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Sample records for extent feasible requirement

  1. 7 CFR 3575.47 - Economic feasibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... credit quality in a written financial feasibility analysis which includes adequacy of equity, cash flow, security, history, and management capabilities. Financial feasibility reports must take into consideration... financial credit analysis may also serve as the feasibility analysis when sufficient evidence is included to...

  2. To What Extent Do Student Teachers Have the Values Required for the Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Vives, Fabia; Camps, Misericordia; Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine to what extent the values held by student teachers at the start of a university degree programme coincide with the values that practising teachers consider important for their profession. Our findings show that student teachers and practising teachers have different value profiles, and that there is…

  3. Hazard Analysis and Safety Requirements for Small Drone Operations: To What Extent Do Popular Drones Embed Safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plioutsias, Anastasios; Karanikas, Nektarios; Chatzimihailidou, Maria Mikela

    2018-03-01

    Currently, published risk analyses for drones refer mainly to commercial systems, use data from civil aviation, and are based on probabilistic approaches without suggesting an inclusive list of hazards and respective requirements. Within this context, this article presents: (1) a set of safety requirements generated from the application of the systems theoretic process analysis (STPA) technique on a generic small drone system; (2) a gap analysis between the set of safety requirements and the ones met by 19 popular drone models; (3) the extent of the differences between those models, their manufacturers, and the countries of origin; and (4) the association of drone prices with the extent they meet the requirements derived by STPA. The application of STPA resulted in 70 safety requirements distributed across the authority, manufacturer, end user, or drone automation levels. A gap analysis showed high dissimilarities regarding the extent to which the 19 drones meet the same safety requirements. Statistical results suggested a positive correlation between drone prices and the extent that the 19 drones studied herein met the safety requirements generated by STPA, and significant differences were identified among the manufacturers. This work complements the existing risk assessment frameworks for small drones, and contributes to the establishment of a commonly endorsed international risk analysis framework. Such a framework will support the development of a holistic and methodologically justified standardization scheme for small drone flights. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. 7 CFR 1779.47 - Economic feasibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... complete the financial feasibility analysis for WW systems. If the facility is used by businesses and the success or failure of the facility is dependent on individual businesses, then the economic viability of..., security, history, and management capabilities. Financial feasibility reports must take into consideration...

  5. The feasibility of using expert systems to cope with the complexity and extent of the indoor radon problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raes, F.; Poffijn, A.; Eggermont, G.

    1988-01-01

    The main problems in predicting the average radon concentration in a single house are: (1) to obtain specific high resolution information about the house, and (2) to handle qualitative but relevant information. We introduce the idea of using an expert system to obtain high resolution data by interrogating the inhabitants about their house, as well as to interpret the qualitative information obtained in this way. To study the feasibility of this approach, a prototype expert system has been written which was given the obvious name Radon Expert System (RAES). RAES derives a radon index starting from information obtained from geological maps and other data bases. It subsequently refines this information and focusses on a single house by asking for information from the inhabitants. With the help of RAES, we interrogated the inhabitants of a number of houses where radon measurements had previously been performed. The correspondence between prediction and measurement is encouraging. (author)

  6. Hazard analysis & safety requirements for small drone operations : to what extent do popular drones embed safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plioutsias, Anastasios; Karanikas, Nektarios; Chatzimichailidou, Maria Mikela

    2018-01-01

    Currently, published risk analyses for drones refer mainly to commercial systems, use data from civil aviation, and are based on probabilistic approaches without suggesting an inclusive list of hazards and respective requirements. Within this context, this paper presents: (1) a set of safety

  7. 46 CFR 56.95-10 - Type and extent of examination required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiography, in which case the pertinent radiographic specification shall apply. (5) Magnetic particle. Where magnetic particle testing is required, the entire surface of the weld being examined shall be covered. The... necessary by the Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection. In such cases a method of testing satisfactory to the...

  8. Do children overestimate the extent of smoking among their peers? A feasibility study of the social norms approach to prevent smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Helen; Owiredu, Elizabeth; Thomson, Heather; Mann, Gemma; Mehta, Rashesh; Siddiqi, Kamran

    2015-02-01

    Social norms approaches (SNA) are based on the premise that we frequently overestimate risk behaviours among our peers. By conducting campaigns to reduce these misperceptions, SNAs aim to reduce risk behaviours. This study examines the extent to which 12 to 13year old pupils overestimate smoking among their peers and explores the appropriateness of using SNA in secondary schools to prevent smoking uptake. The extent of overestimation of smoking among peers was assessed through an on-line SNA questionnaire in five schools (n=595). Based on questionnaire results, pupils developed SNA campaigns in each school. Qualitative methods of focus groups (7), interviews (7) and observation were used to explore in-depth, from the perspective of staff and pupils, the appropriateness and feasibility of the SNA to prevent smoking uptake in secondary schools. A quarter of pupils, 25.9% (95% CI 25.6% to 26.1%) believed that most of their peers smoked, however, only 3% (95% CI 2.8% to 3.3%) reported that they actually did; a difference of 22.9% (95% CI 19.1% to 26.6%). Self-reported smoking was not significantly different between schools (X(2)=8.7 p=0.064), however, perceptions of year group smoking was significantly different across schools (X(2)=63.9 psmoking among peers in secondary schools, thus supporting a key premise of social norms theory. Implementing SNAs and studying effects is feasible within secondary schools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Daily CT planning during boost irradiation of prostate cancer. Feasibility and time requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Kuzmany, A.; Kneschaurek, P.

    2000-01-01

    Background: In the irradiation of prostate cancer internal organ movement leads to uncertainties in the daily localization of the clinical target volume. Therefore more or less large safety margins are added when designing the treatment portals. With daily CT planning internal organ movement can be compensated to some extent, safety margins can be reduced and irradiated normal tissue can be spared. The feasibility of daily CT-based 3D treatment planning is studied in a patient with localized prostate carcinoma using a new patient positioning system. Methods: Daily CT planning was applied during boost irradiation of a patient with prostate cancer: After patient immobilization the pelvis was scanned in 3 mm CT slices. Planning was done with the BrainSCAN planning system for stereotactic body irradiation. The prostate was contoured in all slices and the safety margins of the micromultileafs were automatically set to the distance chosen by the physician (0.8 cm). Patient positioning was done with the BrainLAB ExacTrac positioning system on the basis of skin attached stereotactic body markers. Before each treatment verification images of the isocenter were taken. Results: The total time requirement for planning and irradiation was about 1 hour 15 minutes. Patient positioning on the treatment couch took about 10 minutes. The accuracy of the positioning system was good (75% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The shift of the single markers from CT scan to CT scan was more extensive than those of the center of all 7 markers combined (47% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The location of the markers seems to influence the magnitude of their dislocation. Conclusion: Daily CT planning is feasible but time consuming. The new patient positioning system ExacTrac is an interesting tool especially for daily CT planning since conventional simulation can be omitted. (orig.) [de

  10. Portable Intraoperative Computed Tomography Scan in Image-Guided Surgery for Brain High-grade Gliomas: Analysis of Technical Feasibility and Impact on Extent of Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Palmucci, Stefano; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Paratore, Sabrina; Attinà, Giancarlo; Sortino, Giuseppe; Albanese, Vincenzo; Certo, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard among image-guided techniques for glioma surgery. Scant data are available on the role of intraoperative computed tomography (i-CT) in high-grade glioma (HGG) surgery. To verify the technical feasibility and usefulness of portable i-CT in image-guided surgical resection of HGGs. This is a retrospective series control analysis of prospectively collected data. Twenty-five patients (Group A) with HGGs underwent surgery using i-CT and 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence. A second cohort of 25 patients (Group B) underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery but without i-CT. We used a portable 8-slice CT scanner and, in both groups, neuronavigation. Extent of tumor resection (ETOR) and pre- and postoperative Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores were measured; the impact of i-CT on overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was also analyzed. In 8 patients (32%) in Group A, i-CT revealed residual tumor, and in 4 of them it helped to also resect pathological tissue detached from the main tumor. EOTR in these 8 patients was 97.3% (96%-98.6%). In Group B, residual tumor was found in 6 patients, whose tumor's mean resection was 98% (93.5-99.7). The Student t test did not show statistically significant differences in EOTR in the 2 groups. The KPS score decreased from 67 to 69 after surgery in Group A and from 74 to 77 in Group B (P = .07 according to the Student t test). Groups A and B did not show statistically significant differences in OS and PFS (P = .61 and .46, respectively, by the log-rank test). No statistically significant differences in EOTR, KPS, PFS, and OS were observed in the 2 groups. However, i-CT helped to verify EOTR and to update the neuronavigator with real-time images, as well as to identify and resect pathological tissue in multifocal tumors. i-CT is a feasible and effective alternative to intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Portable i-CT can provide useful

  11. 75 FR 15772 - Feasibility of Including a Volunteer Requirement for Receipt of Federal Education Tax Credits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Feasibility of Including a Volunteer Requirement for Receipt of Federal... Internal Revenue Code. Taxpayers may claim a lifetime learning credit for 20 percent of up to $10,000 of expenses for tuition and required fees per taxpayer for a maximum credit of $2,000. The lifetime learning...

  12. Examining the Extent of Environmental Compliance Requirements on Mechatronic Products and Their Implementation through Product Lifecycle Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Vukica

    2010-01-01

    The present mixed-methods study examined the opinions of industry practitioners related to the implementation of environmental compliance requirements into design and manufacturing processes of mechatronic and electromechanical products. It focused on the environmental standards for mechatronic and electromechanical products and how Product…

  13. Immediate postoperative outcome of orthognathic surgical planning, and prediction of positional changes in hard and soft tissue, independently of the extent and direction of the surgical corrections required

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Ole; Bjørn-Jørgensen, Jens; Hermund, Niels Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    orthognathic correction using the computerised, cephalometric, orthognathic, surgical planning system (TIOPS). Preoperative cephalograms were analysed and treatment plans and prediction tracings produced by computerised interactive simulation. The planned changes were transferred to models and finally...... with the presently included soft tissue algorithms, the current study shows relatively high mean predictability of the immediately postoperative hard and soft tissue outcome, independent of the extent and direction of required orthognathic correction. Because of the relatively high individual variability, caution...

  14. The requirements and feasibility of business planning in the office of space and terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. S.; Miller, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of applying strategic business planning techniques which are developed and used in the private sector to the planning of certain projects within the NASA Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications was assessed. The methods of strategic business planning that are currently in use in the private sector are examined. The typical contents of a private sector strategic business plan and the techniques commonly used to develop the contents of the plan are described, along with modifications needed to apply these concepts to public sector projects. The current long-range planning process in the Office of Space and Terrestrial Applications is reviewed and program initiatives that might be candidates for the use of strategic business planning techniques are identified. In order to more fully illustrate the information requirements of a strategic business plan for a NASA program, a sample business plan is prepared for a hypothetical Operational Earth Resources Satellite program.

  15. Real-Time, Interactive Echocardiography Over High-Speed Networks: Feasibility and Functional Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Real-time, Interactive Echocardiography Over High Speed Networks: Feasibility and Functional Requirements is an experiment in advanced telemedicine being conducted jointly by the NASA Lewis Research Center, the NASA Ames Research Center, and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. In this project, a patient undergoes an echocardiographic examination in Cleveland while being diagnosed remotely by a cardiologist in California viewing a real-time display of echocardiographic video images transmitted over the broadband NASA Research and Education Network (NREN). The remote cardiologist interactively guides the sonographer administering the procedure through a two-way voice link between the two sites. Echocardiography is a noninvasive medical technique that applies ultrasound imaging to the heart, providing a "motion picture" of the heart in action. Normally, echocardiographic examinations are performed by a sonographer and cardiologist who are located in the same medical facility as the patient. The goal of telemedicine is to allow medical specialists to examine patients located elsewhere, typically in remote or medically underserved geographic areas. For example, a small, rural clinic might have access to an echocardiograph machine but not a cardiologist. By connecting this clinic to a major metropolitan medical facility through a communications network, a minimally trained technician would be able to carry out the procedure under the supervision and guidance of a qualified cardiologist.

  16. The Extent to Which Methyl Salicylate Is Required for Signaling Systemic Acquired Resistance Is Dependent on Exposure to Light after Infection1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Pu; von Dahl, Caroline C.; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a state of heightened defense to a broad spectrum of pathogens that is activated throughout a plant following local infection. Development of SAR requires the translocation of one or more mobile signals from the site of infection through the vascular system to distal (systemic) tissues. The first such signal identified was methyl salicylate (MeSA) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Subsequent studies demonstrated that MeSA also serves as a SAR signal in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). By contrast, another study suggested that MeSA is not required for SAR in Arabidopsis and raised questions regarding its signaling role in tobacco. Differences in experimental design, including the developmental age of the plants, the light intensity, and/or the strain of bacterial pathogen, were proposed to explain these conflicting results. Here, we demonstrate that the length of light exposure that plants receive after the primary infection determines the extent to which MeSA is required for SAR signaling. When the primary infection occurred late in the day and as a result infected plants received very little light exposure before entering the night/dark period, MeSA and its metabolizing enzymes were essential for SAR development. In contrast, when infection was done in the morning followed by 3.5 h or more of exposure to light, SAR developed in the absence of MeSA. However, MeSA was generally required for optimal SAR development. In addition to resolving the conflicting results concerning MeSA and SAR, this study underscores the importance of environmental factors on the plant’s response to infection. PMID:22021417

  17. The extent to which methyl salicylate is required for signaling systemic acquired resistance is dependent on exposure to light after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Pu; von Dahl, Caroline C; Klessig, Daniel F

    2011-12-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a state of heightened defense to a broad spectrum of pathogens that is activated throughout a plant following local infection. Development of SAR requires the translocation of one or more mobile signals from the site of infection through the vascular system to distal (systemic) tissues. The first such signal identified was methyl salicylate (MeSA) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Subsequent studies demonstrated that MeSA also serves as a SAR signal in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and potato (Solanum tuberosum). By contrast, another study suggested that MeSA is not required for SAR in Arabidopsis and raised questions regarding its signaling role in tobacco. Differences in experimental design, including the developmental age of the plants, the light intensity, and/or the strain of bacterial pathogen, were proposed to explain these conflicting results. Here, we demonstrate that the length of light exposure that plants receive after the primary infection determines the extent to which MeSA is required for SAR signaling. When the primary infection occurred late in the day and as a result infected plants received very little light exposure before entering the night/dark period, MeSA and its metabolizing enzymes were essential for SAR development. In contrast, when infection was done in the morning followed by 3.5 h or more of exposure to light, SAR developed in the absence of MeSA. However, MeSA was generally required for optimal SAR development. In addition to resolving the conflicting results concerning MeSA and SAR, this study underscores the importance of environmental factors on the plant's response to infection.

  18. A study of the extent to which university English education fulfills workplace requirements for Vietnamese graduates and of the extent to which action research can lead to improvements in university English education

    OpenAIRE

    Vo, Thi Hong Le

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on possible approaches that can be undertaken at university to prepare undergraduate students with English language communicative competence required at the workplace. In exploring how English is taught at a university and whether English education met the needs of business, the main concern of this study is how materials design and teacher education can support learners to develop the skills to communicate effectively in the Vietnamese workplace. The purpose of the stud...

  19. Phase Two Feasibility Study for Software Safety Requirements Analysis Using Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Gregory; Price, Petra

    2010-01-01

    A feasibility study was performed on a representative aerospace system to determine the following: (1) the benefits and limitations to using SCADE , a commercially available tool for model checking, in comparison to using a proprietary tool that was studied previously [1] and (2) metrics for performing the model checking and for assessing the findings. This study was performed independently of the development task by a group unfamiliar with the system, providing a fresh, external perspective free from development bias.

  20. Feasibility and parametric study of tetrahydrofuran dehydration using reactive distillation with low energy requirement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavan, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    A new configuration of a RD (reactive distillation) process is investigated to break the THF (tetrahydrofuran)/water azeotrope using Hysys process software. The main module is a column system containing the reaction of EO (ethylene oxide) with water, in which top and bottom streams are the desired products, THF and EG (ethylene glycol), respectively. This contribution explores feasibility of using the reaction in the RD column and also describes the influence of reflux ratio, reaction trays, operating pressure and feed–inlet locations of the RD column in simulation environment. The results show that high purities of EG and THF are simultaneously obtained by this novel technique leading to more profits of the RD process. The optimal design of the RD process is obtained by minimizing the energy demand and the optimum number of reactive trays is found to be 10. Furthermore, minimum energy demand is observed when the column operates at atmospheric pressure with reflux ratio of 1.25. Particularly, it is found that the optimal reboiler duty per unit THF produced is reduced from 32 to 3.7% for the new process as compared to the conventional one, while both schemes predict similar outputs. - Highlights: • A reactive distillation column is proposed to produce pure tetrahydrofuran. • The tetrahydrofuran-water azeotrope is broken using reactive distillation column. • High energy saving (88%) is found for the reactive distillation process

  1. Defining user requirements for tele-nuclear medicine applications: from technical feasibility to clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd-Pokropek, A.; Chanachai, R.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Defining the user requirements for tele-nuclear medicine systems, in particular in developing countries, is an important prerequisite to establishing a service. However, the availability of low cost PC based servers and, now, access to local ISPs, has made the technical provision of such networks relatively simple and low cost, although transfer of data to and form legacy systems still present many difficulties. Method and Materials: The key driving force in developing countries is the imbalance between skills in the relatively few centres of excellence and the increasing number of installations overall. Requirements include both very rapid remote reporting and/or overnight tele-consultation. Original raw NM data must be available not just 'images'. Using current network standards (VPN) data transfer rate requirements are low. Provision of image fusion between NM, CT and MRI is also highly desirable. Results: Experience has been obtained e.g. in Thailand and Morocco, where a network of servers and remote users, with cardiac application of particular importance, has demonstrated benefit, and increasing volumes of usage. Conclusions: However, the requirements need to be clearly defined, and a staff training program is essential, as is a full evaluation. The transfer of skills is important in raising the overall quality of health care

  2. Economic feasibility of promoting species of lower water requirements to improve water condition of lake Urmia using of PES schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneshi, A.; Panahi, M.; Vafakhah, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since agricultural sector is considered as the biggest user of freshwater resources in Iran, one of the major factors of Urmia lake drying might be attributed to unsustainable development of agricultural activities. Therefore, it would be of interest to focus the lake restoration measures on water usage management in agricultural sector. It seems that a program to change cropping pattern based on the use of species with lower water requirements instead of higher water need ones is an effective policy. In this study, we attempted firstly, to propose to farmers change in cropping pattern by replacing the sugar beet, alfalfa, corn and tomato with wheat and barley as a solution. Then, results of the survey have been assessed in economic terms. Area in which the survey has been undertaken is Simineh Rud basin. To collect data, a combined techniques of interview and questionnaires have been used. The results of this study showed that this program has sufficient acceptability to the farmers (in 2014) and in case of having financial support by government, it will have successful implementation. Meanwhile, from technical and economic point of view, implementation of such a program has benefit-cost ratio of 2.12 for wheat and 2.06 for barley. Therefore, based on feasibility of such proposal, allocating required budgets, implementing the proposed plan in all other sub-basins of Urmia lake and paying income deficit caused by change in cropping pattern to farmers may suggested.

  3. Sound insulation between dwellings in multi-storey housing in Greenland - Need and feasibility of increased requirements?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgit; Thysell, Erik

    2014-01-01

    goals, one of them being check of fulfilment of the current regulatory sound insulation requirements, the other one being an evaluation of the possibilities to strengthen the requirements in the next building regulations. Sound insulation measurements between dwellings were made in three newly...

  4. Laue lens for radiotherapy applications through a focused hard x-ray beam: a feasibility study on requirements and tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camattari, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    Focusing a hard x-ray beam would represent an innovative technique for tumour treatment, since such a beam may deliver a dose to a tumour located at a given depth under the skin, sparing the surrounding healthy cells. A detailed study of a focusing system for hard x-ray aimed at radiotherapy is presented here. Such a focusing system, named Laue lens, exploits x-ray diffraction and consists of a series of crystals disposed as concentric rings capable of concentrating a flux of x-rays towards a focusing point. A feasibility study regarding the positioning tolerances of the crystalline optical elements has been carried out. It is shown that a Laue lens can effectively be used in the context of radiotherapy for tumour treatments provided that the mounting errors are below certain values, which are reachable in the modern micromechanics. An extended survey based on an analytical approach and on simulations is presented for precisely estimating all the contributions of each mounting error, analysing their effect on the focal spot of the Laue lens. Finally, a simulation for evaluating the released dose in a water phantom is shown.

  5. Feasibility study and functional requirements for a digital non-conventional literature system at INIS and Member Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendley, T.; Dixon, R.

    1993-03-01

    The aim of any Non-Conventional Literature (NCL) system will be to improve the service INIS provides to members, reducing the operational cost of administering the NCL service by the streamlining of procedures, allowing INIS to provide NCL to members using media relevant to the needs of members and positioning INIS so that as a member's needs change these needs can be catered for. Specific functional requirements include the receipt and checking of NCL documents and bibliographic data, conversion of received NCL into digital image form accessed by an image index database referenced alongside the existing bibliographic database and output of NCL to digital interchange/distribution media in addition to microfiche and possibly paper. The quality of service to members in terms of document quality and turn around time must be at least maintained. The study was undertaken by Cimtech consultants between December 1992 and March 1993. Approximate costs and benefits of implementing a digital NCL system were identified. Some outstanding issues need to be resolved. This could include a pilot system being introduced which would allow requirements to be defined more fully and operational experience to be gained. (Author)

  6. Feasibility and efficacy of an isocaloric high-protein vs. standard diet on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luger, M; Holstein, B; Schindler, K

    2013-01-01

    To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks.......To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a high-protein diet compared with a standard diet aiming for weight maintenance in insulin treated type-2 diabetic patients on insulin requirement, body weight and metabolic parameters over 12 weeks....

  7. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - Part I: Neutronics-based study in respect to control rod system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćutić Avdo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a summary of extensive studies in determining the highest achievable power level of the current University of Utah TRIGA core configuration in respect to control rod requirements. Although the currently licensed University of Utah TRIGA power of 100 kW provides an excellent setting for a wide range of experiments, we investigate the possibility of increasing the power with the existing fuel elements and core structure. Thus, we have developed numerical models in combination with experimental procedures so as to assess the potential maximum University of Utah TRIGA power with the currently available control rod system and have created feasibility studies for assessing new core configurations that could provide higher core power levels. For the maximum determined power of a new University of Utah TRIGA core arrangement, a new control rod system was proposed.

  8. The feasibility of a pragmatic randomised controlled trial to compare usual care with usual care plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E A; Shaw, A; Nichol, J; Hollinghurst, S; Henderson, A J; Thompson, T; Sharp, D

    2011-07-01

    To test the feasibility of a pragmatic trial design with economic evaluation and nested qualitative study, comparing usual care (UC) with UC plus individualised homeopathy, in children requiring secondary care for asthma. This included recruitment and retention, acceptability of outcome measures patients' and health professionals' views and experiences and a power calculation for a definitive trial. In a pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial (RCT) design, children on step 2 or above of the British Thoracic Society Asthma Guidelines (BTG) were randomly allocated to UC or UC plus a five visit package of homeopathic care (HC). Outcome measures included the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire, Quality of Life Questionnaire and a resource use questionnaire. Qualitative interviews were used to gain families' and health professionals' views and experiences. 226 children were identified from hospital clinics and related patient databases. 67 showed an interest in participating, 39 children were randomised, 18 to HC and 21 to UC. Evidence in favour of adjunctive homeopathic treatment was lacking. Economic evaluation suggests that the cost of additional consultations was not offset by the reduced cost of homeopathic remedies and the lower use of primary care by children in the homeopathic group. Qualitative data gave insights into the differing perspectives of families and health care professionals within the research process. A future study using this design is not feasible, further investigation of a potential role for homeopathy in asthma management might be better conducted in primary care with children with less severe asthma. Copyright © 2011 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Steps required to inclusion in commercial ECG analysis systems--the new ECG indices for quantitating extent, acuteness and severity of acute myocardial ischemia for facilitating emergency triage decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, David R

    2014-01-01

    Clinically useful diagnostic methods for chest pain triage often fail to reach everyday practice where they can improve patient outcomes. One means to bridge the gap is through adoption of ECG interpretive algorithms with enhanced accuracy or expanded features into established commercial products. The transition from innovation to industry can be facilitated if researchers consider three factors aiding a successful handoff to companies. First, they should assess their algorithm to assure that it meets a real market need and can be easily assimilated by commercial partners. Second, their design documentation and databases should support the regulated development processes required of manufacturers. Finally, they should hold appropriate expectations for the structure of commercial partnerships that lead to release of a marketed product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation No. 100/2006 Coll. of the Ministry of Health of the Slovak Republic dated as of February 6, 2006 laying down the requirements for natural healing water and natural mineral water, Balneology details of the report, distribution, extent of monitoring and content analysis of natural healing waters and natural mineral waters and their products and requirements for entry to the list of accredited laboratories maintained by the State Commission bathroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Regulation provides: (a) requirements for natural healing water and natural mineral water; (b) requirements for the recognition of natural mineral water; (c) details of balneology report; (d) distribution of natural healing waters and natural mineral water; (e) the extent of tracking of natural healing waters and natural mineral waters and their products; (f) content analysis of natural healing waters and natural mineral waters and their products; (g) registration requirements for accredited laboratories in the list maintained by the State Commission bathroom. This Regulation came into force on March 1, 2006.

  11. Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, P.; Kalas, P.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility study itself examines the technical, economic and financial implications of a nuclear power station in depth so as to make sure that nuclear power is the right course to take. This means that it is quite an expensive operation and it is to avoid wasting this money that a pre-feasibility study is carried out. This preliminary study should eliminate cases where the electrical system cannot absorb the capacity of a nuclear station of commercial size, where other sources of power such as hydro-electricity, gas or cheap coal would make nuclear obviously uneconomic or where no suitable sites exist. If this first rather simple survey shows that nuclear power is a credible solution to a utilities need for electricity or heat production plant, then the next stage is a full feasibility study. (orig./TK) [de

  12. 7 CFR 1980.442 - Feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... management, nature and extent of market area, marketing plans for sale of projected output, extent of... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS...) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan Program § 1980.442 Feasibility...

  13. An experimental study to investigate the feasibility to classify paints according to neurotoxicological risks: Occupational air requirement (OAR) and indoor use of alkyd paints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, D.H.; Pater, N.A.J. de; Zomer, C.; Lurvink, M.W.M.; Hemmen, J.J. van

    2005-01-01

    The concept of occupational air requirement (OAR), representing the quantity of air required to dilute the vapor concentration in the work environment resulting from 11 product to a concentration below the occupational exposure limit (OEL), was considered to have potential to discriminate between

  14. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - part II: Thermohydraulics and heat transfer study in respect to cooling system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitz Philip

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic conditions of the University of Utah's TRIGA Reactor were simulated using SolidWorks Flow Simulation, Ansys, Fluent and PARET-ANL. The models are developed for the reactor's currently maximum operating power of 90 kW, and a few higher power levels to analyze thermohydraulics and heat transfer aspects in determining a design basis for higher power including the cost estimate. It was found that the natural convection current becomes much more pronounced at higher power levels with vortex shedding also occurring. A departure from nucleate boiling analysis showed that while nucleate boiling begins near 210 kW it remains in this state and does not approach the critical heat flux at powers up to 500 kW. Based on these studies, two upgrades are proposed for extended operation and possibly higher reactor power level. Together with the findings from Part I studies, we conclude that increase of the reactor power is highly feasible yet dependable on its purpose and associated investments.

  15. Mandatory requirements in relation to air, soil, or water protection. Analysis of need and feasibility. Final Report (Tasks 3 and 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Chavez, R.; Kunen, E.; Walden, D.; Fingerman, K.; Arya, L; Chalmers, J. [Winrock International, Little Rock (United States); Kretschmer, B.; Polakova, J.; Farmer, A.; Bowyer, C.; Menadue, H. [Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP, London (United Kingdom); Alberici, S.; Toop, G. [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    This study focusses on the environmental impacts, both within and outside Europe, associated with the agricultural management of biofuel feedstocks consumed within the European Union (EU). This study has focussed on an examination of the environmental effects associated with crops that: Represent the prevailing cropping type in a country/region and are already produced in intensive agricultural systems and in zones with vulnerable soil/water conditions; and have become the prevailing feedstocks to supply the EU biofuel markets. The report starts with an overview of key biofuel crops and focus countries within and outside the EU (Section 2). Section 3 provides an overview of soils risks from biofuels consumed in the EU. It sets out the type of risks arising from the cultivation of biofuel feedstocks within Europe and in non-EU countries, provides information from case studies on actual risks arising in the selected countries, as well as considering the scope and effectiveness of existing provisions for soil protection. A synthesis of the estimated risks per region for different types of risks concludes the section. Section 4 sets out water risks associated with the identified biofuel crops in the selected EU and non-EU focus areas. Similarly to the soil section, the assessment of existing provisions for water protection addresses their scope and effectiveness in containing the pressures from biofuel feedstock production and concludes with a synthesis estimating the actual risks. Section 5 provides a corresponding analysis of air quality risks. Section 6 discussed the feasibility of introducing additional sustainability criteria in the RED to mitigate identified risks to soil, water and air and overall concludes the study.

  16. 27 CFR 4.2 - Territorial extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Territorial extent. 4.2 Section 4.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Scope § 4.2 Territorial extent. This part...

  17. Regional Mapping of Plantation Extent Using Multisensor Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbick, N.; Ledoux, L.; Hagen, S.; Salas, W.

    2016-12-01

    Industrial forest plantations are expanding rapidly across the tropics and monitoring extent is critical for understanding environmental and socioeconomic impacts. In this study, new, multisensor imagery were evaluated and integrated to extract the strengths of each sensor for mapping plantation extent at regional scales. Three distinctly different landscapes with multiple plantation types were chosen to consider scalability and transferability. These were Tanintharyi, Myanmar, West Kalimantan, Indonesia, and southern Ghana. Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2), and Sentinel-1A images were fused within a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) framework using random forest and high-resolution surveys. Multi-criteria evaluations showed both L-and C-band gamma nought γ° backscatter decibel (dB), Landsat reflectance ρλ, and texture indices were useful for distinguishing oil palm and rubber plantations from other land types. The classification approach identified 750,822 ha or 23% of the Taninathryi, Myanmar, and 216,086 ha or 25% of western West Kalimantan as plantation with very high cross validation accuracy. The mapping approach was scalable and transferred well across the different geographies and plantation types. As archives for Sentinel-1, Landsat-8, and PALSAR-2 continue to grow, mapping plantation extent and dynamics at moderate resolution over large regions should be feasible.

  18. 12 CFR 618.8020 - Feasibility requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) An analysis of how the program relates to or promotes the institution's business plan and strategic... plan; (2) An analysis of the expected financial returns of the program which, at a minimum, must include an evaluation of market, pricing, competition issues, and expected profitability. This analysis...

  19. Feasibility of using cellular telephone data to determine the truckshed of intermodal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    In order to determine the feasibility of using cellular telephone location data in deriving the geographic extent : (truckshed) from intermodal facilities, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility analysis in three aspects: : technology,...

  20. Updated Vertical Extent of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagg, R.; Bartzis, P.; Papanikolaou, P.

    2002-01-01

    The probabilistic distribution of the vertical extent of collision damage is an important and somewhat controversial component of the proposed IMO harmonized damage stability regulations for cargo and passenger ships. The only pre-existing vertical distribution, currently used in the international...

  1. The Geographic Extent of Global Supply Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machikita, Tomohiro; Ueki, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    We study the extent to which inter-firm relationships are locally concentrated and what determines firm differences in geographic proximity to domestic or foreign suppliers and customers. From micro-data on selfreported customer and supplier data of firms in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, ...

  2. Is Eurasian October snow cover extent increasing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R D; Derksen, C

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent studies present evidence of an increasing trend in Eurasian snow cover extent (SCE) in the October snow onset period based on analysis of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) historical satellite record. These increases are inconsistent with fall season surface temperature warming trends across the region. Using four independent snow cover data sources (surface observations, two reanalyses, satellite passive microwave retrievals) we show that the increasing SCE is attributable to an internal trend in the NOAA CDR dataset to chart relatively more October snow cover extent over the dataset overlap period (1982–2005). Adjusting the series for this shift results in closer agreement with other independent datasets, stronger correlation with continentally-averaged air temperature anomalies, and a decrease in SCE over 1982–2011 consistent with surface air temperature warming trends over the same period. (letter)

  3. The extent of forest in dryland biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Francois Bastin; Nora Berrahmouni; Alan Grainger; Danae Maniatis; Danilo Mollicone; Rebecca Moore; Chiara Patriarca; Nicolas Picard; Ben Sparrow; Elena Maria Abraham; Kamel Aloui; Ayhan Atesoglu; Fabio Attore; Caglar Bassullu; Adia Bey; Monica Garzuglia; Luis G. GarcÌa-Montero; Nikee Groot; Greg Guerin; Lars Laestadius; Andrew J. Lowe; Bako Mamane; Giulio Marchi; Paul Patterson; Marcelo Rezende; Stefano Ricci; Ignacio Salcedo; Alfonso Sanchez-Paus Diaz; Fred Stolle; Venera Surappaeva; Rene Castro

    2017-01-01

    Dryland biomes cover two-fifths of Earth’s land surface, but their forest area is poorly known. Here, we report an estimate of global forest extent in dryland biomes, based on analyzing more than 210,000 0.5-hectare sample plots through a photo-interpretation approach using large databases of satellite imagery at (i) very high spatial resolution and (ii) very high...

  4. Cogeneration: Key feasibility analysis parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coslovi, S.; Zulian, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper first reviews the essential requirements, in terms of scope, objectives and methods, of technical/economic feasibility analyses applied to cogeneration systems proposed for industrial plants in Italy. Attention is given to the influence on overall feasibility of the following factors: electric power and fuel costs, equipment coefficients of performance, operating schedules, maintenance costs, Italian Government taxes and financial and legal incentives. Through an examination of several feasibility studies that were done on cogeneration proposals relative to different industrial sectors, a sensitivity analysis is performed on the effects of varying the weights of different cost benefit analysis parameters. With the use of statistical analyses, standard deviations are then determined for key analysis parameters, and guidelines are suggested for analysis simplifications

  5. Research Misconduct—Definitions, Manifestations and Extent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international scientific community has been rocked by a number of serious cases of research misconduct. In one of these, Woo Suk Hwang, a Korean stem cell researcher published two articles on research with ground-breaking results in Science in 2004 and 2005. Both articles were later revealed to be fakes. This paper provides an overview of what research misconduct is generally understood to be, its manifestations and the extent to which they are thought to exist.

  6. Assessing the Global Extent of Rivers Observable by SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelsky, T.; Durand, M. T.; Andreadis, K.; Beighley, E.; Allen, G. H.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    Flow of water through rivers is among the key fluxes in the global hydrologic cycle and its knowledge would advance the understanding of flood hazards, water resources management, ecology, and climate. However, gauges providing publicly accessible measurements of river stage or discharge remain sparse in many regions. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission is a joint project of NASA and the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) that would provide the first high-resolution images of simultaneous terrestrial water surface height, inundation extent, and ocean surface elevation. Among SWOT's primary goals is the direct observation of variations in river water surface elevation and, where possible, estimation of river discharge from SWOT measurements. The mission science requirements specify that rivers wider than 100 m would be observed globally, with a goal of observing rivers wider than 50m. However, the extent of anticipated SWOT river observations remains fundamentally unknown because no high-resolution, global dataset of river widths exists. Here, we estimate the global extent of rivers wider than 50 m-100 m thresholds using established relationships among river width, discharge, and drainage area. We combine a global digital elevation model with in situ river discharge data to estimate the global extent of SWOT-observable rivers, and validate these estimates against satellite-derived measurements of river width in two large river basins (the Yukon and the Ohio). We then compare the extent of SWOT-observed rivers with the current publicly-available, global gauge network included in the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC) database to examine the impact of SWOT on the availability of river observation over continental and global scales. Results suggest that if SWOT observes 100 m wide rivers, river basins with areas greater than 50,000 km2 will commonly be measured. If SWOT could observe 50 m wide rivers, then most 10,000 km2 basins

  7. 34 CFR 600.10 - Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility... EDUCATION ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General § 600.10 Date, extent, duration, and consequence of eligibility... statutory and regulatory requirements governing its eligibility. (e) Consequence of eligibility. (1) If, as...

  8. Feasibility studies for decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with planning of decommission of the NPPs A1, V1 and V2 Bohunice and Mochovce. It was concluded that: Used model for decommissioning parameters assessment has been suitable for elaboration of initial decommissioning plans (feasibility studies); Basic assessment of main decommissioning parameters and basic comparison of various decommissioning options have been possible; Improvement of the model and corresponding software is desirable and works on software improvement began one year ago; V1-NPP initial decommissioning plan should be actualized, because initial decommissioning plan does not correspond by its content and structure to requirements of Act No. 130/98 and Nuclear Regulatory Authority Degree No. 246/99; Strategy of radioactive wastes treatment and conditioning together with technical provisions at Jaslovske Bohunice site was changed in comparison with the assumptions in 1991-92; Considered V1 NPP decommissioning options are necessary to be re-evaluated in accordance with latest development of knowledge and approaches to NPP decommissioning in the world; Specific unit costs are substantially and differentially changed in comparison with the assumptions in 1991-92; Necessity to take into account technical changes resulted from V1 NPP reconstruction. (author)

  9. Tribal Utility Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, R. A.; Zoellick, J. J.

    2007-06-30

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) assisted the Yurok Tribe in investigating the feasibility of creating a permanent energy services program for the Tribe. The original purpose of the DOE grant that funded this project was to determine the feasibility of creating a full-blown Yurok Tribal electric utility to buy and sell electric power and own and maintain all electric power infrastructure on the Reservation. The original project consultant found this opportunity to be infeasible for the Tribe. When SERC took over as project consultant, we took a different approach. We explored opportunities for the Tribe to develop its own renewable energy resources for use on the Reservation and/or off-Reservation sales as a means of generating revenue for the Tribe. We also looked at ways the Tribe can provide energy services to its members and how to fund such efforts. We identified opportunities for the development of renewable energy resources and energy services on the Yurok Reservation that fall into five basic categories: • Demand-side management – This refers to efforts to reduce energy use through energy efficiency and conservation measures. • Off-grid, facility and household scale renewable energy systems – These systems can provide electricity to individual homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not currently have access to the electric utility grid. • Village scale, micro-grid renewable energy systems - These are larger scale systems that can provide electricity to interconnected groups of homes and Tribal facilities in areas of the Reservation that do not have access to the conventional electric grid. This will require the development of miniature electric grids to serve these interconnected facilities. • Medium to large scale renewable energy development for sale to the grid – In areas where viable renewable energy resources exist and there is access to the conventional electric utility grid, these resources can be

  10. Feasible Histories, Maximum Entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitowsky, I.

    1999-01-01

    We consider the broadest possible consistency condition for a family of histories, which extends all previous proposals. A family that satisfies this condition is called feasible. On each feasible family of histories we choose a probability measure by maximizing entropy, while keeping the probabilities of commuting histories to their quantum mechanical values. This procedure is justified by the assumption that decoherence increases entropy. Finally, a criterion for identifying the nearly classical families is proposed

  11. 14-plex Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotongan, Victoria Hazel [Native Village of Unalakleet

    2013-06-21

    The Native Village of Unalakleet project was a feasibility study for a retrofit of a “tribally owned” three story, 14 apartment complex located in Unalakleet, Alaska. The program objective and overall goal was to create a plan for retrofitting to include current appraised value and comparable costs of new construction to determine genuine feasibility as low-income multi-family housing for tribal members.

  12. The extent of lunar regolith mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C.P.; Murrell, M.T.; Arnold, J.R.; Russ, G.P. III

    1979-01-01

    The activity of solar cosmic-ray-produced 53 Mn has been measured as a function of depth in the upper 100 g/cm 2 (approximately 55 cm) of lunar cores 60009-60010 and 12025-12028. Additional samples which supplement earlier work were analyzed from the Apollo 15 and 16 drill stems. These data, taken in conjunction with previously published results and the 22 Na and 26 Al data of the Battelle Northwest group, indicate that in at least three of the four cases studied the regolith has been measureably disturbed within the last 10 m.y. In one case gardening to > 19 g/cm 2 is required. Activities measured in the uppermost 2 g/cm 2 indicate frequent mixing within this depth range. No undisturbed profiles were observed nor were any major discontinuities observed in the profiles. The Monte Carlo gardening model of Arnold has been used to derive profiles for the gardened moon-wide average of 53 Mn and 26 Al as a function of depth. The 53 Mn and 26 Al experimental results are compared with these theoretical predictions. Agreement is good in several respects, but the calculated depth of disturbance appears to be too low. (Auth.)

  13. Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent - Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Multisensor Analyzed Sea Ice Extent Northern Hemisphere (MASIE-NH) products provide measurements of daily sea ice extent and sea ice edge boundary for the...

  14. Feasible mathematics II

    CERN Document Server

    Remmel, Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    Perspicuity is part of proof. If the process by means of which I get a result were not surveyable, I might indeed make a note that this number is what comes out - but what fact is this supposed to confirm for me? I don't know 'what is supposed to come out' . . . . 1 -L. Wittgenstein A feasible computation uses small resources on an abstract computa­ tion device, such as a 'lUring machine or boolean circuit. Feasible math­ ematics concerns the study of feasible computations, using combinatorics and logic, as well as the study of feasibly presented mathematical structures such as groups, algebras, and so on. This volume contains contributions to feasible mathematics in three areas: computational complexity theory, proof theory and algebra, with substantial overlap between different fields. In computational complexity theory, the polynomial time hierarchy is characterized without the introduction of runtime bounds by the closure of certain initial functions under safe composition, predicative recursion on nota...

  15. Capturing heterogeneity: The role of a study area's extent for estimating mean throughfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Alexander; Voss, Sebastian; Metzger, Johanna Clara; Hildebrandt, Anke; Zimmermann, Beate

    2016-11-01

    The selection of an appropriate spatial extent of a sampling plot is one among several important decisions involved in planning a throughfall sampling scheme. In fact, the choice of the extent may determine whether or not a study can adequately characterize the hydrological fluxes of the studied ecosystem. Previous attempts to optimize throughfall sampling schemes focused on the selection of an appropriate sample size, support, and sampling design, while comparatively little attention has been given to the role of the extent. In this contribution, we investigated the influence of the extent on the representativeness of mean throughfall estimates for three forest ecosystems of varying stand structure. Our study is based on virtual sampling of simulated throughfall fields. We derived these fields from throughfall data sampled in a simply structured forest (young tropical forest) and two heterogeneous forests (old tropical forest, unmanaged mixed European beech forest). We then sampled the simulated throughfall fields with three common extents and various sample sizes for a range of events and for accumulated data. Our findings suggest that the size of the study area should be carefully adapted to the complexity of the system under study and to the required temporal resolution of the throughfall data (i.e. event-based versus accumulated). Generally, event-based sampling in complex structured forests (conditions that favor comparatively long autocorrelations in throughfall) requires the largest extents. For event-based sampling, the choice of an appropriate extent can be as important as using an adequate sample size.

  16. Quantifying emphysema extent from weakly labeled CT scans of the lungs using label proportions learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørting, Silas Nyboe; Petersen, Jens; Wille, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of emphysema extent is important in diagnosing and monitoring patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Several studies have shown that emphysema quantification by supervised texture classification is more robust and accurate than traditional densitometry. Current...... techniques require highly time consuming manual annotations of patches or use only weak labels indicating overall disease status (e.g, COPD or healthy). We show how visual scoring of regional emphysema extent can be exploited in a learning with label proportions (LLP) framework to both predict presence...... of emphysema in smaller patches and estimate regional extent. We evaluate performance on 195 visually scored CT scans and achieve an intraclass correlation of 0.72 (0.65–0.78) between predicted region extent and expert raters. To our knowledge this is the first time that LLP methods have been applied...

  17. Full slurry treatment: purpose and feasibility of biotechnical approaches; Guelle-Totalaufbereitung: Zielsetzung und Machbarkeit biotechnischer Ansaetze. Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmack, C. [Schmack Biogas GmbH, Burglengenfeld (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The basic purpose of full slurry treatment is to provide techniques for reducing agricultural N and PO{sub 4} emissions to the extent that this is economically feasible and ecologically desirable. Its long-term goal is to establish mass and material management systems which meet the sustainability requirements of Agenda 21. [German] Guelletotalaufbereitung muss im Rahmen des betriebswirtschaftlich Moeglichen und oekologisch Noetigen zunaechst Techniken bereitstellen, mit dem Ziel die N- und PO{sub 4}-Emissionen aus der Landwirtschaft zu reduzieren. Fernziel muss es sein Massen- und Stoffmanagementsysteme zu etablieren, die den Anforderungen der ''sustainability'' im Sinne der Agenda 21 gerecht wird. (orig.)

  18. Characterizing CDMA downlink feasibility via effective interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endrayanto, A.I.; van den Berg, Hans Leo; Boucherie, Richardus J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper models and analyses downlink power assignment feasibility in Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mobile networks. By discretizing the area into small segments, the power requirements are characterized via a matrix representation that separates user and system characteristics. We obtain a

  19. Extent and modes of physics instruction in European dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letić, Milorad; Popović, Gorjana

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dental education towards integration of sciences and convergence of curricula have affected instruction in physics. Earlier studies of undergraduate curricula make possible comparisons in physics instruction. For this study, the websites of 245 European dental schools were explored, and information about the curriculum was found on 213 sites. Physics instruction in the form of a separate course was found in 63 percent of these schools, with eighty-two hours and 5.9 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits on average. Physics integrated with other subjects or into modules was found in 19 percent of these schools. Half of these schools had on average sixty-one hours and 6.9 ECTS credits devoted to physics. Eighteen percent of the schools had no noticeable obligatory physics instruction, but in half of them physics was found to be required or accepted on admission, included in other subjects, or appeared as an elective course. In 122 dental schools, the extent of physics instruction was found to be between forty and 120 contact hours. Physics instruction has been reduced by up to 14 percent in the last fourteen years in the group of eleven countries that were members of the European Union (EU) in 1997, but by approximately 30 percent in last five years in the group of ten Accession Countries to the EU.

  20. Feasibility studies and technological innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvelplund, Frede Kloster; Lund, Henrik; Sukkumnoed, Decharut

    2004-01-01

    The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives.......The chapter offers a tool to conduct feasibility studies and focuses on how to make feasibility studies in a situation with environmental concerns, in which technological innovation and institutional chnages are among the objectives....

  1. Assimilation of flood extent data with 2D flood inundation models for localised intense rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, J. C.; Wood, M.; Bermúdez, M.; Hostache, R.; Freer, J. E.; Bates, P. D.; Coxon, G.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing of flood inundation extent has long been a potential source of data for constraining and correcting simulations of floodplain inundation. Hydrodynamic models and the computing resources to run them have developed to the extent that simulation of flood inundation in two-dimensional space is now feasible over large river basins in near real-time. However, despite substantial evidence that there is useful information content within inundation extent data, even from low resolution SAR such as that gathered by Envisat ASAR in wide swath mode, making use of the information in a data assimilation system has proved difficult. He we review recent applications of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) and Particle Filter for assimilating SAR data, with a focus on the River Severn UK and compare these with complementary research that has looked at the internal error sources and boundary condition errors using detailed terrestrial data that is not available in most locations. Previous applications of the EnKF to this reach have focused on upstream boundary conditions as the source of flow error, however this description of errors was too simplistic for the simulation of summer flood events where localised intense rainfall can be substantial. Therefore, we evaluate the introduction of uncertain lateral inflows to the ensemble. A further limitation of the existing EnKF based methods is the need to convert flood extent to water surface elevations by intersecting the shoreline location with a high quality digital elevation model (e.g. LiDAR). To simplify this data processing step, we evaluate a method to directly assimilate inundation extent as a EnKF model state rather than assimilating water heights, potentially allowing the scheme to be used where high-quality terrain data are sparse.

  2. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-12-18

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations.

  3. PWR decontamination feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silliman, P.L.

    1978-01-01

    The decontamination work which has been accomplished is reviewed and it is concluded that it is worthwhile to investigate further four methods for decontamination for future demonstration. These are: dilute chemical; single stage strong chemical; redox processes; and redox/chemical in combination. Laboratory work is recommended to define the agents and processes for demonstration and to determine the effect of the solvents on PWR materials. The feasibility of Indian Point 1 for decontamination demonstrations is discussed, and it is shown that the system components of Indian Point 1 are well suited for use in demonstrations

  4. Functional MRI of the cervical spinal cord on 1.5 T with fingertapping: to what extent is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, N.; Beghin, J.; Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Vandervliet, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Michiels, J.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was mainly used to study brain physiology. The activation signal measured with fMRI is based upon the changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin that arise from an increase in blood flow in the vicinity of neuronal firing. Technical limitations have impeded such research in the human cervical spinal cord. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a reliable fMRI signal can be elicited from the cervical spinal cord during fingertapping, a complex motor activity. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether the fMRI signal could be spatially localized to the particular neuroanatomical location specific for this task. A group of 12 right-handed healthy volunteers performed the complex motor task of fingertapping with their right hand. T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T clinical unit was used to image the cervical spinal cord. Motion correction was applied. Cord activation was measured in the transverse imaging plane, between the spinal cord levels C5 and T1. In all subjects spinal cord responses were found, and in most of them on the left and the right side. The distribution of the activation response showed important variations between the subjects. While regions of activation were distributed throughout the spinal cord, concentrated activity was found at the anatomical location of expected motor innervation, namely nerve root C8, in 6 of the 12 subjects. fMRI of the human cervical spinal cord on an 1.5-T unit detects neuronal activity related to a complex motor task. The location of the neuronal activation (spinal cord segment C5 through T1 with a peak on C8) corresponds to the craniocaudal anatomical location of the neurons that activate the muscles in use. (orig.)

  5. Medical yoga in the workplace setting-perceived stress and work ability-a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axén, Iben; Follin, Gabriella

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using an intervention of Medical Yoga in the workplace and investigated its effects on perceived stress and work ability. This was a quasi-experimental pilot study comparing a group who received Medical Yoga (intervention group, N=17), with a group waiting to receive Medical Yoga (control group, N=15). Medical Yoga in nine weekly sessions led by a certified instructor, as well as an instruction film to be followed at home twice weekly. Feasibility was assessed through recruitment, eligibility, willingness to participate, response to questionnaires and adherence to the intervention plan. Stress was measured with the Perceived Stress Scale, work ability with the Work Ability Index. Convincing unit managers to let their employees participate in this intervention was difficult. Eligibility was perfect, but only 40% of workers were willing to participate. The subjects adhered to a great extent to the intervention and answered the questionnaires satisfactorily. Reaching target individuals requires careful attention to informing participants. The intervention showed no significant effects on stress and work ability, though the two measures correlated significantly over time. Factors limiting feasibility of this workplace intervention were identified. Work place interventions may need to be sanctioned at a higher managerial level. The optimal time, length and availability of the workplace intervention should be explored further. Knowledge from this study could be used as a foundation when planning a larger scale study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Northern New Mexico regional airport market feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1998-06-01

    This report is about the market for airline travel in northern New Mexico. Interest in developing a northern New Mexico regional airport has periodically surfaced for a number of years. The New Mexico State Legislature passed a memorial during the 1998 Second Session calling for the conduct of a study to determine the feasibility of building a new regional airport in NNM. This report is a study of the passenger market feasibility of such an airport. In addition to commercial passenger market feasibility, there are other feasibility issues dealing with siting, environmental impact, noise, economic impact, intermodal transportation integration, region-wide transportation services, airport engineering requirements, and others. These other feasibility issues are not analyzed in any depth in this report although none were discovered to be show-stoppers as a by-product of the authors doing research on the passenger market itself. Preceding the need for a detailed study of these other issues is the determination of the basic market need for an airport with regular commercial airline service in the first place. This report is restricted to an in-depth look at the market for commercial passenger air service in NNM. 20 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. 32 CFR 644.453 - Major restoration cases-determining extent of restoration required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Leaseholds and Leasehold...)”. The estimates of cost under Items 10 and 12 will be based on sound estimating practices generally...

  8. Feasibility of evacuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The main question is whether evacuation of people is feasible in case of accidents with a nuclear power plant. The limiting conditions of this question are extracted from other studies. This study is therefore focused on a postulated accident in a newly built nuclear power plant with an electric capacity of 1000 Megawatt and a source term of one percent. In this particular case an evacuation should take place within the period between the accident and the emission of nuclear materials. Initial focus is on the administrative-organizational aspects of evacuation. Then bottlenecks in the technical implementation of evacuation are determined. An analysis is made for each potential Dutch location (Borssele, Eemshaven, Maasvlakte, Moerdijk and Westelijke Noordoostpolderdijk) of a nuclear power plant. By means of a model the following question is examined: can the population leave the danger area or be evacuated on time, under certain circumstances. It is concluded that preventive evacuation of the population from the planned locations is feasible, but at Moerdijk complications may occur because of the presence of some homes for the elderly and a nursing home. 18 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. Reconstructed North American Snow Extent, 1900-1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains reconstructed monthly North American snow extent values for November through March, 1900-1993. Investigators used a combination of satellite...

  10. Exploring the extent to which ELT students utilise smartphones for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zehra

    2015-11-09

    Nov 9, 2015 ... aimed to explore the extent to which English Language Teaching (ELT) students utilise ... Given the fact that almost all students have a personal smartphone, and use it ..... ears as a disadvantage for smartphones (Kétyi,.

  11. Telepsychiatry: effectiveness and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajaria A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amy Gajaria,1 David K Conn,1,2 Robert Madan1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Providing psychiatric services by real-time videoconferencing has been increasingly adopted as a method of reaching hard-to-serve populations since the early 1990s. As the field has expanded, a growing body of research has developed investigating both how telepsychiatry compares to in-person psychiatric care and how effectively telepsychiatry can be implemented in routine clinical care. A narrative review was performed to consider the evidence that telepsychiatry is feasible and effective across a variety of patient populations and clinical settings. There is a growing body of evidence investigating the efficacy of telepsychiatry when used for psychiatric assessment and treatment in the adult, child, and geriatric populations. Though studies vary in quality, they generally demonstrate that telepsychiatry is effective across multiple age groups and clinical settings. Telepsychiatry is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians and is feasible to implement, with the suggestion that some patients may actually prefer telepsychiatry to in-person treatment. Issues to consider in the implementation of telepsychiatry services include funding and reimbursement, medico-legal issues when provision crosses legislative boundaries, incorporation into existing health systems, and crosscultural considerations. Future directions for research and practice include a need for higher-quality efficacy studies, consideration of data security, increased attention to low- and middle-income countries, and the introduction of novel technological approaches. Keywords: efficacy, service delivery, telemental health, videoconferencing 

  12. Monitoring of organic loads at waste water treatment plant with due consideration of factual necessity, technical feasibility and statutory requirements; Erfassung der organischen Belastung bei Abwasserreinigungsanlagen unter Beachtung der fachlichen Notwendigkeit, der technischen Moeglichkeiten und der gesetzlichen Auflagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, P. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserbau, Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    Between the statutory requirement and factual necessity for monitoring organic loads in waste water discharged to municipal and industrial waste water treatment plant and effluents from these there are substantial discrepancies. The paper points out the different approaches and gives recommendations on how to proceed in the future. At plant with stable nitrification, self and external monitoring for BOD{sub 5} can be distinctly reduced without fear of impaired process transparency or water quality. Monitoring organic loads online is little expedient technically, especially where effluent from municipal sewage treatment plants is concerned. But in the industrial sector there exist the most diverse applications with a view to carbon elimination. (orig.) [German] Zwischen den gesetzlichen Anforderungen und der fachlichen Notwendigkeit bei der Erfassung der organischen Belastung im Zu- und Ablauf von kommunalen und industriellen Klaeranlagen bestehen erhebliche Diskrepanzen. In diesem Beitrag werden die unterschiedlichen Ansaetze aufgezeigt und Empfehlungen fuer die zukuenftige Vorgehensweise gegeben. Bei Anlagen mit stabiler Nitrifikation ist die Selbst- wie Fremdueberwachung bezueglich BSB{sub 5} deutlich zu reduzieren, ohne dass Einbussen fuer Prozesstransparenz und Gewaesserqualitaet zu erwarten sind. Die online-Ueberwachung der organischen Belastung ist insbesondere bei Ablaeufen in kommunalen Klaeranlagen fachlich wenig sinnvoll, im Bereich der industriellen Abwasserreinigung ergeben sich dafuer bei dem Reinigungsziel der Kohlenstoffelimination dagegen verschiedenste Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten. (orig.)

  13. West Valley feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirro, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the results of a technical assessment of decontamination alternative prepared for the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The purpose of the assessment is to determine the recommended method for decontamination of cell surfaces and decontamination and removal of fuel reprocessing cell equipment to permit manual entry into the cells for the installation of waste solidification equipment. The primary cells of interest are the PMC, GPC, and CPC because they offer the largest usable volume for the solidification program. The secondary cells include XC-1, XC-2, XC-3 and the PPC which may be needed to support the solidification program. Five decontamination assessments were evaluated (A-E). The assessments included the estimated cost, occupational exposure, duration, manpower, waste volume generated, and final cell radiation levels achieved with the alternative decontamination methods. The methods varied from thorough destructive decontamination to equipment removal without decontamination followed by cell wall and floor decontamination. The recommended method for the primary cells is to utilize the remote manipulators and cranes to the maximum extent possible to decontaminate equipment and cell surfaces remotely, and to remove the equipment for temporary on-site storage. The recommended method for secondary cell decontamination is to remotely decontaminate the cells to the maximum extent possible prior to manned entry for contact-removal of the fuel reprocessing equipment (Assessment D). Assessment A is expected to cost $8,713,500 in 1980 dollars (including a 25% contingency) and will result in an occupational exposure of 180.3 manRem. Assessment D is expected to cost $11,039,800 and will result in an occupational exposure of 259 manRems

  14. West Valley feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirro, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report presents the results of a technical assessment of decontamination alternative prepared for the Western New York Nuclear Service Center (WNYNSC). The purpose of the assessment is to determine the recommended method for decontamination of cell surfaces and decontamination and removal of fuel reprocessing cell equipment to permit manual entry into the cells for the installation of waste solidification equipment. The primary cells of interest are the PMC, GPC, and CPC because they offer the largest usable volume for the solidification program. The secondary cells include XC-1, XC-2, XC-3 and the PPC which may be needed to support the solidification program. Five decontamination assessments were evaluated (A-E). The assessments included the estimated cost, occupational exposure, duration, manpower, waste volume generated, and final cell radiation levels achieved with the alternative decontamination methods. The methods varied from thorough destructive decontamination to equipment removal without decontamination followed by cell wall and floor decontamination. The recommended method for the primary cells is to utilize the remote manipulators and cranes to the maximum extent possible to decontaminate equipment and cell surfaces remotely, and to remove the equipment for temporary on-site storage. The recommended method for secondary cell decontamination is to remotely decontaminate the cells to the maximum extent possible prior to manned entry for contact-removal of the fuel reprocessing equipment (Assessment D). Assessment A is expected to cost $8,713,500 in 1980 dollars (including a 25% contingency) and will result in an occupational exposure of 180.3 manRem. Assessment D is expected to cost $11,039,800 and will result in an occupational exposure of 259 manRems.

  15. Mapping US Urban Extents from MODIS Data Using One-Class Classification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas are one of the most important components of human society. Their extents have been continuously growing during the last few decades. Accurate and timely measurements of the extents of urban areas can help in analyzing population densities and urban sprawls and in studying environmental issues related to urbanization. Urban extents detected from remotely sensed data are usually a by-product of land use classification results, and their interpretation requires a full understanding of land cover types. In this study, for the first time, we mapped urban extents in the continental United States using a novel one-class classification method, i.e., positive and unlabeled learning (PUL, with multi-temporal Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data for the year 2010. The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS night stable light data were used to calibrate the urban extents obtained from the one-class classification scheme. Our results demonstrated the effectiveness of the use of the PUL algorithm in mapping large-scale urban areas from coarse remote-sensing images, for the first time. The total accuracy of mapped urban areas was 92.9% and the kappa coefficient was 0.85. The use of DMSP-OLS night stable light data can significantly reduce false detection rates from bare land and cropland far from cities. Compared with traditional supervised classification methods, the one-class classification scheme can greatly reduce the effort involved in collecting training datasets, without losing predictive accuracy.

  16. Feasibility of solar-pumped dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1987-01-01

    Dye laser gains were measured at various pump-beam irradiances on a dye cell in order to evaluate the feasibility of solar pumping. Rhodamine 6G dye was considered as a candidate for the solar-pumped laser because of its high utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. Measurements show that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye.

  17. A Fully Automated Classification for Mapping the Annual Cropland Extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldner, F.; Defourny, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping the global cropland extent is of paramount importance for food security. Indeed, accurate and reliable information on cropland and the location of major crop types is required to make future policy, investment, and logistical decisions, as well as production monitoring. Timely cropland information directly feed early warning systems such as GIEWS and, FEWS NET. In Africa, and particularly in the arid and semi-arid region, food security is center of debate (at least 10% of the population remains undernourished) and accurate cropland estimation is a challenge. Space borne Earth Observation provides opportunities for global cropland monitoring in a spatially explicit, economic, efficient, and objective fashion. In the both agriculture monitoring and climate modelling, cropland maps serve as mask to isolate agricultural land for (i) time-series analysis for crop condition monitoring and (ii) to investigate how the cropland is respond to climatic evolution. A large diversity of mapping strategies ranging from the local to the global scale and associated with various degrees of accuracy can be found in the literature. At the global scale, despite efforts, cropland is generally one of classes with the poorest accuracy which make difficult the use for agricultural. This research aims at improving the cropland delineation from the local scale to the regional and global scales as well as allowing near real time updates. To that aim, five temporal features were designed to target the key- characteristics of crop spectral-temporal behavior. To ensure a high degree of automation, training data is extracted from available baseline land cover maps. The method delivers cropland maps with a high accuracy over contrasted agro-systems in Ukraine, Argentina, China and Belgium. The accuracy reached are comparable to those obtained with classifiers trained with in-situ data. Besides, it was found that the cropland class is associated with a low uncertainty. The temporal features

  18. Identification of Biokinetic Models Using the Concept of Extents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mašić, Alma; Srinivasan, Sriniketh; Billeter, Julien; Bonvin, Dominique; Villez, Kris

    2017-07-05

    The development of a wide array of process technologies to enable the shift from conventional biological wastewater treatment processes to resource recovery systems is matched by an increasing demand for predictive capabilities. Mathematical models are excellent tools to meet this demand. However, obtaining reliable and fit-for-purpose models remains a cumbersome task due to the inherent complexity of biological wastewater treatment processes. In this work, we present a first study in the context of environmental biotechnology that adopts and explores the use of extents as a way to simplify and streamline the dynamic process modeling task. In addition, the extent-based modeling strategy is enhanced by optimal accounting for nonlinear algebraic equilibria and nonlinear measurement equations. Finally, a thorough discussion of our results explains the benefits of extent-based modeling and its potential to turn environmental process modeling into a highly automated task.

  19. Extent, accuracy, and credibility of breastfeeding information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Ulfat; Scott, Barbara J

    2005-05-01

    Our objective was to test and describe a model for evaluating Websites related to breastfeeding. Forty Websites most likely to be accessed by the public were evaluated for extent, accuracy, credibility, presentation, ease of use, and adherence to ethical and medical Internet publishing standards. Extent and accuracy of Website content were determined by a checklist of critical information. The majority of Websites reviewed provided accurate information and complied with the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes. Approximately half the Websites complied with standards of medical Internet publishing. While much information on breastfeeding on the Internet is accurate, there is wide variability in the extent of information, usability of Websites, and compliance with standards of medical Internet publishing. Results of this study may be helpful to health care professionals as a model for evaluating breastfeeding-related Websites and to highlight considerations when recommending or designing Websites.

  20. Real-time flood extent maps based on social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilander, Dirk; van Loenen, Arnejan; Roskam, Ruud; Wagemaker, Jurjen

    2015-04-01

    During a flood event it is often difficult to get accurate information about the flood extent and the people affected. This information is very important for disaster risk reduction management and crisis relief organizations. In the post flood phase, information about the flood extent is needed for damage estimation and calibrating hydrodynamic models. Currently, flood extent maps are derived from a few sources such as satellite images, areal images and post-flooding flood marks. However, getting accurate real-time or maximum flood extent maps remains difficult. With the rise of social media, we now have a new source of information with large numbers of observations. In the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, the intensity of unique flood related tweets during a flood event, peaked at 8 tweets per second during floods in early 2014. A fair amount of these tweets also contains observations of water depth and location. Our hypothesis is that based on the large numbers of tweets it is possible to generate real-time flood extent maps. In this study we use tweets from the city of Jakarta, Indonesia, to generate these flood extent maps. The data-mining procedure looks for tweets with a mention of 'banjir', the Bahasa Indonesia word for flood. It then removes modified and retweeted messages in order to keep unique tweets only. Since tweets are not always sent directly from the location of observation, the geotag in the tweets is unreliable. We therefore extract location information using mentions of names of neighborhoods and points of interest. Finally, where encountered, a mention of a length measure is extracted as water depth. These tweets containing a location reference and a water level are considered to be flood observations. The strength of this method is that it can easily be extended to other regions and languages. Based on the intensity of tweets in Jakarta during a flood event we can provide a rough estimate of the flood extent. To provide more accurate flood extend

  1. The feasibility study: a health economics perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Gannon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The remit of research funding bodies is to prioritise funding for research that is of relevance and of high quality. This in turn will aim to raise the quality of healthcare and benefit to patients. Researchers are faced with increasing demands and expectations from the public purse and patients. The emphasis is to improve the quality of their research, with the ultimate aim of improving population health. While guidelines on feasibility study methods concentrate heavily on trials, there appears less guidance on application of health economics within feasibility studies, yet these are a less costly way to determine first of all if a full randomised controlled trial (RCT is feasible. A feasibility study assesses if the study can be done in a small RCT type study. Since by definition, a feasibility study does not evaluate the outcome, researchers often omit the health economics aspects but do however include statistical analysis. This leaves a gap in interpretation for policy makers and potential funders. It also means that any resulting publication does not include relevant information and therefore comparison across studies in terms of difficulty in collecting cost data is not possible. The main aim of this commentary therefore, is to demonstrate a suggested health economics analysis within a feasibility study and to recommend to researchers to include these aspects from the conception of their intervention. This paper proposes a number of points, with rationale for each point, to indicate the health economics data and the potential benefits required for coherent interpretation of the feasibility of future economic evaluations in a full trial. Economic evaluation is necessary if implementation into standard care is anticipated. Therefore, collection and summary analysis of relevant data is good practice at each point of the intervention development. Current guidelines for economic evaluation, for example, The Medical Research Guidelines in the

  2. A cask maintenance facility feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a transportation system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and defense high level waste (HLW) as a part of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). In early 1988, a feasibility study was undertaken to design a stand-alone, ''green field'' facility for maintaining the FWMS casks. The feasibility study provided an initial layout facility design, an estimate of the construction cost, and an acquisition schedule for a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF). The study also helped to define the interfaces between the transportation system and the waste generators, the repository, and a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The data, design, and estimated costs resulting from the study have been organized for use in the total transportation system decision-making process. Most importantly, the feasibility study also provides a foundation for continuing design and planning efforts. Fleet servicing facility studies, operational studies from current cask system operators, a definition of the CMF system requirements, and the experience of others in the radioactive waste transportation field were used as a basis for the feasibility study. In addition, several cask handling facilities were visited to observe and discuss cask operations to establish the functions and methods of cask maintenance expected to be used in the facility. Finally, a peer review meeting was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee in August, 1988, in which the assumptions, design, layout, and functions of the CMF were significantly refined. Attendees included representatives from industry, the repository and transportation operations

  3. LEVEL AND EXTENT OF MERCURY CONTAMINATION IN OREGON LOTIC FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of the U.S. EPA's EMAP Oregon Pilot project, we conducted a probability survey of 154 Oregon streams and rivers to assess the spatial extent of mercury (Hg) contamination in fish tissue across the state. Samples consisted of whole fish analyses of both small (< 120 mm) a...

  4. Spatial extent in demographic research - approach and problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the starting methodological problems in demographic research is the definition of spatial extent, which mostly doesn’t correspond to spatial extent already defined by different levels of administrative-territorial unitsthat are used for distribution of usable statistical data. That’s why determining the spatial extent of a demographic research is closely tied with administrative-territorial division of the territory that is being researched, wherein the fact that differentiation of demographic phenomena and processes cannot be the only basis of setting the principles of regionalization must be strictly acknowledged. This problem is particularly common in historical demographic analyses of geographically determined wholes, which are in administratively-territorial sense represented by one or more smaller territorial units, with their borders changing through the history, which directly affects comparability of the statistical data, and makes it considerably more difficult to track demographic change through longer time intervals. The result of these efforts is usually a solution based on a compromise which enables us to examine the dynamics of population change with little deviation from already defined borders of regional geographic wholes. For that reason in this paper the problem of defining spatial extent in demographic research is examined trough several different approaches in case of Eastern Serbia, as a geographically determined region, a historic area, a spatially functioning whole and as a statistical unit for demographic research, with no judgment calls in regard to any of the regionalization principles. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 47006

  5. The Extent of Immature Fish Harvesting by the Commercial Fishery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sustainability of a given fishery is a function of the number of sexually matured fish present in water. If there is intensive immature fishing, the population of fish reaching the stage of recruitment will decrease, which in turn results in lower yield and biomass. The present study was conducted to estimate the extent of ...

  6. Does Trust Influence the Extent of Inter-Organizational Barter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    2014-01-01

    The 1999 World Business Environment Survey investigated, among many other things, the extent of inter-organizational barter in various countries. Reported values differed a lot, e.g. it was less than 1% in Hungary but more than 30% in neighboring Croatia. Since in many such contracts goods and...

  7. Veterinary drug prescriptions: to what extent do pet owners comply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Separate questionnaires were designed for pet owners (clients) and veterinarians to ascertain the existence and extent of noncompliance in veterinary practice in lbadan and to elucidate the influence of such factors as logistics, education, economy, attitudes and veterinarian/client relationship on non-compliance. Analyses ...

  8. To what extent does banks' credit stimulate economic growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines the extent to which banks' credit affects economic growth in Nigeria. The data used was collected from the Central Bank of Nigeria statistical bulletin for a period of 24 years from 1990 to 2013. We used credit to the private sector, credit to the public sector and inflation to proxy commercial bank credit ...

  9. Extent of reaction in open systems with multiple heterogeneous reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedly, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The familiar batch concept of extent of reaction is reexamined for systems of reactions occurring in open systems. Because species concentrations change as a result of transport processes as well as reactions in open systems, the extent of reaction has been less useful in practice in these applications. It is shown that by defining the extent of the equivalent batch reaction and a second contribution to the extent of reaction due to the transport processes, it is possible to treat the description of the dynamics of flow through porous media accompanied by many chemical reactions in a uniform, concise manner. This approach tends to isolate the reaction terms among themselves and away from the model partial differential equations, thereby enabling treatment of large problems involving both equilibrium and kinetically controlled reactions. Implications on the number of coupled partial differential equations necessary to be solved and on numerical algorithms for solving such problems are discussed. Examples provided illustrate the theory applied to solute transport in groundwater flow.

  10. Extent and Distribution of Groundwater Resources in Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The extent and distribution of groundwater resources in parts of Anambra State, Nigeria has been investigated. The results show that the study area is directly underlain by four different geological formations including, Alluvial Plain Sands, Ogwashi-Asaba Formation, Ameki/Nanka Sands and Imo Shale, with varying water ...

  11. Extent of implementation of collection development policies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is a survey research on the extent of implementation of collection development policies in academic libraries in Imo state. The population of the study comprises five (5) academic libraries in the area of study. The academic libraries understudy are: Imo State University Owerri (IMSU), Federal University of ...

  12. An investigation into Nigerian teacher's attitude towards and extent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The attitude of Biology teachers towards and their extent of improvisation, were investigated 80 teachers from 50 randomly selected secondary schools in Oyo state of Nigeria participated in the study. Analysis of the twenty item questionnaire administered to the teachers revealed that though many of them exhibited positive ...

  13. Extent of implementation of Collection Development Policies (CDP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was on the extent of implementation of collection development policies by public University libraries in the Niger Delta Area, Nigeria. Descriptive survey design was employed. Population for the study consisted of all the 16 Colle ction Development Librarians in the Area studied. No sample was used because the ...

  14. The extent of groundwater use for domestic and irrigation activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AKMENSAH

    2015-06-04

    Jun 4, 2015 ... Albert Kobina Mensah1*, Evans Appiah Kissi2, Kwabena Krah3 and Okoree D. Mireku4. 1Department of Geography, Kenyatta University, Nairobi. 2Department of .... catchment in Kiambu County in Kenya had limited themselves to the assessment of water quality. Little work has been done on the extent to ...

  15. Forest extent and deforestation in tropical Africa since 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Julie C; Jarzyna, Marta A; Staver, A Carla

    2018-01-01

    Accurate estimates of historical forest extent and associated deforestation rates are crucial for quantifying tropical carbon cycles and formulating conservation policy. In Africa, data-driven estimates of historical closed-canopy forest extent and deforestation at the continental scale are lacking, and existing modelled estimates diverge substantially. Here, we synthesize available palaeo-proxies and historical maps to reconstruct forest extent in tropical Africa around 1900, when European colonization accelerated markedly, and compare these historical estimates with modern forest extent to estimate deforestation. We find that forests were less extensive in 1900 than bioclimatic models predict. Resultantly, across tropical Africa, ~ 21.7% of forests have been deforested, yielding substantially slower deforestation than previous estimates (35-55%). However, deforestation was heterogeneous: West and East African forests have undergone almost complete decline (~ 83.3 and 93.0%, respectively), while Central African forests have expanded at the expense of savannahs (~ 1.4% net forest expansion, with ~ 135,270 km 2 of savannahs encroached). These results suggest that climate alone does not determine savannah and forest distributions and that many savannahs hitherto considered to be degraded forests are instead relatively old. These data-driven reconstructions of historical biome distributions will inform tropical carbon cycle estimates, carbon mitigation initiatives and conservation planning in both forest and savannah systems.

  16. The Extent of Reversibility of Polychlorinated Biphenyl Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extent of reversibility of PCB bonding to sediments has been characterized in studies on the partitioning behavior of a hexachlorobiphenyl isomer. Linear non-singular isotherms have been observed for the adsorption and desorption of 2.4.5.2?,4?,5? hexachlorobiphenyl (HCBP) to...

  17. The Extent of Educational Technology's Influence on Contemporary Educational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bradford-Watts

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how advances in educational technologies have influenced contemporary educational practices.It discusses the nature of educational technology, the limitations imposed by the digital divide and other factors of uptake, and the factors leading to successful implementation of educational technologies.The extent of influence is then discussed,together with the probable implications for educational sites for the future.

  18. Determining wetland spatial extent and seasonal variations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, done in the Witbank Dam Catchment in Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, explores a remote-sensing technique to delineate wetland extent and assesses the seasonal variations of the inundated area. The objective was to monitor the spatio-temporal changes of wetlands over time through remote sensing ...

  19. 32 CFR 728.12 - Extent of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 728.12 Extent of care. Members who are away from their duty stations or are on duty where there is no... providing authorization for non-Federal care at DHHS expense. (b) Maternity episode for active duty female... facilities (once the mother has been admitted to the USMTF) from funds available for care of active duty...

  20. 27 CFR 24.158 - Extent of relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extent of relief. 24.158 Section 24.158 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., until all tax is fully paid. (d) Wine vinegar plant bond. The surety will be relieved of liability for...

  1. Establishing the extent of malaria transmission and challenges facing pre-elimination in the Republic of Djibouti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drakeley Christopher J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Countries aiming for malaria elimination require a detailed understanding of the current intensity of malaria transmission within their national borders. National household sample surveys are now being used to define infection prevalence but these are less efficient in areas of exceptionally low endemicity. Here we present the results of a national malaria indicator survey in the Republic of Djibouti, the first in sub-Saharan Africa to combine parasitological and serological markers of malaria, to evaluate the extent of transmission in the country and explore the potential for elimination. Methods A national cross-sectional household survey was undertaken from December 2008 to January 2009. A finger prick blood sample was taken from randomly selected participants of all ages to examine for parasitaemia using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs and confirmed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Blood spots were also collected on filter paper and subsequently used to evaluate the presence of serological markers (combined AMA-1 and MSP-119 of Plasmodium falciparum exposure. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors for P. falciparum infection and/or exposure. The Getis-Ord G-statistic was used to assess spatial heterogeneity of combined infections and serological markers. Results A total of 7151 individuals were tested using RDTs of which only 42 (0.5% were positive for P. falciparum infections and confirmed by PCR. Filter paper blood spots were collected for 5605 individuals. Of these 4769 showed concordant optical density results and were retained in subsequent analysis. Overall P. falciparum sero-prevalence was 9.9% (517/4769 for all ages; 6.9% (46/649 in children under the age of five years; and 14.2% (76/510 in the oldest age group (≥ 50 years. The combined infection and/or antibody prevalence was 10.5% (550/4769 and varied from 8.1% to 14.1% but overall regional differences were not statistically

  2. Establishing the extent of malaria transmission and challenges facing pre-elimination in the Republic of Djibouti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Abdisalan M; Mohamed, Maoulid B; Mugyenyi, Cleopatra K; Osman, Mouna A; Guessod, Hawa H; Kabaria, Caroline W; Ahmed, Ifrah A; Nyonda, Mary; Cook, Jackie; Drakeley, Christopher J; Mackinnon, Margaret J; Snow, Robert W

    2011-05-11

    Countries aiming for malaria elimination require a detailed understanding of the current intensity of malaria transmission within their national borders. National household sample surveys are now being used to define infection prevalence but these are less efficient in areas of exceptionally low endemicity. Here we present the results of a national malaria indicator survey in the Republic of Djibouti, the first in sub-Saharan Africa to combine parasitological and serological markers of malaria, to evaluate the extent of transmission in the country and explore the potential for elimination. A national cross-sectional household survey was undertaken from December 2008 to January 2009. A finger prick blood sample was taken from randomly selected participants of all ages to examine for parasitaemia using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and confirmed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Blood spots were also collected on filter paper and subsequently used to evaluate the presence of serological markers (combined AMA-1 and MSP-119) of Plasmodium falciparum exposure. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors for P. falciparum infection and/or exposure. The Getis-Ord G-statistic was used to assess spatial heterogeneity of combined infections and serological markers. A total of 7151 individuals were tested using RDTs of which only 42 (0.5%) were positive for P. falciparum infections and confirmed by PCR. Filter paper blood spots were collected for 5605 individuals. Of these 4769 showed concordant optical density results and were retained in subsequent analysis. Overall P. falciparum sero-prevalence was 9.9% (517/4769) for all ages; 6.9% (46/649) in children under the age of five years; and 14.2% (76/510) in the oldest age group (≥50 years). The combined infection and/or antibody prevalence was 10.5% (550/4769) and varied from 8.1% to 14.1% but overall regional differences were not statistically significant (χ2=33.98, p=0.3144). Increasing

  3. Nuclear power planning and feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeton, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    This lecture will review the basic steps associated with planning the introduction of nuclear power. Areas covered will include power market surveys, energy resources evaluations, potential alternative strategies, organisational factors and implementational requirements. The lecture will then consider the implications and requirements associated with establishing the feasibility of a nuclear project. Among others, aspects of power systems integration, site selection reactor type evaluation, cost and economic analysis, influence of contracting strategies, comparison with alternative power generation solutions, financial impact, etc. will be discussed and reviewed. (HK) [de

  4. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-18

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design.

  5. Muon muon collider: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10 35 cm -2 s -1 . The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice--the authors believe--to allow them to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring which has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design

  6. GINGER: A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Angela D. V.; Belfi, Jacopo; Ni, Wei-Tou; Beverini, Nicolo; Carelli, Giorgio; Maccioni, Enrico; Porzio, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    GINGER (Gyroscopes IN General Relativity) is a proposal for an Earth-based experiment to measure the Lense-Thirring (LT) and de Sitter effects. GINGER is based on ring lasers, which are the most sensitive inertial sensors to measure the rotation rate of the Earth. We show that two ring lasers, one at maximum signal and the other horizontal, would be the simplest configuration able to retrieve the GR effects. Here, we discuss this configuration in detail showing that it would have the capability to test LT effect at 1%, provided the accuracy of the scale factor of the instrument at the level of 1 part in 1012 is reached. In principle, one single ring laser could do the test, but the combination of the two ring lasers gives the necessary redundancy and the possibility to verify that the systematics of the lasers are sufficiently small. The discussion can be generalised to seismology and geodesy and it is possible to say that signals 10-12 orders of magnitude below the Earth rotation rate can be studied; the proposed array can be seen as the basic element of multi-axial systems, and the generalisation to three dimensions is feasible adding one or two devices and monitoring the relative angles between different ring lasers. This simple array can be used to measure with very high precision the amplitude of angular rotation rate (the length of the day, LOD), its short term variations, and the angle between the angular rotation vector and the horizontal ring laser. Finally this experiment could be useful to probe gravity at fundamental level giving indications on violations of Einstein Equivalence Principle and Lorenz Invariance and possible chiral effects in the gravitational field.

  7. To what extent do student teachers develop their mathematical problem solving ability by self-study?

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, Marjolein; Keijzer, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    A primary teacher needs mathematical problem solving ability. That is why Dutch student teachers have to show this ability in a nationwide mathematics test that contains many non-routine problems. Most student teachers prepare for this test by working on their own solving test-like problems. To what extent does these individual problem solving activities really contribute to their mathematical problem solving ability? Developing mathematical problem solving ability requires reflective mathema...

  8. Feasibility of selected private money

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Nevěděl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the entry: “Feasibility of selected private money” is the assessment of practicability of selected private money types as future currency especially in terms of attributes that the currency should meet to fulfil all claims required by its users. In the first step the features that the widely used currency has to have will be described and it will be analysed which of these features are characteristic for nowadays currencies (Czech crown and Euro too. In the second step private (unnationalized money will be described as well as several concepts derived from it. The paper will concern mainly on Hayek’s concept of private money and on particular variations of Local exchange trading systems. In the next part there will be pointed out good and bad features of these types of money, mainly from the view of characteristics that the proper currency should have. At the end it will be carried out the comparison of bad and good effects resulting from using of particular currencies types and I will decide about the applicability of analysed private money types. The paper uses the standard methods of scientific work. Firstly, the method of description is used to describe the development of private money concepts and characteristic features that the currency should have. Then, a comparative analysis is used to discuss the differences between contemporary currencies and unnationalized currencies as well as between required and real features of particular private money. At the end the method of synthesis, deduction and induction is used.

  9. Human activities on the deep seafloor in the North East Atlantic: an assessment of spatial extent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R Benn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental impacts of human activities on the deep seafloor are of increasing concern. While activities within waters shallower than 200 m have been the focus of previous assessments of anthropogenic impacts, no study has quantified the extent of individual activities or determined the relative severity of each type of impact in the deep sea. METHODOLOGY: The OSPAR maritime area of the North East Atlantic was chosen for the study because it is considered to be one of the most heavily impacted by human activities. In addition, it was assumed data would be accessible and comprehensive. Using the available data we map and estimate the spatial extent of five major human activities in the North East Atlantic that impact the deep seafloor: submarine communication cables, marine scientific research, oil and gas industry, bottom trawling and the historical dumping of radioactive waste, munitions and chemical weapons. It was not possible to map military activities. The extent of each activity has been quantified for a single year, 2005. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human activities on the deep seafloor of the OSPAR area of the North Atlantic are significant but their footprints vary. Some activities have an immediate impact after which seafloor communities could re-establish, while others can continue to make an impact for many years and the impact could extend far beyond the physical disturbance. The spatial extent of waste disposal, telecommunication cables, the hydrocarbon industry and marine research activities is relatively small. The extent of bottom trawling is very significant and, even on the lowest possible estimates, is an order of magnitude greater than the total extent of all the other activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To meet future ecosystem-based management and governance objectives for the deep sea significant improvements are required in data collection and availability as well as a greater awareness of the relative impact of

  10. Fusion technology status and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined

  11. Electrocardiogram Scanner-System Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-03-01

    An experimental and analytical study has been conducted to establish the feasibility for scanning and digitizing electrocardiogram records. The technical requirements and relative costs for two systems are discussed herein. One is designed to automat...

  12. Integrated Warfare Requirements Methodology (IWRM). Phase 1 - Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-29

    effects of chemical antidotes will produce short-term reductions in effectiveness @ The psychological effects of mass destruction, fE ’, and the fa- tigue...scoreboards for each combat posture, iS necessary. K-i T ’Ri ATAR US i puu s t n d (t Uri Cu0! i~t .L voy )1 J I fy 1119 a3 Tif it’ s dL. t 1u e1 I V ver

  13. A cask maintenance facility feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is supporting the USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in developing a transportation system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and defense high level waste (HLW) as a part of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). In early 1988, a feasibility study was undertaken to design a stand-alone, green field facility for maintaining the FWMS casks. The feasibility study provided an initial layout facility design, an estimate of the construction cost, and an acquisition schedule for a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF). The study also helped to define the interfaces between the transportation system and the waste generators, the repository, and a Monitored Retrieveable Storage (MRS) facility. The data, design, and estimated cost resulting from the study have been organized for use in the total transportation system decision-making process. Most importantly, the feasibility study also provides a foundation for continuing design and planning efforts. The feasibility study was based on an assumed stand-alone green field configuration because of the flexibility this design approach provides. A stand-alone facility requires the inclusion with support functions as well as the primary process facilities thus yielding a comprehensive design evaluation and cost estimate. For example, items such as roads, security and waste processing which might be shared with an integrated or collocated facility have been fully costed in the feasibility study. Thus, while the details of the facility design might change, the overall concept used in the study can be applied to other facility configurations as planning for the total FWMS develops

  14. Extent and kinetics of recovery of occult spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, K. Kian; Jiang, G.-L.; Feng Yan; Stephens, L. Clifton; Tucker, Susan L.; Price, Roger E.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain clinically useful quantitative data on the extent and kinetics of recovery of occult radiation injury in primate spinal cord, after a commonly administered elective radiation dose of 44 Gy, given in about 2 Gy per fraction. Methods and Materials: A group of 56 rhesus monkeys was assigned to receive two radiation courses to the cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord, given in 2.2 Gy per fraction. The dose of the initial course was 44 Gy in all monkeys. Reirradiation dose was 57.2 Gy, given after 1-year (n 16) or 2-year (n = 20) intervals, or 66 Gy, given after 2-year (n = 4) or 3-year (n = 14) intervals. Two animals developed intramedullary tumors before reirradiation and, therefore, did not receive a second course. The study endpoint was myeloparesis, manifesting predominantly as lower extremity weakness and decrease in balance, occurring within 2.5 years after reirradiation, complemented by histologic examination of the spinal cord. The data obtained were analyzed along with data from a previous study addressing single-course tolerance, and data from a preliminary study of reirradiation tolerance. Results: Only 4 of 45 monkeys completing the required observation period (2-2.5 years after reirradiation, 3-5.5 years total) developed myeloparesis. The data revealed a substantial recovery of occult injury induced by 44 Gy within the first year, and suggested additional recovery between 1 and 3 years. Fitting the data with a model, assuming that all (single course and reirradiation) dose-response curves were parallel, yielded recovery estimates of 33.6 Gy (76%), 37.6 Gy (85%), and 44.6 Gy (101%) of the initial dose, after 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, at the 5% incidence (D 5 ) level. The most conservative estimate, using a model in which it was assumed that there was no recovery between 1 and 3 years following initial irradiation and that the combined reirradiation curve was not necessarily parallel to the single-course curve, still showed an

  15. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  16. The extent of emphysema in patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, Saher Burhan; Stavngaard, Trine; Hestad, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The global initiative for COPD (GOLD) adopted the degree of airway obstruction as a measure of the severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to apply CT to assess the extent of emphysema in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relate...... measurement and visual and quantitative assessment of CT, from which the relative area of emphysema below -910 Hounsfield units (RA-910) was extracted. RESULTS: Mean RA-910 was 7.4% (n = 5) in patients with GOLD stage I, 17.0% (n = 119) in stage II, 24.2% (n = 79) in stage III and 33.9% (n = 6) in stage IV....... Regression analysis showed a change in RA-910 of 7.8% with increasing severity according to GOLD stage (P emphysema, whereas 25 patients had no emphysema. CONCLUSION: The extent of emphysema...

  17. Extent of hippocampal atrophy predicts degree of deficit in recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Eva Zita; Gadian, David G; Cooper, Janine M; Dzieciol, Anna M; Mishkin, Mortimer; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh

    2015-10-13

    Which specific memory functions are dependent on the hippocampus is still debated. The availability of a large cohort of patients who had sustained relatively selective hippocampal damage early in life enabled us to determine which type of mnemonic deficit showed a correlation with extent of hippocampal injury. We assessed our patient cohort on a test that provides measures of recognition and recall that are equated for difficulty and found that the patients' performance on the recall tests correlated significantly with their hippocampal volumes, whereas their performance on the equally difficult recognition tests did not and, indeed, was largely unaffected regardless of extent of hippocampal atrophy. The results provide new evidence in favor of the view that the hippocampus is essential for recall but not for recognition.

  18. A report on the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    A market survey was carried out to study the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia. From the survey, the radioisotopes and their activities/quantities that are used in Industry, Medicine and Research were identified. The radioisotopes that are frequently needed or routinely used were also determined and this formed the basis of the recommendations put forward in this report. It is proposed that PUSPATI adopt the concept of a Distribution Centre in order to provide a service to the Malaysian community. (author)

  19. The extent and impact of outsourcing: evidence from Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Craig P. Aubuchon; Subhayu Bandyopadhyay; Sumon Bhaumik

    2012-01-01

    The authors use data from several sources, including plant-level data from the manufacturing sector in Germany, to expand the literature on outsourcing. They find that, in Germany, the extent of outsourcing among manufacturing industries is higher than among service industries and that the outsourcing intensity of these industries did not change much between 1995 and 2005. They also find a statistically significantly positive impact of industry-level outsourcing intensity on German plant-leve...

  20. Statistics of Radial Ship Extent as Seen by a Seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Auckland in pure and applied mathematics and physics, and a Master of Science in physics from the same university with a thesis in applied accelerator...does not demand contributions from two angle bins to one extent bin, unlike the rectangle; this is a very big advantage of the ellipse model. However...waveform that mimics the full length of a ship. This allows more economical use to be made of available false-target generation resources. I wish to

  1. To what extent can the nuclear public relations be effective?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki [CRC Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The effect of public relations (PRs) on the public`s attitude to nuclear energy was assessed using a model developed under the assumption that the extent of attitude change of the public by the PRs activity is essentially the same as that by the nuclear information released by the newsmedia. The attitude change of the public was quantitatively estimated by setting variables explicitly manifesting the activities such as the circulation of exclusive publicity and the area of advertising messages in the newspaper as parameters. The public`s attitude became clear to have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of activity, the extent of its change being varied considerably with demographic classes. Under a given financial condition, the offer of PRs information to the people, as many as possible in a target region, in spite of its little force of appeal, was found to be more effective for the amelioration of public attitude than the repeated offer of the information to a limited member of the public. It also became clear that there exists the most effective media mix for the activity depending on the extent of target region and on the target class of demography, therefore, it is quite significant to determine beforehand the proper conditions for the activity to be executed, such a situation indicating the need for the introduction of nuclear PRs management. (Author).

  2. To what extent can the nuclear public relations be effective?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Teruaki

    1996-01-01

    The effect of public relations (PRs) on the public's attitude to nuclear energy was assessed using a model developed under the assumption that the extent of attitude change of the public by the PRs activity is essentially the same as that by the nuclear information released by the newsmedia. The attitude change of the public was quantitatively estimated by setting variables explicitly manifesting the activities such as the circulation of exclusive publicity and the area of advertising messages in the newspaper as parameters. The public's attitude became clear to have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of activity, the extent of its change being varied considerably with demographic classes. Under a given financial condition, the offer of PRs information to the people, as many as possible in a target region, in spite of its little force of appeal, was found to be more effective for the amelioration of public attitude than the repeated offer of the information to a limited member of the public. It also became clear that there exists the most effective media mix for the activity depending on the extent of target region and on the target class of demography, therefore, it is quite significant to determine beforehand the proper conditions for the activity to be executed, such a situation indicating the need for the introduction of nuclear PRs management. (Author)

  3. Exploring the Origin, Extent, and Future of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertka, Constance M.

    2009-09-01

    1. Astrobiology in societal context Constance Bertka; Part I. Origin of Life: 2. Emergence and the experimental pursuit of the origin of life Robert Hazen; 3. From Aristotle to Darwin, to Freeman Dyson: changing definitions of life viewed in historical context James Strick; 4. Philosophical aspects of the origin-of-life problem: the emergence of life and the nature of science Iris Fry; 5. The origin of terrestrial life: a Christian perspective Ernan McMullin; 6. The alpha and the omega: reflections on the origin and future of life from the perspective of Christian theology and ethics Celia Deane-Drummond; Part II. Extent of Life: 7. A biologist's guide to the Solar System Lynn Rothschild; 8. The quest for habitable worlds and life beyond the Solar System Carl Pilcher; 9. A historical perspective on the extent and search for life Steven J. Dick; 10. The search for extraterrestrial life: epistemology, ethics, and worldviews Mark Lupisella; 11. The implications of discovering extraterrestrial life: different searches, different issues Margaret S. Race; 12. God, evolution, and astrobiology Cynthia S. W. Crysdale; Part III. Future of Life: 13. Planetary ecosynthesis on Mars: restoration ecology and environmental ethics Christopher P. McKay; 14. The trouble with intrinsic value: an ethical primer for astrobiology Kelly C. Smith; 15. God's preferential option for life: a Christian perspective on astrobiology Richard O. Randolph; 16. Comparing stories about the origin, extent, and future of life: an Asian religious perspective Francisca Cho; Index.

  4. Monitoring the Extent of Forests on National to Global Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townshend, J.; Townshend, J.; Hansen, M.; DeFries, R.; DeFries, R.; Sohlberg, R.; Desch, A.; White, B.

    2001-05-01

    Information on forest extent and change is important for many purposes, including understanding the global carbon cycle and managing natural resources. International statistics on forest extent are generated using many different sources often producing inconsistent results spatially and through time. Results will be presented comparing forest extent derived from the recent global Food and Agricultural Organization's (FAO) FRA 2000 report with products derived using wall-to-wall Landsat, AVHRR and MODIS data sets. The remotely sensed data sets provide consistent results in terms of total area despite considerable differences in spatial resolution. Although the location of change can be satisfactorily detected with all three remotely sensed data sets, reliable measurement of change can only be achieved through use of Landsat-resolution data. Contrary to the FRA 2000 results we find evidence of an increase in deforestation rates in the late 1990s in several countries. Also we have found evidence of considerable changes in some countries for which little or no change is reported by FAO. The results indicate the benefits of globally consistent analyses of forest cover based on multiscale remotely sensed data sets rather than a reliance on statistics generated by individual countries with very different definitions of forest and methods used to derive them.

  5. The extent of emphysema in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Saher Burhan; Stavngaard, Trine; Hestad, Marianne; Bach, Karen Skjoelstrup; Tonnesen, Philip; Dirksen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The global initiative for COPD (GOLD) adopted the degree of airway obstruction as a measure of the severity of the disease. The objective of this study was to apply CT to assess the extent of emphysema in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and relate this extent to the GOLD stage of airway obstruction. We included 209 patients with COPD. COPD was defined as FEV(1)/FVC or=20 pack-years. Patients were assessed by lung function measurement and visual and quantitative assessment of CT, from which the relative area of emphysema below -910 Hounsfield units (RA-910) was extracted. Mean RA-910 was 7.4% (n = 5) in patients with GOLD stage I, 17.0% (n = 119) in stage II, 24.2% (n = 79) in stage III and 33.9% (n = 6) in stage IV. Regression analysis showed a change in RA-910 of 7.8% with increasing severity according to GOLD stage (P < 0.001). Combined visual and quantitative assessment of CT showed that 184 patients had radiological evidence of emphysema, whereas 25 patients had no emphysema. The extent of emphysema increases with increasing severity of COPD and most patients with COPD have emphysema. Tissue destruction by emphysema is therefore an important determinant of disease severity in COPD.

  6. Feasibility of graphene CRLH metamaterial waveguides and leaky wave antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Derrick A.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); NG NEXT Nanophotonics and Plasmonics Laboratory, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States); Williams, Benjamin S., E-mail: bswilliams@ucla.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The feasibility of composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial waveguides based upon graphene plasmons is demonstrated via numerical simulation. Designs are presented that operate in the terahertz frequency range along with their various dimensions. Dispersion relations, radiative and free-carrier losses, and free-carrier based tunability are characterized. Finally, the radiative characteristics are evaluated, along with its feasibility for use as a leaky-wave antenna. While CRLH waveguides are feasible in the terahertz range, their ultimate utility will require precise nanofabrication, and excellent quality graphene to mitigate free-carrier losses.

  7. Radiation processing of flue gases: Guidelines for feasibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this publication is to facilitate the performance of feasibility studies for Electron Beam flue gas cleanup projects by providing guidelines to conduct these studies and compiling information on the state of the art. This document summarizes the contents of a feasibility study; discusses the main items in plant construction, measurement and control systems, radiation safety and building construction; and lists the required economic data for internationally funded projects.

  8. Radiation processing of flue gases: Guidelines for feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this publication is to facilitate the performance of feasibility studies for Electron Beam flue gas cleanup projects by providing guidelines to conduct these studies and compiling information on the state of the art. This document summarizes the contents of a feasibility study; discusses the main items in plant construction, measurement and control systems, radiation safety and building construction; and lists the required economic data for internationally funded projects

  9. Base compaction specification feasibility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this research is to establish the technical engineering and cost : analysis concepts that will enable WisDOT management to objectively evaluate the : feasibility of switching construction specification philosophies for aggregate base...

  10. Northward extent of East Asian monsoon covaries with intensity on orbital and millennial timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Yonaton; Broecker, Wallace S.; Xu, Hai; Polissar, Pratigya J.; deMenocal, Peter B.; Porat, Naomi; Lan, Jianghu; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-02-01

    The magnitude, rate, and extent of past and future East Asian monsoon (EAM) rainfall fluctuations remain unresolved. Here, late Pleistocene-Holocene EAM rainfall intensity is reconstructed using a well-dated northeastern China closed-basin lake area record located at the modern northwestern fringe of the EAM. The EAM intensity and northern extent alternated rapidly between wet and dry periods on time scales of centuries. Lake levels were 60 m higher than present during the early and middle Holocene, requiring a twofold increase in annual rainfall, which, based on modern rainfall distribution, requires a ˜400 km northward expansion/migration of the EAM. The lake record is highly correlated with both northern and southern Chinese cave deposit isotope records, supporting rainfall “intensity based” interpretations of these deposits as opposed to an alternative “water vapor sourcing” interpretation. These results indicate that EAM intensity and the northward extent covary on orbital and millennial timescales. The termination of wet conditions at 5.5 ka BP (˜35 m lake drop) triggered a large cultural collapse of Early Neolithic cultures in north China, and possibly promoted the emergence of complex societies of the Late Neolithic.

  11. Northward extent of East Asian monsoon covaries with intensity on orbital and millennial timescales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Yonaton; Broecker, Wallace S; Xu, Hai; Polissar, Pratigya J; deMenocal, Peter B; Porat, Naomi; Lan, Jianghu; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Weijian; An, Zhisheng

    2017-02-21

    The magnitude, rate, and extent of past and future East Asian monsoon (EAM) rainfall fluctuations remain unresolved. Here, late Pleistocene-Holocene EAM rainfall intensity is reconstructed using a well-dated northeastern China closed-basin lake area record located at the modern northwestern fringe of the EAM. The EAM intensity and northern extent alternated rapidly between wet and dry periods on time scales of centuries. Lake levels were 60 m higher than present during the early and middle Holocene, requiring a twofold increase in annual rainfall, which, based on modern rainfall distribution, requires a ∼400 km northward expansion/migration of the EAM. The lake record is highly correlated with both northern and southern Chinese cave deposit isotope records, supporting rainfall "intensity based" interpretations of these deposits as opposed to an alternative "water vapor sourcing" interpretation. These results indicate that EAM intensity and the northward extent covary on orbital and millennial timescales. The termination of wet conditions at 5.5 ka BP (∼35 m lake drop) triggered a large cultural collapse of Early Neolithic cultures in north China, and possibly promoted the emergence of complex societies of the Late Neolithic.

  12. Extent and distribution of skeletal muscle necrosis after graded periods of complete ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labbe, R.; Lindsay, T.; Walker, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The management of an acutely ischemic extremity requires knowledge of the response of skeletal muscle (the largest component of the lower limb) to prolonged periods of complete normothermic ischemia. We have used the canine gracilis muscle model to evaluate the extent and distribution of ischemic necrosis after 3 and 5 hours of ischemia and 48 hours of reperfusion. Each muscle was cut into six slices, and the extent and distribution of postischemic necrosis identified by means of nitroblue tetrazolium staining and 99mTc pyrophosphate uptake. After 3, 4, and 5 hours of ischemia the extent of necrosis was 2.0% +/- 0.9%, 30.3% +/- 6.0%, and 90.1% +/- 3.5% (mean +/- SEM), respectively. A statistically significant correlation exists between the extent of necrosis and the uptake of 99mTc pyrophosphate uptake per gram of tissue (y = 1574.9x - 8.4, r = 0.84, p less than 0.001). Most necrosis was centrally located and found in the thickest portion of the muscle. We conclude that there is a graded response in the extent of skeletal muscle necrosis related to the length of ischemic stress rather than an ''all-or-none'' phenomenon. This central distribution of necrosis makes the usual external evaluation of ischemic damage clinically unreliable. In addition, since there was no enveloping fascia in this model, a compartment release alone may not prevent the development of skeletal muscle necrosis. This knowledge of the response of skeletal muscle to ischemia may lead to an improved clinical approach to an extremity suffering a prolonged ischemic insult

  13. Feasibility of extracting data from electronic medical records for research: an international comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthoven, Michelle Helena; Mastellos, Nikolaos; Majeed, Azeem; O'Donoghue, John; Car, Josip

    2016-07-13

    Electronic medical records (EMR) offer a major potential for secondary use of data for research which can improve the safety, quality and efficiency of healthcare. They also enable the measurement of disease burden at the population level. However, the extent to which this is feasible in different countries is not well known. This study aimed to: 1) assess information governance procedures for extracting data from EMR in 16 countries; and 2) explore the extent of EMR adoption and the quality and consistency of EMR data in 7 countries, using management of diabetes type 2 patients as an exemplar. We included 16 countries from Australia, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe to the Americas. We undertook a multi-method approach including both an online literature review and structured interviews with 59 stakeholders, including 25 physicians, 23 academics, 7 EMR providers, and 4 information commissioners. Data were analysed and synthesised thematically considering the most relevant issues. We found that procedures for information governance, levels of adoption and data quality varied across the countries studied. The required time and ease of obtaining approval also varies widely. While some countries seem ready for secondary uses of data from EMR, in other countries several barriers were found, including limited experience with using EMR data for research, lack of standard policies and procedures, bureaucracy, confidentiality, data security concerns, technical issues and costs. This is the first international comparative study to shed light on the feasibility of extracting EMR data across a number of countries. The study will inform future discussions and development of policies that aim to accelerate the adoption of EMR systems in high and middle income countries and seize the rich potential for secondary use of data arising from the use of EMR solutions.

  14. A Global Geospatial Database of 5000+ Historic Flood Event Extents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellman, B.; Sullivan, J.; Doyle, C.; Kettner, A.; Brakenridge, G. R.; Erickson, T.; Slayback, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    A key dataset that is missing for global flood model validation and understanding historic spatial flood vulnerability is a global historical geo-database of flood event extents. Decades of earth observing satellites and cloud computing now make it possible to not only detect floods in near real time, but to run these water detection algorithms back in time to capture the spatial extent of large numbers of specific events. This talk will show results from the largest global historical flood database developed to date. We use the Dartmouth Flood Observatory flood catalogue to map over 5000 floods (from 1985-2017) using MODIS, Landsat, and Sentinel-1 Satellites. All events are available for public download via the Earth Engine Catalogue and via a website that allows the user to query floods by area or date, assess population exposure trends over time, and download flood extents in geospatial format.In this talk, we will highlight major trends in global flood exposure per continent, land use type, and eco-region. We will also make suggestions how to use this dataset in conjunction with other global sets to i) validate global flood models, ii) assess the potential role of climatic change in flood exposure iii) understand how urbanization and other land change processes may influence spatial flood exposure iv) assess how innovative flood interventions (e.g. wetland restoration) influence flood patterns v) control for event magnitude to assess the role of social vulnerability and damage assessment vi) aid in rapid probabilistic risk assessment to enable microinsurance markets. Authors on this paper are already using the database for the later three applications and will show examples of wetland intervention analysis in Argentina, social vulnerability analysis in the USA, and micro insurance in India.

  15. Extent of pyrolysis impacts on fast pyrolysis biochar properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Catherine E; Hu, Yan-Yan; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Loynachan, Thomas E; Laird, David A; Brown, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    A potential concern about the use of fast pyrolysis rather than slow pyrolysis biochars as soil amendments is that they may contain high levels of bioavailable C due to short particle residence times in the reactors, which could reduce the stability of biochar C and cause nutrient immobilization in soils. To investigate this concern, three corn ( L.) stover fast pyrolysis biochars prepared using different reactor conditions were chemically and physically characterized to determine their extent of pyrolysis. These biochars were also incubated in soil to assess their impact on soil CO emissions, nutrient availability, microorganism population growth, and water retention capacity. Elemental analysis and quantitative solid-state C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed variation in O functional groups (associated primarily with carbohydrates) and aromatic C, which could be used to define extent of pyrolysis. A 24-wk incubation performed using a sandy soil amended with 0.5 wt% of corn stover biochar showed a small but significant decrease in soil CO emissions and a decrease in the bacteria:fungi ratios with extent of pyrolysis. Relative to the control soil, biochar-amended soils had small increases in CO emissions and extractable nutrients, but similar microorganism populations, extractable NO levels, and water retention capacities. Corn stover amendments, by contrast, significantly increased soil CO emissions and microbial populations, and reduced extractable NO. These results indicate that C in fast pyrolysis biochar is stable in soil environments and will not appreciably contribute to nutrient immobilization. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Detecting the Extent of Eutectoid Transformation in U-10Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McInnis, Colleen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lombardo, Nicholas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    During eutectoid transformation of U-10Mo alloy, uniform metastable γ UMo phase is expected to transform to a mixture of α-U and γ’-U2Mo phase. The presence of transformation products in final U-10Mo fuel, especially the α phase is considered detrimental for fuel irradiation performance, so it is critical to accurately evaluate the extent of transformation in the final U-10Mo alloy. This phase transformation can cause a volume change that induces a density change in final alloy. To understand this density and volume change, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the volume expansion and resultant density change of U-10Mo alloy as a function of the extent of eutectoid transformation. Based on the theoretically calculated density change for 0 to 100% transformation, we conclude that an experimental density measurement system will be challenging to employ to reliably detect and quantify the extent of transformation. Subsequently, to assess the ability of various methods to detect the transformation in U-10Mo, we annealed U-10Mo alloy samples at 500°C for various times to achieve in low, medium, and high extent of transformation. After the heat treatment at 500°C, the samples were metallographically polished and subjected to optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Based on our assessment, optical microscopy and image processing can be used to determine the transformed area fraction, which can then be correlated with the α phase volume fraction measured by XRD analysis. XRD analysis of U-10Mo aged at 500°C detected only α phase and no γ’ was detected. To further validate the XRD results, atom probe tomography (APT) was used to understand the composition of transformed regions in U-10Mo alloys aged at 500°C for 10 hours. Based on the APT results, the lamellar transformation product was found to comprise α phase with close to 0 at% Mo and γ phase with 28–32 at% Mo, and the Mo concentration was highest at the

  17. Extent of the Immirzi ambiguity in quantum general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marugan, Guillermo A Mena

    2002-01-01

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number. (letter to the editor)

  18. Determination of extent of surgical intervention for endometrial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smakhtina, O.L.; Nugmanova, M.I.; Nigaj, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Clinical, cytologic, histologic and X-ray procedures were used in examining 120 patients with endometrial carcinoma. The results of pre- and intraoperative determination of clinical stage were compared in 65 cases of uterine extirpation with appendages and lymphadenectomy. Errors in preoperative identification of the extent of tumor expansion were made in 9 cases (13.8+-4.3%). It was found that determinations of the site and expansion of tumor make the case for hysterocervico-angiolymphography whereas identification of tumor pattern and degree of cell differentiation-for cytologic and histologic assays

  19. Detecting the Extent of Eutectoid Transformation in U-10Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devaraj, Arun; Jana, Saumyadeep; McInnis, Colleen A.; Lombardo, Nicholas J.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Lavender, Curt A.

    2016-01-01

    During eutectoid transformation of U-10Mo alloy, uniform metastable ? UMo phase is expected to transform to a mixture of ?-U and ?'-U_2Mo phase. The presence of transformation products in final U-10Mo fuel, especially the ? phase is considered detrimental for fuel irradiation performance, so it is critical to accurately evaluate the extent of transformation in the final U-10Mo alloy. This phase transformation can cause a volume change that induces a density change in final alloy. To understand this density and volume change, we developed a theoretical model to calculate the volume expansion and resultant density change of U-10Mo alloy as a function of the extent of eutectoid transformation. Based on the theoretically calculated density change for 0 to 100% transformation, we conclude that an experimental density measurement system will be challenging to employ to reliably detect and quantify the extent of transformation. Subsequently, to assess the ability of various methods to detect the transformation in U-10Mo, we annealed U-10Mo alloy samples at 500°C for various times to achieve in low, medium, and high extent of transformation. After the heat treatment at 500°C, the samples were metallographically polished and subjected to optical microscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. Based on our assessment, optical microscopy and image processing can be used to determine the transformed area fraction, which can then be correlated with the ? phase volume fraction measured by XRD analysis. XRD analysis of U-10Mo aged at 500°C detected only ? phase and no ?' was detected. To further validate the XRD results, atom probe tomography (APT) was used to understand the composition of transformed regions in U-10Mo alloys aged at 500°C for 10 hours. Based on the APT results, the lamellar transformation product was found to comprise ? phase with close to 0 at% Mo and ? phase with 28-32 at% Mo, and the Mo concentration was highest at the ?/? interface.

  20. Measurement of extent of intense ion beam charge neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelko, V [Efremov Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Giese, H; Schalk, S [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). INR

    1997-12-31

    Various diagnostic tools were employed to study and optimize the extent of space charge neutralization in the pulsed intense proton beam facility PROFA, comprising Langmuir probes, capacitive probes, and a novel type of the three electrode collector. The latter does not only allow us to measure ion and electron beam current densities in a high magnetic field environment, but also to deduce the density spectrum of the beam electrons. Appropriate operating conditions were identified to attain a complete space charge neutralisation. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs.

  1. Rapid Estimates of Rupture Extent for Large Earthquakes Using Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, J.; Thio, H. K.; Kremer, M.

    2009-12-01

    The spatial distribution of aftershocks is closely linked to the rupture extent of the mainshock that preceded them and a rapid analysis of aftershock patterns therefore has potential for use in near real-time estimates of earthquake impact. The correlation between aftershocks and slip distribution has frequently been used to estimate the fault dimensions of large historic earthquakes for which no, or insufficient, waveform data is available. With the advent of earthquake inversions that use seismic waveforms and geodetic data to constrain the slip distribution, the study of aftershocks has recently been largely focused on enhancing our understanding of the underlying mechanisms in a broader earthquake mechanics/dynamics framework. However, in a near real-time earthquake monitoring environment, in which aftershocks of large earthquakes are routinely detected and located, these data may also be effective in determining a fast estimate of the mainshock rupture area, which would aid in the rapid assessment of the impact of the earthquake. We have analyzed a considerable number of large recent earthquakes and their aftershock sequences and have developed an effective algorithm that determines the rupture extent of a mainshock from its aftershock distribution, in a fully automatic manner. The algorithm automatically removes outliers by spatial binning, and subsequently determines the best fitting “strike” of the rupture and its length by projecting the aftershock epicenters onto a set of lines that cross the mainshock epicenter with incremental azimuths. For strike-slip or large dip-slip events, for which the surface projection of the rupture is recti-linear, the calculated strike correlates well with the strike of the fault and the corresponding length, determined from the distribution of aftershocks projected onto the line, agrees well with the rupture length. In the case of a smaller dip-slip rupture with an aspect ratio closer to 1, the procedure gives a measure

  2. Extent and application of patient diaries in Austria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heindl, Patrik; Bachlechner, Adelbert; Nydahl, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diaries written for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) are offered in many European countries. In Austria, ICU diaries have been relatively unknown, but since 2012, they have started to emerge. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the extent and application of ICU diaries...... in Austria in 2015. Method: The study had a prospective multiple methods design of survey and interviews. All ICUs in Austria were surveyed in 2015 to identify which ICUs used diaries. ICUs using diaries were selected for semi-structured key-informant telephone interviews on the application of ICU diaries...

  3. Integrating remotely sensed surface water extent into continental scale hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla-Romero, Beatriz; Wanders, Niko; Burek, Peter; Salamon, Peter; de Roo, Ad

    2016-12-01

    In hydrological forecasting, data assimilation techniques are employed to improve estimates of initial conditions to update incorrect model states with observational data. However, the limited availability of continuous and up-to-date ground streamflow data is one of the main constraints for large-scale flood forecasting models. This is the first study that assess the impact of assimilating daily remotely sensed surface water extent at a 0.1° × 0.1° spatial resolution derived from the Global Flood Detection System (GFDS) into a global rainfall-runoff including large ungauged areas at the continental spatial scale in Africa and South America. Surface water extent is observed using a range of passive microwave remote sensors. The methodology uses the brightness temperature as water bodies have a lower emissivity. In a time series, the satellite signal is expected to vary with changes in water surface, and anomalies can be correlated with flood events. The Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) is a Monte-Carlo implementation of data assimilation and used here by applying random sampling perturbations to the precipitation inputs to account for uncertainty obtaining ensemble streamflow simulations from the LISFLOOD model. Results of the updated streamflow simulation are compared to baseline simulations, without assimilation of the satellite-derived surface water extent. Validation is done in over 100 in situ river gauges using daily streamflow observations in the African and South American continent over a one year period. Some of the more commonly used metrics in hydrology were calculated: KGE', NSE, PBIAS%, R 2 , RMSE, and VE. Results show that, for example, NSE score improved on 61 out of 101 stations obtaining significant improvements in both the timing and volume of the flow peaks. Whereas the validation at gauges located in lowland jungle obtained poorest performance mainly due to the closed forest influence on the satellite signal retrieval. The conclusion is that

  4. Development and feasibility of falls prevention advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten-Krouwel, Diny; Schuurmans, Marieke; Emmelot-Vonk, Mariëlle; Pel-Littel, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the feasibility of nursing falls prevention advice and factors influencing feasibility. The frequency and seriousness of falls in hospitalised patients are underestimated, and such falls should be preventable because of the presence of professionals. A best practice-based falls prevention advice was developed to decrease the incidence of secondary falls and the incidence of primary falls in the long term and to increase the knowledge of nurses about falls prevention and the seriousness of falls. A descriptive, explorative study. Feasibility of the advice for 30 patients was assessed 82 times (theoretically, three times per patient) by observation and by interviewing nurses, patients and their families. The falls prevention advice was used in 48% of the assessments. There was a difference in use between interventions. Interventions that required more knowledge, communication and extra activities were implemented the least. The absence of materials and knowledge about falls prevention were important determinants of the non-implementation of certain interventions. Before falls prevention advice is implemented, it is important to educate nurses about falls, communication skills and implementation of the advice. The falls prevention advice might help nurses to prevent falls and increase their knowledge about falls prevention. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. A Feasibility study of a mining business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cehlár Michal

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic evaluation of a project requires a great deal of diverse information to be brought together in one place. The greatest concern is that there will be an error by omission, so it is useful to have a detailed list of what one needs to know in order to make a thorough evaluation.There are various of detail required at the different stages of evaluation in the project, from the "quick and dirty" overview to the pre-feasibility study, through a full detailed feasibility study, to a due diligence review. This list addresses most of the economic variables in project and can be used at all levels of studies. Its purpose is to identify a variable or issue and to raise a question, which the review can pursue in more detail using an increasingly more comprehensive checklist for each topic. While developed from the point of view of a new project, this list is equally valid for an ongoing operation.A feasibility study is defined as an assessment of all aspects of a project including technical, infrastructural, environmental, social, legislative and commercial factors, which is sufficiently detailed to support a decision on the implementation. Each project has an associated level of risk. For a proposed investment to increase the value of a firm's stock, it should have a higher expected rate of return than shareholders require for assuming that risk. Since investors demand for a higher potential returns from a riskier project, the cost of capital depends on the venture's risk.

  6. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A; Chettle, D R; McNeill, F E

    2008-01-01

    g/g Ca. It also provides a revised estimate of expected referent levels of manganese in bone, now estimated to be 0.63 μg/g Ca and highlights the extent to which technical improvements will be required to further extend the application of the technique for in vivo measurements in non-exposed human subjects

  7. Quantification of manganese in human hand bones: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslam; Pejovic-Milic, A; Chettle, D R; McNeill, F E [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1 (Canada)], E-mail: aslamib@mcmaster.ca

    2008-08-07

    limit in the hand of human subjects of 1.6 {mu}g/g Ca. It also provides a revised estimate of expected referent levels of manganese in bone, now estimated to be 0.63 {mu}g/g Ca and highlights the extent to which technical improvements will be required to further extend the application of the technique for in vivo measurements in non-exposed human subjects.

  8. Feasibility Study of Thin Film Thermocouple Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisk, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, thermopile detectors, generators, and refrigerators based on bulk materials have been used to measure temperature, generate power for spacecraft, and cool sensors for scientific investigations. New potential uses of small, low-power, thin film thermopiles are in the area of microelectromechanical systems since power requirements decrease as electrical and mechanical machines shrink in size. In this research activity, thin film thermopile devices are fabricated utilizing radio frequency sputter coating and photoresist lift-off techniques. Electrical characterizations are performed on two designs in order to investigate the feasibility of generating small amounts of power, utilizing any available waste heat as the energy source.

  9. Depleted uranium concrete container feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haelsig, R.T.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to consider the feasibility of using containers constructed of depleted uranium aggregate concrete (DUCRETE) to store and transport radioactive materials. The method for this study was to review the advantages and disadvantages of DUCRETE containers considering design requirements for potential applications. The author found that DUCRETE is a promising material for onsite storage containers, provided DUCRETE vessels can be certified for one-way transport to disposal sites. The author also found that DUCRETE multipurpose spent nuclear fuel storage/transport packages are technically viable, provided altered temperature acceptance limits can be developed for DUCRETE

  10. Reassessing the extent of the Q classification for containment paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spires, G.

    1995-01-01

    A mounting number of site-specific paint debris transport and screen clogging analyses submitted to justify substandard containment paint work have been deemed persuasive by virtue of favorable U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission safety evaluation report (SER) findings. These lay a strong foundation for a standardized approach to redefining the extent to which paint in containment needs to be considered open-quotes Q.close quotes This information justifies an initiative by licensees to roll back paint work quality commitments made at the design phase. This paper questions the validity of the basic premise that all primary containment paint can significantly compromise core and containment cooling [emergency core cooling system/engineered safeguard feature (ECCS/ESF)]. It is posited that the physical extent of painted containment surfaces for which extant material qualification and quality control (QC) structures need apply can be limited to zones relatively proximate to ECCS/ESF suction points. For other painted containment surfaces, simplified criteria should be allowed

  11. The regional extent of suppression: strabismics versus nonstrabismics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Raiju Jacob; Clavagnier, Simon R; Bobier, William; Thompson, Benjamin; Hess, Robert F

    2013-10-09

    Evidence is accumulating that suppression may be the cause of amblyopia rather than a secondary consequence of mismatched retinal images. For example, treatment interventions that target suppression may lead to better binocular and monocular outcomes. Furthermore, it has recently been demonstrated that the measurement of suppression may have prognostic value for patching therapy. For these reasons, the measurement of suppression in the clinic needs to be improved beyond the methods that are currently available, which provide a binary outcome. We describe a novel quantitative method for measuring the regional extent of suppression that is suitable for clinical use. The method involves a dichoptic perceptual matching procedure at multiple visual field locations. We compare a group of normal controls (mean age: 28 ± 5 years); a group with strabismic amblyopia (four with microesotropia, five with esotropia, and one with exotropia; mean age: 35 ± 10 years); and a group with nonstrabismic anisometropic amblyopia (mean age: 33 ± 12 years). The extent and magnitude of suppression was similar for observers with strabismic and nonstrabismic amblyopia. Suppression was strongest within the central field and extended throughout the 20° field that we measured. Suppression extends throughout the central visual field in both strabismic and anisometropic forms of amblyopia. The strongest suppression occurs within the region of the visual field corresponding to the fovea of the fixing eye.

  12. Corticocortical feedback increases the spatial extent of normalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Normalization has been proposed as a canonical computation operating across different brain regions, sensory modalities, and species. It provides a good phenomenological description of non-linear response properties in primary visual cortex (V1), including the contrast response function and surround suppression. Despite its widespread application throughout the visual system, the underlying neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recently observed that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression in V1, raising the possibility that feedback acts through normalization. To test this idea, we characterized area summation and contrast response properties in V1 with and without feedback from V2 and V3 in alert macaques and applied a standard normalization model to the data. Area summation properties were well explained by a form of divisive normalization, which computes the ratio between a neuron's driving input and the spatially integrated activity of a "normalization pool." Feedback inactivation reduced surround suppression by shrinking the spatial extent of the normalization pool. This effect was independent of the gain modulation thought to mediate the influence of contrast on area summation, which remained intact during feedback inactivation. Contrast sensitivity within the receptive field center was also unaffected by feedback inactivation, providing further evidence that feedback participates in normalization independent of the circuit mechanisms involved in modulating contrast gain and saturation. These results suggest that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression by increasing the visuotopic extent of normalization and, via this mechanism, feedback can play a critical role in contextual information processing.

  13. Corticocortical feedback increases the spatial extent of normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Gómez-Laberge, Camille; Kreiman, Gabriel; Born, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    Normalization has been proposed as a canonical computation operating across different brain regions, sensory modalities, and species. It provides a good phenomenological description of non-linear response properties in primary visual cortex (V1), including the contrast response function and surround suppression. Despite its widespread application throughout the visual system, the underlying neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. We recently observed that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression in V1, raising the possibility that feedback acts through normalization. To test this idea, we characterized area summation and contrast response properties in V1 with and without feedback from V2 and V3 in alert macaques and applied a standard normalization model to the data. Area summation properties were well explained by a form of divisive normalization, which computes the ratio between a neuron's driving input and the spatially integrated activity of a “normalization pool.” Feedback inactivation reduced surround suppression by shrinking the spatial extent of the normalization pool. This effect was independent of the gain modulation thought to mediate the influence of contrast on area summation, which remained intact during feedback inactivation. Contrast sensitivity within the receptive field center was also unaffected by feedback inactivation, providing further evidence that feedback participates in normalization independent of the circuit mechanisms involved in modulating contrast gain and saturation. These results suggest that corticocortical feedback contributes to surround suppression by increasing the visuotopic extent of normalization and, via this mechanism, feedback can play a critical role in contextual information processing. PMID:24910596

  14. The feasibility of ecological taxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, A.T.G.

    1995-01-01

    The feasibility of ecological taxation in general and for the Netherlands in specific was analyzed within the context of one of the NRP research projects. The analysis shows that the feasibility of ecological taxes is generally determined by the tax design, the taxing authority by which these taxes are imposed and by the constitutional, institutional and fiscal structures into which they are embedded. In order to be feasible, the analysis shows that ecologically relevant taxes have to be imposed by a taxing authority which is clearly related to relevant ecological circumstances. Since normal taxing authorities tend to be political units which most of the times do not fit this description, institutional and constitutional changes are necessary to introduce and impose (additional) feasible types of ecological taxes in practice. Within the context of the Netherlands, the analysis shows that the currently changing intergovernmental and financial relationships in this country provide important starting points for municipalities, water authorities and provinces to introduce feasible types of such taxes. 225 refs

  15. Acceptability and Feasibility of a Shared Decision-Making Model in Work Rehabilitation: A Mixed-Methods Study of Stakeholders' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Marie-France; Légaré, France; Durand, Marie-José; Stacey, Dawn; Labrecque, Marie-Elise; Corbière, Marc; Bainbridge, Lesley

    2018-04-16

    Purpose To establish the acceptability and feasibility of implementing a shared decision-making (SDM) model in work rehabilitation. Methods We used a sequential mixed-methods design with diverse stakeholder groups (representatives of private and public employers, insurers, and unions, as well as workers having participated in a work rehabilitation program). First, a survey using a self-administered questionnaire enabled stakeholders to rate their level of agreement with the model's acceptability and feasibility and propose modifications, if necessary. Second, eight focus groups representing key stakeholders (n = 34) and four one-on-one interviews with workers were conducted, based on the questionnaire results. For each stakeholder group, we computed the percentage of agreement with the model's acceptability and feasibility and performed thematic analyses of the transcripts. Results Less than 50% of each stakeholder group initially agreed with the overall acceptability and feasibility of the model. Stakeholders proposed 37 modifications to the objectives, 17 to the activities, and 39 to improve the model's feasibility. Based on in-depth analysis of the transcripts, indicators were added to one objective, an interview guide was added as proposed by insurers to ensure compliance of the SDM process with insurance contract requirements, and one objective was reformulated. Conclusion Despite initially low agreement with the model's acceptability on the survey, subsequent discussions led to three minor changes and contributed to the model's ultimate acceptability and feasibility. Later steps will involve assessing the extent of implementation of the model in real rehabilitation settings to see if other modifications are necessary before assessing its impact.

  16. Extent and application of ICU diaries in Germany in 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nydahl, Peter; Knueck, Dirk; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    in keeping ICU diaries. CONCLUSION: Six years after the introduction of ICU diaries, ICU nurses in Germany are becoming familiar with the concept. Nursing shortage and bureaucratic challenges have impeded the process of implementation, but the adaption of ICU diaries to German conditions appears......, newsletters, newspapers, lectures and publications in German nursing journals. AIM: The aim of the study was to update our knowledge of the extent and application of ICU diaries in Germany in 2014. DESIGN: The study had a prospective mixed methods multicenter design. METHOD: All 152 ICUs in the two German...... of Germany had implemented diaries and three units were planning to do so. Interviews were conducted with nurses at 14 selected ICUs. Informants reported successful adaption of the diary concept to their culture, but variability in application. No units were identified where all nursing staff participated...

  17. Lymphadenectomy in bladder cancer: What should be the extent?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Muruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent of Lymh node dissection (LND during radical cystectomy is a subject of increasing importance with several studies suggesting that an extended LND may improve staging accuracy and outcome. Significant numbers of patients have lymph node metastasis above the boundaries of standard LND. Extended LND yields higher number of lymph nodes which may result in better staging. Various retrospective studies have reported better oncological outcomes with extended LND compared to limited LND. No difference in the mortality and the incidence of lymphocele formation has been found between ′standard′ and ′extended′ LND. Till we have a well-designed randomized controlled trial to address these issues for level 1 evidence, it is not justified to deny our patients the advantages of ′extended′ lymphadenectomy based on the current level of evidence.

  18. Peritoneum and mesenterium. Radiological anatomy and extent of peritoneal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Bastati, N.; Uffmann, M.; Schima, W.

    2009-01-01

    The abdominal cavity is subdivided into the peritoneal cavity, lined by the parietal peritoneum, and the extraperitoneal space. It extends from the diaphragm to the pelvic floor. The visceral peritoneum covers the intraperitoneal organs and part of the pelvic organs. The parietal and visceral layers of the peritoneum are in sliding contact; the potential space between them is called the peritoneal cavity and is a part of the embryologic abdominal cavity or primitive coelomic duct. To understand the complex anatomical construction of the different variants of plicae and recesses of the peritoneum, an appreciation of the embryologic development of the peritoneal cavity is crucial. This knowledge reflects the understanding of the peritoneal anatomy, deep knowledge of which is very important in determining the cause and extent of peritoneal diseases as well as in decision making when choosing the appropriate therapeutic approach, whether surgery, conservative treatment, or interventional radiology. (orig.) [de

  19. Obesity and extent of emphysema depicted at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, S.; Li, R.; Leader, J.K.; Zheng, B.; Bon, J.; Gur, D.; Sciurba, F.; Jin, C.; Pu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the underlying relationship between obesity and the extent of emphysema depicted at CT. Methods and materials: A dataset of 477 CT examinations was retrospectively collected from a study of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The low attenuation areas (LAAs; ≤950 HU) of the lungs were identified. The extent of emphysema (denoted as %LAA) was defined as the percentage of LAA divided by the lung volume. The association between log-transformed %LAA and body mass index (BMI) adjusted for age, sex, the forced expiratory volume in one second as percent predicted value (FEV1% predicted), and smoking history (pack years) was assessed using multiple linear regression analysis. Results: After adjusting for age, gender, smoking history, and FEV1% predicted, BMI was negatively associated with severe emphysema in patients with COPD. Specifically, one unit increase in BMI is associated with a 0.93-fold change (95% CI: 0.91–0.96, p < 0.001) in %LAA; the estimated %LAA for males was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.36–2.26, p < 0.001) times that of females; per 10% increase in FEV1% predicated is associated with a 0.72-fold change (95% CI: 0.69–0.76, p < 0.001) in %LAA. Conclusion: Increasing obesity is negatively associated with severity of emphysema independent of gender, age, and smoking history. - Highlights: • BMI is inversely associated with emphysema depicted on CT. • Emphysema severity in men was higher than that in women. • ∼50% of the subjects with COPD in our dataset were either overweight or obese. • Age and smoking status are not significantly associated with %LAA

  20. Measuring the extent of overlaps in protected area designations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguignet, Marine; Arnell, Andy; Juffe-Bignoli, Diego; Shi, Yichuan; Bingham, Heather; MacSharry, Brian; Kingston, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades, a number of national policies and international conventions have been implemented to promote the expansion of the world's protected area network, leading to a diversification of protected area strategies, types and designations. As a result, many areas are protected by more than one convention, legal instrument, or other effective means which may result in a lack of clarity around the governance and management regimes of particular locations. We assess the degree to which different designations overlap at global, regional and national levels to understand the extent of this phenomenon at different scales. We then compare the distribution and coverage of these multi-designated areas in the terrestrial and marine realms at the global level and among different regions, and we present the percentage of each county's protected area extent that is under more than one designation. Our findings show that almost a quarter of the world's protected area network is protected through more than one designation. In fact, we have documented up to eight overlapping designations. These overlaps in protected area designations occur in every region of the world, both in the terrestrial and marine realms, but are more common in the terrestrial realm and in some regions, notably Europe. In the terrestrial realm, the most common overlap is between one national and one international designation. In the marine realm, the most common overlap is between any two national designations. Multi-designations are therefore a widespread phenomenon but its implications are not well understood. This analysis identifies, for the first time, multi-designated areas across all designation types. This is a key step to understand how these areas are managed and governed to then move towards integrated and collaborative approaches that consider the different management and conservation objectives of each designation.

  1. Estimating Global Cropland Extent with Multi-year MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher O. Justice

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the suitability of 250 m MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data for mapping global cropland extent. A set of 39 multi-year MODIS metrics incorporating four MODIS land bands, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and thermal data was employed to depict cropland phenology over the study period. Sub-pixel training datasets were used to generate a set of global classification tree models using a bagging methodology, resulting in a global per-pixel cropland probability layer. This product was subsequently thresholded to create a discrete cropland/non-cropland indicator map using data from the USDA-FAS (Foreign Agricultural Service Production, Supply and Distribution (PSD database describing per-country acreage of production field crops. Five global land cover products, four of which attempted to map croplands in the context of multiclass land cover classifications, were subsequently used to perform regional evaluations of the global MODIS cropland extent map. The global probability layer was further examined with reference to four principle global food crops: corn, soybeans, wheat and rice. Overall results indicate that the MODIS layer best depicts regions of intensive broadleaf crop production (corn and soybean, both in correspondence with existing maps and in associated high probability matching thresholds. Probability thresholds for wheat-growing regions were lower, while areas of rice production had the lowest associated confidence. Regions absent of agricultural intensification, such as Africa, are poorly characterized regardless of crop type. The results reflect the value of MODIS as a generic global cropland indicator for intensive agriculture production regions, but with little sensitivity in areas of low agricultural intensification. Variability in mapping accuracies between areas dominated by different crop types also points to the desirability of a crop-specific approach rather than attempting

  2. A theoretical analysis of the feasibility of a singularity-induced micro-electroporation system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory D Troszak

    Full Text Available Electroporation, the permeabilization of the cell membrane lipid bilayer due to a pulsed electric field, has important implications in the biotechnology, medicine, and food industries. Traditional macro and micro-electroporation devices have facing electrodes, and require significant potential differences to induce electroporation. The goal of this theoretical study is to investigate the feasibility of singularity-induced micro-electroporation; an electroporation configuration aimed at minimizing the potential differences required to induce electroporation by separating adjacent electrodes with a nanometer-scale insulator. In particular, this study aims to understand the effect of (1 insulator thickness and (2 electrode kinetics on electric field distributions in the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration. A non-dimensional primary current distribution model of the micro-electroporation channel shows that while increasing insulator thickness results in smaller electric field magnitudes, electroporation can still be performed with insulators thick enough to be made with microfabrication techniques. Furthermore, a secondary current distribution model of the singularity-induced micro-electroporation configuration with inert platinum electrodes and water electrolyte indicates that electrode kinetics do not inhibit charge transfer to the extent that prohibitively large potential differences are required to perform electroporation. These results indicate that singularity-induced micro-electroporation could be used to develop an electroporation system that consumes minimal power, making it suitable for remote applications such as the sterilization of water and other liquids.

  3. Automated flood extent identification using WorldView imagery for the insurance industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Christina

    2017-10-01

    Flooding is the most common and costly natural disaster around the world, causing the loss of human life and billions in economic and insured losses each year. In 2016, pluvial and fluvial floods caused an estimated 5.69 billion USD in losses worldwide with the most severe events occurring in Germany, France, China, and the United States. While catastrophe modeling has begun to help bridge the knowledge gap about the risk of fluvial flooding, understanding the extent of a flood - pluvial and fluvial - in near real-time allows insurance companies around the world to quantify the loss of property that their clients face during a flooding event and proactively respond. To develop this real-time, global analysis of flooded areas and the associated losses, a new methodology utilizing optical multi-spectral imagery from DigitalGlobe (DGI) WorldView satellite suite is proposed for the extraction of pluvial and fluvial flood extents. This methodology involves identifying flooded areas visible to the sensor, filling in the gaps left by the built environment (i.e. buildings, trees) with a nearest neighbor calculation, and comparing the footprint against an Industry Exposure Database (IE) to calculate a loss estimate. Full-automation of the methodology allows production of flood extents and associated losses anywhere around the world as required. The methodology has been tested and proven effective for the 2016 flood in Louisiana, USA.

  4. Hilar cholangiocarcinoma: controversies on the extent of surgical resection aiming at cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shuai; Lau, Wan Yee; Chen, Xiao-ping

    2015-02-01

    Hilar cholangiocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor affecting the extrahepatic bile duct. Surgical treatment offers the only possibility of cure, and it requires removal of all tumoral tissues with adequate resection margins. The aims of this review are to summarize the findings and to discuss the controversies on the extent of surgical resection aiming at cure for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The English medical literatures on hilar cholangiocarcinoma were studied to review on the relevance of adequate resection margins, routine caudate lobe resection, extent of liver resection, and combined vascular resection on perioperative and long-term survival outcomes of patients with resectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Complete resection of tumor represents the most important prognostic factor of long-term survival for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. The primary aim of surgery is to achieve R0 resection. When R1 resection is shown intraoperatively, further resection is recommended. Combined hepatic resection is now generally accepted as a standard procedure even for Bismuth type I/II tumors. Routine caudate lobe resection is also advocated for cure. The extent of hepatic resection remains controversial. Most surgeons recommend major hepatic resection. However, minor hepatic resection has also been advocated in most patients. The decision to carry out right- or left-sided hepatectomy is made according to the predominant site of the lesion. Portal vein resection should be considered when its involvement by tumor is suspected. The curative treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma remains challenging. Advances in hepatobiliary techniques have improved the perioperative and long-term survival outcomes of this tumor.

  5. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Bonnema; D. Moser; J. Riedesel; K. Kooda; K. Liekhus; K. Rebish; S. Poling

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when

  6. Feasibility Study on HYSOL CSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Baldini, Mattia; Skytte, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    integrated HYSOL concept, therefore, becomes a fully dispatchable (offering firm power) and fully renewable energy source (RES) based power supply alternative, offering CO2-free electricity in regions with sufficient solar resources. The economic feasibility of HYSOL configurations is addressed in this paper....... The CO2 free HYSOL alternative is discussed relative to conventional reference firm power generation technologies. In particular the HYSOL performance relative to new power plants based on natural gas (NG) such as open cycle or combined cycle gas turbines (OCGT or CCGT) are in focus. The feasibility...

  7. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  8. Transportation System Requirements Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification

  9. Exoskeleton for Soldier Enhancement Systems Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, J.F.

    2000-09-28

    The development of a successful exoskeleton for human performance augmentation (EHPA) will require a multi-disciplinary systems approach based upon sound biomechanics, power generation and actuation systems, controls technology, and operator interfaces. The ability to integrate key components into a system that enhances performance without impeding operator mobility is essential. The purpose of this study and report are to address the issue of feasibility of building a fieldable EHPA. Previous efforts, while demonstrating progress and enhancing knowledge, have not approached the level required for a fully functional, fieldable system. It is doubtless that the technologies required for a successful exoskeleton have advanced, and some of them significantly. The question to be addressed in this report is have they advanced to the point of making a system feasible in the next three to five years? In this study, the key technologies required to successfully build an exoskeleton have been examined. The primary focus has been on the key technologies of power sources, actuators, and controls. Power sources, including internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, super capacitors, and hybrid sources have been investigated and compared with respect to the exoskeleton application. Both conventional and non-conventional actuator technologies that could impact EHPA have been assessed. In addition to the current state of the art of actuators, the potential for near-term improvements using non-conventional actuators has also been addressed. Controls strategies, and their implication to the design approach, and the exoskeleton to soldier interface have also been investigated. In addition to these key subsystems and technologies, this report addresses technical concepts and issues relating to an integrated design. A recommended approach, based on the results of the study is also presented.

  10. Feasibility and desirability study of implementing a duty-cycle data-collection system as part of NPRDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Howe, K.R.; Koppe, R.H.; Voegtle, R.B.; Kline, S.C.; Olson, E.A.J.

    The objective of this project was to investigate cost-effective ways to improve the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS) failure statistics as they are affected by the component-usage question. The nominal way to improve these statistics is to record, and to some extent describe, each operation of a safety component as well as each failure. Failures per demand or failures per operating hour could then be determined. It was recognized that such component-usage data collection for even a small number of key components could be costly or otherwise impractical. The reporting requirements for nuclear units are already burdensome and frequently redundant or overlapping. Therefore, the desirability of these information retrieval plans, in terms of the expected burdens and benefits, was also a consideration to be addressed, in addition to the feasibility of actually implementing such data collection

  11. General discussion of feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calori, F.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals, objectives and parameters of feasibility studies in the field of nuclear power project planning are discussed in a general way. Technical and economic problems to be considered are pointed out. In special cases, IAEA offers its aid and support. (UA) [de

  12. The feasibility of ecological taxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulus, A.T.G.

    1995-01-01

    From an analysis of the possibilities and complexities of ecological taxation, conducted within the context of the first NRP (research project 851051E), it follows that the feasibility of ecological taxes is determined by their design, the level at which they are implemented, the taxing authority by which they are imposed and by the constitutional, institutional and fiscal framework in which they are embedded

  13. Significance of microscopic extention from 1162 esophageal carcinoma specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Zhu Shuchai; Han Chun; Zhang Xin; Xiao Aiqin; Ma Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the subclinical microscopic tumor extention along the long axis in 1162 specimens of esophageal carcinoma so as to help define the clinical target volume(CTV) according to the degree of microscopic extention(ME) for radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. Methods: 1162 resected esophageal carcinoma specimens originally located in the neck and thorax were studied with special reference to the correlation between upper and lower resection length from the tumor and positive microscopic margin. Another 52 resected esophageal carcinoma specimens were made into pathological giant sections: the actual resection length of upper and para-esophageal normal tissues was compared with that of the lower nor- mal tissues from the tumor, there by, the ratio of shrinkage was obtained and compared. Results: After fixation, microscopic positive margin ratio of the upper resection border in length ≤0.5 cm group was higher than that in length > 0.5 cm group (16.4% vs 4.1%, P=0.000). Microscopic positive margin ratio of the lower resection border in length ≤1.5 cm group was higher than that in length > 1.5 cm group( 8.1% vs 0.4%, P = 0.000). This showed that the positive margin ratio of the upper border was higher than that of the lower border in resection length > 1.5 cm group(3.5% vs 0.4%, P=0. 000). The actual length of upper and lower normal esophageal tissue after having been made into pathological giant sections in 52 patients, was 30% ± 14% and 44% ± 19% of that measured in the operation. Conclusions: Considering the shrinkage of the normal esophagus during fixation, a CTV margin of 2.0 cm along the upper long axis and 3.5 cm along the lower long axis should be chosen for radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma, according to the ratio of shrinkage. Ascending invasion proportion is higher than the descending invasion in that tumor. (authors)

  14. Utility requirements for HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholls, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Eskom, the state utility of South Africa, is currently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of the helium cooled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor with a closed cycle gas turbine power conversion system for future power generating additions to its electric system. This paper provides an overview of the Eskom system including the needs of the utility for future generation capacity and the key performance requirements necessary for incorporation of this gas cooled reactor plant. (author)

  15. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle

  16. Distracted walking: Examining the extent to pedestrian safety problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mwakalonge

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians, much like drivers, have always been engaged in multi-tasking like using hand-held devices, listening to music, snacking, or reading while walking. The effects are similar to those experienced by distracted drivers. However, distracted walking has not received similar policies and effective interventions as distracted driving to improve pedestrian safety. This study reviewed the state-of-practice on policies, campaigns, available data, identified research needs, and opportunities pertaining to distracted walking. A comprehensive review of literature revealed that some of the agencies/organizations disseminate useful information about certain distracting activities that pedestrians should avoid while walking to improve their safety. Various walking safety rules/tips have been given, such as not wearing headphones or talking on a cell phone while crossing a street, keeping the volume down, hanging up the phone while walking, being aware of traffic, and avoiding distractions like walking with texting. The majority of the past observational-based and experimental-based studies reviewed in this study on distracted walking is in agreement that there is a positive correlation between distraction and unsafe walking behavior. However, limitations of the existing crash data suggest that distracted walking may not be a severe threat to the public health. Current pedestrian crash data provide insufficient information for researchers to examine the extent to which distracted walking causes and/or contributes to actual pedestrian safety problems.

  17. Estimation of steam-chamber extent using 4D seismic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, M. [Waseda Univ., Waseda (Japan); Endo, K. [Japan Canada Oil Sands Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Onozuka, S. [Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-01

    The steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique is among the most effective steam injection methods and is widely applied in Canadian oil-sand reservoirs. The SAGD technology uses hot steam to decrease bitumen viscosity and allow it to flow. Japan Canada Oil Sands Limited (JACOS) has been developing an oil-sand reservoir in the Alberta's Hangingstone area since 1997. This paper focused on the western area of the reservoir and reported on a study that estimated the steam-chamber extent generated by horizontal well pairs. It listed steam injection start time for each well of the western area. Steam-chamber distribution was determined by distinguishing high temperature and high pore-pressure zones from low temperature and high pore-pressure zones. The bitumen recovery volume in the steam-chamber zone was estimated and compared with the actual cumulative production. This paper provided details of the methodology and interpretation procedures for the quantitative method to interpret 4D-seismic data for a SAGD process. A procedure to apply a petrophysical model was demonstrated first by scaling laboratory measurements to field-scale applications, and then by decoupling pressure and temperature effects. The first 3D seismic data in this study were already affected by higher pressures and temperatures. 11 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs.

  18. The extent and nature of alcohol advertising on Australian television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Roberts, Michele; Pescud, Melanie; Chapman, Kathy; Quester, Pascale; Miller, Caroline

    2012-09-01

    Current alcohol guidelines in Australia recommend minimising alcohol consumption, especially among minors. This study investigated (i) the extent to which children and the general population are exposed to television advertisements that endorse alcohol consumption and (ii) the themes used in these advertisements. A content analysis was conducted on alcohol advertisements aired over two months in major Australian cities. The advertisements were coded according to the products that were promoted, the themes that were employed, and the time of exposure. Advertising placement expenditure was also captured. In total, 2810 alcohol advertisements were aired, representing one in 10 beverage advertisements. Advertisement placement expenditure for alcohol products in the five cities over the two months was $15.8 million. Around half of all alcohol advertisements appeared during children's popular viewing times. The most common themes used were humour, friendship/mateship and value for money. Children and adults are regularly exposed to advertisements that depict alcohol consumption as fun, social and inexpensive. Such messages may reinforce existing alcohol-related cultural norms that prevent many Australians from meeting current intake guidelines. © 2012 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  19. The nature and extent of college student hazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Elizabeth J; Madden, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the nature and extent of college student hazing in the USA. Hazing, a form of interpersonal violence, can jeopardize the health and safety of students. Using a web-based survey, data were collected from 11,482 undergraduate students, aged 18-25 years, who attended one of 53 colleges and universities. Additionally, researchers interviewed 300 students and staff at 18 of the campuses. Results reveal hazing among USA college students is widespread and involves a range of student organizations and athletic teams. Alcohol consumption, humiliation, isolation, sleep-deprivation and sex acts are hazing practices common across student groups. Furthermore, there is a large gap between the number of students who report experience with hazing behaviors and those that label their experience as hazing. To date, hazing prevention efforts in post-secondary education have focused largely on students in fraternities/sororities and intercollegiate athletes. Findings from this study can inform development of more comprehensive and research-based hazing prevention efforts that target a wider range of student groups. Further, data can serve as a baseline from which to measure changes in college student hazing over time.

  20. Extent of linkage disequilibrium and effective population size in four South African Sanga cattle breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sithembile Olga Makina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD in livestock populations is essential to determine the minimum distance between markers required for effective coverage when conducting genome-wide association studies. This study evaluated the extent of LD, persistence of allelic phase and effective population size (Ne for four Sanga cattle breeds in South Africa including the Afrikaner (n=44, Nguni (n=54, Drakensberger (n=47 and Bonsmara breeds (n=46, using Angus (n=31 and Holstein (n=29 as reference populations. We found that moderate LD extends up to inter-marker distances of 40-60 kb in Angus (0.21 and Holstein (0.21 and up to 100 kb in Afrikaner (0.20. This suggests that genomic selection and association studies performed within these breeds using an average inter-marker r2 ≥ 0.20 would require about 30,000 -50,000 SNPs. However, r2 ≥ 0.20 extended only up to 10-20 kb in the Nguni and Drakensberger and 20-40 kb in the Bonsmara indicating that 75,000 to 150,000 SNPs would be necessary for genome-wide association studies in these breeds. Correlation between alleles at contiguous loci indicated that phase was not strongly preserved between breeds. This suggests the need for breed-specific reference populations in which a much greater density of markers should be scored to identify breed specific haplotypes which may then be imputed into multi-breed commercial populations. Analysis of effective population size based on the extent of LD, revealed Ne=95 (Nguni, Ne=87 (Drakensberger, Ne=77 (Bonsmara and Ne=41 (Afrikaner. Results of this study form the basis for implementation of genomic selection programs in the Sanga breeds of South Africa.

  1. Tolerating extremism : to what extent should intolerance be tolerated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guiora, Amos Neuser

    2013-01-01

    In discussing extremism, the key questions are: to whom is a duty owed and what are the limits of intolerance that are to be tolerated? Answering these questions requires examining limits and rights; analyzing them in the context of extremism is the ‘core’ of this book. While freedom of speech and

  2. Use of well points to determine the thickness and extent of floating product atop the water table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liikala, T.L.; Lewis, R.; Gilmore, T.; Hoffmann, H.

    1994-01-01

    The release of petroleum products to the ground water is a widespread problem. Conventional plume tracking techniques are to drill wells and measure product thickness and extent. In this study, well points were installed to rapidly and inexpensively determine the thickness and extent of floating product atop the water table. Spills and leaks of JP-4 have produced a discrete full layer atop the water table at one site at Eielson Air Force Base near Fairbanks, Alaska. The 0.2- to 1.3-foot-thick layer was identified in two ground water monitoring wells at a depth of approximately 10 feet. The layer is contained within unconsolidated glaciofluvial sands and gravels. A comprehensive assessment of the product thickness and extent was necessary for the site remedial investigation/feasibility study. The emplacement of additional monitoring wells was discouraged because of time and budget constraints. The fuel layer was delineated with 18 screened well points. The points consist of 2-inch-diameter galvanized steel pipe. The points were driven into the floating products with a hollow-stem auger rig sampling hammer. The product thickness was measured with an interface probe. The presence of floating product could be measured immediately after emplacement; the product thickness measurements typically stabilized within three days. The product thickness compared favorably with those measured in adjacent monitoring wells

  3. Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, B.; Cignetti, N.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section

  4. Extent of lymph node dissection for adenocarcinoma of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; McCulloch, Peter; Kazi, Hussain; Gama-Rodrigues, Joaquin J; Yuan, Yuhong; Nitti, Donato

    2015-08-12

    The impact of lymphadenectomy extent on the survival of patients with primary resectable gastric carcinoma is debated. We aimed to systematically review and meta-analyze the evidence on the impact of the three main types of progressively more extended lymph node dissection (that is, D1, D2 and D3 lymphadenectomy) on the clinical outcome of patients with primary resectable carcinoma of the stomach. The primary objective was to assess the impact of lymphadenectomy extent on survival (overall survival [OS], disease specific survival [DSS] and disease free survival [DFS]). The secondary aim was to assess the impact of lymphadenectomy on post-operative mortality. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE until 2001, including references from relevant articles and conference proceedings. We also contacted known researchers in the field. For the updated review, CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2001 to February 2015. We considered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the three main types of lymph node dissection (i.e., D1, D2 and D3 lymphadenectomy) in patients with primary non-metastatic resectable carcinoma of the stomach. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies. Hazard ratios (HR) and relative risks (RR) along with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to measure differences in survival and mortality rates between trial arms, respectively. Potential sources of between-study heterogeneity were investigated by means of subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The same two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of eligible studies according to the standards of the Cochrane Collaboration and the quality of the overall evidence based on the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) criteria. Eight RCTs (enrolling 2515 patients) met the inclusion criteria. Three RCTs (all performed in Asian countries) compared D3 with D2 lymphadenectomy: data suggested no significant difference in OS

  5. The Feasibility of First Step to Success with Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Andy J; Small, Jason; Feil, Edward; Seeley, John; Walker, Hill; Golly, Annemieke

    2013-07-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine feasibility of the preschool version of the First Step to Success (FSS) intervention. Toward this end, the following four research questions were addressed: (1) To what extent was the intervention implemented with integrity? (2) To what extent do teachers and parents perceive the intervention to be socially valid? (3) To what extent were teachers and parents satisfied with the intervention? and (4) To what extent was the intervention effective in reducing problem behavior and improving social skills? Twelve students participated in the study. Treatment integrity, social validity, and satisfaction results were analyzed at the aggregate level, and a reliable change index was calculated at the case level for primary outcome measures to assess the potential efficacy of the intervention. Fidelity data suggest the preschool version of the intervention can be implemented with acceptable integrity by coaches and teachers in preschool settings. Social validity outcomes suggest parents' perceptions of the program's goals, procedures, and outcomes were extremely favorable, and social validity from the teacher perspective was acceptable. The results provide initial evidence that participating in the preschool version of the FSS intervention improves children's social skills and decreases problem behavior.

  6. Assessing the extent of non-stationary biases in GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Jannatun; Johnson, Fiona; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are the main tools for estimating changes in the climate for the future. The imperfect representation of climate models introduces biases in the simulations that need to be corrected prior to their use for impact assessments. Bias correction methods generally assume that the bias calculated over the historical period does not change and can be applied to the future. This study investigates this assumption by considering the extent and nature of bias non-stationarity using 20th century precipitation and temperature simulations from six CMIP5 GCMs across Australia. Four statistics (mean, standard deviation, 10th and 90th quantiles) in monthly and seasonal biases are obtained for three different time window lengths (10, 25 and 33 years) to examine the properties of bias over time. This approach is repeated for two different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which is known to have strong influences on the Australian climate. It is found that bias non-stationarity at decadal timescales is indeed an issue over some of Australia for some GCMs. When considering interdecadal variability there are significant difference in the bias between positive and negative phases of the IPO. Regional analyses confirmed these findings with the largest differences seen on the east coast of Australia, where IPO impacts tend to be the strongest. The nature of the bias non-stationarity found in this study suggests that it will be difficult to modify existing bias correction approaches to account for non-stationary biases. A more practical approach for impact assessments that use bias correction maybe to use a selection of GCMs where the assumption of bias non-stationarity holds.

  7. The extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, J. O. S.; Kendall, J.-M.; Collier, J. S.; Rümpker, G.

    2013-11-01

    The granitic islands of the Seychelles Plateau have long been recognised to overlie continental crust, isolated from Madagascar and India during the formation of the Indian Ocean. However, to date the extent of continental crust beneath the Seychelles region remains unknown. This is particularly true beneath the Mascarene Basin between the Seychelles Plateau and Madagascar and beneath the Amirante Arc. Constraining the size and shape of the Seychelles continental fragment is needed for accurate plate reconstructions of the breakup of Gondwana and has implications for the processes of continental breakup in general. Here we present new estimates of crustal thickness and VP/VS from H-κ stacking of receiver functions from a year long deployment of seismic stations across the Seychelles covering the topographic plateau, the Amirante Ridge and the northern Mascarene Basin. These results, combined with gravity modelling of historical ship track data, confirm that continental crust is present beneath the Seychelles Plateau. This is ˜30-33 km thick, but with a relatively high velocity lower crustal layer. This layer thins southwards from ˜10 km to ˜1 km over a distance of ˜50 km, which is consistent with the Seychelles being at the edge of the Deccan plume prior to its separation from India. In contrast, the majority of the Seychelles Islands away from the topographic plateau show no direct evidence for continental crust. The exception to this is the island of Desroche on the northern Amirante Ridge, where thicker low density crust, consistent with a block of continental material is present. We suggest that the northern Amirantes are likely continental in nature and that small fragments of continental material are a common feature of plume affected continental breakup.

  8. Migratory decisions in birds: Extent of genetic versus environmental control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonowski, M.S.; Conway, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Migration is one of the most spectacular of animal behaviors and is prevalent across a broad array of taxa. In birds, we know much about the physiological basis of how birds migrate, but less about the relative contribution of genetic versus environmental factors in controlling migratory tendency. To evaluate the extent to which migratory decisions are genetically determined, we examined whether individual western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) change their migratory tendency from one year to the next at two sites in southern Arizona. We also evaluated the heritability of migratory decisions by using logistic regression to examine the association between the migratory tendency of burrowing owl parents and their offspring. The probability of migrating decreased with age in both sexes and adult males were less migratory than females. Individual owls sometimes changed their migratory tendency from one year to the next, but changes were one-directional: adults that were residents during winter 2004-2005 remained residents the following winter, but 47% of adults that were migrants in winter 2004-2005 became residents the following winter. We found no evidence for an association between the migratory tendency of hatch-year owls and their male or female parents. Migratory tendency of hatch-year owls did not differ between years, study sites or sexes or vary by hatching date. Experimental provision of supplemental food did not affect these relationships. All of our results suggest that heritability of migratory tendency in burrowing owls is low, and that intraspecific variation in migratory tendency is likely due to: (1) environmental factors, or (2) a combination of environmental factors and non-additive genetic variation. The fact that an individual's migratory tendency can change across years implies that widespread anthropogenic changes (i.e., climate change or changes in land use) could potentially cause widespread changes in the migratory tendency of

  9. Rate and extent of aqueous perchlorate removal by iron surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Angela M; De Leon, Corinne H; Young, Thomas M

    2003-07-15

    The rate and extent of perchlorate reduction on several types of iron metal was studied in batch and column reactors. Mass balances performed on the batch experiments indicate that perchlorate is initially sorbed to the iron surface, followed by a reduction to chloride. Perchlorate removal was proportional to the iron dosage in the batch reactors, with up to 66% removal in 336 h in the highest dosage system (1.25 g mL(-1)). Surface-normalized reaction rates among three commercial sources of iron filings were similar for acid-washed samples. The most significant perchlorate removal occurred in solutions with slightly acidic or near-neutral initial pH values. Surface mediation of the reaction is supported by the absence of reduction in batch experiments with soluble Fe2+ and also by the similarity in specific reaction rate constants (kSA) determined for three different iron types. Elevated soluble chloride concentrations significantly inhibited perchlorate reduction, and lower removal rates were observed for iron samples with higher amounts of background chloride contamination. Perchlorate reduction was not observed on electrolytic sources of iron or on a mixed-phase oxide (Fe3O4), suggesting that the reactive iron phase is neither pure zerovalent iron nor the mixed oxide alone. A mixed valence iron hydr(oxide) coating or a sorbed Fe2+ surface complex represent the most likely sites for the reaction. The observed reaction rates are too slow for immediate use in remediation system design, but the findings may provide a basis for future development of cost-effective abiotic perchlorate removal techniques.

  10. The extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanmy, Norah

    2017-09-01

    Online pharmacies sell medicine over the Internet and deliver them by mail. The main objective of this study is to explore the extent of use of online pharmacies in Saudi Arabia which will be useful for the scientific community and regulators. An Arabic survey questionnaire was developed for this study. The questionnaire was distributed via email and social media. Four sections were created to cover the objectives: experience with online shopping in general, demographics, awareness of the existence and customer experiences of buying medicine online, and reasons for buying/not buying medicine online. A total of 633 responses were collected. Around 69% (437) of them were female and the majority (256, 40.4%) was in the age range 26-40. Only 23.1% (146) were aware of the existence of online pharmacies where 2.7% (17) of them had bought a medicine over the Internet and 15 (88.2%) respondents out of the 17 was satisfied with the process. Lack of awareness of the availability of such services was the main reason for not buying medicines online. Many respondents (263, 42.7%) were willing to try an online pharmacy, although majorities (243, 45.9%) were unable to differentiate between legal and illegal online pharmacies. The largest categories of products respondents were willing to buy them online were nonprescription medicines and cosmetics. The popularity of purchasing medicines over the Internet is still low in Saudi Arabia. However, because the majority of respondents are willing to purchase medicines online, efforts should be made by the Saudi FDA to set regulations and monitor this activity.

  11. Intraoperative cell salvage in South Africa: Feasible, beneficial and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    More than one CS blood unit was available for transfusion in 66% of cases. No additional staff were required to operate the Cell Saver, which was successfully used by medical officers. Conclusions. This study showed that intraoperative CS use is feasible, has potential patient benefit by reducing blood bank blood ...

  12. HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility and options for ... is required to increase the rate of HIV testing and expand treatment services. ... 244(80%) of the HCWs had motivation or interest to be tested by themselves.

  13. Biological Feasibility of Measles Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in reducing global measles mortality has renewed interest in measles eradication. Three biological criteria are deemed important for disease eradication: (1) humans are the sole pathogen reservoir; (2) accurate diagnostic tests exist; and (3) an effective, practical intervention is available at reasonable cost. Interruption of transmission in large geographical areas for prolonged periods further supports the feasibility of eradication. Measles is thought by many experts to meet these criteria: no nonhuman reservoir is known to exist, accurate diagnostic tests are available, and attenuated measles vaccines are effective and immunogenic. Measles has been eliminated in large geographical areas, including the Americas. Measles eradication is biologically feasible. The challenges for measles eradication will be logistical, political, and financial. PMID:21666201

  14. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  15. Feasibility of Wind Energy Parks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Jose

    2000-01-01

    The paper discuss the feasibility of wind energy parks including aspects of supply and demand of energy, costs of generation and risks of investment associated. The paper introduce to the situation of wind energy in the word and specifically in Spain, describes the legal framework in promotion of renewables in Spain, the analysis of revenues and the risk of this business in the european market

  16. NTRE extended life feasibility assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of a feasibility analysis of a long life, reusable nuclear thermal rocket engine are presented in text and graph form. Two engine/reactor concepts are addressed: the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) design and the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) concept. Engine design, integration, reliability, and safety are addressed by various members of the NTRE team from Aerojet Propulsion Division, Energopool (Russia), and Babcock & Wilcox.

  17. Feasibility assessment, Lowell Hydroelectric Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility analysis for hydroelectric generating facilities on the Merrimack River at Lowell, Massachusetts. The projected facility would utilize the existing Pawtucket Dam and a portion of the existing Northern Canal. The project was examined for economic, engineering, and environmental viability, and the results are favorable. The owners intend to proceed to the next step of negotiating a firm power purchase agreement.

  18. What intent, whose intent and to what extent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, David; Minssen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    . The latter is commonly referred to as the knowledge requirement. The basic idea behind indirect infringement is that the patentee can already start legal action before his patent is actually infringed. It is thus potentially a powerful tool for patentees. In respect of the UK, it has been said...... that the indirect infringement rules extend the patent proprietor’s monopoly to cover the supply of means, relating to an essential element, for putting the invention into effect. Similarly, in Germany the instrument of indirect patent infringement has been described as containing the expansion of the protection...... patent infringement under German law is not easy to understand and its application causes problems in practice. One of the reasons why an indirect patent infringement could fail is because the knowledge requirement in an indirect patent infringement claim is not fulfilled. Why this is so, and also under...

  19. Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Miller

    2009-03-22

    This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

  20. Extent of Cropland and Related Soil Erosion Risk in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Karamage

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land conversion to cropland is one of the major causes of severe soil erosion in Africa. This study assesses the current cropland extent and the related soil erosion risk in Rwanda, a country that experienced the most rapid population growth and cropland expansion in Africa over the last decade. The land cover land use (LCLU map of Rwanda in 2015 was developed using Landsat-8 imagery. Based on the obtained LCLU map and the spatial datasets of precipitation, soil properties and elevation, the soil erosion rate of Rwanda was assessed at 30-m spatial resolution, using the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE model. According to the results, the mean soil erosion rate was 250 t·ha−1·a−1 over the entire country, with a total soil loss rate of approximately 595 million tons per year. The mean soil erosion rate over cropland, which occupied 56% of the national land area, was estimated at 421 t·ha−1·a−1 and was responsible for about 95% of the national soil loss. About 24% of the croplands in Rwanda had a soil erosion rate larger than 300 t·ha−1·a−1, indicating their unsuitability for cultivation. With a mean soil erosion rate of 1642 t·ha−1·a−1, these unsuitable croplands were responsible for 90% of the national soil loss. Most of the unsuitable croplands are distributed in the Congo Nile Ridge, Volcanic Range mountain areas in the west and the Buberuka highlands in the north, regions characterized by steep slopes (>30% and strong rainfall. Soil conservation practices, such as the terracing cultivation method, are paramount to preserve the soil. According to our assessment, terracing alone could reduce the mean cropland soil erosion rate and the national soil loss by 79% and 75%, respectively. After terracing, only a small proportion of 7.6% of the current croplands would still be exposed to extreme soil erosion with a rate >300 t·ha−1·a−1. These irremediable cropland areas should be returned to mountain forest to

  1. Evaluation of nature and extent of injuries during Dahihandi festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemade, P; Wade, R; Patwardhan, A R; Kale, S

    2012-01-01

    Injuries related to the Hindu festival of Dahihandi where a human pyramid is formed and a pot of money kept at a height is broken, celebrated in the state of Maharashtra, have seen a significant rise in the past few years. The human pyramid formed is multi-layered and carries with it a high risk of injury including mortality. To evaluate the nature, extent and influencing factors of injuries related to Dahihandi festival. We present a retrospective analysis of patients who presented in a tertiary care center with injuries during the Dahihandi festival in the year 2010. 124 patients' records were evaluated for timing of injury, height of the Dahihandi pyramid, position of the patient in the multi-layered pyramid, mode of pyramid collapse and mechanism of an injury. A binary regression logistic analysis for risk factors was done at 5% significance level. Univariate and multi-variate binary logistic regression of the risk factors for occurrence of a major or minor injury was done using Minitab™ version 16.0 at 5% significance. Out of 139 patients presented to the center, 15 were not involved directly in the formation of pyramid, rest 124 were included in the analysis. A majority of the patients were above 15 years of age [110 (83.6%)]. 46 (37.1%) patients suffered major injuries. There were 39 fractures, 3 cases of chest wall trauma with 10 cases of head injuries and 1 death. More than half of the patients [78 (56.1%)] were injured after 1800 hours. 73 (58.9%) injured participants were part of the pyramid constructed to reach the Dahihandi placed at 30 feet or more above the ground. 72 (51.8%) participants were part of the middle layers of the pyramid. Fall of a participant from upstream layers on the body was the main mechanism of injury, and majority [101 (81.5%)] of the patients suffered injury during descent phase of the pyramid. There is a considerable risk of serious, life-threatening injuries inherent to human pyramid formation and descent in the Dahihandi

  2. Geographic extent and variation of a coral reef trophic cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Muthiga, N A

    2016-07-01

    Trophic cascades caused by a reduction in predators of sea urchins have been reported in Indian Ocean and Caribbean coral reefs. Previous studies have been constrained by their site-specific nature and limited spatial replication, which has produced site and species-specific understanding that can potentially preclude larger community-organization nuances and generalizations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the extent and variability of the cascade community in response to fishing across ~23° of latitude and longitude in coral reefs in the southwestern Indian Ocean. The taxonomic composition of predators of sea urchins, the sea urchin community itself, and potential effects of changing grazer abundance on the calcifying benthic organisms were studied in 171 unique coral reef sites. We found that geography and habitat were less important than the predator-prey relationships. There were seven sea urchin community clusters that aligned with a gradient of declining fishable biomass and the abundance of a key predator, the orange-lined triggerfish (Balistapus undulatus). The orange-lined triggerfish dominated where sea urchin numbers and diversity were low but the relative abundance of wrasses and emperors increased where sea urchin numbers were high. Two-thirds of the study sites had high sea urchin biomass (>2,300 kg/ha) and could be dominated by four different sea urchin species, Echinothrix diadema, Diadema savignyi, D. setosum, and Echinometra mathaei, depending on the community of sea urchin predators, geographic location, and water depth. One-third of the sites had low sea urchin biomass and diversity and were typified by high fish biomass, predators of sea urchins, and herbivore abundance, representing lightly fished communities with generally higher cover of calcifying algae. Calcifying algal cover was associated with low urchin abundance where as noncalcifying fleshy algal cover was not clearly associated with herbivore abundance. Fishing of the orange

  3. Exploring an innovative watershed management approach: From feasibility to sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Said, A.; Sehlke, G.; Stevens, D.K.; Sorensen, D.; Walker, W.; Hardy, T.; Glover, T.

    2006-01-01

    Watershed management is dedicated to solving watershed problems on a sustainable basis. Managing watershed development on a sustainable basis usually entails a balance between the needs of humans and nature, both in the present and in the future. From a watershed or water resources development basis, these problems can be classified into five general categories: lack of water quantity, deterioration in water quality, ecological impacts, weak public participation, and weak economic value. The first three categories can be combined to make up physical sustainability while the last two categories can be defined as social and economic sustainability. Therefore, integrated watershed management should be designed to achieve physical sustainability utilizing, to the greatest extent possible, public participation in an economically viable manner. This study demonstrates an innovative approach using scientific, social, and motivational feasibilities that can be used to improve watershed management. Scientific feasibility is tied to the nature of environmental problems and the scientific means to solve them. Social feasibility is associated with public participation. Motivational feasibility is related to economic stimulation for the stakeholders to take actions. The ecological impacts, lack of water quantity and deterioration in water quality are problems that need scientific means in order to improve watershed health. However, the implementation of these means is typically not achievable without the right public participation. In addition, public participation is typically accelerated by economic motivation for the stakeholders to use the resources in a manner that improves watershed health. The Big Lost River in south-central Idaho has been used as an illustration for implementing scientific, social and motivational feasibilities and in a manner that can achieve sustainability relative to water resources management. However, the same approach can be used elsewhere after

  4. Exploring an innovative watershed management approach: From feasibility to sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said, A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Sehlke, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Stevens, D.K.; Sorensen, D.; Walker, W.; Hardy, T. [Civil and Environmental Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84321 (United States); Glover, T. [Economics Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84321 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    Watershed management is dedicated to solving watershed problems on a sustainable basis. Managing watershed development on a sustainable basis usually entails a balance between the needs of humans and nature, both in the present and in the future. From a watershed or water resources development basis, these problems can be classified into five general categories: lack of water quantity, deterioration in water quality, ecological impacts, weak public participation, and weak economic value. The first three categories can be combined to make up physical sustainability while the last two categories can be defined as social and economic sustainability. Therefore, integrated watershed management should be designed to achieve physical sustainability utilizing, to the greatest extent possible, public participation in an economically viable manner. This study demonstrates an innovative approach using scientific, social, and motivational feasibilities that can be used to improve watershed management. Scientific feasibility is tied to the nature of environmental problems and the scientific means to solve them. Social feasibility is associated with public participation. Motivational feasibility is related to economic stimulation for the stakeholders to take actions. The ecological impacts, lack of water quantity and deterioration in water quality are problems that need scientific means in order to improve watershed health. However, the implementation of these means is typically not achievable without the right public participation. In addition, public participation is typically accelerated by economic motivation for the stakeholders to use the resources in a manner that improves watershed health. The Big Lost River in south-central Idaho has been used as an illustration for implementing scientific, social and motivational feasibilities and in a manner that can achieve sustainability relative to water resources management. However, the same approach can be used elsewhere after

  5. A feasible DY conjugate gradient method for linear equality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Can

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a feasible conjugate gradient method for solving linear equality constrained optimization problem. The method is an extension of the Dai-Yuan conjugate gradient method proposed by Dai and Yuan to linear equality constrained optimization problem. It can be applied to solve large linear equality constrained problem due to lower storage requirement. An attractive property of the method is that the generated direction is always feasible and descent direction. Under mild conditions, the global convergence of the proposed method with exact line search is established. Numerical experiments are also given which show the efficiency of the method.

  6. What is the microscopic tumor extent beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Woo, Tony; Assaad, Dalal; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; McKenzie, David; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Breen, Dale; Mamedov, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the microscopic tumor extension beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers. Methods and Materials: A prospective, single arm, study. Preoperatively, a radiation oncologist outlined the boundary of a gross lesion, and drew 5-mm incremental marks in four directions from the delineated border. Under local anesthesia, the lesion was excised, and resection margins were assessed microscopically by frozen section. Once resection margins were clear, the microscopic tumor extent was calculated using the presurgical incremental markings as references. A potential relationship between the distance of microscopic tumor extension and other variables was analyzed. Results: A total of 71 lesions in 64 consecutive patients, selected for surgical excision with frozen-section-assisted assessment of resection margins, were accrued. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross lesion varied from 1 mm to 15 mm, with a mean of 5.2 mm. A margin of 10 mm was required to provide a 95% chance of obtaining clear resection margins. The microscopic tumor extent was positively correlated with the size of gross lesion, but not with other variables. Conclusions: The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross nonmelanoma skin cancer was variable, with a mean of 5.2 mm. Such information is critical for the proper radiation planning of skin cancer therapy

  7. What is the microscopic tumor extent beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Richard; Woo, Tony; Assaad, Dalal; Antonyshyn, Oleh; Barnes, Elizabeth A; McKenzie, David; Fialkov, Jeffrey; Breen, Dale; Mamedov, Alexander

    2005-07-15

    To quantify the microscopic tumor extension beyond clinically delineated gross tumor boundary in nonmelanoma skin cancers. A prospective, single arm, study. Preoperatively, a radiation oncologist outlined the boundary of a gross lesion, and drew 5-mm incremental marks in four directions from the delineated border. Under local anesthesia, the lesion was excised, and resection margins were assessed microscopically by frozen section. Once resection margins were clear, the microscopic tumor extent was calculated using the presurgical incremental markings as references. A potential relationship between the distance of microscopic tumor extension and other variables was analyzed. A total of 71 lesions in 64 consecutive patients, selected for surgical excision with frozen-section-assisted assessment of resection margins, were accrued. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross lesion varied from 1 mm to 15 mm, with a mean of 5.2 mm. A margin of 10 mm was required to provide a 95% chance of obtaining clear resection margins. The microscopic tumor extent was positively correlated with the size of gross lesion, but not with other variables. The distance of microscopic tumor extension beyond a gross nonmelanoma skin cancer was variable, with a mean of 5.2 mm. Such information is critical for the proper radiation planning of skin cancer therapy.

  8. Food price seasonality in Africa: Measurement and extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Christopher L; Christiaensen, Luc; Kaminski, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    Everyone knows about seasonality. But what exactly do we know? This study systematically measures seasonal price gaps at 193 markets for 13 food commodities in seven African countries. It shows that the commonly used dummy variable or moving average deviation methods to estimate the seasonal gap can yield substantial upward bias. This can be partially circumvented using trigonometric and sawtooth models, which are more parsimonious. Among staple crops, seasonality is highest for maize (33 percent on average) and lowest for rice (16½ percent). This is two and a half to three times larger than in the international reference markets. Seasonality varies substantially across market places but maize is the only crop in which there are important systematic country effects. Malawi, where maize is the main staple, emerges as exhibiting the most acute seasonal differences. Reaching the Sustainable Development Goal of Zero Hunger requires renewed policy attention to seasonality in food prices and consumption.

  9. DPC loading feasibility study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafoe, R.E.; Lopez, D.A.; Williams, K.L.

    1997-11-01

    Disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a ''Settlement Agreement'' between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This study investigates the feasibility of using the Dry Transfer Cell facility to package waste into Dual Purpose Canisters for interim storage at the adjacent Dry Storage System comprised of an interim storage pad with NUHOMS reg-sign storage modules. The wastes would then be road-ready for eventual disposal in a permanent repository. The operating period for these activities is expected to be from 2015 to 2035

  10. Coal pre-feasibility assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    It examines the feasibility of using coal from the Delbi-Moya reserve for domestic or institutional cooking, industrial process heating and electricity generation. It indicates as coal can be mined from the Delbi reserve at a cost of EB110/tonne, can be processed for EB400/tonne and transported to Addis Ababa for 150/tonne. The wholesale price of coal briquettes in Addis Ababa would be EB750/tonne. Domestic users can save EB475 per year by switching from charcoal to coal briquettes. And for a 50MW plant annual saving would be of the order of EB30 million per year. 11 tab. 4 figs. 6 appendex

  11. Collaborative, Rapid Mapping of Water Extents During Hurricane Harvey Using Optical and Radar Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, R.; Jones, M.; Herndon, K. E.; Bell, J. R.; Anderson, E. R.; Markert, K. N.; Molthan, A.; Adams, E. C.; Shultz, L.; Cherrington, E. A.; Flores, A.; Lucey, R.; Munroe, T.; Layne, G.; Pulla, S. T.; Weigel, A. M.; Tondapu, G.

    2017-12-01

    On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall between Port Aransas and Port O'Connor, Texas, bringing with it unprecedented amounts of rainfall and flooding. In times of natural disasters of this nature, emergency responders require timely and accurate information about the hazard in order to assess and plan for disaster response. Due to the extreme flooding impacts associated with Hurricane Harvey, delineations of water extent were crucial to inform resource deployment. Through the USGS's Hazards Data Distribution System, government and commercial vendors were able to acquire and distribute various satellite imagery to analysts to create value-added products that can be used by these emergency responders. Rapid-response water extent maps were created through a collaborative multi-organization and multi-sensor approach. One team of researchers created Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) water extent maps using modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA. This group used backscatter images, pre-processed by the Alaska Satellite Facility's Hybrid Pluggable Processing Pipeline (HyP3), to identify and apply a threshold to identify water in the image. Quality control was conducted by manually examining the image and correcting for potential errors. Another group of researchers and graduate student volunteers derived water masks from high resolution DigitalGlobe and SPOT images. Through a system of standardized image processing, quality control measures, and communication channels the team provided timely and fairly accurate water extent maps to support a larger NASA Disasters Program response. The optical imagery was processed through a combination of various band thresholds by using Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Modified Normalized Water Index (MNDWI), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and cloud masking. Several aspects of the pre-processing and image access were run on internal servers to expedite the provision of images to

  12. Collaborative, Rapid Mapping of Water Extents During Hurricane Harvey Using Optical and Radar Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, Rebekke; Jones, Madeline; Herndon, Kelsey; Schultz, Lori; Bell, Jordan; Anderson, Eric; Markert, Kel; Molthan, Andrew; Adams, Emily; Cherrington, Emil; hide

    2017-01-01

    On August 25, 2017, Hurricane Harvey made landfall between Port Aransas and Port O'Connor, Texas, bringing with it unprecedented amounts of rainfall and record flooding. In times of natural disasters of this nature, emergency responders require timely and accurate information about the hazard in order to assess and plan for disaster response. Due to the extreme flooding impacts associated with Hurricane Harvey, delineations of water extent were crucial to inform resource deployment. Through the USGS's Hazards Data Distribution System, government and commercial vendors were able to acquire and distribute various satellite imagery to analysts to create value-added products that can be used by these emergency responders. Rapid-response water extent maps were created through a collaborative multi-organization and multi-sensor approach. One team of researchers created Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) water extent maps using modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2017), processed by ESA. This group used backscatter images, pre-processed by the Alaska Satellite Facility's Hybrid Pluggable Processing Pipeline (HyP3), to identify and apply a threshold to identify water in the image. Quality control was conducted by manually examining the image and correcting for potential errors. Another group of researchers and graduate student volunteers derived water masks from high resolution DigitalGlobe and SPOT images. Through a system of standardized image processing, quality control measures, and communication channels the team provided timely and fairly accurate water extent maps to support a larger NASA Disasters Program response. The optical imagery was processed through a combination of various band thresholds and by using Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), Modified Normalized Water Index (MNDWI), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and cloud masking. Several aspects of the pre-processing and image access were run on internal servers to expedite the provision of

  13. Harnessing ISO/IEC 12207 to Examine the Extent of SPI Activity in an Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Paul; O'Connor, Rory

    The quality of the software development process directly affects the quality of the software product. To be successful, software development organisations must respond to changes in technology and business circumstances, and therefore software process improvement (SPI) is required. SPI activity relates to any modification that is performed to the software process in order to improve an aspect of the process. Although multiple process assessments could be employed to examine SPI activity, they present an inefficient tool for such an examination. This paper presents an overview of a new survey-based resource that utilises the process reference model in ISO/IEC 12207 in order to expressly and directly determine the level of SPI activity in a software development organisation. This survey instrument can be used by practitioners, auditors and researchers who are interested in determining the extent of SPI activity in an organisation.

  14. TO WHAT EXTENT DOES THE DEGREE OF MEANINGFUL MODEL COMPLEXITY DEPEND ON OBSERVATION DATA?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Philip; Doherty, John; Christensen, Steen

    reduction of predictive uncertainty. This gives raise to interesting questions concerning the level of complexity required. The capacity of a recharge model to reduce the uncertainty of future groundwater level predictions does not rely on accurate estimation of all hydraulic properties affecting......We systematically quantify to what extent vadose zone parameters can be constrained by including different types of observation data in the calibration process. Observation data considered are hydraulic heads, soil saturation, evaporation and transpiration. Besides assessing parameter uncertainty....... The results show that observations of the hydraulic head allow a significant reduction of predictive uncertainty. However, this it is not because any parameter is well estimated. Rather, this reduction is acquired knowledge that is applicable to combinations of parameters that contribute to a significant...

  15. Field measurement of albedo for limited extent test surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailor, David J. [Portland State University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, P.O. Box 751-ME, Portland, OR 97207 (United States); Resh, Kyle; Segura, Del [Tulane University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 400 Lindy Boggs Center, New Orleans, LA 70118 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    A new method is introduced for field measurement of surface albedo. This method consists of the use of a cylindrical shade ring made of opaque fabric with a known (low) albedo placed over a test surface. The albedo measurement is accomplished using two small pyranometers situated so that the downward-facing pyranometer receives radiation only from the test surface and the shade ring. The upward-facing pyranometer simultaneously records the incoming solar radiation. The radiation received by the downward-facing pyramometer is a combination of reflected radiation from shaded and unshaded portions of these two surfaces, requiring detailed accounting of the resulting view factor geometries. The method presented here improves upon past approaches by allowing for smaller sample sizes, minimizing errors associated with reflective properties of the surroundings, and allowing for accurate measurements even under partially cloudy skies. In addition to these methodological improvements we introduce an approach for estimating the uncertainty in the resulting albedo measurements. Results from field measurements are presented to validate the measurement protocol, and to compare its accuracy with the accuracy of a published standard. (author)

  16. [Autonomy: to what extent is the concept relevant in psychiatry?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, F A

    2012-01-01

    Autonomy is an important concept in psychiatry, but because it is a somewhat abstract and ambiguous notion, it is not applicable in its entirety in a psychiatric context. This becomes obvious in situations where patients are receiving long term care and treatment. To modify the concept of autonomy in such a way that it acquires an extra dimension that renders it applicable to daily psychiatric practice. The literature was reviewed in order to find articles that reveal the tensions that arise between autonomy and dependence in psychiatry and that reflect the human characteristics that are concealed behind the modern concepts of autonomy, freedom and respect for autonomy. Concepts such as person, identity, acknowledgement, dialogical ethics and life histories are used as an addition to the concepts of autonomy of Kant and Mill. A phenomenological and a context sensitive conception of autonomy is needed within the perspective of dialogical ethics. A dialogical perspective requires from psychiatric professionals a susceptibility for what the patient as a human being really has to say. On the basis of a dialogue where there is space and attention for life histories, backgrounds and the potentials of patients, a new perspective can be developed that is shared by the persons involved. In psychiatry, statements about real autonomy and genuine respect for autonomy are only truly meaningful within the context of doctors, nurses and patients. A hermeneutic approach to patients which involves dialogue creates new opportunities in the field of staff-patient relations.

  17. Intraoperative MRI to control the extent of brain tumor surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauth, M.; Sartor, K.; Wirtz, C.R.; Tronnier, V.M.; Staubert, A.; Kunze, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intraoperative MRI definitely showed residual tumor in 6 of the 18 patients and resulted in ambiguous findings in 3 patients. In 7 patients surgery was continued. Early postoperative MRI showed residual tumor in 3 patients and resulted in uncertain findings in 2 patients. The rate of patients in whom complete removal of enhancing tumor could be achieved was 50% at the time of the intraoperative MR examination and 72% at the time of the early postoperative MR control. The difference in proportion of patients with 'complete tumor removal' between the groups who had been operated on using neuronavigation (NN) and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) and those who had been operated on using only modern neurosurgical techniques except NN and ioMRI was statistically highly significant (Fisher exact test; P=0.008). Four different types of surgically induced contrast enhancement were observed. These phenomena carry different confounding potentials with residual tumor. Conclusion: Our preliminary experience with intraoperative MRI in patients with enhancing intraaxial tumors is encouraging. Combined use of neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI was able to increase the proportion of patients in whom complete removal of the enhancing parts of the tumor was achieved. Surgically induced enhancement requires careful analysis of the intraoperative MRI in order not to confuse it with residual tumor. (orig.) [de

  18. PV solar system feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashhab, Moh’d Sami S.; Kaylani, Hazem; Abdallah, Abdallah

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► This research studies the feasibility of PV solar systems. ► The aim is to develop the theory and application of a hybrid system. ► Relevant research topics are reviewed and some of them are discussed in details. ► A prototype of the PV solar system is designed and built. - Abstract: This research studies the feasibility of PV solar systems and aims at developing the theory and application of a hybrid system that utilizes PV solar system and another supporting source of energy to provide affordable heating and air conditioning. Relevant research topics are reviewed and some of them are discussed in details. Solar heating and air conditioning research and technology exist in many developed countries. To date, the used solar energy has been proved to be inefficient. Solar energy is an abundant source of energy in Jordan and the Middle East; with increasing prices of oil this source is becoming more attractive alternative. A good candidate for the other system is absorption. The overall system is designed such that it utilizes solar energy as a main source. When the solar energy becomes insufficient, electricity or diesel source kicks in. A prototype of the PV solar system that operates an air conditioning unit is built and proper measurements are collected through a data logging system. The measured data are plotted and discussed, and conclusions regarding the system performance are extracted.

  19. A negative bioventing feasibility test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Greene, D.W.; Herbes, S.E.; Walzel, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    A bioventing feasibility test was conducted at a hydrocarbon fuel spill site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The soils at this site are generally of low air permeability and are representative of the clayey soils encountered at several Department of Energy sites and throughout the southeastern United States. The tests included an in situ air permeability test and in situ respiration tests at three well where highest soil contamination was measured. The in situ respiration tests showed that there was the potential for significant biodegradation in the soil with adequate oxygenation. The in situ permeability tests indicated that the majority of flow was trough fractures, rather than through the bulk soils. A helium tracer test verified that injected gas flowed directly to the surface through a small number of fractures, with no flow reaching the monitoring wells. These results indicate that oxygen transport to the bulk soils would be severely limited by diffusion, such that bioventing was deemed not feasible for this site. In light of these results, the importance of testing for fracture flow in soils of lower permeability is stressed -- whether the technology is bioventing or conventional soil venting

  20. SYNCHEM feasibility report: Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Several Czech and US companies have entered into a development agreement for the purposes of determining the technical and economic feasibility and overall financeability of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) regional energy facility to be located adjacent to the Chemopetrol refinery in Litvinov, Czech Republic. The Project would use a feedstock comprised of coal supplied by Doly a upravny Komorany s.p. (DUK) coal mining company and mined from the Most/Litvinov area together with high sulfur residual oils from the Chemopetrol refinery. When gasified together with oxygen from an Air Products air separation plant, and based on an average yearly consumption of 2,100K metric tons per year of coal (as delivered) and 630K tonnes per year of oil, approximately 11 million normal cubic meters per day of syngas will be produced. At its current projected design capacity, when combusted in two General Electric advanced technology Frame 9FA gas turbines, the Project will produce approximately 690MW of electric power; 250 metric tons/hour of steam for process; and 135 thermal equivalent MW of district heat. The Feasibility Phase efforts described in this report indicate the real possibility for a successful and profitable IGCC Project for the Czech Republic. It is therefore incumbent upon all the Project Participants to review and evaluate the information contained herein such that a go/no-go decision can be reached by early next year.

  1. Hualapai Wind Project Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Kevin [Hualapai Tribe; Randall, Mark [Daystar Consulting; Isham, Tom [Power Engineers; Horna, Marion J [MJH Power Consulting LLC; Koronkiewicz, T [SWCA Environmental, Inc.; Simon, Rich [V-Bar, LLC; Matthew, Rojas [Squire Sanders Dempsey; MacCourt, Doug C. [Ater Wynne, LLP; Burpo, Rob [First American Financial Advisors, Inc.

    2012-12-20

    The Hualapai Department of Planning and Economic Development, with funding assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy, Tribal Energy Program, with the aid of six consultants has completed the four key prerequisites as follows: 1. Identify the site area for development and its suitability for construction. 2. Determine the wind resource potential for the identified site area. 3. Determine the electrical transmission and interconnection feasibility to get the electrical power produced to the marketplace. 4. Complete an initial permitting and environmental assessment to determine the feasibility for getting the project permitted. Those studies indicated a suitable wind resource and favorable conditions for permitting and construction. The permitting and environmental study did not reveal any fatal flaws. A review of the best power sale opportunities indicate southern California has the highest potential for obtaining a PPA that may make the project viable. Based on these results, the recommendation is for the Hualapai Tribal Nation to move forward with attracting a qualified wind developer to work with the Tribe to move the project into the second phase - determining the reality factors for developing a wind project. a qualified developer will bid to a utility or negotiate a PPA to make the project viable for financing.

  2. Feasibility study on the interconnection of traction and other power line infrastructures; Machbarkeitsstudie zur Verknuepfung von Bahn- und Energieleitungsinfrastrukturen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Lutz [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energieversorgung und Hochspannungstechnik; Stephan, Arnd [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur Elektrische Bahnen; Weyer, Hartmut [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Deutsches und Internationales Berg- und Energierecht

    2013-06-15

    It was the purpose of the feasibility study to find out if and to what extent the existing transmission route potentials of the 16.7 Hz traction power network (DB Energie GmbH) can be used for the installation of new transmission lines of the standard 50 Hz power supply system. Of importance is here the question if and in which way the integration of new three-phase or DC overhead lines or cable systems in existing traction power routes is technically feasible, and to what extent such interconnection offers a potential for the acceleration of the planning and approval processes. (orig.)

  3. An essay on the extent and significance of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the extent of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period. It is demonstrated that the athletic culture had a surprising extent, and the article goes on the discuss the historical significance of this fact.......This article discusses the extent of the Greek athletic culture in the classical period. It is demonstrated that the athletic culture had a surprising extent, and the article goes on the discuss the historical significance of this fact....

  4. Earthquake Loss Scenarios: Warnings about the Extent of Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, M.; Tolis, S.; Rosset, P.

    2016-12-01

    It is imperative that losses expected due to future earthquakes be estimated. Officials and the public need to be aware of what disaster is likely in store for them in order to reduce the fatalities and efficiently help the injured. Scenarios for earthquake parameters can be constructed to a reasonable accuracy in highly active earthquake belts, based on knowledge of seismotectonics and history. Because of the inherent uncertainties of loss estimates however, it would be desirable that more than one group calculate an estimate for the same area. By discussing these estimates, one may find a consensus of the range of the potential disasters and persuade officials and residents of the reality of the earthquake threat. To model a scenario and estimate earthquake losses requires data sets that are sufficiently accurate of the number of people present, the built environment, and if possible the transmission of seismic waves. As examples we use loss estimates for possible repeats of historic earthquakes in Greece that occurred between -464 and 700. We model future large Greek earthquakes as having M6.8 and rupture lengths of 60 km. In four locations where historic earthquakes with serious losses have occurred, we estimate that 1,000 to 1,500 people might perish, with an additional factor of four people injured. Defining the area of influence of these earthquakes as that with shaking intensities larger and equal to V, we estimate that 1.0 to 2.2 million people in about 2,000 settlements may be affected. We calibrate the QLARM tool for calculating intensities and losses in Greece, using the M6, 1999 Athens earthquake and matching the isoseismal information for six earthquakes, which occurred in Greece during the last 140 years. Comparing fatality numbers that would occur theoretically today with the numbers reported, and correcting for the increase in population, we estimate that the improvement of the building stock has reduced the mortality and injury rate in Greek

  5. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski

  6. A Front-End Readout Architecture for the CMS Barrel Muon Detector: A Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, P.; Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Marin, J.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Pablos, J.L. de; Romero, L.; Willmot, C.

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study of a possible architecture for the CMS barrel muon detector readout electronics is presented. some aspects of system reliability are discussed. Values for the required FIFO's to store data during the first level trigger latency are given

  7. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  8. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.D.; Berry, S.M.; Galloway, K.J.; Langenwalter, T.A.; Lopez, D.A.; Noakes, C.M.; Peterson, H.K.; Pope, M.I.; Turk, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase

  9. 9 CFR 381.76 - Post-mortem inspection, when required; extent; traditional, Streamlined Inspection System (SIS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS... (NELS) Inspection System, both of which shall be used only for broilers and cornish game hens; the New... Inspection. (i) The SIS shall be used only for broilers and cornish game hens if: (a) The Administrator...

  10. Feasibility Study on HYSOL CSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Skytte, Klaus; Pérez, Cristian Hernán Cabrera

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) plants utilize thermal conversion of direct solar irradiation. A trough or tower configuration focuses solar radiation and heats up oil or molten salt that subsequently in high temperature heat exchangers generate steam for power generation. High temperature molten...... salt can be stored and the stored heat can thus increase the load factor and the usability for a CSP plant, e.g. to cover evening peak demand. In the HYSOL concept (HYbrid SOLar) such configuration is extended further to include a gas turbine fuelled by upgraded biogas or natural gas. The optimised...... integrated HYSOL concept, therefore, becomes a fully dispatchable (offering firm power) and fully renewable energy source (RES) based power supply alternative, offering CO2-free electricity in regions with sufficient solar resources. The economic feasibility of HYSOL configurations is addressed in this paper...

  11. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory's (ANL's) scientific staff members were very active in R ampersand D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R ampersand D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately

  12. IPNS upgrade: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Many of Argonne National Laboratory`s (ANL`s) scientific staff members were very active in R&D work related to accelerator-based spoliation sources in the 1970s and early 1980s. In 1984, the Seitz/Eastman Panel of the National Academy of Sciences reviewed U.S. materials science research facilities. One of the recommendations of this panel was that the United States build a reactor-based steady-state source, the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS), at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Subsequently, R&D activities related to the design of an accelerator-based source assumed a lower priority. The resumption of pulsed-source studies in this country started simultaneously with design activities in Europe aimed at the European Spallation Source (ESS). The European Community funded a workshop in September 1991 to define the parameters of the ESS. Participants in this workshop included both accelerator builders and neutron source users. A consortium of European countries has proposed to build a 5-MW pulsed source, and a feasibility study is currently under way. Soon after the birth of the ESS, a small group at ANL set about bringing themselves up to date on pulsed-source information since 1984 and studied the feasibility of upgrading ANL`s Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) to 1 MW by means of a rapidly cycling synchrotron that could be housed, along with its support facilities, in existing buildings. In early 1993, the Kohn panel recommended that (1) design and construction of the ANS should be completed according to the proposed project schedule and (2) development of competitive proposals for cost-effective design and construction of a 1-MW pulsed spallation source should be authorized immediately.

  13. Feasibility of lunar Helium-3 mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschneider, Andreas; Van Overstraeten, Dmitry; Van der Reijnst, Roy; Van Hoorn, Niels; Lamers, Marvin; Hubert, Laurent; Dijk, Bert; Blangé, Joey; Hogeveen, Joel; De Boer, Lennaert; Noomen, Ron

    With fossil fuels running out and global energy demand increasing, the need for alternative energy sources is apparent. Nuclear fusion using Helium-3 may be a solution. Helium-3 is a rare isotope on Earth, but it is abundant on the Moon. Throughout the space community lunar Helium-3 is often cited as a major reason to return to the Moon. Despite the potential of lunar Helium-3 mining, little research has been conducted on a full end-to-end mission. This abstract presents the results of a feasibility study conducted by students from Delft University of Technology. The goal of the study was to assess whether a continuous end-to-end mission to mine Helium-3 on the Moon and return it to Earth is a viable option for the future energy market. The set requirements for the representative end-to-end mission were to provide 10% of the global energy demand in the year 2040. The mission elements have been selected with multiple trade-offs among both conservative and novel concepts. A mission architecture with multiple decoupled elements for each transportation segment (LEO, transfer, lunar surface) was found to be the best option. It was found that the most critical element is the lunar mining operation itself. To supply 10% of the global energy demand in 2040, 200 tons of Helium-3 would be required per year. The resulting regolith mining rate would be 630 tons per second, based on an optimistic concentration of 20 ppb Helium-3 in lunar regolith. Between 1,700 to 2,000 Helium-3 mining vehicles would be required, if using University of Wisconsin’s Mark III miner. The required heating power, if mining both day and night, would add up to 39 GW. The resulting power system mass for the lunar operations would be in the order of 60,000 to 200,000 tons. A fleet of three lunar ascent/descent vehicles and 22 continuous-thrust vehicles for orbit transfer would be required. The costs of the mission elements have been spread out over expected lifetimes. The resulting profits from Helium

  14. Focused feasibility study of engineered barriers for waste management units in the 200 areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Hanford Site in Washington State is organized into numerically designated operational areas consisting of the 100, 200, 300, 400, 600, and 1100 Areas. In November 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) included the 200 Areas (as well as the 100, 300, and 1,100 Areas) of the Hanford Site on the National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Inclusion on the NPL initiates the remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) process to characterize the nature and extent of contamination, assess risks to human health and the environment, and select remedial actions. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was developed and signed by representatives from the EPA, Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and DOE in May 1989 to provide a framework to implement and integrate cleanup activities. The scope of the agreement covers CERCLA past-practice, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) past-practice, and RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) activities on the Hanford Site. The 1991 revision to the Tri-Party Agreement required that an aggregate area approach be implemented in the 200 Areas based on the Hanford Site Past-Practice Strategy (HPPS) and established a milestone (M-27-00) to complete 10 Aggregate Area Management Study (AAMS) Reports in 1992

  15. Feasibility study for remedial action at the chemical plant area of the Weldon Spring Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The Weldon Spring site is radioactively and chemically contaminated at levels that exceed certain standards and guidelines for protecting human health and the environment. The ongoing site characterization and environmental monitoring programs provide information on the nature and extent of contamination, including information for off-site areas to which contaminants have migrated or could migrate in the future. Although humans and biota are not adversely impacted by site contaminants at this time, the purpose of DOE's remedial action program is to preclude the potential for such impacts in the future by implementing long-term environmental restoration and waste management decisions. The DOE is addressing long-term management of the Weldon Spring site through an integrated environmental decision-making process. Supporting information for the feasibility study is provided in Appendixes A through J. This information addresses scoping (Appendix A), engineering technologies (Appendix B), potential health and environmental impacts (Appendixes C, D, E, F, H and I), regulatory requirements (Appendix G), and letters of consultation received from the various agencies contacted (Appendix J). Additional engineering information is presented in supporting technical reports

  16. Are biofuels a feasible option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldemberg, Jose; Guardabassi, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Recently a number of objections have been raised against the use of ethanol produced from agricultural products such as maize, sugarcane, wheat or sugar beets as a replacement for gasoline, despite some of their advantages such as being cleaner and to some extent renewable. We address these objections in this paper. Topics discussed include the 'corn connection' (which was theorized to be a cause of deforestation in the Amazonia), the rise of food prices due to ethanol production and the real possibilities of ethanol in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. It has been shown that such concerns are grossly exaggerated and that ethanol from sugarcane, as produced in Brazil, is the preferred option for the production of fuel not only in terms of cost but also as a favourable energy balance. Finally, the possibility of expanding ethanol production to other sugar-producing countries is also discussed

  17. Estimating the location and spatial extent of a covert anthrax release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Legrand

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly identifying the features of a covert release of an agent such as anthrax could help to inform the planning of public health mitigation strategies. Previous studies have sought to estimate the time and size of a bioterror attack based on the symptomatic onset dates of early cases. We extend the scope of these methods by proposing a method for characterizing the time, strength, and also the location of an aerosolized pathogen release. A back-calculation method is developed allowing the characterization of the release based on the data on the first few observed cases of the subsequent outbreak, meteorological data, population densities, and data on population travel patterns. We evaluate this method on small simulated anthrax outbreaks (about 25-35 cases and show that it could date and localize a release after a few cases have been observed, although misspecifications of the spore dispersion model, or the within-host dynamics model, on which the method relies can bias the estimates. Our method could also provide an estimate of the outbreak's geographical extent and, as a consequence, could help to identify populations at risk and, therefore, requiring prophylactic treatment. Our analysis demonstrates that while estimates based on the first ten or 15 observed cases were more accurate and less sensitive to model misspecifications than those based on five cases, overall mortality is minimized by targeting prophylactic treatment early on the basis of estimates made using data on the first five cases. The method we propose could provide early estimates of the time, strength, and location of an aerosolized anthrax release and the geographical extent of the subsequent outbreak. In addition, estimates of release features could be used to parameterize more detailed models allowing the simulation of control strategies and intervention logistics.

  18. A systematic review of the extent and measurement of healthcare provider racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Yin; Truong, Mandy; Priest, Naomi

    2014-02-01

    Although considered a key driver of racial disparities in healthcare, relatively little is known about the extent of interpersonal racism perpetrated by healthcare providers, nor is there a good understanding of how best to measure such racism. This paper reviews worldwide evidence (from 1995 onwards) for racism among healthcare providers; as well as comparing existing measurement approaches to emerging best practice, it focuses on the assessment of interpersonal racism, rather than internalized or systemic/institutional racism. The following databases and electronic journal collections were searched for articles published between 1995 and 2012: Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, Sociological Abstracts. Included studies were published empirical studies of any design measuring and/or reporting on healthcare provider racism in the English language. Data on study design and objectives; method of measurement, constructs measured, type of tool; study population and healthcare setting; country and language of study; and study outcomes were extracted from each study. The 37 studies included in this review were almost solely conducted in the U.S. and with physicians. Statistically significant evidence of racist beliefs, emotions or practices among healthcare providers in relation to minority groups was evident in 26 of these studies. Although a number of measurement approaches were utilized, a limited range of constructs was assessed. Despite burgeoning interest in racism as a contributor to racial disparities in healthcare, we still know little about the extent of healthcare provider racism or how best to measure it. Studies using more sophisticated approaches to assess healthcare provider racism are required to inform interventions aimed at reducing racial disparities in health.

  19. Methodology study: Co-generation feasibility at sawmills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Host, J.

    1991-01-01

    This report discussed the various factors that should be studied and evaluated before establishing a cogeneration plant. The results of three case studies and a survey of energy needs in smaller and medium size sawmills are also presented. In general, cogeneration is feasible for supplying electric energy required for processing logs using fuelbark and other residues from the manufacturing process. A rebuilt turbine-generator unit is an initial cost saving alternative that is advantageous throughout the life of the operation

  20. Polarimetric neutron spin echo: Feasibility and first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, C. [Hahn-Meitner Institut Berlin, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: pappas@hmi.de; Lelievre-Berna, E. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Bentley, P. [Hahn-Meitner Institut Berlin, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Bourgeat-Lami, E. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Moskvin, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut Berlin, Glienickerstr. 100, 14109 Berlin (Germany); PNPI, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation); Thomas, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6, Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble (France); Grigoriev, S.; Dyadkin, V. [PNPI, 188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-21

    Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) spectroscopy uses polarized neutrons and accordingly polarization analysis is an intrinsic feature of NSE. However, the multifaceted dynamics of antiferromagnets and helimagnets require more than the classical NSE set-up. Here we present the feasibility test and first results of a new and powerful technique: Polarimetric NSE, obtained by combining the wide angle NSE spectrometer SPAN, developed at HMI with the zero-field polarimeter Cryopad developed at ILL.

  1. Polarimetric neutron spin echo: Feasibility and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappas, C.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Bentley, P.; Bourgeat-Lami, E.; Moskvin, E.; Thomas, M.; Grigoriev, S.; Dyadkin, V.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron Spin Echo (NSE) spectroscopy uses polarized neutrons and accordingly polarization analysis is an intrinsic feature of NSE. However, the multifaceted dynamics of antiferromagnets and helimagnets require more than the classical NSE set-up. Here we present the feasibility test and first results of a new and powerful technique: Polarimetric NSE, obtained by combining the wide angle NSE spectrometer SPAN, developed at HMI with the zero-field polarimeter Cryopad developed at ILL

  2. An evolution friendly modular architecture to produce feasible robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faina, Andres; Bellas, Francisco; Orjales, Felix

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of a modular robotic architecture in order to produce feasible robots through evolution. To this end, the main requirements the architecture must fulfill are analyzed and a top-down methodology is employed to obtain the different types of modules that make it up...... is described and different experiments provide an indication of how versatile the architecture is for evolving robot morphologies and control for specific tasks and how easy it is to build them....

  3. Feasibility of a Mound-designed transportable calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duff, M.F.; Fellers, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of operating a Mound twin resistance bridge calorimeter outside a temperature-controlled water bath was demonstrated. An existing calorimeter was retrofit with two additional jackets through which water was transferred from an external reservoir. Comparison of test results collected before and after the retrofit indicated that the calorimeter performance was not degraded by this modification. Similarly designed calorimeters have potential applications in laboratories where equipment space is limited for inspectors who are required to transport their assay instrumentation

  4. Economic Feasibility Analysis Report. Strategic Mobility 21

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mallon, Lawrence G; Monaco, Kristen; Fetty, George R

    2007-01-01

    .... This multi-disciplinary analysis provides an objective examination of the economic and operational feasibility of a shuttle train intermodal rail operation under various scenarios connecting the San...

  5. Full system decontamination feasibility studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denault, R.P.; LeSurf, J.E.; Walschot, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Many chemical decontaminations have been performed on subsystems in light water reactors (BWRs and PWRs) but none on the full system (including the fuel) of large, (>500 MWe) investor owned reactors. Full system decontaminations on pressure-tubed reactors have been shown to facilitate maintenance, inspection, repair and replacement of reactor components. Further advantages are increased reactor availability and plant life extension. A conceptual study has been performed for EPRI (for PWRs) and Commonwealth Edison Co (for BWRs) into the applicability and cost benefit of full system decontaminations (FSD). The joint study showed that FSDs in both PWRs and BWRs, with or without the fuel included in the decontamination, are feasible and cost beneficial provided a large amount of work is to be done following the decontamination. The large amounts of radioactive waste generated can be managed using current technologies. Considerable improvements in waste handling, and consequent cost savings, can be obtained if new techniques which are now reaching commercial application are used. (author)

  6. MRS transfer facility feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jowdy, A.K.; Smith, R.I.

    1990-12-01

    Under contract to the US Department of Energy, Parsons was requested to evaluate the feasibility of building a simple hot cell (waste handling) transfer facility at the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) site to facilitate acceptance of spent fuel into the Federal Waste Management System starting in early 1998. The Transfer Facility was intended to provide a receiving and transfer to storage capability at a relatively low throughput rate (approximately 500 MTU/yr) and to provide the recovery capability needed on the site in the event of a transport or storage cask seal failure during a period of about two years while the larger Spent Fuel Handling Building (SFHB) was being completed. Although the original study basis postulated an incremental addition to the larger, previously considered MRS configurations, study results show that the Transfer Facility may be capable of receiving and storing spent fuel at annual rates of 3000 MTU/yr or more, making a larger fuel handling structure unnecessary. In addition, the study analyses showed that the Transfer Facility could be constructed and put into service in 15--17 months and would cost less than the previous configurations. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Feasibility of the recent Russian nuclear electric propulsion concept: 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakirov, Vadim; Pavshook, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The paper focuses on feasibility of the Russian nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept. → The Russian NEP concept is based on the past experience and is, therefore, technically feasible. → The big concern is that the program will be cancelled due to non-technical issues. - Abstract: The paper introduces recent Russian nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept for space exploration. The concept advantages are listed along with future missions. The current development status for the two main enabling technologies is presented and the feasibility analysis of the up-to-date experience is performed. The main features of NEP concept are discussed. Revision of these features and available technologies demonstrates that the NEP concept is a logical continuation of the previous efforts by the former Soviet Union. Because no breakthrough technologies are needed for NEP development while the existing technologies only need to be adapted to the megawatt (MW) class NEP the development is considered technically feasible, low risk program likely to succeed unless cancelled by the listed non-technical reasons. Successful NEP space vehicle development is going to bring practical space exploration of solar system to the new level as well as require supplementary payload program, supporting monitoring and communication radar networks. Nuclear safety during future NEP missions can be ensured by adherence to the United Nations guidelines in the same way it was done during the Soviet Topaz Nuclear Power System (NPS) missions.

  8. Feasibility of the recent Russian nuclear electric propulsion concept: 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakirov, Vadim, E-mail: v.zakirov@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Room 3121, Yifu Building, School of Aerospace, Tsinghua University, Haidian District, Beijing 100084 (China); Pavshook, Vladimir, E-mail: vap_ki@mail.r [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov Sq. 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: The paper focuses on feasibility of the Russian nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept. The Russian NEP concept is based on the past experience and is, therefore, technically feasible. The big concern is that the program will be cancelled due to non-technical issues. - Abstract: The paper introduces recent Russian nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) concept for space exploration. The concept advantages are listed along with future missions. The current development status for the two main enabling technologies is presented and the feasibility analysis of the up-to-date experience is performed. The main features of NEP concept are discussed. Revision of these features and available technologies demonstrates that the NEP concept is a logical continuation of the previous efforts by the former Soviet Union. Because no breakthrough technologies are needed for NEP development while the existing technologies only need to be adapted to the megawatt (MW) class NEP the development is considered technically feasible, low risk program likely to succeed unless cancelled by the listed non-technical reasons. Successful NEP space vehicle development is going to bring practical space exploration of solar system to the new level as well as require supplementary payload program, supporting monitoring and communication radar networks. Nuclear safety during future NEP missions can be ensured by adherence to the United Nations guidelines in the same way it was done during the Soviet Topaz Nuclear Power System (NPS) missions.

  9. Feasibility of Using Video to Teach a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skill to Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Jennifer; Dimeff, Linda A.; Koerner, Kelly; Linehan, Marsha M.; Taylor, Laura; Miller, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using a psychoeducational video recording to teach a behavioral skill from the Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT; Linehan, 1993a, 1993b) skills training program to individuals meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder. A video presenting a DBT emotion-regulation skill was developed and the extent to…

  10. Developing and testing transferability and feasibility of a model for educators using simulation-based learning - A European collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøje, Rikke Buus; Bland, Andrew; Sutton, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    of the study were to develop a model to educate the educators who deliver simulation-based learning and to test to which extent this model could be transferred to education providers in different national settings. METHODS: This model, its transferability and feasibility, was tested across three European...

  11. Wind pumps for farms: Economic and environmental feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccoli, F.

    1992-01-01

    The cost and environmental benefits of four different types of water pumps for use on farms are compared. The factors considered in the analysis of the different pumps categorized according to head (7, 30 and 50 m) and energy source (wind energy, electricity, gasoline or fuel oil) include operating and maintenance costs, and payback periods. Particular attention is given to the socio-economic implications of the use of wind pumps in developing countries. In this case, the various aspects taken into account are: wind pump siting requirements, optimum sizing, the feasibility of water pumping-power production with the use of wind turbines, required skill levels of operators, and environmental compatibility

  12. A feasibility demonstration program for superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filios, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency, as the agent of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Office, has begun a program to build an engineering test model (ETM) of a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The ETM will serve to demonstrate the feasibility of using SMES technology to meet both SDI and public utility requirements for electric energy storage. SMES technology characteristics are reviewed and related to SDI and electric utility requirements. Program structure and schedule are related to specific objectives, and critical issues are defined

  13. Sedimentary Geothermal Feasibility Study: October 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, Chad [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zerpa, Luis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this project is to analyze the feasibility of commercial geothermal projects using numerical reservoir simulation, considering a sedimentary reservoir with low permeability that requires productivity enhancement. A commercial thermal reservoir simulator (STARS, from Computer Modeling Group, CMG) is used in this work for numerical modeling. In the first stage of this project (FY14), a hypothetical numerical reservoir model was developed, and validated against an analytical solution. The following model parameters were considered to obtain an acceptable match between the numerical and analytical solutions: grid block size, time step and reservoir areal dimensions; the latter related to boundary effects on the numerical solution. Systematic model runs showed that insufficient grid sizing generates numerical dispersion that causes the numerical model to underestimate the thermal breakthrough time compared to the analytic model. As grid sizing is decreased, the model results converge on a solution. Likewise, insufficient reservoir model area introduces boundary effects in the numerical solution that cause the model results to differ from the analytical solution.

  14. Automated docking screens: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, John J; Shoichet, Brian K; Mysinger, Michael M; Huang, Niu; Colizzi, Francesco; Wassam, Pascal; Cao, Yiqun

    2009-09-24

    Molecular docking is the most practical approach to leverage protein structure for ligand discovery, but the technique retains important liabilities that make it challenging to deploy on a large scale. We have therefore created an expert system, DOCK Blaster, to investigate the feasibility of full automation. The method requires a PDB code, sometimes with a ligand structure, and from that alone can launch a full screen of large libraries. A critical feature is self-assessment, which estimates the anticipated reliability of the automated screening results using pose fidelity and enrichment. Against common benchmarks, DOCK Blaster recapitulates the crystal ligand pose within 2 A rmsd 50-60% of the time; inferior to an expert, but respectrable. Half the time the ligand also ranked among the top 5% of 100 physically matched decoys chosen on the fly. Further tests were undertaken culminating in a study of 7755 eligible PDB structures. In 1398 cases, the redocked ligand ranked in the top 5% of 100 property-matched decoys while also posing within 2 A rmsd, suggesting that unsupervised prospective docking is viable. DOCK Blaster is available at http://blaster.docking.org .

  15. 12 CFR 618.8025 - Feasibility reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feasibility reviews. 618.8025 Section 618.8025 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM GENERAL PROVISIONS Related Services § 618.8025 Feasibility reviews. (a) Prior to an association offering a related service program for the...

  16. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  17. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  18. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: the feasibility of computer interrogation of experts for WISAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, L.H.

    1980-05-01

    Simulation of the response of a waste repository to events that could initiate a fault tree to breach and failure is currently a keystone to the Battelle Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). The repository simulation, which is part of the Disruptive Event Analysis Task, models the repository for its entire design life, one million years. This is clearly a challenging calculation, requiring input unlike any other response analysis by virtue of the long design life of the facility. What technology will provide design criteria for a million year design life. Answers to questions like this can, to some extent, be based on data, but always require some subjective judgments. The subjectivity, which is sometimes driven by inadequate or incomplete data or by a lack of understanding of the physical process, is therefore a crucial ingredient in an analysis of initiating events. Because of the variety of possible initiating events (glaciation, man-caused disruption, volcanism, etc.), many expert opinions will be solicited as input. The complexity of the simulation, the variety of experts involved, and the volume of applicable data all suggest that there may be a more direct, economical method to solicit the expert opinion. This report addresses the feasibility of such a system. Background information is presented that demonstrates the advantages of a computer interrogation system over conventional interrogation and assessment techniques. In the subsequent three sections the three elements - structure and decomposition, scaling, and synthesis - that are basic to any interrogation and assessment technique are reviewed. The interrelationship are schematically illustrated between these three fundamental elements and, therefore, serves as a useful guide to these three sections. Each of these three sections begins with a recommended approach to the particular element and ends with an illustration of representative dialogue.

  19. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems: the feasibility of computer interrogation of experts for WISAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wight, L.H.

    1980-05-01

    Simulation of the response of a waste repository to events that could initiate a fault tree to breach and failure is currently a keystone to the Battelle Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP). The repository simulation, which is part of the Disruptive Event Analysis Task, models the repository for its entire design life, one million years. This is clearly a challenging calculation, requiring input unlike any other response analysis by virtue of the long design life of the facility. What technology will provide design criteria for a million year design life. Answers to questions like this can, to some extent, be based on data, but always require some subjective judgments. The subjectivity, which is sometimes driven by inadequate or incomplete data or by a lack of understanding of the physical process, is therefore a crucial ingredient in an analysis of initiating events. Because of the variety of possible initiating events (glaciation, man-caused disruption, volcanism, etc.), many expert opinions will be solicited as input. The complexity of the simulation, the variety of experts involved, and the volume of applicable data all suggest that there may be a more direct, economical method to solicit the expert opinion. This report addresses the feasibility of such a system. Background information is presented that demonstrates the advantages of a computer interrogation system over conventional interrogation and assessment techniques. In the subsequent three sections the three elements - structure and decomposition, scaling, and synthesis - that are basic to any interrogation and assessment technique are reviewed. The interrelationship are schematically illustrated between these three fundamental elements and, therefore, serves as a useful guide to these three sections. Each of these three sections begins with a recommended approach to the particular element and ends with an illustration of representative dialogue

  20. The Spatial Extent of Epiretinal Electrical Stimulation in the Healthy Mouse Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Hosseinazdeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Retinal prostheses use electrical stimulation to restore functional vision to patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa. A key detail is the spatial pattern of ganglion cells activated by stimulation. Therefore, we characterized the spatial extent of network-mediated electrical activation of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in the epiretinal monopolar electrode configuration. Methods: Healthy mouse RGC activities were recorded with a micro-electrode array (MEA. The stimuli consisted of monophasic rectangular cathodic voltage pulses and cycling full-field light flashes. Results: Voltage tuning curves exhibited significant hysteresis, reflecting adaptation to electrical stimulation on the time scale of seconds. Responses decreased from 0 to 300 µm, and were also dependent on the strength of stimulation. Applying the Rayleigh criterion to the half-width at half-maximum of the electrical point spread function suggests a visual acuity limit of no better than 20/946. Threshold voltage showed only a modest increase across these distances. Conclusion: The existence of significant hysteresis requires that future investigations of electrical retinal stimulation control for such long-memory adaptation. The spread of electrical activation beyond 200 µm suggests that neighbouring electrodes in epiretinal implants based on indirect stimulation of RGCs may be indiscriminable at interelectrode spacings as large as 400 µm.

  1. Transparency in corporate governance: Extent of directors duty to declare interest in company’s transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony O. Nwafor

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The realization that the directors occupy important position in corporate governance, and as business men and women, cannot be prevented from having dealings with the company, demand a close scrutiny of corporate transactions in which they are directly or indirectly involved or have an interest to ensure that such interest is not placed above their duty to the company. One of the ways in which the law strives to achieve this balance is by imposing a duty on the director to disclose to the board any interest he has in company’s transactions. This requirement which was previously governed by the common law and the company’s articles, is presently increasingly finding a place in companies statutes in different jurisdictions. The paper examines, through a comparative analysis, the provisions on the duty of the director to disclose interest in company’s transactions in South Africa and United Kingdom with the aim of discovering the extent to which the statute in both jurisdictions upholds the common law prescriptions. The paper argues that the need for transparency in corporate governance and the preservation of the distinct legal personality of the company demand that the duty to disclose interest should be upheld even in those cases of companies run by a sole director.

  2. Assessment of extent of skin involvement in scleroderma using shear wave elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Wakhlu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis [SSc] is a rare autoimmune disease which manifests as fibrosis in the skin and other internal organs. Conventionally, the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS has been used to quantify the extent of skin fibrosis (resulting in skin tightness in SSc. This technique, although widely validated, is limited by the requirement of a trained, experienced assessor. Recent literature suggests that utilization of the objective ultrasound-based assessment of skin fibrosis utilizing shear wave elastography (SWE may be a more robust technique to detect early skin tightness in SSc. Methods: We evaluated the use of SWE (assessed by an experienced radiologist in 24 patients with SSc compared with 16 healthy controls. Results: Our patients were predominantly females, with median disease duration of 1.5 years and median MRSS of 17. There was minimal intraobserver variation in the assessment of SWE. Patients with SSc had higher SWE values (mean elasticity [Emean] compared to healthy controls at most assessed sites for the MRSS. The Emeancorrelated significantly at all sites with the MRSS scores. At the sites where MRSS was scored as 0 (normal, the Emeanin patients with SSc was higher when compared with similarly clinical normal skin in patients with SSc, suggesting potential early involvement of these areas of the skin with fibrosis. Conclusion: SWE is a promising tool to objectively assess skin fibrosis in SSc and may be useful in detecting early, subclinical skin involvement in this disease.

  3. Correlating Ice Cores from Quelccaya Ice Cap with Chronology from Little Ice Age Glacial Extents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, J. S.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.

    2010-12-01

    Proxy records indicate Southern Hemisphere climatic changes during the Little Ice Age (LIA; ~1300-1850 AD). In particular, records of change in and around the tropical latitudes require attention because these areas are sensitive to climatic change and record the dynamic interplay between hemispheres (Oerlemans, 2005). Despite this significance, relatively few records exist for the southern tropics. Here we present a reconstruction of glacial fluctuations of Quelccaya Ice Cap (QIC), Peruvian Andes, from pre-LIA up to the present day. In the Qori Kalis valley, extensive sets of moraines exist beginning with the 1963 AD ice margin (Thompson et al., 2006) and getting progressively older down valley. Several of these older moraines can be traced and are continuous with moraines in the Challpa Cocha valley. These moraines have been dated at chronology of past ice cap extents are correlated with ice core records from QIC which show an accumulation increase during ~1500-1700 AD and an accumulation decrease during ~1720-1860 AD (Thompson et al., 1985; 1986; 2006). In addition, other proxy records from Peru and the tropics are correlated with the records at QIC as a means to understand climate conditions during the LIA. This work forms the basis for future modeling of the glacial system during the LIA at QIC and for modeling of past temperature and precipitation regimes at high altitude in the tropics.

  4. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spain, Stephen

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide

  5. Feasibility of Biomass Biodrying for Gasification Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidian, Arash

    An important challenge of biomass gasification is the limitation of feedstock quality especially the moisture content, which plays a significant role on the performance of gasification process. Gasification requires low moisture levels (20% and less) and several reports have emphasized on the moisture as a typical problem while gasifying biomass. Moisture affects overall reaction rates in the gasifiers as a result of temperature drop and ultimately increases tar content, decreases gas yield, changes the composition of produced gas and affects the efficiency. Therefore, it is mandatory to pre-treat the biomass before gasification and reduce the moisture content to the suitable and economic level. The well-known solutions are either natural drying (not practical for commercial plants) or conventional drying technologies (have high operating costs). Biodrying is an alternative process, which uses both convective air and heat of biological reactions as a source of energy, to reduce the moisture. In the biodrying reactor heat is generated from exothermic decomposition of organic fraction of biomass and that is why the process is called "self-heating process". Employing such technology for drying biomass at pre-treatment units of gasification process returns several economic and environmental advantages to mills. In Europe, municipal waste treatment (MSW) plants use the biodrying at commercial scale to degrade a part of the biodegradable fraction of waste to generate heat and reduce the moisture content for high quality SRF (Solid Recovered Fuel) production. In Italy, wine industry is seeking to develop biodrying for energy recovery of grape wastes after fermentation and distillation, which returns economic benefits to the industry. In Canada, the development of biodrying technology for pulp and paper industry was started at Ecole polytechnique de Montreal as an option for sludge management solution. Therefore, batch biodrying reactor was successfully developed in 2004

  6. Impact of alternative metrics on estimates of extent of occurrence for extinction risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, Lucas N; Butchart, Stuart H M; Hoffmann, Michael; Bachman, Steve P; Akçakaya, H Resit; Moat, Justin F; Böhm, Monika; Holland, Robert A; Newton, Adrian; Polidoro, Beth; Hughes, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    In International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List assessments, extent of occurrence (EOO) is a key measure of extinction risk. However, the way assessors estimate EOO from maps of species' distributions is inconsistent among assessments of different species and among major taxonomic groups. Assessors often estimate EOO from the area of mapped distribution, but these maps often exclude areas that are not habitat in idiosyncratic ways and are not created at the same spatial resolutions. We assessed the impact on extinction risk categories of applying different methods (minimum convex polygon, alpha hull) for estimating EOO for 21,763 species of mammals, birds, and amphibians. Overall, the percentage of threatened species requiring down listing to a lower category of threat (taking into account other Red List criteria under which they qualified) spanned 11-13% for all species combined (14-15% for mammals, 7-8% for birds, and 12-15% for amphibians). These down listings resulted from larger estimates of EOO and depended on the EOO calculation method. Using birds as an example, we found that 14% of threatened and near threatened species could require down listing based on the minimum convex polygon (MCP) approach, an approach that is now recommended by IUCN. Other metrics (such as alpha hull) had marginally smaller impacts. Our results suggest that uniformly applying the MCP approach may lead to a one-time down listing of hundreds of species but ultimately ensure consistency across assessments and realign the calculation of EOO with the theoretical basis on which the metric was founded. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Feasibility evaluation of downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J. A.; Langhus, B. G.; Belieu, S.

    1999-01-31

    transferred to operators, particularly to small or medium-sized independent U.S. companies. One of the missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) is to assess the feasibility of promising oil and gas technologies that offer improved operating performance, reduced operating costs, or greater environmental protection. To further this mission, the NPTO provided funding to a partnership of three organizations a DOE national laboratory (Argonne National Laboratory), a private-sector consulting firm (CH2M-Hill), and a state government agency (Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission) to assess the feasibility of DOWS. The purpose of this report is to provide general information to the industry on DOWS by describing the existing uses of simultaneous injection, summarizing the regulatory implications of simultaneous injection, and assessing the potential future uses of the technology. Chapter 2 provides a more detailed description of the two major types of DOWS. Chapter 3 summarizes the existing U.S. and Canadian installations of DOWS equipment, to the extent that operators have been willing to share their data. Data are provided on the location and geology of existing installations, production information before and after installation of the DOWS, and costs. Chapter 4 provides an overview of DOWS-specific regulatory requirements imposed by some state agencies and discusses the regulatory implications of handling produced water downhole, rather than pumping it to the surface and reinjecting it. Findings and conclusions are presented in Chapter 5 and a list of the references cited in the report is provided in Chapter 6. Appendix A presents detailed data on DOWS installations. This report presents the findings of Phase 1 of the simultaneous injection project, the feasibility assessment. Another activity of the Phase 1 investigation is to design a study plan for Phase 2 of the project, field pilot studies. The Phase 2

  8. Range Flight Safety Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftin, Charles E.; Hudson, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this NASA Technical Standard is to provide the technical requirements for the NPR 8715.5, Range Flight Safety Program, in regards to protection of the public, the NASA workforce, and property as it pertains to risk analysis, Flight Safety Systems (FSS), and range flight operations. This standard is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and NASA Centers, including Component Facilities and Technical and Service Support Centers, and may be cited in contract, program, and other Agency documents as a technical requirement. This standard may also apply to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory or to other contractors, grant recipients, or parties to agreements to the extent specified or referenced in their contracts, grants, or agreements, when these organizations conduct or participate in missions that involve range flight operations as defined by NPR 8715.5.1.2.2 In this standard, all mandatory actions (i.e., requirements) are denoted by statements containing the term “shall.”1.3 TailoringTailoring of this standard for application to a specific program or project shall be formally documented as part of program or project requirements and approved by the responsible Technical Authority in accordance with NPR 8715.3, NASA General Safety Program Requirements.

  9. Nuclear power safety reporting system feasibility analysis and concept description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, F.C.; Ims, J.R.; Hussman, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is assisting the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the evaluation of the potential attributes of a voluntary, nonpunitive data gathering system for identifying and quantifying the factors that contribute to the occurrence of significant safety problems involving humans in nuclear power plants. The objectives of the Aerospace Administration (FAA)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) in order to determine whether it would be feasible to apply part (or all) of the ASRS concepts for collecting data on human factor related incidents to the nuclear industry; and (2) to identify and define the basic elements and requirements of a Nuclear Power Safety Reporting System (NPSRS), assuming the feasibility of implementing such a system was established

  10. Environmental pollution and shipping feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jihong; Zeng, Xin; Deng, Yibing

    2016-12-15

    In recent years, the Nicaraguan government's renewed interest in constructing this interoceanic canal has once again aroused widespread concern, particularly in the global shipping industry. The project's immense ecological risks, coupled with the recent expansions of both the Panama Canal and the Suez Canal, have raised questions among scientists and experts about its viability. Whether the Nicaragua Canal is really feasible for international shipping, given its high marine pollution risks, requires the further study. This paper discusses and analyses the feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal in the context of its environmental impact and value as a shipping service. This paper aims to provide an important information reference to inform strategic decision-making among policymakers and stakeholders. Our research results indicate that the environmental complexity, economic costs and safety risks of building a new transoceanic canal are simply too high to justify the project. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fast-mixed spectrum reactor interim report initial feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.J.; Cerbone, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of an initial four-month feasibility study of the Fast-Mixed Spectrum Reactor (FMSR). Reactor physics, fuel cycle, and thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed on a reference design. These results when coupled to a fuel and materials evaluation performed in cooperation with the Argonne National Laboratory indicate that the FMSR is feasible provided the fuels, cladding, and subassembly ducts can survive a peak fuel burnup of 15 to 20 atom percent heavy metal and peak fluences of 8 x 10 23 (nvt > 0.1 MeV). The results of this short study have also provided a basis for exploring alternative designs requiring significantly lower peak burnup and fluences for their operation

  12. Feasibility Study on Manufacturing Lightweight Aggregates from Water Purification Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-Fang; Chen, How-Ji

    2018-02-01

    This study mainly discussed the feasibility of manufacturing lightweight aggregates from water purification sludge in Taiwan. They were analysed for the physical and chemical composition before the sintering test for lightweight aggregates in a laboratory. Then the physical and mechanical properties of the synthesized aggregates were assessed. The result showed that the chemical composition of sludge in the water purification plants was within the appropriate range for manufacturing lightweight aggregate as proposed in the literature. The sintering test demonstrated that the particle density of aggregates from the ten types of water purification sludge were mostly less than 1.8 g/cm3. In addition, the dry unit weight, the organic impurity, the ignition loss, and other characteristics of synthesized aggregates met the requirement of CNS standards, while its water absorption and crushing strength also fulfilled the general commercial specifications. Therefore, reclamation of water purification sludge for production of lightweight aggregate is indeed feasible.

  13. Prevalence, Vascular Distribution, and Multiterritorial Extent of Subclinical Atherosclerosis in a Middle-Aged Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Friera, Leticia; Peñalvo, José L; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    age, 45.8 years; 63% male) to evaluate the systemic extent of atherosclerosis in the carotid, abdominal aortic, and iliofemoral territories by 2-/3-dimensional ultrasound and coronary artery calcification by computed tomography. The extent of subclinical atherosclerosis, defined as presence of plaque...

  14. Extent of resection and timing of surgery in adult low grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Mirza, Farhan; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-06-01

    Low grade glioma is a group of WHO grade II tumours including diffuse astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and oligoastrocytoma. Strong evidence exists in literature now to support early surgery and higher extent of safe resection in improving outcomes. In this review, we are highlighting some of the important studies done in the last few years specifically addressing timing of surgery and extent of resection.

  15. Effects of geographical extent on the determinants of woody plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhiheng; Rahbek, Carsten; Fang, Jingyun

    2012-01-01

    the quantitative effects of geographical extent are rarely tested. Here, using distribution maps of 11,405 woody species found in China and associated environmental data to the domain, we investigated the influence of geographical extent on the determinants of species richness patterns. Our results revealed...

  16. Calculation and visualisation of future glacier extent in the Swiss Alps by means of hypsographic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, F.; Maisch, M.; Rothenbühler, C.; Hoelzle, M.; Haeberli, W.

    2007-02-01

    The observed rapid glacier wastage in the European Alps during the past 20 years already has strong impacts on the natural environment (rock fall, lake formation) as well as on human activities (tourism, hydro-power production, etc.) and poses several new challenges also for glacier monitoring. With a further increase of global mean temperature in the future, it is likely that Alpine glaciers and the high-mountain environment as an entire system will further develop into a state of imbalance. Hence, the assessment of future glacier geometries is a valuable prerequisite for various impact studies. In order to calculate and visualize in a consistent manner future glacier extent for a large number of individual glaciers (> 100) according to a given climate change scenario, we have developed an automated and simple but robust approach that is based on an empirical relationship between glacier size and the steady-state accumulation area ratio (AAR 0) in the Alps. The model requires digital glacier outlines and a digital elevation model (DEM) only and calculates new glacier geometries from a given shift of the steady-state equilibrium line altitude (ELA 0) by means of hypsographic modelling. We have calculated changes in number, area and volume for 3062 individual glacier units in Switzerland and applied six step changes in ELA 0 (from + 100 to + 600 m) combined with four different values of the AAR 0 (0.5, 0.6, 0.67, 0.75). For an AAR 0 of 0.6 and an ELA 0 rise of 200 m (400 m) we calculate a total area loss of - 54% (- 80%) and a corresponding volume loss of - 50% (- 78%) compared to the 1973 glacier extent. In combination with a geocoded satellite image, the future glacier outlines are also used for automated rendering of perspective visualisations. This is a very attractive tool for communicating research results to the general public. Our study is illustrated for a test site in the Upper Engadine (Switzerland), where landscape changes above timberline play an

  17. Power to the people: To what extent has public involvement in applied health research achieved this?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gill

    2016-01-01

    Public involvement is required for applied health research funded in the UK. One of the largest funders, the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR), makes it clear that it values the knowledge of patients and the public. As a result, there are now many resources to make sure that the public voice is included in decision-making about research. However, there is concern that the public voice still has limited impact on research decision-making. This article asks to what extent has power shifted from the scientific research community to the public? It looks at how much power and impact patients and members of the public have about research by asking: How do the public contribute to deciding which research areas and which research projects should be funded? How do they influence how the research is carried out? The article argues that there is evidence that the public voice is present in research decision-making. However, there is less evidence of a change in the power dynamic between the scientific research community and the public. The public involved in research are not always equal partners. The scientific research community still has the loudest voice and patients and the public do not always feel sufficiently empowered to challenge it. Public involvement in applied health research is a pre-requisite for funding from many funding bodies. In particular the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) in the UK, clearly states that it values lay knowledge and there is an expectation that members of the public will participate as research partners in research. As a result a large public involvement infrastructure has emerged to facilitate this. However, there is concern that despite the flurry of activity in promoting public involvement, lay knowledge is marginalised and has limited impact on research decision-making. This article asks to what extent has power shifted from the scientific research community to the public? It discusses the meaning of power and

  18. FBI fingerprint identification automation study. AIDS 3 evaluation report. Volume 4: Economic feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhall, B. D. L.

    1980-01-01

    The results of the economic analysis of the AIDS 3 system design are presented. AIDS 3 evaluated a set of economic feasibility measures including life cycle cost, implementation cost, annual operating expenditures and annual capital expenditures. The economic feasibility of AIDS 3 was determined by comparing the evaluated measures with the same measures, where applicable, evaluated for the current system. A set of future work load scenarios was constructed using JPL's environmental evaluation study of the fingerprint identification system. AIDS 3 and the current system were evaluated for each of the economic feasibility measures for each of the work load scenarios. They were compared for a set of performance measures, including response time and accuracy, and for a set of cost/benefit ratios, including cost per transaction and cost per technical search. Benefit measures related to the economic feasibility of the system are also presented, including the required number of employees and the required employee skill mix.

  19. Engineering management at feasibility study stage of nuclear power plant under EPC mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    After the investment reform by the State Council in 2004, NDRC carries out approval system for enterprises to invest in nuclear power plants. Feasibility study stage is a critical stage on the mainline of nuclear power project approval, which intersects with the license application, and engineering design. The owners of nuclear power plants are required stringently in engineering management. From the owners' management point of view under EPC mode, this paper sorts the preliminary project process for nuclear power plants, focusing on the management in the feasibility study stage. License application and engineering design management in the feasibility study stage are also discussed. (author)

  20. SSPA Equipment Engineering Feasibility Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; C.R. Clark

    2011-09-01

    In response to a demanding reactor conversion schedule, construction of the Shielded Sample Preparation Area (SSPA) was initiated in 2010 to augment the existing capabilities of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF). While HFEF is and will remain the workhorse for post irradiation sample preparation, there is currently a large backlog of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) experiments caused by numerous competing projects (this backlog is expected to continue for the foreseeable future). HFEF, in its present configuration also lacks the ability to prepare samples suitable for several of the tests that have been identified for the successful conclusion of the RERTR program; these samples require fine detail machining of irradiated fuel plates.

  1. Assessing the extent of decomposition of natural organic materials using solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddock, J.A.; Oades, J.M.; Nelson, P.N.; Skene, T.M.; Golchin, A.; Clarke, P.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has become an important tool for examining the chemical structure of natural organic materials and the chemical changes associated with decomposition. In this paper, solid-state 13 C NMR data pertaining to changes in the chemical composition of a diverse range of natural organic materials, including wood, peat, composts, forest litter layers, and organic materials in surface layers of mineral soils, were reviewed with the objective of deriving an index of the extent of decomposition of such organic materials based on changes in chemical composition. Chemical changes associated with the decomposition of wood varied considerably and were dependent on a strong interaction between the species of wood examined and the species composition of the microbial decomposer community, making the derivation of a single general index applicable to wood decomposition unlikely. For the remaining forms of natural organic residues, decomposition was almost always associated with an increased content of alkyl C and a decreased content of O-alkyl C. The concomitant increase and decrease in alkyl and O-alkyl C contents, respectively, suggested that the ratio of alkyl to O-alkyl carbon (A/O-A ratio) may provide a sensitive index of the extent of decomposition. Contrary to the traditional view that humic substances with an aromatic core accumulate as decomposition proceeds, changes in the aromatic region were variable and suggested a relationship with the activity of lignin-degrading fungi. The A/O-A ratio did appear to provide a sensitive index of extent of decomposition provided that its use was restricted to situations where the organic materials were derived from a common starting material. In addition, the potential for adsorption of highly decomposable materials on mineral soil surfaces and the impacts which such an adsorption may have on bioavailability required consideration when the A/O-A ratio was used to assess the

  2. Temporal and spatial patterns of wetland extent influence variability of surface water connectivity in the Prairie Pothole Region, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhoof, Melanie; Alexander, Laurie C.; Todd, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Context. Quantifying variability in landscape-scale surface water connectivity can help improve our understanding of the multiple effects of wetlands on downstream waterways. Objectives. We examined how wetland merging and the coalescence of wetlands with streams varied both spatially (among ecoregions) and interannually (from drought to deluge) across parts of the Prairie Pothole Region. Methods. Wetland extent was derived over a time series (1990-2011) using Landsat imagery. Changes in landscape-scale connectivity, generated by the physical coalescence of wetlands with other surface water features, were quantified by fusing static wetland and stream datasets with Landsat-derived wetland extent maps, and related to multiple wetness indices. The usage of Landsat allows for decadal-scale analysis, but limits the types of surface water connections that can be detected. Results. Wetland extent correlated positively with the merging of wetlands and wetlands with streams. Wetness conditions, as defined by drought indices and runoff, were positively correlated with wetland extent, but less consistently correlated with measures of surface water connectivity. The degree of wetland-wetland merging was found to depend less on total wetland area or density, and more on climate conditions, as well as the threshold for how wetland/upland was defined. In contrast, the merging of wetlands with streams was positively correlated with stream density, and inversely related to wetland density. Conclusions. Characterizing the degree of surface water connectivity within the Prairie Pothole Region in North America requires consideration of 1) climate-driven variation in wetness conditions and 2) within-region variation in wetland and stream spatial arrangements.

  3. The true extent of agriculture's contribution to national greenhouse gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Cloy, J.M.; Rees, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantification of agricultural GHG emissions is required under legislation. • Alternative approaches to calculating agricultural GHG inventories were compared. • The Scottish Government and IPCC attribute different emissions to the agricultural sector. • High emissions from agriculture are calculated when land-use change is included. • Agriculture is a greater source of emissions using the Scottish Government approach. - Abstract: The agricultural sector is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and a growing global population means that agricultural production will remain high if food demands are to be met. Mitigation methods to reduce emissions from this sector are thus required, along with identification and quantification of emission sources, so that the agricultural community can act and measure its progress. International legislation requires the submission of annual reports quantifying GHG emissions from agriculture. The importance of attributing the correct sources of emissions to the agricultural sector is clear; however the current approach taken by the IPCC, and reported to the UNFCCC, omits emissions from soils during agricultural land-use change from its agricultural inventory. This paper questions the IPCC approach, and the attribution of agricultural land-use change emissions to a separate category: ‘Land-use, Land-use change and Forestry’. Here a new approach adopted by the Scottish Government is examined, and compared to IPCC guidelines and national communications submitted to the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the UNFCCC. The new Scottish Government approach attributes emissions from both land-use conversion and agricultural land under continuous use to the agricultural sector, in addition to those emissions from livestock and energy use on farms. The extent of emissions attributed to the agricultural sector using the Scottish Government approach is much greater than that using

  4. Three Affliated Tribes Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belvin Pete; Kent Good; Krista Gordon; Ed McCarthy,

    2006-05-26

    The Three Affliated Tribes on the Fort Berthold Reservation studied the feasibility of a commercial wind facility on land selected and owned by the Tribes and examined the potential for the development of renewable energy resources on Tribal Lands.

  5. Conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suer, A.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual Thermal Treatment Technologies Feasibility Study (FS) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) focusing exclusively on thermal treatment technologies for contaminated soil, sediment, or sludge remediation projects

  6. Renewable Energy Park - Preliminary Feasibility & Engineering Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariwite, Roderick [Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe, NV (United States)

    2015-07-31

    This "Renewable Energy Park - Preliminary Feasibility & Engineering Report" seeks to provide an overall assessment and review of renewable energy development opportunities on the Fallon Indian Reservation and Colony Lands.

  7. The feasibility Problem in Theorizing Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Huzum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available G. A. Cohen and Andrew Mason have recently argued, against many contemporary philosophers, that feasibility is not a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice. Their main argument is that principles of justice are logically independent of issues of feasibility and, consequently, feasibility has no bearing on the correctness of these principles. This article is a critical examination of three attempts to show that Cohen and Mason’s argument is unsound. The examined attempts are those of Harry Brighouse, Collin Farrelly, and David Miller. I argue that all these arguments are based on false, unjustified or implausible, premises and/or assumptions. Consequently, they cannot discredit the soundness of Cohen and Mason’s argument and of the thesis that feasibility is not, in fact, a legitimate constraint in theorizing about social justice.

  8. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document

  9. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  10. White Earth Biomass/Biogas Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triplett, Michael

    2015-03-12

    The White Earth Nation examined the feasibility of cost savings and fossil energy reduction through the installation of biogas/biomass boiler at the tribal casino. The study rejected biogas options due to availability and site constraints, but found a favorable environment for technical and financial feasibility of installing a 5 MMBtu hot water boiler system to offset 60-70 percent of current fuel oil and propane usage.

  11. Sampling, feasibility, and priors in Bayesian estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Chorin, Alexandre J.; Lu, Fei; Miller, Robert N.; Morzfeld, Matthias; Tu, Xuemin

    2015-01-01

    Importance sampling algorithms are discussed in detail, with an emphasis on implicit sampling, and applied to data assimilation via particle filters. Implicit sampling makes it possible to use the data to find high-probability samples at relatively low cost, making the assimilation more efficient. A new analysis of the feasibility of data assimilation is presented, showing in detail why feasibility depends on the Frobenius norm of the covariance matrix of the noise and not on the number of va...

  12. Study to evaluate the feasibility of constructing a retrofit containment for the 105-L reactor at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of a study performed to determine the feasibility of constructing a retrofit containment dome meeting the requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear containment vessels over the existing Savannah River 105-L reactor. Using existing large dome structures as a guide, design concepts were developed and analyses performed to evaluate the structural feasibility of containment dome structures. Construction schedules and costs were estimated to assess financial feasibility as well. It was concluded that such a retrofit containment dome was structurally feasible and within the capabilities of present day construction technology

  13. Closure requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Closure of a waste management unit can be either permanent or temporary. Permanent closure may be due to: economic factors which make it uneconomical to mine the remaining minerals; depletion of mineral resources; physical site constraints that preclude further mining and beneficiation; environmental, regulatory or other requirements that make it uneconomical to continue to develop the resources. Temporary closure can occur for a period of several months to several years, and may be caused by factors such as: periods of high rainfall or snowfall which prevent mining and waste disposal; economic circumstances which temporarily make it uneconomical to mine the target mineral; labor problems requiring a cessation of operations for a period of time; construction activities that are required to upgrade project components such as the process facilities and waste management units; and mine or process plant failures that require extensive repairs. Permanent closure of a mine waste management unit involves the provision of durable surface containment features to protect the waters of the State in the long-term. Temporary closure may involve activities that range from ongoing maintenance of the existing facilities to the installation of several permanent closure features in order to reduce ongoing maintenance. This paper deals with the permanent closure features

  14. Tunnel sealing: concept and feasibility evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, R.P.; Eppinger, G.; Mettler, K.

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses first the aim and purpose of tunnel seals as well as the requirements which should be satisfied. The basic seal concept is a zoned plug consisting of key zones and intermediate zones. The key zones act as barrier elements and will be placed into sections of competent and sound rock. The main function of the intermediate zones is that of a support and the requirements for sealing efficiency may be somewhat relaxed. Three sealing concepts have been devised for both the key zones and the intermediate zones. They differ in the materials used for the seal and in the placement method. For the key zones highly compacted bentonite is recommended, but also cement-based materials, such as standard concrete or prepact concrete are considered suitable. For the intermediate zones, the use of pumped concrete with subsequent grouting of the roof zone is favourable, but also a combination of concrete with a sand/gravel mixture or with properly compacted excavation material is feasible. The concepts introduced can all be realized by conventional tunnelling methods. Excavation by tunnel boring machine is most advantageous as it minimizes disturbance of the rock caused by the cavity-forming process. By employing simple material models, it can be shown that the depth of the excavation disturbed zone can be minimized if support of the tunnel is provided as early as possible after excavation. The cutting of a groove in the tunnel wall along the key zone can further contribute to reduce the depth of the excavation-disturbed zone. In order to ensure the quality of a seal, the quantities of the materials used can be checked and the work procedures to place the seal can be supervised. For the latter the experiences obtained from a large-scale test should be available. Finally, it is also shown that when considering safety analytical aspects, the proposed sealing concepts represent adequate solutions in spite of the probably increased permeability in the excavation

  15. Nature and extent of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prothro, L.B.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.

    1997-09-01

    Work is currently underway within the Underground Test Area subproject of the US Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Environmental Restoration Program to develop corrective action plans in support of the overall corrective action strategy for the Nevada Test Site as established in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). A closure plan is currently being developed for Pahute Mesa, which has been identified in the FFACO as consisting of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units. Part of this effort requires that hydrogeologic data be compiled for inclusion in a regional model that will be used to predict a contaminant boundary for these Corrective Action Units. Hydrogeologic maps have been prepared for use in the model to define the nature and extent of aquifers and confining units that might influence the flow of contaminated groundwater from underground nuclear tests conducted at Pahute Mesa. Much of the groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa occurs within lava-flow aquifers. An understanding of the distribution and hydraulic character of these important hydrogeologic units is necessary to accurately model groundwater flow beneath Pahute Mesa. This report summarizes the results of a study by Bechtel Nevada geologists to better define the hydrogeology of lava-flow aquifers at Pahute Mesa. The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) aid in the development of the hydrostratigraphic framework for Pahute Mesa, and (2) provide information on the distribution and hydraulic character of lava-flow aquifers beneath Pahute Mesa for more accurate computer modeling of the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  16. Autonomous Aerobraking: A Design, Development, and Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.; Murri, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Aerobraking has been used four times to decrease the apoapsis of a spacecraft in a captured orbit around a planetary body with a significant atmosphere utilizing atmospheric drag to decelerate the spacecraft. While aerobraking requires minimum fuel, the long time required for aerobraking requires both a large operations staff, and large Deep Space Network resources. A study to automate aerobraking has been sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to determine initial feasibility of equipping a spacecraft with the onboard capability for autonomous aerobraking, thus saving millions of dollars incurred by a large aerobraking operations workforce and continuous DSN coverage. This paper describes the need for autonomous aerobraking, the development of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software that includes an ephemeris estimator, an atmospheric density estimator, and maneuver calculation, and the plan forward for continuation of this study.

  17. Feasibility study of a contained pulsed nuclear propulsion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Metzger, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The result of a feasibility analysis of a contained pulsed nuclear propulsion (CPNP) engine concept utilizing the enormously dense energy generated by small nuclear detonations is presented in this article. This concept was initially proposed and studied in the 1950s and 1960s under the program name HELIOS. The current feasibility of the concept is based upon materials technology that has advanced to a state that allows the design of pressure vessels required to contain the blast associated with small nuclear detonations. The impulsive nature of the energy source provides the means for circumventing the materials thermal barriers that are inherent in steady-state nuclear propulsion concepts. The rapid energy transfer to the propellant results in high thrust levels for times less than 1 s following the detonation. The preliminary feasibility analysis using off-the-shelf materials technology appears to indicate that the CPNP concept can have thrust-to-weight ratios on the order of 1 or greater. Though the specific impulse is not a good indicator for impulsive engines, an operating-cycle averaged specific impulse of approximately 1000 or greater seconds was calculated. 16 refs

  18. Feasibility study on large pool-type LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A feasibility study has been conducted from 1981 FY to 1983 FY, in order to evaluate the feasibility of a large pool-type LMFBR under the Japanese seismic design condition and safety design condition, etc. This study was aimed to establish an original reactor structure concept which meets those design conditions especially required in Japan. In the first year, preceding design concepts had been reviewed and several concepts were originated to be suitable to Japan. For typical two of them being selected by preliminary analysis, test programs were planned. In the second year, more than twenty tests with basic models had been conducted under severe conditions, concurrently analytical approaches were promoted. In the last year, larger model tests were conducted and analytical methods have been verified concerning hydrodynamic effects on structure vibration, thermo-hydraulic behaviours in reactor plena and so on. Finally the reactor structure concepts for a large pool-type LMFBR have been acknowledged to be feasible in Japan. (author)

  19. Environmental pollution and shipping feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jihong; Zeng, Xin; Deng, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Nicaraguan government's renewed interest in constructing this interoceanic canal has once again aroused widespread concern, particularly in the global shipping industry. The project's immense ecological risks, coupled with the recent expansions of both the Panama Canal and the Suez Canal, have raised questions among scientists and experts about its viability. Whether the Nicaragua Canal is really feasible for international shipping, given its high marine pollution risks, requires the further study. This paper discusses and analyses the feasibility of the Nicaragua Canal in the context of its environmental impact and value as a shipping service. This paper aims to provide an important information reference to inform strategic decision-making among policymakers and stakeholders. Our research results indicate that the environmental complexity, economic costs and safety risks of building a new transoceanic canal are simply too high to justify the project. - Highlights: • The Nicaragua Canal is a long-standing controversial maritime project. • We develop specific analysis of the high environmental pollution risks of the canal. • The shipping service feasibility of the canal is faced with great uncertainty. • The government and stakeholders are suggested to be discreet to the mega project.

  20. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-01-01

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft 3 /min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft 3 /min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm

  1. Linoleic acid intake and vitamin E requirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, F.C.

    1973-01-01

    In experiments with rats and Peking ducklings it has been investigated to what extent the linoleic acid content of the diet is of influence on the requirement of vitamin E. This requirement was determined by adding D-α-tocopheryl acetate in increasing doses to vitamin E-free diets and to determine

  2. Reconstructed North American, Eurasian, and Northern Hemisphere Snow Cover Extent, 1915-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series of monthly snow cover extent (SCE) for North America, Eurasia, and the Northern Hemisphere from 1915 to 1997, based on snow cover...

  3. extent of use of ict by fish farmers in isoko agricultural zone of delta

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr. TONY A

    Abstract. The study examined the extent of use of ICTs by fish farmers in Isoko .... TABLE 1: Percentage distribution of respondents selected socioeconomics ... fish breeds, feeds and management), and made inquiries about market predictions.

  4. To what extent do science ESP learning materials fit the purpose for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To what extent do science ESP learning materials fit the purpose for which they have been devised? An evaluation in terms of Cronje's (1993) criteria. ... Journal for Language Teaching. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced ...

  5. LBA-ECO LC-07 Wetland Extent, Vegetation, and Inundation: Lowland Amazon Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a map of wetland extent, vegetation type, and dual-season flooding state of the entire lowland Amazon basin. The map was derived from mosaics...

  6. Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Ice Edge Location and Extent in the Russian Arctic, 1933-2006 data are derived from sea ice charts from the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI),...

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE), Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) is a record for the Northern Hemisphere (NH) Snow Cover Extent (SCE) spanning from October 4, 1966 to present, updated monthly...

  8. The extent of unwanted infrared photoacoustic signals from polymer sampling tubings exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.; Solyom, A.; Angeli, G.; Wegh, H.; Postumus, M.; Jalink, H.

    1995-01-01

    The extent of unwanted photoacoustic (PA) signals due to volatiles released from various polymer tubing materials [transparent, red and black polyethylene (PE), polymer of tetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and copolymer of tetrafluorethylene and hexafluorethylene (FEP)] when exposed to 245 nm radiation was

  9. Comment on ''Canonical formalism for Lagrangians with nonlocality of finite extent''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llosa, Josep

    2003-01-01

    The paper by Woodward [Phys. Rev. A 62, 052105 (2000)] claimed to have proved that Lagrangian theories with a nonlocality of finite extent are necessarily unstable. In this Comment we propose that this conclusion is false

  10. Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska ESI: ICE (Ice Extent Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains locations of ice extent in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Vector lines in the data set represent 50 percent ice coverage. Location-specific type and...

  11. Global extent and determinants of savanna and forest as alternative biome states

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Staver, C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Theoretically, fire–tree cover feedbacks can maintain savanna and forest as alternative stable states. However, the global extent of fire- driven discontinuities in tree cover is unknown, especially accounting for seasonality and soils. The authors...

  12. The value and extent of religious participation of members of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-14

    Jan 14, 2013 ... ... of Human. Resource Management, .... This is why employees of the SAPS, as human beings, to a large extent ... everywhere, supporting us in the workplace, at home and in hospitals. ..... such as diversity interventions).

  13. The extent of problematic alcohol and other drug use within selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To describe the nature and extent of AOD problems in selected workplace ... compiled by an Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) service provider in SA. As part of an EAP risk audit, assessments for AOD-related problems were ...

  14. Global Human Built-up And Settlement Extent (HBASE) Dataset From Landsat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Human Built-up And Settlement Extent (HBASE) Dataset from Landsat is a global map of HBASE derived from the Global Land Survey (GLS) Landsat dataset for...

  15. Using Nonexperts for Annotating Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interaction Mentions in Product Labeling: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Harry; Ning, Yifan; Hernandez, Andres; Horn, John R; Jacobson, Rebecca; Boyce, Richard D

    2016-04-11

    Because vital details of potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions are often described in free-text structured product labels, manual curation is a necessary but expensive step in the development of electronic drug-drug interaction information resources. The use of nonexperts to annotate potential drug-drug interaction (PDDI) mentions in drug product label annotation may be a means of lessening the burden of manual curation. Our goal was to explore the practicality of using nonexpert participants to annotate drug-drug interaction descriptions from structured product labels. By presenting annotation tasks to both pharmacy experts and relatively naïve participants, we hoped to demonstrate the feasibility of using nonexpert annotators for drug-drug information annotation. We were also interested in exploring whether and to what extent natural language processing (NLP) preannotation helped improve task completion time, accuracy, and subjective satisfaction. Two experts and 4 nonexperts were asked to annotate 208 structured product label sections under 4 conditions completed sequentially: (1) no NLP assistance, (2) preannotation of drug mentions, (3) preannotation of drug mentions and PDDIs, and (4) a repeat of the no-annotation condition. Results were evaluated within the 2 groups and relative to an existing gold standard. Participants were asked to provide reports on the time required to complete tasks and their perceptions of task difficulty. One of the experts and 3 of the nonexperts completed all tasks. Annotation results from the nonexpert group were relatively strong in every scenario and better than the performance of the NLP pipeline. The expert and 2 of the nonexperts were able to complete most tasks in less than 3 hours. Usability perceptions were generally positive (3.67 for expert, mean of 3.33 for nonexperts). The results suggest that nonexpert annotation might be a feasible option for comprehensive labeling of annotated PDDIs across a broader

  16. Feasibility of a spin light polarimeter at JLab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Dipangkar

    2011-01-01

    The future 12 GeV program at JLab includes several high precision experiments that aim to use parity violation in electroweak interactions to search for interactions beyond the Standard Model. These experiments require precision electron polarimetry with an uncertainty of ∼ 0.4%. Compton and Moller polarimeters are typically the polarimeters of choice for these experiments. However, a complimentary polarimetry technique based on the spin dependence of synchrotron radiation (SR), referred to as 'spin-light,' is often overlooked. In this article we examine the feasibility of a 'spin-light' polarimeter at Jefferson Lab (JLab) for 12 GeV experiments.

  17. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment of the spent nuclear fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    A series of analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Integrated Process Strategy (IPS). The goal was to develop a series of thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety related issues that may arise pertaining to the SNFP, as well as provide a basis for validation of the results. Results show that there is a reasonable envelope for process conditions and requirements that are thermally and hydraulically acceptable

  18. Proliferation Potential of Accelerator-Driven Systems: Feasibility Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riendeau, C.D.; Moses, D.L.; Olson, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerator-driven systems for fissile materials production have been proposed and studied since the early 1950s. Recent advances in beam power levels for small accelerators have raised the possibility that such use could be feasible for a potential proliferator. The objective of this study is to review the state of technology development for accelerator-driven spallation neutron sources and subcritical reactors. Energy and power requirements were calculated for a proton accelerator-driven neutron spallation source and subcritical reactors to produce a significant amount of fissile material--plutonium

  19. Feasibility of short-lived radionuclide production at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten Haken, R.K.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    The requirements for establishing a short-lived radionuclide production program at Fermilab are explored. Such a program would utilize beam from the linac portion of the injector much like the present Neutron Therapy Facility. It should be possible to use approximately 10 to 20 μA of 66-MeV protons for iodine-123 production. Several additional magnets would need to be acquired and a shielded target facility would need to be constructed. However, the feasibility of establishing such a program hinges upon its harmonious operation with the high energy physics program

  20. Feasibility study for mega-electron-volt electron beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, U; Bärtling, Y; Hoppe, D; Kuksanov, N; Fadeev, S; Salimov, R

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam tomography is a promising imaging modality for the study of fast technical processes. But for many technical objects of interest x rays of several hundreds of keV energy are required to achieve sufficient material penetration. In this article we report on a feasibility study for fast electron beam computed tomography with a 1 MeV electron beam. The experimental setup comprises an electrostatic accelerator with beam optics, transmission target, and a single x-ray detector. We employed an inverse fan-beam tomography approach with radiographic projections being generated from the linearly moving x-ray source. Angular projections were obtained by rotating the object.

  1. Technical feasibility study of 60 MWe fast reactor concept: RAPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Ueda, Nobuyuki; Uotani, Masaki

    1993-01-01

    A study has been performed on the passive safety features and technical feasibility of an inherently safe 60 MWe fast reactor concept RAPID to meet various power requirements in Japan. The system dynamic analyses on the UTOP and ULOF transients revealed that the enhanced reactivity feedback derived from an annular core configuration and the integrated fuel assembly provides a high margin of self-protection. Structural integrity of the integrated fuel assembly has also been confirmed. The following innovative key technologies have been demonstrated; Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for ultimate shutdown, Lithium Expansion Modulus (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback and Void Leading Channel (VLC) for the sodium void worth reduction. (author)

  2. Extent of Surgery Does Not Influence 30-Day Mortality in Surgery for Metastatic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hindsø, Klaus; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann

    2016-01-01

    describing the extent of the surgical trauma were found to be associated with 30-day mortality. The 30-day mortality in patients undergoing surgery for MBD is highly dependent on the general health status of the patients as measured by the ASA score and the Karnofsky performance status. The extent of surgery......, measured as duration of surgery, blood loss, and degree of bone resection were not associated with 30-day mortality....

  3. The Extent of computerization in big companies of the Spanish hotel sector

    OpenAIRE

    Infante Moro, Alfonso; Martínez López, Francisco José; Infante Moro, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study of the hotel sector regarding the extent of computerization in its big companies. This study examines the extent of computerization in big companies of the Spanish hotel sector with the aim of confirming the viability and sustainability of this sector relative to changes in ICT, a stage which is defined by the extensive use of the Internet and online social networks, and the handling of large quantities of information generated within these new env...

  4. Nimbus Satellite Data Rescue Project for Sea Ice Extent: Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G. G.; Sandler, M.; Moses, J. F.; Gallaher, D. W.

    2011-12-01

    Early Nimbus satellites collected both visible and infrared observations of the Earth at high resolution. Nimbus I operated in September, 1964. Nimbus II operated from April to November 1966 and Nimbus III operated from May 1969 to November 1969. We will discuss our procedures to recover this data into a modern digital archive useful for scientific analysis. The Advanced Videocon Camera System data was transmitted as an analog signal proportional to the brightness detected by a video camera. This was archived on black and white film. At NSIDC we are scanning and digitizing the film images using equipment derived from the motion picture industry. The High Resolution Infrared Radiance data was originally recorded in 36 bit words on 7 track digital tapes. The HRIR data were recently recovered from the tapes and TAP (tape file format from 1966) files were placed in EOSDIS archives for online access. The most interesting parts of the recovery project were the additional processing required to rectify and navigate the raw digital files. One of the artifacts we needed to identify and remove were fiducial marks representing latitude and longitude lines added to the film for users in the 1960's. The IR data recording inserted an artificial random jitter in the alignment of individual scan lines. We will describe our procedures to navigate, remap, detect noise and remove artifacts in the data. Beyond cleaning up the HRIR swath data or the AVCS picture data, we are remapping the data into standard grids for comparisons in time. A first run of all the Nimbus 2 HRIR data into EASE grids in NetCDF format has been completed. This turned up interesting problems of overlaps and missing data issues. Some of these processes require extensive computer resources and we have established methods for using the 'Elastic Compute Cloud' facility at Amazon.com to run the many processes in parallel. In addition we have set up procedures at the University of Colorado to monitor the ongoing

  5. Detecting spatial structures in throughfall data: The effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and variogram estimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Beate; Zimmermann, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades, an increasing number of studies analyzed spatial patterns in throughfall by means of variograms. The estimation of the variogram from sample data requires an appropriate sampling scheme: most importantly, a large sample and a layout of sampling locations that often has to serve both variogram estimation and geostatistical prediction. While some recommendations on these aspects exist, they focus on Gaussian data and high ratios of the variogram range to the extent of the study area. However, many hydrological data, and throughfall data in particular, do not follow a Gaussian distribution. In this study, we examined the effect of extent, sample size, sampling design, and calculation method on variogram estimation of throughfall data. For our investigation, we first generated non-Gaussian random fields based on throughfall data with large outliers. Subsequently, we sampled the fields with three extents (plots with edge lengths of 25 m, 50 m, and 100 m), four common sampling designs (two grid-based layouts, transect and random sampling) and five sample sizes (50, 100, 150, 200, 400). We then estimated the variogram parameters by method-of-moments (non-robust and robust estimators) and residual maximum likelihood. Our key findings are threefold. First, the choice of the extent has a substantial influence on the estimation of the variogram. A comparatively small ratio of the extent to the correlation length is beneficial for variogram estimation. Second, a combination of a minimum sample size of 150, a design that ensures the sampling of small distances and variogram estimation by residual maximum likelihood offers a good compromise between accuracy and efficiency. Third, studies relying on method-of-moments based variogram estimation may have to employ at least 200 sampling points for reliable variogram estimates. These suggested sample sizes exceed the number recommended by studies dealing with Gaussian data by up to 100 %. Given that most previous

  6. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A; Mattsson, Brady J; Germino, Matthew J; Burg, Max Post Van Der; Bradford, John B; Brunson, Mark W

    2014-04-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broad-extent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program's context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system? © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. Correlation between left ventricular filling and ischemic extent during exercise-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Akitada; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Iwase, Mitsunori

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how the extent of exercise-induced myocardial ischemia influence left ventricular filling. Twenty-two consecutive patients with effort angina, consisting of 16 with single vessel disease and 6 with double vessel disease, underwent exercise studies in lying and sitting positions. Extent score (ES) and severity score (SS) were calculated on polar map prepared from early exercise Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images to determine ischemic extent. Pulmonary arterial wedge pressure (PAWP), as obtained at exercise in lying position, correlated significantly well with both ES (r=0.75, p<0.001) and SS (r=0.61, p<0.01). There was, however, no significant correlation between the other hemodynamic parameters, such as heart rate, systolic pressure, rate-pressure product, cardiac index and stroke index, and both ES and SS. Either increased PAWP or ischemic extent was not dependent on the number of diseased vessels. In conclusion, the extent of increased left ventricular filling did not correlate with the number of diseased vessels, but correlated positively with ischemic extent. (N.K.)

  8. Corporate environmental policy statements in mainland China: to what extent do they conform to ISO 14000 documentation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan Shan; Fryxell, Gerald E; Lo, Carlos W H

    2005-04-01

    For decades, industry has been the main source of pollution in China. Determined to make changes, the mainland Chinese authorities have decided to promote mechanisms that incorporate environmental concerns into the internal management of enterprises. This is manifested in the rapid adoption of the ISO14000 standards, including a significant increase in ISO14001 registrations in China. Thus, this study examined the environmental policy statements of 106 certified facilities in mainland China against a strict interpretation of the mandatory requirements of the ISO 14001:1996 standard and the nonmandatory ISO14004 requirements in order to shed some light on the implementation of environmental management systems in an emerging economic giant. It was decided to analyze the environmental policy statement because such a statement is a core element in the ISO system of environmental management of each facility and there are relatively clear and specific requirements on what an environmental policy statement shall include. An analysis of the contents of the environmental policy statements shows that conformance to the relevant requirements of both the mandatory ISO14001 standard and the nonmandatory ISO14004 standard is far from impressive and that the facilities in our sample seldom went beyond the minimum requirements. By using ISO14001 and ISO14004 conformance scores as the dependent variables, we found that conformity to ISO14001 and overall conformance to ISO14000 series can be explained to some extent by the degree of top management commitment, the experience with informal environmental management systems, and the form of ownership of the facilities.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 2. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document contains appendices A (water characterization), B (sediment characterization), C (biota Characterization), D (applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements) from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include 137 Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and 137 Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River

  10. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 2. Appendixes A, B, C, D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains appendices A (water characterization), B (sediment characterization), C (biota Characterization), D (applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements) from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  11. Sealed source and device removal and consolidation feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.E.; Carter, J.G.; Meyers, R.L.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of removing Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) sealed sources from their containment device and consolidating them for transport to a storage or disposal facility. A sealed source is a sealed capsule containing a radioactive material that is placed in a device providing radioactive containment. It is used in the medical, industrial, research, and food-processing communities for calibrating, measuring, gauging, controlling processes, and testing. This feasibility study addresses the key operational, safety, regulatory, and financial requirements of the removal/consolidation process. This report discusses the process to receive, handle, repackage, and ship these sources to an interim or dedicated storage facility until a final disposal repository can be built and become operational (∼ c. 2010). The study identifies operational and facility requirements to perform this work. Hanford, other DOE facilities, and private hot-cell facilities were evaluated to determine which facilities could perform this work. The personnel needed, design and engineering, facility preparation, process waste disposal requirements, and regulatory compliance were evaluated to determine the cost to perform this work. Cost requirements for items that will have to meet future changing regulatory requirements for transportation, transportation container design and engineering, and disposal were not included in this study. The cost associated with in-process consolidation of the sealed sources reported in this study may have not been modified for inflation and were based on 1992 dollars. This study shows that sealed source consolidation is possible with minimal personnel exposure, and would reduce the risk of radioactive releases to the environment. An initial pilot-scale operation could evaluate the possible methods to reduce the cost and consolidate sources

  12. Design Feasible Area on Water Cooled Thorium Breeder Reactor in Equilibrium States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidik Permana; Naoyuki Takaki; Hiroshi Sekimoto

    2006-01-01

    Thorium as supplied fuel has good candidate for fuel material if it is converted into fissile material 233 U which shows superior characteristics in the thermal region. The Shippingport reactor used 233 U-Th fuel system, and the molten salt breeder reactor (MSBR) project showed that breeding is possible in a thermal spectrum. In the present study, feasibility of water cooled thorium breeder reactor is investigated. The key properties such as flux, η value, criticality and breeding performances are evaluated for different moderator to fuel ratios (MFR) and burn-ups. The results show the feasibility of breeding for different MFR and burn-ups. The required 233 U enrichment is about 2% - 9% as charge fuel. The lower MFR and the higher enrichment of 233 U are preferable to improve the average burn-up; however the design feasible window is shrunk. This core shows the design feasible window especially in relation to MFR with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  13. Effect of Emphysema Extent on Serial Lung Function in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Vincent; Hansell, David M; Sverzellati, Nicola; Weycker, Derek; Antoniou, Katerina M; Atwood, Mark; Oster, Gerry; Kirchgaessler, Klaus-Uwe; Collard, Harold R; Wells, Athol U

    2017-11-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema may have artificially preserved lung volumes. In this post hoc analysis, we investigated the relationship between baseline emphysema and fibrosis extents, as well as pulmonary function changes, over 48 weeks. Data were pooled from two phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of IFN-γ-1b in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (GIPF-001 [NCT00047645] and GIPF-007 [NCT00075998]). Patients with Week 48 data, baseline high-resolution computed tomographic images, and FEV 1 /FVC ratios less than 0.8 or greater than 0.9 (0.9 in GIPF-007), as well as randomly selected patients with ratios of 0.8-0.9 and 0.7-0.8, were included. Changes from baseline in pulmonary function at Week 48 were analyzed by emphysema extent. The relationship between emphysema and fibrosis extents and change in pulmonary function was assessed using multivariate linear regression. Emphysema was identified in 38% of patients. A negative correlation was observed between fibrosis and emphysema extents (r = -0.232; P emphysema extent (28 to 65%) showed the smallest FVC decline, with a difference of 3.32% at Week 48 versus patients with no emphysema (P = 0.047). In multivariate analyses, emphysema extent greater than or equal to 15% was associated with significantly reduced FVC decline over 48 weeks versus no emphysema or emphysema less than 15%. No such association was observed for diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide or composite physiologic index. FVC measurements may not be appropriate for monitoring disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema extent greater than or equal to 15%.

  14. Mapping the Extent and Stability of Montane Wetlands ("Bofedales") in the Andes of Bolivia and Peru using Landsat Imagery, 1980s to Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayback, D. A.; Hubbard, A. B.; Yager, K.

    2017-12-01

    Montane wetlands (locally termed "bofedales") in the Andean highlands of Peru and Bolivia provide an important forage resource for camelids (llama and alpaca) in extensive pastoral agriculture systems. For many communities, these systems may provide the only available green forage during the long winter dry season. As a part of a larger project, we are examining the impacts of both current climate change and of socioeconomic drivers on the health and status of these systems. A key part of this analysis requires mapping the current bofedal extent, and observed changes over the recent past, to link to hypothesized drivers. We are therefore mapping bofedal extent using Landsat imagery, from the mid 1980s to present, using a variety of methods (supervised and unsupervised classification, and machine learning). We will present preliminary results from this analysis, showing total regional extent, and observed stability of the bofedales (or lack thereof) over time.

  15. Buddy Tag CONOPS and Requirements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brotz, Jay Kristoffer [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deland, Sharon M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document defines the concept of operations (CONOPS) and the requirements for the Buddy Tag, which is conceived and designed in collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Princeton University under the Department of State Key VerificationAssets Fund. The CONOPS describe how the tags are used to support verification of treaty limitations and is only defined to the extent necessary to support a tag design. The requirements define the necessary functions and desired non-functional features of the Buddy Tag at a high level

  16. Holographic Microscopy: A Feasibility Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Guy W.

    The department of Physics of the University of Glasgow was concerned about losing students after the end of the level 1 Physics course. The current research project started as an attempt to find out the reasons for this, but moved to investigate attitudes towards Physics at several stages during secondary school and attitudes towards science with primary pupils. Analyses of factors, which influence students' intentions towards studying Physics, were performed against the background of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, which interprets people's behaviour by considering three factors: attitude towards behaviour (advantages or disadvantages of being involved in the behaviour, e.g. studying Physics for Honours); subjective norm (approval or disapproval of important people towards engaging in the behaviour, e.g. parents, teacher, general norms of the society); perceived behavioural control (skills, knowledge, cooperation of others, abilities, efforts required to perform the behaviour). Analysis of these factors revealed some reasons for students' withdrawal from Physics after level 1 and pointed to factors which may facilitate students' persistence in the subject. A general analysis of level 1 and level 2 students' attitudes towards different aspects of the university Physics course revealed that the level 1 students' attitudes towards their university course of lectures and course of laboratories tended to be negatively polarised. Recommendations were suggested on the basis of the gathered evidence about how to make students' experience in university Physics more satisfactory for them. The data obtained from the separate analyses of females' and males' attitudes towards university Physics course have showed that attitudes of females and males were similar. The only significant difference between level 1 females and males was found to be the perceived behavioural control factor (students' attitudes towards course difficulty, attitudes towards work load in the course

  17. Gilabert on the Feasibility of Global Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin M. Macleod

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss the analysis of the feasibility of global justice developed by Pablo Gilabert in his recent book From Global Poverty to Global Equality: A Philosophical Exploration. Gilabert makes many valuable contributions to this topic and I agree with most of his analysis. However, I identify a distinction between strategic justification and moral justification that Gilabert neglects. I show how this distinction is useful in addressing objections to the feasibility of global justice. I also claim that Gilabert makes some problematic assumptions concerning the way in which global justice is morally demanding.

  18. Factors influencing the spatial extent of mobile source air pollution impacts: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Jonathan I

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been growing interest among exposure assessors, epidemiologists, and policymakers in the concept of "hot spots", or more broadly, the "spatial extent" of impacts from traffic-related air pollutants. This review attempts to quantitatively synthesize findings about the spatial extent under various circumstances. Methods We include both the peer-reviewed literature and government reports, and focus on four significant air pollutants: carbon monoxide, benzene, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter (including both ultrafine particle counts and fine particle mass. From the identified studies, we extracted information about significant factors that would be hypothesized to influence the spatial extent within the study, such as the study type (e.g., monitoring, air dispersion modeling, GIS-based epidemiological studies, focus on concentrations or health risks, pollutant under study, background concentration, emission rate, and meteorological factors, as well as the study's implicit or explicit definition of spatial extent. We supplement this meta-analysis with results from some illustrative atmospheric dispersion modeling. Results We found that pollutant characteristics and background concentrations best explained variability in previously published spatial extent estimates, with a modifying influence of local meteorology, once some extreme values based on health risk estimates were removed from the analysis. As hypothesized, inert pollutants with high background concentrations had the largest spatial extent (often demonstrating no significant gradient, and pollutants formed in near-source chemical reactions (e.g., nitrogen dioxide had a larger spatial extent than pollutants depleted in near-source chemical reactions or removed through coagulation processes (e.g., nitrogen oxide and ultrafine particles. Our illustrative dispersion model illustrated the complex interplay of spatial extent definitions, emission rates

  19. Evaluation of multiple hydraulic models in generating design/near-real time flood inundation extents under various geophysical settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Rajib, M. A.; Jafarzadegan, K.; Merwade, V.

    2015-12-01

    Application of land surface/hydrologic models within an operational flood forecasting system can provide probable time of occurrence and magnitude of streamflow at specific locations along a stream. Creating time-varying spatial extent of flood inundation and depth requires the use of a hydraulic or hydrodynamic model. Models differ in representing river geometry and surface roughness which can lead to different output depending on the particular model being used. The result from a single hydraulic model provides just one possible realization of the flood extent without capturing the uncertainty associated with the input or the model parameters. The objective of this study is to compare multiple hydraulic models toward generating ensemble flood inundation extents. Specifically, relative performances of four hydraulic models, including AutoRoute, HEC-RAS, HEC-RAS 2D, and LISFLOOD are evaluated under different geophysical conditions in several locations across the United States. By using streamflow output from the same hydrologic model (SWAT in this case), hydraulic simulations are conducted for three configurations: (i) hindcasting mode by using past observed weather data at daily time scale in which models are being calibrated against USGS streamflow observations, (ii) validation mode using near real-time weather data at sub-daily time scale, and (iii) design mode with extreme streamflow data having specific return periods. Model generated inundation maps for observed flood events both from hindcasting and validation modes are compared with remotely sensed images, whereas the design mode outcomes are compared with corresponding FEMA generated flood hazard maps. The comparisons presented here will give insights on probable model-specific nature of biases and their relative advantages/disadvantages as components of an operational flood forecasting system.

  20. Successes and challenges from formation to implementation of eleven broad-extent conservation programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beever, Erik A.; Bradford, John B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Mattsson, Brady J.; Post van der Burg, Max; Brunson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Integration of conservation partnerships across geographic, biological, and administrative boundaries is increasingly relevant because drivers of change, such as climate shifts, transcend these boundaries. We explored successes and challenges of established conservation programs that span multiple watersheds and consider both social and ecological concerns. We asked representatives from a diverse set of 11 broadextent conservation partnerships in 29 countries 17 questions that pertained to launching and maintaining partnerships for broad-extent conservation, specifying ultimate management objectives, and implementation and learning. Partnerships invested more funds in implementing conservation actions than any other aspect of conservation, and a program’s context (geographic extent, United States vs. other countries, developed vs. developing nation) appeared to substantially affect program approach. Despite early successes of these organizations and benefits of broad-extent conservation, specific challenges related to uncertainties in scaling up information and to coordination in the face of diverse partner governance structures, conflicting objectives, and vast uncertainties regarding future system dynamics hindered long-term success, as demonstrated by the focal organizations. Engaging stakeholders, developing conservation measures, and implementing adaptive management were dominant challenges. To inform future research on broad-extent conservation, we considered several challenges when we developed detailed questions, such as what qualities of broad-extent partnerships ensure they complement, integrate, and strengthen, rather than replace, local conservation efforts and which adaptive management processes yield actionable conservation strategies that account explicitly for dynamics and uncertainties regarding multiscale governance, environmental conditions, and knowledge of the system?

  1. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitti, Davide O; Bovenga, Fabio; Chiaradia, Maria T; Greco, Mario; Pinelli, Gianpaolo

    2015-07-28

    This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS) measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR) and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM). A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimated UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory remedial investigation/feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, R.D.; Hoffman, J.M.; Hyde, L.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) began in June 1987 to evaluate 13 contaminated waste area groupings (WAGs) to determine the feasibility and benefits of potential remedial action. The RI/FS and any future remedial action at ORNL will be of national significance and will likely lead to developments that will become models for environmental investigations and cleanups. Bechtel National, Inc. and a team of subcontractors will be working with Martin Marietta Energy systems to conduct intensive field investigations to obtain data required to evaluate the WAGs. The RI/F project continued in FY 1988 with project planning and preparation for field activities. Remedial Investigation (RI) Plans were prepared for 10 of the 13 WAGs. These plans were developed with sufficient information to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements, with intensive attention given to environmental, safety, and health protection; waste management; data management; and quality assurance. This paper reports on the progress made during FY 1988 and discusses activities planned for FY 1989

  3. Feasibility of Using Synthetic Aperture Radar to Aid UAV Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide O. Nitti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR to aid Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV navigation when Inertial Navigation System (INS measurements are not accurate enough to eliminate drifts from a planned trajectory. This problem can affect medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE UAV class, which permits heavy and wide payloads (as required by SAR and flights for thousands of kilometres accumulating large drifts. The basic idea is to infer position and attitude of an aerial platform by inspecting both amplitude and phase of SAR images acquired onboard. For the amplitude-based approach, the system navigation corrections are obtained by matching the actual coordinates of ground landmarks with those automatically extracted from the SAR image. When the use of SAR amplitude is unfeasible, the phase content can be exploited through SAR interferometry by using a reference Digital Terrain Model (DTM. A feasibility analysis was carried out to derive system requirements by exploring both radiometric and geometric parameters of the acquisition setting. We showed that MALE UAV, specific commercial navigation sensors and SAR systems, typical landmark position accuracy and classes, and available DTMs lead to estimated UAV coordinates with errors bounded within ±12 m, thus making feasible the proposed SAR-based backup system.

  4. Feasibility of AmbulanCe-Based Telemedicine (FACT study: safety, feasibility and reliability of third generation in-ambulance telemedicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Yperzeele

    Full Text Available Telemedicine is currently mainly applied as an in-hospital service, but this technology also holds potential to improve emergency care in the prehospital arena. We report on the safety, feasibility and reliability of in-ambulance teleconsultation using a telemedicine system of the third generation.A routine ambulance was equipped with a system for real-time bidirectional audio-video communication, automated transmission of vital parameters, glycemia and electronic patient identification. All patients ( ≥ 18 years transported during emergency missions by a Prehospital Intervention Team of the Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel were eligible for inclusion. To guarantee mobility and to facilitate 24/7 availability, the teleconsultants used lightweight laptop computers to access a dedicated telemedicine platform, which also provided functionalities for neurological assessment, electronic reporting and prehospital notification of the in-hospital team. Key registrations included any safety issue, mobile connectivity, communication of patient information, audiovisual quality, user-friendliness and accuracy of the prehospital diagnosis.Prehospital teleconsultation was obtained in 41 out of 43 cases (95.3%. The success rates for communication of blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, glycemia, and electronic patient identification were 78.7%, 84.8%, 80.6%, 64.0%, and 84.2%. A preliminary prehospital diagnosis was formulated in 90.2%, with satisfactory agreement with final in-hospital diagnoses. Communication of a prehospital report to the in-hospital team was successful in 94.7% and prenotification of the in-hospital team via SMS in 90.2%. Failures resulted mainly from limited mobile connectivity and to a lesser extent from software, hardware or human error. The user acceptance was high.Ambulance-based telemedicine of the third generation is safe, feasible and reliable but further research and development, especially with regard to high

  5. The spatial extent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emission in the Herbig star HD 179218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, A. S.; Labadie, L.; Pantin, E.; Matter, A.; Alvarez, C.; Esquej, P.; Grellmann, R.; Rebolo, R.; Telesco, C.; Wolf, S.

    2018-04-01

    Aim. We investigate, in the mid-infrared, the spatial properties of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emission in the disk of HD 179218, an intermediate-mass Herbig star at 300 pc. Methods: We obtained mid-infrared images in the PAH-1, PAH-2 and Si-6 filters centered at 8.6, 11.3, and 12.5 μm, and N-band low-resolution spectra using CanariCam on the 10-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We compared the point spread function (PSF) profiles measured in the PAH filters to the profile derived in the Si-6 filter, where the thermal continuum emission dominates. We performed radiative transfer modeling of the spectral energy distribution (SED) and produced synthetic images in the three filters to investigate different spatial scenarios. Results: Our data show that the disk emission is spatially resolved in the PAH-1 and PAH-2 filters, while unresolved in the Si-6 filter. Thanks to very good observing conditions, an average full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.232'', 0.280'' and 0.293'' is measured in the three filters, respectively. Gaussian disk fitting and quadratic subtraction of the science and calibrator PSFs suggests a lower-limit characteristic angular diameter of the emission of 100 mas, or 30 au. The photometric and spectroscopic results are compatible with previous findings. Our radiative transfer (RT) modeling of the continuum suggests that the resolved emission should result from PAH molecules on the disk atmosphere being UV-excited by the central star. Simple geometrical models of the PAH component compared to the underlying continuum point to a PAH emission uniformly extended out to the physical limits of the disk model. Furthermore, our RT best model of the continuum requires a negative exponent of the surface density power-law, in contrast with earlier modeling pointing to a positive exponent. Conclusions: We have spatially resolved - for the first time to our knowledge - the PAHs emission in the disk of HD 179218 and set constraints on its

  6. Feasibility studies for a wireless 60 GHz tracking detector readout

    CERN Document Server

    Dittmeier, Sebastian; Soltveit, Hans Kristian; Wiedner, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The amount of data produced by highly granular silicon tracking detectors in high energy physics experiments poses a major challenge to readout systems. At high collision rates, e.g. at LHC experiments, only a small fraction of data can be read out with currently used technologies. To cope with the requirements of future or upgraded experiments new data transfer techniques are required which offer high data rates at low power and low material budget. Wireless technologies operating in the 60 GHz band or at higher frequencies offer high data rates and are thus a promising upcoming alternative to conventional data transmission via electrical cables or optical fibers. Using wireless technology, the amount of cables and connectors in detectors can be significantly reduced. Tracking detectors profit most from a reduced material budget as fewer secondary particle interactions (multiple Coulomb scattering, energy loss, etc.) improve the tracking performance in general. We present feasibility studies regarding the in...

  7. A universal pre- and postprocessing system, feasible or fiction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonink, G.; Bink, E.

    1982-01-01

    The large number and the widespread applicability of available auxiliary software for pre- and postprocessing of finite element analyses has led to the desire to obtain access to one or more general purpose tools. The article discusses important aspects influencing the feasibility and likelihood of such tools to be developed. Required capabilities are summarized as well as features incorporated in existing programs, implications of new hardware and software provisions and types of suppliers one may expect to come out with attractive products. The preprocessing function in itself is straight forward and is covered by increasingly convenient tools. Computer aided design (CAD) requirements however dictate the necessity to interact strongly with the postprocessing part. Therefore developers in the CAD area of application are expected to be the ones with the potential of offering the most flexible facilities for large ranges of combined pre- and postprocessing activities. (orig.)

  8. Comparative analysis of knowledge representation and reasoning requirements across a range of life sciences textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhri, Vinay K; Elenius, Daniel; Goldenkranz, Andrew; Gong, Allison; Martone, Maryann E; Webb, William; Yorke-Smith, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Using knowledge representation for biomedical projects is now commonplace. In previous work, we represented the knowledge found in a college-level biology textbook in a fashion useful for answering questions. We showed that embedding the knowledge representation and question-answering abilities in an electronic textbook helped to engage student interest and improve learning. A natural question that arises from this success, and this paper's primary focus, is whether a similar approach is applicable across a range of life science textbooks. To answer that question, we considered four different textbooks, ranging from a below-introductory college biology text to an advanced, graduate-level neuroscience textbook. For these textbooks, we investigated the following questions: (1) To what extent is knowledge shared between the different textbooks? (2) To what extent can the same upper ontology be used to represent the knowledge found in different textbooks? (3) To what extent can the questions of interest for a range of textbooks be answered by using the same reasoning mechanisms? Our existing modeling and reasoning methods apply especially well both to a textbook that is comparable in level to the text studied in our previous work (i.e., an introductory-level text) and to a textbook at a lower level, suggesting potential for a high degree of portability. Even for the overlapping knowledge found across the textbooks, the level of detail covered in each textbook was different, which requires that the representations must be customized for each textbook. We also found that for advanced textbooks, representing models and scientific reasoning processes was particularly important. With some additional work, our representation methodology would be applicable to a range of textbooks. The requirements for knowledge representation are common across textbooks, suggesting that a shared semantic infrastructure for the life sciences is feasible. Because our representation overlaps

  9. Mixture model to assess the extent of cross-transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajczyk, Rafael T; Kauermann, Göran; Sagel, Ulrich; Kretzschmar, Mirjam

    2009-08-01

    Creation of a mixture model based on Poisson processes for assessment of the extent of cross-transmission of multidrug-resistant pathogens in the hospital. We propose a 2-component mixture of Poisson processes to describe the time series of detected cases of colonization. The first component describes the admission process of patients with colonization, and the second describes the cross-transmission. The data set used to illustrate the method consists of the routinely collected records for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), imipenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii over a period of 3 years in a German tertiary care hospital. For MRSA and multidrug-resistant A. baumannii, cross-transmission was estimated to be responsible for more than 80% of cases; for imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, cross-transmission was estimated to be responsible for 59% of cases. For new cases observed within a window of less than 28 days for MRSA and multidrug-resistant A. baumannii or 40 days for imipenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, there was a 50% or greater probability that the cause was cross-transmission. The proposed method offers a solution to assessing of the extent of cross-transmission, which can be of clinical use. The method can be applied using freely available software (the package FlexMix in R) and it requires relatively little data.

  10. Considerations on pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics: can everything be explained by the extent of drug binding to its receptor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Hernández, G; Granados-Soto, V

    2000-03-01

    It is frequently assumed that pharmacological responses depend solely on the extent of drug binding to its receptor according to the occupational theory. It is therefore presumed that the intensity of the effect is determined by drug concentration at its receptor site, yielding a unique concentration-effect relationship. However, when dependence, abstinence, and tolerance phenomena occur, as well as for pharmacological responses in vivo that are modulated by homeostatic mechanisms, the rate of drug input shifts the concentration-effect relationship. Hence, such responses cannot be explained on the sole basis of the extent of drug binding to its receptor. Information on the cellular and molecular processes involved in the generation of abstinence, dependence, and tolerance will undoubtedly result in the development of pharmacodynamic models allowing a satisfactory explanation of drug effects modulated by these phenomena. Notwithstanding, integrative physiology concepts are required to develop pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models allowing the description of drug effects in an intact organism. It is therefore important to emphasize that integrative physiology cannot be neglected in pharmacology teaching and research, but should be considered as an equally valuable tool as molecular biology and other biomedical disciplines for the understanding of pharmacological effects.

  11. Bioventing feasibility test to aid remediation strategy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pearce, K

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A case study is presented where the feasibility of bioventing was assessed for the remediation of a petroleum-contaminated site. This was achieved through the determination of the radius of influence of a single vent well, the soil gas permeability...

  12. The Feasibility of Collecting School Nurse Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2016-01-01

    School nurses cite barriers to collecting comprehensive data on the care they provide. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting school nurse data on selected child health and education outcomes. Outcome variables included school health office visits; health provider, parent, and staff communication; early dismissal; and medications…

  13. Feasibility and Stability in Normative Political Philosophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2006-01-01

    Arguments from stability for liberal nationalism rely on considerations about conditions for the feasibility or stability of liberal political ideals and factual claims about the circumstances under which these conditions are fulfilled in order to argue for nationalist conclusions. Such reliance ...

  14. Feasibility of uranium enrichment in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    The Council considered that provided the balance between costs and markets was found to be acceptable, there was no valid reason against the Government proceeding with a study on the feasibility of, and perhaps participating in the establishment of a commercial uranium enrichment industry in Australia. Areas covered include technical expertise and industrial structure in Australia, environmental aspects and safeguards

  15. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, Tim [Antares Group Inc.

    2013-10-30

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to assess the feasibility of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. A solar energy project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of potential future energy savings, increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a solar project’s overall feasibility, including: Technical appropriateness; Solar resource characteristics and expected system performance; Levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) economic assessment. The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to prepare a biomass resource assessment study and evaluate the feasibility of a bioenergy project on Community land. A biomass project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a biomass project’s overall feasibility, including: Resource analysis and costs; Identification of potential bioenergy projects; Technical and economic (levelized cost of energy) modeling for selected project configuration.

  16. Bond Feasibility Study. Project Identification Committee Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichita Public Schools, KS.

    A committee, appointed by the Board of Education, was requested to make a comprehensive study of the school building needs of Unified School District No. 259. In an attempt to determine the feasibility of a general bond election to upgrade the public schools, the specific charge to the committee was to evaluate the needs for physical plant…

  17. Technical feasibility study on polycarbonate solar panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hackmann, M.M.; Meuwissen, M.H.H.; Bots, T.L.; Buijs, J.A.H.M.; Broek, K.M.; Kinderman, R.; Tanck, O.B.F.; Schuurmans, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a technical feasibility study on the application of polycarbonate (PC) plates in a superstrate photovoltaic module design. The lamination process was performed in a conventional laminator apparatus using low temperature curing (100°C) ethylene-vinyl-acetate (EVA) as the potting

  18. A method for determining the extent of thermal burns in elephants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shakespeare

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A practical method was developed to assess the extent of burns suffered by elephants caught in bush fires. In developing this method, the surface areas of the different body parts of juvenile, subadult and adult elephants were first determined using standard equations, and then expressed as a percentage of the total body surface area. When viewed from a distance, the burnt proportion of all body segments is estimated, converted to percentages of total body surface area, and then summed to determine the extent of burns suffered.

  19. Role of extent of resection on quality of life in patients with newly diagnosed GBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudry, Usama Khalid; Shaikh, Huzaifa Ismail; Nisar, Areeba; Khan, Saad Akhtar; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2018-01-01

    Glioblastomas known for their adverse outcomes are most reportedly managed by surgical resection. Studies on the impact of (Extent of Resection) EOR against Quality of Life (QOL) are very limited. We have collected data from recent studies in this review to extract a general consensus among the neurosurgeons regarding the EOR. Key parameters like functional independence, neurocognitive improvements and global health status have been explored in the context of QOL. The currently available data suggests that an increased EOR may help improve QOL in GBM patients. With the help of recent advancements it may be possible to attain a better extent of resection while operating on GBMs.

  20. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  1. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  2. Diabetes and male sex are key risk factor correlates of the extent of coronary artery calcification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, Rachel; Zhao, Ying; Wiklund, Urban

    2017-01-01

    for CAC scoring. RESULTS: Among all patients, male sex (OR = 4.85, pdyslipidemia and smoking also showing a relationship. Among patients with CAC, age, diabetes, hypertension...... and dyslipidemia were associated with an increasing CAC score in males and females, with diabetes being the strongest dichotomous risk factor (p... males and females. To a lesser extent, hypertension and dyslipidemia were also associated in the high CAC quantiles and the low CAC quantiles respectively. CONCLUSION: In addition to age and male sex in the total population, diabetes is the most important correlate of CAC extent in both sexes....

  3. Section 4: Requirements Intertwining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucopoulos, Pericles

    Business analysts are being asked to develop increasingly complex and varied business systems that need to cater to the changing and dynamic market conditions of the new economy. This is particularly acute in today’s turbulent business environment where powerful forces such as deregulation, globalisation, mergers, advances in information and telecommunications technologies, and increasing education of people provide opportunities for organising work in ways that have never before been possible. Enterprises attempt to create wealth either by getting better at improving their products and services or by harnessing creativity and human-centred management to create innovative solutions. In these business settings, requirements become critical in bridging system solutions to organisational and societal problems. They intertwine organisational, social, cognitive, and implementation considerations and they can provide unique insights to change in systems and their business context. Such design situations often involve multiple stakeholders from different participating organisations, subcontractors, divisions, etc., who may have a diversity of expertise, come from different organisational cultures and often have competing goals. The success or failure of many projects depends, to a large extent, on understanding the contextual setting of requirements and their interaction amongst a diverse population of stakeholders.

  4. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 300-FF-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Over 1,400 waste facilities have been identified on the Hanford Site. Most of the waste facilities are located within geographic areas on the Hanford Site that are referred to as the 100, 200, 300, 400, and 1100 areas. The purpose of this work plan is to document the project scoping process and to outline all remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) activities, to determine the nature and extent of the threat presented by releases of hazardous substances from the operable unit, and to evaluate proposed remedies for such releases. The goal of the 300-FF-1 remedial investigation (RI) is to provide sufficient information needed to conduct the feasibility study (FS), by determining the nature and extent of the threat to public health and the environment posed by releases of hazardous substances from 300-FF-1, and the performance of specific remedial technologies. 62 refs., 28 figs., 48 tabs

  5. Modelling curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloninko K.S.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors research the issue of functional properties of curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand. Settlement of the problem, and its connection with important scientific and practical tasks. According to its nature, the market economy is unstable and is in constant movement. Economy has an effective instrument for explanation of changes in economic environment; this tool is called the modelling of economic processes. The modelling of economic processes depends first and foremost on the building of economic model which is the base for the formalization of economic process, that is, the building of mathematical model. The effective means for formalization of economic process is the creation of the model of hypothetic or imaginary economy. The building of demand model is significant for the market of goods and services. The problem includes the receiving (as the result of modelling definite functional properties of curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand according to which one can determine their mathematical model. Another problem lies in obtaining majorant properties of curves of joint demand on the market of goods and services. Analysis of the latest researches and publications. Many domestic and foreign scientists dedicated their studies to the researches and building of the models of curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand. In spite of considerable work of the scientists, such problems as functional properties of the curves and their practical use in modelling. The purpose of the article is to describe functional properties of curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand on the market of goods and services on the base of modelling of their building. Scientific novelty and practical value. The theoretical regulations (for functional properties of curves of manufacturing feasibilities and demand received as a result of the present research, that is convexity, give extra practical possibilities in a microeconomic

  6. Feasibility Assessment of a Fine-Grained Access Control Model on Resource Constrained Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte Itzazelaia, Mikel; Astorga, Jasone; Jacob, Eduardo; Huarte, Maider; Romaña, Pedro

    2018-02-13

    Upcoming smart scenarios enabled by the Internet of Things (IoT) envision smart objects that provide services that can adapt to user behavior or be managed to achieve greater productivity. In such environments, smart things are inexpensive and, therefore, constrained devices. However, they are also critical components because of the importance of the information that they provide. Given this, strong security is a requirement, but not all security mechanisms in general and access control models in particular are feasible. In this paper, we present the feasibility assessment of an access control model that utilizes a hybrid architecture and a policy language that provides dynamic fine-grained policy enforcement in the sensors, which requires an efficient message exchange protocol called Hidra. This experimental performance assessment includes a prototype implementation, a performance evaluation model, the measurements and related discussions, which demonstrate the feasibility and adequacy of the analyzed access control model.

  7. Millimeter-scale MEMS enabled autonomous systems: system feasibility and mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulskamp, Jeffrey S.

    2012-06-01

    Millimeter-scale robotic systems based on highly integrated microelectronics and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) could offer unique benefits and attributes for small-scale autonomous systems. This extreme scale for robotics will naturally constrain the realizable system capabilities significantly. This paper assesses the feasibility of developing such systems by defining the fundamental design trade spaces between component design variables and system level performance parameters. This permits the development of mobility enabling component technologies within a system relevant context. Feasible ranges of system mass, required aerodynamic power, available battery power, load supported power, flight endurance, and required leg load bearing capability are presented for millimeter-scale platforms. The analysis illustrates the feasibility of developing both flight capable and ground mobile millimeter-scale autonomous systems while highlighting the significant challenges that must be overcome to realize their potential.

  8. Feasibility for EGRET detection of antimatter concentrations in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although the Grand Unified Theories of elementary particle dynamics have to some extent reduced the aesthetic attraction of matter-antimatter symmetry in the Universe, the idea is still not ruled out. Although first introduced by Alfven (1965), most of the theoretical development related to gamma-ray astronomy was carried out by Stecker, who has proposed (Stecker, Morgan, and Bredekamp, 1971) matter-antimatter annihilation extending back to large redshifts as a possible explanation of the apparently extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation. Other candidate explanations were also proposed, such as superposition of extragalactic discrete sources. Clearly, the existence of significant amounts of antimatter in the universe would be of great cosmological importance; its detection, however, is not simple. Since the photon is its own antiparticle, it carries no signature identifying whether it originated in a matter or an antimatter process; even aggregates of photons (spectra) are expected to be identical from matter and antimatter processes. The only likely indicator of the presence of concentrations of antimatter is evidence of its annihilation with normal matter, assuming there is some region of contact or overlap. The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) on the Gamma Ray Observatory, with a substantial increase in sensitivity compared with earlier high energy gamma ray telescopes, may be able to address this issue. The feasibility of using EGRET in such a search for antimatter annihilation in the Universe is considered.

  9. Feasibility for EGRET detection of antimatter concentrations in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Although the Grand Unified Theories of elementary particle dynamics have to some extent reduced the aesthetic attraction of matter-antimatter symmetry in the Universe, the idea is still not ruled out. Although first introduced by Alfven (1965), most of the theoretical development related to gamma-ray astronomy was carried out by Stecker, who has proposed (Stecker, Morgan, and Bredekamp, 1971) matter-antimatter annihilation extending back to large redshifts as a possible explanation of the apparently extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation. Other candidate explanations were also proposed, such as superposition of extragalactic discrete sources. Clearly, the existence of significant amounts of antimatter in the universe would be of great cosmological importance; its detection, however, is not simple. Since the photon is its own antiparticle, it carries no signature identifying whether it originated in a matter or an antimatter process; even aggregates of photons (spectra) are expected to be identical from matter and antimatter processes. The only likely indicator of the presence of concentrations of antimatter is evidence of its annihilation with normal matter, assuming there is some region of contact or overlap. The EGRET (Energetic Gamma-Ray Experimental Telescope) on the Gamma Ray Observatory, with a substantial increase in sensitivity compared with earlier high energy gamma ray telescopes, may be able to address this issue. The feasibility of using EGRET in such a search for antimatter annihilation in the Universe is considered

  10. A curve fitting approach to estimate the extent of fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Weening, D.; Jonkers, E.; Boer, T.; Stellaard, F.; Small, A. C.; Preston, T.; Vonk, R. J.; Priebe, M. G.

    Background Information about the extent of carbohydrate digestion and fermentation is critical to our ability to explore the metabolic effects of carbohydrate fermentation in vivo. We used cooked (13)C-labelled barley kernels, which are rich in indigestible carbohydrates, to develop a method which

  11. Flood extent and water level estimation from SAR using data-model integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajadi, O. A.; Meyer, F. J.

    2017-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images have long been recognized as a valuable data source for flood mapping. Compared to other sources, SAR's weather and illumination independence and large area coverage at high spatial resolution supports reliable, frequent, and detailed observations of developing flood events. Accordingly, SAR has the potential to greatly aid in the near real-time monitoring of natural hazards, such as flood detection, if combined with automated image processing. This research works towards increasing the reliability and temporal sampling of SAR-derived flood hazard information by integrating information from multiple SAR sensors and SAR modalities (images and Interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence) and by combining SAR-derived change detection information with hydrologic and hydraulic flood forecast models. First, the combination of multi-temporal SAR intensity images and coherence information for generating flood extent maps is introduced. The application of least-squares estimation integrates flood information from multiple SAR sensors, thus increasing the temporal sampling. SAR-based flood extent information will be combined with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to reduce false alarms and to estimate water depth and flood volume. The SAR-based flood extent map is assimilated into the Hydrologic Engineering Center River Analysis System (Hec-RAS) model to aid in hydraulic model calibration. The developed technology is improving the accuracy of flood information by exploiting information from data and models. It also provides enhanced flood information to decision-makers supporting the response to flood extent and improving emergency relief efforts.

  12. The extent of permafrost in China during the local Last Glacial Maximum (LLGM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, L.; Jin, H.; Li, C.; Cui, Z.; Chang, X.; Marchenko, S.S.; Vandenberghe, J.; Zhang, T.; Luo, D.; Liu, G.; Yi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent investigations into relict periglacial phenomena in northern and western China and on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau provide information for delineating the extent of permafrost in China during the Late Pleistocene. Polygonal and wedge-shaped structures indicate that, during the local Last Glacial

  13. Fascin expression in cholesteatoma: correlation with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnetoglu, A; Sari, M; Baglam, T; Erbarut Seven, I; Yumusakhuylu, A C; Topuz, M F; Batman, C

    2015-08-01

    Fascin is an actin-bundling protein found in cell membrane protrusions and increases cell motility. The expression of fascin in epithelial neoplasms has been described only recently. No data are available concerning the role of this protein in invasive cholesteatoma. Thus, we investigated the expression of fascin in cholesteatoma tissue and the relationship between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation of the destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Cholesteatoma specimens of 28 patients and external auditory canal (EAC) skin specimens of the same patients (as the control group) were collected from mastoidectomies. Immunohistochemical technique was used to investigate the fascin expression in all cholesteatoma tissues and EAC skin specimens. Immunohistochemical staining was assessed semiquantitatively based on the thickness of epithelium. SPSS software version 16.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was performed to statistically analyse the relationships between fascin expression and intraoperative evaluation destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Immunohistochemically, there was no or very low fascin expression observed in normal epithelial cells of EAC skin, while expressed in cholesteatoma tissue. Also, fascin expression in cholesteatoma tissues was significantly correlated with destruction of ossicular chain and extent of the disease. Fascin expression is usually found in cholesteatoma epithelium and is correlated with destruction of the ossicular chain and extent of disease. Considering all of the correlations between the clinical and histopathological findings, 'fascin immunoexpression scoring' may be used for histological grading of cholesteatoma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Interdependence between measures of extent and severity of myocardial perfusion defects provided by automatic quantification programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Ali, Henrik Hussein; Palmer, John; Carlsson, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the values of lesion extent and severity provided by the two automatic quantification programs AutoQUANT and 4D-MSPECT using myocardial perfusion images generated by Monte Carlo simulation of a digital phantom. The combination between a realistic computer phantom and a...

  15. Estimating the seaward extent of sea breeze from QuickSCAT scatterometry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aparna, M.; Shetye, S.R.; Shankar, D.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.

    An objective method for quantifying the seaward extent of the sea breeze is presented. The underlying assumption is that the offshore decay in the strength of the sea breeze results in an offshore decay of the vector correlation between the wind...

  16. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Prekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaskowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and

  17. 26 CFR 1.731-1 - Extent of recognition of gain or loss on distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., that is, capital gain or loss. (b) Gain or loss recognized by partnership. A distribution of property... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Distributions by A Partnership § 1.731-1 Extent of... gain. (i) Where money is distributed by a partnership to a partner, no gain shall be recognized to the...

  18. Extent of availability and utilization of law reports by law students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the extent of availability and utilization of law reports by final year lawstudents in the Universities of Uyo and Calabar law libraries. Survey research design was adopted for the study. A total of 450 under graduate final year Law students projects were examined to determine thefrequencyofcitations of ...

  19. Accuracy of determining preoperative cancer extent measured by automated breast ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Fukuma, Eisuke

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring preoperative cancer extent using automated breast ultrasonography (US). This retrospective study consisted of 40 patients with histopathologically confirmed breast cancer. All of the patients underwent automated breast US (ABVS; Siemens Medical Solutions, Mountain View, CA, USA) on the day before the surgery. The sizes of the lesions on US were measured on coronal multiplanar reconstruction images using the ABVS workstation. Histopathological measurement of tumor size included not only the invasive foci but also any in situ component and was used as the gold standard. The discrepancy of the tumor extent between automated breast US and the histological examination was calculated. Automated breast US enabled visualization of the breast carcinomas in all patients. The mean size of the lesions on US was 12 mm (range 4-62 mm). The histopathological diagnosis was ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in seven patients and invasive ductal carcinoma in 33 patients (18 without an intraductal component, 15 with an intraductal component). Lesions ranged in diameter from 4 to 65 mm (mean 16 mm). The accuracy of determination of the tumor extent with a deviation in length of <2 cm was 98% (39/40). Automated breast US is thought to be useful for evaluating tumor extent preoperatively.

  20. The Extent to which the Chemistry Textbook of Grade 11 is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to identify the extent to which the chemistry textbook of grade 11 in Ethiopian schools is appropriate for learner-centered approach. The content of the new chemistry textbook for grade 11 was analyzed vis-à-vis the suggested evidence of learnercentered techniques. The analysis covered the ...

  1. To What Extent Does Current Scientific Research and Textbook Content Align? A Methodology and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierema, Andrea M.-K.; Schwartz, Renee S.; Gill, Sharon A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent calls for reform in education recommend science curricula to be based on central ideas instead of a larger number of topics and for alignment between current scientific research and curricula. Because alignment is rarely studied, especially for central ideas, we developed a methodology to discover the extent of alignment between primary…

  2. Extent of reference services to users in Ebonyi State Public Libraary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users are very satisfied with the extent of reference services provided to them by the public library studied. Findings further show that the reference section of Ebonyi State Public Library, Abakiliki is faced with the problems of inadequate reading space, equipment and furniture, reference information sources, unconducive ...

  3. a research tool for analysing and monitoring the Extent to which ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice at the majority of under-resourced rural schools in the country. ... into the extent to which they integrate natural resource management issues. ... education is promoted as the best educational strategy to deal with the ... environmental sustainability and human wellbeing. ..... Comparative Education, 38(2), 171–187.

  4. Total Quality Management in Secondary Schools in Kenya: Extent of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngware, Moses Waithanji; Wamukuru, David Kuria; Odebero, Stephen Onyango

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent to which secondary schools practiced aspects of total quality management (TQM). Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. A sample of 300 teachers in a residential session during a school holiday provided their perceptions on the practice of TQM in their schools. Data…

  5. Detecting the Extent of Cellular Decomposition after Sub-Eutectoid Annealing in Rolled UMo Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautz, Elizabeth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sweet, Lucas E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-31

    This report presents an automated image processing approach to quantifying microstructure image data, specifically the extent of eutectoid (cellular) decomposition in rolled U-10Mo foils. An image processing approach is used here to be able to quantitatively describe microstructure image data in order to relate microstructure to processing parameters (time, temperature, deformation).

  6. The Extent and Effects of Peer Pressure among High School Students: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B. Bradford

    1982-01-01

    The extent of peer pressure in high school and its influences on behavior were examined in accounts from college undergraduates. One-third of both genders identified peer pressure as difficult, being stronger for females. Pressure areas included dating, sexual activity, and drug and alcohol use, but not parent-child relationships. (Author/CM)

  7. Effect of dietary molasses on the site and extent of digestion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the site and extent of digestion of nutrients in sheep fed broiler litter alone (100% litter treatment), broiler litter plus 7.5% sugarcane molasses (92.5% litter treatment) and broiler litter plus 15% molasses (85% litter treatment). Voluntary intake was increased by molasses, ...

  8. Duodenal Derotation and Extent Tapering Jejunoplasty as Primary Repair for Neonates With High Jejunal Atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Cheng Luo

    2010-10-01

    Conclusion: In very proximal high atresia, the extent of tapering is limited by the proximity of the ligament of Treitz. Duodenal derotation provides better access to the high atresia. The results of this limited experience suggest that the DDETJ procedure could provide an alternative therapy in patients with high jejunal atresia.

  9. Efficacy of helical CT in evaluating local tumor extent of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT (HCT) in the determination of local tumor extent of breast cancer. One hundred forty consecutive patients with breast cancer, including 87 invasive ductal carcinomas without extensive intraductal components (EIC), 44 invasive ductal carcinomas with EIC, 2 non-invasive ductal carcinomas, and 7 invasive lobular carcinomas, were included in the study. Three-dimensional tumor diameter including whole extent was measured on HCT, and the amount of invasion to fat tissue, skin, pectoral muscle, and chest wall was estimated using a three-step scale. These results were then compared with the pathological findings. Breast cancers appeared as areas of high attenuation compared with the surrounding breast tissue in all patients. Tumor extent was correctly diagnosed by HCT to within a maximum difference of 1 cm in 88 patients (63%) and within 2 cm in 122 patients (87%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing muscular invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing skin invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 84%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. HCT was able to visualize all of the tumors and detect the correct tumor extent in most patients. (author)

  10. Efficacy of helical CT in evaluating local tumor extent of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozaki, Yutaka [Juntendo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Urayasu Hospital

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the diagnostic accuracy of helical CT (HCT) in the determination of local tumor extent of breast cancer. One hundred forty consecutive patients with breast cancer, including 87 invasive ductal carcinomas without extensive intraductal components (EIC), 44 invasive ductal carcinomas with EIC, 2 non-invasive ductal carcinomas, and 7 invasive lobular carcinomas, were included in the study. Three-dimensional tumor diameter including whole extent was measured on HCT, and the amount of invasion to fat tissue, skin, pectoral muscle, and chest wall was estimated using a three-step scale. These results were then compared with the pathological findings. Breast cancers appeared as areas of high attenuation compared with the surrounding breast tissue in all patients. Tumor extent was correctly diagnosed by HCT to within a maximum difference of 1 cm in 88 patients (63%) and within 2 cm in 122 patients (87%). Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing muscular invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 100%, 99%, and 99%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in diagnosing skin invasion of breast cancer using HCT were 84%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. HCT was able to visualize all of the tumors and detect the correct tumor extent in most patients. (author)

  11. The visual extent of an object: suppose we know the object locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijlings, J.R.R.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Scha, R.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    The visual extent of an object reaches beyond the object itself. This is a long standing fact in psychology and is reflected in image retrieval techniques which aggregate statistics from the whole image in order to identify the object within. However, it is unclear to what degree and how the visual

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.60 - To what extent must my agency use electronic commerce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agency use electronic commerce? 102-118.60 Section 102-118.60 Public Contracts and Property Management... Services § 102-118.60 To what extent must my agency use electronic commerce? Your agency must use electronic commerce in all areas of your transportation program. This includes the use of electronic systems...

  13. Less ice on the Baltic reduces the extent of hypoxic bottom waters and sedimentary phosphorus release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaat, J.E.; Bouwer, L.M.

    2009-01-01

    A significant relation was established between the maximum extent of sea ice covering the Baltic Sea and the hypoxic area in the deeper parts of the Baltic Proper, with a lag of 2 years: for the period 1970-2000, less ice was correlated with a smaller anoxic area. At the same time, maximum ice

  14. A curve fitting approach to estimate the extent of fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, H.; Weening, D.; Jonkers, E.; Boer, T.; Stellaard, F.; Small, A. C.; Preston, T.; Vonk, R. J.; Priebe, M. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Information about the extent of carbohydrate digestion and fermentation is critical to our ability to explore the metabolic effects of carbohydrate fermentation in vivo. We used cooked (13)C-labelled barley kernels, which are rich in indigestible carbohydrates, to develop a method which

  15. Northern Alaskan land surface response to reduced Arctic sea ice extent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Matthew E. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Cassano, John J. [University of Colorado, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2012-05-15

    With Arctic sea ice extent at near-record lows, an improved understanding of the relationship between sea ice and the land surface is warranted. We examine the land surface response to changing sea ice by first conducting a simulation using the Community Atmospheric Model version 3.1 with end of the twenty-first century sea ice extent. This future atmospheric response is then used to force the Weather and Research Forecasting Model version 3.1 to examine the terrestrial land surface response at high resolution over the North Slope of Alaska. Similar control simulations with twentieth century sea ice projections are also performed, and in both simulations only sea ice extent is altered. In the future sea ice extent experiment, atmospheric temperature increases significantly due to increases in latent and sensible heat flux, particularly in the winter season. Precipitation and snow pack increase significantly, and the increased snow pack contributes to warmer soil temperatures for most seasons by insulating the land surface. In the summer, however, soil temperatures are reduced due to increased albedo. Despite warmer near-surface atmospheric temperatures, it is found that spring melt is delayed throughout much of the North Slope due to the increased snow pack, and the growing season length is shortened. (orig.)

  16. DOD Service Academies. Update on Extent of Sexual Harassment. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. National Security and International Affairs Div.

    This report provides an update on the nature and extent of sexual harassment at the three Department of Defense (DOD) service academies. It is based on a stratified random survey of 430 Military Academy cadets, 470 Naval Academy midshipmen, and 428 Air Force Academy cadets, which oversampled women to ensure that a statistically significant number…

  17. The effects of curvature on haptic judgments of extent in sighted and blind people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, Morton A.; Kappers, Astrid M L; McCarthy, Melissa; Clark, Ashley; Riddle, Tara; Fulkerson, Erin; Wemple, Lindsay; Walk, Anne McClure; Basso, Andreana; Wanek, Crystal; Russler, Kristen

    2008-01-01

    A series of experiments was carried out to examine the effect of curvature on haptic judgments of extent in sighted and blind individuals. Experiment 1 showed that diameters connecting the endpoints of semicircular lines were underestimated with respect to straight lines, but failed to show an

  18. In vitro estimation of the rate and extent of ruminal digestion of cereal feed fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahir, M.N.; Lund, Peter; Hetta, M.

    2011-01-01

    by their physical and chemical properties and might be ranked as highly and poorly degrading starch after their extent and rate of degradation in rumen (Nocek and Tamminga, 1991). It is hypothesized that rumen fermentation rate of cereal starch varies considerably and that this might affect fibre digestibility...

  19. Inability to determine tissue health is main indication of allograft use in intermediate extent burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, John L; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Sinha, Indranil; Leung, Kai P; Renz, Evan M; Chan, Rodney K

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous allograft is commonly used in the early coverage of excised burns when autograft is unavailable. However, allograft is also applied in intermediate-extent burns (25-50%), during cases in which it is possible to autograft. In this population, there is a paucity of data on the indications for allograft use. This study explores the indications for allograft usage in moderate size burns. Under an IRB-approved protocol, patients admitted to our burn unit between March 2003 and December 2010 were identified through a review of the burn registry. Data on allograft use, total burn surface area, operation performed, operative intent, number of operations, intensive care unit length of stay, and overall length of stay were collected and analyzed. Data are presented as means±standard deviations, except where noted. In the study period, 146 patients received allograft during their acute hospitalization. Twenty-five percent of allograft recipients sustained intermediate-extent burns. Patients with intermediate-extent burns received allograft later in their hospitalization than those with large-extent (50-75% TBSA) burns (6.8 days vs. 3.4 days, p=0.01). Allografted patients with intermediate-extent burns underwent more operations (10.8 vs. 6.1, p=0.002) and had longer hospitalizations (78.3 days vs. 40.9 days, ppatients, when controlled for TBSA. Clinical rationale for placement of allograft in this population included autograft failure, uncertain depth of excision, lack of autograft donor site, and wound complexity. When uncertain depth of excision was the indication, allograft was universally applied onto the face. In half of allografted intermediate-extent burn patients the inability to identify a viable recipient bed was the ultimate reason for allograft use. Unlike large body surface area burns, allograft skin use in intermediate-extent injury occurs later in the hospitalization and is driven by the inability to determine wound bed suitability for autograft

  20. Automated Snow Extent Mapping Based on Orthophoto Images from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Spallek, Waldemar; Witek-Kasprzak, Matylda

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents the application of the k-means clustering in the process of automated snow extent mapping using orthophoto images generated using the Structure-from-Motion (SfM) algorithm from oblique aerial photographs taken by unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). A simple classification approach has been implemented to discriminate between snow-free and snow-covered terrain. The procedure uses the k-means clustering and classifies orthophoto images based on the three-dimensional space of red-green-blue (RGB) or near-infrared-red-green (NIRRG) or near-infrared-green-blue (NIRGB) bands. To test the method, several field experiments have been carried out, both in situations when snow cover was continuous and when it was patchy. The experiments have been conducted using three fixed-wing UAVs (swinglet CAM by senseFly, eBee by senseFly, and Birdie by FlyTech UAV) on 10/04/2015, 23/03/2016, and 16/03/2017 within three test sites in the Izerskie Mountains in southwestern Poland. The resulting snow extent maps, produced automatically using the classification method, have been validated against real snow extents delineated through a visual analysis and interpretation offered by human analysts. For the simplest classification setup, which assumes two classes in the k-means clustering, the extent of snow patches was estimated accurately, with areal underestimation of 4.6% (RGB) and overestimation of 5.5% (NIRGB). For continuous snow cover with sparse discontinuities at places where trees or bushes protruded from snow, the agreement between automatically produced snow extent maps and observations was better, i.e. 1.5% (underestimation with RGB) and 0.7-0.9% (overestimation, either with RGB or with NIRRG). Shadows on snow were found to be mainly responsible for the misclassification.

  1. Telephone Care Management of Fall Risk:: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A; Pence, Maureen; Williams, Barbara; MacCornack, Frederick A

    2017-03-01

    Care management has been found to be more effective than usual care for some chronic conditions, but few studies have tested care management for prevention of elder falls. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of telephone care management of older adults presenting for medical attention due to a fall. The setting was an independent practice association in western Washington serving 1,300 Medicare Advantage-insured patients. Patients aged ≥65 years treated for a fall in an emergency department or their primary care provider's office were contacted via telephone by a care manager within 48 hours of their fall-related visit and invited to participate in a telephone-administered interview to identify modifiable fall risk factors and receive recommendations and follow-up to address identified risk factors. Data from care manager records, patient medical records, and healthcare claims for the first 6 months (November 2009-April 2010) of program implementation were analyzed in 2011. The feasibility of screening and management of fall risk factors over the telephone and the effect on medically attended falls were assessed. Twenty-two patients eligible for fall care management were reached and administered the protocol. Administration took 15-20 minutes and integrated easily with the care manager's other responsibilities. Follow-through on recommendations varied, from 45% for those for whom exercise participation was recommended to 100% for other recommendations. No medically attended falls occurred over 6 months of follow-up. Telephone care management of fall risk appears feasible and may reduce falls requiring medical attention. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 100-HR-2 Operable Unit Focused Feasibility study report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The standard Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Feasibility Study (FS) includes development and screening of alternatives (Phases 1 and 2) and the detailed analysis of alternatives (Phase 3). This focused feasibility study (FFS) was conducted for the 100-HR-2 Operable Unit (OU) at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. This FFS constitutes the Phase 3 portion of the FS process for the remedial alternatives initially developed and screened in the 100 Area Feasibility Study Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1993a). The objective of this OU-specific FFS is to provide decision makers with sufficient information to allow appropriate and timely selection of interim remedial measures (IRM) for the seven IRM candidate sites associated with the 100-HR-2 OU. The IRM candidate waste sites identified in Table ES-1 are determined in the limited field investigation (DOE-RL 1994b). Site profiles are developed for each of these waste sites. The site profiles are used in the application of the plug-in approach. The waste site either plugs into the analysis of the alternatives for the group, or deviations from the developed group alternatives are described and documented. A summary for the 100-HR-2 IRM candidate waste site is as follows: none of the waste sites require additional alternative development. six of the seven waste sites directly plug into the waste site group alternatives. The site-specific detailed analysis is conducted, referencing the waste site group analysis as appropriate. A waste site detailed analysis summary is presented in Table ES-1.A comparative analysis of remedial alternatives is presented for each waste site. A summary of the comparative analysis is presented in Table ES-2

  3. Impact of pannus formation on hemodynamic dysfunction of prosthetic aortic valve: pannus extent and its relationship to prosthetic valve motion and degree of stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jung; Ha, Hojin; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Jeong A; Song, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Hwa Jung; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2018-02-19

    Although pannus is an important cause of prosthetic valve dysfunction, the minimum pannus size that can induce hemodynamic dysfunction has not yet been determined. This study investigated the correlation between the limitation of motion (LOM) of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and determined the pannus extent that could induce severe aortic stenosis. This study included 49 patients who underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) and showed pannus on cardiac computed tomography (CT). Pannus width, ratio of pannus width to valve diameter, pannus area, effective orifice area, encroachment ratio by pannus, pannus involvement angle and percent LOM of mechanical valves were evaluated on CT. Transvalvular peak velocity (TPV) and transvalvular pressure gradient (TPG) were measured by transesophageal echocardiography to determine the degree of aortic stenosis. The relationship between percent LOM of the prosthetic valve and pannus extent and the cut-off of pannus extent required to induce severe aortic stenosis were evaluated. The mean interval between AVR and pannus formation was 11 years and was longer in patients with than without severe aortic stenosis (14.0 vs. 7.3 years). On CT, the percent LOM of the prosthetic valve was significantly associated with the extent of pannus only in patients with pannus involvement angle > 180° (r = 0.55-0.68, P Pannus width, effective orifice area, and encroachment ratio were significantly associated with increased TPV and TPG (r = 0.51-0.62, P Pannus width > 3.5 mm, pannus width/valve inner diameter > 0.15, and encroachment ratio > 0.14 were significantly associated with severe aortic stenosis (TPV > 4 m/s; mean TPG ≥ 35 mmHg), with c-indices of 0.74-079 (P pannus extent parameters are good indicators of significant hemodynamic changes with increased TPV and mean TPG.

  4. Feasibility of stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Woodford

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available SBRT was feasible for approximately half of the locally-advanced NSCLC patients we assessed and for these patients has the potential to reduce a 30 fraction course to 12 fractions. Using SBRT in this setting requires compromises in techniques and further compromises may allow SBRT in a greater proportion of patients.

  5. Vacuum with mesh is a feasible temporary closure device after fascial dehiscence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørsum-Meyer, Thomas; Skarbye, Mona; Jensen, Kenneth Højsgaard

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The open abdomen is a challenging condition and a temporary abdominal closure device is required in order to protect the intra-abdominal viscera. We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a recent device: vacuum-assisted wound closure and mesh-mediated fascial traction (VAWCM) after f...

  6. A Pilot and Feasibility Study of Virtual Reality as a Distraction for Children with Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Jonathan; Zimand, Elana; Pickering, Melissa; Rothbaum, Barbara Olasov; Hodges, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To pilot and test the feasibility of a novel technology to reduce anxiety and pain associated with an invasive medical procedure in children with cancer. Method: Children with cancer (ages 7-19) whose treatment protocols required access of their subcutaneous venous port device (port access) were randomly assigned to a virtual reality…

  7. 38 CFR 21.53 - Reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... achieving a vocational goal. 21.53 Section 21.53 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF... achieving a vocational goal. (a) Requirement. The Department of Veterans Affairs shall determine the reasonable feasibility of achieving a vocational goal in each case in which a veteran has either: (1) An...

  8. Feasibility of EPC to BPEL Model Transformations based on Ontology and Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas O.; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Eckartz, Silja M.; Rinderle-Ma, Stefanie; Sadiq, Shazia; Leymann, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Model-Driven Engineering holds the promise of transforming business models into code automatically. This requires the concept of model transformation. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of model transformations from Event-driven Process Chain models to Business Process Execution Language

  9. The Feasibility of Pellet Re-Fuelling of a Fusion Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Tinghong; Jørgensen, L. W.; Nielsen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of re-fuelling a fusion reactor by injecting pellets of frozen hydrogen isotopes is reviewed. First a general look is taken of the dominant energy fluxes received by the pellet, the re-fuelling rate required and the relation between pellet size, injection speed and frequency...

  10. Combined leadless pacemaker and subcutaneous implantable defibrillator therapy: feasibility, safety, and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong, F. V. Y.; Brouwer, T. F.; Smeding, L.; Kooiman, K. M.; de Groot, J. R.; Ligon, D.; Sanghera, R.; Schalij, M. J.; Wilde, A. A. M.; Knops, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) and leadless pacemaker (LP) are evolving technologies that do not require intracardiac leads. However, interactions between these two devices are unexplored. We investigated the feasibility, safety, and performance of combined LP and

  11. The Feasibility of Generalized Acoustic Sensor Operator Training. Final Report for Period February 1974-February 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Richard W.; Alden, David G.

    The feasibility of generalized approaches to training military personnel in the use of different types of sonar/acoustic warfare systems was explored. The initial phase of the project consisted of the analysis of representative sonar and acoustic equipment to identify training areas and operator performance requirements that could be subjected to…

  12. COLD-SAT feasibility study safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchenry, Steven T.; Yost, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-orbit Liquid Depot-Storage, Acquisition, and Transfer (COLD-SAT) satellite presents some unique safety issues. The feasibility study conducted at NASA-Lewis desired a systems safety program that would be involved from the initial design in order to eliminate and/or control the inherent hazards. Because of this, a hazards analysis method was needed that: (1) identified issues that needed to be addressed for a feasibility assessment; and (2) identified all potential hazards that would need to be controlled and/or eliminated during the detailed design phases. The developed analysis method is presented as well as the results generated for the COLD-SAT system.

  13. Human reliability data bank: feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comer, K.; Miller, D.P.; Donovan, M.

    1984-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Sandia National Laboratories have been developing a plan for a human reliability data bank since August 1981. This research is in response to the data needs of the nuclear power industry's probabilistic risk assessment community. The three phases of the program are to: (A) develop the data bank concept, (B) develop an implementation plan and conduct a feasibility study, and (C) assist a sponsor in implementing the data bank. The program is now in Phase B. This paper describes the methods used in the feasibility study. Decisions to be made in the future regarding full-scale implementation will be based, in part, on the outcome of this study. 3 references, 2 figures

  14. Construction feasibility of OTEC platforms. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewer, J H; Harwood, P; Solberg, K; Fjeld, S

    1978-12-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the feasibility of constructing either steel or concrete OTEC platforms of both spar and ship shape configurations for a range of platform sizes with respect to existing, developed shipyard or fabrication yard facilities that are currently active in marine vessel construction within the US. This brief study is quite broad in scope. Many parameters, including plant size; vessel type, size, configuration, and dimensions; position of heat exchangers; existing construction facility size, geographic location, and potential for modification; and, availability of undeveloped deep water construction sites affect the conclusions drawn. Nevertheless, the conclusions should remain valid and not change significantly, unless there are major changes in either vessel size or US construction capabilities. The various concepts are ranked in order of their feasibility and practicality of construction in existing or modified existing facilities and new facilities.

  15. B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howden, G.F.

    1996-01-01

    Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace

  16. Feasibility Study of Renewable Energy in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    King, Sebastian; Wettergren, Per

    2011-01-01

    Singapore is a country that is currently highly dependent on import of oil and gas. In order to be able to shift into a more sustainable energy system, Singapore is investing in research regarding different technologies and systems so as to establish more sustainable energy solutions. Seeing how air-conditioning accounts for approximately 30 % of Singapore’s total energy consumption, a feasibility study is being conducted on whether an integrated system using a thermally active building syste...

  17. Feasibility study on volcanic power generation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-07-01

    Investigations were carried out to determine the feasibility of volcanic power generation on Satsuma Io Island. Earthquakes were studied, as were the eruptions of subaerial and submarine hot springs. Hydrothermal rock alteration was studied and electrical surveys were made. General geophysical surveying was performed with thermocameras and radiation monitoring equipment. In particular, the Toyoba mine was studied, both with respect to its hot spring and its subsurface temperatures.

  18. Feasibility study on tandem fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, P.S.; Suh, I.S.; Rim, C.S.; Kim, B.K.; Suh, K.S.; Ro, S.K.; Juhn, P.I.; Kim, S.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this feasibility study is to review and assess the current state of technology concerning the tandem fuel cycle. Based on the results from this study, a long-term development plan suitable for Korea has been proposed for this cycle, i.e., the PWR → CANDU tandem fuel cycle which used plutonium and uranium, recovered from spent PWR fuel by co-processing, as fuel material for CANDU reactors. (Author)

  19. FEASIBILITY OF INVESTMENT IN BUSINESS ANALYTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Varga

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trends in data processing for decision support show that business users need business analytics, i.e. analytical applications which incorporate a variety of business oriented data analysis techniques and task-specific knowledge. The paper discusses the feasibility of investment in two models of implementing business analytics: custom development and packed analytical applications. The consequences of both models are shown on two models of business analytics implementation in Croatia.

  20. Feasible Path Planning for Autonomous Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Trieu Minh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to find feasible path planning algorithms for nonholonomic vehicles including flatness, polynomial, and symmetric polynomial trajectories subject to the real vehicle dynamical constraints. Performances of these path planning methods are simulated and compared to evaluate the more realistic and smoother generated trajectories. Results show that the symmetric polynomial algorithm provides the smoothest trajectory. Therefore, this algorithm is recommended for the development of an automatic control for autonomous vehicles.

  1. Feasibility of satellite quantum key distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Bonato, Cristian; Tomaello, Andrea; Da Deppo, Vania; Naletto, Giampiero; Villoresi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel analysis of the feasibility of quantum key distribution between a LEO satellite and a ground station. First of all, we study signal propagation through a turbulent atmosphere for uplinks and downlinks, discussing the contribution of beam spreading and beam wandering. Then we introduce a model for the background noise of the channel during night-time and day-time, calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for different configurations. We also discuss the expected e...

  2. Feasibility of mitigating the effects of windfarms on primary radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.M.; Johnson, D.A.

    2003-07-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the feasibility of modifying civil and military radars to mitigate the effects from wind turbines, to provide costings for implementing changes to the radar and to produce guidelines for planning wind farms in the vicinity of radars. The effect of wind turbines on radar signals, assessed through computer modelling, is summarised. The key aspects of turbine design that can be modified to minimise these effects are described. A key issue is the fact that no two radar installations are alike, with settings being customised for local requirements. As a consequence, a detailed understanding of the design and features of each individual radar would be required in order to assess the impact of a wind farm proposal. The costs of a programme of modifications to the civil ATC (air traffic control) radar base will depend on many factors. An estimate of costs is provided, based on the assumption that only 30 of the UK radars would need modification and that a range of modifications from very simple to very complex will be required. A number of other approaches, outside of modification of the radar system, may require investigation during a windfarm planning application, such as layout and location of the wind farm or changing air traffic routes in the vicinity of the wind farm.

  3. Gasohol: economic feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M. L.; Hammaker, G. S.; Buzenberg, R. J.; Wagner, J. P.

    1978-07-01

    This report was prepared by Development Planning and Research Associates, Inc. under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Center of the University of Nebraska in cooperation with the Agricultural Products Industrial Utilization Committee and the State of Nebraska. Funding for this study was provided to the Energy Research and Development Center by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Old West Regional Commission. The primary objective of the study was to: determine the fiscal and market conditions under which the production of gasohol would be profitable for private producers. For purposes of this study, gasohol is a motor fuel consisting of 10 percent agriculturally-derived anhydrous ethanol and 90 percent unleaded gasoline. The study assumes that gasohol can be a fuel substitute for gasoline; indeed, the cost of gasoline will significantly influence that for gasohol. Gasoline prices are determined by factors external to ethanol; thus, the economic feasibility study of gasohol is in large part an economic feasibility study of fuel-grade ethanol production. More specifically, the study examined the following: the technical aspects of distributing, marketing, and using gasohol; the costs of the distribution and marketing of ethanol and gasohol; the energy balance of ethanol production; the cost of producing ethanol; the factors influencing ehtanol plant size and location; and the conditions that would make ethanol economicaly feasible for private producers.

  4. Assessment of the depth and extent of myometrial invasion in uterine adenomyosis using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Mi Gyung; Cho, Jae Ho; Chang, Jay Chun; Park, Bok Hwan

    2000-01-01

    To determine the detection rate of MRI in the diagnosis of adenomyosis and ascertain the accuracy of MRI in assessing the extent and depth of the myometrial invasion. By retrospective analysis of MR images of the pelvis in 65 pathologically proven cases of uterine adenomyosis, we investigated the detection rate and differences of in the detection rate when this was based on (a) the extent, and (b) the depth of myometrial invasion. The condition was classified as diffuse or focal according to the extent of invasion, and mild, moderate, or severe according to its depth. Pathologically, there were 35 cases of focal adenomyosis (53.8%), and 30 of diffuse adenomyosis (46.2%). Among patients with the focal variety of this condition, 12 cases were mild, 14 were mild, 14 were moderate, and nine were severe, while among those with the diffuse variety, two were mild, ten were moderate and 18 were severe. A total of 48 cases (73.8%) were detected on MR images; the detection rate of focal adenomyosis was 60.0% (21/35) and that of diffuse adenomyosis was 90.0% (27/30). The detection rates of mild, moderate, and severe adenomyosis were 42.9% (6/14), 79.2% (19/24), and 85.2% (23/27), respectively. Among the 48 cases detected on MR images, the pathologic and MR findings were consistent with regard to both the extent and depth of myometrial invasion in 26 (54.2%). For diffuse adenomyosis, the consistency rate was higher than for the focal variety (81.5%, 22/27; compared with 19%, 4/21). The extent of myometrial invasion was correctly evaluated in 32 cases (66.7%); the consistency rate for the diffuse form was higher than for the focal form (96.3%(26/27), compared with 28.6% (6/21)). In 42 cases (87.5%), the depth of invasion was correctly evaluated, though differences in this depth were not significant. MR imaging was a useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of uterine adenomyosis. With regard to the extent of myometrial invasion, the detection rate was higher among cases of the

  5. Feasibility of tidal power development in the Bay of Fundy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1969-01-01

    A committee was formed to carry out technical studies on the feasibility of a tidal power plant in the Bay of Fundy. Basic information was collected on the physical, geological, climatic, and tidal characteristics of the area to determine areas for more intense investigation. Studies were conducted on the possible effects of the plant on navigation, ground transportation, fisheries, and area development. Electric power marketing and transmission were also examined, as well as the basic concepts for extracting tidal energy. A number of potential sites were examined, and the three most promising sites were selected for preliminary design and cost estimates. Computerized models were used at appropriate stages in order to evaluate various tidal power schemes. This report presents a summary of the committee's investigations. It was seen that a site at the entrance to Cobequid Bay would have an economic advantage over the other sites considered. From the results of the design studies, it was concluded that a long period of construction, plus extensive capital investment, would be required. However, the lowest unit cost of output was calculated at 5.6 mills/kWh, substantially above the incremental cost of energy available from existing sources. Under current economic conditions, the tidal power plant would not be feasible. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future

  7. Economic feasibility of food irradiation in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singson, C.C.; De Guzman, Z.M.; Pasion, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation is not a new technology and is accepted in many countries. Market acceptance of irradiated foods is established and the importance of radiation to reduce post-harvest food losses, increase shelf-life and improve hygienic quality of foods has been recognized in Asia and the Pacific. Countries with strict quarantine restrictions, such as the United States and Japan, require treatment of fresh fruits and produce for insect pests disinfestation. Several studies have established the technical feasibility of using radiation to preserve some food items in the country such as mangoes, onions, garlic, black pepper, coffee, prawns and desiccated coconut. The aim of this study is to determine the feasibility of setting up an irradiation facility in the Philippines, to undertake the processing of selected food items especially those with good export potentials, to identify areas of concern vital to the success or failure of this type of undertaking and to make recommendations to enhance the viability of this project. (auth.). 13 refs.; appendices; 6 tabs

  8. Geometric feasibility of flexible cask transportation system for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, P; Ribeiro, M I; Aparicio, P [Instituto Superior Tecnico-Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1998-07-01

    One of the remote operations that has to be carried out in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the transportation of sealed casks between the various ports of the Tokamak Building (TB) and the Hot Cell Building (HCB). The casks may contain different in-vessel components (e.g. blanket modules, divertors) and are designed for a maximum load of about 80 ton. To improve the safety and flexibility of ITER Remote Handling (RH) transport vehicles, the cask is not motorized by itself, but instead, a motorized platform carrying the cask was proposed. This paper addresses the geometric feasibility of the flexible cask transportation system, taking into account the vehicle kinematics. The feasibility issues studied include planning smooth paths to increase safety, the discussion of building constraints by the evaluation of the vehicle spanned areas when following a planned path, and the analysis of the clearance required to remove the platform from underneath the cask at different possible failure locations. Simulation results are presented for the recommended trajectory, the spanned area and the rescue manoeuvres at critical locations along the path. (authors)

  9. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. A feasibility report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; White, W.B.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility of forming borehole plugs by hydrothermal transport was examined with respect to five systems, utilizing available literature data. In general, it would appear possible to create plugs with hydrothermal cements, with hydrothermally transported quartz, and with carbonates precipitated in-situ using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide and water as reacting fluids. Hydrothermal cements appear to be most feasible from an engineering and economic point of view using a slurry with a lime-alumina-silica composition carried into the hole in a single pipe at temperatures in the range of 200 0 C and requiring only enough pressure to drive the mixture into the hole. Quartz or chalcedony plugs would be the most impervious, have the lowest chemical reactivity with groundwater, the lowest thermal expansion, and be most compatible with the wall rock. Deposition is likely to be slow, and there are severe engineering problems associated with a single pipe system carrying silica-rich solutions at temperatures in excess of 500 0 C at pressure of 2000 bars (30,000 psi). Calcite plugs could be formed as compatible plug materials in contact with a limestone or dolomite wall rock. It is not known whether non-porous plugs can be readily formed and there is also a problem of chemical reaction with percolating groundwater. The clay-water and sulfur-water systems do not appear to be viable plug systems. In-situ reconstitution of the wall rock does not appear to be an economically feasible possibility

  10. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future.

  11. The medically compromised patient: Are dental implants a feasible option?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissink, A; Spijkervet, Fkl; Raghoebar, G M

    2018-03-01

    In healthy subjects, dental implants have evolved to be a common therapy to solve problems related to stability and retention of dentures as well as to replace failing teeth. Although dental implants are applied in medically compromised patients, it is often not well known whether this therapy is also feasible in these patients, whether the risk of implant failure and developing peri-implantitis is increased, and what specific preventive measures, if any, have to be taken when applying dental implants in these patients. Generally speaking, as was the conclusion by the leading review of Diz, Scully, and Sanz on placement of dental implants in medically compromised patients (J Dent, 41, 2013, 195), in a few disorders implant survival may be lower, and the risk of a compromised peri-implant health and its related complications be greater, but the degree of systemic disease control outweighs the nature of the disorder rather than the risk accompanying dental implant treatment. So, as dental implant treatment is accompanied by significant functional benefits and improved oral health-related quality of life, dental implant therapy is a feasible treatment in almost any medically compromised patient when the required preventive measures are taken and follow-up care is at a high level. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility Study Analysis of Establishing Archery Sports Special Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, U. P. P.; Mardhatillah, A.; Budiman, I.; Sembiring, A. C.; Ramadhan, M. S.

    2018-04-01

    This study essentially discusses the basic concepts related to the decision and process of selecting a sports archery business project in order to provide economic and social benefits over time. Archery sports is a sport that requires special skills, both accuracy, coordination mental training and improves the physical condition of the prime. In Medan, it's still a bit of practice archery, but many people love this sport. From the data collected, there are three locations where archery in the city of the field of the Sunggal Knights is located at Jl Tunggul Hitam no.1A, Kec. Medan Sunggal, Avros Educational Park Aval address at Avros Street No.60 Medan, and the Knights of Johor Archery Club which is located at Jl. The work of Darma Gg. Ujung Family, Medan Johor. Therefore a feasibility study was undertaken in establishing an archery sports place in the field. The aspects to be considered in making feasibility studies are market and marketing aspects, technical and equipment aspects, management aspects, legal aspects, economic and social aspects, and financial aspects. Financial analysis using own capital got Payback Period 3 years 5,8 months, Net Present Value Rp 11.684.026 and obtained Internal Rate of Return of 17%.

  13. Feasible reactor power cutback logic development for an integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Soon-Kyoo; Lee, Chung-Chan; Choi, Suhn; Kang, Han-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Major features of integral reactors that have been developed around the world recently are simplified operating systems and passive safety systems. Even though highly simplified control system and very reliable components are utilized in the integral reactor, the possibility of major component malfunction cannot be ruled out. So, feasible reactor power cutback logic is required to cope with the malfunction of components without inducing reactor trip. Simplified reactor power cutback logic has been developed on the basis of the real component data and operational parameters of plant in this study. Due to the relatively high rod worth of the integral reactor the control rod assembly drop method which had been adapted for large nuclear power plants was not desirable for reactor power cutback of the integral reactor. Instead another method, the control rod assembly control logic of reactor regulating system controls the control rod assembly movements, was chosen as an alternative. Sensitivity analyses and feasibility evaluations were performed for the selected method by varying the control rod assembly driving speed. In the results, sensitivity study showed that the performance goal of reactor power cutback system could be achieved with the limited range of control rod assembly driving speed. (orig.)

  14. Transvaginal uterosacral ligament hysteropexy: a retrospective feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Rodolfo; Frigerio, Matteo; Manodoro, Stefano; Cola, Alice; Spelzini, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Uterine-sparing procedures could be attractive in patients concerned about preservation of fertility and change in corporeal image and sexuality. Transvaginal uterosacral hysteropexy can provide an alternative mesh-free technique for uterine suspension. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of transvaginal uterine suspension to uterosacral ligaments in terms of operative data, complications, midterm efficacy, and patient satisfaction. This retrospective study analyzed the first 20 cases of transvaginal hysteropexy through bilateral high uterosacral ligaments (modified Shull technique) performed in our Institution. Mean follow-up was 33.2 months. The procedure was performed in 84 ± 19 min ,and blood loss was 228 ± 139 ml. Three mild complications (15 %) were observed. Recurrence [Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) stage ≥ II was observed in five patients (25 %), and three of them (15 %) required reintervention. Mean Patient Global Impression of Improvement score was "much improved." Two woman (40 %) who had not fulfilled their childbearing desire obtained a pregnancy. Both underwent elective caesarean section at term. Transvaginal uterosacral hysteropexy appears a feasible mesh-free technique for apical support. This procedure can be indicated in women with the desire of preserving fertility or who prefer a uterine-sparing surgical option.

  15. Geometric feasibility of flexible cask transportation system for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, P.; Ribeiro, M.I.; Aparicio, P.

    1998-01-01

    One of the remote operations that has to be carried out in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is the transportation of sealed casks between the various ports of the Tokamak Building (TB) and the Hot Cell Building (HCB). The casks may contain different in-vessel components (e.g. blanket modules, divertors) and are designed for a maximum load of about 80 ton. To improve the safety and flexibility of ITER Remote Handling (RH) transport vehicles, the cask is not motorized by itself, but instead, a motorized platform carrying the cask was proposed. This paper addresses the geometric feasibility of the flexible cask transportation system, taking into account the vehicle kinematics. The feasibility issues studied include planning smooth paths to increase safety, the discussion of building constraints by the evaluation of the vehicle spanned areas when following a planned path, and the analysis of the clearance required to remove the platform from underneath the cask at different possible failure locations. Simulation results are presented for the recommended trajectory, the spanned area and the rescue manoeuvres at critical locations along the path. (authors)

  16. Feasibility of using fiber optics for monitoring ground water contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirschfeld, T.; Deaton, T.; Milanovich, F.; Klainer, S.M.

    1984-06-01

    The report contains the results of the initial feasibility study for a research program undertaken to develop the technology needed to use fiber optics for monitoring groundwater contaminants. The technology appears especially well suited to the requirements of detection monitoring where a few indicator parameters can be measured continuously by sensors placed down small-diameter monitoring wells. Data are generated at a remote, centrally located fluorimeter, connected to the sampling sites by inexpensive optical fibers. The analytical method is laser-induced fluorescence which gives the desired sensitivity. The optrode, a chemical system and/or a mechanical device at the distal end of a fiber optic, furnishes the needed specificity. Various fiber and optrode configurations have been evaluated and their applications to groundwater monitoring are discussed. Feasibility is shown for physical measurements such as temperature, pressure and pH. Chemical detection and quantification of the actinides, inorganic and organic chlorides, sulfates, alcohols, aldehydes, pesticides and tracer materials are presented. Finally, it is shown that the need for smaller diameter wells (as compared to conventional sampling methods), and the ability to make up to 50 unattended in situ measurements, using a reasonably priced centralized fluorometer system connected to the sampling sites by inexpensive optical fibers, results in acceptable economy

  17. Behavioral Assessment of Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent and Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dios, Y. E.; Kofman, I. S.; Gadd, N. E.; Kreutzberg, G. A.; Peters, B. T.; Taylor, L. C.; Campbell, D. J.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Seidler, R. D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to the microgravity environment during spaceflight missions impacts crewmembers' sensorimotor function. Bock et al. [1] studied the cognitive demands of human sensorimotor performance and dual tasking during long duration missions and concluded that both stress and scarcity of cognitive resources required for sensorimotor adaptation may be responsible for these deficits during spaceflight. Therefore, in consideration of the health and performance of crewmembers in- and post-flight, we are conducting this study to investigate the effects of spaceflight on the extent, longevity and neural bases of sensorimotor, cognitive, and neural changes. The data presented will focus on the behavioral measures that were collected pre-, in- and post-flight including spatial cognition, processing speed, bimanual coordination, functional mobility, computerized dynamic posturography (CDP), and vibrotactile induced vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). To date, data were collected over the course of two pre-flight sessions and four post-flight sessions on five crewmembers (n=13) using the protocol described in Koppelmans et al. [2]. Balance control was assessed using CDP, with eyes closed and a sway-referenced base of support (Sensory Organization Test 5), with and without head movements in the pitch plane. Spatial working memory was assessed using Thurston's Card Rotation Test and a Mental Rotation Test. The Rod and Frame Test was performed to test visual dependence. The Digit Symbol Substitution Test was performed to evaluate processing speed, and the Purdue Pegboard Task was performed to test bimanual coordination. Vestibular function was assessed by eliciting ocular VEMP via a hand held striker on the side of the head as subjects lay supine on a gurney. Subjects also performed the Functional Mobility Test of walking through an obstacle course to assess rate of early motor learning. Data were also collected on the same crewmembers during three in-flight sessions on

  18. The Department of Defense's Civilian Human Capital Strategic Plan Does Not Meet Most Statutory Requirements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Brenda S

    2008-01-01

    To examine the extent to which DOD's civilian human capital strategic plan addresses congressional reporting requirements, we obtained and analyzed the "Department of Defense Civilian Human Capital...

  19. Strategic environmental assessment in tourism planning - Extent of application and quality of documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Lemos, Clara, E-mail: clara@sc.usp.br [Environmental Engineering Science, Engineering School of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense, 400, Caixa Postal 292, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, 13566-590 (Brazil); Fischer, Thomas B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Civic Design, University of Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool, L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom); Pereira Souza, Marcelo, E-mail: mps@usp.br [Environmental Engineering Science, Engineering School of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense, 400, Caixa Postal 292, Sao Carlos, Sao Paulo, 13566-590 (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has been applied throughout the world in different sectors and in various ways. This paper reports on results of a PhD research on SEA applied to tourism development planning, reflecting the situation in mid-2010. First, the extent of tourism specific SEA application world-wide is established. Then, based on a review of the quality of 10 selected SEA reports, good practice, as well as challenges, trends and opportunities for tourism specific SEA are identified. Shortcomings of SEA in tourism planning are established and implications for future research are outlined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extent of tourism specific SEA practice is identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Selected SEA/Tourism reports are evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEA application to tourism planning is still limited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A number of shortcomings can be pointed out.

  20. Strategic environmental assessment in tourism planning — Extent of application and quality of documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Lemos, Clara; Fischer, Thomas B.; Pereira Souza, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has been applied throughout the world in different sectors and in various ways. This paper reports on results of a PhD research on SEA applied to tourism development planning, reflecting the situation in mid-2010. First, the extent of tourism specific SEA application world-wide is established. Then, based on a review of the quality of 10 selected SEA reports, good practice, as well as challenges, trends and opportunities for tourism specific SEA are identified. Shortcomings of SEA in tourism planning are established and implications for future research are outlined. - Highlights: ► The extent of tourism specific SEA practice is identified. ► Selected SEA/Tourism reports are evaluated. ► SEA application to tourism planning is still limited. ► A number of shortcomings can be pointed out.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Extent of Ion Spectral Structures at the Inner Edge of the Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferradas, C.; Reeves, G. D.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2017-12-01

    Several ion spectral structures are observed near the inner edge of the plasma sheet and constitute the signatures of ion drift and loss in the highly dynamic environment of the inner magnetosphere. Their study helps us understand ion access and losses in this region. Several studies have found that these structures vary with geomagnetic activity, local time, and ion species, but their spatial and temporal extent remain undetermined. We use data from the Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometers onboard the Van Allen Probes to analyze the spectral structures in the energy range of 1- 50 keV. HOPE measurements on both Van Allen Probes spacecraft enable us to resolve the extent of these ion structures in space and time. As the structures respond to changes in the convection electric field on a variety of time scales, the lapping of the two spacecraft on time scales of minutes to hours helps determine their spatial and temporal evolution.

  2. Role of 5-ALA in improving extent of tumour resection in patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammad; Khan, Inamullah; Shamim, Muhammad Shahzad

    2017-10-01

    Goal of surgery for patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is gross total resection with no new neurological deficits. Surgical resection is often restricted due the difficulty in differentiating the tumour from surrounding normal brain using either naked eye, or standard intra-operative white light microscopy. GBM uptakes orally administered 5-ALA becomes fluorescent when viewed by a special light, and this property has been used to improve intra-operative tumour identification. This technique should therefore allow better extent of tumour resection. The hypothesis has been tested through several studies and even though most studies are of low quality, they strongly favour the use of 5- ALA in improving the extent of resection when compared to white light microscopy. A systematic review on the topic had a similar conclusion. Few studies have also hinted on a high false negative rate with the use of this technique..

  3. Knee ultrasound from research to real practice: a systematic literature review of adult knee ultrasound assessment feasibility studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltea, Alexandra; Berghea, Florian; Gudu, Tania; Ionescu, Ruxandra

    2016-12-05

    To identify and analyse existing data regarding knee ultrasound (US) feasibility in clinical practice. Material and methods: A systematic literature review was performed using the terms: ("knee") AND ("ultrasound" OR "ultrasonography") AND ("feasibility" OR "pilot" OR "proof of concept"). Feasibility studies regarding knee US or US aided maneuver involving knee joint, published during 2005-2015, were selected and evaluated against a complex framework constructed around mandatory key areas for feasibility studies: acceptability, demand, implementation, practicality, adaptation, integration and expansion. One hundred and fifty-nine publications were identified, of which 9 were included in the final analysis: 6 dealt with the development and implementation of novel US scores, while the rest focused on implementing MSUS in clinical practice, evaluating the usefulness of articular cartilage US assessment and the feasibility of sonography for intra-articular knee injections, respectively. Six studies quantified feasibility as time spent for the evaluation, with only two addressing areassuch as acceptability, implementation and practicality, although none of these systematically assessed all feasibility domains. Knee US feasibility is still poorly addressed; the time required for US assessment is the main area addressed. This information gap should be properly addressed in future works, in order to ensure the right place for this technique.

  4. To what extent do food purchases reflect shoppers? diet quality and nutrient intake?

    OpenAIRE

    Appelhans, Bradley M.; French, Simone A.; Tangney, Christy C.; Powell, Lisa M.; Wang, Yamin

    2017-01-01

    Background Food purchasing is considered a key mediator between the food environment and eating behavior, and food purchasing patterns are increasingly measured in epidemiologic and intervention studies. However, the extent to which food purchases actually reflect individuals? dietary intake has not been rigorously tested. This study examined cross-sectional agreement between estimates of diet quality and nutrient densities derived from objectively documented household food purchases and thos...

  5. Extent of linkage disequilibrium in the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus, and its breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Alhaddad

    Full Text Available Domestic cats have a unique breeding history and can be used as models for human hereditary and infectious diseases. In the current era of genome-wide association studies, insights regarding linkage disequilibrium (LD are essential for efficient association studies. The objective of this study is to investigate the extent of LD in the domestic cat, Felis silvestris catus, particularly within its breeds. A custom illumina GoldenGate Assay consisting of 1536 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs equally divided over ten 1 Mb chromosomal regions was developed, and genotyped across 18 globally recognized cat breeds and two distinct random bred populations. The pair-wise LD descriptive measure (r(2 was calculated between the SNPs in each region and within each population independently. LD decay was estimated by determining the non-linear least-squares of all pair-wise estimates as a function of distance using established models. The point of 50% decay of r(2 was used to compare the extent of LD between breeds. The longest extent of LD was observed in the Burmese breed, where the distance at which r(2 ≈ 0.25 was ∼380 kb, comparable to several horse and dog breeds. The shortest extent of LD was found in the Siberian breed, with an r(2 ≈ 0.25 at approximately 17 kb, comparable to random bred cats and human populations. A comprehensive haplotype analysis was also conducted. The haplotype structure of each region within each breed mirrored the LD estimates. The LD of cat breeds largely reflects the breeds' population history and breeding strategies. Understanding LD in diverse populations will contribute to an efficient use of the newly developed SNP array for the cat in the design of genome-wide association studies, as well as to the interpretation of results for the fine mapping of disease and phenotypic traits.

  6. The Nature and Extent of Mutational Pleiotropy in Gene Expression of Male Drosophila serrata

    OpenAIRE

    McGuigan, Katrina; Collet, Julie M.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Yixin H.; Allen, Scott L.; Chenoweth, Stephen F.; Blows, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    The nature and extent of mutational pleiotropy remain largely unknown, despite the central role that pleiotropy plays in many areas of biology, including human disease, agricultural production, and evolution. Here, we investigate the variation in 11,604 gene expression traits among 41 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Drosophila serrata. We first confirmed that these expression phenotypes were heritable, detecting genetic variation in 96% of them in an outbred, natural population of D. serr...

  7. Evolutionary history, immigration history, and the extent of diversification in community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knope, Matthew L; Forde, Samantha E; Fukami, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    During community assembly, species may accumulate not only by immigration, but also by in situ diversification. Diversification has intrigued biologists because its extent varies even among closely related lineages under similar ecological conditions. Recent research has suggested that some of this puzzling variation may be caused by stochastic differences in the history of immigration (relative timing and order of immigration by founding populations), indicating that immigration and diversification may affect community assembly interactively. However, the conditions under which immigration history affects diversification remain unclear. Here we propose the hypothesis that whether or not immigration history influences the extent of diversification depends on the founding populations' prior evolutionary history, using evidence from a bacterial experiment. To create genotypes with different evolutionary histories, replicate populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens were allowed to adapt to a novel environment for a short or long period of time (approximately 10 or 100 bacterial generations) with or without exploiters (viral parasites). Each evolved genotype was then introduced to a new habitat either before or after a standard competitor genotype. Most genotypes diversified to a greater extent when introduced before, rather than after, the competitor. However, introduction order did not affect the extent of diversification when the evolved genotype had previously adapted to the environment for a long period of time without exploiters. Diversification of these populations was low regardless of introduction order. These results suggest that the importance of immigration history in diversification can be predicted by the immigrants' evolutionary past. The hypothesis proposed here may be generally applicable in both micro- and macro-organisms.

  8. Genetic Dissection of the Canq1 Locus Governing Variation in Extent of the Collateral Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiliang; Zhang, Hua; Wiltshire, Tim; Sealock, Robert; Faber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Native (pre-existing) collaterals are arteriole-to-arteriole anastomoses that interconnect adjacent arterial trees and serve as endogenous bypass vessels that limit tissue injury in ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary and peripheral artery disease. Their extent (number and diameter) varies widely among mouse strains and healthy humans. We previously identified a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 7 (Canq1, LOD = 29) responsible for 37% of the heritable variation in collateral extent between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. We sought to identify candidate genes in Canq1 responsible for collateral variation in the cerebral pial circulation, a tissue whose strain-dependent variation is shared by similar variation in other tissues. Methods and Findings Collateral extent was intermediate in a recombinant inbred line that splits Canq1 between the C57BL/6 and BALB/c strains. Phenotyping and SNP-mapping of an expanded panel of twenty-one informative inbred strains narrowed the Canq1 locus, and genome-wide linkage analysis of a SWRxSJL-F2 cross confirmed its haplotype structure. Collateral extent, infarct volume after cerebral artery occlusion, bleeding time, and re-bleeding time did not differ in knockout mice for two vascular-related genes located in Canq1, IL4ra and Itgal. Transcript abundance of 6 out of 116 genes within the 95% confidence interval of Canq1 were differentially expressed >2-fold (p-valuecollateral formation. Conclusions These findings refine the Canq1 locus and identify several genes as high-priority candidates important in specifying native collateral formation and its wide variation. PMID:22412848

  9. Modelling of the effect of discontinuities on the extent of the fracture zone surrounding deep tunnels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sellers, EJ

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available - ments in sandstone and granite indicate that the breakout shape may be altered by the applied stress path, the strain rate, the boundary conditions and the excavation shape. (Ewy and Cook 1990a, 1990b; Gay 1973; Barla 1972... of sandstone containing cylindrical holes tested under increasing hy- drostatic pressures, up to 275 MPa, indicate that the extent of the fracture zone size increases with increasing pressure, until the entire sample fails (Gay...

  10. Relation between extent of myostatin depletion and muscle growth in mature mice

    OpenAIRE

    Welle, Stephen; Burgess, Kerri; Thornton, Charles A.; Tawil, Rabi

    2009-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle growth and fiber size. Changes in myostatin expression might contribute to changes in muscle mass associated with various conditions, and reducing the amount of active myostatin is a potential strategy for preventing or reversing muscle atrophy. The present study was done to determine the extent to which myostatin levels must decline to induce growth of mature muscles. Myostatin expression was reduced by activating Cre recombinase in adult mice with...

  11. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2008-01-29

    Accidents involving release of large (multi-ton) quantities of toxic industrial chemicals often yield far fewer fatalities and causalities than standard, widely-used assessment and emergency response models predict. While recent work has suggested that models should incorporate the protection provided by buildings, more refined health effect methodologies, and more detailed consideration of the release process; investigations into the role of deposition onto outdoor surfaces has been lacking. In this paper, we examine the conditions under which dry deposition may significantly reduce the extent of the downwind hazard zone. We provide theoretical arguments that in congested environments (e.g. suburbs, forests), deposition to vertical surfaces (such as building walls) may play a significant role in reducing the hazard zone extent--particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. Our analysis suggests that in these urban or suburban environments, the amount of toxic chemicals lost to earth's surface is typically a small fraction of overall depositional losses. For isothermal gases such as chlorine, the degree to which the chemicals stick to (or react with) surfaces (i.e. surface resistance) is demonstrated to be a key parameter controlling hazard extent (the maximum distance from the release at which hazards to human health are expected). This analysis does not consider the depositional effects associated with particulate matter or gases that undergo significant thermal change in the atmosphere. While no controlled experiments were available to validate our hypothesis, our analysis results are qualitatively consistent with the observed downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine accidents.

  12. Arterial Stiffness and its Correlation with the Extent of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourak Poorzand

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary artery disease secondary to atherosclerosis is the most common cause of mortality. Coronary angiography is the most precise method for determining the extent of disease in the coronary vascular bed. Arterial stiffness has been proposed as a marker of atherosclerosis in some studies. One of the noninvasive methods for the determination of arterial stiffness is Doppler echocardiography. In this study, we aimed to find the correlation between arterial stiffness as measured by echocardiography and the extent of coronary artery disease as evaluated through angiography. Materials and Methods: Aortic pulse wave velocity (APWV was measured by using the Doppler method in 70 patients, who were candidates for coronary angiography. The extent of coronary artery disease was determined quantitatively in terms of Friesinger index and semi-quantitatively as the number of vessels with stenosis of over 50%. Then, the correlation between arterial stiffness and these factors was evaluated. Results: The mean APWV was 9.1±5 m/s. There was a direct relationship between APWV and Friesinger index, which was not statistically significant (P=0.67. The mean APWV for patients with one-vessel disease was 4.4±1.8 m/s, while it was 9.9±3.6 m/s in patients with two and 7.9±4 m/s in three-vessel disease which did not show statistically significant difference. Conclusion: Doppler echocardiography to measure APWV was not considered as a promising tool to predict the extent of coronary artery disease.

  13. The decline of cisco Coregonus artedi at its southern range extent: Stock biology and management implications

    OpenAIRE

    Honsey, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    The cisco Coregonus artedi is distributed throughout northern North America and is relegated to coldwater, oligotrophic systems. Populations of cisco located at the species' southern range extent, including northern Indiana and southern Michigan, have drastically declined over the past century, seemingly due to a combination of climate warming and exacerbation of hypolimnetic hypoxic conditions via intensive land-use and resulting increases in nutrient loading. Apart from their decline, infor...

  14. Goals, requirements and prerequisites for teleradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, M.; Wein, B.; Lehmann, K.J.; Bolte, R.; Kilbinger, M.; Loose, R.; Guenther, R.W.; Georgi, M.

    1997-01-01

    Specific radiological requirements have to be considered for the realization of telemedicine. In this article the goals and requirements for an extensive introduction of teleradiology will be defined from the radiological user's point of view. Necessary medical, legal and professional prerequisites for teleradiology are presented. Essential requirements, such as data security maintenance of personal rights and standardization, must be realized. Application-specific requirements, e.g. quality and extent of teleradiological functions, as well as technological alternatives, are discussed. Each project must be carefully planned in relation to one's own needs, extent of functions and system selection. Topics, such as acknowledgement of electronic documentation, reimbursement of teleradiology and liability, must be clarified. Legal advice and the observance of quality guidelines are recommended. (orig.) [de

  15. Variability of the extent of the Hadley circulation in the southern hemisphere: a regional perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H.; Hendon, H. H.; Lim, E.-P.; Boschat, G.; Maloney, E.; Timbal, B.

    2018-01-01

    In order to understand the regional impacts of variations in the extent of the Hadley circulation in the Southern Hemisphere, regional Hadley circulations are defined in three sectors centered on the main tropical heat sources over Africa, Asia-Pacific (Maritime Continent) and the Americas. These regional circulations are defined by computing a streamfunction from the divergent component of the meridional wind. A major finding from this study is that year-to-year variability in the extent of the hemispheric Hadley circulation in the Southern Hemisphere is primarily governed by variations of the extent of the Hadley circulation in the Asia-Pacific sector, especially during austral spring and summer when there is little co-variability with the African sector, and the American sector exhibits an out of phase behavior. An expanded Hadley circulation in the Southern Hemisphere (both hemispherically and in the Asia-Pacific sector) is associated with La Niña conditions and a poleward expansion of the tropical wet zone in the Asia-Pacific sector. While La Niña also promotes expansion in the American and African sectors during austral winter, these tropical conditions tend to promote contraction in the two sectors during austral summer as a result of compensating convergence over the Americas and Africa sectors: a process driven by variations in the Walker circulation and Rossby wave trains emanating from the tropical Indian Ocean.

  16. Flood Extent Mapping for Namibia Using Change Detection and Thresholding with SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Stephanie; Fatoyinbo, Temilola E.; Policelli, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    A new method for flood detection change detection and thresholding (CDAT) was used with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to delineate the extent of flooding for the Chobe floodplain in the Caprivi region of Namibia. This region experiences annual seasonal flooding and has seen a recent renewal of severe flooding after a long dry period in the 1990s. Flooding in this area has caused loss of life and livelihoods for the surrounding communities and has caught the attention of disaster relief agencies. There is a need for flood extent mapping techniques that can be used to process images quickly, providing near real-time flooding information to relief agencies. ENVISAT/ASAR and Radarsat-2 images were acquired for several flooding seasons from February 2008 to March 2013. The CDAT method was used to determine flooding from these images and includes the use of image subtraction, decision based classification with threshold values, and segmentation of SAR images. The total extent of flooding determined for 2009, 2011 and 2012 was about 542 km2, 720 km2, and 673 km2 respectively. Pixels determined to be flooded in vegetation were typically flooding in vegetation was much greater (almost one third of the total flooded area). The time to maximum flooding for the 2013 flood season was determined to be about 27 days. Landsat water classification was used to compare the results from the new CDAT with SAR method; the results show good spatial agreement with Landsat scenes.

  17. Dynamic and thermodynamic impacts of the winter Arctic Oscillation on summer sea ice extent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Stewart, A.

    2017-12-01

    Arctic summer sea ice extent exhibits substantial interannual variability, as is highlighted by the remarkable recovery in sea ice extent in 2013 following the record minimum in the summer of 2012. Here, we explore the mechanism via which Arctic Oscillation (AO)-induced ice thickness changes impact summer sea ice, using observations and reanalysis data. A positive AO weakens the basin-scale anticyclonic sea ice drift and decreases the winter ice thickness by 15cm and 10cm in the Eurasian and the Pacific sectors of the Arctic respectively. Three reanalysis datasets show that the (upward) surface heat fluxes are reduced over wide areas of the Arctic, suppressing the ice growth during the positive AO winters. The winter dynamic and thermodynamic thinning preconditions the ice for enhanced radiative forcing via the ice-albedo feedback in late spring-summer, leading to an additional 8-10 cm of thinning over the Pacific sector of the Arctic. Because of these winter AO-induced dynamic and thermodynamics effects, the winter AO explains about 22% (r = -0.48) of the interannual variance of September sea ice extent from year 1980 to 2015.

  18. Measures of extents of laterality for high-frequency ``transposed'' stimuli under conditions of binaural interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Leslie R.; Trahiotis, Constantine

    2005-09-01

    Our purpose in this study was to determine whether across-frequency binaural interference would occur if ITD-based extents of laterality were measured using high-frequency transposed stimuli as targets. The results of an earlier study [L. R. Bernstein and C. Trahiotis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 3062-3069 (2004)], which focused on threshold-ITDs, rather than extents of laterality, suggested that high-frequency transposed stimuli might be ``immune'' to binaural interference effects resulting from the addition of a spectrally remote, low-frequency interferer. In contrast to the earlier findings, the data from this study indicate that high-frequency transposed targets are susceptible to binaural interference. Nevertheless, high-frequency transposed targets, even when presented along with an interferer, yielded greater extents of ITD-based laterality than did high-frequency Gaussian noise targets presented in isolation. That is, the ``enhanced potency'' of ITDs conveyed by transposed stimuli persisted, even in the presence of a low-frequency interferer. Predictions made using an extension of the model of Heller and Trahiotis [L. M. Heller and C. Trahiotis, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 3632-3637 (1996)] accounted well for across-frequency binaural interference obtained with conventional Gaussian noise targets but, in all but one case, overpredicted the amounts of interference found with the transposed targets.

  19. RANGELAND DEGRADATION: EXTENT, IMPACTS, AND ALTERNATIVE RESTORATION TECHNIQUES IN THE RANGELANDS OF ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mussa Abdulahi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rangeland degradation remains a serious impediment to improve pastoral livelihoods in the lowlands of Ethiopia. This review paper presents an overview of the extent of rangeland degradation, explores its drivers, discusses the potential impacts of rangeland degradation and also suggests alternative rangeland restoration techniques. It is intended to serve as an exploratory tool for ensuing more detailed quantitative analyses to support policy and investment programs to address rangeland degradation in Ethiopia. The extent of rangeland degradation increases with time, and the productivity of rangelands are losing if not given due attention. The major drivers leading to rangeland degradation includes climate change, overgrazing, bush encroachment, population pressure, drought, and government policy, encroachment of rain fed agriculture and decline of traditional resource management institution. Degradation of rangeland has resulted in substantial declines in rangeland condition, water potential, soil status, and animal performance, livestock holding at the household level and community become destitute. Another consequence of rangeland degradation is linked to food insecurity, poverty to the extent of food aid, expansion of aridity and the need for alternative livelihood and income diversification. Moreover, it has increasingly become a threat to the pastoral production systems, and has contributed towards increases in poverty and tribal conflicts over grazing land and water resources. In spite of these impacts, the adoption of alternative restoration techniques in the country is highly insufficient. To address rangeland degradation problems, there is a strong need to substantially increase the investments and strengthen the policy support for sustainable land management.

  20. Measuring the relative extent of pulmonary infiltrates by hierarchical classification of patient-specific image features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsevas, S.; Iakovidis, D. K.

    2011-11-01

    Pulmonary infiltrates are common radiological findings indicating the filling of airspaces with fluid, inflammatory exudates, or cells. They are most common in cases of pneumonia, acute respiratory syndrome, atelectasis, pulmonary oedema and haemorrhage, whereas their extent is usually correlated with the extent or the severity of the underlying disease. In this paper we propose a novel pattern recognition framework for the measurement of the extent of pulmonary infiltrates in routine chest radiographs. The proposed framework follows a hierarchical approach to the assessment of image content. It includes the following: (a) sampling of the lung fields; (b) extraction of patient-specific grey-level histogram signatures from each sample; (c) classification of the extracted signatures into classes representing normal lung parenchyma and pulmonary infiltrates; (d) the samples for which the probability of belonging to one of the two classes does not reach an acceptable level are rejected and classified according to their textural content; (e) merging of the classification results of the two classification stages. The proposed framework has been evaluated on real radiographic images with pulmonary infiltrates caused by bacterial infections. The results show that accurate measurements of the infiltration areas can be obtained with respect to each lung field area. The average measurement error rate on the considered dataset reached 9.7% ± 1.0%.

  1. Factors affecting the extent of utilization of physiotherapy services by physicians in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mansour Abdullah; Alhasan, Hammad; Alayat, Mohamed; Al-subahi, Moayad; Yaseen, Khalid; Ismail, Ayah; Tobaigy, Abdullah; Almalki, Obaid; Alqahtani, Abdulfattah; Fallata, Basmah

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate physicians’ attitudes, opinions and experiences towards physiotherapy services as well as to identify the potential factors that may affect the extent of utilization of physiotherapy services (based on physicians’ beliefs) in Saudi Arabia (SA). [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional study was conducted. [Results] A total of 108 respondents met the inclusion criteria. The respondents’ attitude towards physiotherapy was slightly low (53.5%), while their opinions and experiences of physiotherapy indicated some important issues. For example, 50% of them believed that physiotherapists did not create a good awareness about physiotherapy services and 55.5% admitted that they did not have enough information about physiotherapy services. The most potential factor reported by physicians that may affect the extent of utilization of physiotherapy services was the lack of physiotherapist’s skills and knowledge to assess and treat patients (55.3%), followed by the limited knowledge of physicians regarding the types of physiotherapy services (44.5%) and the lack of cooperation between physicians and physiotherapists (40.7%). [Conclusion] There were some factors that limited the extent of utilization of physiotherapy services in SA. Physiotherapy academics and clinicians should attempt to change physicians’ negative attitudes, promoting awareness to provide them with a better understanding of physiotherapy services. PMID:29545681

  2. Assessing the extent of bone degradation using glutamine deamidation in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Julie; van Doorn, Nienke L; Collins, Matthew J

    2012-11-06

    Collagen peptides are analyzed using a low-cost, high-throughput method for assessing deamidation using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). For each chosen peptide, the theoretical distribution is calculated and the measured distribution for each sample compared with this to determine the extent of glutamine deamidation. The deamidation of glutamine (Q) to glutamic acid (E) results in a mass shift of +0.984 Da. Thus, from the resolution of our data, the second peak in the isotope distribution for a peptide containing one glutamine residue coincides with the first peak of the isotope distribution for the peptide in which the residue is deamidated. A genetic algorithm is used to determine the extent of deamidation that gives the best fit to the measured distribution. The method can be extended to peptides containing more than one glutamine residue. The extent of protein degradation assessed in this way could be used, for example, to assess the damage of collagen, and screen samples for radiocarbon dating and DNA analysis.

  3. Does oxygen exposure time control the extent of organic matter decomposition in peatlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philben, Michael; Kaiser, Karl; Benner, Ronald

    2014-05-01

    The extent of peat decomposition was investigated in four cores collected along a latitudinal gradient from 56°N to 66°N in the West Siberian Lowland. The acid:aldehyde ratios of lignin phenols were significantly higher in the two northern cores compared with the two southern cores, indicating peats at the northern sites were more highly decomposed. Yields of hydroxyproline, an amino acid found in plant structural glycoproteins, were also significantly higher in northern cores compared with southern cores. Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins are not synthesized by microbes and are generally less reactive than bulk plant carbon, so elevated yields indicated that northern cores were more extensively decomposed than the southern cores. The southern cores experienced warmer temperatures, but were less decomposed, indicating that temperature was not the primary control of peat decomposition. The plant community oscillated between Sphagnum and vascular plant dominance in the southern cores, but vegetation type did not appear to affect the extent of decomposition. Oxygen exposure time appeared to be the strongest control of the extent of peat decomposition. The northern cores had lower accumulation rates and drier conditions, so these peats were exposed to oxic conditions for a longer time before burial in the catotelm, where anoxic conditions prevail and rates of decomposition are generally lower by an order of magnitude.

  4. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2008-05-11

    Accidents that involve large (multi-ton) releases of toxic industrial chemicals and form dense-gas clouds often yield far fewer fatalities, casualties and environmental effects than standard assessment and emergency response models predict. This modeling study, which considers both dense-gas turbulence suppression and deposition to environmental objects (e.g. buildings), demonstrates that dry deposition to environmental objects may play a significant role in reducing the distance at which adverse impacts occur - particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. The degree to which the released chemical sticks to (or reacts with) environmental surfaces is likely a key parameter controlling hazard extents. In all modeled cases, the deposition to vertical surfaces of environmental objects (e.g. building walls) was more efficient in reducing atmospheric chemical concentrations than deposition to the earth's surface. This study suggests that (1) hazard extents may vary widely by release environment (e.g. grasslands vs. suburbia) and release conditions (e.g. sunlight or humidity may change the rate at which chemicals react with a surface) and (2) greenbelts (or similar structures) may dramatically reduce the impacts of large-scale releases. While these results are demonstrated to be qualitatively consistent with the downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine releases, critical knowledge gaps exist and this study provides recommendations for additional experimental studies.

  5. A method for predicting the extent of petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huesemann, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of solid- and slurry-phase soil bioremediation experiments involving different crude oils and refined petroleum products were performed to investigate the factors which affect the maximum extent of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) biodegradation. The authors used a comprehensive petroleum hydrocarbon characterization procedure involving group-type separation analyses, boiling-point distributions, and hydrocarbon typing by field ionization mass spectroscopy. Initial and final concentrations of specified hydrocarbon classes were determined in each of seven different bioremediation treatments. Generally, they found that the degree of TPH biodegradation was affected mainly by the type of hydrocarbons in the contaminant matrix. In contrast, the influence of experimental variables such as soil type, fertilizer concentrations, microbial plate counts, and treatment type (slurry versus landfarming) on the overall extent of TPH biodegradation was insignificant. Based on these findings, a predictive algorithm was developed to estimate the extent of TPH biodegradation from the average reduction of 86 individual hydrocarbon classes and their respective initial concentrations. Model predictions for gravimetric TPH removals were in close agreement with analytical results from two independent laboratories

  6. Extent and impact of industry sponsorship conflicts of interest in dermatology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Clifford S; Harwood, Michael; Perlis, Roy H

    2005-06-01

    Many published clinical trials are authored by investigators with financial conflicts of interest. The general medical literature documents the pervasive extent and sometimes problematic impact of these conflicts. Accordingly, there is renewed discussion about author disclosure and clinical trial registry to minimize publication bias from financial conflicts of interest. Despite this evolving discussion in the general medical literature, little is known about the extent or role of financial conflicts of interest in dermatology research. Our purpose was to determine the extent and impact of industry sponsorship conflicts of interest in dermatology research. We recorded potential financial conflicts of interest, study design, and study outcome in 179 clinical trials published between Oct 1, 2000 and Oct 1, 2003 in four leading dermatology journals. Forty-three percent of analyzed studies included at least one author with a reported conflict of interest. These studies were more likely to report a positive result, demonstrate higher methodological quality, and include a larger sample size. Conflict of interest in clinical investigations in dermatology appears to be prevalent and associated with potentially significant differences in study methodology and reporting.

  7. The sign, magnitude and potential drivers of change in surface water extent in Canadian tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Mark L.; Loboda, Tatiana V.

    2018-04-01

    The accelerated rate of warming in the Arctic has considerable implications for all components of ecosystem functioning in the High Northern Latitudes. Changes to hydrological cycle in the Arctic are particularly complex as the observed and projected warming directly impacts permafrost and leads to variable responses in surface water extent which is currently poorly characterized at the regional scale. In this study we take advantage of the 30 plus years of medium resolution (30 m) Landsat data to quantify the spatial patterns of change in the extent of water bodies in the Arctic tundra in Nunavut, Canada. Our results show a divergent pattern of change—growing surface water extent in the north-west and shrinking in the south-east—which is not a function of the overall distribution of surface water in the region. The observed changes cannot be explained by latitudinal stratification, nor is it explained by available temperature and precipitation records. However, the sign of change appears to be consistent within the boundaries of individual watersheds defined by the Canada National Hydro Network based on the random forest analysis. Using land cover maps as a proxy for ecological function we were able to link shrinking tundra water bodies to substrates with shallow soil layers (i.e. bedrock and barren landscapes) with a moderate correlation (R 2 = 0.46, p evaporation as an important driver of surface water decrease in these cases.

  8. Optical coherence tomography to evaluate variance in the extent of carious lesions in depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Jin; Schneider, Hartmut; Ziebolz, Dirk; Krause, Felix; Haak, Rainer

    2018-05-03

    Evaluation of variance in the extent of carious lesions in depth at smooth surfaces within the same ICDAS code group using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in vitro and in vivo. (1) Verification/validation of OCT to assess non-cavitated caries: 13 human molars with ICDAS code 2 at smooth surfaces were imaged using OCT and light microscopy. Regions of interest (ROI) were categorized according to the depth of carious lesions. Agreement between histology and OCT was determined by unweighted Cohen's Kappa and Wilcoxon test. (2) Assessment of 133 smooth surfaces using ICDAS and OCT in vitro, 49 surfaces in vivo. ROI were categorized according to the caries extent (ICDAS: codes 0-4, OCT: scoring based on lesion depth). A frequency distribution of the OCT scores for each ICDAS code was determined. (1) Histology and OCT agreed moderately (κ = 0.54, p ≤ 0.001) with no significant difference between both methods (p = 0.25). The lesions (76.9% (10 of 13)) _were equally scored. (2) In vitro, OCT revealed caries in 42% of ROI clinically assessed as sound. OCT detected dentin-caries in 40% of ROIs visually assessed as enamel-caries. In vivo, large differences between ICDAS and OCT were observed. Carious lesions of ICDAS codes 1 and 2 vary largely in their extent in depth.

  9. Industrial feasibility study of a spent nuclear fuel package for direct deep disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Lous, K.; Loubrieu, J.; Chupeau, J.; Serpantie, J.P.; Becle, D.; Aubry, S.

    2001-01-01

    EDF has undertaken to study the industrial feasibility of a spent nuclear fuel package meeting direct disposal requirements. In this context, a disposal concept has been defined in which packages are cooled in place until the module is finally sealed. Indeed, one of the objectives of that disposal concept is to reduce the underground area occupied by the repository. A functional analysis has been performed within the framework of that ventilated disposal concept, taking into account the phases of the package lifetime from its conditioning until the disposal post-closure phase. An industrial feasibility study is in progress, which takes into account the functional specifications and some preliminary studies. (author)

  10. Feasibility of 4 patient-reported outcome measures in a registry setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Aksel; Pedersen, Alma Becic; Overgaard, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Feasibility is an important parameter when choosing which patient-reported outcomes (PRO) to use in a study. We assessed the feasibility of PROs in a hip registry setting. Methods Primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) patients (n = 5,747) who had been operated on 1-2, 5.......1% to 46%, respectively. Missing items ranged from 1.2% to 3.4%, and 0.8-4.3% required manual validation (p analysis, depending on descriptive factor and choice of PRO. Interpretation All 4 PROs fulfilled...

  11. Summary of feasibility studies on in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbrecht, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A scoping study was conducted over the period 1998-2000 to consider the feasibility of in situ disposal as a decommissioning option for AECL's Nuclear Power Demonstration Reactor located at Rolphton, Ontario. The results of a detailed assessment are summarized and the study concludes that in situ disposal appears feasible. Additional work required to confirm the results is also identified. A second in situ component, contaminated Winnipeg River sediments at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratory located in Manitoba, was also evaluated. That study concluded that in situ abandonment would have no adverse impact on aquatic life, humans and the environment. A summary of the study is presented as an appendix to the report. (author)

  12. Understanding Patient Experience Using Internet-based Email Surveys: A Feasibility Study at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew; Lau, Davina; Jivraj, Tanaz; Principi, Tania; Dietrich, Sandra; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-01-01

    Email is becoming a widely accepted communication tool in healthcare settings. This study sought to test the feasibility of Internet-based email surveys of patient experience in the ambulatory setting. We conducted a study of email Internet-based surveys sent to patients in selected ambulatory clinics at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto, Canada. Our findings suggest that email links to Internet surveys are a feasible, timely and efficient method to solicit patient feedback about their experience. Further research is required to optimally leverage Internet-based email surveys as a tool to better understand the patient experience.

  13. Current status of feasibility studies on commercialized fuel cycle system for Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, Hisao; Nagaoki, Yoshihiro

    2000-01-01

    A 'Feasibility Studies on Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System' is underway at the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). The study will select the promising concepts with their R and D tasks in order to commercialize the fast breeder reactor (FBR) cycle system. The feasibility studies (F/S) have to present surveyed and screened various relevant technologies, and defined the design requirement of the commercialized fuel cycle system for FBR. The promising technical options are being evaluated and conceptual designs are being examined. At the end of JFY2000, several candidate concepts of the commercialized FBR cycle system will be proposed. (author)

  14. The CEPHEID Project - Conceptual and Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Ph.

    1997-02-01

    Different blanket concepts have been proposed for future thermonuclear fusion reactors. Among the two candidate concepts selected, the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB), which is based on ceramic pebble beds, lithium orthosilicate and beryllium, cooled by helium. The paper describes an experimental device to be installed in the BR-2 reactor and aiming at operating a HCPB test module in nominal conditions, to the maximum possible extent. The device has been called CEramic Pebble bed Helium cooled Irradiation for Demo (CEPHEID)

  15. The CEPHEID Project - Conceptual and Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, Ph.

    1997-02-01

    Different blanket concepts have been proposed for future thermonuclear fusion reactors. Among the two candidate concepts selected, the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB), which is based on ceramic pebble beds, lithium orthosilicate and beryllium, cooled by helium. The paper describes an experimental device to be installed in the BR-2 reactor and aiming at operating a HCPB test module in nominal conditions, to the maximum possible extent. The device has been called CEramic Pebble bed Helium cooled Irradiation for Demo (CEPHEID).

  16. Feasibility of passive heat removal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurko, Yu M [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a review of decay heat removal systems (DHRSs) used in liquid metal-cooled fast reactors (LMFRs). Advantages and the disadvantages of these DHRSs, extent of their passivity and prospects for their use in advanced fast reactor projects are analyzed. Methods of extending the limitations on the employment of individual systems, allowing enhancement in their effectiveness as safety systems and assuring their total passivity are described. (author). 10 refs, 10 figs.

  17. 75 FR 76666 - Reporting, Recordkeeping, and Daily Trading Records Requirements for Swap Dealers and Major Swap...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... requirements for digital and electronic communications more economically feasible and systemically prudent... associated with compliance with the marketing communication recordkeeping requirement to be approximately 12...: Marketing Communications Number of registrants: 300. Frequency of collection: As needed. Estimated number of...

  18. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

  19. Feasibility of beam crystallization in a cooler storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yuri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been known theoretically that a charged-particle beam circulating in a storage ring exhibits an “ordered” configuration at the space-charge limit. Such an ultimate state of matter is called a crystalline beam whose emittance is ideally equal to zero except for quantum noise. This paper discusses how close one can come to various ordered states by employing currently available accelerator technologies. The dynamic nature of ultracold beams and conditions required for crystallization are briefly reviewed. Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the feasibility of this unique phenomenon, considering practical situations in general cooling experiments. It is pointed out that several essential obstacles must be overcome to reach a three-dimensional crystalline state in a storage ring. Doppler laser cooling of ion beams is also numerically simulated to explore the possibility of beam crystallization in an existing machine.

  20. The preliminary feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaier, J.R.; Yashan, D.; Naud, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on graphite intercalation compounds which may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electro-magnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have desirable characteristics of both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations have been performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading have been addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

  1. Gas turbines for the rubber industry: Retrofit feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, F.; Pautasso, F.

    1992-01-01

    Cogeneration is becoming industry's choice to satisfy process requirements characterized by high energy demand and fairly steady thermal and electrical loads. This paper illustrated the suitability of cogeneration for the production of rubber and PVC floor tiles. The example studied here consists of a gas fuelled turboalternator set capable of producing 1,050 kW of electric power. The energy plant is equipped with a heat recovery system and a post-combustor for the production of a diathermic fluid used by the process equipment. The paper points out how engineers overcame the installation problems due to the presence of existing process equipment and the necessity for continuous plant operation during retrofitting. Attention is given to the energy and cost feasibility aspects of this intervention

  2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under epidural anesthesia: a clinical feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Huh, Jin; Kim, Duk Kyung; Gil, Jea Ryoung; Min, Sung Won; Han, Sun Sook

    2010-12-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has traditionally been performed under general anesthesia, however, owing in part to the advancement of surgical and anesthetic techniques, many laparoscopic cholecystectomies have been successfully performed under the spinal anesthetic technique. We hoped to determine the feasibility of segmental epidural anesthesia for LC. Twelve American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II patients received an epidural block for LC. The level of epidural block and the satisfaction score of patients and the surgeon were checked to evaluate the efficacy of epidural block for LC. LC was performed successfully under epidural block, with the exception of 1 patient who required a conversion to general anesthesia owing to severe referred pain. There were no special postoperative complications, with the exception of one case of urinary retention. Epidural anesthesia might be applicable for LC. However, the incidence of intraoperative referred shoulder pain is high, and so careful patient recruitment and management of shoulder pain should be considered.

  3. Feasibility study of CANDU-9 fuel handling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jeong Ki; Jo, C. H.; Kim, H. M.

    1996-12-01

    CANDU`s combination of natural uranium, heavy water and on-power refuelling is unique in its design and remarkable for reliable power production. In order to offer more output, better site utilization, shorter construction time, improved station layout, safety enhancements and better control panel layout, CANDU-9 is now under development with design improvement added to all proven CANDU advantages or applicable technologies. One of its major improvement has been applied to fuel handling system. This system is very similar to that of CANDU-3, and some parts of the system are applied to those of the existing CANDU-6 or CANDU-9. Design concepts and design requirements of fuel handling system for CANDU-9 have been identified to compare with those of the existing CANDU and the design feasibilities have been evaluated. (author). 4 tabs., 13 figs., 9 refs.

  4. Security by quantum key distribution and IPSEC (SEQKEIP): feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfaxi, M.A.; Ghernaouti-Helie, S.; Ribordy, G; Gay, O.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Classical cryptography algorithms are based on mathematical functions. The robustness of a given cryptosystem is based essentially on the secrecy of its (private) key and the difficulty with which the inverse of its one-way function(s) can be calculated. Unfortunately, there is no mathematical proof that will establish whether it is not possible to find the inverse of a given one-way function. On the contrary, quantum cryptography is a method for sharing secret keys, whose security can be formally demonstrated. It is based on the laws of physics. The possible applications of quantum cryptography are mainly linked to telecommunication services that require very high level of security. Quantum cryptography could be integrated in various existing concepts and protocols. One of the possible use of quantum cryptography is within IPSEC. The aim of this paper is to analyse the feasibility of using quantum cryptography in IPSEC and to present the estimated performances of this solution. (author)

  5. The implantation of life on Mars - Feasibility and motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Robert H.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    Scientific concepts are reviewed regarding the potential formation and development of a life-bearing environment on Mars, and a potential ecopoiesis scenario is given. The development of the earth's biosphere is defined, and the major assumptions related to the formation of Martian life are listed. Three basic phases are described for the life-implantation concept which include determining whether sufficient quantities of volatiles are available, engineering the warming of the planet, and implanting microbial communities if necessary. Warming the planet theoretically releases liquid H2O and produces a thick CO2 atmosphere, and the implantation of biological communities is only necessary if no indigenous microbes emerge. It is concluded that a feasibility study is required to assess the possibilities of implanting life on Mars more concretely.

  6. Laparoscopic repair of high rectovaginal fistula: Is it technically feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthasarathi Ramakrishnan

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rectovaginal fistula (RVF is an epithelium-lined communication between the rectum and vagina. Most RVFs are acquired, the most common cause being obstetric trauma. Most of the high RVFs are repaired by conventional open surgery. Laparoscopic repair of RVF is rare and so far only one report is available in the literature. Methods We present a case of high RVF repaired by laparoscopy. 56-year-old female who had a high RVF following laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy was successfully operated laparoscopically. Here we describe the operative technique and briefly review the literature. Results The postoperative period of the patient was uneventful and after a follow up of 6 months no recurrence was found. Conclusion Laparoscopic repair of high RVF is feasible in selected patients but would require proper identification of tissue planes and good laparoscopic suturing technique.

  7. Acoustic cloaking in two dimensions: a feasible approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, Daniel; Sanchez-Dehesa, Jose [Wave Phenomena Group, Department of Electronic Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, C/ Camino de vera s.n., E-46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jsdehesa@upvnet.upv.es

    2008-06-15

    This work proposes an acoustic structure feasible to engineer that accomplishes the requirements of acoustic cloaking design recently introduced by Cummer and Schurig (2007 New J. Phys. 9 45). The structure, which consists of a multilayered composite made of two types of isotropic acoustic metamaterials, exactly matches the conditions for the acoustic cloaking. It is also shown that the isotropic metamaterials needed can be made of sonic crystals containing two types of material cylinders, whose elastic parameters should be properly chosen in order to satisfy (in the homogenization limit) the acoustic properties under request. In contrast to electromagnetic cloaking, the structure here proposed verifies the acoustic cloaking in a wide range of wavelengths; its performance is guaranteed for any wavelength above a certain cutoff defined by the homogenization limit of the sonic crystal employed in its fabrication.

  8. Feasibility study for a transportation operations system cask maintenance facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the development of a waste management program for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The program will include a transportation system for moving the nuclear waste from the sources to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Specially designed casks will be used to safely transport the waste. The cask systems must be operated within limits imposed by DOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). A dedicated facility for inspecting, testing, and maintaining the cask systems was recommended by the General Accounting Office (in 1979) as the best means of assuring their operational effectiveness and safety, as well as regulatory compliance. In November of 1987, OCRWM requested a feasibility study be made of a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF) that would perform the required functions. 46 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs

  9. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-09-01

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  10. Developing feasible loading patterns using perturbation theory methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.R.; Avila, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    This work illustrates an approach to core reload design that combines the power of integer programming with the efficiency of generalized perturbation theory. The main use of the method is as a tool to help the design engineer identify feasible loading patterns with minimum time and effort. The technique is highly successful for the burnable poison (BP) loading problem, but the unpredictable behavior of the branch-and-bound algorithm degrades overall performance for large problems. Unfortunately, the combined fuel shuffling plus BP optimization problem falls into this latter classification. Overall, however, the method shows great promise for significantly reducing the manpower time required for the reload design process. And it may even give the further benefit of better designs and improved performance

  11. A Regularized Algorithm for the Proximal Split Feasibility Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangsong Yao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The proximal split feasibility problem has been studied. A regularized method has been presented for solving the proximal split feasibility problem. Strong convergence theorem is given.

  12. Extent of Implementing Accreditation and Quality Assurance Standards in Azal University of Human Development from the Faculty Members’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zain Saleh ALSadi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to find out how far accreditation and quality assurance standards in Azal University for human development are implemented from the perspective of faculty members. To achieve this objective, to the researchers adopted descriptive analytical approach techniques. The research population was all the teaching staff at the university; and the sample consisted of (94 faculty members, (48.45 % of the total number of the population. A questionnaire was designed to collect data relevant to the testing of the research objectives. The questionnaire consisted of two parts: the first included the personal data, while the second part included the standards of accreditation and quality assurance. The study revealed the following results: The mean of implementing standards as a whole was (3.44, the standard deviation (0.76, and the extent of the using the standards was (high. There were no significant differences between the research participants’ responses about the extent of using the standards due to the variables (gender – Qualification – college type – years of teaching experience. In light of the results of the study, a set of recommendations were presented, including the need to provide the necessary requirements for implementing accreditation and quality assurance standards, whether material, human or financial resources, and creating a positive conducive learning environment to be suitable and ready for a complete implementation of quality standards. One of the main suggestions made by the research was to conduct a similar study on government and private universities and community colleges in Yemen. Keywords: Quality Assurance and accreditation; Azal University of Human Development.

  13. The feasibility of domestic CO2 emissions trading in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missfeldt, F.; Hauff, J.

    2000-09-01

    In early 2000, neither a comprehensive upstream system nor an all-encompassing downstream approach to CO 2 emissions permit trading seems feasible in Poland. However, a pilot emissions trading system in the power and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) sector is thought to be a realistic option in the near future. A comprehensive upstream approach would require permits for the carbon contained in fossil fuels produced or imported in Poland. It is ruled out due to the perceived difficulties of the inclusion of the coal sector in such a system. While inclusion of the gas sector, and especially of the oil sector, seems possible within a relatively short time, relying on an upstream approach without the coal sector is not advisable. Once the restructuring of the coal sector as well as the privatization of the gas and oil sector is advanced, an upstream approach might become an option again. A comprehensive downstream approach would regulate CO 2 emissions at their source, that is mostly at point of combustion of fossil fuels. A system which includes industry, households and transport can be assumed to be infeasible. Instead, a 'core program' was examined, which would focus on power and heat generation as well as energy intensive industries. Such an approach was found feasible in principle. Currently, however, only the largest emitters could be easily integrated in a reliable system. Drawing the line between those included and those excluded from such a partial system requires careful analysis. Including all enterprises in the relevant sectors would require significant improvements in monitoring and reporting reliability. A pilot emissions permit trading system could be introduced in the professional power and heat sector. Here, awareness concerning the instrument was found to be high and the system could be based on monitoring requirements already required by law. Gradual inclusion of more relevant sectors and eventual combination with an upstream component to include oil

  14. Chromosphere of K giant stars. Geometrical extent and spatial structure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berio, P.; Merle, T.; Thévenin, F.; Bonneau, D.; Mourard, D.; Chesneau, O.; Delaa, O.; Ligi, R.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Pichon, B.; Stee, P.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; Clausse, J. M.; Spang, A.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Interferometers provide accurate diameter measurements of stars by analyzing both the continuum and the lines formed in photospheres and chromospheres. Tests of the geometrical extent of the chromospheres are therefore possible by comparing the estimated radius in the continuum of the photosphere and the estimated radii in chromospheric lines. Aims: We aim to constrain the geometrical extent of the chromosphere of non-binary K giant stars and detect any spatial structures in the chromosphere. Methods: We performed observations with the CHARA interferometer and the VEGA beam combiner at optical wavelengths. We observed seven non-binary K giant stars (β and η Cet, δ Crt, ρ Boo, β Oph, 109 Her, and ι Cep). We measured the ratio of the radii of the photosphere to the chromosphere using the interferometric measurements in the Hα and the Ca II infrared triplet line cores. For β Cet, spectro-interferometric observations are compared to a non-local thermal equilibrium (NLTE) semi-empirical model atmosphere including a chromosphere. The NLTE computations provide line intensities and contribution functions that indicate the relative locations where the line cores are formed and can constrain the size of the limb-darkened disk of the stars with chromospheres. We measured the angular diameter of seven K giant stars and deduced their fundamental parameters: effective temperatures, radii, luminosities, and masses. We determined the geometrical extent of the chromosphere for four giant stars (β and η Cet, δ Crt and ρ Boo). Results: The chromosphere extents obtained range between 16% to 47% of the stellar radius. The NLTE computations confirm that the Ca II/849 nm line core is deeper in the chromosphere of β Cet than either of the Ca II/854 nm and Ca II/866 nm line cores. We present a modified version of a semi-empirical model atmosphere derived by fitting the Ca II triplet line cores of this star. In four of our targets, we also detect the signature of a

  15. Is laser cooling for heavy-ion fusion feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, D.D.-M.; Brandon, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy-ion beams, each with current in the kiloampere range and particle energy in the giga-electronvolt range, must be focused onto a millimetre-size spot to provide the power required for ignition of high-gain targets for inertial confinement fusion. However, the focal spot size is always enlarged by chromatic aberration generated by the thermal spread of the beam ions in the direction of beam propagation. Enlarged focal spot degrades the target performance. For high-current beams, the conventional remedy for chromatic aberration using sextupole magnets has been shown to be ineffective. If novel correction schemes can be found, then the spot size can be reduced to below that previously believed possible. Smaller spots can mean lower energy targets so that the heavy-ion fusion (HIF) scenario can look more attractive. Success in laser cooling of ion beams in storage rings has inspired us to explore the feasibility of applying laser cooling for HIF, and the recirculator configuration proposed for HIF appears to be well suited for this purpose. However, using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical arguments, we demonstrate in this paper that although laser cooling of heavy-ion beams is feasible in principle, the rapid velocity-space diffusion of ions in the bump-in-tail distribution, set up by the cooling lasers, limits the velocity-space compressibility of the thermal spread along the beam. Consequently, laser cooling is impractical for high-current, heavy-ion beams for the proposed recirculator configuration. Nevertheless, if the recirculator architecture or the target requirement can reduce the beam current, then the cooling scheme described here would be useful. This scheme may also be applicable to the RF linac and storage ring approach to HIF.

  16. Visually guided male urinary catheterization: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willette, Paul A; Banks, Kevin; Shaffer, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Ten percent to 15% of urinary catheterizations involve complications. New techniques to reduce risks and pain are indicated. This study examines the feasibility and safety of male urinary catheterization by nursing personnel using a visually guided device in a clinical setting. The device, a 0.6-mm fiber-optic bundle inside a 14F triple-lumen flexible urinary catheter with a lubricious coating, irrigation port, and angled tip, connects to a camera, allowing real-time viewing of progress on a color monitor. Two emergency nurses were trained to use the device. Male patients 18 years or older presenting to the emergency department with an indication for urinary catheterization using a standard Foley or Coudé catheter were eligible to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria were a current suprapubic tube or gross hematuria prior to the procedure. Twenty-five patients were enrolled. Data collected included success of placement, total procedure time, pre-procedure pain and maximum pain during the procedure, gross hematuria, abnormalities or injuries identified if catheterization failed, occurrence of and reason for equipment failures, and number of passes required for placement. All catheters were successfully placed. The median number of passes required was 1. For all but one patient, procedure time was ≤ 17 minutes. A median increase in pain scores of 1 point from baseline to the maximum was reported. Gross hematuria was observed in 2 patients. The success rate for placement of a Foley catheter with the visually guided device was 100%, indicating its safety, accuracy, and feasibility in a clinical setting. Minimal pain was associated with the procedure. Copyright © 2013 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for endophytic hilar tumors: feasibility and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, G B; Tartaglia, N; Aresu, L; Polara, A; Cielo, A; Cristini, C; Grande, P; Gentile, V; Grosso, G

    2014-06-01

    To analyze feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) for endophytic hilar tumors in low-intermediate (ASA I-II) risk patients. This is a single centre retrospective study. From May 2009 to September 2011, 208 LPNs were performed at our institution. Overall 11 (5.2%) elective LPNs were for hilar tumors not visible on kidney surface. Hilar tumor was defined as a mass located in the renal hilum and in contact with a major renal vessel on preoperative imaging. Procedures were carried out by a single experienced surgeon (G.G.) via retroperitoneal approach by clamping the only main renal artery. Mean (range) age of patients was 45.3 years (38.2-64.1), tumor size 1.6 cm (1.2-2.0), warm ischemia time 24 min (19-32), operative time 140 min (110-200) and estimated blood loss 270 ml (100-750). Two collecting system injuries were observed and repaired intraoperatively. No conversion to open surgery was required. Final pathological examination revealed 10 renal cell carcinomas and 1 oncocytoma. A negative surgical margin was obtained in 10/11 (91%) patients. Renal function and serum hemoglobin were nearly unaltered pre and post-surgery. No tumor recurrence was observed at mean (range) follow-up of 34 months (15-43). In experienced hands, LPN represents a feasible, safe and effective treatment for selected patients diagnosed with endophytic hilar masses. A larger number of patients and longer follow-up are required to draw definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 45 CFR 150.203 - Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circumstances requiring CMS enforcement. 150.203... CARE ACCESS CMS ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for... requiring CMS enforcement. CMS enforces HIPAA requirements to the extent warranted (as determined by CMS) in...

  19. Feasibility of a Constellation of Miniature Satellites for Performing Measurements of the Magnetic Field of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the requirements for a small constellation of satellites to perform measurements of the magnetic field of the Earth and a payload and boom design for such a mission is discussed. After studying communication, power and mass requirements it is found that it is feasible to develop...

  20. Understanding Regulation of Metabolism through Feasibility Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikerel, Emrah; Berkhout, Jan; Hu, Fengyuan; Teusink, Bas; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick

    2012-01-01

    Understanding cellular regulation of metabolism is a major challenge in systems biology. Thus far, the main assumption was that enzyme levels are key regulators in metabolic networks. However, regulation analysis recently showed that metabolism is rarely controlled via enzyme levels only, but through non-obvious combinations of hierarchical (gene and enzyme levels) and metabolic regulation (mass action and allosteric interaction). Quantitative analyses relating changes in metabolic fluxes to changes in transcript or protein levels have revealed a remarkable lack of understanding of the regulation of these networks. We study metabolic regulation via feasibility analysis (FA). Inspired by the constraint-based approach of Flux Balance Analysis, FA incorporates a model describing kinetic interactions between molecules. We enlarge the portfolio of objectives for the cell by defining three main physiologically relevant objectives for the cell: function, robustness and temporal responsiveness. We postulate that the cell assumes one or a combination of these objectives and search for enzyme levels necessary to achieve this. We call the subspace of feasible enzyme levels the feasible enzyme space. Once this space is constructed, we can study how different objectives may (if possible) be combined, or evaluate the conditions at which the cells are faced with a trade-off among those. We apply FA to the experimental scenario of long-term carbon limited chemostat cultivation of yeast cells, studying how metabolism evolves optimally. Cells employ a mixed strategy composed of increasing enzyme levels for glucose uptake and hexokinase and decreasing levels of the remaining enzymes. This trade-off renders the cells specialized in this low-carbon flux state to compete for the available glucose and get rid of over-overcapacity. Overall, we show that FA is a powerful tool for systems biologists to study regulation of metabolism, interpret experimental data and evaluate hypotheses. PMID