tendon systems. Therefore, it seems reasonable that global leg stiffness emerges from local elasticity established by appropriate joint torques. A recently published model of an elastically operating, segmented leg predicts that proper adjustment of joint elasticities to the leg geometry and initial conditions of ground contact provides internal leg stability. Another recent study suggests that in turn the leg segmentation and the initial conditions may be a consequence of metabolic and bone stress constraints. In this study, the theoretical predictions were verified experimentally with respect to initial conditions and elastic joint characteristics in human running. Kinematics and kinetics were measured and the joint torques were estimated by inverse dynamics. Stiffnesses and elastic nonlinearities describing the resulting joint characteristics were extracted from parameter fits. Our results clearly support the theoretical predictions: the knee joint is always stiffer and more extended than the ankle joint. Moreover, the knee torque characteristic on the average shows the higher nonlinearity. According to literature, the leg geometry is a consequence of metabolic and material stress limitations. Adapted to this given geometry, the initial joint angle conditions in fast locomotion are a compromise between metabolic and control effort minimisation. Based on this adaptation, an appropriate joint stiffness ratio between ankle and knee passively safeguards the internal leg stability. The identified joint nonlinearities contribute to the linearisation of the leg spring.

  1. The Effect of Ankle-Foot Orthosis on Walking Ability in Chronic Stroke Patients: A randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, D.C.M.; Buurke, Jaap; Nijlant, J.M.M.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Regaining walking ability is a major goal during the rehabilitation of stroke patients. To support this process an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) is often prescribed. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of an AFO on walking ability in chronic stroke patients. Design: Cross-over

  2. A Survey of Parachute Ankle Brace Breakages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-10

    reduced since it was subject to abrasion from the concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop zone. b. DJ...strap was also directly under the heel and subject to abrasion from concrete in the harness shed, asphalt on the loading ramp, and dirt on the drop...airborne injuries), airborne students who did not wear the brace were 1.90 times more likely to experience an ankle sprain, 1.47 times more likely to

  3. OCDMA PON supporting ONU inter-networking based on gain-switched Fabry-Pérot lasers with external dual-wavelength injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Zeng, Duoduo; Guo, Changjian; Xu, Lei; He, Sailing

    2010-10-25

    We propose and demonstrate an OCDMA-PON scheme with optical network unit (ONU) internetworking capability, which utilizes low-cost gain-switched Fabry-Pérot (GS-FP) lasers with external dual-wavelength injection as the pulse sources on the ONU side. The injection-generated optical pulses in two wavelengths from the same GS-FP laser are used separately for the PON uplink transmission and ONU internetworking. Experimental results based on a two-user OCDMA system confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme. With OCDMA technologies, separate ONU-internetworking groups can be established using different optical codes. We also give experiment results to analyze the performance of the ONU-ONU transmission at different power of interference signals when two ONU-internetworking groups are present in the OCDMA-PON.

  4. [Influence of Ankle Braces on the Prevalence of Ankle Inversion Injuries in the Swiss Volleyball National League A].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, J; Kneubühler, S; Rogan, S

    2016-06-01

    Ankle inversion is a common injury among volleyball players. The injury rate during a game is 2.1 times higher than during training. As a result, the preventive use of ankle braces is frequently observed in Swiss volleyball leagues. Studies have shown that ankle braces have a preventive effect on the prevalence of ankle inversion. In Switzerland there has been no investigation into the preventive use of braces and their influence on prevalence. For this reason, the goals of this study are 1) to determine when, why and by whom ankle braces are worn and 2) to evaluate the injury rate of users and non-users of ankle braces. A modified questionnaire was sent to 18 men's and women's teams of the Swiss National League A. The questionnaire included questions about injury rates and the circumstances of ankle inversion injuries. The data were statistically analysed with Microsoft Excel 2012 and SPSS Version 20. The overall response rate was 61 %, allowing data from 181 players to be analysed. 33 % (59 of 181) of the players used an ankle brace. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of ankle inversion between users (12 injured) and non-users (8 injured) (p = 0.006). Wearing an ankle brace during training or during a game made no difference in the prevention of injuries (p = 0.356). More athletes were injured during training (n = 13) than during a game (n = 7). The results of the present study indicate that volleyball players preferably wear ankle braces to prevent injury. More than one third of the players in the study wore an ankle brace, 60 % for primary prevention and 40 % for secondary prevention due to a previous injury. The study shows that significantly more users than non-users of ankle braces were injured. This is contrary to literature. Furthermore it was shown that more injuries occur during training than during a game. This finding results from the fact that ankle braces were rarely worn during training. It is

  5. THE EFFECTS OF KINESIO TAPING ON PROPRIOCEPTION AT THE ANKLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark DeBeliso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was designed to determine if KinesioTM taping the anterior and lateral portion of the ankle would enhance ankle proprioception compared to the untaped ankle. 30 subjects, 15 men, 15 women, ages 18-30 participated in this study. Exclusion criteria: Ankle injury < 6 months prior to testing, significant ligament laxity as determined through clinical evaluation by an ATC, or any severe foot abnormality. Experiment utilized a single group, pretest and posttest. Plantar flexion and inversion with 20° of plantar flexion reproduction of joint position sense (RJPS was determined using an ankle RJPS apparatus. Subjects were barefooted, blindfolded, and equipped with headphones playing white noise to eliminate auditory cues. Subjects had five trials in both plantar flexion and inversion with 20° plantar flexion before and after application of the KinesioTM tape to the anterior/lateral portion of the ankle. Constant error and absolute error were determined from the difference between the target angle and the trial angle produced by the subject. The treatment group (KinesioTM taped subjects showed no change in constant and absolute error for ankle RJPS in plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion when compared to the untaped results using the same motions. The application of KinesioTM tape does not appear to enhance proprioception (in terms of RJPS in healthy individuals as determined by our measures of RJPS at the ankle in the motions of plantar flexion and 20º of plantar flexion with inversion.

  6. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  7. Hindfoot endoscopy for posterior ankle impingement. Surgical technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C.N.; de Leeuw, P.A.J.; Scholten, P.E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The surgical treatment of posterior ankle impingement is associated with a high rate of complications and a substantial time to recover. An endoscopic approach to the posterior ankle (hindfoot endoscopy) may lack these disadvantages. We hypothesized that hindfoot endoscopy causes less mo

  8. Dislocated ankle fracture complicated by near total distal ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygun, Fatih; Sertkaya, Omer; Aldemir, Cengiz; Dogan, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Total arterial ischaemia is rarely seen following a dislocated ankle fracture but if it does and intervention is not made, it can lead to serious morbidity. We present a 39-year-old woman with almost total occlusion in the arteria tibialis and arteria dorsalis pedis following a dislocated ankle fracture as a result of a bicycle fall. PMID:24248319

  9. Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement using a 3-component prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Total ankle replacement is an established surgical procedure in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. We analyzed complications and medium-term results in patients with simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement. Patients and methods 10 women and 16 men, mean age 60 (SD 13) years, were followed for a median of 5 (2–10) years. Results There were no intraoperative or perioperative complications, with the exception of 1 patient with prolonged wound healing. Major revision surgery was necessary in 6 of the 52 ankles, including 4 revisions of prosthetic components. The average pain score decreased from 6.9 (4−10) to 1.8 (0−4) points. The American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score increased from 32 (SD 14) points preoperatively to 74 (SD 12) points postoperatively. The average range of motion increased from 28° (SD 12) preoperatively to 38° (SD 9) postoperatively. All 8 categories of SF-36 score improved. Interpretation Simultaneous bilateral total ankle replacement is a suitable method for restoration of function and attainment of pain relief in patients with bilateral end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. The results of this procedure, including complication rates, revision rates, and functional outcome, are comparable to those reported in patients with unilateral total ankle replacement. PMID:21999622

  10. Review on design and control aspects of ankle rehabilitation robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamwal, Prashant K; Hussain, Shahid; Xie, Sheng Q

    2015-03-01

    Ankle rehabilitation robots can play an important role in improving outcomes of the rehabilitation treatment by assisting therapists and patients in number of ways. Consequently, few robot designs have been proposed by researchers which fall under either of the two categories, namely, wearable robots or platform-based robots. This paper presents a review of both kinds of ankle robots along with a brief analysis of their design, actuation and control approaches. While reviewing these designs it was observed that most of them are undesirably inspired by industrial robot designs. Taking note of the design concerns of current ankle robots, few improvements in the ankle robot designs have also been suggested. Conventional position control or force control approaches, being used in the existing ankle robots, have been reviewed. Apparently, opportunities of improvement also exist in the actuation as well as control of ankle robots. Subsequently, a discussion on most recent research in the development of novel actuators and advanced controllers based on appropriate physical and cognitive human-robot interaction has also been included in this review. Implications for Rehabilitation Ankle joint functions are restricted/impaired as a consequence of stroke or injury during sports or otherwise. Robots can help in reinstating functions faster and can also work as tool for recording rehabilitation data useful for further analysis. Evolution of ankle robots with respect to their design and control aspects has been discussed in the present paper and a novel design with futuristic control approach has been proposed.

  11. Mechanically induced ankle inversion during human walking and jumping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, P.H.J.A.; Grüneberg, C.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    A new method to study sudden ankle inversions during human walking and jumping is presented. Ankle inversions of 25 degrees were elicited using a box containing a trap door. During the gait task, subjects walked at a speed of 4 km/h. At a pre-programmed delay after left heel strike, an electromagnet

  12. Medium- to long-term outcome of ankle arthrodesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P.M. Hendrickx; S.A.S. Stufkens; E.E. de Bruijn; I.N. Sierevelt; C.N. van Dijk; G.M.M.J. Kerkhoffs

    2011-01-01

    Despite improvement in outcome after ankle arthroplasty, fusion of the ankle joint is still considered the gold standard. A matter of concern is deterioration of clinical outcome as a result of loss of motion and advancing degeneration of adjacent joints. We performed a long-term study to address th

  13. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, S.H.; Kuo, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Humans normally dissipate significant energy during walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy. The replacement of lost energy is nec

  14. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Daniel TP

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprain injury, prescribing orthosis decreases the risk while increased exercise intensity in soccer raises the risk. For intrinsic factors, a foot size with increased width, an increased ankle eversion to inversion strength, plantarflexion strength and ratio between dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength, and limb dominance could increase the ankle sprain injury risk. Players with a previous sprain history, players wearing shoes with air cells, players who do not stretch before exercising, players with inferior single leg balance, and overweight players are 4.9, 4.3, 2.6, 2.4 and 3.9 times more likely to sustain an ankle sprain injury. The aetiology of most ankle sprain injuries is incorrect foot positioning at landing – a medially-deviated vertical ground reaction force causes an explosive supination or inversion moment at the subtalar joint in a short time (about 50 ms. Another aetiology is the delayed reaction time of the peroneal muscles at the lateral aspect of the ankle (60–90 ms. The failure supination or inversion torque is about 41–45 Nm to cause ligamentous rupture in simulated spraining tests on cadaver. A previous case report revealed that the ankle joint reached 48 degrees inversion and 10 degrees internal rotation during an accidental grade I ankle ligamentous sprain injury during a dynamic cutting trial in laboratory. Diagnosis techniques and grading systems vary, but the management of ankle ligamentous sprain injury is mainly conservative

  15. Technique of Arthroscopic Treatment of Impingement After Total Ankle Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christopher E; Neumann, Julie A; Godin, Jonathan A; DeOrio, James K

    2016-04-01

    Rates of medial and/or lateral gutter impingement after total ankle replacement are not insignificant. If impingement should occur, it typically arises an average of 17 months after total ankle replacement. Our patient underwent treatment for right ankle medial gutter bony impingement with arthroscopic debridement 5 years after her initial total ankle replacement. Standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals and a 30° 2.7-mm-diameter arthroscope were used. An aggressive soft-tissue and bony resection was performed using a combination of curettes, a 3.5-mm shaver, a 5.5-mm unsheathed burr, a drill, and a radiofrequency ablator. This case shows that arthroscopic treatment is an effective and potentially advantageous alternative to open treatment of impingement after total ankle replacement. In addition, symptoms of impingement often improve in a short amount of time after arthroscopic debridement of the medial and/or lateral gutter.

  16. Total ankle replacement – surgical treatment and rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting. PMID:27407223

  17. Finite element analysis of a composite artificial ankle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Leigh Ann; Johnston, Lawrence; Denniston, Charles; Czekalski, Blaise E.

    1993-01-01

    Ultra-light carbon fiber composite materials are being utilized in artificial limbs with increasing frequency in recent years. Dr. Arthur Copes, an orthotist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has developed a graphite expoxy composite material artificial ankle (Copes/Bionic Ankle) that is intended to be used by amputees who require the most advanced above-and-below-the-knee prosthetic devices. The Copes/Bionic Ankle is designed to reproduce the function of the natural ankle joint by allowing the composite material to act as a spring mechanism without the use of metal mechanical parts. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has agreed to participate in the design effort by providing the structural analysis of the artificial ankle design.

  18. Ankle tuberculosis. A case in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, F E; Gómez-Alessandri, J; Tintó, M; Sánchez-González, M; Vicent, V

    Articular tuberculosis of the ankle joint is a rare presentation of skeletal tuberculosis (10% of cases). This unusual location and the low index of clinical suspicion leads to delays in diagnosis and treatment. Radiographic and analytic studies are unspecific in the first stage. CAT and MRI are useful in diagnosis. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment and surgery is often required to establish the diagnosis and in the treatment. We report a case of ankle tuberculosis in a 22 month-old child. The diagnosis was confirmed by synovial biopsy. There was no patient or family contact with tuberculosis patients. There was no risk factor. There was no lung disease. Diagnosis was made 1 year after onset of symptoms. The treatment was with chemotherapy and surgery was performed as preventive treatment of equinus deformity and osteoarthritis. Good clinical and functional outcome was achieved after 20 years of follow up. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of chronic ankle instability and induced mediolateral muscular fatigue of the ankle on competitive taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myeounggon; Youm, Changhong; Son, Minji; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Youkyung

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic ankle instability and induced mediolateral muscular fatigue of the ankle on competitive Taekwondo athletes during single-leg drop landing. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen competitive taekwondo athletes with chronic ankle instability and 14 healthy adults participated, and they performed three single-leg drop landings from a 40-cm height before and after induced fatigue. Ankle angular position, peak vertical ground reaction force, loading rate, eccentric work, and contribution were calculated and analyzed. [Results] Athletes had lower ankle eversion and abduction angle than the controls did at maximum knee flexion both pre- and post-fatigue. Furthermore, athletes had lower eccentric work of the hip than the controls did post-fatigue, and they had lower eccentric work of the knee than controls at both pre- and post-fatigue. The eccentric work of the knee increased while, peak vertical ground reaction force decreased in both, athletes as well as controls post-fatigue. [Conclusion] Taekwondo athletes with chronic ankle instability who participate in a high-intensity training program are continuously exposed to potential injuries of their ankle or knee joints. Therefore, competitive taekwondo athletes with chronic ankle instability should limit their participation in regular training until they complete the rehabilitation process.

  20. Mechanics of the ankle and subtalar joints revealed through a 3D quasi-static stress MRI technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, S; Udupa, J K; Ringleb, S I; Imhauser, C W; Hirsch, B E; Odhner, D; Saha, P K; Okereke, E; Roach, N

    2005-03-01

    A technique to study the three-dimensional (3D) mechanical characteristics of the ankle and of the subtalar joints in vivo and in vitro is described. The technique uses an MR scanner compatible 3D positioning and loading linkage to load the hindfoot with precise loads while the foot is being scanned. 3D image processing algorithms are used to derive from the acquired MR images bone morphology, hindfoot architecture, and joint kinematics. The technique was employed to study these properties both in vitro and in vivo. The ankle and subtler joint motion and the changes in architecture produced in response to an inversion load and an anterior drawer load were evaluated. The technique was shown to provide reliable measures of bone morphology. The left-to-right variations in bone morphology were less than 5%. The left-to-right variations in unloaded hindfoot architecture parameters were less than 10%, and these properties were only slightly affected by inversion and anterior drawer loads. Inversion and anterior drawer loads produced motion both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. In addition, high degree of coupling, primarily of internal rotation with inversion, was observed both at the ankle and at the subtalar joint. The in vitro motion produced in response to inversion and anterior drawer load was greater than the in vivo motion. Finally, external motion, measured directly across the ankle complex, produced in response to load was much greater than the bone movements measured through the 3D stress MRI technique indicating the significant effect of soft tissue and skin interference.

  1. The effect of the heel- to- toe rocker shoe on moments of ankle joint and temporal-spatial of gait in female student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    masoomeh Veiskarami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rocker shoes are the most commonly prescribed external therapeutic shoe modification and are used for treatment of the ankle and midfoot problems. The aim of this study was to assesse the effects of the heel- to-toe rocker shoes on temporal-spatial and ankle joint moments in sagital and frontal plane. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-exprimental study, three-dimentional gait analysis was carried out on 20 healthy university female students with normal normal gait pattern selected by convenience sampling method. A Vicon 470 system(Oxford Metrix, U.K. consisting of 6 cameras operating at 60Hz and kistler forceplate (A9286 was used.The paired samples T test was used to statistical analysis. Results: The results showed that there is no significant change in temporal-spatial parameters while wearing this modified shoe ,but the ankle moments while wearing rocker shoes in sagittal plane was significantly less than that while wearing traditional shoes(p=0.002 but in frontal plane significantly increased(p=0.007. Conclusion: Based on the current findings the major benefits of this modified shoe appear to be significantly restricted sagital plane moments with maintenance of walking speed so the loads on ankle joint and achilles tendon reduced, but increases frontal plain moments which leads to increase of mediolateral instability of ankle joint.

  2. A powered prosthetic ankle joint for walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer, Martin; Holgate, Matthew; Holgate, Robert; Boehler, Alexander; Ward, Jeffrey; Hollander, Kevin; Sugar, Thomas; Seyfarth, André

    2016-12-19

    Current prosthetic ankle joints are designed either for walking or for running. In order to mimic the capabilities of an able-bodied, a powered prosthetic ankle for walking and running was designed. A powered system has the potential to reduce the limitations in range of motion and positive work output of passive walking and running feet. To perform the experiments a controller capable of transitions between standing, walking, and running with speed adaptations was developed. In the first case study the system was mounted on an ankle bypass in parallel with the foot of a non-amputee subject. By this method the functionality of hardware and controller was proven. The Walk-Run ankle was capable of mimicking desired torque and angle trajectories in walking and running up to 2.6 m/s. At 4 m/s running, ankle angle could be matched while ankle torque could not. Limited ankle output power resulting from a suboptimal spring stiffness value was identified as a main reason. Further studies have to show to what extent the findings can be transferred to amputees.

  3. Summary of Human Ankle Mechanical Impedance During Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouse, Elliott J.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2016-01-01

    The human ankle joint plays a critical role during walking and understanding the biomechanical factors that govern ankle behavior and provides fundamental insight into normal and pathologically altered gait. Previous researchers have comprehensively studied ankle joint kinetics and kinematics during many biomechanical tasks, including locomotion; however, only recently have researchers been able to quantify how the mechanical impedance of the ankle varies during walking. The mechanical impedance describes the dynamic relationship between the joint position and the joint torque during perturbation, and is often represented in terms of stiffness, damping, and inertia. The purpose of this short communication is to unify the results of the first two studies measuring ankle mechanical impedance in the sagittal plane during walking, where each study investigated differing regions of the gait cycle. Rouse et al. measured ankle impedance from late loading response to terminal stance, where Lee et al. quantified ankle impedance from pre-swing to early loading response. While stiffness component of impedance increases significantly as the stance phase of walking progressed, the change in damping during the gait cycle is much less than the changes observed in stiffness. In addition, both stiffness and damping remained low during the swing phase of walking. Future work will focus on quantifying impedance during the “push off” region of stance phase, as well as measurement of these properties in the coronal plane. PMID:27766187

  4. [Isokinetic assessment of ankles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Silvia Cristina Gutierrez; Oliveira, Leda Magalhaes; Jones, Anamaria; Natour, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    The foot and ankle in rheumatoid arthritis undergo highly destructive synovitis with loss of muscle strength. To evaluate the muscle strength of ankles in patients with rheumatoid arthritis based on isokinetic dynamometry parameters. Thirty patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis involving the ankle(s) and 30 healthy subjects (control group) matched for age, gender, race, body mass index and lower limb dominance were studied. Dorsiflexion, plantarflexion, inversion and eversion were evaluated in all subjects on an isokinetic Cybex Norm dynamometer. The variables were compared between the rheumatoid arthritis and control groups and between the right and left ankles, and the dorsiflexor/plantar flexor and invertor/evertor muscle strength ratio was determined. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis performed statistically worse in the isokinetic dynamometry test for all ankle movements. The muscle strength ratio between dorsiflexors and plantar flexors was different in the two groups. No significant differences were observed in the invertor and evertor ratios. In the two groups the plantar flexor musculature was statistically stronger than dorsiflexors. We conclude that patients with rheumatoid arthritis perform worse in isokinetic dynamometry regarding all ankle movements than control subjects, with similar isokinetic test results being observed for the right and left side in both groups, with few exceptions. Isokinetic evaluation posed no additional risk such as important pain or inflammatory activity to patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of distal tibiofibular synostosis on ankle function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhen-hai; ZHOU Ji-hong; YE Hong; SHI Jian-guo; ZHENG Long-bao; YAO Jun; NI Zhi-ming

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence distal tibiofibular synostosis on ankle function.Methods: From October 1998 to October 2004,a total of 281 consecutive patients underwent operations because of ankle fractures or distal fractures of the tibia and fibula.Distal tibiofibular synostosis occurred after operation in 8 Patients.The duration of follow-up averaged 20.6 months (14-44 months).The ankle function was assessed on the basis of functional rating system described by Mazur.1Results: According to Mazur's ankle evaluation system,4 patients achieved an excellent result,2 a good result and 2 a fair result.The dorsiflexion of the synostosis ankle reduced by 8.26 degrees as compared with that of the contralateral ankle.and there was little influence on the plantar flexion.All the Patients had a normal gait.Conclusion: The distal tibiofibular synostosis after the operation of ankle fractures or distal fractures of the tibia and fibula usually gives rise to few symptoms and needs no specific treatment.

  6. Mobile-bearing total ankle arthroplasty : a fundamental assessment of the clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doets, Hendrik Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    Ankle arthritis often leads to significant impairments for the patient. As total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) with use of fixed-bearing (2-component) total ankle prostheses has a high rate of early failures, fusion of the ankle joint is, until today, considered to be the standard surgical treatment for

  7. Registry data trends of total ankle replacement use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Prissel, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Joint arthroplasty registry data are meaningful when evaluating the outcomes of total joint replacement, because they provide unbiased objective information regarding survivorship and incidence of use. Critical evaluation of the registry data information will benefit the surgeon, patient, and industry. However, the implementation and acceptance of registry data for total ankle replacement has lagged behind that of hip and knee implant arthroplasty. Currently, several countries have national joint arthroplasty registries, with only some procuring information for total ankle replacement. We performed an electronic search to identify publications and worldwide registry databanks with pertinent information specific to total ankle replacement to determine the type of prostheses used and usage trends over time. We identified worldwide registry data from 33 countries, with details pertinent to total ankle replacement identified in only 6 countries. The obtained information was arbitrarily stratified into 3 distinct periods: 2000 to 2006, 2007 to 2010, and 2011. Within these study periods, the data from 13 total ankle replacement systems involving 3,980 ankles were identified. The vast majority (97%) of the reported ankle replacements were 3-component, mobile-bearing, uncemented prostheses. Three usage trends were identified: initial robust embracement followed by abrupt disuse, minimal use, and initial embracement followed by sustained growth in implantation. Before the widespread acceptance of new total ankle replacements, the United States should scrutinize and learn from the international registry data and develop its own national joint registry that would include total ankle replacement. Caution against the adoption of newly released prostheses, especially those without readily available revision components, is recommended.

  8. Preoperative gait characterization of patients with ankle arthrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazzam, Michael; Long, Jason T; Marks, Richard M; Harris, Gerald F

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinematic changes that occur about the foot and ankle during gait in patients with degenerative joint disease (DJD). By comparing a normal adult population with what was found in the DJD population we determined how the motion of theses groups differed, thereby characterizing how this pathology affects foot and ankle motion. A 15-camera Vicon Motion Analysis System was used in conjunction with weight bearing radiographs to obtain three-dimensional motion of the foot and ankle during ambulation. The study was comprised of 34 patients and 35 ankles diagnosed with DJD (19 men and 15 women) of the ankle and 25 patients with normal ankles (13 men and 12 women). Dynamic foot and ankle motion was analyzed using the four-segment Milwaukee Foot Model (MFM). The data from this model resulted in three-dimensional (3D) kinematic parameters in the sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes as well as spatial-temporal parameters. Patient health status was evaluated using the SF-36 Health Survey and American Orthopaedics Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot scores. The DJD group showed significant differences (pgait. This decreased range of motion may be related to several factors including bony deformity, muscle weakness, and attempts to decrease the pain associated with weight bearing. To date there has not been a study which describes the effect of this disease process on motion of the foot and ankle. These findings may prove to be useful in the pre-operative assessment of these patients.

  9. Use of a trabecular metal implant in ankle arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement is complicated and delayed union, nonunion, and shortening of the leg often occur—especially with large bone defects. We investigated the use of a trabecular metal implant and a retrograde intramedullary nail to obtain fusion. Patients and methods 13 patients with a migrated or loose total ankle implant underwent arthrodesis with the use of a retrograde intramedullary nail through a trabecular metal Tibial Cone. The mean follow-up time was 1.4 (0.6–3.4) years. Results At the last examination, 7 patients were pain-free, while 5 had some residual pain but were satisfied with the procedure. 1 patient was dissatisfied and experienced pain and swelling when walking. The implant-bone interfaces showed no radiographic zones or gaps in any patient, indicating union. Interpretation The method is a new way of simplifying and overcoming some of the problems of performing arthrodesis after failed total ankle replacement. PMID:21067435

  10. Agility to INBONE: anterior and posterior approaches to the difficult revision total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, J George; Scott, Ryan T; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Lee, Thomas H; DeOrio, James K

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement is now acknowledged as a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis for end-stage ankle arthritis. The authors present a series of 14 patients who were converted from the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement. This report is unique in that anterior and posterior approaches are discussed and detailed. Although the authors present successful conversion of the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement, the difficulty of this procedure is demonstrated by the high complication rate and 2 early failures.

  11. Strategies for Revision Total Ankle Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, PhD, FACFAS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the frequency of primary total ankle replacement (TAR continues to build, revision will become more commonplace. At present there are no “standard principles” associated with revision TAR. What is clear is that the current approaches are technically complex, fraught with complications and no one approach represents the only answer. Exchange of TAR metallic components to the same system standard or dedicated revision components are viable options with limited occurrence of complications. Explantation and conversion to custom-design long stemmed components has limited availability. Explantation and conversion to another TAR system is high-risk and has strong potential for complications. The use of metal reinforced polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation of failed TAR systems and tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis should be reserved for very select situations where other options are not possible. There is a real need for long-term survivorship following revision TAR and future efforts ought to be directed in this area.

  12. Multicenter follow-up study of ankle fracture surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hai-lin; WANG Gang; WANG Guang-lin; WU Xin-bao; LIU Li-min; LI Xuan; ZHANG Dian-ying; FU Zhong-guo; WANG Tian-bing; ZHANG Pei-xun; JIANG Bao-guo; SHEN Hui-liang

    2012-01-01

    Background Few data on ankle fractures in China from large multicenter epidemiological and clinical studies are available.The aim of this research was to evaluate the epidemiological features and surgical outcomes of ankle fractures by reviewing 235 patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five hospitals in China.Methods This study included patients who underwent ankle fracture surgery at five Chinese hospitals from January 2000 to July 2009.Age,gender,mechanism of injury,Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) fracture type,fracture pattern,length of hospital stay and treatment outcome were recorded.Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS software.The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale,visual analogue scale (VAS),and arthritis scale were used to evaluate outcome.Results Of 235 patients with ankle fractures,105 were male with an average age of 37.8 years and 130 were female with an average age of 47.3 years.The average follow-up period was 55.7 months.There were significant differences in the ratios of patients in different age groups between males and females,and in mechanisms of injury among different age groups.There were also significant differences in the length of hospital stay among different fracture types and mechanisms of injury.In healed fractures,the average AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score was 95.5,with an excellence rate of 99.6%,the average VAS score was 0.17,and the average arthritis score was 0.18.Movement of the injured ankle was significantly different to that of the uninjured ankle.There were no significant differences between AO fracture types,fracture patterns or follow-up periods and AOFAS score,but there were some significant differences between these parameters and ankle joint movements,pain VAS score and arthritis score.Conclusions Ankle fractures occur most commonly in middle-aged and young males aged 20-39 years and in elderly females aged 50-69 years.The most common mechanisms of

  13. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observations. Inversion velocity is another parameter that increased the reality of simulation. This review summarised the simulators, and aimed to compare and contrast their features and settings.

  14. Seasonality of Ankle Swelling: Population Symptom Reporting Using Google Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangwei; Allan, G Michael; Korownyk, Christina; Kolber, Michael; Flook, Nigel; Sternberg, Harvey; Garrison, Scott

    2016-07-01

    In our experience, complaints of ankle swelling are more common in summer, typically from patients with no obvious cardiovascular disease. Surprisingly, this observation has never been reported. To objectively establish this phenomenon, we sought evidence of seasonality in the public's Internet searches for ankle swelling. Our data, obtained from Google Trends, consisted of all related Google searches in the United States from January 4, 2004, to January 26, 2016. Consistent with our expectations and confirmed by similar data for Australia, Internet searches for information on ankle swelling are highly seasonal (highest in midsummer), with seasonality explaining 86% of search volume variability.

  15. Diabetic charcot neuroarthropathy of the foot and ankle with osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    One of the most devastating foot and/or ankle complications in the diabetic population with peripheral neuropathy is the presence of Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN). In recent years, diabetic limb salvage has been attempted more frequently as opposed to major lower extremity amputation for CN of the foot and ankle with ulceration and/or deep infection. Treatment strategies for osteomyelitis in the diabetic population have evolved. This article reviews some of the most common surgical strategies recommended for the diabetic patient with CN of the foot and/or ankle and concomitant osteomyelitis.

  16. Internal Fixation of Open Ankle Fracture. Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Truffin Rodríguez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Open ankle fracture is sporadically seen in the orthopedic practice. Its clinical course is subject to multiple factors, showing a propensity to cause ankle osteoarthritis over the years. Two cases treated at the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos are presented. The patients underwent emergency surgical treatment consisting of surgical cleaning of the open wound, reduction of the dislocation and internal fixation of the fracture. These cases are presented due to the infrequency of this type of ankle injury and its importance for the medical staff, especially orthopedic doctors.

  17. Ultrasound-guided interventions of the foot and ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Corrie M

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) provides excellent delineation of tendons and ligaments in the foot and ankle and provides real-time visualization of a needle during interventions, yielding greater accuracy and efficacy than the traditional blind approach using anatomical landmarks. For this reason, US is rapidly gaining acceptance as the preferred modality for guiding interventions in the foot and ankle where the anatomy is complex, neurovascular structures should be identified, and precise technique is demanded. In the foot and ankle, US is especially useful to guide tendon sheath, bursal, and Achilles paratenon injections, Morton neuroma injections, plantar fascial injections, and joint aspirations and injections.

  18. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft of the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Grigolo, Brunella; Bevoni, Roberto; Di Caprio, Francesco; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Desando, Giovanna; Vannini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Severe post-traumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in the young and active patient. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft (BFOA) may represent an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis and prosthetic replacement. The aim of this study was to describe a lateral trans-malleolar technique for BFOA, and to evaluate the results in a case series. From 2004 to 2006, 32 patients, mean age of 36.8 +/- 8.4 years, affected by ankle arthritis underwent BFOA with a mean followup of 31.2 months. The graft was prepared by specifically designed jigs, including the talus and the tibia with the medial malleolus. The host surfaces were prepared by the same jigs through a lateral approach. The graft was placed and fixed with twist-off screws. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 2, 4, and 6 month after operation, and at a minimum 24 months followup. A biopsy of the grafted areas was obtained from 7 patients at 1-year followup for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Preoperative AOFAS score was 33.1 +/- 10.9 and postoperatively 69.5 +/- 19.4 (p < 0.0005). Six failures occurred. Cartilage harvests showed hyaline-like histology with a normal collagen component but low proteoglycan presence and a disorganized structure. Samples were positive for MMP-1, MMP-13 and Capsase-3. The use of BFOA represents an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis or arthroplasty. We believe precise allograft sizing, stable fitting and fixation and delayed weightbearing were key factors for a successful outcome. Further research regarding the immunological behavior of transplanted cartilage is needed.

  19. Ankle control and strength training for children with cerebral palsy using the Rutgers Ankle CP: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioi, Daniel; Kale, Angad; Burdea, Grigore; Engsberg, Jack; Janes, William; Ross, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to develop and feasibility test the Rutgers Ankle CP, aimed at ankle strengthening and improved control for children with cerebral palsy (CP). The system was an upgrade in hardware (new foot attachment, new robot controller) and software (new games and programming language) of the earlier Rutgers Ankle in order to permit training of children with CP. The new Rutgers Ankle CP was used to train ankle strength and motor control in a 7 year old boy with CP during 36 rehabilitation sessions (12 weeks, 3 times/week). Assessments for impairment, function and quality of life were taken before and after training. Results indicated improvements in both strength and motor control. Gait function improved substantially in ankle kinematics, speed and endurance. Overall function (GMFM) indicated improvements that were typical of other ankle strength training programs. Quality of life increased beyond what would be considered a minimal clinical important difference. While these results are only for a single participant, they are very encouraging toward improving the function and quality of life of children with cerebral palsy. Further research with a larger number of participants is planned. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Effects of hip and head position on ankle range of motion, ankle passive torque, and passive gastrocnemius tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, R J; Lacourpaille, L; Freitas, S R; McNair, P J; Nordez, A

    2016-01-01

    Ankle joint range of motion (ROM) is notably influenced by the position of the hip joint. However, this result remains unexplained. Thus, the aim of this study was to test if the ankle passive torque and gastrocnemius muscle tension are affected by the hip and the head positions. The torque and the muscle shear elastic modulus (measured by elastography to estimate muscle tension) were collected in nine participants during passive ankle dorsiflexions performed in four conditions (by combining hip flexion at 90 or 150°, and head flexed or neutral). Ankle maximum dorsiflexion angle significantly decreased by flexing the hip from 150 to 90° (P  0.05). Maximal passive torque and shear elastic modulus were higher with the hip flexed at 90° (P  0.05) were found for both torque and shear elastic modulus at a given common ankle angle among conditions. Shifts in maximal ankle angle due to hip angle manipulation are not related neither to changes in passive torque nor tension of the gastrocnemius. Further studies should be addressed to better understand the functional role of peripheral nerves and fasciae in the ankle ROM limits.

  1. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation using a load-distributing band external cardiac support device for in-hospital cardiac arrest: a single centre experience of AutoPulse-CPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, J R; White, S; Quinn, N; Gubran, C J; Ludman, P F; Townend, J N; Doshi, S N

    2015-02-01

    Poor quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) predicts adverse outcome. During invasive cardiac procedures automated-CPR (A-CPR) may help maintain effective resuscitation. The use of A-CPR following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) remains poorly described. Firstly, we aimed to assess the efficiency of healthcare staff using A-CPR in a cardiac arrest scenario at baseline, following re-training and over time (Scenario-based training). Secondly, we studied our clinical experience of A-CPR at our institution over a 2-year period, with particular emphasis on the details of invasive cardiac procedures performed, problems encountered, resuscitation rates and in-hospital outcome (AutoPulse-CPR Registry). Scenario-based training: Forty healthcare professionals were assessed. At baseline, time-to-position device was slow (mean 59 (±24) s (range 15-96s)), with the majority (57%) unable to mode-switch. Following re-training time-to-position reduced (28 (±9) s, pCPR Registry: 285 patients suffered IHCA, 25 received A-CPR. Survival to hospital discharge following conventional CPR was 28/260 (11%) and 7/25 (28%) following A-CPR. A-CPR supported invasive procedures in 9 patients, 2 of whom had A-CPR dependant circulation during transfer to the catheter lab. A-CPR may provide excellent haemodynamic support and facilitate simultaneous invasive cardiac procedures. A significant learning curve exists when integrating A-CPR into clinical practice. Further studies are required to better define the role and effectiveness of A-CPR following IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle osteoarthritis commonly involves sagittal malalignment with anterior translation of the talus relative to the tibia. Total ankle arthroplasty has become an increasingly popular treatment for patients with symptomatic ankle osteoarthritis. However, no comprehensive study has been conducted on the outcomes of total ankle arthroplasty for osteoarthritis with preoperative sagittal malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of anterior translation of the talus on outcomes of three-component total ankle arthroplasty. Methods One hundred and four osteoarthritic ankles in 104 patients who underwent three-component total ankle arthroplasty were included in this study. The 104 ankles were divided into 2 groups: ankles with anteriorly translated talus (50 ankles), and ankles with non-translated talus (54 ankles). Clinical and radiographic outcomes were assessed in both groups. The mean follow-up duration was 42.8 ± 17.9 months (range, 24 to 95 months). Results Forty-six (92%) of 50 ankles with anterior translation of the talus showed relocation of the talus within the mortise at 6 months, and 48 (96%) ankles were relocated at 12 months after total ankle arthroplasty. But, 2 (4%) ankles were not relocated until the final follow-up. The AOFAS scores, ankle range of motion, and radiographic outcomes showed no significant difference between the two groups at the final follow-up (p > 0.05 for each). Conclusions In majority of cases, the anteriorly translated talus in osteoarthritic ankles was restored to an anatomical position within 6 months after successful three-component total ankle arthroplasty. The clinical and radiographic outcomes in the osteoarthritic ankles with anteriorly translated talus group were comparable with those in non-translated talus group. PMID:24007555

  3. Analysis of 3-dimensional finite element after reconstruction of impaired ankle deltoid ligament

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yunhan; Tang, Xianzhong; Li, Yifan; Xu, Wei; Qiu, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    We compared four repair techniques for impaired ankle ligament deltoideum, namely Wiltberger, Deland, Kitaoka and Hintermann using a 3-dimensional finite element. We built an ankle ligament deltoideum model, including six pieces of bone structures, gristles and main ligaments around the ankle. After testing the model, we built an impaired ligament deltoideum model plus four reconstruction models. Subsequently, different levels of force on ankles with different flexion were imposed and ankle b...

  4. Treatment of Isolated Ankle Osteoarthritis with Arthrodesis or the Total Ankle Replacement: A Comparison of Early Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Charles L.; Kadoko, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ankle arthrodesis and replacement are two common surgical treatment options for end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. However, the relative value of these alternative procedures is not well defined. This study compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes as well as the early perioperative complications of the two procedures. Methods Between January 2, 1998 and May 31, 2002, 138 patients were treated with ankle fusion or replacements. Seventy one patients had isolated posttraumatic or primary ankle arthritis. However, patients with inflammatory arthritis, neuropathic arthritis, concomitant hind foot fusion, revision procedures and two component system ankle replacement were excluded. Among them, one group of 42 patients had a total ankle replacement (TAR), whereas the other group of 29 patients underwent ankle fusion. A complete follow-up could be performed on 89% (37/42) and 73% (23/29) of the TAR and ankle fusion group, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 4.2 years (range, 2.2 to 5.9 years). Results The outcomes of both groups were compared using a student's t-test. Only the short form heath survery mental component summary score and Ankle Osteoarthritis Scale pain scale showed significantly better outcomes in the TAR group (p < 0.05). In the radiographic evaluation, there was no significant difference in preoperative and postoperative osteoarthritis between the TAR and fusion groups. Conclusions The clinical results of TAR are similar to those of fusion at an average follow-up of 4 years. However, the arthroplasty group showed better pain relief and more postoperative complications that required surgery. PMID:20190994

  5. External iliac vein thrombosis in an athletic cyclist with a history of external iliac artery endofibrosis and thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kelly M; Skeik, Nedaa; Shepherd, Roger F; Wennberg, Paul W

    2011-11-01

    External iliac artery endofibrosis describes an intimal subendothelial fibrosis leading to wall thickening and stenosis that has been described in high-performance athletes. There are anatomical, mechanical, and probably metabolic factors that may contribute to this pathology. Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement with exercise testing, duplex ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiogram, and ultimately arteriography help to make the diagnosis. Management can be conservative, but most cases require surgical intervention. External iliac vein stenosis and thrombosis in cyclists has rarely been described in the literature. We report a case of extensive left lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT) including the external iliac vein diagnosed in a 57-year-old athletic cyclist with a history of external iliac artery thrombosis.

  6. The effectiveness of mobilisation with movement for chronic medial ankle pain: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Penso

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose: It has been shown that approximatelythirty percent of those sustaining an ankle sprain are likely to develop chronicfunctional limitations. Mulligan has developed mobilisation with movement (MWMfor treatment of joint dysfunction and suggests that it is a positional fault of the jointthat causes pain and movement restriction. Method: This single case reports on the effects of a MWM technique on chronicmedial ankle pain. The patient was a 25-year-old female runner who had experiencedpain since an initial ankle sprain at 8 years of age. The main findings of the subjective and physical examinations were decrease in active and passive dorsiflexion and eversion range of motion (ROM, shortening of gastrocnemiusand soleus muscles and the functional limitation of pain when running. The patient was treated twice with the MWMtechnique.Results: Outcomes of immediate reduction in pain, restoration of full dorsiflexion and eversion ROM, increase in calfmuscle length and pain free running were observed. This was maintained over a four-month follow up period.Conclusion: This case concurs with previous studies detailing increases in range of motion and restoration of painfree movement as well as adding new support for the resolution of chronic pain with MWM.

  7. Does kinesiology taping of the ankles affect proprioceptive control in professional football (soccer) players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel; Firth, Paul

    2017-05-01

    To determine whether the bilateral application of kinesiology tape (KT) to professional footballers' ankles can improve their lower limb proprioception. A single blind randomised crossover study. Participants were randomly assigned to complete a proprioception test in either a taped or not taped condition first. Following a wash out period, participants were then re-tested in the alternate condition. A UK Championship League Football Club, mid-season. Twenty male professional football players over the age of 18, currently match fit with no injuries. Proprioception was assessed by participants undertaking the moving target program on the balance module attached to a Kin-Com 125AP isokinetic dynamometer. A paired sample two tailed t-test was used to assess whether there was a significant difference between the participants test scores in the not taped and taped conditions. The bilateral application of KT to professional footballers' ankles did not bring about a significant change in participants' scores when tested with a fine movement and balance control test. Percentage accuracy score mean difference 4.2 (p = 0.285). The results of this study do not support the use of KT when applied to the ankles of healthy footballers as a method of improving proprioception. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopy-assisted ankle arthrodesis with MIPF. An alternative proposal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cymet-Ramírez, J

    2011-01-01

    ... the most important part of our musculo-skeletal system designed for ambulation and bipedestation. In case of ankle injuries, arthrodesis is a procedure performed to relieve pain, decrease deformity and provide stability...

  9. Ultrasound of ankle and foot: overuse and sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Viviane; Guillin, Raphaël; Dhanju, Jag; Cardinal, Etienne

    2007-06-01

    Sports and overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Ultrasound (US) has been established as an excellent diagnostic modality for foot and ankle injuries, providing a rapid noninvasive, economical, and readily available tool that is well tolerated by the patient with acute or chronic pain. The opportunity for dynamic examination is another advantage of US in evaluating ankle and foot pathology, where maneuvers such as muscle contraction and stressing of the joint may be particularly helpful. In many cases, US can be used as a first-line and only imaging modality for diagnosis. This article focuses on ankle disorders related to sports or overuse that affect tendons, including tendinosis, tenosynovitis, paratendinitis, rupture, dislocation, and ligaments that are commonly torn. The sonographic features of certain common foot disorders related to physical activity and overuse are also discussed, including plantar fasciitis, Morton's neuroma, stress fractures, and plantar plate injury.

  10. Isolated medial foot compartment syndrome after ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Josep; Amat, Carles; Selga, Jordi; Corona, Pablo Salvador

    2014-03-01

    Foot compartment syndrome is a serious potential complication of foot crush injury, fractures, surgery, and vascular injury. An acute compartment syndrome isolated to the medial compartment of the foot after suffering an ankle sprain is a rare complication. We report the case of a 31-year-old man who developed a medial foot compartment syndrome after suffering a deltoid ligament rupture at ankle while playing football. The patient underwent a medial compartment fasciotomy with resolution of symptoms. Compartment syndromes of the foot are rare and have been reported to occur after severe trauma. But, there are some reports in the literature of acute exertional compartment syndrome. In our case, the compartment syndrome appeared after an ankle sprain without vascular injuries associated. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Estimation of passive ankle joint moment during standing and walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Tetsuro; Muramatsu, Tadashi; Takeshita, Daisuke; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-02-01

    This study estimated the passive ankle joint moment during standing and walking initiation and its contribution to total ankle joint moment during that time. The decrement of passive joint moment due to muscle fascicle shortening upon contraction was taken into account. Muscle fascicle length in the medial gastrocnemius, which was assumed to represent muscle fascicle length in plantarflexors, was measured using ultrasonography during standing, walking initiation, and cyclical slow passive ankle joint motion. Total ankle joint moment during standing and walking initiation was calculated from ground reaction forces and joint kinematics. Passive ankle joint moment during the cyclical ankle joint motion was measured via a dynamometer. Passive ankle joint moment during standing and at the time (Tp) when the MG muscle-tendon complex length was longest in the stance phase during walking initiation were 2.3 and 5.4 Nm, respectively. The muscle fascicle shortened by 2.9 mm during standing compared with the length at rest, which decreased the contribution of passive joint moment from 19.9% to 17.4%. The muscle fascicle shortened by 4.3 mm at Tp compared with the length at rest, which decreased the contribution of passive joint moment from 8.0% to 5.8%. These findings suggest that (a) passive ankle joint moment plays an important role during standing and walking initiation even in view of the decrement of passive joint moment due to muscle fascicle shortening upon muscle contraction, and (b) muscle fascicle shortening upon muscle contraction must be taken into account when estimating passive joint moment during movements.

  12. Supramalleolar osteotomy for realignment of the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Noman A; Herzenberg, John E; Lamm, Bradley M

    2012-10-01

    Ankle replacement systems have not been as reliable as hip replacements in providing long-term relief of pain, increased motion, and return to full activity. Supramalleolar Osteotomy is an extraarticular procedure that realigns the mechanical axis, thereby restoring ankle function. The literature discussing knee arthritis has shown that realignment osteotomies of the tibia improve function and prolong total knee replacement surgery. The success of the procedure is predicated on understanding the patient's clinical and radiographic presentation and proper preoperative assessment and planning.

  13. Multivariable dynamic ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2014-11-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic "peanut" shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed.

  14. Foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kickboxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseenon, Tanawat; Intharasompan, Piyapong; Wattanarojanapom, Thongaek; Theeraamphon, Nipon; Auephanviriyakul, Sansanee; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2015-01-01

    Muay Thai kickboxing is a common sport that uses the foot and ankle in fighting. Muay Thai kickboxing trainees usually receive training in Thailand Foot and ankle problems in this group ofpeople who usually train barefoot remain unexplored To evaluate the prevalence of common foot and ankle problems in Muay Thai kick boxers. The present study is a cross-sectional survey of Muay Thai kick boxers practicing in northern Thailand. Interviews were conducted and foot and ankle examinations were evaluated Foot morphology was examined using a Harris mat footprint. One hundred and twenty-three Muay Thai kickbox ersinnine training gyms were included in this study. Common foot and ankle problems found in the Muay Thai kick boxers were callosity (59%), gastrocnemius contracture (57%), toe deformities (49.3%), wounds (10%) and heel pain (9%). Callosity was most commonly found on the forefoot (77.5%), on the plantar first metatarsal (55.3%) and on the big toe (33.3%). An association was found between a tight heel cord and a history of foot injury with prolonged periods of weekly training. Toe deformities such as hallux rigidus (37.6%) were also associated with prolonged periods of training (p = 0.001). No correlation was found between type of foot arch and foot and ankle problems. Plantar forefoot callosities and wounds as well as toe deformities including tight heel cords are some of the foot and ankle problems commonly found in Muay Thai kick boxers. They are associated with prolonged periods of barefoot training. The unique pattern of training and of the kicks in Muay Thai might be a path mechanism, leading to the development of foot and ankle problems.

  15. Location of the ankle center for total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Shigeki; Mori, Shigeshi; Inoue, Shinji; Tsukamoto, Ichiroh; Akagi, Masao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ankle center position as determined from the malleoli for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography data from 102 patients with osteoarthritic knees. The tibial anteroposterior (AP) axis and transmalleolar axis (TMA) were used as rotational reference axes of the knee and ankle joint, respectively. With these axes, we regarded the offset distance from the intermalleolar midpoint as the position of the ankle center and investigated any angular osteotomy errors on the proximal tibia when the ankle center was assumed to the intermalleolar midpoint. The mean offset distances relative to the tibial AP axis were 1.8±0.9mm medial and 4.2±1.2mm anterior, and the distances relative to the TMA were 3.0±0.9 and 3.6±1.1mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. Mean angular osteotomy errors were 0.3±0.2° in the coronal plane and 0.8±0.2° in the sagittal plane. The ankle center was located around the intermalleolar midpoint. The position of the ankle center observed along the knee reference axis further approached the intermalleolar midpoint than when observed along the ankle reference axis in the coronal plane, but not in the sagittal plane. And the coronal angular osteotomy error was smaller than the sagittal error. Therefore, the intermalleolar midpoint in the coronal plane is a reliable landmark for the ankle center during TKA. However, surgeons should be cognizant of this sagittal angular error. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of Ankle Proprioception Between Pregnant and Non Pregnant Women

    OpenAIRE

    Preetha R; John Solomon M

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant women report falls especially during their third trimester. Physiological changes along with ligament laxity can affect the joint proprioception in this population. This study was conducted to compare the ankle proprioception between pregnant and non pregnant women. Thirty pregnant and 30 non pregnant women were included in the study and the position of ankles were recorded by a digital camera placed 60 cms away from the feet of the subject. UTHSCSA Image tool software version 3.0. w...

  17. Effect of kinesio-taping on ankle joint stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat A. Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ankle Instability is characterized by recurrent giving way and often develops after repeated lateral ankle sprains. Kinesiotape is more elastic than traditional athletic tape and is becoming increasingly popular. It is reported to decrease pain, improve muscle function, circulation and proprioception, however, research examining the effects of Kinesiotape in ankle instability is limited. The objective of this study was to determine if applying Kinesiotape to unstable ankle may improve performance in the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT, which has been shown to be a sensitive and reliable measure for quantifying dynamic balance. Thirty subjects with first degree ankle sprain were participated in this study. SEBT was used to test the subject dynamic balance under three conditions; without taping, with white athletic tape and with kinesiotape. One way repeated measure ANOVA using Greenhouse-Geisser corrections were conducted to evaluate differences in SEBT for the three conditions. Pairwise comparison of the outcome measures in the three occasions (without taping, with athletic taping, and with kinesio taping revealed statistically significant differences of all outcomes between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 2 (with athletic taping favoring the athletic taping (p < 0.05. Also, a statistically significant difference between occasion 1 (without taping and occasion 3 (with kinesio taping were found (p < 0.05 favoring kinesio taping. Moreover, pairwise comparison of the ankle stability outcomes using athletic taping versus kinesio taping indicated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in favor of kinesio taping measures. Conclusion: kinesiotape has superior effect than athletic tape in patients with first degree ankle sprain and can be used safely for improving ankle joint stability.

  18. Ultrasound-guided intervention in the ankle and foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gina M; Watura, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In this comprehensive review, we discuss the main interventions performed in the foot and ankle for Achilles tendinopathy, Morton's neuromas and Plantar fasciitis as well as techniques for intra-articular and peritendinous injections. We present the different imaging techniques and injectable agents that can be used in clinical practice, trying to help the reader decide the most appropriate way of managing the patient with a problem in the ankle and foot. PMID:26537692

  19. Effects of Talocrural Mobilization with Movement on Ankle Strength, Mobility, and Weight-Bearing Ability in Hemiplegic Patients with Chronic Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chang-Man; Jo, Shin-Ok

    2017-01-01

    In general, adequate movement of the ankle joint is known to play an important role in functional activities. Stroke survivors frequently have limited range of motion of the ankle, leading to dysfunctional weight transfer toward the paretic lower limb during standing or gait. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of talocrural mobilization with movement (MWM) on ankle strength, dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF-PROM), and weight-bearing ability on the paretic limb during standing or gait in stroke patients with limited ankle dorsiflexion. Twenty-six participants with chronic hemiplegia (>6 months post stroke) were divided into 2 groups: MWM group (n = 13) and control group (n = 13). Both groups attended conventional physiotherapy sessions 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Additionally, the MWM group underwent talocrural MWM 3 times a week for 5 weeks. Isokinetic ankle strength, DF-PROM, and weight-bearing ability measures included the limit of stability (LOS); gait parameters were evaluated before and after interventions. Plantarflexors peak torque and DF-PROM significantly increased in the MWM group. In addition, forward and forward-paretic direction LOS significantly increased in the MWM group. Paretic direction LOS, single-limb support phase of the paretic limb significantly increased and double limb support phase significantly decreased within the MWM group. This study demonstrates that talocrural MWM has an augmented effect on ankle strength, mobility, and weight-bearing ability in chronic stroke patients with limited ankle motion when added to conventional therapy. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the ankle: radiologic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da-Peng; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Xu, Wen-Jian; Wang, Zhen-Chang; Wang, Xue-Na

    2011-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the ankle is a rare benign proliferative growth of the synovium. Studies of the radiologic characteristics of ankle PVNS are sparse. To characterize the radiologic features of ankle PVNS, five patients with histologically proven ankle PVNS were retrospectively studied. The features of their radiographs, computed tomographic scans, and magnetic resonance images were reviewed, with emphasis on the morphological features, extension, margin, bone involvement, signal intensity, and degree of magnetic resonance enhancement. All five lesions were diffuse, affecting the ankle and distal tibiofibular joint; three lesions also involved the subtalar joint. Radiography demonstrated extrinsic bone erosions with marginal sclerosis of the involved joints in all of the patients, but computed tomography identified this much better than did radiography. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple lobulated soft-tissue masses in all of the cases. These soft-tissue masses surrounded the flexor hallux longus tendon and were hypointense on T1-weighted images, with a heterogeneous signal in two cases and homogenous hypointensity in three cases on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images. In one patient who underwent gadolinium-enhanced imaging, the masses showed intense enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging is the best way to reveal ankle PVNS. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of predominant hypointensity on all pulse sequences and standard radiography findings of bone erosion with marginal sclerosis are characteristic.

  1. [ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF PIGMENTED VILLONODULAR SYNOVITIS OF ANKLE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Li, Jian; Li, Qi

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of arthroscopic treatment of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the ankle. Twelve patients who were initially diagnosed as having PVNS of the ankle were treated between January 2005 and May 2012. There were 6 males and 6 females, aged 20-50 years (mean, 35.4 years). Disease duration ranged from 6 months to 12 years (median, 3.6 years). One case of recurrence was included. The preoperative American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score was 55.5 ± 7.6. According to degree and range of the PVNS lesions, 4 cases of local PVNS were treated with arthroscopic debridement, and 8 cases of diffuse PVNS were treated with arthroscopically assisted arthrotomy; and local radiotherapy was given in all patients after operation. Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients. The mean follow-up time was 2.8 years (range, 1-6 years). At 12 months after operation, no obvious pain, swelling, and limited range of motion of the ankle were observed. The AOFAS score was increased to 84.3 ± 3.4 at 12 months, and it was significantly higher than that at preoperation (P PVNS of the ankle according to the PVNS lesion degree and range. And arthroscopically assisted surgery has many advantages of less traumas and hemorrhage, fast recovery, and less complications.

  2. Flap surgery in treatment of patients with pathology of ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Kutyanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the capabilities and perspectives of flap surgery in treatment of patients with traumas and diseases of ankle joint region. Material and methods. The results of surgical treatment of 88 such patients. All the patients were treated in the Vreden Russian Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics within the period from 2000 to 2011. All the patients had pedicled flap transfer (46 cases or free tissue transfer (45 cases. 11 patients had additional need in other open orthopedic operations of ankle joint. Besides this, scientific works dealing with the studied problem have been analyzed. Results and conclusions. It has been stated that flap surgery is predominantly used as the only and exhaustive method of treatment of such patients (87,5%. In these situations pedicled flap transfer and free tissue transfer tend to be used in comparatively equal quantities. Flap surgery is now seldom used as a component of complex surgical treatment. It is used only in some cases of bone reconstruction of distal tibia by Ilizarov bone transport, in some cases of tumors of ankle joint as well as in some cases of local infectious complications after internal fixation and total ankle arthroplasty. Patients with the pathology of this kind have a high need in free tissue transfer (from 66,7% to 83,3%. Progressing technology of total ankle arthroplasty will contribute to the frequency of use of flap surgery for patients with pathology of ankle joint.

  3. The External Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  4. Immediate effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape on the dynamic balance of young players with functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeong-Gyu; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Soccer, one of the most popular and well-known sports worldwide, involves complex motions such as running, quick changes in direction, jumping, and landing, all of which have a high risk of injury. Among them, ankle injuries are the most frequent. This study investigated the immediate effects of ankle balance taping (ABT) with kinesiology tape on the dynamic balance of young male soccer players with functional ankle instability (FAI). Nine young male soccer players with FAI in their dominant ankle were randomly subjected to no-, placebo-, and real-ABT conditions. After the appropriate treatment was administered, the dynamic balance was measured using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). In terms of the anterior and posterolateral reach distances on the SEBT, the real-ABT condition showed statistically significant increases compared to the no- and placebo-ABT conditions (p kinesiology tape can be expected to improve the dynamic balance of young male soccer players with FAI.

  5. Biomechanics of the Ankle-Foot System during Stair Ambulation: Implications for Design of Advanced Ankle-Foot Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    effective shape progresses superiorly. After the foot is flat on the step, the effective shape travels superiorly and anteriorly as weight is shifted...During Walking. Ph.D. Thesis. Palmer, M., 2002. Sagittal Plane Charaterization Of Normal Human Ankle Function Across A Range Of Walking Gait Speeds. M.S...human joint motion—part I: ankle, hip, and spine . Journal of Biomechanics 35 (4), 543–548. Yack, H.J., Nielsen, D.H., et al., 1999. Kinetic patterns

  6. Influence of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Park, Tae-Jin; Park, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2013-08-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of walking with talus taping on the ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM. [Subjects] Fifteen ankles with limited DF PROM were examined. [Methods] After rigid strapping tape was applied to the ankles from the talus to the calcaneus, progressing posteriorly and inferiorly, the subjects walked on a walkway for 10 min. Using a goniometer, the ankle DF PROM was measured with the knee extended before and after walking with talus taping. The difference in ankle DF PROM between before and after walking with talus taping was analyzed using the paired t-test. [Results] The ankle DF PROM was significantly increased after walking with talus taping. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that walking with talus taping is effective for increasing the ankle DF PROM in individuals with limited ankle DF PROM.

  7. The mid-term outcome of total ankle arthroplasty and ankle fusion in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background While arthrodesis is the standard treatment of a severely arthritic ankle joint, total ankle arthroplasty has become a popular alternative. This review provides clinical outcomes and complications of both interventions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Studies were obtained from Pubmed, Embase and Web of Science (January 1980 – June 2011) and additional manual search. Inclusion criteria: original clinical study, > 5 rheumatoid arthritis (population), internal fixation arthrodesis or three-component mobile bearing prosthesis (intervention), ankle scoring system (outcome). The clinical outcome score, complication- and failure rates were extracted and the methodological quality of the studies was analysed. Results 17 observational studies of 868 citations were included. The effect size concerning total ankle arthroplasty ranged between 1.9 and 6.0, for arthrodesis the effect sizes were 4.0 and 4.7. Reoperation due to implant failure or reoperation due to non-union, was 11% and 12% for respectively total ankle arthroplasty and arthrodesis. The methodological quality of the studies was low (mean 6.4 out of a maximum of 14 points) and was lower for arthrodesis (mean 4.8) as compared to arthroplasty (mean 7.8) (p = 0.04). Conclusions 17 observational and no (randomized) controlled clinical trials are published on the effectiveness of arthroplasty or arthrodesis of the ankle in rheumatoid arthritis. Regardless of the methodological limitations it can be concluded that both interventions show clinical improvement and in line with current literature neither procedure is superior to the other. PMID:24161014

  8. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro M. Ficanha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF, focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to –4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  9. Ankle mechanics during sidestep cutting implicates need for 2-degrees of freedom powered ankle-foot prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficanha, Evandro M; Rastgaar, Mohammad; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint of currently available powered prostheses is capable of controlling one degree of freedom (DOF), focusing on improved mobility in the sagittal plane. To increase agility, the requirements of turning in prosthesis design need to be considered. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were studied during sidestep cutting and straight walking. There were no significant differences between the ankle sagittal plane mechanics when comparing sidestep cutting and straight walking; however, significant differences were observed in ankle frontal plane mechanics. During straight walking, the inversion-eversion (IE) angles were smaller than with sidestep cutting. The ankle that initiated the sidestep cutting showed progressively increasing inversion from 2 to 13 degrees while the following contralateral step showed progressively decreasing inversion from 8 to -4 degrees during normal walking speed. The changes in IE kinematics were the most significant during sidestep cutting compared with straight walking. The IE moments of the step that initiated the sidestep cutting were always in eversion, acting as a braking moment opposing the inverting motion. This suggests that an ankle-foot prosthesis with active DOFs in the sagittal and frontal planes will increase the agility of gait for patients with limb loss.

  10. Chronic Plantarflexor Stretching During Ankle Immobilization Helps Preserve Calf Girth, Plantarflexion Peak Torque, and Ankle Dorsiflexion Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Samantha; Christensen, Bryan; Gange, Kara; Todden, Christopher; Hatterman-Valenti, Harlene; Albrecht, Jay M

    2017-09-27

    Chronic plantarflexor (PF) stretching during ankle immobilization helps preserve calf girth, plantarflexion peak torque, and ankle dorsiflexion (DF) motion. Immobilization can lead to decreases in muscle peak torque, muscle size, and joint ROM. Recurrent static stretching during a period of immobilization may reduce the extent of these losses. To investigate the effects of chronic static stretching on PF peak torque, calf girth, and DF range of motion (ROM) after two weeks of ankle immobilization. Randomized controlled clinical trial. Athletic training facility. Thirty-six healthy college-aged (19.81±2.48) females. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: control group, immobilized group (IM), and immobilized plus stretching group (IM+S). Each group participated in a familiarization period, a pre-test, and, two weeks later, a post-test. The IM group and IM+S group wore the Aircast FP Walker for two weeks on the left leg. During this time, the IM+S group participated in a stretching program, which consisted of two 10-minute stretching procedures each day for the 14 days. One-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in the change of ankle girth, PF peak torque, and DF ROM between groups with an α level of stretching during two weeks of immobilization may decrease the loss of calf girth, ankle PF peak torque, and ankle DF ROM.

  11. Clinical evaluation of a knee-ankle-foot-orthosis for hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaka, Y; Matsuo, Y; Nojima, M; Morinaka, S

    1982-08-01

    The KAFO described provides hemiplegics with effective and dynamic ambulation, because of its light weight, easy application, reasonably located genucentric knee and ankle joints, together with the flexibility of thigh and lower leg cuffs and arch support. The flexibility of this orthosis permits proper torsion of thigh and lower leg cuff. After application of the KAFO, hemiplegics become able to extend or flex their hip or knee joints in a wide range of motion. As the result of these characteristics, hemiplegics can ambulate smoothly and effectively in the KAFO as described in the results and practical investigations.

  12. Robotics and gaming to improve ankle strength, motor control, and function in children with cerebral palsy--a case study series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdea, Grigore C; Cioi, Daniel; Kale, Angad; Janes, William E; Ross, Sandy A; Engsberg, Jack R

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of game-based robotic training of the ankle in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The design was a case study, 12 weeks intervention, with no follow-up. The setting was a university research laboratory. The participants were a referred sample of three children with cerebral palsy, age 7-12, all male. All completed the intervention. Participants trained on the Rutgers Ankle CP system for 36 rehabilitation sessions (12 weeks, three times/week), playing two custom virtual reality games. The games were played while participants were seated, and trained one ankle at-a-time for strength, motor control, and coordination. The primary study outcome measures were for impairment (DF/PF torques, DF initial contact angle and gait speed), function (GMFM), and quality of life (Peds QL). Secondary outcome measures relate to game performance (game scores as reflective of ankle motor control and endurance). Gait function improved substantially in ankle kinematics, speed and endurance. Overall function (GMFM) indicated improvements that were typical of other ankle strength training programs. Quality of life increased beyond what would be considered a minimal clinical important difference. Game performance improved in both games during the intervention. This feasibility study supports the assumption that game-based robotic training of the ankle benefits gait in children with CP. Game technology is appropriate for the age group and was well accepted by the participants. Additional studies are needed however, to quantify the level of benefit and compare the approach presented here to traditional methods of therapy.

  13. Regulating multiple externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldo, Staffan; Jensen, Frank; Nielsen, Max

    2016-01-01

    Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory instrume......Open access is a well-known externality problem in fisheries causing excess capacity and overfishing. Due to global warming, externality problems from CO2 emissions have gained increased interest. With two externality problems, a first-best optimum can be achieved by using two regulatory...

  14. Managing External and Internal Support Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    stantly must mentally separate the BSB’s brigade combat team (BCT) sustainment requirements from inter- nal BSB logistics requirements. BSBs that fail...and their executive officers (XOs) must then work with the battalion S–4 to coor- dinate movement of additional unit equipment. They must also work ...plained to my team that the proper way to use the HETs for internal transportation requirements was for me or my troop XO to submit a request to the

  15. ExternE National Implementation Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingoud, K.; Maelkki, H.; Wihersaari, M.; Pirilae, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Hongisto, M. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland); Siitonen, S. [Ekono Energy Ltd, Espoo (Finland); Johansson, M. [Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    ExternE National Implementation is a continuation of the ExternE Project, funded in part by the European Commission's Joule III Programme. This study is the result of the ExternE National Implementation Project for Finland. Three fuel cycles were selected for the Finnish study: coal, peat and wood-derived biomass, which together are responsible for about 40% of total electricity generation in Finland and about 75% of the non-nuclear fuel based generation. The estimated external costs or damages were dominated by the global warming (GW) impacts in the coal and peat fuel cycles, but knowledge of the true GW impacts is still uncertain. From among other impacts that were valued in monetary terms the human health damages due to airborne emissions dominated in all the three fuel cycles. Monetary valuation for ecosystem impacts is not possible using the ExternE methodology at present. The Meri-Pori power station representing the coal fuel cycle is one of the world's cleanest and most efficient coal-fired power plants with a condensing turbine. The coal is imported mainly from Poland. The estimated health damages were about 4 mECU/kWh, crop damages an order of magnitude lower and damages caused to building materials two orders of magnitude lower. The power stations of the peat and biomass fuel cycles are of CHP type, generating electricity and heat for the district heating systems of two cities. Their fuels are of domestic origin. The estimated health damages allocated to electricity generation were about 5 and 6 mECU/kWh, respectively. The estimates were case-specific and thus an generalisation of the results to the whole electricity generation in Finland is unrealistic. Despite the uncertainties and limitations of the methodology, it is a promising tool in the comparison of similar kinds of fuel cycles, new power plants and pollution abatement technologies and different plant locations with each other. (orig.)

  16. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  17. The Eccentric Torque Production Capacity of the Ankle, Knee, and Hip Muscle Groups in Patients with Unilateral Chronic Ankle Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Moradi-Bousari, Aida; Naghibi, Saeed; Sarrafzadeh, Javad; Shaterzadeh-Yazdi, Mohammad-Jafar; Goharpey, Shahin; Etemadi, Malihe; Mazaheri, Masood; Feizi, Awat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate eccentric torque production capacity of the ankle, knee and hip muscle groups in patients with unilateral chronic ankle instability (CAI) as compared to healthy matched controls. Methods In this case-control study, 40 participants (20 with CAI and 20 controls) were recruited based on convenient non-probability sampling. The average peak torque to body weight (APT/BW) ratio of reciprocal eccentric contraction of ankle dorsi flexor/plantar flexor, ankle evertor/invertor, knee flexor/extensor, hip flexor/extensor and hip abductor/adductor was determined using an isokinetic dynamometer. All subjects participated in two separate sessions with a rest interval of 48 to 72 hours. In each testing session, the torque production capacity of the ankle, knee, and hip muscle groups of only one lower limb was measured. At first, 3 repetitions of maximal eccentric-eccentric contraction were performed for the reciprocal muscles of a joint in a given movement direction. Then, the same procedure of practice and testing trials was repeated for the next randomly-ordered muscle group or joint of the same limb. Results There was no significant interaction of group (CAI and healthy controls) by limb (injured and non-injured) for any muscle groups. Main effect of limb was not significant. Main effect of group was only significant for eccentric torque production capacity of ankle dorsi flexor and hip flexor muscle groups. The APT/BW ratio of these muscles was significantly lower in the CAI group than the healthy controls (P<0.05). Conclusion CAI is associated with eccentric strength deficit of ankle dorsi flexor and hip flexor muscles as indicated by reduction in torque production capacity of these muscles compared to healthy controls. This strength deficit appeared to exist in both the injured and non-injured limbs of the patients. PMID:23802057

  18. [Arthrodesis versus total joint replacement of the ankle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlmeier, T

    2013-06-01

    In general, for the treatment of end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle joint arthrodesis is considered to be the gold standard based on its versatility and eligibility for numerous indications. Nowadays, total ankle arthroplasty represents a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis taking into account distinct premises as both procedures provide a calculable reduction of the preoperative pain level and a comparable functional gain. Furthermore, current 10-year-survival rates of total ankle replacement are reported to range between 76 % and 89 %. Revision rates of up to 10 % for both techniques have been reported with manifest differences within the respective spectrum of complications. Due to the fact that more than two thirds of patients suffer from post-traumatic osteoarthritis with a relatively low average of age concomitant malalignment, soft tissue damage or instability may frequently occur. A restoration of anatomic axes and an adequate centering of the talus under the tibia appear to be crucial for the outcome as well as an adequate soft tissue balancing, in particular in total ankle replacement. Thus, the selection of the correct indication and the right choice of treatment on the basis of complete preoperative diagnostics considering necessary additive surgical measures are of paramount importance for the final outcome.

  19. [PARTICULAR QUALITIES OF DIAGNOSTIC ACUTE LATERAL ANKLE LIGAMENT INJURIES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnoperov, S N; Shishka, I V; Golovaha, M L

    2015-01-01

    Delayed diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligaments injury and subsequent inadequate treatment leads to the development of chronic instability and rapid progression of degenerative processes in the joint. The aim of our work was to improve treatment results by developing an diagnostic algorithm and treatment strategy of acute lateral ankle ligament injuries. The study included 48 patients with history of acute inversion ankle injury mechanism. Diagnostic protocol included clinical and radiological examination during 48 hours and after 7-10 days after injury. According to the high rate of inaccurate clinical diagnosis in the first 48 hours of the injury a short course of conservative treatment for 7-10 days is needed with follow-up and controlling clinical and radiographic instability tests. Clinical symptoms of ankle inversion injury showed that the combination of local tenderness in the projection of damaged ligaments, the presence of severe periarticular hematoma in the lateral department and positive anterior drawer and talar tilt tests in 7-10 days after the injury in 87% of cases shows the presence of ligament rupture. An algorithm for diagnosis of acute lateral ankle ligament injury was developed, which allowed us to determine differential indications for surgical repair of the ligaments and conservative treatment of these patients.

  20. Leg stiffness primarily depends on ankle stiffness during human hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, C T; Morgenroth, D C

    1999-03-01

    When humans hop in place or run forward, they adjust leg stiffness to accommodate changes in stride frequency or surface stiffness. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms by which humans adjust leg stiffness during hopping in place. Five subjects hopped in place at 2.2 Hz while we collected force platform and kinematic data. Each subject completed trials in which they hopped to whatever height they chose ("preferred height hopping") and trials in which they hopped as high as possible ("maximum height hopping"). Leg stiffness was approximately twice as great for maximum height hopping as for preferred height hopping. Ankle torsional stiffness was 1.9-times greater while knee torsional stiffness was 1.7-times greater in maximum height hopping than in preferred height hopping. We used a computer simulation to examine the sensitivity of leg stiffness to the observed changes in ankle and knee stiffness. Our model consisted of four segments (foot, shank, thigh, head-arms-trunk) interconnected by three torsional springs (ankle, knee, hip). In the model, increasing ankle stiffness by 1.9-fold, as observed in the subjects, caused leg stiffness to increase by 2.0-fold. Increasing knee stiffness by 1.7-fold had virtually no effect on leg stiffness. Thus, we conclude that the primary mechanism for leg stiffness adjustment is the adjustment of ankle stiffness.

  1. Adaptation to walking with an exoskeleton that assists ankle extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, S; Malcolm, P; Derave, W; De Clercq, D

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate adaptation to walking with bilateral ankle-foot exoskeletons with kinematic control that assisted ankle extension during push-off. We hypothesized that subjects would show a neuromotor and metabolic adaptation during a 24min walking trial with a powered exoskeleton. Nine female subjects walked on a treadmill at 1.36±0.04ms(-1) during 24min with a powered exoskeleton and 4min with an unpowered exoskeleton. Subjects showed a metabolic adaptation after 18.5±5.0min, followed by an adapted period. Metabolic cost, electromyography and kinematics were compared between the unpowered condition, the beginning of the adaptation and the adapted period. In the beginning of the adaptation (4min), a reduction in metabolic cost of 9% was found compared to the unpowered condition. This reduction was accompanied by reduced muscular activity in the plantarflexor muscles, as the powered exoskeleton delivered part of the necessary ankle extension moment. During the adaptation this metabolic reduction further increased to 16%, notwithstanding a constant exoskeleton assistance. This increased reduction is the result of a neuromotor adaptation in which subjects adapt to walking with the exoskeleton, thereby reducing muscular activity in all leg muscles. Because of the fast adaptation and the significant reductions in metabolic cost we want to highlight the potential of an ankle-foot exoskeleton with kinematic control that assists ankle extension during push-off.

  2. FIBULAR MOTOR NERVE CONDUCTION STUDIES AND ANKLE SENSORIMOTOR CAPACITIES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, James K.; Allet, Lara; Kim, Hogene; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Nerve conduction studies provide information regarding the status of the peripheral nerve, but relationships with sensorimotor capacities that influence mobility have not been defined. Methods A secondary analysis was conducted of data from 41 older subjects (20 women, age 69.1 ± 8.3 years), 25 with diabetic neuropathy of varying severity, and 16 without diabetes or neuropathy. Measurements included routine fibular motor nerve conduction studies and laboratory-based determination of ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds and ankle inversion/eversion motor function. Results Independent of age, fibular amplitude correlated robustly with ankle inversion/eversion proprioceptive thresholds (R2 = .591, p < .001), moderately with ankle inversion and eversion rates of torque generation (R2 = .216; p = .004 and R2 = .200; p = .006, respectively), and more strongly when fibular motor amplitude was normalized for body mass index (R2 = .350; p < .001 and R2 = .275; p = .001). Discussion Fibular motor amplitude was strongly associated with ankle sensorimotor capacities that influence lateral balance and recovery from perturbations during gait. The results suggest that nerve conduction study measures have potential for an expanded clinical role in evaluating mobility function in the population studied. PMID:23225524

  3. ASH External Web Portal (External Portal) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The ASH External Web Portal is a web-based portal that provides single sign-on functionality, making the web portal a single location from which to be authenticated...

  4. Effects of Shading and External Mechanical Supporting on Morphological Plasticity of Climbing Plant Momordica Charantia%攀援植物苦瓜对遮阴和外界支持物的形态可塑性反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶建平; 钟章成

    2001-01-01

    Through the method of shading and providing external mec hanical support,the growth dynamics and morphological characters of herbaceous c limbing plant Momordica charantia were studied .The results showed :(1)the g rowth of Momordica charantia had significant difference under different shad ing treatments,the poor light conditions decreased the chance for plants to incr ease modular numbers and accumulate biomass;(2)the plant formed few shoots ,thin laminas ,long and thin petioles and slender stems in poor light conditions ,and in thes e light conditions ,the plants showed stronger morphological plasticity than in rich light conditions;(3)the plant had stronger morphological plasticity in earl y growth period than in later growth period ;(4) the absence of external mechani cal support had little effect on plant growth when climbing plant grew in rich l ight conditions.%通过人为遮阴和人为提供外界支持物的方法,对草本攀援植物苦瓜的生长动态以及形态特征进行了研究,结果表明:(1)不同遮阴处理下苦瓜植株的生长有较大的差异,弱光照不利于苦瓜构件数量的增加和生物量的积累;(2)植株在弱光下形成较少的分枝、较薄的叶片,以及较细长的主茎和叶柄,表现比强光生长环境下更强的形态可塑性;(3)植株在生长早期较生长晚期有较大的形态可塑性;(4)在光资源充足的情况下,外界支持物的缺乏不会对苦瓜的生长造成太大的影响.

  5. Comparison of Complications for Internal and External Fixation for Charcot Reconstruction: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Paul; Feilmeier, Mindi; Thompson, Mitchell; Whitehouse, Paul; Reimer, Rachel A

    2015-01-01

    The surgical reconstruction of Charcot deformity can be a challenge for foot and ankle surgeons. Consensus is lacking among surgeons regarding the best method of surgical fixation to be used in reconstruction, and clear strong evidence is also lacking in published studies. We undertook a systematic review of electronic databases and other relevant sources in an attempt to better understand the complications and outcomes associated with internal and external fixation for Charcot foot and ankle reconstruction. A total of 23 level 4 studies with 616 procedures were identified. Of these, 12 studies with 275 procedures used internal fixation, and 11 studies with 341 procedures used external fixation. The odds of a successful outcome with internal fixation was 6.86. The odds of a successful outcome with external fixation was 13.20 (odds ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.30 to 0.90). The odds of success for internal fixation was 0.52 times as likely as the odds of success with external fixation. Because the odds ratio did not include 1, this difference was statistically significant at the p foot and ankle surgeons when making decisions regarding fixation for Charcot reconstruction.

  6. Modeling and stress analyses of a normal foot-ankle and a prosthetic foot-ankle complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, Mustafa; Sayman, Onur; Havitcioglu, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is a relatively new concept and is becoming more popular for treatment of ankle arthritis and fractures. Because of the high costs and difficulties of experimental studies, the developments of TAR prostheses are progressing very slowly. For this reason, the medical imaging techniques such as CT, and MR have become more and more useful. The finite element method (FEM) is a widely used technique to estimate the mechanical behaviors of materials and structures in engineering applications. FEM has also been increasingly applied to biomechanical analyses of human bones, tissues and organs, thanks to the development of both the computing capabilities and the medical imaging techniques. 3-D finite element models of the human foot and ankle from reconstruction of MR and CT images have been investigated by some authors. In this study, data of geometries (used in modeling) of a normal and a prosthetic foot and ankle were obtained from a 3D reconstruction of CT images. The segmentation software, MIMICS was used to generate the 3D images of the bony structures, soft tissues and components of prosthesis of normal and prosthetic ankle-foot complex. Except the spaces between the adjacent surface of the phalanges fused, metatarsals, cuneiforms, cuboid, navicular, talus and calcaneus bones, soft tissues and components of prosthesis were independently developed to form foot and ankle complex. SOLIDWORKS program was used to form the boundary surfaces of all model components and then the solid models were obtained from these boundary surfaces. Finite element analyses software, ABAQUS was used to perform the numerical stress analyses of these models for balanced standing position. Plantar pressure and von Mises stress distributions of the normal and prosthetic ankles were compared with each other. There was a peak pressure increase at the 4th metatarsal, first metatarsal and talus bones and a decrease at the intermediate cuneiform and calcaneus bones, in

  7. Study Casts Doubt on Need for Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162090.html Study Casts Doubt on Need for Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain Rates of 'excellent recovery' similar ... a sprained ankle often involves some kind of physical therapy, but a new study questions the usefulness of ...

  8. 78 FR 34708 - Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Activity... Control No. 2900--NEW (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-2. OMB Control Number: 2900--NEW...

  9. 78 FR 68908 - Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ankle Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB... Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Crystal Rennie, Enterprise Records... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ankle Conditions Disability...

  10. Assessment of AK (Above Knee) Prosthesis with Different Ankle Assembly Using GRF Pattern in Stance Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Min; Kim, Sung-Jae; Bae, Ha-Suk

    In this study, ground reaction force (GRF), absolute symmetry index (ASI) and coefficient of variation (CV) of fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assemblies were investigated by biomechanical evaluation of above knee amputees. In the experiments, 37 normal male volunteers, two male and two female Above Knee (AK) amputees GRF data were tested with fixed, single-axis and multi-axis prosthetic ankle assembly. A gait analysis was carried out to derive the ratio of GRF to weight as the percentage of total stance phase for ten points. The results showed that fixed-axis ankle assembly was superior to other two ankle assemblies for forwarding and braking forces. Multi-axis ankle was relatively superior to other two ankle assemblies for gait balancing and movement of the mass center. Single-axis ankle was relatively superior to the other two ankle assemblies for CV and ASI of GRF.

  11. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults ... on Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) and Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) ...

  12. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Robert W.; Chahal, Gurdip S.; Chapman, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA) has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR) has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial. PMID:25215242

  13. Is End-Stage Ankle Arthrosis Best Managed with Total Ankle Replacement or Arthrodesis? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. End-stage ankle osteoarthritis is a debilitating condition. Traditionally, ankle arthrodesis (AA has been the surgical intervention of choice but the emergence of total ankle replacement (TAR has challenged this concept. This systematic review aims to address whether TAR or AA is optimal in terms of functional outcomes. Methods. We conducted a systematic review according to PRISMA checklist using the online databases Medline and EMBASE after January 1, 2005. Participants must be skeletally mature and suffering from ankle arthrosis of any cause. The intervention had to be an uncemented TAR comprising two or three modular components. The comparative group could include any type of ankle arthrodesis, either open or arthroscopic, using any implant for fixation. The study must have reported at least one functional outcome measure. Results. Of the four studies included, two reported some significant improvement in functional outcome in favour of TAR. The complication rate was higher in the TAR group. However, the quality of studies reviewed was poor and the methodological weaknesses limited any definitive conclusions being drawn. Conclusion. The available literature is insufficient to conclude which treatment is superior. Further research is indicated and should be in the form of an adequately powered randomised controlled trial.

  14. Salto Talaris fixed-bearing total ankle replacement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Shannon M; Todd, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement is an anatomically designed fixed bearing prosthesis available in the United States based on the successful design of the mobile-bearing Salto prosthesis available outside the United States. The original mobile-bearing design was modified and the mobile-bearing was transferred to the precision instrumentation at the trial phase evaluation. Instrumentation and technique allow the surgeon to determine the functional joint axis before final implantation. The Salto Talaris total ankle replacement design blends minimal bone resection and optimizes surface area, cortical contact, and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene conformity. The authors present an overview of the Salto Talaris total ankle replacement surgical technique and pearls for successful application.

  15. Circular External Fixation as a Primary or Adjunctive Therapy for the Podoplastic Approach of the Diabetic Charcot Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Numerous techniques have been described for surgical management of the diabetic Charcot foot. External fixation has become a main surgical tool for the reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon when dealing with the ulcerated diabetic Charcot foot. In the presence of an open wound and/or osteomyelitis, staged reconstruction with circular external fixation becomes ideal for salvage of the diabetic lower extremity. Also, circular external fixation can provide simultaneous compression and stabilization, correct the underlying osseous or soft tissue deformities, and surgically offload the diabetic Charcot foot. This article describes a variety of circular external fixation applications for the diabetic Charcot foot.

  16. Perineural fibrosis of superficial peroneal nerve complicating ankle sprain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acus, R W; Flanagan, J P

    1991-02-01

    The peroneal nerve is susceptible to traction injury during inversion ankle sprains. Previously, these traction lesions have been identified only at the fibular neck and popliteal fossa level. This report illustrates a previously unreported condition of perineural fibrosis of the superficial peroneal nerve at the level of the ankle following an inversion ankle sprain. Perineural fibrosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pain after ankle sprain.

  17. Intraoperative Radiation Exposure During Revision Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukis, Thomas S; Iceman, Kelli; Elliott, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Intraoperative C-arm image intensification is required for primary total ankle replacement implantation. Significant radiation exposure has been linked to these procedures; however, the radiation exposure during revision total ankle replacement remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the radiation exposure encountered during revision total ankle replacement. The data from 41 patients were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database: 19 Agility(™) to Agility(™); 4 Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™); 9 Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II; 5 Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT; 2 Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT; and 2 INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II revision total ankle replacements were performed. Two broad categories were identified: partial revision (Agility(™) to Agility(™), Agility(™) to Custom Agility(™), INBONE(®) I to INBONE(®) II) and complete conversion (Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, Agility(™) to Salto Talaris(®) XT, Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement Prosthesis to Salto Talaris(®) XT). The mean radiation exposure per case was significant at 3.49 ± 2.21 mGy. Complete conversions, specifically Agility(™) to INBONE(®) II, exhibited the greatest radiation exposure and C-arm time. Revision implant selection and revision type (complete or partial) directly contributed to radiation exposure. Accordingly, revision systems requiring less radiation exposure are preferable. Surgeons should strive to minimize intraoperative complications and limit additional procedures to those necessary, because both lead to additional radiation exposure.

  18. Acute paediatric ankle trauma: MRI versus plain radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohman, M. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Radiological Dept., Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland); Kivisaari, A.; Kivisaari, L. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology; Kallio, P.; Puntila, J. [Dept. of Paediatric Surgery, Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland); Vehmas, T. [Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland)

    2001-09-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnosis of acute physeal ankle fractures on plain radiographs using MRI as the gold standard. Methods: Sixty consecutive children, 29 with a clinical diagnosis of lateral ligament injury and 31 with physeal ankle fractures, were examined using both radiographs and MRI in the acute period. The imaging data were reviewed by three ''masked'' radiologists. The fracture diagnosis and Slater-Harris classification of radiographs were compared with findings on MRI. Results: Plain radiography produced five of 28 (18%) false negative and 12 of 92 (13%) false positive fracture diagnoses compared with MRI. Six of the 12 false positive fractures were due to a misclassification of lateral ligament disruption as SH1 fractures. Altogether a difference was found in 21% of cases in either the diagnosis or the classification of the fractures according to Salter- Harris. All bone bruises in the distal tibia and fibula and 64% of bone bruises in the talus were seen in association with lateral ligament injuries. Talar bone bruises in association with fractures occurred on the same side as the malleolar fracture; talar bone bruises in association with lateral ligament disruption were seen in different locations. The errors identified on radiographs by MRI did not affect the management of the injury. Conclusions: The incidence of false negative ankle fractures in plain radiographs was small and no complex ankle fractures were missed on radiographs. The total extent of complex fractures was, however, not always obvious on radiographs. In an unselected series of relatively mild ankle injuries, we were unable to show a single case where the treatment or prognosis based on plain radiography should have been significantly altered after having done a routine MRI examination. Plain radiography is still the diagnostic cornerstone of paediatric ankle injuries. (orig.)

  19. Deltoid ligament in acute ankle injury: MR imaging analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Min Sun; Choi, Yun Sun; Kim, Yun Jung; Jung, Yoon Young [Eulji University, Department of Radiology, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Su; Young, Ki Won [Eulji University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Eulji Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    To identify the pattern of deltoid ligament injury after acute ankle injury and the relationship between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-six patients (32 male, and 4 female; mean age, 29.8 years) with acute deltoid ligament injury who had undergone MRI participated in this study. The deltoid ligament was classified as having 3 superficial and 2 deep components. An image analysis included the integrity and tear site of the deltoid ligament, and other associated injuries. Association between ankle fracture and deltoid ligament tear was assessed using Fisher's exact test (P < 0.05). Of the 36 patients, 21 (58.3 %) had tears in the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments, 6 (16.7 %) in the superficial ligaments only, and 4 (11.1 %) in the deep ligaments only. The most common tear site of the three components of the superficial deltoid and deep anterior tibiotalar ligaments was their proximal attachments (94 % and 91.7 % respectively), and that of the deep posterior tibiotalar ligament (pTTL) was its distal attachment (82.6 %). The common associated injuries were ankle fracture (63.9 %), syndesmosis tear (55.6 %), and lateral collateral ligament complex tear (44.4 %). All the components of the deltoid ligament were frequently torn in patients with ankle fractures (tibionavicular ligament, P = 0.009). The observed injury pattern of the deltoid ligament was complex and frequently associated with concomitant ankle pathology. The most common tear site of the superficial deltoid ligament was the medial malleolar attachment, whereas that of the deep pTTL was near its medial talar insertion. (orig.)

  20. Triceps surae contracture: implications for foot and ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmassih, Sami; Phisitkul, Phinit; Femino, John E; Amendola, Annunziato

    2013-07-01

    Restricted ankle dorsiflexion secondary to contracture of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex is frequently encountered in patients with foot and ankle pain and is well documented in the literature. During gait, decreased dorsiflexion shifts weight-bearing pressures from the heel to the forefoot, which may result in or exacerbate one of several pathologic conditions. Modest success has been achieved with nonsurgical management of triceps surae contracture, including splinting and stretching exercises. Surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex at multiple levels has been described, and early clinical results have been promising. Additional research is required to further elucidate the long-term outcomes of various lengthening techniques.

  1. Functional bandage for ankle sprains. Recommendations for nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Isabel Arcos Cirauqui

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Three quarters of ankle injuries are diagnosed as sprains. For the most part sprains are caused by a forced inversion movement with involvement of the lateral collateral ligament (LCL. One of the recommended guidelines is immobilization by taping. The aim of this article is to unify the recommendations for nursing, on taping in the treatment of ankle sprains. The methodology used was a literature review, analyzing the information found in books and journals in hospital libraries and nursing databases on the Internet. The main results are a set of guidelines for the most accurate and therapeutic taping.

  2. Motion Simulation of a New Ankle Rehabilitation Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Racu (Cazacu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ankle structure holds one of the most important role in the human biomechanics. Due to complexity of everyday activities this joint is the most prone to be injured part of the lower limb. For a complete recovery of the locomotion function, recovery exercises are mandatory. The introduction of robotic physical recovery systems represents a modern alternative to traditional recovery. Based on the 3D virtual model and a previous dimensional synthesis of a new ankle rehabilitation device, its motion simulation is presented in this paper, to prove that it may fully recover the range of motion required for this joint.

  3. Imaging of Soft Tissue Lesions of the Foot and Ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Mostafavi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Differential diagnosis of soft tissue lesions of the foot may be narrowed with imaging. The cystic nature of ganglia, synovial cysts, and bursitis can be confirmed with MR imaging or sonography. Location and signal characteristics of noncystic lesions may suggest Morton's neuroma, giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath and plantar fibromatosis. Synovial-based lesions of the foot and ankle can be differentiated based on presence or absence of mineralization, lesion density, signal intensity, and the enhancement pattern. Knowledge of the incidence of specific neoplasms of the foot and ankle based on patient age aids in providing a limited differential diagnosis

  4. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  5. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: an evidence-based clinical guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Bekerom, M. van den; Elders, L.A.; Beek, P.A. van; Hullegie, W.A.; Bloemers, G.M.; Heus, E.M. de; Loogman, M.C.; Rosenbrand, K.C.; Kuipers, T.; Hoogstraten, J.W.; Dekker, R.; Duis, H.J. Ten; Dijk, C.N. van; Tulder, M.W. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Bie, R.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  6. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: An evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-L.H. Kerkhoffs (Jean-Louis); M.P.J. van den Bekerom (Michel); L.A.M. Elders (Leo); P.A. van Beek (Peter); Y. Hullegie; W. Bloemers; E.M. de Heus (Elly); M.C.M. Loogman (Masja C.); D. Rosenbrand (Dagmar); T. Kuipers; J.W.A.P. Hoogstraten (J. W A P); R. Dekker (Rienk); H.-J. ten Duis (Henk-Jan); C.N. van Dijk (Niek); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); P. van der Wees (P.); R.A. de Bie (Robert)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAnkle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on

  7. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains: an evidence-based clinical guideline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, G.M.; Bekerom, M. van den; Elders, L.A.; Beek, P.A. van; Hullegie, W.A.; Bloemers, G.M.; Heus, E.M. de; Loogman, M.C.; Rosenbrand, K.C.; Kuipers, T.; Hoogstraten, J.W.; Dekker, R.; Duis, H.J. Ten; Dijk, C.N. van; Tulder, M.W. van; Wees, P.J. van der; Bie, R.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  8. Use of an acrylic mold for mortise view improvement in ankle fractures: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donken, C.C.; Verhofstad, M.H.J.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schoemaker, M.C.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    We investigated an acrylic mold for use in obtaining ankle radiographs in 31 consecutive patients with ankle fracture. The radiologic examination consisted of routine lateral and mortise views, with the same views procured with the use of the acrylic mold to position the ankle. Radiographic evidence

  9. The feasibility of total ankle prosthesis for severe arthropathy in haemophilia and prothrombin deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, H.J. van der; Nováková, I.R.O.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2006-01-01

    The standard treatment for end-stage arthropathy of the ankle joint in haemophilia has been fusion of the ankle joint. Total ankle replacement is used in osteoarthritis and especially in rheumatoid arthritis with good medium-term results. In this case series three patients are being described, in wh

  10. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  11. The effect of ankle foot orthosis stiffness on the energy cost of walking: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bregman, D.J.J.; Van der Krogt, M.M.; De Groot, V.; Harlaar, J.; Wisse, M.; Collins, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background In stroke and multiple sclerosis patients, gait is frequently hampered by a reduced ability to push-off with the ankle caused by weakness of the plantar-flexor muscles. To enhance ankle push-off and to decrease the high energy cost of walking, spring-like carbon-composite Ankle Foot Ortho

  12. Ankle injuries in the Netherlands : Trends over 10-25 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemler, Ellen; van de Port, I.; Valkenberg, H.; Hoes, A. W.; Backx, F. J G

    2015-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a common health problem; data on ankle injury rates and time trends in the population at large are scarce. Our aim was to investigate the incidence of and time trends in population-based and emergency department-treated ankle injuries related to sports activities and other

  13. Use of an acrylic mold for mortise view improvement in ankle fractures: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donken, C.C.; Verhofstad, M.H.J.; Edwards, M.J.R.; Schoemaker, M.C.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    We investigated an acrylic mold for use in obtaining ankle radiographs in 31 consecutive patients with ankle fracture. The radiologic examination consisted of routine lateral and mortise views, with the same views procured with the use of the acrylic mold to position the ankle. Radiographic evidence

  14. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical

  15. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ankle sprains : an evidence-based clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.; van den Bekerom, Michel; Elders, Leon A. M.; van Beek, Peter A.; Hullegie, Wim A. M.; Bloemers, Guus M. F. M.; de Heus, Elly M.; Loogman, Masja C. M.; Rosenbrand, Kitty C. J. G. M.; Kuipers, Ton; Hoogstraten, J. W. A. P.; Dekker, Rienk; ten Duis, Henk-Jan; van Dijk, C. Niek; van Tulder, Maurits W.; van der Wees, Philip J.; de Bie, Rob A.

    2012-01-01

    Ankle injuries are a huge medical and socioeconomic problem. Many people have a traumatic injury of the ankle, most of which are a result of sports. Total costs of treatment and work absenteeism due to ankle injuries are high. The prevention of recurrences can result in large savings on medical cost

  16. Posttraumatic severe infection of the ankle joint - long term results of the treatment with resection arthrodesis in 133 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienast B

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although there is a clear trend toward internal fixation for ankle arthrodesis, there is general consensus that external fixation is required for cases of posttraumatic infection. We retrospectively evaluated the technique and clinical long term results of external fixation in a triangular frame for cases of posttraumatic infection of the ankle. From 1993 to 2006 a consecutive series of 155 patients with an infection of the ankle was included in our study. 133 cases of the advanced "Gächter" stage III and IV were treated with arthrodesis. We treated the patients with a two step treatment plan. After radical debridement and sequestrectomy the malleoli and the joint surfaces were resected. An AO fixator was applied with two Steinmann-nails inserted in the tibia and in the calcaneus and the gap was temporary filled with gentamicin beads as the first step. In the second step we performed an autologous bone graft after a period of four weeks. The case notes were evaluated regarding trauma history, medical complaints, further injuries and illnesses, walking and pain status and occupational issues. Mean age at the index procedure was 49.7 years (18-82, 104 patients were male (67,1%. Follow up examination after mean 4.5 years included a standardised questionnaire and a clinical examination including the criteria of the AO-FAS-Score and radiographs. 92,7% of the cases lead to a stable arthrodesis. In 5 patients the arthrodesis was found partly-stable. In six patients (4,5% the infection was not controllable during the treatment process. These patients had to be treated with a below knee amputation. The mean AOFAS score at follow up was 63,7 (53-92. Overall there is a high degree of remaining disability. The complication rate and the reduced patient comfort reserve this method mainly for infection. Joint salvage is possible in the majority of cases with an earlier stage I and II infection.

  17. Increased calf and plantar muscle fibrotic contents in obese subjects may cause ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Jianning

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is strongly associated with musculoskeletal disorders of the lower limb, including ankle instability and resulting gait problems. In the present study, we aimed to examine, using paired comparisons of subjects, whether moderate duration of obesity in patients with mild to moderate elevations of body mass index (BMI), changes the fibrous contents of muscles that support the ankle mortices, namely calf and plantar muscles. We attempted to examine these parameters because this shall provide direct evidence of whether obesity directly impacts myoarchitecture and support of the adjoining joints. MRI image segmentation and pixel correlations by grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and entropy were used to analyse the changes. The differences in the means between groups (both GLCM and entropy) were significant from control lean populations (P<0.0001, ANOVA) for the parameters examined for both the calf and the plantar muscles. Reduction in weight should thus be a first-line approach in preventing these changes that may significantly affect quality of life due to gait disturbances.

  18. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Chamorro-Moriana

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale-CHAGS and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles.Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1, deviation of Center of Gravity(2, crutch inclination(3, steps rhythm(4, symmetry of step length(5, cross support(6, simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7, forearm off(8, facing forward(9 and fluency(10. Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding. Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested.CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable.CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs.

  19. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  20. Functional Rehabilitation With a Foot Plate Modification for Circular External Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    neurologic injury,3,5,6,16,19 multiple studies3,5 have suggested that weight bearing in an ankle-spanning circular external fix- ator must be delayed until...the patient has radiographic evi- dence of healing. In the past, many limb salvage patients at our institution witnessed their amputee counterparts...Only 1 patient was able to truly run in his circular exter- nal fixator. There were multiple complications documented that hin- dered the rehabilitation

  1. Dorsiflexion deficit during jogging with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Lindsay K; McKeon, Patrick O; Kerrigan, D Casey; Hertel, Jay

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI) demonstrate altered dorsiflexion/plantar flexion range of motion (ROM) compared to controls during jogging. The case control study took place in a university motion analysis laboratory. Fourteen volunteers participated in the study, seven suffered from CAI (age 25+/-4.2 years, height 173+/-9.4 cm, mass 71+/-8.1kg) and seven were healthy, matched controls (age 25+/-4.5 years, height 168+/-5.9 cm, mass 67+/-9.8kg). All subjects jogged on an instrumented treadmill while a ten-camera motion analysis system collected three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities. The main outcome measure was sagittal plane (dorsiflexion/plantar flexion) range of motion of the ankle throughout the gait cycle. CAI subjects had significantly less dorsiflexion compared to the control group from 9% to 25% during jogging (4.83+/-0.55 degrees ). CAI subjects demonstrated limited ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the time of maximal dorsiflexion during jogging. Limited dorsiflexion ROM during gait among individuals with CAI may be a risk factor for recurrent ankle sprains. These deficits should be treated appropriately by rehabilitation clinicians.

  2. Analysis and simulation of fully ankle actuated planar bipedal robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, M.C.J.; van Oort, Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of planar bipedal robots, based on passive dynamic walkers, which are actuated only by actuation of the ankle joints. An overview of the major design characteristics of such robots and their influence on the feasibility of a stable limit cycle is presented. It is

  3. Analysis and simulation of fully ankle actuated planar bipedal robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, Michel; Oort, van Gijs; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of planar bipedal robots, based on passive dynamic walkers, which are actuated only by actuation of the ankle joints. An overview of the major design characteristics of such robots and their influence on the feasibility of a stable limit cycle is presented. It is s

  4. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... different hospitals from June 2011 to June 2015 for stochastic ... injury of basketball players and promote physical rehabilitation of ... prone to ankle ligament injury in training or competition, which has a direct ... causing intense repeated impact of articular surface, ... However, without effective treatment,.

  5. Radiographic evaluation of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, A C; Shelbourne, K D; Beltz, H F; Robertson, D W; Arfken, P

    1987-10-01

    Injuries of the ankle and foot in athletes are quite common. They range from the extremely simple sprain to the difficult stress fracture, and may result in long-term disability. In all cases, the athlete is best treated after an accurate diagnosis is achieved.

  6. Epidemiologic study of ankle fractures in a tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Marcos Hideyo; Matsumura, Bruno Akio Rodrigues; Dotta, Thiago De Angelis Guerra; Pontin, Pedro Augusto; Dos Santos, Alexandre Leme Godoy; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiology of ankle fractures surgically treated at the Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade de São Paulo. Medical records of patients admitted with foot and ankle fractures between 2006 and 2011 were revised. Seventy three ankle fractures that underwent surgical treatment were identified. The parameters analyzed included age, gender, injured side, AO and Gustilo & Anderson classification, associated injuries, exposure, need to urgent treatment, time to definitive treatment and early post-operative complications. retrospective epidemiological study. Male gender was predominant among subjects and the mean age was 27.5 years old. Thirty nine fractures resulted from traffic accidents and type B fracture according to AO classification was the most common. Twenty one were open fractures and 22 patients had associated injuries. The average time to definitive treatment was 6.5 days. Early post-operative complications were found in 21.3% of patients. Ankle fractures treated in a tertiary hospital of a large city in Brazil affect young people victims of high-energy accidents and present significant rates of associated injuries and post-operative complications. Level of Evidence IV, Cases Series.

  7. Wear prediction on total ankle replacement effect of design parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Saad, Amir Putra Bin Md; Harun, Muhamad Noor; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    2016-01-01

    This book develops and analyses computational wear simulations of the total ankle replacement for the stance phase of gait cycle. The emphasis is put on the relevant design parameters. The book presents a model consisting of three components; tibial, bearing and talar representing their physiological functions.

  8. Gait Training and Ankle Dorsiflexors in Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at University of Copenhagen, Denmark, evaluated whether 4 weeks of 30 min daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve control of the ankle joint in 16 children, aged 5-14 years, with cerebral palsy.

  9. Ultrasound Findings of the Painful Ankle and Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suheil Artul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To document the prevalence and spectrum of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSKUS findings at different parts of the foot. Materials and Methods: All MSKUS studies conducted on the foot during a 2-year period (2012-2013 at the Department of Radiology were reviewed. Demographic parameters including age, gender, and MSKUS findings were documented. Results: Three hundred and sixty-four studies had been conducted in the 2-year period. Ninety-three MSKUS evaluations were done for the ankle, 30 studies for the heel, and 241 for the rest of the foot. The most common MSKUS finding at the ankle was tenosynovitis, mostly in female patients; at the heel it was Achilles tendonitis, also mostly in female patients; and for the rest of the foot it was fluid collection and presence of foreign body, mainly in male patients. The number of different MSKUS abnormalities that were reported was 9 at the ankle, 9 at the heel, and 21 on the rest of the foot. Conclusions: MSKUS has the potential for revealing a huge spectrum of abnormalities. The most common finding was collection/hematoma and foreign bodies at the foot, tenosynovitis at the ankle, and Achilles tendinitis at the heel.

  10. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  11. An Irreducible Ankle Fracture Dislocation: The Bosworth Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); T. Hagenaars (Tjebbe); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIrreducible fracture dislocations of the ankle are rare and represent true orthopedic emergencies. We present a case of a fracture dislocation that was irreducible owing to a fixed dislocation of the proximal fibular fragment posterior to the lateral ridge of the tibia. This particular t

  12. Robot-Aided Neurorehabilitation: A Pediatric Robot for Ankle Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P; Rossi, Stefano; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the pediAnklebot, an impedance-controlled low-friction, backdriveable robotic device developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that trains the ankle of neurologically impaired children of ages 6-10 years old. The design attempts to overcome the known limitations of the lower extremity robotics and the unknown difficulties of what constitutes an appropriate therapeutic interaction with children. The robot's pilot clinical evaluation is on-going and it incorporates our recent findings on the ankle sensorimotor control in neurologically intact subjects, namely the speed-accuracy tradeoff, the deviation from an ideally smooth ankle trajectory, and the reaction time. We used these concepts to develop the kinematic and kinetic performance metrics that guided the ankle therapy in a similar fashion that we have done for our upper extremity devices. Here we report on the use of the device in at least nine training sessions for three neurologically impaired children. Results demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the performance metrics assessing explicit and implicit motor learning. Based on these initial results, we are confident that the device will become an effective tool that harnesses plasticity to guide habilitation during childhood.

  13. Energy exchange between knee and ankle in a transfemoral prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.; Behrens, Sebastiaan Maria; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Ünal, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    In order to make an energy efficient transfemoral prosthesis, there should be energy exchange between knee and ankle of the prosthesis. A concept containing various spring elements is designed and tested for a single subject. It is shown that the concept of energy exchange can be realized; in this

  14. Ankle Injuries and Disorders - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Translations Spanish (español) Lesiones y enfermedades del tobillo Ukrainian (Українська) Ankle Sprain Розтягування зв'язок гомілковостопного ...

  15. A controlled-release ergometer for the human ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    1997-01-01

    A hydraulic ergometer for the human foot is described that can apply ankle rotations up to 1 rad at a constant high speed of 10-20 rad/s against moments up to 200 N m. The initial acceleration is damped, so as not to exceed a preset value. With the presented set-up the series elasticity of the intac

  16. New ankle actuation mechanism for a humanoid robot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van Gijs; Reinink, Roelof; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss the design of a new ankle actuation mechanism for the humanoid robot TUlip. The new mechanism consists of two coupled series-elastic systems. We discuss the choice of actuators according to calculations for maximum achievable walking speed. Some control issues, MIMO and no

  17. Long-term Results After Ankle Syndesmosis Injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlijmen, N. van; Denk, K.; Kampen, A. van; Jaarsma, R.L.

    2015-01-01

    Syndesmotic disruption occurs in more than 10% of ankle fractures. Operative treatment with syndesmosis screw fixation has been successfully performed for decades and is considered the gold standard of treatment. Few studies have reported the long-term outcomes of syndesmosis injuries. This study in

  18. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Pablo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion.

  19. Genetic determinants of the ankle-brachial index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wassel, Christina L; Lamina, Claudia; Nambi, Vijay

    2012-01-01

    Candidate gene association studies for peripheral artery disease (PAD), including subclinical disease assessed with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), have been limited by the modest number of genes examined. We conducted a two stage meta-analysis of ∼50,000 SNPs across ∼2100 candidate genes...

  20. Foot and ankle fractures at the supination line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Schepers (Tim); E.M. van Schie- van der Weert; M.R. de Vries (Mark); M. van der Elst (Maarten)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The supination line is a fictive line along the foot and ankle, on which over twenty fracture types and approximately ten different ligamentous sprain-injuries have been identified. Objective: The current study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of different types of

  1. TOTAL ANKLE ARTHROPLASTY: BRAZILIAN EXPERIENCE WITH THE HINTEGRA PROSTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, Caio; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz; Réssio, Cibele; Fuchs, Mauro Luiz; Godoy Santos, Alexandre Leme de; Ortiz, Rafael Trevisan

    2010-01-01

    Ankle arthrosis is becoming more and more common. The search for solutions that preserve joint function has led to a new generation of prosthesis with three components and more degrees of freedom. This paper presents the results achieved for ten patients treated with the HINTEGRA Prosthesis (Integra, New Deal), through collaborative action between the Foot and Ankle Groups of the Orthopedics and Traumatology divisions of Escola Paulista de Medicina, Unifesp, and the School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo (USP). The ten patients (six women and four men, aged between 29 and 66 years), underwent a surgical procedure consisting of Hintermann's technique, between January and June 2005. They were evaluated at prearranged intervals, and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The surgery led to a significant improvement in ankle mobility. Radiological evaluation showed no signs of loosening or failure in the prosthetic components in any of the patients studied. Although the complication rate in our sample was high, it was equivalent to the rates found by other authors, and directly represents the learning curve associate with this kind of procedure. Four years after the procedure, it was found that the patients pain levels had significantly decreased, and that their functional patterns had significantly improved, with AOFAS and Hintermann scores indicating results that were excellent for 20%, good for 70% and poor for 10%. Treatment of ankle arthritis by means of total arthroplasty using the HINTEGRA prosthesis was capable of providing good results over an average observation period of four years.

  2. International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB: past, present and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenbaum Dieter

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community (i-FAB is an international collaborative activity which will have an important impact on the foot and ankle biomechanics community. It was launched on July 2nd 2007 at the foot and ankle session of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB meeting in Taipei, Taiwan. i-FAB is driven by the desire to improve our understanding of foot and ankle biomechanics as it applies to health, disease, and the design, development and evaluation of foot and ankle surgery, and interventions such as footwear, insoles and surfaces.

  3. Ankle Bracing, Fatigue, and Time to Stabilization in Collegiate Volleyball Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Megan Y; Gribble, Phillip A; Frye, Jamie L

    2008-01-01

    Context: Fatigue has been shown to disrupt dynamic stability in healthy volunteers. It is not known if wearing prophylactic ankle supports can improve dynamic stability in fatigued athletes. Objective: To determine the type of ankle brace that may be more effective at providing dynamic stability after a jump-landing task during normal and fatigued conditions. Design: Two separate repeated-measures analyses of variance with 2 within-subjects factors (condition and time) were performed for each dependent variable. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten healthy female collegiate volleyball athletes participated (age  =  19.5 ± 1.27 years, height  =  179.07 ± 7.6 cm, mass  =  69.86 ± 5.42 kg). Intervention(s): Athletes participated in 3 separate testing sessions, applying a different bracing condition at each session: no brace (NB), Swede-O Universal lace-up ankle brace (AB), and Active Ankle brace (AA). Three trials of a jump-landing task were performed under each condition before and after induced functional fatigue. The jump-landing task consisted of a single-leg landing onto a force plate from a height equivalent to 50% of each participant's maximal jump height and from a starting position 70 cm from the center of the force plate. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time to stabilization in the anterior-posterior (APTTS) and medial-lateral (MLTTS) directions. Results: For APTTS, a condition-by-time interaction existed (F2,18  =  5.55, P  =  .013). For the AA condition, Tukey post hoc testing revealed faster pretest (2.734 ± 0.331 seconds) APTTS than posttest (3.817 ± 0.263 seconds). Post hoc testing also revealed that the AB condition provided faster APTTS (2.492 ± 0.271 seconds) than AA (3.817 ± 0.263 seconds) and NB (3.341 ± 0.339 seconds) conditions during posttesting. No statistically significant findings were associated with MLTTS. Conclusions: Fatigue increased APTTS for the AA condition. Because the

  4. Combined total ankle replacement and modified bridle tendon transfer for end-stage ankle joint arthrosis with paralytic dropfoot: report of an unusual case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbo, Christopher; Baronofsky, Hyim J; Jaffe, Leland

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, total ankle replacement has become a reasonable option for many patients with end-stage ankle arthrosis. In order to be successful, total ankle replacement requires a relatively balanced alignment of the foot in relation to the leg. Such alignment is traditionally achieved surgically by means of stabilization of the hindfoot in conjunction with relocation osteotomy of the calcaneus and/or tibia. In this report, we describe the unconventional combination of total ankle replacement in an adult patient with concomitant paralysis that was addressed by means of tendon transfer.

  5. Potential savings of a program to prevent ankle sprain recurrence: Economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hupperets, M.D.W.; Verhagen, E.A.L.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Bosmans, J.E.; Tulder, M.W. van; Mechelen, W. van

    2010-01-01

    Background: The most common ankle injury is the lateral ankle sprain. Dutch annual sports-related ankle sprain costs can roughly be estimated at 187,200,000. Research has shown that proprioceptive training accounts for an approximated overall 50% reduction in ankle sprain recurrence rate. Hypothesis

  6. [Arthrodesis and endoprostheses of the ankle joint: indications, techniques and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, S H; Klammer, G; Espinosa, N

    2013-09-01

    If adequate conservative measures for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis have failed, surgery may be taken into consideration. After exorbitant failure rates in the beginning of total ankle replacement, nowadays this kind of treatment has regained lot of interest and has become a viable alternative to ankle fusion. The correct indication and a precise explanation of the surgical procedure, outcomes and potential complications provide a solid base for future success.Currently, there is no doubt that total ankle replacement has become an important player in the treatment of symptomatic and debilitating end-stage ankle arthritis. With increasing number of patients who undergo total ankle replacement the experience with this kind of procedure increases too. As a consequence several surgeons have started to stretch indications favoring total ankle replacement. However, it must be mentioned here, despite progress in terms of improved anatomical and biomechanical understanding of the hindfoot and improved surgical techniques and instruments, total ankle replacement and ankle fusion remain challenging and difficult procedures. We provide a review article including an overview of the relevant techniques. This article should serve as rough guide for surgeons and help in decision-making regarding total ankle replacement and ankle fusion.

  7. Ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical and ultrasonographic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Naves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate ankle tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, regarding its presence, the kind of tendon involved and the concordance between clinical and ultrasound findings. Methods: Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis and pain or swollen ankle joint were evaluated. Tendon involvement was evaluated with ultrasound imaging. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ was performed for disability evaluation. Age, sex, disease duration, and vocational activity levels were also obtained. The statistical analysis included Fisher’s exact test. The significance level was 0.05. Results: Tenosynovitis was found in 13 of 20 (65.0% patients in 19 joints, in which 6 were bilaterally (46.1% and unilateral in 7 (53.8%. Tibialis posterior tenosynovitis was seen in nine (45.0% patients, Achilles tenosynovitis in seven (35.0%, tibialis anterior tenosynovitis in three (15.0%, and peroneal tenosynovitis in three (15.0% patients. We found concordance between symptomatic ankle and ultrasonographic findings in 92.3% of the patients with tenosynovitis. Association between severe HAQ with tendon involvement was not found (p>0.05. Disease duration was not associated with tenosynovitis. Patients were predominantly older, female, with mean age around 50.8 years. The long disease duration of patients presented a mean of 11.4 years and, most of them, with no vocational activity (65.0%. Conclusions: The results indicate that ankle tenosynovitis is very common in rheumatoid arthritis patients, both unilateral and bilateral. Tibialis posterior was the most common tendon involvement found. Finally, we found concordance between the clinical and ultrasound findings in almost all rheumatoid arthritis patients with ankle tenosynovitis.

  8. The postoperative COFAS end-stage ankle arthritis classification system: interobserver and intraobserver reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Fabian G; Di Silvestro, Matthew; Penner, Murray J; Wing, Kevin J; Glazebrook, Mark A; Daniels, Timothy R; Lau, Johnny T C; Younger, Alastair S E

    2012-02-01

    End-stage ankle arthritis is operatively treated with numerous designs of total ankle replacement and different techniques for ankle fusion. For superior comparison of these procedures, outcome research requires a classification system to stratify patients appropriately. A postoperative 4-type classification system was designed by 6 fellowship-trained foot and ankle surgeons. Four surgeons reviewed blinded patient profiles and radiographs on 2 occasions to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the classification. Excellent interobserver reliability (κ = .89) and intraobserver reproducibility (κ = .87) were demonstrated for the postoperative classification system. In conclusion, the postoperative Canadian Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (COFAS) end-stage ankle arthritis classification system appears to be a valid tool to evaluate the outcome of patients operated for end-stage ankle arthritis.

  9. Activation of brain areas following ankle dorsiflexion versus plantar flexion Functional magnetic resonance imaging verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianyu Jiang; Weiping Wu; Xinglin Wang; Changshui Weng; Qiuhua Wang; Yanmei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Changes in activated areas of the brain during ankle active dorsiflexion and ankle active plantar flexion were observed in six healthy subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging.Excited areas of ankle active dorsiflexion involved the bilateral primary motor area and the primary somatosensory area, as well as the bilateral supplementary sensory area, the primary visual area, the right second visual area, and the vermis of cerebellum.Excited areas of ankle active plantar flexion included the ipsilateral supplementary motor area, the limbic system, and the contralateral corpus striatum.Fine movements of the cerebral cortex control the function of the ankle dorsiflexion to a larger extent than ankle plate flexion, and the function of ankle plate flexion is more controlled by the subcortical area.

  10. Evaluation of flexibility of the ankle in elementary students with mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavrou V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to measure and evaluate the flexibility of the legs, namely the ankle by measuring the maximum values in flexion and extension of both legs. Method: The study included twelve students with mental retardation. Measured and recorded values of ankle-bending extent of both legs and assign the average of each test. Calculated and measurement the temperature of space and time. The measurement flexion and extension of the ankle was a plastic protractor. Results: The flexion presents decrease at the right ankle relationship with the left ankle by 1.86. The extension presents decrease at the left ankle relationship with the right ankle by 11.43. Conclusions: The results found that the normal range of motion of joints has a significant role in improving efficiency and thus on quality of life of persons with mental retardation. The flexibility is a determinant of performance and therefore should be evaluated at regular intervals.

  11. Staged bilateral ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of patient with severe defect of the talus (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Mikhaylov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ankle arthroplasty is known to become more successful procedure versus ankle fusion in patients with ankle osteoarthritis. This article represents a clinical case of performing three-staged bilateral ankle arthroplasty by means of HINTEGRA and Mobility implants in a patient with severe defect of the talus. The patient was followed up for 2 years for right ankle and 4 years - for left ankle. The correct treatment strategy gave the patient a new lease of life. He resumed sports activities, being pain-free in both the ankle joints.

  12. Three-dimensional computer graphics-based ankle morphometry with computerized tomography for total ankle replacement design and positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Chung; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Leardini, Alberto; Lu, Tung-Wu; Kuo, Mei-Ying; Hsu, Horng-Chaung

    2014-05-01

    Morphometry of the bones of the ankle joint is important for the design of joint replacements and their surgical implantations. However, very little three-dimensional (3D) data are available and not a single study has addressed the Chinese population. Fifty-eight fresh frozen Chinese cadaveric ankle specimens, 26 females, and 32 males, were CT-scanned in the neutral position and their 3D computer graphics-based models were reconstructed. The 3D morphology of the distal tibia/fibula segment and the full talus was analyzed by measuring 31 parameters, defining the relevant dimensions, areas, and volumes from the models. The measurements were compared statistically between sexes and with previously reported data from Caucasian subjects. The results showed that, within a general similarity of ankle morphology between the current Chinese and previous Caucasian subjects groups, there were significant differences in 9 out of the 31 parameters analyzed. From a quantitative comparison with available prostheses designed for the Caucasian population, few of these designs have both tibial and talar components suitable in dimension for the Chinese population. The current data will be helpful for the sizing, design, and surgical positioning of ankle replacements and for surgical instruments, especially for the Chinese population.

  13. Comparing Arc-shaped Feet and Rigid Ankles with Flat Feet and Compliant Ankles for a Dynamic Walker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlemann, Ilyas; Matthias Braun, Jan; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    walking robot RunBot, controlled by an reflexive neural network, uses only few sensors for generating its stable gait. The results show that at feet and compliant ankles extend RunBot's parameter range especially to more leaning back postures. They also allow the robot to stably walk over obstacles...

  14. Foot and Ankle Kinematics in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Influence of Foot and Ankle Joint and Leg Tendon Pathologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeldam, Rosemary; Baan, H.; Nene, A.V.; Drossaers-Bakker, K.W.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Buurke, Jaap

    Introduction From early onset of the disease, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) suffer from walking impairments. Clinically, pathologic effects of RA on foot and ankle structures have been studied, but little is know how they relate to kinematic changes during gait. The aim of this study was

  15. Multi-segment foot kinematics after total ankle replacement and ankle arthrodesis during relatively long-distance gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, H; Favre, J; Aminian, K; Crevoisier, X

    2012-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of ankle osteoarthritis (AOA) treatments, i.e., ankle arthrodesis (AA) and total ankle replacement (TAR), on the kinematics of multi-segment foot and ankle complex during relatively long-distance gait. Forty-five subjects in four groups (AOA, AA, TAR, and control) were equipped with a wearable system consisting of inertial sensors installed on the tibia, calcaneus, and medial metatarsals. The subjects walked 50-m twice while the system measured the kinematic parameters of their multi-segment foot: the range of motion of joints between tibia, calcaneus, and medial metatarsals in three anatomical planes, and the peaks of angular velocity of these segments in the sagittal plane. These parameters were then compared among the four groups. It was observed that the range of motion and peak of angular velocities generally improved after TAR and were similar to the control subjects. However, unlike AOA and TAR, AA imposed impairments in the range of motion in the coronal plane for both the tibia-calcaneus and tibia-metatarsals joints. In general, the kinematic parameters showed significant correlation with established clinical scales (FFI and AOFAS), which shows their convergent validity. Based on the kinematic parameters of multi-segment foot during 50-m gait, this study showed significant improvements in foot mobility after TAR, but several significant impairments remained after AA.

  16. Using an electrohydraulic ankle foot orthosis to study modifications in feedforward control during locomotor adaptation to force fields applied in stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouyer Laurent J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adapting to external forces during walking has been proposed as a tool to improve locomotion after central nervous system injury. However, sensorimotor integration during walking varies according to the timing in the gait cycle, suggesting that adaptation may also depend on gait phases. In this study, an ElectroHydraulic AFO (EHO was used to apply forces specifically during mid-stance and push-off to evaluate if feedforward movement control can be adapted in these 2 gait phases. Methods Eleven healthy subjects walked on a treadmill before (3 min, during (5 min and after (5 min exposure to 2 force fields applied by the EHO (mid-stance/push-off; ~10 Nm, towards dorsiflexion. To evaluate modifications in feedforward control, strides with no force field ('catch strides' were unexpectedly inserted during the force field walking period. Results When initially exposed to a mid-stance force field (FF20%, subjects showed a significant increase in ankle dorsiflexion velocity. Catches applied early into the FF20% were similar to baseline (P > 0.99. Subjects gradually adapted by returning ankle velocity to baseline over ~50 strides. Catches applied thereafter showed decreased ankle velocity where the force field was normally applied, indicating the presence of feedforward adaptation. When initially exposed to a push-off force field (FF50%, plantarflexion velocity was reduced in the zone of force field application. No adaptation occurred over the 5 min exposure. Catch strides kinematics remained similar to control at all times, suggesting no feedforward adaptation. As a control, force fields assisting plantarflexion (-3.5 to -9.5 Nm were applied and increased ankle plantarflexion during push-off, confirming that the lack of kinematic changes during FF50% catch strides were not simply due to a large ankle impedance. Conclusion Together these results show that ankle exoskeletons such as the EHO can be used to study phase-specific adaptive

  17. THE EFFECT OF CRYOTHERAPY ON THREE DIMENSIONAL ANKLE KINEMATICS DURING A SIDESTEP CUTTING MANEUVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean L. McCrory

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Although cryotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of acute and chronic athletic injuries, the deleterious effects of limb cooling, such as decreased nerve and muscle function, slowed sensation and inhibition of normal relaxes, may put an athlete at increased risk of additional injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of cryotherapy on subtalar and ankle joint kinematics of healthy athletes performing a sidestep 45° cut. We hypothesized that greater joint displacements and velocities would be seen after icing. Twenty one subjects performed a 45° sidestep cut prior to and after limb cooling. Retroreflective markers were placed on the subject's shank and foot while 6 high-speed cameras were used to collect the kinematic data. In this test-retest controlled laboratory study, a repeated measures ANOVA was performed on the PRE and POST icing data for the minimum and maximum joint displacements and velocities. No statistical differences were noted between the PRE and POST icing conditions. The results indicate that a 10-minute icing treatment did not have an effect on either the movement patterns or angular velocities. Our results do not support any change in practice of icing injured ankles for ten minutes during halftime of athletic events

  18. Below-knee orthosis: a wrap-around design for ankle-foot control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, B M; Erickson, G; Simons, D

    1979-02-01

    Control of foot and ankle positions with orthotic appliances is generally more difficult to accomplish in children with spastic than flaccid paralytic disorders. Our new design for a custom molded plastic ankle-foot orthosis has proven superior to other designs in most applications. The appliance is vacuum molded from very thin polypropylene plastic and innerfaced with a foam material (Aliplast). The limb is enclosed completely in plastic with an anterior opening secured by several Velcro straps. Although the material is soft and pliable, the circumferential support provides remarkably rigid control of the limb. The orthosis has been successfully applied to children with polio, meningomyelocele and all forms of spastic and athetoid cerebral palsy. In addition to superior limb control, another advantage appears to be reflex inhibition of abnormal motor tone in may spastic patients. Patients have preferred this orthosis to those previously worn probably due to greater comfort. The limitation of adjustability of dorsiflexion can be compensated by heel or sole shoe lifts. Excessive heat created by the "wrap-around" design can be reduced by a thin cotton sock extended above the orthosis.

  19. Modulation of anticipatory postural adjustments of gait using a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Matthew N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2013-06-01

    Prior to taking a step, properly coordinated anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) are generated to control posture and balance as the body is propelled forward. External cues (audio, visual, somatosensory) have been shown to facilitate gait initiation by improving the magnitude and timing of APAs in Parkinson's disease (PD), but the efficacy of these cueing strategies has been limited by their inability to produce the forces required to generate an appropriate APA. To date, mechanical cueing paradigms have been relatively underexplored. Using healthy young adults, we investigated the use of a portable powered ankle-foot orthosis (PPAFO) to provide a modest torque at the ankle as a mechanical cue to initiate gait. Subjects were instructed to initiate gait in five test conditions: (1) self-initiated in running shoes [baseline-shoe], (2) self-initiated trial in unpowered passive PPAFO [baseline-passive], (3) with acoustic go-cue in passive PPAFO [acoustic-passive], (4) acoustic go-cue and simultaneous mechanical assist from powered PPAFO [acoustic-assist], and (5) mechanical assist cue only [assist]. APA characteristics were quantified using ground reaction force (GRF), center of pressure (COP), and electromyography (EMG) data. Mechanical cueing significantly increased medial-lateral COP and GRF peak amplitude, and decreased GRF time to peak amplitude, COP and GRF onset times, and time to toe off. Mechanical cueing conditions also demonstrated consistent bimodal EMG behaviors across all subjects. Overall, these data suggest that the mechanical assist from the PPAFO can significantly improve APA timing parameters and increase APA force production in healthy young adults.

  20. Italian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the "American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot scale".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigheb, Massimiliano; Janicka, Paulina; Andorno, Silvano; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Magnani, Corrado; Grassi, Federico

    2016-05-06

    Background and Aim of the workAnkle and hindfoot injuries are common and may lead to functional impairment, disability, exclusion from occupational and daily activities. It's necessary a standardized method for assessing treatment outcomes in people with same condition and disease.American-Orthopaedics-Foot-and-Ankle-Society's-Ankle-Hindfoot-Evaluation-Scale (AOFAS-AHES) is specific to estimate clinical problems of the ankle-hindfoot.Outcome evaluation scales should be translated and culturally adapted into the language of the investigated patient.Our purpose was to translate and culturally adapt into Italian AOFAS-AHES, and to check its reproducibility and validity.MethodsAn Italian translation of the AOFAS-scale was retranslated into English by a native English and compared to the original to define a second correct Italian-version, that was submitted to 50 randomized patients operated at their ankle or hindfoot with a minimum follow-up of 6 months for cultural adaptation, and to 10 healthcare professionals to check comprehension of the medical part.To check intra and inter-observer reproducibility each patient underwent 2 interviews by interviewer-A and 1 by B. ShortForm(SF)-36-questionnaire for quality of life and Visual-Analogue-Scale (VAS) for pain were also compared for validation. The Pearson's-Correlation-Coefficient and the Intra-Class-Correlation coefficient were calculated to check inter and intra-observer reproducibility for validation.ResultsCultural adaptation revealed to be good. We obtained a good correlation of the inter and intra-observer reproducibility. Further validation of the Italian-AOFAS-AHES was obtained comparing AOFAS results to SF-36.ConclusionsItalian translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the AOFAS-AHES has been performed successfully and could be useful to improve assistance quality in care practice.

  1. The effects of powered ankle-foot orthoses on joint kinematics and muscle activation during walking in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Antoinette

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Powered lower limb orthoses could reduce therapist labor during gait rehabilitation after neurological injury. However, it is not clear how patients respond to powered assistance during stepping. Patients might allow the orthoses to drive the movement pattern and reduce their muscle activation. The goal of this study was to test the effects of robotic assistance in subjects with incomplete spinal cord injury using pneumatically powered ankle-foot orthoses. Methods Five individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (ASIA C-D participated in the study. Each subject was fitted with bilateral ankle-foot orthoses equipped with artificial pneumatic muscles to power ankle plantar flexion. Subjects walked on a treadmill with partial bodyweight support at four speeds (0.36, 0.54, 0.72 and 0.89 m/s under three conditions: without wearing orthoses, wearing orthoses unpowered (passively, and wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by a physical therapist. Subjects also attempted a fourth condition wearing orthoses activated under pushbutton control by them. We measured joint angles, electromyography, and orthoses torque assistance. Results A therapist quickly learned to activate the artificial pneumatic muscles using the pushbuttons with the appropriate amplitude and timing. The powered orthoses provided ~50% of peak ankle torque. Ankle angle at stance push-off increased when subjects walked with powered orthoses versus when they walked with passive-orthoses (ANOVA, p Two of the five subjects were able to control the orthoses themselves using the pushbuttons. The other three subjects found it too difficult to coordinate pushbutton timing. Orthoses assistance and maximum ankle angle at push-off were smaller when the subject controlled the orthoses compared to when the therapist-controlled the orthoses (p Conclusion Mechanical assistance from powered ankle-foot orthoses improved ankle push-off kinematics without

  2. Does use of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis restore whole-body angular momentum during walking at different speeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Susan; Wilhelm, Natalie; Silverman, Anne K; Grabowski, Alena M

    2014-10-01

    Whole-body angular momentum (H) influences fall risk, is tightly regulated during walking, and is primarily controlled by muscle force generation. People with transtibial amputations using passive-elastic prostheses typically have greater H compared with nonamputees. (1) Do people with unilateral transtibial amputations using passive-elastic prostheses have greater sagittal and frontal plane H ranges of motion during walking compared with nonamputees and compared with using powered prostheses? (2) Does use of powered ankle-foot prostheses result in equivalent H ranges in all planes of motion compared with nonamputees during walking as a result of normative prosthetic ankle power generation? Eight patients with a unilateral transtibial amputation and eight nonamputees walked 0.75, 1.00, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75 m/s while we measured kinematics and ground reaction forces. We calculated H for participants using their passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis and for nonamputees at each speed. Patients using passive-elastic prostheses had 32% to 59% greater sagittal H ranges during the affected leg stance phase compared with nonamputees at 1.00 to 1.75 m/s (p passive-elastic prostheses had 5% and 9% greater sagittal H ranges compared with using powered prostheses at 1.25 and 1.50 m/s, respectively (p passive-elastic prostheses had 29% and 17% greater frontal H ranges at 0.75 and 1.50 m/s, respectively, compared with nonamputees (p walking speeds when using powered compared with passive-elastic prostheses. Our results support the hypothesis that an ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive work during the stance phase of walking reduces sagittal plane H; future studies are needed to validate our biomechanical findings with larger numbers of patients and should determine whether powered prostheses can decrease the risk of falls in patients with a transtibial amputation.

  3. A Novel Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Treatment for Recovery of Ankle Dorsiflexion in Chronic Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Chae, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of improving active ankle dorsiflexion with contralaterally controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (CCNMES). Design CCNMES dorsiflexes the paretic ankle with a stimulation intensity that is directly proportional to the degree of voluntary dorsiflexion of the unimpaired contralateral ankle, which is detected by an instrumented sock. Three subjects with chronic (>6-mo poststroke) dorsiflexor paresis participated in a 6-wk CCNMES treatment, which consisted of self-administering CCNMES-assisted ankle dorsiflexion exercises at home daily and practicing an ankle motor control task in the research laboratory twice a week. Results For subjects 1 and 2, respectively, maximum voluntary ankle dorsiflexion increased by 13 and 17 degrees, ankle movement tracking error decreased by ~57% and 57%, and lower limb Fugl-Meyer score (maximum score is 34) increased by 4 and 5 points. Subject 3 had no appreciable improvement in these measures. Both subjects 1 and 2 maintained their performance in ankle movement tracking through the 3-mo follow-up; subject 2 also maintained the gains in maximum ankle dorsiflexion and Fugl-Meyer score. Conclusions These results suggest that CCNMES may have a positive effect on ankle motor impairment in some stroke survivors. Further investigation of the effect of CCNMES on gait is warranted. PMID:20531158

  4. A one year prospective study on ankle stability and landing technique : The occurrence of ankle and knee injuries in elite ball team athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Does, Henrike van der; Brink, M.S.; Lemmink, K.A.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In team sports lower extremity injuries account for more than 50% of all injuries, indicating the importance of early detection of athletes at risk. Objective: To investigate the predictive value of ankle stability and landing technique at baseline for ankle and knee injury occurrence du

  5. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Driscoll, Jeremiah

    2011-06-09

    Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI) are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed\\/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs) during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  6. Effect of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Driscoll Jeremiah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle joint sprain and the subsequent development of chronic ankle instability (CAI are commonly encountered by clinicians involved in the treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal injuries. It has recently been advocated that ankle joint post-sprain rehabilitation protocols should incorporate dynamic neuromuscular training to enhance ankle joint sensorimotor capabilities. To date no studies have reported on the effects of dynamic neuromuscular training on ankle joint positioning during landing from a jump, which has been reported as one of the primary injury mechanisms for ankle joint sprain. This case report details the effects of a 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme on ankle joint function in an athlete with CAI. Methods The athlete took part in a progressive 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme which incorporated postural stability, strengthening, plyometric, and speed/agility drills. The outcome measures chosen to assess for interventional efficacy were: 1 Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT scores, 2 Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT reach distances, 3 ankle joint plantar flexion during drop landing and drop vertical jumping, and 4 ground reaction forces (GRFs during walking. Results CAIT and SEBT scores improved following participation in the programme. The angle of ankle joint plantar flexion decreased at the point of initial contact during the drop landing and drop vertical jumping tasks, indicating that the ankle joint was in a less vulnerable position upon landing following participation in the programme. Furthermore, GRFs were reduced whilst walking post-intervention. Conclusions The 6-week dynamic neuromuscular training programme improved parameters of ankle joint sensorimotor control in an athlete with CAI. Further research is now required in a larger cohort of subjects to determine the effects of neuromuscular training on ankle joint injury risk factors.

  7. Externally Verifiable Oblivious RAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gancher Joshua

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the idea of externally verifiable oblivious RAM (ORAM. Our goal is to allow a client and server carrying out an ORAM protocol to have disputes adjudicated by a third party, allowing for the enforcement of penalties against an unreliable or malicious server. We give a security definition that guarantees protection not only against a malicious server but also against a client making false accusations. We then give modifications of the Path ORAM [15] and Ring ORAM [9] protocols that meet this security definition. These protocols both have the same asymptotic runtimes as the semi-honest original versions and require the external verifier to be involved only when the client or server deviates from the protocol. Finally, we implement externally verified ORAM, along with an automated cryptocurrency contract to use as the external verifier.

  8. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Prostate Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Why is ... Radiation Oncology) Breast Cancer Treatment Esophageal Cancer Treatment Lung Cancer Treatment Images related to External Beam Therapy (EBT) Sponsored ...

  9. MALIGNANT EXTERNAL OTITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Massoud Moghaddam

    1993-01-01

    Two case reports of malignant external otitis in the elderly diabetics and their complications and management with regard to our experience at Amir Alam Hospital, Department of ENT will be discussed here.

  10. Checklists for external validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine; Kidholm, Kristian; Gerke, Oke;

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The quality of the current literature on external validity varies considerably. An improved checklist with validated items on external validity would aid decision-makers in judging similarities among circumstances when transferring evidence from a study setting...... to an implementation setting. In this paper, currently available checklists on external validity are identified, assessed and used as a basis for proposing a new improved instrument. METHOD: A systematic literature review was carried out in Pubmed, Embase and Cinahl on English-language papers without time restrictions....... The retrieved checklist items were assessed for (i) the methodology used in primary literature, justifying inclusion of each item; and (ii) the number of times each item appeared in checklists. RESULTS: Fifteen papers were identified, presenting a total of 21 checklists for external validity, yielding a total...

  11. Ankle Arthritis: You Can't Always Replace It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brandon J; Gonzalez, Tyler; Smith, Jeremy T; Chiodo, Christopher P; Bluman, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    End-stage arthritis of the tibiotalar joint is disabling and causes substantial functional impairment. Most often it is the residual effect of a previous traumatic injury. Nonsurgical treatment of end-stage arthritis of the ankle includes bracing, shoe-wear modifications, and selective joint injections. For patients who fail to respond to nonsurgical modalities, the two primary treatment options are arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Each has its proponents. Although no ideal treatment of ankle arthritis exists, high-quality studies can help guide treatment in patients of varying demographics. Inherent risks are linked with each treatment option, but those of greatest concern are early implant loosening that requires revision following arthroplasty and the acceleration of adjacent joint degeneration associated with arthrodesis.

  12. Foot and Ankle Deformity in Young Acrobatic and Artistic Gymnasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobera Anna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the paper was to determine the occurrence of feet and ankle deformities in trampoline and artistic gymnasts. Methods. Ten acrobatic gymnasts (trampolinists and 10 artistic gymnasts aged 6-14 years were recruited. The calcaneal-tibial (rearfoot angle was determined as the angle of the upper calcaneal tendon and the longitudinal heel axis while Clarke angles were determined by podoscopy. Results. The trampolinists showed significantly greater medial angulation (calcaneal valgus than the group of gymnasts. Right and left foot Clark’s angles in both the trampoline and artistic gymnasts were above 55°. Conclusions. Trampolinists exhibit significantly more pronounced calcaneal valgus than artistic gymnasts. The prevalence of foot and ankle deformities in both populations should be addressed by coaches in the gymnastics training of young children.

  13. SIRT2 regulates nuclear envelope reassembly through ANKLE2 deacetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Tanja; Kukolj, Eva; Brachner, Andreas; Beltzung, Etienne; Bruno, Melania; Kostrhon, Sebastian; Opravil, Susanne; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Warren, Graham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is an NAD-dependent deacetylase known to regulate microtubule dynamics and cell cycle progression. SIRT2 has also been implicated in the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and progeria. Here, we show that SIRT2 depletion or overexpression causes nuclear envelope reassembly defects. We link this phenotype to the recently identified regulator of nuclear envelope reassembly ANKLE2. ANKLE2 acetylation at K302 and phosphorylation at S662 are dynamically regulated throughout the cell cycle by SIRT2 and are essential for normal nuclear envelope reassembly. The function of SIRT2 therefore extends beyond the regulation of microtubules to include the regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics. PMID:27875273

  14. Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, one year on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borthwick Alan M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Journal of Foot and Ankle Research was launched one year ago, and a number of its key achievements are highlighted in this editorial. Although the journal is underpinned by professional bodies associated with the podiatry professions in the UK and Australasia, its content is aimed at the wider foot and ankle research community. Nevertheless, the journal's achievements over the past year reflect the development of research in the profession of podiatry. From this perspective, the journal may be viewed as contributing to the overall attainment of some of the profession's key goals and strategic aims over the last decade, across the UK and Australasia. The journal has also witnessed policy changes in the last year, and these are discussed - notably, the decision not to accept case reports for publication. We also report on a few of the key metrics, providing readers with a summary of the journal's performance over the last year.

  15. Running with a powered knee and ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Amanda H; Lawson, Brian E; Goldfarb, Michael

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a running control architecture for a powered knee and ankle prosthesis that enables a transfemoral amputee to run with a biomechanically appropriate running gait and to intentionally transition between a walking and running gait. The control architecture consists firstly of a coordination level controller, which provides gait biomechanics representative of healthy running, and secondly of a gait selection controller that enables the user to intentionally transition between a running and walking gait. The running control architecture was implemented on a transfemoral prosthesis with powered knee and ankle joints, and the efficacy of the controller was assessed in a series of running trials with a transfemoral amputee subject. Specifically, treadmill trials were conducted to assess the extent to which the coordination controller provided a biomechanically appropriate running gait. Separate trials were conducted to assess the ability of the user to consistently and reliably transition between walking and running gaits.

  16. Migration with fiscal externalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercowitz, Z; Pines, D

    1991-11-01

    "This paper analyses the distribution of a country's population among regions when migration involves fiscal externalities. The main question addressed is whether a decentralized decision making [by] regional governments can produce an optimal population distribution...or a centralized intervention is indispensable, as argued before in the literature.... It turns out that, while with costless mobility the fiscal externality is fully internalized by voluntary interregional transfers, with costly mobility, centrally coordinated transfers still remain indispensable for achieving the socially optimal allocation."

  17. Sen cycles and externalities

    OpenAIRE

    Piggins, Ashley; Salerno, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    It has long been understood that externalities of some kind are responsible for Sen’s (1970) theorem on the impossibility of a Paretian liberal. However, Saari and Petron (2006) show that for any social preference cycle generated by combining the weak Pareto principle and individual decisiveness, every decisive individual must suffer at least one strong negative externality. We show that this fundamental result only holds when individual preferences are strict. Building on their contribution,...

  18. Surgical efficacy of the ankle tourniquet for forefoot surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel K; Cleave, Elizabeth S; Rambani, Rohit

    2014-12-01

    For precise, safe and proficient procedures haemostasis is critical. For forefoot surgery, the customary thigh tourniquet is commonly accepted for this role as the additional muscle mass and minimal bony prominences in the thigh avert neuromuscular and skin injury. However, for patients with pathophysiological issues that may be exacerbated by a thigh tourniquet, application of an ankle tourniquet may decrease the risks and increase cuff tolerance as the volume of ischaemic tissue is reduced.

  19. Can an Ankle-Foot Orthosis Change Hearts and Minds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ities. The most common fracture of the lower extremity is to the tibia and fibula . As opposed to prior military From 1Orthopaedic Surgery Service...patients, demonstrates that 26% of patients with extremity wounds have fractures , 82% of which are open, divided evenly between the upper and lower extrem...sustained a severe open ankle fracture and underwent irrigation and debridement with splint immobilization in theater on the day of injury. Thereafter he

  20. [Conservative therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolenski, U C; Best, N; Bocker, B

    2008-03-01

    Cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint reflect the problem that great force is transmitted and balanced out over a relatively small surface area. As a pathophysiological factor, cartilage-bone contusions play a significant role in the development of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint. Physiotherapeutic procedures belong to the standard procedures of conservative therapy. The use and selection of the type of therapy is based on empirical considerations and experience and investigations on effectiveness of particular therapies are relatively rare. At present a symptom-oriented therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint seems to be the most sensible approach. It can be assumed that it makes sense that the symptomatic treatment of cartilage defects or initial stages of arthritis also includes the subsequent symptoms of pain, irritated condition and limited function. This leads to starting points for physiotherapy with respect to pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, avoidance of pressure points, improvement of diffusion and pressure release. In addition to the differential physiotherapeutic findings, the determination of a curative, preventive or rehabilitative procedure is especially important. In physical therapy special importance is placed on a scheduled serial application corresponding to the findings, employing the necessary methods, such as physiotherapy, sport therapy, medical mechanics, manual therapy, massage, electrotherapy and warmth therapy. From this the findings-related therapy is proposed as a practical therapy concept: locomotive apparatus pain therapy, optimisation of pressure relationships, improvement of diffusion and decongestion therapy. Therapy options have been selected base on the current literature and are summarised in tabular form. The art of symptomatic therapy of cartilage defects of the upper ankle joint does not lie in the multitude of sometimes speculative procedures, but in the targeted selection

  1. THE FEATURES OF TIBIOFIBULAR INJURY IN PATENTS WITH ANKLE FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Fomin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of interposition of soft tissues into tibiofibular syndesmosis is analyzed as a cause of unsatisfactory outcomes in the ankle joint pronation fracture treatment. The study is based on clinical (452 patients and experimental material (36 experiments including unfixed anatomic objects. The elevator for minimal invasive operative elimination of interposition of stumps of distal tibiofibular syndesmosis anterior and posterior ligaments is developed and tested.

  2. Finite element analysis of effect of ankle ligment injury on stability of talus%踝关节周围韧带损伤对距骨稳定性影响的有限元分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴海飞; 余斌; 张凯瑞; 熊小龙; 陈志刚; 崔壮; 卢昌怀

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the biomechanical properties of the talus in different ankle ligament injury through finite element analysis and therefore to provide theoretical basis for the clinic treatment of ankle ligament injury. Methods CT scan data, three-dimensional anatomically detailed finite element models was used to simulate human ankle joint internal rotation, external rotation stress state of the finite element analysis. The contact pressure and Von Mises stress distribution of the talar articular surface were compared in different ankle ligament injury. Results The three-dimensional finite element model of bone, cartilage and ligaments of the normal human ankle was established. The biomechanical stability of the talus which influenced by the ankle ligament was different in the internal rotation and external rotation force. Conclusion The anterior tibio-talar ligament playes an important role in ankle stability under external rotation force while under internal rotation force, calca-neofibular ligament playes an important role.%目的 有限元法分析踝关节周围韧带损伤对距骨生物力学稳定性的影响,为临床踝关节周围韧带损伤的治疗提供理论依据.方法 基于正常男性的足踝部螺旋CT扫描数据,运用三维重建软件,建立足踝部三维几何模型,最后导人Abaqus 6.9软件中,模拟人体踝关节内旋、外旋的受力状况,分析踝关节周围韧带损伤后距骨各关节面的接触压力及Von Mises应力分布.结果 建立包括骨、软骨、韧带在内的正常人体足踝部三维有限元模型,踝关节周围韧带在踝关节内旋、外旋时对距骨的生物力学影响不同.结论 在外旋作用力下胫距后韧带对踝关节的稳定性具有重要作用,而在内旋作用力下跟腓韧带对踝关节的稳定性具有重要作用.

  3. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dequan Zou, DSc

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber (CF ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance.

  4. Ultrasound of the ankle and foot in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micu, Mihaela C; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Vlad, Violeta; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-03-01

    In the last years musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) has become a very useful imaging tool for the evaluation of rheumatic patients and a natural extension of the clinical examination of the ankle and foot. Musculoskeletal US allows the evaluation of the symptomatic and asymptomatic ankle and foot with a detailed analysis of a wide range of elementary lesions at the level of different anatomical structures and their distribution in early or long standing disease. In inflammatory pathology, it helps in the assessment of the disease activity and severity at the joint, tendon or entheseal level and in the detection of subclinical pathological features in early disease or residual activity after therapy. Moreover, US guided procedures allow accurate diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. It is a valuable imaging method that can be also used in the follow up of the treated patients (systemic and/ or local therapies or surgical procedures), being a patient friendly, non-invasive, and quick to perform method. The aim of this paper is to review the US technique of scanning and the indications of US in the analysis of the ankle and foot in rheumatic diseases.

  5. SHADE: A Shape-Memory-Activated Device Promoting Ankle Dorsiflexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.; Rossini, M.; Magoni, L.; Pirovano, S.; Villa, E.; Besseghini, S.; Molteni, F.

    2009-08-01

    Acute post-stroke rehabilitation protocols include passive mobilization as a means to prevent contractures. A device (SHADE) that provides repetitive passive motion to a flaccid ankle by using shape memory alloy actuators could be of great help in providing this treatment. A suitable actuator was designed as a cartridge of approximately 150 × 20 × 15 mm, containing 2.5 m of 0.25 mm diameter NiTi wire. This actuator was activated by Joule’s effect employing a 7 s current input at 0.7 A, which provided 10 N through 76 mm displacement. Cooling and reset by natural convection took 30 s. A prototype of SHADE was assembled with two thermoplastic shells hinged together at the ankle and strapped on the shin and foot. Two actuators were fixed on the upper shell while an inextensible thread connected each NiTi wire to the foot shell. The passive ankle motion (passive range of motion, PROM) generated by SHADE was evaluated optoelectronically on three flaccid patients (58 ± 5 years old); acceptability was assessed by a questionnaire presented to further three flaccid patients (44 ± 11.5 years old) who used SHADE for 5 days, 30 min a day. SHADE was well accepted by all patients, produced good PROM, and caused no pain. The results prove that suitable limb mobilization can be produced by SMA actuators.

  6. Effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Mehmet Gürhan; Rutbİl, Hilal; Akpinar, Ercan; Yildirim, Alİ; Karakaya, İlkİm Çitak

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of ankle proprioceptive training on static body balance. [Subjects and Methods] In this randomized-controlled, single-blind study, 59 university students (35 females, 24 males) were randomized into study (n=29) and control (n=30) groups. The study group received a foot and ankle proprioceptive exercise program including stretching, strengthening (plantar and dorsi-flexors, invertor and evertor muscles), and balance board exercises, each with 10 repetitions per session, 5 days a week, for a total of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any intervention. Static body balance was evaluated by a kinesthetic ability trainer, which showed the balance index scores under both single foot and both feet conditions. This evaluation was repeated at the end of two weeks for both groups. [Results] Outcome measures of the groups were similar at the baseline. Balance index scores of both groups improved at the end of two weeks, and the study group had significantly lower index scores than those of the control group, indicating better balance. [Conclusion] Ankle proprioceptive training had positive effects on static body balance parameters in healthy individuals, and it is worth investigating the effects of this type of training in patients with balance disorders.

  7. Immediate Weight-Bearing after Ankle Fracture Fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Firoozabadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that a certain subset of surgical ankle fracture patients can be made weight-bearing as tolerated immediately following surgery. Immediate weight-bearing as tolerated (IWBAT allows patients to return to ambulation and activities of daily living faster and may facilitate rehabilitation. A prospectively gathered orthopaedic trauma database at a Level 1 trauma center was reviewed retrospectively to identify patients who had ORIF after unstable ankle injuries treated by the senior author. Patients were excluded if they were not IWBAT based on specific criteria or if they did meet followup requirement. Only 1/26 patients was noted to have loss of fixation. This was found at the 6-week followup and was attributed to a missed syndesmotic injury. At 2-week followup, 2 patients had peri-incisional erythema that resolved with a short course of oral antibiotics. At 6-week followup, 20 patients were wearing normal shoes and 6 patients continued to wear the CAM Boot for comfort. To conclude, IWBAT in a certain subset of patients with stable osteosynthesis following an ankle fracture could potentially be a safe alternative to a period of protected weight-bearing.

  8. Experimental and computational analysis of composite ankle-foot orthosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Dequan; He, Tao; Dailey, Michael; Smith, Kirk E; Silva, Matthew J; Sinacore, David R; Mueller, Michael J; Hastings, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    Carbon fiber (CF) ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) can improve gait by increasing ankle plantar-flexor power and improving plantar-flexor ankle joint moment and energy efficiency compared with posterior leaf spring AFOs made of thermoplastic. However, fabricating a CF AFO to optimize the performance of the individual user may require multiple AFOs and expensive fabrication costs. Finite element analysis (FEA) models were developed to predict the mechanical behavior of AFOs in this study. Three AFOs, two made of CF composite material and one made of thermoplastic material, were fabricated and then mechanically tested to produce force-displacement data. The FEA models were validated by comparing model predictions with mechanical testing data performed under the same loading and boundary conditions. The actual mechanical testing demonstrated that CF performs better than thermoplastic. The simulation results showed that FEA models produced accurate predictions for both types of orthoses. The relative error of the energy return ratio predicted by the CF AFO FEA model developed in this study is less than 3%. We conclude that highly accurate FEA models will allow orthotists to improve CF AFO fabrication without wasting resources (time and money) on trial and error fabrications that are expensive and do not consistently improve AFO and user performance.

  9. Functional outcome following an ankle or subtalar arthrodesis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Adnan A; Loveday, David T

    2014-06-01

    Arthrodesis surgery aims to give pain relief by abolishing the movement of the joint concerned. Few studies describe the outcome as appreciated by the patient. This was the major concern of the authors, when they set up this retrospective study about the outcome after ankle fusion or subtalar fusion. Inclusion criteria were: pre-existing idiopathic and posttraumatic osteoarthritis, leading to joint pain unresponsive to conservative treatment, clinically and radiologically fused with an open approach between 2007 and 2011. Exclusion criteria were: preexisting joint infection, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, nonunion, age below 18 years, decease, and arthroscopic fusion. Fifteen ankle fusions and 18 subtalar fusions fulfilled the criteria. The mean age of the patients was 77 and 69 years, respectively; the average follow-up period was 3 and 4 years. A telephone questionnaire showed that the average patients' satisfaction was 7.86/10 in the ankle group and 7.94/10 in the subtalar group. All patients driving a car prior to surgery were able to do so afterwards. Forty percent walked unaided and without problems (excellent). Fifty-one percent were able to mobilise, but their walking distance was limited and a stick was required (good or fair). Nine percent were unable to mobilise out of their homes (poor), however it was generalized osteoarthritis which limited their mobility. Forty-five percent were involved in sports including judo, swimming, cycling, jogging, gardening, bowling, golf, and boules.

  10. The clinical features of ankle syndesmosis injuries: a general review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, John J

    2011-11-01

    To review the research conclusions relating to clinical aspects of syndesmosis, the incidence and prognosis of syndesmosis injuries, and the effectiveness of the history and clinical examination to reliably diagnose ankle syndesmosis injury. Google Scholar search: Syndesmosis paired with incidence, prognosis, history, and examination in turn. There was no time limit for the search. Articles were selected by reading titles, abstracts, and the full article, if indicated, seeking original articles determining these clinical aspects of syndesmosis injuries. Further articles were derived from the references of the primary articles. The prognosis for isolated syndesmosis injuries, including the time to functional recovery, is unknown. The incidence of acute syndesmosis injury in moderate to severe ankle injuries requiring imaging is of the order of 5%. Historical features and special clinical tests of syndesmosis injury have not been proven reliable by clinical studies using evidence-based diagnostic criteria. Acute local tenderness of the anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament will indicate significant syndesmosis injury in only approximately half of nonspecific ankle injuries. There is limited, evidence-based, standard, published literature from which to draw conclusions regarding the validity or reliability of various clinical special tests for syndesmosis injury. Literature assessing the incidence, prognosis, and clinical features is generally not based on definitively confirmed syndesmosis injuries, which is a critical aspect of evidence-based medicine before valid conclusions can be drawn.

  11. Celiac disease manifested by polyneuropathy and swollen ankles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zlatko Djuric; Borislav Kamenov; Vuka Katic

    2007-01-01

    A 27-year-old male started to have his ankles swollen during his military service. He was examined at a military hospital where electromyoneurography showed the signs of distal sensory-motor polyneuropathy with axon demyelinization and weak myopathic changes,whereas histopathological examination of gastrocnemius muscle biopsy revealed some mild and nonspecific myopathy. Besides, he was found to have subcutaneous ankle tissue edemas and hypertransaminasemia. Due to these reasons, he was dismissed from the military service and examined at another hospital where bone osteodensitometry revealed low bone mineral density of the spine. However, his medical problems were not resolved and after the second discharge from hospital he was desperately seeing doctors from time to time. Finally, at our institution he was shown to have celiac disease (CD) by positive serology (antitissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibodies) and small bowel mucosal histopathological examination,which showed total small bowel villous atrophy. Three months after the initiation of gluten-free diet, his ankle edema disappeared, electromyoneurographic signs of polyneuropathy improved and liver aminotransferases normalized. Good knowledge of CD extraintestinal signs and serologic screening are essential for early CD recognition and therapy.

  12. Semi-rigid brace and taping decrease variability of the ankle joint position sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Barbanera

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of taping and the semi-rigid ankle brace on ankle joint position sense. Sixteen healthy women (20.8 ± 2.3 years old actively placed the ankle in a target position. The experimental conditions were: 1 wearing no orthosis device, 2 using semi-rigid brace, and 3 wearing ankle taping. Absolute error (AE and variable error (VE were calculated to obtain the joint position sense. We found an interaction effect between condition and target angle at 15o of plantar flexion for the variable VE, which showed smaller errors during the use of taping and semi-rigid brace. In conclusion, the use of ankle joint orthoses, whether taping or semi-rigid brace, decrease the variability of the position sense at 15o of plantar flexion, potentially decreasing ankle sprains occurrence.

  13. Three-dimensional Motion Analysis of the Ankle during Backward Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Naoki; Ueki, Tsutomu; Aoki, Takaaki

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to perform kinematic and kinetic analyses of the ankle during both forward and backward walking using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Subjects] The subjects were 11 healthy adults. [Methods] Measurements of forward and backward walking motions were taken using a three-dimensional motion analysis device and 3 ground reaction force plates. The analysis segment was the standing phase and the items analyzed were walking time, maximum dorsal flexion of the ankle, maximum angle of plantar flexion, peak ankle power in the sagittal plane, workload of the ankle, and work rate. Statistical analysis consisted of comparisons using the t-test for each of the items measured during both forward and backward walking. [Results] The backward walking group had significantly lower ankle power, workload, and work rate. [Conclusion] The propulsive force in backward walking must come from some factor other than the ankle. The analysis of joint power is an important index for understanding the motion.

  14. Clinical benefits of early cold therapy in accident and emergency following ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, J P; Hain, R; Pownall, R

    1989-03-01

    One hundred and forty-three patients presenting with ankle sprains within 24 h of injury were entered into a double blind study. Treatment consisted of a standardized regime of high dose non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication and an elastic support for all patients, who were then randomly allocated to two groups. One group received immediate cold therapy, the other received simulated therapy. Assessments made at 7 days showed a trend in favour of the group receiving cold therapy, although this did not reach significance. It is concluded that cold therapy together with compression may have a beneficial effect but that a single application in the accident and emergency department is not justified when a background therapy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication is given.

  15. Understanding the effect of touchdown distance and ankle joint kinematics on sprint acceleration performance through computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezodis, Neil Edward; Trewartha, Grant; Salo, Aki Ilkka Tapio

    2015-06-01

    This study determined the effects of simulated technique manipulations on early acceleration performance. A planar seven-segment angle-driven model was developed and quantitatively evaluated based on the agreement of its output to empirical data from an international-level male sprinter (100 m personal best = 10.28 s). The model was then applied to independently assess the effects of manipulating touchdown distance (horizontal distance between the foot and centre of mass) and range of ankle joint dorsiflexion during early stance on horizontal external power production during stance. The model matched the empirical data with a mean difference of 5.2%. When the foot was placed progressively further forward at touchdown, horizontal power production continually reduced. When the foot was placed further back, power production initially increased (a peak increase of 0.7% occurred at 0.02 m further back) but decreased as the foot continued to touchdown further back. When the range of dorsiflexion during early stance was reduced, exponential increases in performance were observed. Increasing negative touchdown distance directs the ground reaction force more horizontally; however, a limit to the associated performance benefit exists. Reducing dorsiflexion, which required achievable increases in the peak ankle plantar flexor moment, appears potentially beneficial for improving early acceleration performance.

  16. The Effects of Kinesiotape Applied to the Lateral Aspect of the Ankle: Relevance to Ankle Sprains – A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Brendan Wilson; Andrea Bialocerkowski

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify, evaluate and synthesise evidence on the effect of kinesiotape applied to the lateral aspect of the ankle, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources A search for quantitative studies was undertaken using key terms of “kinesiotape” and “ankle” in seven electronic databases, using the maximum date ranges. Databases included: the Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Scop...

  17. Screening Characteristics of Ultrasonography in Detection of Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Shojaee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ankle fracture is one of the most common joint fractures. X-ray and physical examination are itsmain methods of diagnosis. Recently, ultrasonography (US is considered as a simple and non-invasive methodof fracture diagnosis. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of US in detection of ankle fracture in comparisonto plain radiography. Methods: In this diagnostic accuracy study, which was done in emergency departmentsof Imam Hossein and Shohadaye Tajrish hospitals, Tehran, Iran, during 2014, 141 patients with suspecteddiagnosis of distal leg or ankle fracture were examined by US and radiography (gold standard, independently.Screening performance characteristics of US in detection of distal leg fractures were calculated using SPSS version21. Results: 141 patients with the mean age of 34§11.52 years (range: 15–50 were evaluated (75.9% male.Radiography confirmed ankle fracture in 102 (72.3% patients. There was a significant correlation between theresults of US and radiography [Agreement: 95%; kappa: 0.88 (95% CI: 0.80–0.97; P Ç 0.001]. The screening performancecharacteristics of US in detection ankle fracture were as follows: sensitivity 98.9% (95% CI: 93.5% -99.9%, specificity 86.4% (95% CI: 71.9%–94.3%, PPV 94.1% (95% CI: 87.1%–97.6%, NPV 97.4% (95% CI: 84.9%–99.8%, PLR 16 (95% CI: 7.3–34.8, and NLR 0.02 (95% CI: 0.003 – 0.182. The area under the ROC curve of USin this regard was 95.8 (95% CI: 91.9§99.7. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, we can use USas an accurate and non-invasive method with high sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis ofmalleolus fractures.However, the inherent limitations of US such as operator dependency should be considered in this regard.

  18. Effects of ankle joint cooling on peroneal short latency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J Ty; Hunter, Iain; McLoda, Todd

    2006-01-01

    While cryotherapy has direct physiological effects on contractile tissues, the extent to which joint cooling affects the neuromuscular system is not well understood. The purpose of the study was to detect changes in ankle dynamic restraint (peroneal short latency response and muscle activity amplitude) during inversion perturbation following ankle joint cryotherapy. A 2x3 factorial design was used to compare reaction time and EMG amplitude data of treatment conditions (cryotherapy and control) across time (pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 30 min post-treatment). Thirteen healthy volunteers (age 23 ± 4 yrs, ht 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass 78.8 ± 16.6 kg), with no history of lower extremity joint injury participated in this study. Surface EMG was collected from the peroneus longus (PL) of the dominant leg during an ankle inversion perturbation triggered while walking. Subjects walked the length of a 6.1 m runway 30 times. A trap door mechanism, inducing inversion perturbation, was released at heel contact during six randomly selected trials for each leg. Following baseline measurements, a 1.5 L bag of crushed ice was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the treatment group with an elastic wrap. A bag similar in weight and consistency was applied to the lateral ankle of subjects in the control group. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare treatment conditions across time (p 0.05) for PL reaction time. Average RMS EMG, normalized to an isometric reference position, increased in the cryotherapy group at the 30 min post-treatment interval relative to the control group (p movement is unknown.Short latency response should be measured during functional movement instead of during stance to take into consideration alterations in motor drive.Joint cooling has no effect on peroneal short latency response, and joint cooling may result in increased short term peroneal activation.Joint cooling has no effect on the peroneus longus as a dynamic stabilizer during walking.

  19. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R.; Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data...

  20. Biomechanical and neuromuscular adaptations before and after realignment surgery for ankle osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nüesch, Corina

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the ankle joint develops mainly after trauma. It is less frequent than OA of the knee or hip joint but often affects younger and physically active people. More than half of the patients present with a malalignment of the hindfoot, more frequently into varus. Such patients with asymmetric ankle OA often have partially intact articular cartilage and may thus benefit from joint preserving realignment surgery. With supramalleolar and hindfoot osteotomies, the ankle is surgi...

  1. The impact of external donor support through the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief on the cost of red cell concentrate in Namibia, 2004-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, John P.; Bocking, Adele; Wilkinson, Robert; Postma, Maarten J.; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.; von Finckenstein, Bjorn; Mataranyika, Mary; Marfin, Anthony A.; Lowrance, David W.; Smit Sibinga, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: External assistance can rapidly strengthen health programmes in developing countries, but such funding can also create sustainability challenges. From 2004-2011, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) provided more than $8 million to the Blood Transfusion Service of

  2. Environmental external effects from wind power based on the EU ExternE methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Liselotte Schleisner; Nielsen, Per Sieverts

    1998-01-01

    The European Commission has launched a major study project, ExternE, to develop a methodology to quantify externalities. A “National Implementation Phase”, was started under the Joule II programme with the purpose of implementing the ExternE methodology in all member states. The main objective...

  3. Differences between measured and resultant joint moments during isometric contractions at the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Karamanidis, Kiros; DeMonte, Gianpiero; Stafilidis, Savvas; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine two hypotheses: (a) during voluntary and electrically induced isometric contractions the moments measured at the dynamometer are different from the resultant moments in the same plane around the ankle joint and (b) at a given resultant moment during electrically induced isometric contractions the ankle angle while loading is different from the ankle angle while unloading. Twenty-seven long distance runners participated in the study. All subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) and contractions induced by electrostimulation at four different ankle-knee angle combinations on a Biodex-dynamometer. The kinematics of the leg were recorded using the vicon 624 system with eight cameras operating at 120 Hz. The main findings were: (a) the resultant moment at the ankle joint and the moment measured by the Biodex-dynamometer during isometric contractions are different, (b) during a plantar flexion effort the ankle angle changes significantly, whereas the knee angle shows only small and in most cases not significant changes, and (c) at identical resultant ankle joint moments the ankle angles are different between the loading and the unloading phases. The observed differences may lead to erroneous conclusions concerning the following: (a) diagnostic of muscle architecture, (b) estimation of the moment-ankle angle relationship and (c) estimation of the strain and hysteresis of tendons and aponeuroses.

  4. Septic arthritis of the adult ankle joint secondary to Salmonella enteritidis: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan

    2011-09-01

    Salmonella septic arthritis in healthy individuals is a rare phenomenon. However, septic arthritis of the native adult ankle joint in healthy patients has not been previously described in the published data. This is a case report of a 70-year-old farmer who presented with a 2-week history of a painful, swollen right ankle and an inability to bear weight. He had no history of ankle injury or any predisposing conditions. Joint aspirations were positive for Salmonella enteritidis that was successfully treated with right ankle arthrotomy and washout, along with a 6-week course of intravenous antibiotic therapy.

  5. An unusual cause of pain post ankle arthrodesis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2012-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease which frequently affects the ankle and foot. End stage ankle arthritis from rheumatic disease is commonly managed by the established practice of ankle arthrodesis. Among the adverse sequelae causing pain following this surgery is infection, pseudo-arthrosis and non-union. Stress fracture of the distal third is a recognised but unusual cause of pain of tibia following ankle arthrodesis. The authors\\' present three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who sustained a stress fracture of the distal tibia following arthrodesis, and discuss the contributing factors and highlight the need for orthopaedic surgeons to be suspicious of this complication post surgery.

  6. Total ankle replacement using HINTEGRA, an unconstrained, three-component system: surgical technique and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barg, Alexej; Knupp, Markus; Henninger, Heath B; Zwicky, Lukas; Hintermann, Beat

    2012-12-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) has become a valuable treatment option in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. One popular 3-component system, the HINTEGRA TAR, is an unconstrained system that provides inversion-eversion stability. More natural biomechanics of the replaced ankle may be expected when anatomic considerations drive prosthesis design. The HINTEGRA prosthesis includes 2 anatomically contoured metal components and a polyethylene insert, providing axial rotation and physiologic flexion-extension mobility. This article describes the HINTEGRA TAR design and surgical technique. Use of the prosthesis for complex hindfoot reconstruction in patients with an osteoarthritic, varus, or valgus ankle deformity is described.

  7. Techniques for managing varus and valgus malalignment during total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Jin; Yoon, Hang Seob; Lee, Jin Woo

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate goal of primary total ankle replacement is to provide a well-balanced soft-tissue envelope around a well-aligned, well-fixated implant. Some surgeons have emphasized that good outcomes in total ankle replacement are more dependent on ligament balancing, along with the procedure itself, than the extent of preoperative coronal deformity in the ankle. Thus, it is imperative that the surgeon be familiar with additional procedures to address the varus, valgus, and other associated deformities commonly encountered in primary total ankle replacement.

  8. A neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton to assist walking post-stroke: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kota Z; Lewek, Michael D; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2015-02-25

    In persons post-stroke, diminished ankle joint function can contribute to inadequate gait propulsion. To target paretic ankle impairments, we developed a neuromechanics-based powered ankle exoskeleton. Specifically, this exoskeleton supplies plantarflexion assistance that is proportional to the user's paretic soleus electromyography (EMG) amplitude only during a phase of gait when the stance limb is subjected to an anteriorly directed ground reaction force (GRF). The purpose of this feasibility study was to examine the short-term effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on the mechanics and energetics of gait. Five subjects with stroke walked with a powered ankle exoskeleton on the paretic limb for three 5 minute sessions. We analyzed the peak paretic ankle plantarflexion moment, paretic ankle positive work, symmetry of GRF propulsion impulse, and net metabolic power. The exoskeleton increased the paretic plantarflexion moment by 16% during the powered walking trials relative to unassisted walking condition (p exoskeleton assistance appeared to reduce the net metabolic power gradually with each 5 minute repetition, though no statistical significance was found. In three of the subjects, the paretic soleus activation during the propulsion phase of stance was reduced during the powered assistance compared to unassisted walking (35% reduction in the integrated EMG amplitude during the third powered session). This feasibility study demonstrated that the exoskeleton can enhance paretic ankle moment. Future studies with greater sample size and prolonged sessions are warranted to evaluate the effects of the powered ankle exoskeleton on overall gait outcomes in persons post-stroke.

  9. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  10. ANKLE JOINT CONTROL DURING SINGLE-LEGGED BALANCE USING COMMON BALANCE TRAINING DEVICES - IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION STRATEGIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Mark; Thorborg, Kristian; Bandholm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A lateral ankle sprain is the most prevalent musculoskeletal injury in sports. Exercises that aim to improve balance are a standard part of the ankle rehabilitation process. In an optimal progression model for ankle rehabilitation and prevention of future ankle sprains, it is important...... compared to Airex® and floor. This study can serve as guidance for clinicians who wish to implement a gradual progression of ankle rehabilitation and prevention exercises by taking the related ankle kinematics and muscle activity into account. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3....

  11. A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO THE REHABILITATION OF A COLLEGIATE FOOTBALL PLAYER FOLLOWING ANKLE FRACTURE: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lee D.; Musto, Tony; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A.; Gailey, Robert S.; Kelley, William P.; Alemi, Timothy J.; Espinosa, Braulio; Mandler, Eli; Scavo, Vincent A.; West, Dustin C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and Purpose Multiple rehabilitation factors including overall wellness need to be considered when an athlete returns to sport after an injury. The purpose of this case report is to describe a multidisciplinary approach for return to sport of a Division I collegiate football player following a traumatic ankle fracture requiring surgical repair. The assessment and treatment approach included the use of a performance-based physical therapy outcome measure, self-reported functional abilities, body composition assessments, and nutritional counseling. Case Description A 21 year-old running back fractured his lateral malleolus due to a mechanism of injury of excessive eversion with external rotation of the ankle. Surgical intervention included an open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of the fibula and syndesmosis. In addition to six months of rehabilitation, the patient received consultations from the team sports nutritionist specialist to provide dietary counseling and body composition testing. The Comprehensive High-level Activity Mobility Predictor-Sport (CHAMP-S), a performance-based outcome measure, self-report on the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI-ADL, FADI-S), and body composition testing using whole body densitometry (BOD POD®), were administered throughout rehabilitation. Outcomes The subject was successfully rehabilitated, returned to his starting role, and subsequently was drafted by a National Football League (NFL) franchise. High-level mobility returned to above pre-injury values, achieving 105% of his preseason CHAMP-S score at discharge. Self-reported function on the FADI-ADL and FADI-Sport improved to 100% at discharge. Body fat percentages decreased (13.3% to 11.9%) and fat mass decreased (12.0 kg to 11.0kg). Lean body mass (78.1 kg to 81.5 kg) and lbm/in increased (1.14 kg/in to 1.19 kg/in). His BMI changed from 29.8 kg/m2 to 30.6 kg/m2. Discussion This case report illustrates the positive effects of a

  12. Externality or sustainability economics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergh, Jeroen C.J.M. van den [ICREA, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Economics and Economic History and Institute for Environmental Science and Technology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    In an effort to develop 'sustainability economics' Baumgaertner and Quaas (2010) neglect the central concept of environmental economics-'environmental externality'. This note proposes a possible connection between the concepts of environmental externality and sustainability. In addition, attention is asked for other aspects of 'sustainability economics', namely the distinction weak/strong sustainability, spatial sustainability and sustainable trade, distinctive sustainability policy, and the ideas of early 'sustainability economists'. I argue that both sustainability and externalities reflect a systems perspective and propose that effective sustainability solutions require that more attention is given to system feedbacks, notably other-regarding preferences and social interactions, and energy and environmental rebound. The case of climate change and policy is used to illustrate particular statements. As a conclusion, a list of 20 insights and suggestions for research is offered. (author)

  13. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  14. The immediate effects of ankle balance taping with kinesiology tape on ankle active range of motion and performance in the Balance Error Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the changes in ankle active range of motion (AROM) and performance on the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS) in cases in which no tape, placebo taping or ankle balance taping (ABT) with kinesiology tape was used. Randomized cross-over trial. University laboratory. Fifteen physically active individuals (7 men, 8 women). Postural control was assessed based on performances on the BESS. Active ankle flexibility was assessed by measuring the ankle AROM of both ankles under each taping condition in a random order at 1-week intervals. The ankle AROM among the taping conditions were not significantly different. There were no significant differences in the error scores of single-leg and tandem stances on a firm surface among the taping conditions. Compared to those obtained in the absence of taping, the error scores of the single-leg and tandem stances on a foam surface were significantly lower with ABT, but they did not significantly differ from the placebo taping scores. This study showed that ABT with kinesiology tape immediately improved postural control on unstable surfaces without changes in ankle AROM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Quadruple-component superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap: A chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction of an exposed artificial joint after total ankle arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takumi; Saito, Takafumi; Ishiura, Ryohei; Iida, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) is becoming popular in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ankle joint degeneration. However, ankle wound complications can occur after TAA, which sometimes requires challenging reconstruction due to anatomical complexity of the ankle. Superficial circumflex iliac artery (SCIA) perforator (SCIP) flap has been reported to be useful for various reconstructions, but no case has been reported regarding a chimeric SCIP flap for complex ankle reconstruction. We report a case of complex ankle defect successfully reconstructed with a free quadruple-component chimeric SCIP flap. A 73-year-old female patient with RA underwent TAA, and suffered from an extensive ankle soft tissue defect (13 × 5 cm) with exposure of the implanted artificial joint and the extensor tendons. A chimeric SCIP flap was raised based on the deep branch and the superficial branch of the SCIA, which included chimeric portions of the sartorius muscle, the deep fascia, the inguinal lymph node (ILN), and the skin/fat. The flap was transferred to the recipient ankle. The sartorius muscle was used to cover the artificial joint, the deep fascia to reconstruct the extensor retinaculum, the ILN to prevent postoperative lymphedema, and the adiposal tissue to put around the extensor tendons for prevention of postoperative adhesion. Postoperatively, the patient could walk by herself without persistent leg edema or bowstringing of the extensor tendons, and was satisfied with the concealable donor scar. Although further studies are required to confirm efficacy, multicomponent chimeric SCIP has a potential to be a useful option for complex defects of the ankle.

  16. Co-contraction patterns of trans-tibial amputee ankle and knee musculature during gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedali Mahyo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myoelectric control of upper extremity powered prostheses has been used clinically for many years, however this approach has not been fully developed for lower extremity prosthetic devices. With the advent of powered lower extremity prosthetic components, the potential role of myoelectric control systems is of increasing importance. An understanding of muscle activation patterns and their relationship to functional ambulation is a vital step in the future development of myoelectric control. Unusual knee muscle co-contractions have been reported in both limbs of trans-tibial amputees. It is currently unknown what differences exist in co-contraction between trans-tibial amputees and controls. This study compares the activation and co-contraction patterns of the ankle and knee musculature of trans-tibial amputees (intact and residual limbs, and able-bodied control subjects during three speeds of gait. It was hypothesized that residual limbs would have greater ankle muscle co-contraction than intact and able-bodied control limbs and that knee muscle co-contraction would be different among all limbs. Lastly it was hypothesized that the extent of muscle co-contraction would increase with walking speed. Methods Nine unilateral traumatic trans-tibial amputees and five matched controls participated. Surface electromyography recorded activation from the Tibialis Anterior, Medial Gastrocnemius, Vastus Lateralis and Biceps Femoris of the residual, intact and control limbs. A series of filters were applied to the signal to obtain a linear envelope of the activation patterns. A co-contraction area (ratio of the integrated agonist and antagonist activity was calculated during specific phases of gait. Results Co-contraction of the ankle muscles was greater in the residual limb than in the intact and control limbs during all phases of gait. Knee muscle co-contraction was greater in the residual limb than in the control limb during all phases

  17. Effects of Hip Strengthening on Neuromuscular Control, Hip Strength, and Self-Reported Functional Deficits in Individuals With Chronic Ankle Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brent I; Docherty, Carrie L; Curtis, Denice

    2017-06-12

    Deficits in ankle and hip strength and lower extremity postural control are associated with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Following strength training, muscle groups demonstrate increased strength. This change is partially credited to improved neuromuscular control and many studies have investigated ankle protocols for subjects with CAI. The effects of isolating hip musculature in strength training protocols in this population is not well understood. Examine the effects of hip strengthening on clinical and self-reported outcomes in patients with CAI. Prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Athletic Training facility. Twenty-six participants with CAI (12 males and 14 females, 20.9±1.5 years, 170.0±12.7 cm, 77.5±17.5 kg) were randomly assigned to training or control groups. The participants completed either four weeks of supervised hip strengthening (resistance bands 3x/week) or no intervention. Participants were assessed on four clinical measures (Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) in the anterior, posteromedial and posterolateral directions, Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), hip external rotation strength, hip abduction strength) and a patient reported measure (the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) activities of daily living and sports subscales) before and after the four-week training period. The training group displayed significantly improved post-test measures compared with the control group for: hip abduction strength (training 446.3±77.4 N, control 314.7±49.6 N, p control 169.4±34.6 N, p control 90.2±7.9%, p control 88.0±8.8 %, p control 86.6±9.6%, p control 21.2±6.3 errors, p control 84.8±10.9, p <.01). Improved clinical and patient-reported outcomes in the training group suggest hip strengthening is beneficial in the management and prevention of recurrent symptoms associated with CAI.

  18. Effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement and weight-bearing exercise on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity in patients with stroke: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    An, Chang-Man; Won, Jong-Im

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ankle joint mobilization with movement on knee strength, ankle range of motion, and gait velocity, compared with weight-bearing exercise in stroke patients...

  19. Optimizing ankle performance when taped: Effects of kinesiology and athletic taping on proprioception in full weight-bearing stance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhi; Wang, Renwei; Han, Jia; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Anson, Judith

    2017-03-01

    To explore the effects of kinesiology taping (KT) and athletic taping (AT) on ankle proprioception when tested in functional, full weight-bearing stance. Cross-sectional study. Twenty-four healthy university students participated. Proprioception was measured using the Active Movement Extent Discrimination Apparatus (AMEDA). The three testing conditions: no-taping, KT, AT, and foot tested were randomly assigned. Perceived comfort, support and proprioceptive performance under two taping conditions were recorded. Proprioceptive discrimination scores with 95% CIs for no-taping, KT and AT were 0.81 (0.79-0.84), 0.81 (0.79-0.83), and 0.79 (0.77-0.81). Repeated measures ANOVA showed neither any significant difference associated with taping compared with no-taping (p=0.30), nor any difference between KT and AT (p=0.19). The group was then divided, according to their no-taping scores, into two sub-groups: with scores below the no-taping mean (n=13), and above the mean (n=11). ANOVA revealed a significant interaction (p=0.008) indicating that above-average no-taping performers proprioception scores were worse when taped, whereas below-average performers improved. For both KT and AT, only ratings of perceived comfort when taped were significantly associated with actual proprioceptive performance (both r>0.44, p≤0.03). Other perception ratings (support and performance) were significantly inter-correlated (both r>0.42, p0.31). Taping of the foot and ankle may amplify sensory input in a way that enhances proprioception of poor performers but produces an input overload that impairs proprioception in those who originally performed well when no-taping. Screening of ankle proprioception may identify those who would benefit most from taping. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Stochastic Control - External Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2005-01-01

    This note is devoted to control of stochastic systems described in discrete time. We are concerned with external descriptions or transfer function model, where we have a dynamic model for the input output relation only (i.e.. no direct internal information). The methods are based on LTI systems...

  1. Productivity Change and Externalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kravtsova, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    firms and the economy as a whole. The approach used in the current research accounts for different internal as well as external factors that individual firms face and evaluates the effect on changes in productivity, technology as well as the efficiency of domestic firms. The empirical analysis focuses...... change in different types of firms and sectors of the economy...

  2. Multiple external root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, W Z; Ghazali, M N

    1989-04-01

    Presented is an unusual case of multiple external root resorption. Although the cause of this resorption was not determined, several possibilities are presented. Trauma from occlusion, periodontal and pulpal inflammation, and resorption of idiopathic origin are all discussed as possible causes.

  3. Effects of Ankle Arthrodesis on Biomechanical Performance of the Entire Foot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Ankle arthrodesis is one popular surgical treatment for ankle arthritis, chronic instability, and degenerative deformity. However, complications such as foot pain, joint arthritis, and bone fracture may cause patients to suffer other problems. Understanding the internal biomechanics of the foot is critical for assessing the effectiveness of ankle arthrodesis and provides a baseline for the surgical plan. This study aimed to understand the biomechanical effects of ankle arthrodesis on the entire foot and ankle using finite element analyses. A three-dimensional finite element model of the foot and ankle, involving 28 bones, 103 ligaments, the plantar fascia, major muscle groups, and encapsulated soft tissue, was developed and validated. The biomechanical performances of a normal foot and a foot with ankle arthrodesis were compared at three gait instants, first-peak, mid-stance, and second-peak.Changes in plantar pressure distribution, joint contact pressure and forces, von Mises stress on bone and foot deformation were predicted. Compared with those in the normal foot, the peak plantar pressure was increased and the center of pressure moved anteriorly in the foot with ankle arthrodesis. The talonavicular joint and joints of the first to third rays in the hind- and mid-foot bore the majority of the loading and sustained substantially increased loading after ankle arthrodesis. An average contact pressure of 2.14 MPa was predicted at the talonavicular joint after surgery and the maximum variation was shown to be 80% in joints of the first ray. The contact force and pressure of the subtalar joint decreased after surgery, indicating that arthritis at this joint was not necessarily a consequence of ankle arthrodesis but rather a progression of pre-existing degenerative changes. Von Mises stress in the second and third metatarsal bones at the second-peak instant increased to 52 MPa and 34 MPa, respectively, after surgery. These variations can provide

  4. Noninvasive ankle distraction: relationship between force, magnitude of distraction, and nerve conduction abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, P A; Watson, B V; Amendola, A; Brown, J D

    1996-02-01

    Seven healthy volunteers (14 ankles; four males, 3 females) with no history of ankle or foot pathology were placed in a modified beach chair position on an operating table for ankle distraction using a noninvasive ankle distractor. In-line traction of 0 to 225 N (50 lb) in 22.5-N (5-lb) increments was applied to the ankle. A direct lateral radiograph was obtained at each distraction force. The joint space was measured on the lateral radiographs using electronic microcalipers. Surface recordings of the superficial peroneal, deep peroneal dorsal digital cutaneous, and sural nerves were obtained. The ankle joint space increased progressively from an average 3.1 mm with no force applied to an average 4.2 mm with 225 N (50 lb) distraction force applied. The maximum joint distraction averaged 1.3 mm (range, 0.35 to 2.35 mm). The sensory amplitudes were diminished or absent with increasing time and force of distraction. The decreased amplitudes were most marked after 1 hour of distraction with 135 N (30 lb) or greater distraction force. This correlated with symptoms of paresthesias. The superficial and deep peroneal cutaneous nerves were affected to a much greater extent than the sural nerve. The amplitudes quickly returned to normal values with the weight being released from the ankle. The noninvasive ankle distractor safely increased ankle joint space by more than 1 mm. Distraction with 135 N (30 lb) or more for 1 hour is associated with reversible nerve conduction changes. Based on these findings, we recommend using the noninvasive ankle distraction apparatus for ankle arthroscopy, with up to 135 N (30 lb) of traction applied to the foot for up to 1 hour. Greater force, applied for longer periods, is associated with increasing nerve conduction abnormalities.

  5. [Arthroscopy-assisted ankle arthrodesis with MIPF. An alternative proposal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymet-Ramírez, J

    2011-01-01

    The ankle is a loading joint with a small contact surface and it is therefore very vulnerable to trauma, as it is an exposed region. It is a unique joint because it forms several joints. In this joint the load falls on the contact area, which is one third of the knee or the hip, and it is the most important part of our musculo-skeletal system designed for ambulation and bipedestation. In case of ankle injuries, arthrodesis is a procedure performed to relieve pain, decrease deformity and provide stability. An optimum result of this procedure may be easily achieved if the ankle is fixed in the right position, so this technique will continue to be a treatment alternative. With "minimally invasive percutaneous fixation (MIPF)" fixation is safe, it relieves pain and stops the progression of regeneration, it is a minimally invasive method performed through a small posteromedial incision on the ventral surface of the distal tibial metaphysis, which minimizes soft tissue dissection thus eliminating wound complications. In this study we included patients with severe joint damage and pain, with a physically demanding type of work, in whom other treatments had previously failed and in whom total arthroplasty was not possible (due to questionable results). Patients with a varus-valgus > 15 degrees, talar necrosis, bone defects requiring a graft or subtalar arthrosis were excluded. Our results are no different from the world literature concerning the incidence rate of complications by age and diagnosis as well as the healing rate. Postoperative patient management was better as no rigid immobilization was required. Even though weight bearing was not immediate, at two weeks they could use an unloading boot for partial weight bearing, and total weight bearing was possible by week six. Therefore, there were less complications and in failed cases salvage surgery was possible.

  6. Total ankle replacement through a lateral approach: surgical tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usuelli Federico Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Recently, the Zimmer Trabecular Metal Total Ankle Replacement (Zimmer TM TAR was developed to be used through a lateral transfibular approach. The purpose of this paper is to describe the surgical technique and early outcomes of the TAR via the lateral approach using the Zimmer TM TARs. Methods: Sixty-seven patients underwent primary TAR using the Zimmer TM TAR between May 2013 and May 2015. Patients were clinically evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at six and twelve months and annually using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and hindfoot scores, visual analogue scale (VAS pain score, and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12 questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. Results: The mean AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 32.8 preoperatively to 85.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001. The mean VAS pain score decreased from 8.0 to 2.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001. The Physical and Mental Health Composite Scale scores (PCS and MCS of the SF-12 passed from a mean value of 30.2 preoperatively to 43.1 (p-value < 0.001 and from a mean value of 44.6 to 53.5 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: We present our surgical tips and the early results of this prosthetic design which are encouraging. They could be useful as an adjunct to the manufacturer’s surgical technique guidance for surgeons who utilize these implants.

  7. Stress Fractures of the Foot and Ankle in Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Stephanie W.; Joyner, Patrick W.; Almekinders, Louis C.; Parekh, Selene G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle are a common problem encountered by athletes of all levels and ages. These injuries can be difficult to diagnose and may be initially evaluated by all levels of medical personnel. Clinical suspicion should be raised with certain history and physical examination findings. Evidence Acquisition: Scientific and review articles were searched through PubMed (1930-2012) with search terms including stress fractures and 1 of the following: foot ankle, medial malleolus, lateral malleolus, calcaneus, talus, metatarsal, cuboid, cuneiform, sesamoid, or athlete. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle can be divided into low and high risk based upon their propensity to heal without complication. A wide variety of nonoperative strategies are employed based on the duration of symptoms, type of fracture, and patient factors, such as activity type, desire to return to sport, and compliance. Operative management has proven superior in several high-risk types of stress fractures. Evidence on pharmacotherapy and physiologic therapy such as bone stimulators is evolving. Conclusion: A high index of suspicion for stress fractures is appropriate in many high-risk groups of athletes with lower extremity pain. Proper and timely work-up and treatment is successful in returning these athletes to sport in many cases. Low-risk stress fracture generally requires only activity modification while high-risk stress fracture necessitates more aggressive intervention. The specific treatment of these injuries varies with the location of the stress fracture and the goals of the patient. PMID:25364480

  8. Validating a new computed tomography atlas for grading ankle osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael M; Vela, Nathan D; Levine, Jason E; Barnoy, Eran A

    2015-01-01

    As the most common joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) poses a significant source of pain and disability. It can be defined by classic radiographic findings, particular symptoms, or a combination of the 2. Although specific grading scales have been developed to evaluate OA in various joints, such as the shoulder, hip, and knee, no definitive classification system is available for grading OA in the ankle. The purpose of the present study was to create and validate a standardized atlas for grading (or staging) ankle osteoarthritis using computed tomography (CT) and "hallmark" findings noted on coronal, sagittal, and axial views extrapolated from the Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic scale. The CT scans of 226 patients at the Miami Veterans Affairs Medical Center were reviewed. An atlas was derived from a retrospective review of 30 remaining CT scans taken from July 2008 to November 2011. After this review, 3 orthogonal static CT images, obtained from 11 remaining patients, were chosen to represent the various stages on the OA scale and were used to test the validity of the atlas developed by 2 of us (M.M.C. and N.D.V.). A multispecialty panel of 9 examiners, excluding ourselves, independently rated the 11 CT scan subjects. The differences among examiners and specialties were calculated, including an intra-examiner agreement for 2 separate readings spaced 9 months apart. Although the small number of subspecialty examiners made the intraspecialty comparisons difficult to validate, the findings nevertheless indicated excellent agreement among all specialty groups, with good intra-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.962 and 1) inter-investigational (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.851) values. These results appeared to validate the CT ankle OA atlas, which we believe will be a valuable clinical and research tool, one that will likely be more beneficial than less relevant generalized OA grading scales in use today.

  9. Total ankle replacement through a lateral approach: surgical tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Indino, Cristian; Maccario, Camilla; Manzi, Luigi; Salini, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, the Zimmer Trabecular Metal Total Ankle Replacement (Zimmer TM TAR) was developed to be used through a lateral transfibular approach. The purpose of this paper is to describe the surgical technique and early outcomes of the TAR via the lateral approach using the Zimmer TM TARs. Methods: Sixty-seven patients underwent primary TAR using the Zimmer TM TAR between May 2013 and May 2015. Patients were clinically evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at six and twelve months and annually using the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle and hindfoot scores, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain score, and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) questionnaire. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. Results: The mean AOFAS hindfoot score increased from 32.8 preoperatively to 85.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The mean VAS pain score decreased from 8.0 to 2.0 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001). The Physical and Mental Health Composite Scale scores (PCS and MCS) of the SF-12 passed from a mean value of 30.2 preoperatively to 43.1 (p-value < 0.001) and from a mean value of 44.6 to 53.5 at the latest follow-up (p-value < 0.001), respectively. Conclusions: We present our surgical tips and the early results of this prosthetic design which are encouraging. They could be useful as an adjunct to the manufacturer’s surgical technique guidance for surgeons who utilize these implants. PMID:27855774

  10. Diclofenac epolamine topical patch relieves pain associated with ankle sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lionberger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available David R Lionberger1, Eric Joussellin2, Arturo Lanzarotti3, Jillmarie Yanchick4, Merrell Magelli5 1Southwest Orthopedic Group, LLP, Houston, Texas, USA; 2Institut National du Sport, Paris, France; 3Institut Biochimique SA, Pambionoranco, Switzerland; 4Alpharma Pharmaceuticals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of King Pharmaceuticals®, Inc, Piscataway, New Jersey, USA; 5GTx, Inc, Memphis, Tennessee, USABackground: Sports-related injuries, such as sprains and strains, commonly occur during exercise and athletic events. Current therapy includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, which have a high incidence of upper gastrointestinal side effects. The present study assessed the efficacy and safety of the diclofenac epolamine topical patch (DETP, 1.3%, a topical NSAID for the treatment of acute minor sprains and strains.Methods: This multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study enrolled adult patients (n = 134 with acute ankle pain (due to a minor sprain occurring less than 48 hours prior to entering the study. Patients were treated with either the DETP or a placebo topical patch daily for seven days. Pain intensity was evaluated during the first six hours after application of the patch, and on treatment days 1, 2, 3, and 7.Results: Patients treated with the DETP experienced a significantly greater reduction in pain associated with their ankle injury compared with placebo, beginning four hours after the first patch application (P = 0.02. The DETP was well tolerated and was comparable with placebo in terms of safety.Conclusion: Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that the DETP is an effective analgesic for local treatment of pain in mild acute ankle sprain.Keywords: soft tissue injury, acute pain, visual analog scale, efficacy, tolerability 

  11. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W.; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N.; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E.; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Objectives Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. Methods An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Results Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Conclusions Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance. PMID:23949045

  12. Can textured insoles improve ankle proprioception and performance in dancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Begg, Rezaul; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-08-01

    With the aim of determining both the acute and the chronic effects of textured insoles on the ankle discrimination and performance ability of dancers, 60 ballet dancers from the Australian Ballet School, aged 14-19 years, were divided into three groups (two intervention groups and a control group), age- and level-matched. In the first 5 weeks (weeks 1 to 5), the first intervention group (GRP1) was asked to wear textured insoles in their ballet shoes and the second intervention group (GRP2) was not given textured insoles to wear. In the next 5 weeks (weeks 6 to 10), GRP2 was asked to wear the same type of textured insoles and GRP1 did not wear the textured insoles. The control group (CTRL) did not wear textured insoles during the whole 10 weeks. All participants were tested preintervention, after 5 weeks and after 10 weeks for ankle discrimination score (AUC scores). Dance performance was assessed by 5-7 dance teachers. Pre-to-post change in AUC scores was significantly greater for the groups wearing insoles than for the controls (P = .046) and the size of pre-to-post changes did not differ between the two intervention groups (P = .834). Significant correlation was found between ankle discrimination score and performance scores, using the textured insoles (r = .412; P = .024). In conclusion, the stimulation to the proprioceptive system arising from textured insoles worn for five weeks was sufficient to improve the proprioceptive ability and performance ability of ballet dancers.

  13. Clinical application of a modular ankle robot for stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Larry W; Roy, Anindo; Goodman, Ronald N; Rietschel, Jeremy; Barton, Joseph E; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Macko, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of neuroplasticity and motor learning post-stroke are now being leveraged with the use of robotics technology to enhance physical rehabilitation strategies. Major advances have been made with upper extremity robotics, which have been tested for efficacy in multi-site trials across the subacute and chronic phases of stroke. In contrast, use of lower extremity robotics to promote locomotor re-learning has been more recent and presents unique challenges by virtue of the complex multi-segmental mechanics of gait. Here we review a programmatic effort to develop and apply the concept of joint-specific modular robotics to the paretic ankle as a means to improve underlying impairments in distal motor control that may have a significant impact on gait biomechanics and balance. An impedance controlled ankle robot module (anklebot) is described as a platform to test the idea that a modular approach can be used to modify training and measure the time profile of treatment response. Pilot studies using seated visuomotor anklebot training with chronic patients are reviewed, along with results from initial efforts to evaluate the anklebot's utility as a clinical tool for assessing intrinsic ankle stiffness. The review includes a brief discussion of future directions for using the seated anklebot training in the earliest phases of sub-acute therapy, and to incorporate neurophysiological measures of cerebro-cortical activity as a means to reveal underlying mechanistic processes of motor learning and brain plasticity associated with robotic training. Finally we conclude with an initial control systems strategy for utilizing the anklebot as a gait training tool that includes integrating an Internal Model-based adaptive controller to both accommodate individual deficit severities and adapt to changes in patient performance.

  14. Osteomyelitis of the foot and ankle: diagnosis, epidemiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbloom, Benjamin J; James, Eric R; McGarvey, William C

    2014-09-01

    Osteomyelitis of the foot and ankle is a common, potentially devastating condition with diagnostic and treatment challenges. Understanding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of osteomyelitis can raise clinical suspicion and guide testing and treatments. History and physical examination, laboratory studies, vascular studies, histologic and microbiologic analyses, and various imaging modalities contribute to diagnosis and treatment. Treatment including empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics and surgery should take a multidisciplinary approach to optimize patient factors, ensure eradication of the infection, and restore function. Optimization of vascular status, soft tissues, limb biomechanics, and physiologic state of the patient must be considered to accelerate and ensure healing.

  15. [A very slow growing ankle swelling in a healthy male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Christoph; Merlo, Pierina; Holzinger, Fernando; Pranghofer, Sigrid; Pfeiffer, David; Nüesch, Reto

    2014-08-20

    We describe the case report of a 66-year-old man with a very slow growing ankle tumour caused by a subcutaneous fungal abscess. Phaeoacremonium inflatipes, a member of the Dematiaceae family, was identified by needle puncture and culture of the non-odorous creamy yellow brown fluid. The fungal pseudocyst was surgically removed in toto and no further fungicidal drug therapy was required. Human infections by dematiaceous fungi causes subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, a rare, deep fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues usually acquired through traumatic skin lesions. In addition, systemic infections are reported, predominantly in immunosuppressed individuals.

  16. A walking controller for a powered ankle prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Amanda H; Mitchell, Jason E; Truex, Don; Lawson, Brian E; Ledoux, Elissa; Goldfarb, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a walking controller implemented on a powered ankle prosthesis prototype and assessed by a below-knee amputee subject on a treadmill at three speeds. The walking controller is a finite state machine which emulates a series of passive impedance functions at the joint in order to reproduce the behavior of a healthy joint. The assessments performed demonstrate the ability of the powered prosthesis prototype and walking controller to reproduce essential biomechanical aspects (i.e. joint angle, torque, and power profiles) of the healthy joint, especially relative to a passive prosthesis.

  17. Tibial slope in total ankle arthroplasty: Anterior or lateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuelli, Federico Giuseppe; Maccario, Camilla; Indino, Cristian; Manzi, Luigi; Gross, Christopher Edward

    2017-06-01

    A new total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) system performed through a lateral approach provides direct visualization of the centre of rotation, allowing for accurate reconstruction of the joint alignment and less bone resection. Radiographic references are needed to describe deformities and plan the surgical procedures. The tibial slope is an important factor when treating malalignment. The aim of this study is to show if there is any difference regarding the post-operative tibial slope (β angle) measurement comparing a fixed-bearing TAA through a lateral approach and a mobile-bearing TAA through an anterior approach. The study included 217 ankles. Between May 2011 and April 2015, 77 patients underwent a TAA with a mobile-bearing implant through an anterior approach and 45 with a fixed-bearing implant through a lateral approach: in these patients the β angle was measured 2 and 12 months postoperatively. 95 subjects with unilateral post-traumatic ankle arthritis composed the control group: in these patients we measured the anterior distal tibial angle (ADTA) of the controlateral, non arthritic tibiotalar joint. In the mobile-bearing group, the mean β angle at 2 and 12 months postoperatively was 86.4±3.1 and 86.8±3.1 (p-value=0.12). In the fixed-bearing group, the mean β angle at 2 and 12 months postoperatively was 83.1±5.4 and 83.9±6.5 (p-value=0.26). A statistically significant difference was found between the β angle of the two groups. In the control group the mean ADTA was 84.9±2.5. A non-statistically significant difference was observed only between β angle of the fixed-bearing group and the ADTA of the control group. Regarding the tibial slope, fixed-bearing TAA through a lateral approach showed a more anatomic placement. In contrast, β angle in mobile-bearing group appeared more reproducible than fixed-bearing group. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Septic arthritis of the ankle due to Salmonella enteritidis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dineen, Patrick F

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella septic arthritis in healthy, immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year-old man who presented with a one-day history of painful swelling of his ankle from which was aspirated pus which subsequently grew Salmonella enteritidis. There was no history of trauma or symptoms consistent with Salmonella enterocolitis. Our patient recovered fully after two weeks on intravenous ceftriaxone and six weeks on oral ciprofloxacin. Salmonella is a notifiable disease in the European Union and the United States of America, and is associated with outbreaks as a result of food contamination. The nature of Salmonella arthritis and its appropriate management are outlined.

  19. Isolated Hydatid Cyst of Ankle: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Demirdal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst is a zoonotic infection usually caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cysts are most often localized in the liver and lungs. Isolated cases of hydatid cyst in soft tissue is very rare. The incidance of isolated soft tissue hydatid cyst is 2.3% in endemic areas. Medical treatment is successful in 30-40% of cases. The first choice of treatment is surgery, especially in atypical localization of hydatid cyst. We aimed to present our patient with ankle hydatid cyst, a rare case in the literature.

  20. Acupuncture for ankle sprain: systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ankle sprain is one of the most frequently encountered musculoskeletal injuries; however, the efficacy of acupuncture in treating ankle sprains remains uncertain. We therefore performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence regarding acupuncture for ankle sprains. Methods We searched 15 data sources and two trial registries up to February 2012. Randomized controlled trials of acupuncture were included if they involved patients with ankle sprains and reported outcomes of symptom improvement, including pain. A Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool was used. Risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) was calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in a random effects model. Subgroup analyses were performed based on acupuncture type, grade of sprain, and control type. Sensitivity analyses were also performed with respect to risk of bias, sample size, and outcomes reported. Results Seventeen trials involving 1820 participants were included. Trial quality was generally poor, with just three reporting adequate methods of randomization and only one a method of allocation concealment. Significantly more participants in acupuncture groups reported global symptom improvement compared with no acupuncture groups (RR of symptoms persisting with acupuncture = 0.56, 95% CI 0.42–0.77). However, this is probably an overestimate due to the heterogeneity (I2 = 51%) and high risk of bias of the included studies. Acupuncture as an add-on treatment also improved global symptoms compared with other treatments only, without significant variability (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.51–0.73, I2 = 1%). The benefit of acupuncture remained significant when the analysis was limited to two studies with a low risk of bias. Acupuncture was more effective than various controls in relieving pain, facilitating return to normal activity, and promoting quality of life, but these analyses were based on only a small number of studies. Acupuncture did not appear to be associated with