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Sample records for extensor tendon repair

  1. Extensor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Extensor Tendon Injuries Email to a friend * required ...

  2. Comparison of Early Active Tension and Immobilization Protocols in Rehabilitation of the Hand, Following Zone 5-6 Extensor Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereidoun Layeghi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study was to assess and compare Early Active Tension and Immobilization Protocols in Rehabilitation of the Hand, Following Zone 5-6 Extensor Tendon Repair. Materials & Methods: From the 21 patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial study, 18 cases with average age of 32. 43 years completed the protocol. A total of 41 extensor tendons from 27 fingers of the subjects were studied. A surgeon repaired all tendons in zone 5 and/or 6 by an end to end epitenon running technique using prolen 0.3. For rehabilitation, subjects were randomly assigned into two “Immobilization” and “early active tension” group. Edema, metacarpophalangeal flexion, combined flexion and extension of wrist and fingers, total active motion of fingers and metacarpal extensor lag were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. All aforementioned variables and grip strength were reassessed 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Compared to traditional immobilization protocol, early active tension could significantly improve hand edema, metacarpal flexion, combined flexion and extension of wrist and fingers, total active motion of fingers and grip strength (P0.05. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that in compliant patients, early active tension could be an alternative method for traditional immobilization protocol, after surgical repair of extensor tendon injuries in zone 5 and/or 6.

  3. Open extensor tendon injuries: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillo, Dominic; Rayan, Ghazi M

    2012-01-01

    To report the epidemiology, mechanism, anatomical location, distribution, and severity of open extensor tendon injuries in the digits, hand, and forearm as well as the frequency of associated injuries to surrounding bone and soft tissue. Retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who had operative repair of open digital extensor tendon injuries in all zones within an 11-year period. Data was grouped according to patient characteristics, zone of injury, mechanism of injury, and presence of associated injury. Statistical analysis was used to determine the presence of relevant associations. Eighty-six patients with 125 severed tendons and 105 injured digits were available for chart reviews. Patients were predominantly males (83%) with a mean age of 34.2 years and the dominant extremity was most often injured (60%). The thumb was the most commonly injured (25.7%), followed by middle finger (24.8), whereas small finger was least affected (10.5%). Sharp laceration was the most common mechanism of injury (60%), and most of these occurred at or proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joints. Most saw injuries occurred distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint. Zone V was the most commonly affected in the fingers (27%) while zone VT was the most commonly affected in the thumb (69%). Associated injuries to bone and soft tissue occurred in 46.7% of all injuries with saw and crush/avulsions being predictive of fractures and damage to the underlying joint capsule. The extensor mechanism is anatomically complex, and open injuries to the dorsum of the hand, wrist, and forearm, especially of crushing nature and those inflicted by saws, must be thoroughly evaluated. Associated injuries should be ruled out in order to customize surgical treatment and optimize outcome.

  4. Multiple Tophaceous Gout of Hand with Extensor Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruki Tobimatsu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man presented with painless subcutaneous masses bilaterally on his hands and loss of motion or contracture of the fingers. Initially, drug therapy to reduce the serum uric acid was administered and was expected to reduce the tophi. However, during observation at the clinic, spontaneous rupture of an extensor tendon occurred, and surgical repair of the tendon and resection of the masses were performed. Surgical exploration of the right hand showed hypertrophic white-colored crystal deposits that both surrounded and invaded the extensor digitorum communis of the index finger, which was ruptured. Histopathologic examination of the specimen demonstrated findings consistent with gouty tophi. Tophaceous gout can induce a rupture of tendons during clinical observation, and surgical resection of the tophi might be needed to prevent ruptures.

  5. [Reconstruction of the extensor pollicis longus tendon by transposition of the extensor indicis tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, A; Kalb, K; Van Schoonhoven, J; Landsleitner Dagger, B

    2003-12-01

    Rupture of the extensor pollicis longus-tendon (EPL) is a frequent complication after distal radius fractures. Other traumatic and non-traumatic reasons for this tendon lesion are known, including a theory about a disorder in the blood supply to the tendon itself. We examined 40 patients after reconstruction of the EPL-tendon in a mean follow-up time of 30 months. All patients were clinically examined and a DASH questionnaire was answered by all patients. The method to reconstruct the EPL-tendon was the transposition of the extensor indicis-tendon. After the operations the thumb was put in a splint for four weeks in a "hitch-hiker's-position". 31 ruptures of the tendon (77.5 %) were a result of trauma. In 20 of them (50 %) a distal radius fracture had occurred. Clinical examination included measurements of the movement of the thumb- and index-finger joints, the grip strength and the maximal span of the hand. Significant differences were not found. The isolated extension of the index finger was possible in all patients. But it was reduced in ten cases which represent 25 %. Our results were evaluated by the Geldmacher score to evaluate the reconstruction of the EPL-tendon. 20 % excellent, 65 % good, 12.5 % fair and 2.5 % poor results were reached. The Geldmacher score was used critically. We suggest its modification for the evaluation of thumb abduction. The DASH score reached a functional value of ten points which represents a very good result. In conclusion the extensor indicis-transposition is a safe method to reconstruct the EPL-tendon. Its substantial advantage is taking a healthy muscle as the motor, thereby avoiding the risk of using a degenerated muscle in late tendon reconstruction. A powerful extension of the index finger will be maintained by physical education. Generally, the loss of the extension of the index finger is negligible. It does not disturb the patients. But it has to be discussed with the patient before the operation.

  6. Tuberculosis tenosynovitis of the extensor tendons of the wrist

    OpenAIRE

    Mrabet, Dalila; Ouenniche, Kmar; Mizouni, Habiba; Ounaies, Mouna; Khémiri, Chékib; Sahli, Héla; Sellami, Slaheddine

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterial tuberculous tenosynovitis of the extensor tendon sheath is an extremely rare manifestation of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The diagnosis may be easily delayed because of its non-specific clinical signs. We report a new case of tuberculous tenosynovitis of the extensor without concomitant pulmonary tuberculosis or documented immunodeficiency.

  7. Spontaneous Extensor Tendon Rupture in the Rheumatoid Wrist: Risk Factors and Preventive Role of Extended Tenosynovectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Jung-Hua; Liu, Wen-Chung; Yang, Kuo-Chung; Hsu, Kuei-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Ta; Chen, Lee-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous extensor tendon rupture is often seen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, but the risk factors are not clearly defined. We therefore collected the data of RA patients with previous extensor tendon rupture and those with tenosynovitis and analyzed the relationship between extended tenosynovectomy and spontaneous extensor tendon rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 17 spontaneous extensor tendon rupture episodes in 15 RA patients and 14 tenosynovitis episodes that required tenosynovectomy in 12 RA patients from 1997 to 2013. Correlations between the incidence of tendon rupture, X-ray findings, and clinical findings in the affected wrists before tendon rupture were analyzed statistically using the test for proportion. The following parameters were significantly correlated with spontaneous extensor tendon rupture: disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year duration, and Larsen grade greater than 4 (P = 0.02, 0.03, and 0.01, respectively). Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray contributed to a higher spontaneous extensor tendon rupture rate among RA patients (P = 0.01, 0.05, and 0.03, respectively). Extended tenosynovectomy was performed on 14 wrists in 12 RA patients with persistent tenosynovitis longer than 6 months, and Larsen grade did not deteriorate in this group compared with those who did not undergo the surgery. No spontaneous extensor tendon rupture occurred following the surgery. Risk factors of spontaneous extensor tendon rupture included disease duration longer than 8 years, persistent tenosynovitis longer than 1 year, and wrist Larsen grade greater than 4. Dislocation of the distal end of the ulna, carpal collapse, and the scallop sign on X-ray indicated a higher probability of extensor tendon rupture. Rheumatologists should consult with hand surgeons promptly to preserve hand function before tendon rupture. Prophylactic extended tenosynovectomy

  8. Extensor Tendon Instability Due to Sagittal Band Injury in a Martial Arts Athlete: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochevar, Andrew; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-03-01

    A Taekwondo participant sustained a hand injury from punching an opponent that resulted in painful instability of the ring finger extensor digitorum communis tendon due to sagittal band damage. His symptoms resolved after reconstructive surgery on the sagittal band (SB) with stabilization of the extensor tendon over the metacarpophalangeal joint.

  9. Ulnar-sided pain due to extensor carpi ulnaris tendon subluxation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cift Hakan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present the case of a patient with extensor carpi ulnaris tendon subluxation who was first treated for distal radioulnar joint sprain. Case presentation A 25-year-old Caucasian man was seen at our policlinic one month after he had fallen on his outstretched hand. A diagnosis of extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation was made clinically but we also had the magnetic resonance imaging scan of the patient’s wrist which displayed an increased signal on T2-weighted images consistent with inflammation around the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was found to be dislocating during supination and relocating during pronation. The sheath was reconstructed using extensor retinaculum due to attenuation of subsheath. Conclusion There was no recurrent dislocation of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon of the patient at his last follow up 12 months after the operation.

  10. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon due to Unusual Etiology

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    Süleyman Taş

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon includes systemic or local steroid injections, wrist fracture, tenosynovitis, synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and repetitive wrist motions. Case Report: We encountered a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture with an unusual etiology, cow milking. In this case, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius tendon was performed successfully. At 1 year after surgery, extension of the thumb was sufficient. Conclusion: It appears that patients with occupations involving repetitive motions are at a high risk of closed tendon ruptures.

  11. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your Achilles tendon to point your toes and push off your foot when walking. If your Achilles ... MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee and Drez's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine: Principles and Practice . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  12. Accuracy of High-Resolution Ultrasonography in the Detection of Extensor Tendon Lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Sheppard, Joseph E

    2016-02-01

    Lacerations to the extensor mechanism are usually diagnosed clinically. Ultrasound (US) has been a growing diagnostic tool for tendon injuries since the 1990s. To date, there has been no publication establishing the accuracy and reliability of US in the evaluation of extensor mechanism lacerations in the hand. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of US to detect extensor tendon injuries in the hand. Sixteen fingers and 4 thumbs in 4 fresh-frozen and thawed cadaveric hands were used. Sixty-eight 0.5-cm transverse skin lacerations were created. Twenty-seven extensor tendons were sharply transected. The remaining skin lacerations were used as sham dissection controls. One US technologist and one fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist performed real-time dynamic US studies in and out of water bath. A second fellowship trained musculoskeletal radiologist subsequently reviewed the static US images. Dynamic and static US interpretation accuracy was assessed using dissection as "truth." All 27 extensor tendon lacerations and controls were identified correctly with dynamic imaging as either injury models that had a transected extensor tendon or sham controls with intact extensor tendons (sensitivity = 100%, specificity = 100%, positive predictive value = 1.0; all significantly greater than chance). Static imaging had a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 89%, and accuracy of 88% (all significantly greater than chance). The results of the dynamic real time versus static US imaging were clearly different but did not reach statistical significance. Diagnostic US is a very accurate noninvasive study that can identify extensor mechanism injuries. Clinically suspected cases of acute extensor tendon injury scanned by high-frequency US can aid and/or confirm the diagnosis, with dynamic imaging providing added value compared to static. Ultrasonography, to aid in the diagnosis of extensor mechanism lacerations, can be successfully used in a reliable and

  13. Anatomic relationship of the proximal nail matrix to the extensor hallucis longus tendon insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo López, P; Becerro de Bengoa Vallejo, R; López López, D; Prados Frutos, J C; Alfonso Murillo González, J; Losa Iglesias, M E

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the relationship of the terminal extensor hallucis longus tendon insertion to the proximal limit of the nail matrix of the great toe. Fifty fresh-frozen human cadaver great toes with no evidence of trauma (average age, 62.5 years; 29 males and 21 females) were used for this study. Under 25X magnification, the proximal limit of the nail matrix and the terminal bony insertion of the extensor hallucis longus tendons were identified. The distance from the terminal tendon insertion to the nail matrix was ascertained using precision calipers, an optical microscope, and autocad(®) software for windows. Twenty-five great toes were placed in a neutral formalin solution and further analysed by histological longitudinal-sections. The specimens were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically to determine the presence of the extensor hallucis longus tendon along the dorsal aspect of the distal phalanx of each great toe. The main result we found in great toes was that the extensor tendon is between the matrix and the phalanx and extends dorsally to the distal aspect of the distal phalanx in all, 100%, specimens. The nail matrix of the great toe is not attached to the periosteum of the dorsal aspect of the base of the distal phalanx as is the case for fingers, because the extensor hallucis tendon is plantar or directly underneath the nail matrix and the tendon is dorsal to the bone. We have found that the extensor tendon is between the matrix and the phalanx and extends dorsally to the distal aspect of the distal phalanx. The nail matrix of the great toe is not attached to the periosteum of the dorsal aspect of the base of distal phalanx as is the case in fingers, because the extensor hallucis tendon is plantar or directly underneath the nail matrix and the tendon is dorsal to the bone. Our anatomic study demonstrates that the proximal limit of the matrix and nail bed of the human great toe are dorsal and

  14. A rare knee extensor mechanism injury: Vastus intermedius tendon rupture

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    Engin Cetinkaya

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We report the first case of isolated rupture of the vastus intermedius tendon in the literature and we claim that disorder may be succesfully treated with conservative treatment and adequate physiotheraphy.

  15. Ultrasonographic Characteristics of the Common Extensor Tendon of the Elbow in Asymptomatic Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Thøger P; Fredberg, Ulrich; Ammitzbøl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasonography (US) of the common extensor tendon (CET) of the elbow is often part of the assessment of patients with lateral epicondylitis. This US assessment is currently based on general tendinopathy references and not well-defined US entities. PURPOSE: To describe CET thickness...

  16. Reconstruction of long digital extensor tendon by cranial tibial muscle fascia graft in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiza, Soroush; Khajeh, Ahmad; Naddaf, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Tendon rupture in dogs is generally the result of a direct trauma. This report described the use of adjacent muscle autogenic fascial graft for reconstruction of distal rupture of long digital extensor tendon in a dog. A two-year-old male mix breed dog, was presented with a non-weight bearing lameness of the right hind limb and a deep rupture of lateral side of right tarsus. History taking revealed that this rupture appeared without any apparent cause, when walking around the farm, three days before. Radiography was done and no fracture was observed. Hyperextension of right tarsal joint compared to left limb was observed. Under general anesthesia, after dissections of the ruptured area, complete rupture of long digital extensor tendon was revealed. Then, we attempted to locate the edge of the tendon, however, the tendon length was shortened approximately 1 cm. Hence, a strip of 1 cm length from fascia of cranial tibial muscle was harvested to fill the defect. The graft was sutured to the two ends of tendon using locking loop pattern. Subcutaneous layers and the skin were sutured routinely. Ehmer sling bandage was applied to prevent weight bearing on the surgical region. Re-examination and phone contact with the owner eight weeks and six months postoperatively revealed a poor lameness and excellent function of the dog, respectively. It could be concluded that the fascia of adjacent muscles can be used as an autogenic graft for reconstruction of some tendon ruptures.

  17. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P 0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  18. Tubercular tenosynovitis of extensor tendons of foot--a rare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of soft tissues as a result of spread from adjacent bone or joint is a well recognized entity. However isolated tuberculous pyomyositis, bursitis and tenosynovitis are rare, constituting about 1% of skeletal tuberculosis. Tubercular tenosynovitis commonly involves tendon sheaths of wrist and hand. Cases of ...

  19. [Flexor tendon repair: a short story].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutet, F; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V

    2014-12-01

    This short story of flexor tendon repair aims to illustrate hesitations and wanderings of this surgery. Obviously tendon repair was very early considered, but it developed and diffused rather lately. It became a routine practice only in 20th century. This was due on the one hand, in Occident, to the Galen's dogmatic interdiction, on the other hand, to the repair difficulties of this paradoxical structure. Actually tendon is made of fibroblasts and collagen (sticky substances), and then its only goal is to move. According to this necessity, whatever the used techniques are, gliding is the final purpose. Technical evolutions are illustrated by historical contributions to flexor tendon surgery of several "giants" of hand surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The frondiform ligament and pseudotenosynovitis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon: MRI evaluation with cadaveric correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zember, Jonathan; Rosenberg, Zehava; Mba-Jones, Chimere; Bencardino, Jenny; Rossi, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Fluid along the frondiform ligament, the sinus tarsi stem of the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER), can approximate the extensor digitorum longus (EDL), at times simulating tenosynovitis. Our purpose, based on MRI and cadaveric studies, was to further evaluate this scantly described phenomenon, to identify associated findings and to alert the radiologists to the potential pitfall of over diagnosing EDL tenosynovitis. Two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively reviewed the radiology reports and MRI studies of 258 ankle MRI exams, performed at our institution, for fluid along the frondiform ligament extending toward the EDL. No patient had EDL pathology clinically. MRI was performed in two cadaveric ankles following injection of the sinus tarsi and EDL tendon sheath, under ultrasound guidance. Altogether, 31 MRIs demonstrated fluid extending from the sinus tarsi along the frondiform ligament toward the EDL. In 30 cases (97 %), the fluid partially surrounded the tendon, without tendon sheath distension. Based on the radiology reports, in 11 of the 31 cases (35 %), the fluid was misinterpreted as abnormal. Most common associated findings included ligamentous injury, posterior tibial tendon (PTT) tear, flat-foot, and osteoarthrosis. In the cadavers, fluid extended along the frondiform ligament toward the EDL after sinus tarsi injection; there was no communication between EDL tendon sheath and the sinus tarsi. Fluid within the sinus tarsi can extend along the frondiform ligament and partially surround the EDL, manifesting as pseudotenosynovitis. This phenomenon, often seen with ligamentous tears or PTT dysfunction, should not be misdiagnosed as true pathology of the EDL. (orig.)

  1. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, PPY; Zhang, P; Chan, KM; Qin, L

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be ...

  2. Osteocalcin expressing cells from tendon sheaths in mice contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xu; Huang, Huihui; Xia, Yin; Yao, YiFei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Yung, Patrick Shu-Hang; Chan, Kai-Ming; Wang, Li; Zhang, Chenglin; Huang, Yu; Mak, Kingston King-Lun

    2017-01-01

    Both extrinsic and intrinsic tissues contribute to tendon repair, but the origin and molecular functions of extrinsic tissues in tendon repair are not fully understood. Here we show that tendon sheath cells harbor stem/progenitor cell properties and contribute to tendon repair by activating Hedgehog signaling. We found that Osteocalcin (Bglap) can be used as an adult tendon-sheath-specific marker in mice. Lineage tracing experiments show that Bglap-expressing cells in adult sheath tissues pos...

  3. Association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris tendon pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Torriani, Martin [General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between distal ulnar morphology and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendon pathology. We retrospectively reviewed 71 adult wrist MRI studies with ECU tendon pathology (tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, or tear), and/or ECU subluxation. Subjects did not have a history of trauma, surgery, infection, or inflammatory arthritis. MRI studies from 46 subjects without ECU tendon pathology or subluxation were used as controls. The following morphological parameters of the distal ulna were measured independently by two readers: ulnar variance relative to radius, ulnar styloid process length, ECU groove depth and length. Subjects and controls were compared using Student's t test. Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was calculated. There was a significant correlation between negative ulnar variance and ECU tendon pathology (reader 1 [R1], P = 0.01; reader 2 [R2], P < 0.0001; R1 and R2 averaged data, P < 0.0001) and ECU tendon subluxation (P = 0.001; P = 0.0001; P < 0.0001). In subjects with ECU tendon subluxation there was also a trend toward a shorter length (P = 0.3; P <0.0001; P = 0.001) and a shallower ECU groove (P = 0.01; P = 0.03; P = 0.01; R1 and R2 averaged data with Bonferroni correction, P = 0.08). ECU groove depth (P = 0.6; P = 0.8; P = 0.9) and groove length (P = 0.1; P = 0.4; P = 0.7) showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology, and length of the ulnar styloid process showed no significant correlation with ECU tendon pathology (P = 0.2; P = 0.3; P = 0.2) or subluxation (P = 0.4; P = 0.5; P = 0.5). Inter-observer agreement (ICC) was >0.64 for all parameters. Distal ulnar morphology may be associated with ECU tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  4. Isolated Tuberculous Tenosynovitis of the Anterior Tibial and Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendons

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    Berhan Genç

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal system is involved in 1-5% of extrapulmonary cases of tuberculosis. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is a rare form of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. Tuberculosis of the tendon sheath in the hand has been seen in a few cases. Involvement of the tendons of the leg is less common. Diagnosis is not easy as there are no specific clinical symptoms or signs. A 33-year-old male presented with painful swelling in the distal right lower limb that caused restriction of movement. Imaging studies showed inflammation and infection of the extensor digitorium longus and tibialis anterior tendons. Histopathological studies showed a necrotizing granulomatous inflammation in the synovial tissue. A diagnosis of tuberculosis was made and medical treatment was initiated that proved successful. Patient remained infection-free at 26-month follow-up examination.

  5. Comparison of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of partial tears of finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swen, W. A.; Jacobs, J. W.; Hubach, P. C.; Klasens, J. H.; Algra, P. R.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Finger extensor tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may lead to partial and eventually to complete tendon tears. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of sonography (SG) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize partial tendon tears. Twenty-one RA patients

  6. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired w...

  7. Sonography findings in tears of the extensor pollicis longus tendon and correlation with CT, MRI and surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Santiago, Fernando; Garofano Plazas, Pilar; Fernandez, Juan Miguel Tristan

    2008-01-01

    We present our experience in the diagnosis of extensor pollicis longus tendon tears using different imaging methods. In the past 2 years, 12 patients (7 males, 5 females) with extension deficit of distal phalanx of thumb were diagnosed with extensor pollicis longus tendon (EPL) rupture by means of different imaging methods. The ultrasound pattern consisted of a gap between tendon stumps occupied by a continuous (eight cases) or discontinuous (four cases) attenuated hypoechoic string. In nine cases, the tendon ends were identified as a thickened stump-like structure. In the other three cases, tendon stumps were attenuated and mixed with atrophic muscle or wrist subcutaneous fat. All ultrasound findings were confirmed by CT, MR and/or surgical findings

  8. Chronic triceps insufficiency managed with extensor carpi radialis longus and palmaris longus tendon grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhanpal; Kumar, K Arun; Dinesh, Mc; Raj, Ranju

    2012-03-01

    Chronic triceps insufficiency, causing prolonged disability, occurs due to a missed diagnosis of an acute rupture. We report a 25 year old male with history of a significant fall sustaining multiple injuries. Since then, he had inability in extending his right elbow for which he sought intervention after a year. Diagnosis of triceps rupture was made clinicoradiologically and surgery was planned. Intraoperative findings revealed a deficient triceps with a fleck of avulsed bone from olecranon. Ipsilateral double tendon graft including extensor carpi radialis longus and palmaris longus were anchored to triceps and secured with the olecranon. Six-months follow revealed a complete active extension of elbow and a full function at the donor site.

  9. Arthroscopically-Asissted Achilles Tendon Repair; Long-Term Results

    OpenAIRE

    Turgut, Ak?n; Asfuro?lu, Mert Zeynel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The ruptures of the Achilles tendon (AT) are relatively common. Since there is no consensus on the best method of the repair of the AT; the treatment is determined on the preference of the surgeon and the patient. The study evaluating the cadaveric and short term clinical results done by our clinic in 2002, has shown us that arthroscopically Achilles tendon repair can be good choise in achilles tendon ruptures. Methods: Fortyfour patients who underwent arthroscopically assisted ac...

  10. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-12-15

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7-21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy.

  11. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  12. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M; Lemoine, Jennifer K

    2011-01-01

    Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance...... training. Thirty-six individuals were randomly assigned to a Placebo (67±2y), Acetaminophen (64±1y; 4000mg(.)d(-1)), or Ibuprofen (64±1y; 1200mg(.)d(-1)) group in a double-blind manner and completed 12-weeks of knee extensor resistance-training. Before and after training in vivo patellar tendon properties......, and this response was not influenced with ibuprofen consumption. Mean tendon CSA increased with training in the Acetaminophen group (3%, p0.05) with training in the Placebo group. These responses were generally uninfluenced by ibuprofen consumption. In the Acetaminophen group, tendon deformation and strain...

  13. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  14. A new barbed device for repair of flexor tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, K M

    2012-02-01

    We split 100 porcine flexor tendons into five groups of 20 tendons for repair. Three groups were repaired using the Pennington modified Kessler technique, the cruciate or the Savage technique, one using one new device per tendon and the other with two new devices per tendon. Half of the tendons received supplemental circumferential Silfverskiold type B cross-stitch. The repairs were loaded to failure and a record made of their bulk, the force required to produce a 3 mm gap, the maximum force applied before failure and the stiffness. When only one device was used repairs were equivalent to the Pennington modified Kessler for all parameters except the force to produce a 3 mm gap when supplemented with a circumferential repair, which was equivalent to the cruciate. When two devices were used the repair strength was equivalent to the cruciate repair, and when the two-device repair was supplemented with a circumferential suture the force to produce a 3 mm gap was equivalent to that of the Savage six-strand technique.

  15. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lui PPY

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis" which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed.

  16. A photoactivated nanofiber graft material for augmented Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Tao; Senthil-Kumar, Prabhu; Dubbin, Karen; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador D; Datta, Néha; Randolph, Mark A; Cenis, José L; Rutledge, Gregory C; Kochevar, Irene E; Redmond, Robert W

    2012-10-01

    Suture repair of Achilles tendon rupture can cause infection, inflammation and scarring, while prolonged immobilization promotes adhesions to surrounding tissues and joint stiffness. Early mobilization can reduce complications provided the repair is strong enough to resist re-rupture. We have developed a biocompatible, photoactivated tendon wrap from electrospun silk (ES) to provide additional strength to the repair that could permit early mobilization, and act as a barrier to adhesion formation. ES nanofiber mats were prepared by electrospinning. New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgical transection of the Achilles tendon and repair by: (a) SR: standard Kessler suture + epitendinous suture (5-0 vicryl). (b) ES/PTB: a single stay suture and a section of ES mat, stained with 0.1% Rose Bengal (RB), wrapped around the tendon and bonded with 532 nm light (0.3 W/cm(2) , 125 J/cm(2) ). (c) SR + ES/PTB: a combination of (a) and (b). Gross appearance, extent of adhesion formation and biomechanical properties of the repaired tendon were evaluated at Days 7, 14, or 28 post-operatively (n = 8 per group at each time point). Ultimate stress (US) and Young's modulus (E) in the SR group were not significantly different from the ES/PTB group at Days 7 (US, P = 0.85; E, P = 1), 14 (US, P = 0.054; E, P = 1), and 28 (US, P = 0.198; E, P = 0.12) post-operatively. Adhesions were considerably greater in the SR group compared to the ES/PTB group at Days 7 (P = 0.002), 14 (P tendon repair site provides considerable benefit in Achilles tendon repair. Lasers Surg. Med. 44: 645-652, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bevacizumab Improves Achilles Tendon Repair in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tempfer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Effective wound-healing generally requires efficient re-vascularization after injury, ensuring sufficient supply with oxygen, nutrients, and various cell populations. While this applies to most tissues, tendons are mostly avascular in nature and harbor relatively few cells, probably contributing to their poor regenerative capacity. Considering the minimal vascularization of healthy tendons, we hypothesize that controlling angiogenesis in early tendon healing is beneficial for repair tissue quality and function. Methods: To address this hypothesis, Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody blocking VEGF-A signaling, was locally injected into the defect area of a complete tenotomy in rat Achilles tendon. At 28 days post-surgery, the defect region was investigated using immunohistochemistry against vascular and lymphatic epitopes. Polarization microscopy and biomechanical testing was used to determine tendon integrity and gait analysis for functional testing in treated vs non-treated animals. Results: Angiogenesis was found to be significantly reduced in the Bevacizumab treated repair tissue, accompanied by significantly reduced cross sectional area, improved matrix organization, increased stiffness and Young’s modulus, maximum load and stress. Further, we observed an improved gait pattern when compared to the vehicle injected control group. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study we propose that reducing angiogenesis after tendon injury can improve tendon repair, potentially representing a novel treatment-option.

  18. PRP as an Adjunct to Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan

    2018-06-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is a commonly performed repair. Technical developments provide surgeons the tools to create biomechanically robust repairs. How can the biological response mirror the strong and stable surgery? Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a supraphysiological platelet concentration which may positively augment rotator cuff healing. Not all PRPs are the same. High leukocyte levels and thrombin activation may be detrimental to tendon healing. Thrombin activation triggers an immediate release of growth factors and may actually inhibit some parts of the healing response. Clear differences exist between liquid PRP (products released within hours after activation) and solid fibrin PRP which slowly releases factors over days. The heterogenicity data and grouping liquid and solid PRP together make systematic reviews confusing. Solid PRP fibrin constructs are often associated with increased tendon healing. PRP fibrin matrix offers the greatest promise for improving clinical success after rotator cuff tendon repair.

  19. Snapping wrist due to multiple accessory tendon of first extensor compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhiyaneswaran Subramaniyam

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There are various causes for snapping wrist syndrome. Multiple accessory tendon can also cause snapping as shown in this case report. Moreover am presenting this case to highlight the diagnostic failure with non dynamic radiological investigation and to consider multiple accessory tendon as differential diagnosis for snapping wrist syndrome. Also suggest dynamic study could be a better choice of investigation to diagnosis snapping syndrome. First compartment tunnel release with few accessory tendon slip tenotomy gives good result.

  20. Short Term Results of Arthroscopic Repair of Subscapularis Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zafarani

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being the largest rotator cuff tendon of the shoulder,the function and clinical relevance of subscapularis pathology has been largely ignored in the literature.Although many studies have focused on subscapularis tears recently,majority of them reported techniques for open repair. The advent of arthroscopy and   arthroscopic repair techniques has opened new frontiers in the diagnosis and repair of torn rotator cuff tendons, including the subscapularis.In this article,we review shortterm results of arthroscopic subscapularis repair. Method: Ten patients with subscapularis tendon tear of the rotator cuff were studied   prospectively including 8 men and 2 women with an average age of 49.7±12.8 years and an average delay in treatment of 23.3 months. Clinical outcomes, including the UCLAscore were assessed in all patients after 3 months of the surgery. Results: 6 patients were followed regularly for more than 6 months,while other 4 patients had a follow-up period of more than a year. The pain score improved from 1.75 to 9 and the UCLA score from 8.8 to 30.6.Conclusions: rthroscopic repair of subscapularis tendon tear results in significant subjective and objective improvement and high levels of patient satisfaction.  

  1. Suture anchor tenodesis in repair of distal Achilles tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliçoğlu, Onder; Türker, Mehmet; Yildız, Fatih; Akalan, Ekin; Temelli, Yener

    2014-01-01

    Distal Achilles tendon avulsions are in the form of either bony and nonbony avulsion of Achilles tendon from its calcaneal insertion. Four patients with distal Achilles tendon avulsions or ruptures which were treated with tendon to bone repair using suture anchors are presented here. Operated leg was immobilized in above-knee cast for 4 weeks while the patient walked non-weight-bearing. Then, cast was changed to below knee, and full weight-bearing was allowed. Patients underwent gait analysis minimum at first postoperative year. Mean American Orthopedics Foot Ankle Society ankle/hindfoot score of patients at last visit was 88.75 (range 85-100), and Achilles tendon total rupture score was 77.75 (range 58-87). Mean passive dorsiflexion of injured ankles (14° ± 5°) was lower than uninjured ankles (23° ± 9°). All the kinematic parameters of gait analysis were comparable to the uninjured side. Maximum plantar flexion power of injured ankle was 1.40 W/kg, and this was significantly lower than the contralateral side value 2.38 W/kg; (P = 0.0143). There were no visually altered gait or problems in daily life. Suture anchor tenodesis technique of distal Achilles tendon avulsions was successful in achieving durable osteotendinous repairs.

  2. The wrinkled patellar tendon: An indication of abnormality in the extensor mechanism of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, R.C.; Levinsohn, E.M.; Chrisman, H.

    1991-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition which requires early diagnosis and treatment to avert prolonged disability. In four patients who had surgically confirmed quadriceps tendon rupture, lateral radiographs of the knee and/or sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images demonstrated a corrugated appearance to the patellar tendon. Sagittal MR images of the knee following patellectomy in one patient and radiographs of a transverse fracture of the patella in another also demonstrated this appearance. MRI has superb contrast resolution which provides optimal visualization of the contour of the patellar tendon on sagittal images. A retrospective review of 50 consecutive knee MRI examinations was carried out to evaluate the appearance of the normal patellar tendon. In 49 of 50 patients, the sagittal images demonstrated a straight or nearly straight patellar tendon. A corrugated appearance of the patellar tendon on sagittal images indicates a reduction in the normal tensile force applied to it and indicates the need for careful evaluation of the patella and quadriceps tendon mechanism. (orig.)

  3. A technique for introducing looped sutures in flexor tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamath B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Stronger flexor tendon repairs facilitate early active motion therapy protocols. Core sutures using looped suture material provide 1 ½ to twice the strength of Kessler′s technique (with four strand and six strand Tsuge technique respectively. The technique is well-described and uses preformed looped sutures (supramid. This is not available in many countries and we describe a technique whereby looped sutures can be introduced in flexor tendon repair by the use of 23 G hypodermic needle and conventional 4.0 or 5.0 sutures. This is an alternative when the custom made preformed sutures are not available. This can be practiced in zone 3 to zone 5 repairs. Technical difficulties limit its use in zone 2 repairs.

  4. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  5. Comparing Biomechanical Properties, Repair Times, and Value of Common Core Flexor Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Aakash; Schimoler, Patrick; Miller, Mark C; Kharlamov, Alexander; Merrell, Gregory A; Palmer, Bradley A

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare biomechanical strength, repair times, and repair values for zone II core flexor tendon repairs. A total of 75 fresh-frozen human cadaveric flexor tendons were harvested from the index through small finger and randomized into one of 5 repair groups: 4-stranded cross-stitch cruciate (4-0 polyester and 4-0 braided suture), 4-stranded double Pennington (2-0 knotless barbed suture), 4-stranded Pennington (4-0 double-stranded braided suture), and 6-stranded modified Lim-Tsai (4-0 looped braided suture). Repairs were measured in situ and their repair times were measured. Tendons were linearly loaded to failure and multiple biomechanical values were measured. The repair value was calculated based on operating room costs, repair times, and suture costs. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis were used to compare repair data. The braided cruciate was the strongest repair ( P > .05) but the slowest ( P > .05), and the 4-stranded Pennington using double-stranded suture was the fastest ( P > .05) to perform. The total repair value was the highest for braided cruciate ( P > .05) compared with all other repairs. Barbed suture did not outperform any repairs in any categories. The braided cruciate was the strongest of the tested flexor tendon repairs. The 2-mm gapping and maximum load to failure for this repair approached similar historical strength of other 6- and 8-stranded repairs. In this study, suture cost was negligible in the overall repair cost and should be not a determining factor in choosing a repair.

  6. Scaffolds for Tendon and Ligament Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Anthony; Butler, David L; Dyment, Nathaniel A; Cagle, Paul J; Proctor, Christopher S; Ratcliffe, Seena S; Flatow, Evan L

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced tendon and ligament repair would have a major impact on orthopaedic surgery outcomes, resulting in reduced repair failures and repeat surgeries, more rapid return to function, and reduced health care costs. Scaffolds have been used for mechanical and biologic reinforcement of repair and regeneration with mixed results. This review summarizes efforts made using biologic and synthetic scaffolds using rotator cuff and ACL as examples of clinical applications, discusses recent advances that have shown promising clinical outcomes, and provides insight into future therapy. PMID:25650098

  7. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Acupuncture Effect on Common Extensor Tendon Thickness in Patients with Lateral Epicondylitis: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Fatma Gülçin; Öztürk, Gökhan Tuna; Bölük, Hüma; Akkuş, Selami

    2017-10-01

    To explore the effect of acupuncture on common extensor tendon (CET) thickness in patients with lateral epicondylitis (LE). Additionally, to identify whether clinical and ultrasonographic changes showed any correlation. Forty-one patients were randomly assigned to acupuncture and control groups. Conventional treatment (rest, NSAİİ, bracing, exercise) methods for LE were applied to all patients. In addition to this, the acupuncture treatment was applied to the acupuncture group. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Duruoz Hand Index (DHI) for functioning of the affected limb, the pressure pain threshold, and CET thickness (via ultrasound imaging) were assessed before and end of the treatment in both groups. The VAS and DHI scores in both groups decreased. The pressure pain threshold and CET thickness only demonstrated improvement in the acupuncture group. These findings show that the CET thickness was reduced after 10 sessions of acupuncture treatment in LE patients.

  8. FLEXOR TENDON REPAIR IN THE HAND

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method of Repair. Cases. AGE, SEX ... method is at fault and not the dexterity of the operator or his technique. .... Physio- therapy seldom makes stiff fingers work, but it prevents .... or repaired later by direct suture, graft or transplant. No. of.

  9. MR imaging of patients with lateral epicondylitis of the elbow: is the common extensor tendon an isolated lesion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether an injury of the common extensor tendon (CET is associated with other abnormalities in the elbow joint and find the potential relationships between these imaging features by using a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: Twenty-three patients were examined with 3.0 T MR. Two reviewers were recruited for MR images evaluation. Image features were recorded in terms of (1 the injury degree of CET; (2 associated injuries in the elbow joint. Spearman's rank correlation analysis was performed to analyze the relationships between the injury degree of CET and associated abnormalities of the elbow joint, correlations were considered significant at p<0.05. RESULTS: Total 24 elbows in 23 patients were included. Various degrees of injuries were found in total 24 CETs (10 mild, 7 moderate and 7 severe. Associated abnormalities were detected in accompaniments of the elbow joints including ligaments, tendons, saccussynovialis and muscles. A significantly positive correlation (r = 0.877,p<0.01 was found in injuries of CET and lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL. CONCLUSION: Injury of the CET is not an isolated lesion for lateral picondylitis, which is mostly accompanied with other abnormalities, of which the LUCL injury is the most commonly seen in lateral epicondylitis, and there is a positive correlation between the injury degree in CET and LUCL.

  10. Ultrasonography versus magnetic resonance imaging in detecting and grading common extensor tendon tear in chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Bachta

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic performance and reliability of ultrasonography (US in detecting and grading common extensor tendon (CET tear in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis (LE, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as the reference standard.The study comprised fifty-eight chronic LE patients. Each patient underwent US and MRI. CET status was classified as: high-grade tear (≥50% thickness, low-grade tear (<50% thickness, suspected tear (possible but not evident tear, no tear. Additionally, the following dichotomous scale was used: confirmed or unconfirmed CET tear. Relative US parameters (versus MRI for detecting CET tear included: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy. The agreement between US and MRI findings was measured using the weighted Cohen kappa coefficient (κ.US showed moderate agreement with MRI in detecting and grading CET tear (κ = 0.49. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CET tear detecting by US were 64.52%, 85.19%, and 72.73%, respectively. PPV and NPV of US were 83.33% and 67.65%, respectively. No patient with unconfirmed CET tear on US had high-grade CET tear on MRI.Ultrasonography is a valuable imaging modality that can be used as a screening tool to exclude high-grade CET tear in chronic LE patients. Once a tear is evident on US, MRI should be considered to assess precisely the extent of tendon injury.

  11. Stimulation of tendon repair by platelet concentrate, CDMP-2 and mechanical loading in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Virchenko, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Growth factor delivery may be useful to accelerate the rate of tendon healing. We studied Platelet Concentrate, which in effect can be regarded as a cocktail of growth factors relevant for tendon healing. In a rat Achilles tendon transection model, one postoperative injection of Platelet Concentrate resulted in increased strength even 3 weeks later. Mechanical stimulation improves the repair of ruptured tendons. We studied the effects of platelets upon Achilles tendon regenerates in rats 3, 5...

  12. Spontaneous atraumatic extensor pollicis longus rupture in the nonrheumatoid population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Erin M; Shridharani, Sachin M; Lifchez, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    Extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon rupture is a well-described phenomenon in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Mechanisms of EPL tendon rupture in the nonrheumatoid population have also been described and include traumatic rupture, repetitive motion strain, and steroid injection into the tendon. The operative records for patients undergoing extensor pollicis longus reconstruction by the senior author were reviewed. Patients with a history of trauma to the wrist or inflammatory arthropathy were excluded. We identified 3 patients who presented with spontaneous EPL tendon rupture. These patients reported no risk factors (as listed earlier) or inciting event. All 3 patients had some exposure to local steroids but this exposure was not at the site of subsequent tendon rupture. All patients were operatively repaired and went on to full recovery of EPL function. In patients with sudden loss of extension of the thumb interphalangeal joint, a thorough history of steroid exposure including local steroid exposure remote to the affected EPL tendon may be relevant.

  13. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kursat Dabak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p0.008. Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  14. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p tendon tissue with fibril structure observable only at 45 weeks

  15. MR Imaging of Patients with Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow: Is the Common Extensor Tendon an Isolated Lesion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Wang, Ren-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether an injury of the common extensor tendon (CET) is associated with other abnormalities in the elbow joint and find the potential relationships between these imaging features by using a high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods Twenty-three patients were examined with 3.0 T MR. Two reviewers were recruited for MR images evaluation. Image features were recorded in terms of (1) the injury degree of CET; (2) associated injuries in the elbow joint. Spearman’s rank correlation analysis was performed to analyze the relationships between the injury degree of CET and associated abnormalities of the elbow joint, correlations were considered significant at plateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL). Conclusion Injury of the CET is not an isolated lesion for lateral picondylitis, which is mostly accompanied with other abnormalities, of which the LUCL injury is the most commonly seen in lateral epicondylitis, and there is a positive correlation between the injury degree in CET and LUCL. PMID:24244512

  16. Microstructural stress relaxation mechanics in functionally different tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screen, H R C; Toorani, S; Shelton, J C

    2013-01-01

    Tendons experience widely varying loading conditions in vivo. They may be categorised by their function as either positional tendons, which are used for intricate movements and experience lower stress, or as energy storage tendons which act as highly stressed springs during locomotion. Structural and compositional differences between tendons are thought to enable an optimisation of their properties to suit their functional environment. However, little is known about structure-function relationships in tendon. This study adopts porcine flexor and extensor tendon fascicles as examples of high stress and low stress tendons, comparing their mechanical behaviour at the micro-level in order to understand their stress relaxation response. Stress-relaxation was shown to occur predominantly through sliding between collagen fibres. However, in the more highly stressed flexor tendon fascicles, more fibre reorganisation was evident when the tissue was exposed to low strains. By contrast, the low load extensor tendon fascicles appears to have less capacity for fibre reorganisation or shearing than the energy storage tendon, relying more heavily on fibril level relaxation. The extensor fascicles were also unable to sustain loads without rapid and complete stress relaxation. These findings highlight the need to optimise tendon repair solutions for specific tendons, and match tendon properties when using grafts in tendon repairs. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. EGR1 induces tenogenic differentiation of tendon stem cells and promotes rabbit rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xu; Liu, Junpeng; Chen, Lei; Zhou, You; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1) in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs) using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. EGR1 Induces Tenogenic Differentiation of Tendon Stem Cells and Promotes Rabbit Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1 in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Methods: Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. Results: EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. Conclusion: EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries.

  19. Effects of Smoking on Hand Tendon Repair: Scientific Study & Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Samona J; Samona S; Gilin M; Carwile D; Persons S; AG Dass

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical effect of smoking on after tendon repair in smokers vs non-smokers was investigated, via exploring effects on flexor and tendon repair, and incidence of wound complications. Methods: Retrospective review of patients treated by 1 orthopedic surgeon, fellowship trained in hand surgery, and 3 occupational therapists working together in 1 physical therapy institution. 56 patients (20 smokers and 36 non-smokers) with acute traumatic tendon lacerations, fixed via direct (end-t...

  20. Extensor Mechanism Disruption after Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Series and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2016-02-04

    Extensor mechanism disruption following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a rare but devastating complication. These patients may require revision of the implants, but even then, it may not be possible to restore the normal function of the knee after the disruption. The patterns of extensor mechanism disruption can broadly be classified into three types: suprapatellar (quadriceps tendon rupture), transpatellar (patellar fracture), or infrapatellar (patellar tendon rupture). Infrapatellar tendon ruptures are the worst injuries, as they carry maximum morbidity and are challenging to manage. The disruption of the extensor mechanism may occur either intra-operatively or in the immediate postoperative period due to an injury. The treatment of extensor mechanism complications after TKA may include either nonsurgical management or surgical intervention in the form of primary repair or reconstruction with autogenous, allogeneic, or synthetic substitutes. We have provided an algorithm for the management of extensor mechanism disruption after TKA.

  1. Nickel-titanium wire in circumferential suture of a flexor tendon repair: a comparison to polypropylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, T; He, M; Chong, A K S; Lim, A Y T; Ryhanen, J

    2010-07-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) has been proposed as an alternative material for flexor tendon core suture. To our knowledge, its suitability as a circumferential suture of flexor tendon repair has not been investigated before. The purpose of this ex vivo study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of NiTi circumferential repairs and to compare them with commonly used polypropylene. Forty porcine flexor tendons were cut and repaired by simple running or interlocking mattress technique using 100 microm NiTi wire or 6-0 polypropylene. The NiTi circumferential repairs showed superior stiffness, gap resistance, and load to failure when compared to polypropylene repairs with both techniques. Nickel-titanium wire seems to be a potential material for circumferential repair of flexor tendons. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Repaired supraspinatus tendons in clinically improving patients: Early postoperative findings and interval changes on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young; Jin Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    To demonstrate and further determine the incidences of repaired supraspinatus tendons on early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in clinically improving patients and to evaluate interval changes on follow-up MRIs. Fifty patients, who showed symptomatic and functional improvements after supraspinatus tendon repair surgery and who underwent postoperative MRI twice with a time interval, were included. The first and the second postoperative MRIs were obtained a mean of 4.4 and 11.5 months after surgery, respectively. The signal intensity (SI) patterns of the repaired tendon on T2-weighted images from the first MRI were classified into three types of heterogeneous high SI with fluid-like bright high foci (type I), heterogeneous high SI without fluid-like bright high foci (type II), and heterogeneous or homogeneous low SI (type III). Interval changes in the SI pattern, tendon thickness, and rotator cuff interval thickness between the two postoperative MRIs were evaluated. The SI patterns on the first MRI were type I or II in 45 tendons (90%) and type III in five (10%). SI decreased significantly on the second MRI (p < 0.050). The mean thickness of repaired tendons and rotator cuff intervals also decreased significantly (p < 0.050). Repaired supraspinatus tendons exhibited high SI in 90% of clinically improving patients on MRI performed during the early postsurgical period. The increased SI and thickness of the repaired tendon decreased on the later MRI, suggesting a gradual healing process rather than a retear.

  3. Repaired supraspinatus tendons in clinically improving patients: Early postoperative findings and interval changes on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Eun; Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Rhee, Yong Girl; Yoon, So Hee; Park, So Young; Jin Wook

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate and further determine the incidences of repaired supraspinatus tendons on early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in clinically improving patients and to evaluate interval changes on follow-up MRIs. Fifty patients, who showed symptomatic and functional improvements after supraspinatus tendon repair surgery and who underwent postoperative MRI twice with a time interval, were included. The first and the second postoperative MRIs were obtained a mean of 4.4 and 11.5 months after surgery, respectively. The signal intensity (SI) patterns of the repaired tendon on T2-weighted images from the first MRI were classified into three types of heterogeneous high SI with fluid-like bright high foci (type I), heterogeneous high SI without fluid-like bright high foci (type II), and heterogeneous or homogeneous low SI (type III). Interval changes in the SI pattern, tendon thickness, and rotator cuff interval thickness between the two postoperative MRIs were evaluated. The SI patterns on the first MRI were type I or II in 45 tendons (90%) and type III in five (10%). SI decreased significantly on the second MRI (p < 0.050). The mean thickness of repaired tendons and rotator cuff intervals also decreased significantly (p < 0.050). Repaired supraspinatus tendons exhibited high SI in 90% of clinically improving patients on MRI performed during the early postsurgical period. The increased SI and thickness of the repaired tendon decreased on the later MRI, suggesting a gradual healing process rather than a retear.

  4. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon repair: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Medeiros Storti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare clinical entity, seldom reported in the literature and with unclear therapeutic setting. The authors report the case of a 39-year-old white man who suffered a simultaneous bilateral rupture while working out. When weightlifting with elbows at 90° of flexion, he suddenly felt pain on the anterior aspect of the arms, coming for evaluation after two days. He presented bulging contour of the biceps muscle belly and ecchymosis in the antecubital fossa, extending distally to the medial aspect of the forearm, as well as a marked decrease of supination strength and pain in active elbow flexion. MRI confirmed the rupture with retraction of the distal biceps bilaterally. The authors opted for performing the tendon repairs simultaneously through the double incision technique and fixation to the bicipital tuberosity with anchors. The patient progressed quite well, with full return to labor and sports activities, being satisfied with the result after two years of surgery. In the literature search, few reports of simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps were retrieved, with only one treated in the acute phase of injury. Therefore, the authors consider this procedure to be a good option to solve this complex condition.

  5. Simultaneous bilateral distal biceps tendon repair: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storti, Thiago Medeiros; Paniago, Alexandre Firmino; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps tendon is a rare clinical entity, seldom reported in the literature and with unclear therapeutic setting. The authors report the case of a 39-year-old white man who suffered a simultaneous bilateral rupture while working out. When weightlifting with elbows at 90° of flexion, he suddenly felt pain on the anterior aspect of the arms, coming for evaluation after two days. He presented bulging contour of the biceps muscle belly and ecchymosis in the antecubital fossa, extending distally to the medial aspect of the forearm, as well as a marked decrease of supination strength and pain in active elbow flexion. MRI confirmed the rupture with retraction of the distal biceps bilaterally. The authors opted for performing the tendon repairs simultaneously through the double incision technique and fixation to the bicipital tuberosity with anchors. The patient progressed quite well, with full return to labor and sports activities, being satisfied with the result after two years of surgery. In the literature search, few reports of simultaneous bilateral rupture of the distal biceps were retrieved, with only one treated in the acute phase of injury. Therefore, the authors consider this procedure to be a good option to solve this complex condition.

  6. Determining flexor-tendon repair techniques via soft computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M.; Firoozbakhsh, K.; Moniem, M.; Jamshidi, M.

    2001-01-01

    An SC-based multi-objective decision-making method for determining the optimal flexor-tendon repair technique from experimental and clinical survey data, and with variable circumstances, was presented. Results were compared with those from the Taguchi method. Using the Taguchi method results in the need to perform ad-hoc decisions when the outcomes for individual objectives are contradictory to a particular preference or circumstance, whereas the SC-based multi-objective technique provides a rigorous straightforward computational process in which changing preferences and importance of differing objectives are easily accommodated. Also, adding more objectives is straightforward and easily accomplished. The use of fuzzy-set representations of information categories provides insight into their performance throughout the range of their universe of discourse. The ability of the technique to provide a "best" medical decision given a particular physician, hospital, patient, situation, and other criteria was also demonstrated.

  7. Systemic EP4 Inhibition Increases Adhesion Formation in a Murine Model of Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Geary

    Full Text Available Flexor tendon injuries are a common clinical problem, and repairs are frequently complicated by post-operative adhesions forming between the tendon and surrounding soft tissue. Prostaglandin E2 and the EP4 receptor have been implicated in this process following tendon injury; thus, we hypothesized that inhibiting EP4 after tendon injury would attenuate adhesion formation. A model of flexor tendon laceration and repair was utilized in C57BL/6J female mice to evaluate the effects of EP4 inhibition on adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon repair. Systemic EP4 antagonist or vehicle control was given by intraperitoneal injection during the late proliferative phase of healing, and outcomes were analyzed for range of motion, biomechanics, histology, and genetic changes. Repairs treated with an EP4 antagonist demonstrated significant decreases in range of motion with increased resistance to gliding within the first three weeks after injury, suggesting greater adhesion formation. Histologic analysis of the repair site revealed a more robust granulation zone in the EP4 antagonist treated repairs, with early polarization for type III collagen by picrosirius red staining, findings consistent with functional outcomes. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated accelerated peaks in F4/80 and type III collagen (Col3a1 expression in the antagonist group, along with decreases in type I collagen (Col1a1. Mmp9 expression was significantly increased after discontinuing the antagonist, consistent with its role in mediating adhesion formation. Mmp2, which contributes to repair site remodeling, increases steadily between 10 and 28 days post-repair in the EP4 antagonist group, consistent with the increased matrix and granulation zones requiring remodeling in these repairs. These findings suggest that systemic EP4 antagonism leads to increased adhesion formation and matrix deposition during flexor tendon healing. Counter to our hypothesis that EP4 antagonism

  8. A Comparative Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Double-Row, Distal Triceps Tendon Repairs

    OpenAIRE

    Dorweiler, Matthew A.; Van Dyke, Rufus O.; Siska, Robert C.; Boin, Michael A.; DiPaola, Mathew J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Triceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries that almost always require surgical repair. This study tests the biomechanical properties of an original anchorless double-row triceps repair against a previously reported knotless double-row repair. Hypothesis: The anchorless double-row triceps repair technique will yield similar biomechanical properties when compared with the knotless double-row repair technique. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Eighteen ca...

  9. Flexor tendon repair with a knotless, bidirectional barbed suture: an in vivo biomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Grady E; Ludwig, Jonathan; Craig, Eric R; Woods, David; Joiner, Aaron; Chaudhari, Nilesh; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Siegal, Gene P; Eberhardt, Alan; Ponce, Brent

    2015-05-01

    To compare and analyze biomechanical properties and histological characteristics of flexor tendons either repaired by a 4-strand modified Kessler technique or using barbed suture with a knotless repair technique in an in vivo model. A total of 25 chickens underwent surgical transection of the flexor digitorum profundus tendon followed by either a 4-strand Kessler repair or a knotless repair with barbed suture. Chickens were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups with various postoperative times to death. Harvested tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing or histologic analysis. Harvested tendons revealed failures in 25% of knotless repairs (8 of 32) and 8% of 4-strand Kessler repairs (2 of 24). Biomechanical testing revealed no significant difference in tensile strength between 4-strand Kessler and barbed repairs; however, this lack of difference may be attributed to lower statistical power. We noted a trend toward a gradual decrease in strength over time for barbed repairs, whereas we noticed the opposite for the 4-strand Kessler repairs. Mode of failure during testing differed between repair types. The barbed repairs tended toward suture breakage as opposed to 4-strand Kessler repairs, which demonstrated suture pullout. Histological analysis identified no difference in the degree of inflammation or fibrosis; however, there was a vigorous foreign body reaction around the 4-strand Kessler repair and no such response around the barbed repairs. In this model, knotless barbed repairs trended toward higher in vivo failure rates and biomechanical inferiority under physiologic conditions, with each repair technique differing in mode of failure and respective histologic reaction. We are unable to recommend the use of knotless barbed repair over the 4-strand modified Kessler technique. For the repair techniques tested, surgeons should prefer standard Kessler repairs over the described knotless technique with barbed suture. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery

  10. An anomalous accessory extensor proprius indicis muscle: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Kurklu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Variations related to tendon insertion and musculotendinous junction of the extensor proprius indicis muscle are commonly encountered. An anomalous extensor indicis proprius muscle (EIP tendon was detected in a fifty-year-old female cadaver during routine dissection of the right upper extremity. The body of tendon was initiated from the posterior ulna as a one muscle body, then continued as two separate muscle bodies and tendons and finally they were separated into two slips after passing the fourth dorsal compartment. As a radial part, it was divided into two slips at the level of the first metacarpophalangeal joint, and conjugated with the extensor pollicis longus (EPL muscle. Then, as an ulnar part, it was terminated at the radial side of the lateral band of the second metacarpophalangeal joint. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations of the tendons may help to prevent confusion and mistakes during tendon repairs, and tendon transfers. [Hand Microsurg 2013; 2(3.000: 122-124

  11. management of open achilles tendon injury: primary repair and early ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is attributable to increase in both competitive and recreational sports. In most of the literature written on Achilles tendon injuries there were rarely any information about open Achilles tendon ... The most common aetiology was motorbike spoke.

  12. Rotator cuff repair with a tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; Qu, Jin; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Steinmann, Scott P; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-11-01

    To compare the mechanical performance of a rotator cuff repaired with a novel tendon-fibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch vs the traditional Mason-Allen repair in an in vitro canine model. Twenty shoulders and 10 bridging patches from patellar tendon were harvested. The patches were trimmed and sliced into 2 layers. An infraspinatus tendon tear was created in each shoulder. Modified Mason-Allen sutures were used to repair the infraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity, with or without the bridging patch (bridging patch group and controls, respectively). Shoulders were loaded to failure under displacement control at a rate of 0.5mm/s. The ultimate tensile load was significantly higher in the bridging patch group than control (mean [SD], 365.46 [36.45] vs 272.79 [48.88] N; Pfibrocartilage-bone composite bridging patch achieved higher ultimate tensile load and stiffness at the patch-greater tuberosity repair site compared with traditional repair in a canine model. This composite tissue transforms the traditional tendon-to-bone healing interface (with dissimilar tissues) into a pair of bone-to-bone and tendon-to-tendon interfaces, which may improve healing quality and reduce retear rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of acetaminophen and ibuprofen on in vivo patellar tendon adaptations to knee extensor resistance exercise in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carroll, C C; Dickinson, J M; LeMoine, J K

    2011-01-01

    adults induces modest changes in the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Over-the-counter doses of acetaminophen, but not ibuprofen, have a strong influence on tendon mechanical and material property adaptations to resistance training. These findings add to a growing body of evidence......Millions of older individuals consume acetaminophen or ibuprofen daily and these same individuals are encouraged to participate in resistance training. Several in vitro studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-inhibiting drugs can alter tendon metabolism and may influence adaptations to resistance...... tendon properties were assessed with MRI [cross-sectional area (CSA) and signal intensity] and ultrasonography of patellar tendon deformation coupled with force measurements to obtain stiffness, modulus, stress, and strain. Mean patellar tendon CSA was unchanged (P > 0.05) with training in the placebo...

  14. A Comparative Biomechanical Analysis of 2 Double-Row, Distal Triceps Tendon Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorweiler, Matthew A; Van Dyke, Rufus O; Siska, Robert C; Boin, Michael A; DiPaola, Mathew J

    2017-05-01

    Triceps tendon ruptures are rare orthopaedic injuries that almost always require surgical repair. This study tests the biomechanical properties of an original anchorless double-row triceps repair against a previously reported knotless double-row repair. The anchorless double-row triceps repair technique will yield similar biomechanical properties when compared with the knotless double-row repair technique. Controlled laboratory study. Eighteen cadaver arms were randomized into 2 groups. One group received the anchorless repair and the other received the knotless anchor repair. A materials testing system (MTS) machine was used to cycle the repaired arms from 0° to 90° with a 2.5-pound weight for 1500 cycles at 0.25 Hz. Real-time displacement of the tendon was measured during cycling using a probe. Load to failure was performed after completion of cyclic loading. The mean displacement with the anchorless technique was 0.77 mm (SD, 0.25 mm) at 0° (full elbow extension) and 0.76 mm (SD, 0.38 mm) at 90° (elbow flexion). The mean displacement with the anchored technique was 0.83 mm (SD, 0.57 mm) at 0° and 1.01 mm (SD, 0.62 mm) at 90°. There was no statistically significant difference for tendon displacement at 0º ( P = .75) or 90º ( P = .31). The mean load to failure with the anchorless technique was 618.9 N (SD, 185.6 N), while it was 560.5 N (SD, 154.1 N) with the anchored technique, again with no statistically significant difference ( P = .28). Our anchorless double-row triceps repair technique yields comparable biomechanical properties to previously described double-row triceps tendon repair techniques, with the added benefit of avoiding the cost of suture anchors. This anchorless double-row triceps tendon repair can be considered as an acceptable alternative to a knotless anchor repair for triceps tendon ruptures.

  15. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  16. In Vitro Comparison of Two Barbed Suture Configurations for Flexor Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Jamie L; Gabra, Joseph N; Esterle, Andrew R; Lanzinger, William D; Elias, John J

    2017-12-01

    Purpose  The current study compares the strength of a previously studied technique for flexor tendon repair with barbed sutures to an experimental approach that aligns all the barbs to oppose distraction. Methods  Twelve flexor tendons from cadaveric specimens were mechanically tested following repair of simulated zone II tendon injuries. Two repair techniques utilizing barbed sutures were studied: the Marrero-Amadeo four-core barbed suture approach and the experimental configuration with all barbs on four cores opposing distraction. Maximum applied load at failure, that is, ultimate load, and 2-mm gap force were compared between the two repair techniques, both as raw values and after normalization to cross-sectional area of the intact tendon. Statistical testing was performed using t -tests and Mann-Whitney U -tests, where appropriate, with a significance level of 0.05. Results  The ultimate loads, raw (58.2 N) and normalized (4.8 N/mm 2 ), were significantly larger for the Marrero-Amadeo repair than the proposed experimental approach (35.6 N and 2.7 N/mm 2 ; p  barbs to oppose distraction does not improve strength of the repaired tendon. The Marrero-Amadeo technique was found to have superior strength for use in traumatic zone II flexor tendon injuries.

  17. Patellar Tendon Repair Augmentation With a Knotless Suture Anchor Internal Brace: A Biomechanical Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothfeld, Alex; Pawlak, Amanda; Liebler, Stephenie A H; Morris, Michael; Paci, James M

    2018-04-01

    Patellar tendon repair with braided polyethylene suture alone is subject to knot slippage and failure. Several techniques to augment the primary repair have been described. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose was to evaluate a novel patellar tendon repair technique augmented with a knotless suture anchor internal brace with suture tape (SAIB). The hypothesis was that this technique would be biomechanically superior to a nonaugmented repair and equivalent to a standard augmentation with an 18-gauge steel wire. Controlled laboratory study. Midsubstance patellar tendon tears were created in 32 human cadaveric knees. Two comparison groups were created. Group 1 compared #2 supersuture repair without augmentation to #2 supersuture repair with SAIB augmentation. Group 2 compared #2 supersuture repair with an 18-gauge stainless steel cerclage wire augmentation to #2 supersuture repair with SAIB augmentation. The specimens were potted and biomechanically loaded on a materials testing machine. Yield load, maximum load, mode of failure, plastic displacement, elastic displacement, and total displacement were calculated for each sample. Standard statistical analysis was performed. There was a statistically significant increase in the mean ± SD yield load and maximum load in the SAIB augmentation group compared with supersuture alone (mean yield load: 646 ± 202 N vs 229 ± 60 N; mean maximum load: 868 ± 162 N vs 365 ± 54 N; P augmented repairs (mean yield load: 495 ± 213 N vs 566 ± 172 N; P = .476; mean maximum load: 737 ± 210 N vs 697 ± 130 N; P = .721). Patellar tendon repair augmented with SAIB is biomechanically superior to repair without augmentation and is equivalent to repair with augmentation with an 18-gauge stainless steel cerclage wire. This novel patellar tendon repair augmentation is equivalent to standard 18-gauge wire augmentation at time zero. It does not require a second surgery for removal, and it is biomechanically superior to primary repair alone.

  18. Flexor tendon repair: a comparative study between a knotless barbed suture repair and a traditional four-strand monofilament suture repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Joyce, C W

    2014-01-01

    We compared the tensile strength of a novel knotless barbed suture method with a traditional four-strand Adelaide technique for flexor tendon repairs. Forty fresh porcine flexor tendons were transected and randomly assigned to one of the repair groups before repair. Biomechanical testing demonstrated that the tensile strengths between both tendon groups were very similar. However, less force was required to create a 2 mm gap in the four-strand repair method compared with the knotless barbed technique. There was a significant reduction in the cross-sectional area in the barbed suture group after repair compared with the Adelaide group. This would create better gliding within the pulley system in vivo and could decrease gapping and tendon rupture.

  19. Extrusion of bone anchor suture following flexor digitorum profundus tendon avulsion injury repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, William H C

    2011-09-01

    Flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) zone I tendon avulsion injury is traditionally repaired with a pullout suture technique. More recently, bone anchor sutures have been used as a viable alternative and have largely replaced areas in hand surgery where pullout suture technique was once required. To date, there have been very few complications reported related to bone anchor suture use in FDP tendon reattachment to the bone. We report a very unusual case of extrusion of bone anchor through the nailbed, 6 years after zone I FDP tendon avulsion injury repair and a brief review of literature.

  20. A Barbed Suture Repair For Flexor Tendons: A Novel Technique With No Exposed Barbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormac W. Joyce, MB BCh

    2014-10-01

    Conclusions: We demonstrated that a 4-strand knotless, barbed method attained comparable strength to that of the traditional Adelaide repair technique. The barbed method had a significantly reduced cross-sectional area at the repair site compared with the Adelaide group. The 2-mm gap formation force was less in the barbed group than the Adelaide group. Barbed repairs show promise for tendon repairs; this simple method warrants further study in an animal model.

  1. The Biomechanical Role of Scaffolds in Augmented Rotator Cuff Tendon Repairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The biomechanical role of scaffolds in augmented rotator cuff tendon repairs Amit Aurora, D Enga,b, Jesse A. McCarron, MDc, Antonie J. van den Bogert...used for rotator cuff repair augmentation; however, the appropriate scaffold material properties and/or surgical application techniques for achieving...The model predicts that the biomechanical performance of a rotator cuff repair can be modestly increased by augmenting the repair with a scaffold that

  2. Cyclic Testing of the 6-Strand Tang and Modified Lim-Tsai Flexor Tendon Repair Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gavrielle Hui-Ying; Wong, Yoke-Rung; Lim, Rebecca Qian-Ru; Loke, Austin Mun-Kitt; Tay, Shian-Chao

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we compared the Tang repair technique with the 6-strand modified Lim-Tsai repair technique under cyclic testing conditions. Twenty fresh-frozen porcine flexor tendons were randomized into 2 groups for repair with either the modified Lim-Tsai or the Tang technique using Supramid 4-0 core sutures and Ethilon 6-0 epitendinous running suture. The repaired tendons were subjected to 2 stage cyclic loading. The survival rate and gap formation at the repair site were recorded. Tendons repaired by the Tang technique achieved an 80% survival rate. None of the modified Lim-Tsai repairs survived. The mean gap formed at the end of 1000 cycles was 1.09 mm in the Tang repairs compared with 4.15 mm in the modified Lim-Tsai repairs. The Tang repair is biomechanically stronger than the modified Lim-Tsai repair under cyclic loading. The Tang repair technique may exhibit a higher tolerance for active mobilization after surgery with less propensity for gap formation. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppe, Christian; Magnusson, S.P.; Lonsdale, Markus; Friberg, Lars; Svensson, Rene B.; Kjaer, Michael; Neergaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ( 18 F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ( 18 F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P < 0.05 for both), but had normalized by 12 months. These data demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome. (orig.)

  4. A barbed suture repair for flexor tendons: a novel technique with no exposed barbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Cormac W; Sugrue, Conor; Chan, Jeffrey C; Delgado, Luis; Zeugolis, Dimitrios; Carroll, Seam M; Kelly, Jack L

    2014-10-01

    Barbed suture technology has shown promise in flexor tendon repairs, as there is an even distribution of load and the need for a knot is eliminated. We propose that a quick and simple, novel, barbed technique without any exposed barbs on the tendon surface has comparable strength and a smaller cross-sectional area at the repair site than traditional methods of repair. Forty porcine flexor tendons were randomized to polybutester 4-strand barbed repair or to 4-strand Adelaide monofilament repair. The cross-sectional area was measured before and after repair. Biomechanical testing was carried out and 2-mm gap formation force, ultimate strength of repair, and method of failure were recorded. The mean ultimate strength of the barbed repairs was 54.51 ± 17.9 while that of the Adelaide repairs was 53.17 ± 16.35. The mean 2-mm gap formation force for the barbed group was 44.71 ± 17.86 whereas that of the Adelaide group was 20.25 ± 4.99. The postrepair percentage change in cross-sectional area at the repair site for the Adelaide group and barbed group was 12.0 ± 2.3 and 4.6 ± 2.8, respectively. We demonstrated that a 4-strand knotless, barbed method attained comparable strength to that of the traditional Adelaide repair technique. The barbed method had a significantly reduced cross-sectional area at the repair site compared with the Adelaide group. The 2-mm gap formation force was less in the barbed group than the Adelaide group. Barbed repairs show promise for tendon repairs; this simple method warrants further study in an animal model.

  5. Factors influencing the tensile strength of repaired Achilles tendon: a biomechanical experiment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Bai, Jing Ping; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Redat, Darebai; Yilihamu, Tuoheti; Xinlin, Baoltri; Hu, Geyang; Tang, Bin; Liang, Bing; Sun, Qi

    2010-10-01

    Operative treatment has been advocated as the method of choice to repair Achilles tendon rupture as surgery results in reduced re-rupture rate and faster rehabilitation. Many surgical techniques have been introduced allowing for postoperative early motion of the ankle joint. However, it is currently very difficult for surgeons to determine the optimal treatment conditions for ruptured Achilles tendon with an increasing number of end-to-end suture methods, suture materials, and epitenon suture techniques. In the present biomechanical experiment study based on an orthogonal design, thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits received Achilles tendon tenotomy and subsequent operative treatment to repair the tendon employing four end-to-end suture methods, four suture materials, and four epitenon suture techniques. The tensile strength of the repaired Achilles tendon was investigated at four rehabilitation periods, and in comparison with the results of another sixteen rabbits with normal Achilles tendons. The end-to-end suture method contributed most to the final Achilles tendon tensile strength in addition to rehabilitation period, with the highest values occurring with the use of the parachute-like ("Pa" bone) suture method. The other two factors, namely, suture material and epitenon suture technique, had relatively little influence on the results. The parachute-like ("Pa" bone) surgical technique is superior to the other three end-to-end suture methods, with enhanced tensile strength of the repaired tendon. This method allows for postoperative early kinesitherapy of the ankle and knee joints. Therefore, this technique is highly recommended in clinical situations for treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of exercise on age-related changes in collagen fibril diameter distributions in the common digital extensor tendons of young horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsey J; Goodship, Allen E; Birch, Helen L; Patterson-Kane, Janet C

    2005-04-01

    To determine whether specific treadmill exercise regimens would accelerate age-related changes in collagen fibril diameter distributions in the common digital extensor tendon (CDET) of the forelimbs of young Thoroughbreds. 24 female Thoroughbreds. Horses were trained for 18 weeks (6 horses; short term) or 18 months (5 horses; long term) on a high-speed treadmill; 2 age-matched control groups (6 horses/group) performed walking exercise only. Horses were (mean +/- SD) 24 +/- 1 months and 39 +/- 1 months old at termination of the short-term and long-term regimens, respectively. Midmetacarpal CDET specimens were obtained and processed for transmission electron microscopy. Diameter and area of at least 1,000 collagen fibrils/specimen were measured by use of computerized image analysis. Mass-average diameter (MAD) of collagen fibrils and collagen fibril index were calculated for each horse. Collagen fibril MAD for the older horses was significantly less than that for the younger horses. Exercise did not significantly affect fibril diameter or distributions in either age group, and collagen fibril index did not differ significantly between groups. Age-related reduction in collagen fibril MAD agreed with findings for other tendons and species. Training did not accelerate age-related change in the CDET in contrast to a reported decrease in collagen fibril MAD in the superficial digital flexor tendon of horses trained long term. Our results support the concept that the functionally distinct nature of the CDET and superficial digital flexor tendon in horses results in fundamentally different responses to high-speed exercise regimens.

  7. Rectus abdominis muscle flap for repair of prepubic tendon rupture in 8 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archipow, Wendy; Lanz, Otto I

    2011-11-01

    The clinical use and outcome of the rectus abdominis muscle flap to repair prepubic hernias were evaluated retrospectively. Medical records (2002-2007) of 8 dogs that had a rectus abdominis muscle flap to repair traumatic prepubic tendon rupture were reviewed. Only minor donor site complications were noted, including self-limiting ventral and hind-limb swelling. No long-term complications including recurrence of hernia were noted. The results of this study indicate that the rectus abdominis muscle flap is a clinically useful option for repairing prepubic tendon rupture in dogs.

  8. Advanced age diminishes tendon-to-bone healing in a rat model of rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Johannes F; Brown, Philip J; Walters, Jordan; Clark, John A; Smith, Thomas L; Freehill, Michael T; Tuohy, Christopher J; Stitzel, Joel D; Mannava, Sandeep

    2014-04-01

    Advanced patient age is associated with recurrent tearing and failure of rotator cuff repairs clinically; however, basic science studies have not evaluated the influence of aging on tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Hypothesis/ This study examined the effect of aging on tendon-to-bone healing in an established rat model of rotator cuff repair using the aged animal colony from the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. The authors hypothesized that normal aging decreases biomechanical strength and histologic organization at the tendon-to-bone junction after acute repair. Controlled laboratory study. In 56 F344xBN rats, 28 old and 28 young (24 and 8 months of age, respectively), the supraspinatus tendon was transected and repaired. At 2 or 8 weeks after surgery, shoulder specimens underwent biomechanical testing to compare load-to-failure and load-relaxation response between age groups. Histologic sections of the tendon-to-bone interface were assessed with hematoxylin and eosin staining, and collagen fiber organization was assessed by semiquantitative analysis of picrosirius red birefringence under polarized light. Peak failure load was similar between young and old animals at 2 weeks after repair (31% vs 26% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P > .05) but significantly higher in young animals compared with old animals 8 weeks after repair (86% vs 65% of age-matched uninjured controls, respectively; P repair, fibroblasts appeared more organized and uniformly aligned in young animals on hematoxylin and eosin slides compared with old animals. Collagen birefringence analysis of the tendon-to-bone junction demonstrated that young animals had increased collagen fiber organization and similar histologic structure compared with age-matched controls (53.7 ± 2.4 gray scales; P > .05). In contrast, old animals had decreased collagen fiber organization and altered structure compared with age

  9. Does strand configuration and number of purchase points affect the biomechanical behavior of a tendon repair? A biomechanical evaluation using different kessler methods of flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogramaci, Yunus; Kalaci, Aydiner; Sevinç, Teoman Toni; Esen, Erdinc; Komurcu, Mahmut; Yanat, Ahmet Nedim

    2008-09-01

    This study compares the mechanical properties of modified Kessler and double-modified Kessler flexor tendon repair techniques and evaluates simple modifications on both methods. Forty fresh sheep flexor tendons were divided equally into four groups. A transverse sharp cut was done in the middle of each tendon and then repaired with modified Kessler technique, modified Kessler with additional purchase point in the midpoint of each longitudinal strand, double-modified Kessler technique, or a combination of outer Kessler and inner cruciate configuration based on double-modified Kessler technique. The tendons were tested in a tensile testing machine to assess the mechanical performance of the repairs. Outcome measures included gap formation and ultimate forces. The gap strengths of the double-modified Kessler technique (30.85 N, SD 1.90) and double-modified Kessler technique with inner cruciate configuration (33.60 N, SD 4.64) were statistically significantly greater than that of the two-strand modified Kessler (22.56 N, SD 3.44) and modified Kessler with additional purchase configuration (21.75 N, SD 4.03; Tukey honestly significant difference test, P purchase point in modified Kessler repair or changing the inner strand configuration in double-modified Kessler repair. The results of this study show that the number of strands across the repair site together with the number of locking loops clearly affects the strength of the repair; meanwhile, the longitudinal strand orientation and number of purchase points in a single loop did not affect its strength.

  10. CT evaluation of extensor tendon entrapment as a complication of a distal radial fracture in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frawley, Kieran J.; Anton, Christopher G.; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Extensor indicis proprius (EIP) entrapment is a rare complication of a distal radial fracture. We report an 11-year-old with limited flexion of her index finger 1 year after a distal radial fracture. The utility of cross-sectional imaging in the diagnosis and preoperative planning of this complication is presented. (orig.)

  11. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  12. Biomechanical Analysis of All-Inside, Arthroscopic Suture Repair Versus Extensor Retinaculum Capsulorrhaphy for Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears With Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amar A; Alhandi, Ali A; Milne, Edward; Dy, Christopher J; Latta, Loren L; Ouellette, E Anne

    2016-03-01

    To assess ulnocarpal joint stability after treatment of a peripheral triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury with all-inside arthroscopic suture repair (SR), extensor retinaculum capsulorrhaphy with the Herbert sling (HS), and a combination of both (SR+HS). Twelve fresh-frozen, age-matched, upper-extremity specimens intact from the distal humerus were prepared. Nondestructive mechanical testing was performed to assess native ulnocarpal joint stability and load-displacement curves were recorded. A peripheral, ulnar-sided TFCC injury was created with arthroscopic assistance, and mechanical testing was performed. Each specimen was treated with SR or HS and testing was repeated. The 6 specimens treated with SR were then treated with HS (SR+HS), and testing was repeated. We used paired Student t tests for statistical analysis within cohorts. For all cohorts, there was an average increase in ulnar translation after the creation of a peripheral TFCC injury and an average decrease after repair. Herbert sling decreased translation by 21%, SR decreased translation by 12%, and SR+HS decreased translation by 26%. Suture repair plus HS and HS reduce ulnar translation the most after a peripheral TFCC injury, followed by SR alone. Ulnocarpal joint stability should be assessed clinically in patients with peripheral TFCC injury, and consideration should be made for using extensor capsulorrhaphy in isolation or as an adjunct to SR as a treatment option. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tendon 'turnover lengthening' technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerovac, S; Miranda, B H

    2013-11-01

    Tendon defect reconstruction is amongst the most technically challenging areas in hand surgery. Tendon substance deficiency reconstruction techniques include lengthening, grafting, two-stage reconstruction and tendon transfers, however each is associated with unique challenges over and above direct repair. We describe a novel 'turnover lengthening' technique for hand tendons that has successfully been applied to the repair of several cases, including a case of attritional flexor and traumatic extensor tendon rupture in two presented patients where primary tenorrhaphy was not possible. In both cases a good post-operative outcome was achieved, as the patients were happy having returned back to normal activities of daily living such that they were discharged 12 weeks post-operatively. Our technique avoids the additional morbidity and complications associated with grafting, transfers and two stage reconstructions. It is quick, simple and reproducible for defects not exceeding 3-4 cm, provides a means of immediate one stage reconstruction, no secondary donor site morbidity and does not compromise salvage by tendon transfer and/or two-stage reconstruction in cases of failure. To our knowledge no such technique has been previously been described to reconstruct such hand tendon defects. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The prevalence of the extensor digiti minimi tendon of the hand and its variants in humans: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2015-01-01

    The extensor digiti minimi (EDM) is frequently used in the case of an abduction deformity of the little finger. It is also considered as a main resource for tendon transfer. However, it shows many variations in the human hand, which include splitting into two or more slips and sending a slip to the fourth finger, named the extensor digiti minimi et quarti (EDMQ). The aim of this systematic review is to perform an evidence synthesis on the prevalence of the EDM and its variants. Twenty-six cadaveric studies met the inclusion criteria with a total of 2247 hands. Meta-analysis results yielded an overall pooled prevalence estimate (PPE) of the EDM of 99.7% and PPEs of 11.5, 77.6, 7 and 0.6% for the single-, double-, triple- and quadruple-slip EDM, respectively. For the single-slip EDM, the frequencies were such that Indians > Middle Eastern > Europeans > Japanese > North Americans. For the double-slip EDM, the frequencies were such that Japanese > North Americans = Europeans > Middle Eastern > Indians. No significance was found with regard to hand side. The true EDMQ prevalence was found to be at 7.3%, whereas its crude prevalence was 8%. This artilce offers reference values on the prevalence of the EDM and its variants, which are thought to be highly relevant to both anatomists and clinicians.

  15. Effects of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nájera, Diego; Rubio-Zaragoza, Mónica; Sopena-Juncosa, Joaquín J; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat-Bertomeu, Ramón; Fernández-Sarmiento, J Andrés; Domínguez-Pérez, Juan M; García-Balletbó, Montserrat; Primo-Capella, Víctor J; Carrillo-Poveda, José M

    2016-12-01

    To assess the biomechanical effects of intra-tendinous injections of PRGF on the healing Achilles tendon after repair in a sheep model. Thirty sheep were randomly assigned into one of the six groups depending on the type of treatment received (PRGF or placebo) and survival time (2, 4 and 8 weeks). The Achilles tendon injury was repaired by suturing the tendinous edges employing a three-loop pulley pattern. A trans-articular external fixation system was then used for immobilization. The PRGF or placebo was administered on a weekly basis completing a maximum of three infiltrations. The force, section and tension values were compared between the operated and healthy Achilles tendons across all groups. The PRGF-treated tendons had higher force at 8 weeks compared with the placebo group (p = 0.007). Between 2 and 4 weeks, a significant increase in force in both the PRGF-treated tendon (p = 0.0027) and placebo group (p = 0.0095) occurred. No significant differences were found for section ratio between PRGF-treated tendons and the placebo group for any of the time periods evaluated. At 2 weeks, PRGF-treated tendons had higher tension ratio compared with placebo group tendons (p = 0.0143). Both PRGF and placebo treatments significantly improved the force (p PRGF increases Achilles tendon repair strength at 8 weeks compared with the use of placebo. The use of PRGF does not modify section and tension ratios compared with placebo at 8 weeks. The tension ratio progressively increases between 2 and 8 weeks compared with the placebo.

  16. Medial versus lateral supraspinatus tendon properties: implications for double-row rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Vincent M; Wang, Fan Chia; McNickle, Allison G; Friel, Nicole A; Yanke, Adam B; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J

    2010-12-01

    Rotator cuff repair retear rates range from 25% to 90%, necessitating methods to improve repair strength. Although numerous laboratory studies have compared single-row with double-row fixation properties, little is known regarding regional (ie, medial vs lateral) suture retention properties in intact and torn tendons. A torn supraspinatus tendon will have reduced suture retention properties on the lateral aspect of the tendon compared with the more medial musculotendinous junction. Controlled laboratory study. Human supraspinatus tendons (torn and intact) were randomly assigned for suture retention mechanical testing, ultrastructural collagen fibril analysis, or histologic testing after suture pullout testing. For biomechanical evaluation, sutures were placed either at the musculotendinous junction (medial) or 10 mm from the free margin (lateral), and tendons were elongated to failure. Collagen fibril assessments were performed using transmission electron microscopy. Intact tendons showed no regional differences with respect to suture retention properties. In contrast, among torn tendons, the medial region exhibited significantly higher stiffness and work values relative to the lateral region. For the lateral region, work to 10-mm displacement (1592 ± 261 N-mm) and maximum load (265 ± 44 N) for intact tendons were significantly higher (P .05). Regression analyses for the intact and torn groups revealed generally low correlations between donor age and the 3 biomechanical indices. For both intact and torn tendons, the mean fibril diameter and area density were greater in the medial region relative to the lateral (P ≤ .05). In the lateral tendon, but not the medial region, torn specimens showed a significantly lower fibril area fraction (48.3% ± 3.8%) than intact specimens (56.7% ± 3.6%, P row after double-row repair. Larger diameter collagen fibrils as well as greater fibril area fraction in the medial supraspinatus tendon may provide greater resistance to

  17. A Comparison of Radiofrequency-Based Microtenotomy and Arthroscopic Release of the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis Tendon in Recalcitrant Lateral Epicondylitis: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hoo; Park, In; Hyun, Hwan-Sub; Shin, Sang-Jin

    2018-01-20

    To compare the clinical effects of radiofrequency (RF)-based microtenotomy and arthroscopic release of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendon in patients with recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis through a prospective randomized controlled study. A total of 46 patients were randomly assigned to receive arthroscopic release (group A, 24 patients) or RF-based microtenotomy (group B, 22 patients). The visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain, flexion-extension arc, operation time, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH), Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS), and grip power of groups A and B were compared during the recovery phases for up to 2 postoperative years. Both groups showed statistically significant functional improvement compared with their preoperative grip strength and DASH, VAS, and MEPS scores at 2 years after surgery (P lateral epicondylitis provided clinical outcomes comparable with those from arthroscopic release of ECRB tendon during the recovery phase. RF-based microtenotomy is considered as one of the surgical procedures for treating recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis, with the advantages of reliable elbow functional restoration and significantly shorter operation time. Level I, prospective randomized trial. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of exercise-induced enhancement of the leg-extensor muscle-tendon unit capacities on ambulatory mechanics and knee osteoarthritis markers in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Niehoff, Anja; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry. Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention. This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable to change in the elderly following a

  19. Single-row versus double-row repair of the distal Achilles tendon: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilson, Holly; Brown, Philip; Stitzel, Joel; Scott, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Surgery for recalcitrant insertional Achilles tendinopathy often consists of partial or total release of the insertion site, debridement of the diseased portion of the tendon, calcaneal ostectomy, and reattachment of the Achilles to the calcaneus. Although single-row and double-row techniques exist for repair of the detached Achilles tendon, biomechanical data are lacking to support one technique over the other. Based on data extrapolated from the study of rotator cuff repairs, we hypothesized that a double-row construct would provide superior fixation strength over a single-row repair. Eighteen human cadaveric Achilles tendons (9 matched pairs) with attached calcanei were repaired with single-row or double-row techniques. Specimens were mounted in a servohydraulic materials testing machine, subjected to a preconditioning cycle, and loaded to failure. Failure was defined as suture breakage or pullout, midsubstance tendon rupture, or anchor pullout. Among the failures were 12 suture failures, 5 proximal-row anchor failures, and 1 distal-row anchor failure. No midsubstance tendon ruptures or testing apparatus failures were observed. There were no statistically significant differences in the peak load to failure between the single-row and double-row repairs (p = .46). Similarly, no significant differences were observed with regards to mean energy expenditure to failure (p = .069). The present study demonstrated no biomechanical advantages of the double-row repair over a single-row repair. Despite the lack of a clear biomechanical advantage, there may exist clinical advantages of a double-row repair, such as reduction in knot prominence and restoration of the Achilles footprint. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolated Subscapularis Repair in Irreparable Posterosuperior Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Involving the Subscapularis Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Choi, Yun-Rak; Jung, Min; Lee, Won-Yong; Chun, Yong-Min

    2017-05-01

    No previous study has examined whether isolated subscapularis tendon repair in irreparable posterosuperior massive rotator tears involving the subscapularis tendon in relatively young patients without arthritis can yield satisfactory outcomes. We hypothesized that this procedure would produce favorable outcomes in patients who might otherwise be candidates for reverse arthroplasty. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This retrospective study included 24 patients in their 50s and 60s, without shoulder arthritis, who underwent arthroscopic isolated subscapularis repair for an irreparable massive rotator cuff tear involving the subscapularis tendon. Preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, subjective shoulder values (SSVs), University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder scores, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores, subscapularis strength (modified bell-press test; maximum of 5), and shoulder active range of motion (ROM) were assessed. Postoperative magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) was performed 6 months postoperatively to assess structural integrity of the repaired subscapularis. At a mean 34.8 months (range, 24-49 months) of follow-up, VAS pain scores (improved from 7.1 to 2.5), SSVs (33.3 to 75.2), ASES scores (35.9 to 76.0), UCLA shoulder scores (11.6 to 24.8), subscapularis strength, and ROM were significantly improved compared with preoperative measurements ( P rotation improved significantly ( P rotation exhibited no significant improvement. Follow-up MRA was performed in 22 patients (92%) and showed retear of the repaired subscapularis in 6 (27% of the 22). Isolated repair of the subscapularis tendon in irreparable massive rotator cuff tears involving the subscapularis tendon yielded satisfactory short-term outcomes and structural integrity in patients in their 50s and 60s without arthritis. If patients with irreparable massive rotator cuff tears involving the subscapularis tendon are relatively young or

  1. An electrospun polydioxanone patch for the localisation of biological therapies during tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Hakimi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tendon pathology is thought to account for 30-70 % of all shoulder pain. For cases that have failed conservative treatment, surgical re-attachment of the tendon to the bone with a non-absorbable suture is a common option. However, the failure rate of these repairs is high, estimated at up to 75 %. Studies have shown that in late disease stages the tendon itself is extremely degenerate, with reduced cell numbers and poor matrix organisation. Thus, it has been suggested that adding biological factors such as platelet rich plasma (PRP and mesenchymal stem cells could improve healing. However, the articular capsule of the glenohumeral joint and the subacromial bursa are large spaces, and injecting beneficial factors into these sites does not ensure localisation to the area of tendon damage.Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a biocompatible patch for improving the healing rates of rotator cuff repairs. The patch will create a confinement around the repair area and will be used to guide injections to the vicinity of the surgical repair.Here, we characterised and tested a preliminary prototype of the patch utilising in vitro tools and primary tendon-derived cells, showing exceptional biocompatibility despite rapid degradation, improved cell attachment and that cells could migrate across the patch towards a chemo-attractant. Finally, we showed the feasibility of detecting the patch using ultrasound and injecting liquid into the confinement ex vivo. There is a potential for using this scaffold in the surgical repair of interfaces such as the tendon insertion in the rotator cuff, in conjunction with beneficial factors.

  2. MR assessment of the repaired rotator cuff: prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellado, J.M.; Calmet, J.; Ballabriga, J.; Gine, J.; Olona, M.; Camins, A.; Perez del Palomar, L.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to use magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to evaluate the prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture following complete repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). A total of 78 surgically proven full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 74 patients were retrospectively included in the study. Clinical assessment was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles score. Postoperative MR imaging was evaluated to determine prevalence, size, and location of tendon rerupture. At a mean 48.4 months' follow-up, 62 shoulders (79.5%) had favorable outcomes and 45 shoulders (57.6%) showed rerupture on MR imaging studies. Reruptures were significantly more prevalent among patients with intermediate-to-bad outcomes (81.3%), with surgically demonstrated two-tendon tears (78.9%) or three-tendon tears (100%), and with preoperative fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle greater than 1 (91.6%). Reruptures were also significantly larger in those subgroups. Complete repair of RCT of all sizes may have favorable outcomes in a significant proportion of patients in spite of a high prevalence of reruptures. Preoperative tear size and degree of muscle fatty degeneration influence the prevalence and rerupture size. After repair of supraspinatus tears, reruptures tend to invade the posterior aspect of the tendon. (orig.)

  3. MR assessment of the repaired rotator cuff: prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellado, J.M. [Hospital Reina Sofia de Tudela, Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Tudela, Navarra (Spain); Calmet, J.; Ballabriga, J.; Gine, J. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Servei de Cirurgia Ortopedica i Traumatologia, Tarragona (Spain); Olona, M. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Servei de Medicina Preventiva i Epidemiologia, Tarragona (Spain); Camins, A. [Hospital Universitari de Tarragona Joan XXIII, Institut de Diagnostic per la Imatge, Tarragona (Spain); Perez del Palomar, L. [Hospital Ernest Lluch, Servicio de Radiologia, Calatayud, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    The objectives of this study were to use magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to evaluate the prevalence, size, location, and clinical relevance of tendon rerupture following complete repair of full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). A total of 78 surgically proven full-thickness rotator cuff tears in 74 patients were retrospectively included in the study. Clinical assessment was performed using the University of California at Los Angeles score. Postoperative MR imaging was evaluated to determine prevalence, size, and location of tendon rerupture. At a mean 48.4 months' follow-up, 62 shoulders (79.5%) had favorable outcomes and 45 shoulders (57.6%) showed rerupture on MR imaging studies. Reruptures were significantly more prevalent among patients with intermediate-to-bad outcomes (81.3%), with surgically demonstrated two-tendon tears (78.9%) or three-tendon tears (100%), and with preoperative fatty degeneration of the supraspinatus muscle greater than 1 (91.6%). Reruptures were also significantly larger in those subgroups. Complete repair of RCT of all sizes may have favorable outcomes in a significant proportion of patients in spite of a high prevalence of reruptures. Preoperative tear size and degree of muscle fatty degeneration influence the prevalence and rerupture size. After repair of supraspinatus tears, reruptures tend to invade the posterior aspect of the tendon. (orig.)

  4. Large Critical Shoulder Angle Has Higher Risk of Tendon Retear After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Chen, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiwu; Hua, Yinghui; Chen, Shiyi

    2018-05-01

    The critical shoulder angle (CSA) is the angle created between the superior and inferior bone margins of the glenoid and the most lateral border of the acromion. A few studies recently investigated the relation between CSA and functional outcomes after rotator cuff repair. However, there is a lack of research investigating the effect of CSA on postoperative tendon integrity after rotator cuff repair. To assess the effects of the CSA on postoperative tendon integrity after rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All patients who underwent rotator cuff repair for full-thickness supraspinatus tears by 1 senior surgeon between January 2010 and January 2014 were included in this study. All patients had standardized anteroposterior shoulder radiographs the day before surgery. CSA and acromial index (AI) were measured. AI was derived by measuring the distance from the glenoid plane to the lateral border of the acromion and dividing it by the distance from the glenoid plane to the lateral aspect of the humeral head. Functional scores-including American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder evaluation form, modified University of California at Los Angeles score, Constant-Murley score, and visual analog scale for pain-were used to evaluate shoulder function at a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Meanwhile, magnetic resonance imaging examinations were performed to evaluate rotator cuff integrity according to the Sugaya method and the signal/noise quotient (SNQ) of the rotator cuff tendon. A total of 90 patients were included in this study: 42 patients with a single-row repair and 48 with a double-row repair. There was a significant positive correlation between CSA or AI and tendon SNQ. On the basis of CSA, the patients were divided into 2 groups: large CSA (>38°) and control (CSA ≤38°). At final follow-up, the large CSA group and the control CSA group demonstrated no significant differences in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, University of California at

  5. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayad, K. E.; El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F.; Bekheet, A. B.

    2009-09-01

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  6. Effect of the Interposition of Calcium Phosphate Materials on Tendon-Bone Healing During Repair of Chronic Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Peng, Lingjie; Xie, Guoming; Li, Dingfeng; Zhao, Jinzhong; Ning, Congqin

    2014-08-01

    The current nature of tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff (RC) repair is still the formation of granulation tissue at the tendon-bone interface rather than the formation of fibrocartilage, which is the crucial structure in native tendon insertion and can be observed after knee ligament reconstruction. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials has been found to be able to enhance tendon-bone healing in knee ligament reconstruction. However, whether the interposition of these kinds of materials can enhance tendon-bone healing or even change the current nature of tendon-bone healing after RC repair still needs to be explored. The interposition of calcium phosphate materials during RC repair would enhance tendon-bone healing or change its current nature of granulation tissue formation into a more favorable process. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 144 male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon, followed by delayed repair after 3 weeks. The animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone, (2) repair with Ca5(PO4)2SiO4 (CPS) bioceramic interposition, or (3) repair with hydroxyapatite (HA) bioceramic interposition at the tendon-bone interface. Animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, or 8 weeks postoperatively, and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) was used to quantify the new bone formation at the repair site. New fibrocartilage formation and collagen organization at the tendon-bone interface was evaluated by histomorphometric analysis. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed. Statistical analysis was performed using 1-way analysis of variance. Significance was set at P repair, CPS bioceramic significantly increased the area of fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface compared with the control and HA groups. Moreover, CPS and HA bioceramics had significantly improved collagen organization. Biomechanical tests indicated that the CPS and HA groups have greater ultimate

  7. Free Biceps Tendon Autograft to Augment Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Obma, Padraic R.

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have become the standard of treatment for all sizes of tears over the past several years. Current healing rates reported in the literature are quite good, but improving the healing potential of rotator cuff repairs remains a challenging problem. There has been an increase recently in the use of augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with xenografts or synthetics for large and massive tears. Biceps tenodesis is often indicated as part of the treatment plan while...

  8. Four-Strand Core Suture Improves Flexor Tendon Repair Compared to Two-Strand Technique in a Rabbit Model

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    Alice Wichelhaus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study was designed to investigate the influence of the amount of suture material on the formation of peritendinous adhesions of intrasynovial flexor tendon repairs. Materials and Methods. In 14 rabbits, the flexor tendons of the third and the fourth digit of the right hind leg were cut and repaired using a 2- or 4-strand core suture technique. The repaired tendons were harvested after three and eight weeks. The range of motion of the affected toes was measured and the tendons were processed histologically. The distance between the transected tendon ends, the changes in the peritendinous space, and cellular and extracellular inflammatory reaction were quantified by different staining. Results. A 4-strand core suture resulted in significantly less gap formation. The 2-strand core suture showed a tendency to less adhesion formation. Doubling of the intratendinous suture material was accompanied by an initial increase in leukocyte infiltration and showed a greater amount of formation of myofibroblasts. From the third to the eighth week after flexor tendon repair, both the cellular and the extracellular inflammation decreased significantly. Conclusion. A 4-strand core suture repair leads to a significantly better tendon healing process with less diastasis between the sutured tendon ends despite initially pronounced inflammatory response.

  9. Isokinetic strength and endurance after percutaneous and open surgical repair of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, David; Ayalon, Moshe; Nyska, Meir

    2005-04-01

    Reports on complete spontaneous Achilles tendon ruptures and associated treatment have become more frequent in the literature in the past two decades, as has the request for treatments that enable the finest possible functional recovery. The best available treatment is a matter of considerable controversy in the literature. The purpose of this study was to compare the isokinetic strength and endurance of the plantarflexor muscle-tendon unit in subjects who sustained rupture of the Achilles tendon and underwent either open surgery or closed percutaneous repair of the Achilles tendon. Twenty patients (18 males, 2 females) with spontaneous ruptures of the Achilles tendon were included in this study. Ten patients were treated by open surgery, and 10 patients were treated percutaneously. All patients had ruptured their Achilles tendon more than 6 months before the study, and all of the ruptures occurred 3.5 years or less before the day of the testing. All patients underwent an oriented physical examination. An isokinetic Biodex dynamometer (Biodex Medical System, Shirley, NY) was used to measure ankle joint angle, and in plantarflexion to calculate the torque at the ankle joint (Newton/meter), and the average work (jouls) for both maximal power and endurance. Each measurement was compared to the normal ankle. Biodex dynamometer evaluations at 90 deg/sec demonstrated a significant difference of maximal voluntary plantarflexor torque, endurance performance and range of motion at the ankle joint between the involved and uninvolved sides in patients treated by either mode of treatment. Yet, no statistically significant differences were revealed for the parameters mentioned above between the subjects that were treated either percutaneously or by an open surgery. In functional terms, the biomechanical outcomes of open surgery and percutaneous repair for acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon are both effective.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients With Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis: Is There a Relationship Between Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities of the Common Extensor Tendon and the Patient's Clinical Symptom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Liang; Zhang, Yu-Dong; Yu, Rong-Bin; Shi, Hai-Bin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the inter-reliability and intra-observer reliability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for lateral epicondylitis and investigate whether there is a potential relationship between MRI abnormalities of the common extensor tendon (CET) and its clinical symptom.The study group comprised 96 consecutive patients (46 men and 50 women) with a clinical diagnosis of chronic lateral epicondylitis, which were examined on 3.0 T MR. An MRI scoring system was used to grade the degree of tendinopahty. Three independent musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to the patients' clinical information, scored images separately. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Patient-Rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE).Of all the patients, total 96 elbows had MRI-assessed tendinopathy, including 38 (39.6%) with grade 1, 31 (32.3%) with grade 2, and 27 (28.1%) with grade 3. Inter-observer reliability and intra-observer agreement for MRI interpretation of the grades of tendinopathy was good, and a positive correlation between the grades of tendinopathy and PRTEE was determined.MRI is a reliable tool in determining radiological severity of chronical lateral epicondylitis. The severity of MR signal changes positively correlate with the patient's clinical symptom.

  11. The improved oval forceps suture-guiding method for minimally invasive Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Lin, Lixiang; Lin, Chuanlu; Weng, Qihao; Hong, Jianjun

    2018-06-01

    To discuss the effect and advantage of the improved oval forceps suture-guiding method combined with anchor nail in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. A retrospective research was performed on 35 cases of acute Achilles tendon rupture treated with the improved oval forceps suture-guiding method from January 2013 to October 2016. Instead of the Achillon device, we perform the Achillon technique with the use of simple oval forceps, combined with absorbable anchor nail, percutaneously to repair the acute Achilles tendon rupture. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months (range, 12-19 months), and all the patients underwent successful repair of their acute Achilles tendon rupture using the improved oval forceps suture-guiding method without any major intra- or postoperative complications. All the patients returned to work with pre-injury levels of activity at a mean of 12.51 ± 0.76 weeks. Mean AOFAS ankle-hindfoot scores improved from 63.95 (range, 51-78) preoperatively to 98.59 (range, 91-100) at last follow-up. This was statistically significant difference (P anchor nail, the improved technique has better repair capacity and expands the operation indication of oval forceps method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Results of Flexor Tendon Repair in Zone II Using a six Strand Double Loop Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvidou, Christiana; Tsai, Tsu-Min

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the clinical results after repair of flexor tendon zone II injuries utilizing a 6-strand double-loop technique and early post-operative active rehabilitation. We retrospectively reviewed 22 patients involving 51 cases with zone II flexor tendon repair using a six strand double loop technique from September 1996 to December 2012. Most common mechanism of injuries was sharp lacerations (86.5 %). Tendon injuries occurred equally in manual and non-manual workers and were work-related in 33 % of the cases. The Strickland score for active range of motion (ROM) postoperatively was excellent and good in the majority of the cases (81 %). The rupture rate was 1.9 %. The six strand double loop technique for Zone II flexor tendon repair leads to good and excellent motion in the majority of patients and low re- rupture rate. It is clinically effective and allows for early postoperative active rehabilitation.

  13. Fluoroquinolones impair tendon healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Alice J S; Schär, Michael O; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Chen, Tony; Attia, Erik; Binder, Nikolaus B; Otero, Miguel; Gilbert, Susannah L; Nguyen, Joseph T; Chaudhury, Salma; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that fluoroquinolone antibiotics predispose tendons to tendinopathy and/or rupture. However, no investigations on the reparative capacity of tendons exposed to fluoroquinolones have been conducted. Fluoroquinolone-treated animals will have inferior biochemical, histological, and biomechanical properties at the healing tendon-bone enthesis compared with controls. Controlled laboratory study. Ninety-two rats underwent rotator cuff repair and were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (1) preoperative (Preop), whereby animals received fleroxacin for 1 week preoperatively; (2) pre- and postoperative (Pre/Postop), whereby animals received fleroxacin for 1 week preoperatively and for 2 weeks postoperatively; (3) postoperative (Postop), whereby animals received fleroxacin for 2 weeks postoperatively; and (4) control, whereby animals received vehicle for 1 week preoperatively and for 2 weeks postoperatively. Rats were euthanized at 2 weeks postoperatively for biochemical, histological, and biomechanical analysis. All data were expressed as mean ± standard error of the mean (SEM). Statistical comparisons were performed using either 1-way or 2-way ANOVA, with P repair response that has potential clinical implications for patients who are exposed to fluoroquinolones before tendon repair surgery. © 2014 The Author(s).

  14. The Gift Box Open Achilles Tendon Repair Method: A Retrospective Clinical Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Sameh A; Hoffler, C Edward; Shah, Jay N; Rolf, Robert H; Tingan, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Previous biomechanical studies have shown that the gift box technique for open Achilles tendon repair is twice as strong as a Krackow repair. The technique incorporates a paramedian skin incision with a midline paratenon incision, and a modification of the Krackow stitch is used to reinforce the repair. The wound is closed in layers such that the paratenon repair is offset from paramedian skin incision, further protecting the repair. The present study retrospectively reviews the clinical results for a series of patients who underwent the gift box technique for treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures from March 2002 to April 2007. The patients completed the Foot Function Index and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale. The tendon width and calf circumference were measured bilaterally and compared using paired t tests with a 5% α level. A total of 44 subjects, mean age 37.5 ± 8.6 years, underwent surgery approximately 10.8 ± 6.5 days after injury. The response rate was 35 (79.54%) patients for the questionnaire and 20 (45.45%) for the examination. The mean follow-up period was 35.7 ± 20.1 months. The complications included one stitch abscess, persistent pain, and keloid formation. One (2.86%) respondent reported significant weakness. Five (14.29%) respondents indicated persistent peri-incisional numbness. The range of motion was full or adequate. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale score was 93.2 ± 6.8) and the mean Foot Function Index score was 7.0 ± 10.5. The calf girth and tendon width differences were statistically significantly between the limbs. The patients reported no repeat ruptures, sural nerve injuries, dehiscence, or infections. We present the outcomes data from patients who had undergone this alternative technique for Achilles tendon repair. The technique is reproducible, with good patient satisfaction and return to activity. The results compared well with the historical

  15. Rotator Interval Lesion and Damaged Subscapularis Tendon Repair in a High School Baseball Player

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    Tomoyuki Muto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a 16-year-old baseball pitcher visited Nobuhara Hospital complaining of shoulder pain and limited range of motion in his throwing shoulder. High signal intensity in the rotator interval (RI area (ball sign, injured subscapularis tendon, and damage to both the superior and middle glenohumeral ligaments were identified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Repair of the RI lesion and partially damaged subscapularis tendon was performed in this pitcher. During surgery, an opened RI and dropping of the subscapularis tendon were observed. The RI was closed in a 90° externally rotated and abducted position. To reconfirm the exact repaired state of the patient, arthroscopic examination was performed from behind. However, suture points were not visible in the >30° externally rotated position, which indicates that the RI could not be correctly repaired with the arthroscopic procedure. One year after surgery, the patient obtained full function of the shoulder and returned to play at a national convention. Surgical repair of the RI lesion should be performed in exactly the correct position of the upper extremity.

  16. Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs onFlexor Tendon Rehabilitation after Repair

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    Alireza Rouhani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Peritendinous adhesions after repairing an injury to the digital flexor tendons are a major problem in hand surgery. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may affect tendon healing and the development of peritendinous adhesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate ibuprofen effect in patients function after flexor tendon surgical repair.   Method: Thirty-five patients, who had sharp-edge lacerations of hand-zone II requiring flexor tendons repair, participated in this randomized double-blind clinical trial study. The patients were randomly classified into two parallel and matched groups (21 patients in the intervention group and 14 patients in the control group. The groups were matched considering age, gender, and laceration size. The control group received a placebo with the same appearance and dosage. In the intervention group, ibuprofen was prescribed at a high dosage (2400 mg/day. The range of motion improvement rate of the involved fingers and the patients’ performance after their follow-up period were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups for range of motion of the involved finger joints (P=0.03. According to the DASH score, there was a statistically significant difference between the final performance of the patients, such that it was 11±2.4 and 18.4±6.3 in the intervention and control groups, respectively (P=0.01. There was not any case of re-tear or need to re-operate in the intervention and control groups. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that ibuprofen with an anti-inflammatory dose was effective in improving the range of motion of the involved fingers joints after flexor tendon injury.

  17. Effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs onFlexor Tendon Rehabilitation after Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Rouhani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peritendinous adhesions after repairing an injury to the digital flexor tendons are a major problem in hand surgery. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy may affect tendon healing and the development of peritendinous adhesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate ibuprofen effect in patients function after flexor tendon surgical repair.   Method: Thirty-five patients, who had sharp-edge lacerations of hand-zone II requiring flexor tendons repair, participated in this randomized double-blind clinical trial study. The patients were randomly classified into two parallel and matched groups (21 patients in the intervention group and 14 patients in the control group. The groups were matched considering age, gender, and laceration size. The control group received a placebo with the same appearance and dosage. In the intervention group, ibuprofen was prescribed at a high dosage (2400 mg/day. The range of motion improvement rate of the involved fingers and the patients’ performance after their follow-up period were compared. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups for range of motion of the involved finger joints (P=0.03. According to the DASH score, there was a statistically significant difference between the final performance of the patients, such that it was 11±2.4 and 18.4±6.3 in the intervention and control groups, respectively (P=0.01. There was not any case of re-tear or need to re-operate in the intervention and control groups. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that ibuprofen with an anti-inflammatory dose was effective in improving the range of motion of the involved fingers joints after flexor tendon injury.

  18. Repair of the torn distal biceps tendon by endobutton fixation

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    Ravi K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of techniques have been described to reattach the torn distal biceps tendon to the bicipital tuberosity. We report a retrospective analysis of single incision technique using an endobutton fixation in sports persons. Materials and Methods: The present series include nine torn distal biceps tendons in eight patients, fixed anatomically to the radial tuberosity with an endobutton by using a single incision surgical technique; seven patients had suffered the injuries during contact sports. The passage of the endobutton was facilitated by using a blunt tipped pin in order to avoid injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. The patients were evaluated by Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score and Mayo elbow score. Results: The average age of the patients was 27.35 years (range 21-42 years. Average follow-up was 41.5 months (range 24-102 months. The final average flexion extension arc was 0°-143°, while the average pronation and supination angles were 77° (range 70°-82° and 81° (range 78°-85°, respectively at the last followup. All the patients had a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score of 0 and a Mayo elbow score of 100 each. All the seven active sports persons were able to get back to their respective game. There was no nerve injury or any other complication. Conclusions: The surgical procedure used by us is a simple, safe and reproducible technique giving minimal morbidity and better cosmetic results.

  19. The effect of a collagen-elastin matrix on adhesion formation after flexor tendon repair in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichelhaus, Dagmar Alice; Beyersdoerfer, Sascha Tobias; Gierer, Philip; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Th

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of flexor tendon surgery is negatively affected by the formation of adhesions which can occur during the healing of the tendon repair. In this experimental study, we sought to prevent adhesion formation by wrapping a collagen-elastin scaffold around the repaired tendon segment. In 28 rabbit hind legs, the flexor tendons of the third and fourth digits were cut and then repaired using a two-strand suture technique on the fourth digit and a four-strand technique on the third digit. Rabbits were randomly assigned to study and control groups. In the control group, the operation ended by closing the tendon sheath and the skin. In the study group, a collagen-elastin scaffold was wrapped around the repaired tendon segment in both digits. After 3 and 8 weeks, the tendons were harvested and processed histologically. The range of motion of the digits and the gap formation between the repaired tendon ends were measured. The formation of adhesions, infiltration of leucocytes and extracellular inflammatory response were quantified. At the time of tendon harvesting, all joints of the operated toes showed free range of motion. Four-strand core sutures lead to significantly less diastasis between the repaired tendon ends than two-strand core suture repairs. The collagen-elastin scaffold leads to greater gapping after 3 weeks compared to the controls treated without the matrix. Within the tendons treated with the collagen-elastin matrix, a significant boost of cellular and extracellular inflammation could be stated after 3 weeks which was reflected by a higher level of CAE positive cells and more formation of myofibroblasts in the αSMA stain in the study group. The inflammatory response subsided gradually and significantly until the late stage of the study. Both the cellular and extracellular inflammatory response was emphasized with the amount of material used for the repair. The use of a collagen-elastin matrix cannot be advised for the prevention of adhesion

  20. Professional Athletes' Return to Play and Performance After Operative Repair of an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofa, David P; Miller, J Chance; Jang, Eugene S; Woode, Denzel R; Greisberg, Justin K; Vosseller, J Turner

    2017-10-01

    Most Achilles tendon ruptures are sports related. However, few studies have examined and compared the effect of surgical repair for complete ruptures on return to play (RTP), play time, and performance across multiple sports. To examine RTP and performance among professional athletes after Achilles tendon repair and compare pre- versus postoperative functional outcomes of professional athletes from different major leagues in the United States. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and National Hockey League (NHL) athletes who sustained a primary complete Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically between 1989 and 2013 were identified via public injury reports and press releases. Demographic information and performance-related statistics were recorded for 2 seasons before and after surgery and compared with matched controls. Statistical analyses were used to assess differences in recorded metrics. Of 86 athletes screened, 62 met inclusion criteria including 25 NBA, 32 NFL, and 5 MLB players. Nineteen (30.6%) professional athletes with an isolated Achilles tendon rupture treated surgically were unable to return to play. Among athletes who successfully returned to play, game participation averaged 75.4% ( P .05). When individual sports were compared, NBA players were most significantly affected, experiencing significant decreases in games played, play time, and performance. An Achilles tendon rupture is a devastating injury that prevents RTP for 30.6% of professional players. Athletes who do return play in fewer games, have less play time, and perform at a lower level than their preinjury status. However, these functional deficits are seen only at 1 year after surgery compared with matched controls, such that players who return to play can expect to perform at a level commensurate with uninjured controls 2 years postoperatively.

  1. Augmentation of Distal Biceps Repair With an Acellular Dermal Graft Restores Native Biomechanical Properties in a Tendon-Deficient Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Christine; Sethi, Paul; Macken, Craig; Wei, David; Kowalsky, Marc; Mirzayan, Raffy; Pauzenberger, Leo; Dyrna, Felix; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2017-07-01

    The majority of distal biceps tendon injuries can be repaired in a single procedure. In contrast, complete chronic tears with severe tendon substance deficiency and retraction often require tendon graft augmentation. In cases with extensive partial tears of the distal biceps, a human dermal allograft may be used as an alternative to restore tendon thickness and biomechanical integrity. Dermal graft augmentation will improve load to failure compared with nonaugmented repair in a tendon-deficient model. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six matched specimens were organized into 1 of 4 groups: native tendon, native tendon with dermal graft augmentation, tendon with an attritional defect, and tendon with an attritional defect repaired with a graft. To mimic a chronic attritional biceps lesion, a defect was created by a complete tear, leaving 30% of the tendon's width intact. The repair technique in all groups consisted of cortical button and interference screw fixation. All specimens underwent cyclical loading for 3000 cycles and were then tested to failure; gap formation and peak load at failure were documented. The mean (±SD) load to failure (320.9 ± 49.1 N vs 348.8 ± 77.6 N, respectively; P = .38) and gap formation (displacement) (1.8 ± 1.4 mm vs 1.6 ± 1.1 mm, respectively; P = .38) did not differ between the native tendon groups with and without graft augmentation. In the tendon-deficient model, the mean load to failure was significantly improved with graft augmentation compared with no graft augmentation (282.1 ± 83.8 N vs 199.7 ± 45.5 N, respectively; P = .04), while the mean gap formation was significantly reduced (1.2 ± 1.0 mm vs 2.7 ± 1.4 mm, respectively; P = .04). The mean load to failure of the deficient tendon with graft augmentation (282.1 N) compared with the native tendon (348.8 N) was not significantly different ( P = .12). This indicates that the native tendon did not perform differently from the grafted deficient tendon. In a tendon

  2. Repair of Double Head Pectoralis Major Tendon Avulsion into its Native Footprint Using Bi-cortical EndoButtons and Tendon Sliding Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Jagadish; Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Tayara, Bader Kamal; Awad, Rashad Khamis

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to the pectoralis major muscle are relatively infrequent. The mechanism of injury is usually an eccentric shortening of the pectoralis major under heavy load, such as when performing a bench press exercise. We report a case that presented to us with a history of sudden pain in the left pectoral region while doing heavy bench press exercise. The patient sustained a type III D pectoralis muscle -tendon avulsion. Surgical repair was done through a bi-cortical tendon sliding technique using two cortical buttons. In this article we describe our modifications to the previously described surgical technique for the pectoralis major tendon repair using the EndoButton and tension - slide technique, aiming to overcome the possible complications.

  3. Performance outcomes after repair of complete achilles tendon ruptures in national basketball association players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nirav H; Old, Andrew B; Tabb, Loni P; Garg, Rohit; Toossi, Nader; Cerynik, Douglas L

    2013-08-01

    A complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is a devastating injury. Variables affecting return to competition and performance changes for National Basketball Association (NBA) players are not readily evident. Players in the NBA who ruptured their Achilles tendons and who underwent surgical repair would have more experience in the league, and the performance of those who were able to return to competition would be decreased when compared with their performance before injury and with their control-matched peers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data for 18 basketball players with Achilles tendon repair over a 23-year period (1988-2011) were obtained from injury reports, press releases, and player profiles. Variables included age, body mass index (BMI), player position, and number of years playing in the league. Individual season statistics were obtained, and the NBA player efficiency rating (PER) was calculated for 2 seasons before and after injury. Controls were matched by playing position, number of seasons played, and performance statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of each factor. At the time of injury, the average age was 29.7 years, average BMI was 25.6, and average playing experience was 7.6 years. Seven players never returned to play an NBA game, whereas 11 players returned to play 1 season, with 8 of those players returning for ≥2 seasons. Players who returned missed an average of 55.9 games. The PER was reduced by 4.57 (P = .003) in the first season and by 4.38 (P = .010) in the second season. When compared with controls, players demonstrated a significant decline in the PER the first season (P = .038) and second season (P = .081) after their return. The NBA players who returned to play after repair of complete Achilles tendon ruptures showed a significant decrease in playing time and performance. Thirty-nine percent of players never returned to play.

  4. [PART-KESSLER TECHNIQUE WITH SUTURE ANCHOR IN REPAIR OF SPONTANEOUS Achilles TENDON RUPTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jie; Duan, Liang; Li, Weiwei; Wei, Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    To summarize the application and experience of repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 31 patients with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture were treated by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor. Of 31 cases, 23 were male and 8 were female, aged 16-53 years (mean, 38 years). The left side was involved in 15 cases and the right side in 16 cases. The causes of injury included sudden heel pain and walking weakness during sports in 22 cases; no surefooted down-stairs, slip, and carrying heavy loads in 9 cases. The distance from broken site to the calcaneus adhension of Achilles tendon was 3-6 cm (mean, 4.2 cm). The time from injury to operation was 7 hours to 4 days (mean, 36.8 hours). All incisions healed by first intention without nerve injury or adhering with skin. The patients were followed up 6-24 months (mean, 15 months). All patients could complete 25 times heel raising without difficulty at 6 months after operation. No Achilles tendon rupture occurred again during follow-up. At 6 months after operation, the range of motion of the ankle joint in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion showed no significant difference between normal and affected sides (t=0.648, P=0.525; t=0.524, P=0.605). The circumference of the affected leg was significantly smaller than that of normal leg at 6 months after operation (t=2.074, P=0.041), but no significant difference was found between affected and normal sides at 12 months after operation (t=0.905, P=0.426). The American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scores at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after operation were significantly higher than preoperative score (P0.05). Repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture by part-Kessler technique with suture anchor can supply strong strain and decrease the shear forces of suture. So part-Kessler technique with suture anchor is successful in repairing spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture.

  5. Hyaluronic Acid Accelerates Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hirokazu; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Ohzono, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Fukuda, Kanji; Teramura, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shichijo, Shigeki; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-12-01

    There is growing evidence that the subacromial injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) is effective for pain relief in rotator cuff tears; however, its effect on tendon-to-bone healing remains unknown. To examine the effect of HA on the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in vitro and on tendon-to-bone healing in a rotator cuff repair model. Controlled laboratory study. Bilateral complete tears of the infraspinatus tendon were made in rabbits and subsequently repaired. Before closure, 1 mL HA was applied to the repaired site, and phosphate-buffered saline was used in the opposite side as a control. Biomechanical, histological, and immunohistochemical analyses were performed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. After euthanizing each animal, the bone marrow was isolated from the femoral bone in the same rabbits. Then, MSCs were cultured in media for chondrogenic differentiation, and the chondral pellet production and cartilage-related gene expression levels in the cells were examined at various concentrations of HA. At 4 and 8 weeks after surgery, ultimate load-to-failure was significantly greater in the HA group than in the control group (45.61 ± 9.0 N vs 32.42 ± 9.4 N at 4 weeks, 90.7 ± 16.0 N vs 66.97 ± 10.0 N at 8 weeks; both P .05). Linear stiffness was not significant throughout the time point evaluation. The chondroid formation area at the tendon-bone interface stained by safranin O (control vs HA group) was 0.33% ± 0.7% versus 13.5% ± 12.3% at 4 weeks after surgery ( P repaired site stained by PicroSirius Red (control vs HA group) was 16.2 ± 10.6 versus 43.5 ± 21.3 at 4 weeks after surgery ( P .05), and 1.8% ± 4.0% versus 5.4% ± 4.2% at 12 weeks after surgery ( P > .05). Compared with the control group, HA significantly increased the volume of cartilaginous pellet produced by MSCs (0.0016 ± 0.0015 mm 3 at 0 mg/mL of HA, 0.0041 ± 0.0023 mm 3 at 1.0 mg/mL, and 0.0041 ± 0.0018 mm 3 at 4.0 mg/mL), with increased mRNA expression (relative ratio

  6. Biomechanical comparison of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) and PTFE interpositional patches and direct tendon-to-bone repair for massive rotator cuff tears in an ovine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Andrew Dj; Beattie, Rebekah F; Murrell, George Ac; Lam, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears are a difficult problem. Modalities such as irrigation and debridement, partial repair, tendon transfer and grafts have been utilized with high failure rates and mixed results. Synthetic interpositional patch repairs are a novel and increasingly used approach. The present study aimed to examine the biomechanical properties of common synthetic materials for interpositional repairs in contrast to native tendon. Six ovine tendons, six polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt sections and six expanded PTFE (ePTFE) patch sections were pulled-to-failure to analyze their biomechanical and material properties. Six direct tendon-to-bone surgical method repairs, six interpositional PTFE felt patch repairs and six interpositional ePTFE patch repairs were also constructed in ovine shoulders and pulled-to-failure to examine the biomechanical properties of each repair construct. Ovine tendon had higher load-to-failure (591 N) and had greater stiffness (108 N/mm) than either PTFE felt (296 N, 28 N/mm) or ePTFE patch sections (323 N, 34 N/mm). Both PTFE felt and ePTFE repair techniques required greater load-to-failure (225 N and 177 N, respectively) than direct tendon-to-bone surgical repairs (147 N) in ovine models. Synthetic materials lacked several biomechanical properties, including strength and stiffness, compared to ovine tendon. Interpositional surgical repair models with these materials were significantly stronger than direct tendon-to-bone model repairs.

  7. A comparative clinical evaluation of arthroscopic single-row versus double-row supraspinatus tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buess, Eduard; Waibl, Bernhard; Vogel, Roger; Seidner, Robert

    2009-10-01

    Cadaveric studies and commercial pressure have initiated a strong trend towards double-row repair in arthroscopic cuff surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the biomechanical advantages of a double-row supraspinatus tendon repair would result in superior clinical outcome and higher abduction strength. A retrospective study of two groups of 32 single-row and 33 double-row repairs of small to medium cuff tears was performed. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a visual analog scale for pain were used to evaluate the outcome. The participation rate was 100%. A subset of patients was further investigated with the Constant Score (CS) including electronic strength measurement. The double-row repair patients had significantly more (p = 0.01) yes answers in the SST than the single-row group, and pain reduction was slightly better (p = 0.03). No difference was found for the relative CS (p = 0.86) and abduction strength (p = 0.74). Patient satisfaction was 100% for double-row and 97% for single-row repair. Single- and double-row repairs both achieved excellent clinical results. Evidence of superiority of double-row repair is still scarce and has to be balanced against the added complexity of the procedure and higher costs.

  8. Development of biodegradable polycaprolactone film as an internal fixation material to enhance tendon repair: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian-Zhong; Zhou, Yong-Chun; Huang, Li-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin

    2013-08-19

    Current tendon repair techniques do not provide sufficient tensile strength at the repair site, and thus early active motion rehabilitation after tendon repair is discouraged. To enhance the post-operative tensile strength, we proposed and tested an internal fixation technique using a polycaprolactone (PCL) biofilm. PCL was chosen for its good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical strength, and an appropriate degradation time scale. PCL biofilms were prepared by a modified melt-molding/leaching technique, and the physical and mechanical properties and in vitro degradation rate were assessed. The pore size distribution of the biofilm and the paratenon of native tendons were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Next, we determined whether this biofilm could enhance the tensile strength of repaired tendons. We performed tensile tests on rabbit Achilles tendons that were first lacerated and then repaired: 1) using modified Kessler suture combined with running peripheral suture ('control' group), or 2) using biofilm to wrap the tendon and then fixation with sutures ('biofilm' group). The influence of different repair techniques on tendon tensile strength was evaluated by mechanical testing. The novel biofilm had supple texture and a smooth surface. The mean thickness of the biofilm was 0.25 mm. The mean porosity of the biofilm was 45.3%. The paratenon of the rabbit Achilles tendon had pores with diameters ranging from 1 to 9 μm, which were similar to the 4-12 μm diameter pores in the biofilm cross-section. The weight loss of the biofilms at 4 weeks was only 0.07%. The molecular weight of PCL biofilms did not change after immersion in phosphate buffered saline for 4 weeks. The failure loads of the biofilm were similar before (48 ± 9 N) and after immersion (47 ± 7 N, P > 0.1). The biofilm group had ~70% higher mean failure loads and 93% higher stiffness compared with the control group. We proposed and tested an internal fixation technique

  9. Calcium-phosphate matrix with or without TGF-β3 improves tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, David; Fox, Alice J; Bedi, Asheesh; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2011-04-01

    Rotator cuff tendon heals by formation of an interposed zone of fibrovascular scar tissue. Recent studies demonstrate that transforming growth factor-beta 3 (TGF-β(3)) is associated with tissue regeneration and "scarless" healing, in contrast to scar-mediated healing that occurs with TGF-β(1). Delivery of TGF-β(3) in an injectable calcium-phosphate matrix to the healing tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair will result in increased attachment strength secondary to improved bone formation and collagen organization and reduced scar formation of the healing enthesis. Controlled laboratory study. Ninety-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute repair using transosseous suture fixation. Animals were allocated into 1 of 3 groups: (1) repair alone (controls, n = 32), (2) repair augmented by application of an osteoconductive calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) matrix only (n = 32), or (3) repair augmented with Ca-P matrix + TGF-β(3) (2.75 µg) at the tendon-bone interface (n = 32). Animals were euthanized at either 2 weeks or 4 weeks postoperatively. Biomechanical testing of the supraspinatus tendon-bone complex was performed at 2 and 4 weeks (n = 8 per group). Microcomputed tomography was utilized to quantitate bone microstructure at the repair site. The healing tendon-bone interface was evaluated with histomorphometry and immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I (COLI) and III (COLIII). Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way analysis of variance with significance set at P repair site is associated with new bone formation, increased fibrocartilage, and improved collagen organization at the healing tendon-bone interface in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. The addition of TGF-β(3) significantly improved strength of the repair at 4 weeks postoperatively and resulted in a more favorable COLI/COLIII ratio. The delivery of TGF-β(3) with an injectable Ca-P matrix

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in the repair of ruptured Achilles tendons. Morphological difference in healing process between conservative and surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Tetsuo; Tsuruta, Takao; Abe, Yasuyuki; Tani, Akifumi; Koga, Toshimitsu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    1996-01-01

    We observed the healing process of ruptured Achilles tendons in a series using magnetic resonance imaging. In six cases, tendons were repaired percutaneously with limited skin incisions. Seven cases were treated conservatively using unique functional braces. MR imaging revealed two different modes of conjoining. In the conservatively treated group, tendons inclined to conjoin in a dumbbell shape. In the surgically treated group, they inclined to conjoin in a spindle shape. The diameters of the ruptured part are wider in the spindle shape compared to the dumbbell shape at all stages. These findings suggest that surgical treatment is favorable for acquiring earlier strength. (author)

  11. The use of a cognitive task analysis-based multimedia program to teach surgical decision making in flexor tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luker, Kali R; Sullivan, Maura E; Peyre, Sarah E; Sherman, Randy; Grunwald, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the surgical knowledge of residents before and after receiving a cognitive task analysis-based multimedia teaching module. Ten plastic surgery residents were evaluated performing flexor tendon repair on 3 occasions. Traditional learning occurred between the first and second trial and served as the control. A teaching module was introduced as an intervention between the second and third trial using cognitive task analysis to illustrate decision-making skills. All residents showed improvement in their decision-making ability when performing flexor tendon repair after each surgical procedure. The group improved through traditional methods as well as exposure to our talk-aloud protocol (P > .01). After being trained using the cognitive task analysis curriculum the group displayed a statistically significant knowledge expansion (P multimedia surgical curriculum instruction achieved greater command of problem solving and are better equipped to make correct decisions in flexor tendon repair.

  12. Lacerations to Zones VIII and IX: It Is Not Just a Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensor tendon injuries are widely believed to be straightforward problems that are relatively simple to manage. However, these injuries can be complex and demand a thorough understanding of anatomy to achieve the best functional outcomes. When lacerations occur in the forearm as in Zones VIII and IX injury, the repair of the extensor tendon and muscle, and posterior interosseous nerve (PIN is often challenging. A review of the literature shows little guidance and attention for these injuries. We present four patients with injuries to Zones VIII and IX as well as a review of surgical technique, postoperative rehabilitation, and pearls that may be of benefit to those managing these injuries.

  13. Tendon injury and repair - A perspective on the basic mechanisms of tendon disease and future clinical therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snedeker, J.G.; Foolen, J.

    2017-01-01

    Tendon is an intricately organized connective tissue that efficiently transfers muscle force to the bony skeleton. Its structure, function, and physiology reflect the extreme, repetitive mechanical stresses that tendon tissues bear. These mechanical demands also lie beneath high clinical rates of

  14. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Contralateral Patella Tendon Avulsion Post Primary Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extensor mechanism failure secondary to knee replacement could be due to tibial tubercle avulsion, Patellar tendon rupture, patellar fracture or quadriceps tendon rupture. An incidence of Patella tendon rupture of 0.17% and Quadriceps tendon rupture of around 0.1% has been reported after Total knee arthroplasty. These are considered a devastating complication that substantially affects the clinical results and are challenging situations to treat with surgery being the mainstay of the treatment. Case Description: We report here an interesting case of a patellar tendon rupture of one knee and Quadriceps tendon rupture of the contralateral knee following simultaneous bilateral knee replacement in a case of inflammatory arthritis patient. End to end repair for Quadriceps tear and augmentation with Autologous Hamstring tendon graft was done for Patella tendon rupture. OUTCOME: Patient was followed up for a period of 1 year and there was no Extension lag with a flexion of 100 degrees in both the knees. DISCUSSION: The key learning points and important aspects of diagnosing these injuries early and the management techniques are described in this unique case of bilateral extensor mechanism disruption following knee replacements.

  15. Does immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair increase tendon healing? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chong; Tang, Zhi-Hong; Hu, Jun-Zu; Zou, Guo-Yao; Xiao, Rong-Chi; Yan, Dong-Xue

    2014-09-01

    To determine whether immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair improved tendon healing compared with early passive motion. A systematic electronic literature search was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing early passive motion with immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The primary outcome assessed was tendon healing in the repaired cuff. Secondary outcome measures were range of motion (ROM) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder scale, Simple Shoulder Test (SST), Constant, and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain scores. Pooled analyses were performed using a random effects model to obtain summary estimates of treatment effect with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity among included studies was quantified. Three RCTs examining 265 patients were included. Meta-analysis revealed no significant difference in tendon healing in the repaired cuff between the early-motion and immobilization groups. A significant difference in external rotation at 6 months postoperatively favored early motion over immobilization, but no significant difference was observed at 1 year postoperatively. In one study, Constant scores were slightly higher in the early-motion group than in the immobilization group. Two studies found no significant difference in ASES, SST, or VAS score between groups. We found no evidence that immobilization after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was superior to early-motion rehabilitation in terms of tendon healing or clinical outcome. Patients in the early-motion group may recover ROM more rapidly. Level II; systematic review of levels I and II studies.

  16. Evaluation of a New Knotless Suture Anchor Repair in Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: A Biomechanical Comparison of Three Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottom, James M; Baker, Joseph S; Richardson, Phillip E; Maker, Jared M

    Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon are a common injury, and debate has continued in published studies on how best to treat these injuries. Specifically, controversy exists regarding the surgical approaches for Achilles tendon repair when one considers percutaneous versus open repair. The present study investigated the biomechanical strength of 3 different techniques for Achilles tendon repair in a cadaveric model. A total of 36 specimens were divided into 3 groups, each of which received a different construct. The first group received a traditional Krackow suture repair, the second group was repaired using a jig-assisted percutaneous suture, and the third group received a repair using a jig-assisted percutaneous repair modified with suture anchors placed into the calcaneus. The specimens were tested with cyclical loading and to ultimate failure. Cyclical loading showed a trend toward a stronger repair with the use of suture anchors after 10 cycles (p = .295), 500 cycles (p = .120), and 1000 cycles (p = .040). The ultimate load to failure was greatest in the group repaired with the modified knotless technique using the suture anchors (p = .098). The results of the present study show a clear trend toward a stronger construct in Achilles repair using a knotless suture anchor technique, which might translate to a faster return to activity and be more resistant to an early and aggressive rehabilitation protocol. Further clinical studies are warranted to evaluate this technique in a patient population. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversibility of Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy in Tendon-Bone Healing After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Bok; Ryu, Ho Young; Hong, Jin Ho; Ko, Young Hoo; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2016-04-01

    To date, there are few reports of the definite reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after repair. To evaluate the reversibility of rotator cuff muscle atrophy after successful arthroscopic repair. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Included in this study were 47 patients (mean age, 61.2 ± 7.3 years; range, 49-73 years) who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 6-month and last follow-up. Patients who had confirmed rotator cuff healing (grades 1-3 according to the Sugaya classification) on both series of postoperative MRI were enrolled in the study. The mean time from the onset of symptoms to surgery was 24.7 ± 25.6 months (range, 3-120 months). The minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the mean follow-up duration was 41.8 ± 14.4 months. Serial changes in the supraspinatus muscle area on the most matching MRI scans (sagittal-oblique view) were evaluated. The area was measured by 2 independent observers. Both independent observers reported no significant difference in the area of the supraspinatus muscle between the preoperative time point and 6-month follow-up (observer 1: P = .135; observer 2: P = .189). However, there was a significant difference between the 6-month and last follow-up (mean, 41.8 months; observers 1 and 2: P .999) or from 6-month to final follow-up (P = .077). After successful arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, there was a slight (11.3%-13.9%) increase in muscle volume from preoperatively to final follow-up, as seen on serial MRI. Fatty infiltration according to the Goutallier grade was not reversed (P = .077). Some reversibility of supraspinatus muscle atrophy may exist in tendon-bone healing after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair; further follow-up is needed to better elucidate this result. © 2016 The Author(s).

  18. Is the Dresden technique a mechanical design of choice suitable for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Carreño-Zillmann, G; Marambio, H; Henríquez, H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mechanical failure of the Dresden technique for Achilles tendon repair with the double modified Kessler technique controlled repair technique. The maximum resistance of the two repair techniques are also compared. A total of 30 Achilles tendon ruptures in bovine specimens were repaired with an Ethibond(®) suture to 4.5cm from the calcaneal insertion. Each rupture was randomly distributed into one of two surgical groups. After repair, each specimen was subjected to a maximum traction test. The mechanical failure (tendon, suture, or knot) rates (proportions) were compared using the exact Fisher test (α=.05), and the maximum resistances using the Student t test (α=.05). There was a difference in the proportions of mechanical failures, with the most frequent being a tendon tear in the Dresden technique, and a rupture of the suture in the Kessler technique. The repair using the Dresden technique performed in the open mode, compared to the Kessler technique, has a more suitable mechanical design for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures on developing a higher tensile resistance in 58.7%. However, its most common mechanical failure was a tendon tear, which due to inappropriate loads could lead to lengthening of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament repair with patellar and hamstring tendon autografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson, K.A.; Karjalainen, P.T.; Harilainen, A.; Sandelin, J.; Tallroth, K.; Soila, K.; Aronen, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. Several MRI sequences were used to evaluate the 2-year postoperative appearance of asymptomatic knee with a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed with bone-patellar tendon-bone (BTB) and semitendinosus and gracilis (STG) tendon autografts.Design and patients. Two groups with successful repair of ACL tear with BTB (n=10) or STG (n=10) autografts were imaged at 1.5 T with sagittal and oblique coronal proton density-, T2-weighted and sagittal STIR sequences and plain and contrast-enhanced oblique coronal T1-weighted sequences. The appearance of the graft and periligamentous tissues was evaluated.Results. In all 20 cases, the ACL graft showed homogeneous, low signal intensity with periligamentous streaks of intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In 10 cases, localised areas of intermediate signal intensity were seen in the intra-articular segment of the graft on proton density- and T1-weighted images. The graft itself did not show enhancement in either of the two groups, but mild to moderate periligamentous enhancement was detected in 10 cases.Conclusion. The MRI appearance of ACL autograft is variable on proton density- and T1-weighted images. Periligamentous tissue showing contrast enhancement is a typical MRI finding after clinically successful ACL reconstruction. (orig.)

  20. Evaluating adhesion reduction efficacy of type I/III collagen membrane and collagen-GAG resorbable matrix in primary flexor tendon repair in a chicken model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John B; Corazzini, Rubina L; Butler, Timothy J; Garlick, David S; Rinker, Brian D

    2015-09-01

    Reduction of peritendinous adhesions after injury and repair has been the subject of extensive prior investigation. The application of a circumferential barrier at the repair site may limit the quantity of peritendinous adhesions while preserving the tendon's innate ability to heal. The authors compare the effectiveness of a type I/III collagen membrane and a collagen-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) resorbable matrix in reducing tendon adhesions in an experimental chicken model of a "zone II" tendon laceration and repair. In Leghorn chickens, flexor tendons were sharply divided using a scalpel and underwent repair in a standard fashion (54 total repairs). The sites were treated with a type I/III collagen membrane, collagen-GAG resorbable matrix, or saline in a randomized fashion. After 3 weeks, qualitative and semiquantitative histological analysis was performed to evaluate the "extent of peritendinous adhesions" and "nature of tendon healing." The data was evaluated with chi-square analysis and unpaired Student's t test. For both collagen materials, there was a statistically significant improvement in the degree of both extent of peritendinous adhesions and nature of tendon healing relative to the control group. There was no significant difference seen between the two materials. There was one tendon rupture observed in each treatment group. Surgical handling characteristics were subjectively favored for type I/III collagen membrane over the collagen-GAG resorbable matrix. The ideal method of reducing clinically significant tendon adhesions after injury remains elusive. Both materials in this study demonstrate promise in reducing tendon adhesions after flexor tendon repair without impeding tendon healing in this model.

  1. Variability of United States Online Rehabilitation Protocols for Proximal Hamstring Tendon Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Harry M.; Kantrowitz, David E.; Swindell, Hasani W.; Trofa, David P.; Ahmad, Christopher S.; Lynch, T. Sean

    2018-01-01

    Background: The optimal postoperative rehabilitation protocol following repair of complete proximal hamstring tendon ruptures is the subject of ongoing investigation, with a need for more standardized regimens and evidence-based modalities. Purpose: To assess the variability across proximal hamstring tendon repair rehabilitation protocols published online by United States (US) orthopaedic teaching programs. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Online proximal hamstring physical therapy protocols from US academic orthopaedic programs were reviewed. A web-based search using the search term complete proximal hamstring repair rehabilitation protocol provided an additional 14 protocols. A comprehensive scoring rubric was developed after review of all protocols and was used to assess each protocol for both the presence of various rehabilitation components and the point at which those components were introduced. Results: Of 50 rehabilitation protocols identified, 35 satisfied inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Twenty-five protocols (71%) recommended immediate postoperative bracing: 12 (34%) prescribed knee bracing, 8 (23%) prescribed hip bracing, and 5 (14%) did not specify the type of brace recommended. Fourteen protocols (40%) advised immediate nonweightbearing with crutches, while 16 protocols (46%) permitted immediate toe-touch weightbearing. Advancement to full weightbearing was allowed at a mean of 7.1 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks). Most protocols (80%) recommended gentle knee and hip passive range of motion and active range of motion, starting at a mean 1.4 weeks (range, 0-3 weeks) and 4.0 weeks (range, 0-6 weeks), respectively. However, only 6 protocols (17%) provided specific time points to initiate full hip and knee range of motion: a mean 8.0 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks) and 7.8 weeks (range, 0-12 weeks), respectively. Considerable variability was noted in the inclusion and timing of strengthening, stretching, proprioception, and cardiovascular exercises

  2. Variability of United States Online Rehabilitation Protocols for Proximal Hamstring Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Harry M; Kantrowitz, David E; Swindell, Hasani W; Trofa, David P; Ahmad, Christopher S; Lynch, T Sean

    2018-02-01

    The optimal postoperative rehabilitation protocol following repair of complete proximal hamstring tendon ruptures is the subject of ongoing investigation, with a need for more standardized regimens and evidence-based modalities. To assess the variability across proximal hamstring tendon repair rehabilitation protocols published online by United States (US) orthopaedic teaching programs. Cross-sectional study. Online proximal hamstring physical therapy protocols from US academic orthopaedic programs were reviewed. A web-based search using the search term complete proximal hamstring repair rehabilitation protocol provided an additional 14 protocols. A comprehensive scoring rubric was developed after review of all protocols and was used to assess each protocol for both the presence of various rehabilitation components and the point at which those components were introduced. Of 50 rehabilitation protocols identified, 35 satisfied inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Twenty-five protocols (71%) recommended immediate postoperative bracing: 12 (34%) prescribed knee bracing, 8 (23%) prescribed hip bracing, and 5 (14%) did not specify the type of brace recommended. Fourteen protocols (40%) advised immediate nonweightbearing with crutches, while 16 protocols (46%) permitted immediate toe-touch weightbearing. Advancement to full weightbearing was allowed at a mean of 7.1 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks). Most protocols (80%) recommended gentle knee and hip passive range of motion and active range of motion, starting at a mean 1.4 weeks (range, 0-3 weeks) and 4.0 weeks (range, 0-6 weeks), respectively. However, only 6 protocols (17%) provided specific time points to initiate full hip and knee range of motion: a mean 8.0 weeks (range, 4-12 weeks) and 7.8 weeks (range, 0-12 weeks), respectively. Considerable variability was noted in the inclusion and timing of strengthening, stretching, proprioception, and cardiovascular exercises. Fifteen protocols (43%) required completion of

  3. Arthroscopic Removal and Rotator Cuff Repair Without Acromioplasty for the Treatment of Symptomatic Calcifying Tendinitis of the Supraspinatus Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano Andrés; Bongiovanni, Santiago Luis; Tanoira, Ignacio; Piuzzi, Nicolas; Maignon, Gastón

    2015-04-01

    Calcified rotator cuff tendinitis is a common cause of chronic shoulder pain that leads to significant pain and functional limitations. Although most patients respond well to conservative treatment, some eventually require surgical treatment. To evaluate the clinical outcome with arthroscopic removal of calcific deposit and rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty for the treatment of calcific tendinitis of the supraspinatus tendon. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. This study retrospectively evaluated 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 49.2 years. The mean follow-up was 35 months (range, 24-88 months). Pre- and postoperative functional assessment was performed using the Constant score, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score, and Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH). Pain was assessed by visual analog scale (VAS). Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to evaluate the recurrence of calcifications and the indemnity of the supraspinatus tendon repair. Significant improvement was obtained for pain (mean VAS, 8.7 before surgery to 0.8 after; P rotator cuff repair without acromioplasty can lead to good results in patients with symptomatic calcifying tendonitis of the supraspinatus tendon.

  4. Differences of RNA Expression in the Tendon According to Anatomic Outcomes in Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Ok; Chung, Jin-Young; Kim, Do Hoon; Im, Wooseok; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2017-11-01

    Despite increased understanding of the pathophysiology of rotator cuff tears and the evolution of rotator cuff repair, healing failure remains a substantial problem. The critical roles played by biological factors have been emphasized, but little is known of the implications of gene expression profile differences at the time of repair. To document the relationship between the perioperative gene expression of healed and unhealed rotator cuffs by RNA microarray analysis. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Superior (supraspinatus involvement) and posterosuperior (supraspinatus and infraspinatus involvement) tears were included in the study. Samples of rotator cuff tendons were prospectively collected during rotator cuff surgery. Three samples were harvested at the tendon ends of tears from the anterior, middle (apex), and posterior parts using an arthroscopic punch. Seven patients with an unhealed rotator cuff were matched one-to-one with patients with a healed rotator cuff by sex, age, tear size, and fatty degeneration of rotator cuff muscles. mRNA microarray analysis was used to identify genetic differences between healed and unhealed rotator cuff tendons. Gene ontology and gene association files were obtained from the Gene Ontology Consortium, and the Gene Ontology system in DAVID was used to identify enhanced biological processes. Microarray analyses identified 262 genes that were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold between the healed and unhealed groups. Overall, in the healed group, 103 genes were significantly downregulated, and 159 were significantly upregulated. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster analysis showed that in the healed group, the genes most upregulated were related to the G protein-coupled receptor protein signaling pathway and to the neurological system. On the other hand, the genes most downregulated were related to immune and inflammatory responses. BMP5 was the gene most upregulated in the healed group, and the majority of

  5. Stability of double-row rotator cuff repair is not adversely affected by scaffold interposition between tendon and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzel, Knut; Chowaniec, David M; McCarthy, Mary Beth; Cote, Mark P; Russell, Ryan P; Obopilwe, Elifho; Imhoff, Andreas B; Arciero, Robert A; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-05-01

    Rotator cuff reconstructions may be improved by adding growth factors, cells, or other biologic factors into the repair zone. This usually requires a biological carrier (scaffold) to be integrated into the construct and placed in the area of tendon-to-bone healing. This needs to be done without affecting the constructs mechanics. Hypothesis/ The hypothesis was that scaffold placement, as an interposition, has no adverse effects on biomechanical properties of double-row rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of scaffold interposition on the initial strength of rotator cuff repairs. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five fresh-frozen shoulders (mean age: 65.5 ± 8.9 years) were randomly assigned to 5 groups. Groups were chosen to represent a broad spectrum of commonly used scaffold types: (1) double-row repair without augmentation, (2) double-row repair with interposition of a fibrin clot (Viscogel), (3) double-row repair with interposition of a collagen scaffold (Mucograft) between tendon and bone, (4) double-row repair with interposition of human dermis patch (ArthroFlex) between tendon and bone, and (5) double-row repair with human dermis patch (ArthroFlex) placed on top of the repair. Cyclic loading to measure displacement was performed to 3000 cycles at 1 Hz with an applied 10- to 100-N load. The ultimate load to failure was determined at a rate of 31 mm/min. There were no significant differences in mean displacement under cyclic loading, slope, or energy absorbed to failure between all groups (P = .128, P = .981, P = .105). Ultimate load to failure of repairs that used the collagen patch as an interposition (573.3 ± 75.6 N) and a dermis patch on top of the reconstruction (575.8 ± 22.6 N) was higher compared with the repair without a scaffold (348.9 ± 98.8 N; P = .018 and P = .025). No significant differences were found for repairs with the fibrin clot as an interposition (426.9 ± 103.6 N) and the decellularized dermis

  6. Failed healing of rotator cuff repair correlates with altered collagenase and gelatinase in supraspinatus and subscapularis tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Catherine M; Chen, Christopher T; Shindle, Michael K; Cordasco, Frank A; Rodeo, Scott A; Warren, Russell F

    2012-09-01

    Despite improvements in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair technique and technology, a significant rate of failed tendon healing persists. Improving the biology of rotator cuff repairs may be an important focus to decrease this failure rate. The objective of this study was to determine the mRNA biomarkers and histological characteristics of repaired rotator cuffs that healed or developed persistent defects as determined by postoperative ultrasound. Increased synovial inflammation and tendon degeneration at the time of surgery are correlated with the failed healing of rotator cuff tendons. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Biopsy specimens from the subscapularis tendon, supraspinatus tendon, glenohumeral synovium, and subacromial bursa of 35 patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were taken at the time of surgery. Expression of proinflammatory cytokines, tissue remodeling genes, and angiogenesis factors was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Histological characteristics of the affected tissue were also assessed. Postoperative (>6 months) ultrasound was used to evaluate the healing of the rotator cuff. General linear modeling with selected mRNA biomarkers was used to predict rotator cuff healing. Thirty patients completed all analyses, of which 7 patients (23%) had failed healing of the rotator cuff. No differences in demographic data were found between the defect and healed groups. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder scores collected at baseline and follow-up showed improvement in both groups, but there was no significant difference between groups. Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and MMP-9 was found in the supraspinatus tendon in the defect group versus the healed group (P = .006 and .02, respectively). Similar upregulation of MMP-9 was also found in the subscapularis tendon of the defect group (P = .001), which was consistent with the loss of collagen organization as determined by

  7. Comparison of a novel bone-tendon allograft with a human dermis-derived patch for repair of chronic large rotator cuff tears using a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Cook, James L; Kuroki, Keiichi; Jayabalan, Prakash S; Cook, Cristi R; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Waters, Nicole P

    2012-02-01

    This study tested a bone-tendon allograft versus human dermis patch for reconstructing chronic rotator cuff repair by use of a canine model. Mature research dogs (N = 15) were used. Radiopaque wire was placed in the infraspinatus tendon (IST) before its transection. Three weeks later, radiographs showed IST retraction. Each dog then underwent 1 IST treatment: debridement (D), direct repair of IST to bone with a suture bridge and human dermis patch augmentation (GJ), or bone-tendon allograft (BT) reconstruction. Outcome measures included lameness grading, radiographs, and ultrasonographic assessment. Dogs were killed 6 months after surgery and both shoulders assessed biomechanically and histologically. BT dogs were significantly (P = .01) less lame than the other groups. BT dogs had superior bone-tendon, tendon, and tendon-muscle integrity compared with D and GJ dogs. Biomechanical testing showed that the D group had significantly (P = .05) more elongation than the other groups whereas BT had stiffness and elongation characteristics that most closely matched normal controls. Radiographically, D and GJ dogs showed significantly more retraction than BT dogs (P = .003 and P = .045, respectively) Histologically, GJ dogs had lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, tendon degeneration and hypocellularity, and poor tendon-bone integration. BT dogs showed complete incorporation of allograft bone into host bone, normal bone-tendon junctions, and well-integrated allograft tendon. The bone-tendon allograft technique re-establishes a functional IST bone-tendon-muscle unit and maintains integrity of repair in this model. Clinical trials using this bone-tendon allograft technique are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Longitudinal Long-term Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Clinical Follow-up After Single-Row Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Clinical Superiority of Structural Tendon Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberer, Philipp R; Smolen, Daniel; Pauzenberger, Leo; Plachel, Fabian; Salem, Sylvia; Laky, Brenda; Kriegleder, Bernhard; Anderl, Werner

    2017-05-01

    The number of arthroscopic rotator cuff surgeries is consistently increasing. Although generally considered successful, the reported number of retears after rotator cuff repair is substantial. Short-term clinical outcomes are reported to be rarely impaired by tendon retears, whereas to our knowledge, there is no study documenting long-term clinical outcomes and tendon integrity after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. To investigate longitudinal long-term repair integrity and clinical outcomes after arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstruction. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Thirty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with suture anchors for a full-tendon full-thickness tear of the supraspinatus or a partial-tendon full-thickness tear of the infraspinatus were included. Two and 10 years after initial arthroscopic surgery, tendon integrity was analyzed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score and Constant score as well as subjective questions regarding satisfaction with the procedure and return to normal activity were used to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes. At the early MRI follow-up, 42% of patients showed a full-thickness rerupture, while 25% had a partial rerupture, and 33% of tendons remained intact. The 10-year MRI follow-up (129 ± 11 months) showed 50% with a total rerupture, while the other half of the tendons were partially reruptured (25%) or intact (25%). The UCLA and Constant scores significantly improved from preoperatively (UCLA total: 50.6% ± 20.2%; Constant total: 44.7 ± 10.5 points) to 2 years (UCLA total: 91.4% ± 16.0% [ P rotator cuff repair showed good clinical long-term results despite a high rate of retears. Nonetheless, intact tendons provided significantly superior clinical long-term outcomes, making the improvement of tendon healing and repair integrity important goals of future research efforts.

  9. Clinical and biomechanical outcome of minimal invasive and open repair of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction With evolutions in surgical techniques, minimally invasive surgical (MIS repair with Achillon applicator has been introduced. However, there is still a lack of literature to investigate into the clinical merits of MIS over open surgery. This study aims to investigate the correlation between clinical outcome, gait analysis and biomechanical properties comparing both surgical methods. Materials and methods A single centre retrospective review on all the consecutive operated patients between January 2004 and December 2008 was performed. Twenty-six patients (19 male and 7 female; age 40.4 ± 9.2 years had experienced a complete Achilles tendon rupture with operative repair. Nineteen of the patients, 10 MIS versus 9 open repairs (13 men with a mean age of 40.54 ± 10.43 (range 23-62 yrs and 6 women with a mean age of 45.33 ± 7.71 (range 35-57 yrs were further invited to attend a thorough clinical assessment using Holz's scale and biomechanical evaluation at a mean of 25.3 months after operation. This study utilized the Cybex II isokinetic dynamometer to assess the isokinetic peak force of plantar-flexion and dorsiflexion of both ankles. The patients were also invited to return to our Gait Laboratory for analysis. The eight-infrared camera motion capture system (VICON, UK was utilized for the acquisition of kinematic variables. Their anthropometric data was measured according to the Davis and coworkers' standard. Results The mean operative time and length of hospital stay were shorter in the MIS group. The operative time was 54.55 ± 15.15 minutes versus 68.80 ± 18.23 minutes of the MIS group and Open group respectively (p = 0.045, whereas length of stay was 3.36 ± 1.21 days versus 6.40 ± 3.70 days respectively (p = 0.039. There is statistically significant decrease (p = 0.005 in incision length in MIS group than the open surgery group, 3.23 ± 1.10 cm versus 9.64 ± 2.55 cm respectively. Both groups attained similar Holz

  10. Combined Effects of Scaffold Stiffening and Mechanical Preconditioning Cycles on Construct Biomechanics, Gene Expression, and Tendon Repair Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Nirmalanandhan, Victor Sanjit; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Shearn, Jason T.; Boivin, Gregory P.; Galloway, Marc T.; Gooch, Cynthia; Bradica, Gino; Butler, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Our group has previously reported that in vitro mechanical stimulation of tissue-engineered tendon constructs significantly increases both construct stiffness and the biomechanical properties of the repair tissue after surgery. When optimized using response surface methodology, our results indicate that a mechanical stimulus with three components (2.4% strain, 3000 cycles/day, and one cycle repetition) produced the highest in vitro linear stiffness. Such positive correlations between construc...

  11. Arthroscopic Removal and Tendon Repair for Refractory Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinitis of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Hiroshi; Iwashita, Satoshi; Okubo, Atsushi; Takai, Shinro

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes of arthroscopic treatment for refractory rotator cuff calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Subjects were 37 patients (35 women and 2 men; mean age, 47.8 years; age range 34-61 years) who had undergone arthroscopic treatment for calcific tendinitis of the shoulder. Despite sufficient nonsurgical treatments, all patients had residual calcific deposit with persistent or recurrent pain. Before surgery, all patients underwent 3-directional radiographs of the shoulder and three-dimensional computed tomography to determine the location and size of calcific deposit. Arthroscopic surgery was performed with the patient under general anesthesia in the lateral decubitus position. A 2-cm single longitudinal incision was made with a radiofrequency hook blade on the tendon surface above calcific deposit. Calcific deposit was removed as much as possible with a curette and a motorized shaver. The incised tendon was repaired with a side-to-side suture with strong sutures. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score was used to evaluate clinical outcomes. The extent of calcific deposit removal was evaluated with radiographs obtained before surgery, 1 week after the surgery and at the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 30.4 (range, 13-72) months. The mean shoulder score significantly improved from 69.7 (range, 58-80) points before surgery to 97.8 (range, 89-100) points at the final follow-up examination. Postoperative radiographs in all patients, showed that the calcific deposit was resolved or reduced and those from 1 week after surgery to the final examination showed no evidence of recurrence or enlargement of calcific deposit. The calcific deposit had completely resolved in 34 patients but remained in 3 patients. When treating calcific tendinitis of the shoulder, it is important to accurately determine the size and location of calcific deposit by radiographs and 3

  12. Macrophage sub-populations and the lipoxin A4 receptor implicate active inflammation during equine tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Georgina Dakin

    appears to be of insufficient duration and magnitude in natural tendon injury, which may potentiate chronic inflammation and fibrotic repair, as indicated by the presence of M2Mφ.

  13. Clinical Outcomes and Complications of Percutaneous Achilles Repair System Versus Open Technique for Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Jones, Carroll P; Cohen, Bruce E; Davis, W Hodges; Ellington, J Kent; Anderson, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    Limited incision techniques for acute Achilles tendon ruptures have been developed in recent years to improve recovery and reduce postoperative complications compared with traditional open repair. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the clinical outcomes and postoperative complications between acute Achilles tendon ruptures treated using a percutaneous Achilles repair system (PARS [Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL]) versus open repair and evaluate the overall outcomes for operatively treated Achilles ruptures. Between 2005 and 2014, 270 consecutive cases of operatively treated acute Achilles tendon ruptures were reviewed (101 PARS, 169 open). Patients with Achilles tendinopathy, insertional ruptures, chronic tears, or less than 3-month follow-up were excluded. Operative treatment consisted of a percutaneous technique (PARS) using a 2-cm transverse incision with FiberWire (Arthrex, Inc, Naples, FL) sutures or open repair using a 5- to 8-cm posteromedial incision with FiberWire in a Krackow fashion reinforced with absorbable sutures. Patient demographics were recorded along with medical comorbidities, activity at injury, time from injury to surgery, length of follow-up, return to baseline activities by 5 months, and postoperative complications. The most common activity during injury for both groups was basketball (PARS: 39%, open: 47%). A greater number of patients treated with PARS were able to return to baseline physical activities by 5 months compared with the open group (PARS: 98%, open: 82%; P = .0001). There were no significant differences (P > .05) between groups in rates of rerupture (P = 1.0), sural neuritis (P = .16), wound dehiscence (P = .74), superficial (P = .29) and/or deep infection (P = .29), or reoperation (P = .13). There were no deep vein thromboses (DVTs) or reruptures in either group. In the PARS group, there were no cases of sural neuritis, 3 cases (3%) of superficial wound dehiscence, and 2 reoperations (2%) for superficial

  14. REHABILITATION OF A SURGICALLY REPAIRED RUPTURE OF THE DISTAL BICEPS TENDON IN AN ACTIVE MIDDLE AGED MALE: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P.; LaFontaine, Tom; Scheussler, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Background: Complete rupture of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii is relatively rare and there is little information to guide therapists in rehabilitation after this injury. The purposes of this case report are to review the rehabilitation concepts used for treating such an injury, and discuss how to modify exercises during rehabilitation based on patient progression while adhering to physician recommended guidelines and standard treatment protocols. Case Presentation: The patient was an active 38‐year old male experienced in weight‐training. He presented with a surgically repaired right distal biceps tendon following an accident on a trampoline adapted with a bungee suspension harness. The intervention focused on restoring range of motion and strengthening of the supporting muscles of the upper extremity without placing undue stress on the biceps brachii. Outcomes: The patient was able to progress from a moderate restriction in ROM to full AROM two weeks ahead of the physician's post‐operative orders and initiate a re‐strengthening protocol by the eighth week of rehabilitation. At the eighth post‐operative week the patient reported no deficits in functional abilities throughout his normal daily activities with his affected upper extremity. Discussion: The results of this case report strengthen current knowledge regarding physical therapy treatment for a distal biceps tendon repair while at the same time providing new insights for future protocol considerations in active individuals. Most current protocols do not advocate aggressive stretching, AROM, or strengthening of a surgically repaired biceps tendon early in the rehabilitation process due to the fear of a re‐rupture. In the opinion of the authors, if full AROM can be achieved before the 6th week of rehabilitation, initiating a slow transition into light strengthening of the biceps brachii may be possible. Level of evidence: 4‐Single Case report PMID:23316429

  15. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12...... demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust...... negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome....

  16. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (2) width and thickness of the tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (3) degrees of tendon adhesions were significantly lighter

  17. Combined effects of scaffold stiffening and mechanical preconditioning cycles on construct biomechanics, gene expression, and tendon repair biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmalanandhan, Victor Sanjit; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Shearn, Jason T; Boivin, Gregory P; Galloway, Marc T; Gooch, Cynthia; Bradica, Gino; Butler, David L

    2009-08-01

    Our group has previously reported that in vitro mechanical stimulation of tissue-engineered tendon constructs significantly increases both construct stiffness and the biomechanical properties of the repair tissue after surgery. When optimized using response surface methodology, our results indicate that a mechanical stimulus with three components (2.4% strain, 3000 cycles/day, and one cycle repetition) produced the highest in vitro linear stiffness. Such positive correlations between construct and repair stiffness after surgery suggest that enhancing structural stiffness before surgery could not only accelerate repair stiffness but also prevent premature failures in culture due to poor mechanical integrity. In this study, we examined the combined effects of scaffold crosslinking and subsequent mechanical stimulation on construct mechanics and biology. Autologous tissue-engineered constructs were created by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from 15 New Zealand white rabbits on type I collagen sponges that had undergone additional dehydrothermal crosslinking (termed ADHT in this manuscript). Both constructs from each rabbit were mechanically stimulated for 8h/day for 12 consecutive days with half receiving 100 cycles/day and the other half receiving 3000 cycles/day. These paired MSC-collagen autologous constructs were then implanted in bilateral full-thickness, full-length defects in the central third of rabbit patellar tendons. Increasing the number of in vitro cycles/day delivered to the ADHT constructs in culture produced no differences in stiffness or gene expression and no changes in biomechanical properties or histology 12 weeks after surgery. Compared to MSC-based repairs from a previous study that received no additional treatment in culture, ADHT crosslinking of the scaffolds actually lowered the 12-week repair stiffness. Thus, while ADHT crosslinking may initially stiffen a construct in culture, this specific treatment also appears to mask any benefits

  18. Effect of Footprint Preparation on Tendon-to-Bone Healing: A Histologic and Biomechanical Study in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Haruhiko; Morihara, Toru; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kabuto, Yukichi; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Arai, Yuji; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-08-01

    To compare the histologic and biomechanical effects of 3 different footprint preparations for repair of tendon-to-bone insertions and to assess the behavior of bone marrow-derived cells in each method of insertion repair. We randomized 81 male Sprague-Dawley rats and green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chimeric rats into 3 groups. In group A, we performed rotator cuff repair after separating the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tuberosity and removing the residual tendon tissue. In group B, we also drilled 3 holes into the footprint. The native fibrocartilage was preserved in groups A and B. In group C, we excavated the footprint until the cancellous bone was exposed. Histologic repair of the tendon-to-bone insertion, behavior of the bone marrow-derived cells, and ultimate force to failure were examined postoperatively. The areas of metachromasia in groups A, B, and C were 0.033 ± 0.019, 0.089 ± 0.022, and 0.002 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 4 weeks and 0.029 ± 0.022, 0.090 ± 0.039, and 0.003 ± 0.001 mm 2 /mm 2 , respectively, at 8 weeks. At 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, significantly higher cartilage matrix production was observed in group B than in group C (4 weeks, P = .002; 8 weeks, P repair tissue and biomechanical strength at the tendon-to-bone insertion after rotator cuff repair in an animal model. Drilling into the footprint and preserving the fibrocartilage can enhance repair of tendon-to-bone insertions. This method may be clinically useful in rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of hybridized nano- and microstructure biodegradable, biocompatible, collagen-based, three-dimensional bioimplants in repair of a large tendon-defect model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdulhamid; Silver, Ian A; Tanideh, Nader; Golestani, Navid

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of hybridized, three-dimensional (3D) collagen implants in repair of experimentally-induced tendon defects in rabbits. Seventy-five mature New Zealand albino rabbits were divided into treated (n = 50) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. In treated animals defects were filled with hybridized collagen implants and repaired with sutures. In control rabbits tendon defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by ultrasonography. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) at 60 days post-injury. All control animals were euthanized at 60 days. Tendon lesions of all animals were examined morphologically and histologically immediately after death. Those of the experimental groups (n = 20 for each) were examined for gross pathological, histopathological and ultrastructural changes together with dry matter content at 60 days post-injury, as were the normal, contralateral tendons of both groups. In comparison with healing lesions of control animals, the treated tendons showed greater numbers of mature tenoblasts and tenocytes, minimal peritendinous adhesions and oedema, together with greater echogenicity, homogeneity and fibril alignment. Fewer chronic inflammatory cells were present in treated than control tendons. Hybridized collagen implants acted as scaffolds for tenoblasts and longitudinally-orientated newly-formed collagen fibrils, which encouraged tendon repair with homogeneous, well-organized highly aligned scar tissue that was histologically and ultrastructurally more mature than in untreated controls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Bundles of spider silk, braided into sutures, resist basic cyclic tests: potential use for flexor tendon repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Hennecke

    Full Text Available Repair success for injuries to the flexor tendon in the hand is often limited by the in vivo behaviour of the suture used for repair. Common problems associated with the choice of suture material include increased risk of infection, foreign body reactions, and inappropriate mechanical responses, particularly decreases in mechanical properties over time. Improved suture materials are therefore needed. As high-performance materials with excellent tensile strength, spider silk fibres are an extremely promising candidate for use in surgical sutures. However, the mechanical behaviour of sutures comprised of individual silk fibres braided together has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, we characterise the maximum tensile strength, stress, strain, elastic modulus, and fatigue response of silk sutures produced using different braiding methods to investigate the influence of braiding on the tensile properties of the sutures. The mechanical properties of conventional surgical sutures are also characterised to assess whether silk offers any advantages over conventional suture materials. The results demonstrate that braiding single spider silk fibres together produces strong sutures with excellent fatigue behaviour; the braided silk sutures exhibited tensile strengths comparable to those of conventional sutures and no loss of strength over 1000 fatigue cycles. In addition, the braiding technique had a significant influence on the tensile properties of the braided silk sutures. These results suggest that braided spider silk could be suitable for use as sutures in flexor tendon repair, providing similar tensile behaviour and improved fatigue properties compared with conventional suture materials.

  1. Repair of distal biceps brachii tendon assessed with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with functional outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemann, Guillaume; Dietsch, Emmanuel [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Gallinet, David; Obert, Laurent [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Besancon (France); Kastler, Bruno; Aubry, Sebastien [University Hospital of Besancon, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Besancon (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory-EA 4268-IFR 133, Besancon (France)

    2015-05-01

    Objectives were to study the MRI appearance of the repaired distal biceps tendon (DBT), anatomically reinserted, and to search for a correlation between tendon measurements and functional results. Twenty-five patients (mean age, 49 ± 4.9 years old) who benefited from 3-T MRI follow-up of the elbow after surgical reinsertion of the DBT were retrospectively included and compared to a control group (n = 25; mean age, 48 ± 10 years old). MRI was performed during the month of clinical follow-up and on average 22 months after surgery. Delayed complications (secondary avulsion, new rupture), intratendinous osteoma, tendinous signal on T1-weighted (T1{sub w}) and fat-suppressed proton density-weighted (FS-PD{sub w}) images as well as DBT measurements were recorded. The maximum isometric elbow flexion strength (MEFS) and range of motion of the elbow were assessed. Repaired DBT demonstrated a heterogeneous but normally fibrillar structure. Its low T1{sub w} signal was less pronounced than that of normal tendons, and the FS-PD{sub W} image signal was similar to that of T1{sub w} images. MRI detected seven osteomas (Se = 53 % vs. plain radiography), one textiloma and one secondary avulsion. Repaired DBT measurements were significantly correlated with MEFS (dominant arm R2: 0.38; nondominant arm R2: 0.54); this correlation involved the insertion surface (Δ = -75.7 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.046), transverse diameter (Δ = -2.6 mm, p = 0.018), anteroposterior diameter at the level of the radial head (Δ = -3.9 mm, p = 0.001) and DBT cross-sectional area (Δ = -50.2 mm{sup 2}, p = 0.003). The quality of functional outcome after anatomical elbow rehabilitation of DBT correlates with the extent of tendinous hypertrophy during the healing process. (orig.)

  2. Repair of distal biceps brachii tendon assessed with 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and correlation with functional outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alemann, Guillaume; Dietsch, Emmanuel; Gallinet, David; Obert, Laurent; Kastler, Bruno; Aubry, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives were to study the MRI appearance of the repaired distal biceps tendon (DBT), anatomically reinserted, and to search for a correlation between tendon measurements and functional results. Twenty-five patients (mean age, 49 ± 4.9 years old) who benefited from 3-T MRI follow-up of the elbow after surgical reinsertion of the DBT were retrospectively included and compared to a control group (n = 25; mean age, 48 ± 10 years old). MRI was performed during the month of clinical follow-up and on average 22 months after surgery. Delayed complications (secondary avulsion, new rupture), intratendinous osteoma, tendinous signal on T1-weighted (T1 w ) and fat-suppressed proton density-weighted (FS-PD w ) images as well as DBT measurements were recorded. The maximum isometric elbow flexion strength (MEFS) and range of motion of the elbow were assessed. Repaired DBT demonstrated a heterogeneous but normally fibrillar structure. Its low T1 w signal was less pronounced than that of normal tendons, and the FS-PD W image signal was similar to that of T1 w images. MRI detected seven osteomas (Se = 53 % vs. plain radiography), one textiloma and one secondary avulsion. Repaired DBT measurements were significantly correlated with MEFS (dominant arm R2: 0.38; nondominant arm R2: 0.54); this correlation involved the insertion surface (Δ = -75.7 mm 2 , p = 0.046), transverse diameter (Δ = -2.6 mm, p = 0.018), anteroposterior diameter at the level of the radial head (Δ = -3.9 mm, p = 0.001) and DBT cross-sectional area (Δ = -50.2 mm 2 , p = 0.003). The quality of functional outcome after anatomical elbow rehabilitation of DBT correlates with the extent of tendinous hypertrophy during the healing process. (orig.)

  3. Pulsed electromagnetic field therapy improves tendon-to-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jennica J; Cirone, James M; Morris, Tyler R; Nuss, Courtney A; Huegel, Julianne; Waldorff, Erik I; Zhang, Nianli; Ryaby, James T; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2017-04-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common musculoskeletal injuries often requiring surgical intervention with high failure rates. Currently, pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) are used for treatment of long-bone fracture and lumbar and cervical spine fusion surgery. Clinical studies examining the effects of PEMF on soft tissue healing show promising results. Therefore, we investigated the role of PEMF on rotator cuff healing using a rat rotator cuff repair model. We hypothesized that PEMF exposure following rotator cuff repair would improve tendon mechanical properties, tissue morphology, and alter in vivo joint function. Seventy adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: bilateral repair with PEMF (n = 30), bilateral repair followed by cage activity (n = 30), and uninjured control with cage activity (n = 10). Rats in the surgical groups were sacrificed at 4, 8, and 16 weeks. Control group was sacrificed at 8 weeks. Passive joint mechanics and gait analysis were assessed over time. Biomechanical analysis and μCT was performed on left shoulders; histological analysis on right shoulders. Results indicate no differences in passive joint mechanics and ambulation. At 4 weeks the PEMF group had decreased cross-sectional area and increased modulus and maximum stress. At 8 weeks the PEMF group had increased modulus and more rounded cells in the midsubstance. At 16 weeks the PEMF group had improved bone quality. Therefore, results indicate that PEMF improves early tendon healing and does not alter joint function in a rat rotator cuff repair model. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:902-909, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. * Comparison of Autologous, Allogeneic, and Cell-Free Scaffold Approaches for Engineered Tendon Repair in a Rabbit Model-A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbo; Deng, Dan; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, WenJie; Cao, Yilin; Zhang, Peihua; Liu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    Tendons are subjected to high strength dynamic mechanical forces in vivo. Mechanical strength is an essential requirement for tendon scaffold materials. A composite scaffold was used in this study to provide mechanical strength, which was composed of an inter part of nonwoven polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers and an outer part of the net knitted with PGA and polylactic acid (PLA) fibers in a ratio of 4:2. This study compared three different approaches for in vivo tendon engineering, that is, cell-free scaffold and allogeneic and autologous cell seeded scaffolds, using a rabbit Achilles tendon repair model. Dermal fibroblasts were, respectively, isolated from the dermis of regular rabbits or green fluorescence protein transgenic rabbits as the autologous and the allogeneic cell sources, respectively. The cell scaffolds and cell-free scaffolds were implanted to bridge a partial segmental defect of rabbit Achilles tendon. The engineered tendons were harvested at 7 and 13 months postsurgery for various examinations. The results showed that all three groups could achieve in vivo tendon regeneration similarly with slightly better tissue formation in autologous group than in other two groups, including better scaffold degradation and relatively thicker collagen fibrils. There were no statistically significant differences in mechanical parameters among three groups. This work demonstrated that allogeneic fibroblasts and scaffold alone are likely to be used for tendon tissue engineering.

  5. Effects of cell-to-collagen ratio in stem cell-seeded constructs for Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Boivin, Gregory P; Galloway, Marc T; Gooch, Cindi; West, John R; Butler, David L

    2006-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypotheses that implantation of cell-seeded constructs in a rabbit Achilles tendon defect model would 1) improve repair biomechanics and matrix organization and 2) result in higher failure forces than measured in vivo forces in normal rabbit Achilles tendon (AT) during an inclined hopping activity. Autogenous tissue-engineered constructs were fabricated in culture between posts in the wells of silicone dishes at four cell-to-collagen ratios by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from 18 adult rabbits at each of two seeding densities (0.1 x 10(6) and 1 x 10(6) cell/mL) in each of two collagen concentrations (1.3 and 2.6 mg/mL). After 5 days of contraction, constructs having the two highest ratios (0.4 and 0.8 M/mg) were damaged by excessive cell traction forces and could not be used in subsequent in vivo studies. Constructs at the lower ratios (0.04 and 0.08 M/mg) were implanted in bilateral, 2 cm long gap defects in the rabbit's lateral Achilles tendon. At 12 weeks after surgery, both repair tissues were isolated and either failed in tension (n = 13) to determine their biomechanical properties or submitted for histological analysis (n = 5). No significant differences were observed in any structural or mechanical properties or in histological appearance between the two repair conditions. However, the average maximum force and maximum stress of these repairs achieved 50 and 85% of corresponding values for the normal AT and exceeded the largest peak in vivo forces (19% of failure) previously recorded in the rabbit AT. Average stiffness and modulus were 60 and 85% of normal values, respectively. New constructs with lower cell densities and higher scaffold stiffness that do not excessively contract and tear in culture and that further improve the repair stiffness needed to withstand various levels of expected in vivo loading are currently being investigated.

  6. Knitted poly-lactide-co-glycolide scaffold loaded with bone marrow stromal cells in repair and regeneration of rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hong Wei; Goh, James C H; Thambyah, Ashvin; Teoh, Swee Hin; Lee, Eng Hin

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the morphology and biomechanical function of Achilles tendons regenerated using knitted poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs). The animal model used was that of an adult female New Zealand White rabbit with a 10-mm gap defect of the Achilles tendon. In group I, 19 hind legs with the created defects were treated with allogeneic bMSCs seeded on knitted PLGA scaffold. In group II, the Achilles tendon defects in 19 hind legs were repaired using the knitted PLGA scaffold alone, and in group III, 6 hind legs were used as normal control. The tendon-implant constructs of groups I and II were evaluated postoperatively at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks using macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, specimens from group I (n = 7), group II (n = 7), and group III (n = 6) were harvested for biomechanical test 12 weeks after surgery. Postoperatively, at 2 and 4 weeks, the histology of group I specimens exhibited a higher rate of tissue formation and remodeling as compared with group II, whereas at 8 and 12 weeks postoperation, the histology of both group I and group II was similar to that of native tendon tissue. The wound sites of group I healed well and there was no apparent lymphocyte infiltration. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the regenerated tendons were composed of collagen types I and type III fibers. The tensile stiffness and modulus of group I were 87 and 62.6% of normal tendon, respectively, whereas those of group II were about 56.4 and 52.9% of normal tendon, respectively. These results suggest that the knitted PLGA biodegradable scaffold loaded with allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells has the potential to regenerate and repair gap defect of Achilles tendon and to effectively restore structure and function.

  7. The detection of the capsular tear at the undersurface of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon in chronic tennis elbow: the value of magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Onda, Kazunori; Iba, Kosuke; Sonoda, Tomoko; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Wada, Takuro

    2011-04-01

    This study compared the diagnostic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) in the assessment of capsular tears at the undersurface of the extensor carpi radials brevis tendon in chronic tennis elbow using arthroscopy as a gold standard. Because of the higher spatial resolution of CT, we hypothesized that CTA is superior to MRI for assessing capsular tears. We retrospectively reviewed 19 consecutive patients with chronic tennis elbow with preoperative MRI and CTA studies who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Three observers with different levels of training and experience (musculoskeletal radiologist, experienced elbow surgeon, and hand fellow) evaluated the capsular tear by MRI and CTA in a blinded manner. The results of the MRI and CTA were compared and the agreement among the 3 observers was determined using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Then, the results of the MRI and CTA examinations were compared with the intraoperative findings of the arthroscopic examination. The sensitivity, specificity, and κ value were calculated. The ICC of CTA (0.855) was superior to MRI (0.645). The sensitivity, specificity, and κ value of CTA were superior to those of MRI in each of the 3 observers. The κ value was 0.79, 0.89, and 0.79 for CTA, and 0.48, 0.48, and 0.27 for MRI for the radiologist, surgeon, and fellow, respectively. CTA was a reliable and accurate diagnostic modality compared with MRI to detect the capsular tear in patients with chronic tennis elbow. CTA was less influenced by the observer's experience. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Distal biceps brachii tendon repair: a systematic review of patient outcome determination using modified Coleman methodology score criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Causey, Brandon; Wera, Jeff; Krupp, Ryan; Tate, David; Gupta, Amit

    2017-07-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the methodological research design quality of studies that evaluated patient outcomes following distal biceps brachii tendon repair and developed evidence-based recommendations for future patient clinical outcomes research. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses criteria, and using "biceps brachii", "tendon", "repair" and "outcome assessment" search terms, the CINAHL, Academic Search Premier and MEDLINE databases were searched from January 1960-October 2015. The modified Coleman methodology score (MCMS) served as the primary outcome measure. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed for composite and component MCMS and for patient outcome assessment methodology use frequency. A total of 93 studies were evaluated. Overall MCMS was low (57.1 ± 14). Only 12 (12.9 %) had prospective cohort or randomized controlled trial designs. There was a moderate relationship between publication year and MCMS (r = 0.53, P research study methodological scores improved on average since 2008, generally low MCMS scores, retrospective designs, lack of eccentric elbow flexor or supinator strength testing, and poorly described surgical and rehabilitation descriptions remain commonplace. These findings decrease clinical study validity and generalizability. III.

  9. Tendoscopic Double-Row Suture Bridge Peroneal Retinaculum Repair for Recurrent Dislocation of Peroneal Tendons in the Ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Nakazora, Shigeto; Ito, Naoya; Fukuda, Aki; Kato, Ko; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic dislocation of peroneal tendons in the ankle is an uncommon lesion that mainly affects young adults. Unfortunately, most cases lead to recurrent dislocation of the peroneal tendons of the ankle (RPTD). Therefore, most cases need operative treatment. One of the most common operative procedures is superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) repair. Recently, surgery for RPTD has been achieved with less invasive arthroscopic procedures. In this article, tendoscopic surgery for RPTD using a double-row suture bridge technique is introduced. This technique consists of debridement of the lateral aspect of the fibula under an intrasheath pseudo-cavity, suture anchor insertion into the fibular ridge, and reattachment of the SPR to the fibula using a knotless anchor screwed into the lateral aspect of the fibula. This technique mimics the double-row suture bridge technique for rotator cuff tear repair. The double-row suture bridge technique requires more surgical steps than the single-row technique, but it provides a wider bone-SPR contact surface and tighter fixation than the single-row technique. This procedure is an attractive option because it is less invasive and has achieved results similar to open procedures.

  10. Involvement of Indian hedgehog signaling in mesenchymal stem cell-augmented rotator cuff tendon repair in an athymic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Jian-Chun; Mosca, Michael J; Degen, Ryan M; Lebaschi, Amir; Carballo, Camila; Carbone, Andrew; Cong, Guang-Ting; Ying, Liang; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    Bone marrow aspirate has been used in recent years to augment tendon-to-bone healing, including in rotator cuff repair. However, the healing mechanism in cell-based therapy has not been elucidated in detail. Sixteen athymic nude rats were randomly allocated to 2 groups: experimental (human mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin glue carrier) and control (fibrin glue only). Animals were sacrificed at 2 and 4 weeks. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to evaluate Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling and SOX9 signaling in the healing enthesis. Macrophages were identified using CD68 and CD163 staining, and proliferating cells were identified using proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. More organized and stronger staining for collagen II and a higher abundance of SOX9 + cells were observed at the enthesis in the experimental group at 2 weeks. There was significantly higher Gli1 and Patched1 expression in the experimental group at the enthesis at 2 weeks and higher numbers of Ihh + cells in the enthesis of the experimental group vs control at both 2 weeks and 4 weeks postoperatively. There were more CD68 + cells localized to the tendon midsubstance at 2 weeks compared with 4 weeks, and there was a higher level of CD163 staining in the tendon midsubstance in the experimental group than in the control group at 4 weeks. Stem cell application had a positive effect on fibrocartilage formation at the healing rotator cuff repair site. Both SOX9 and Ihh signaling appear to play an important role in the healing process. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of platelet-rich plasma on tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in rats: an in vivo experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapa, Onur; Cakıcı, Hüsamettin; Kükner, Aysel; Aygün, Hayati; Sarkalan, Nazlı; Baysal, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze the effects of local autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection on tendon-to-bone healing in a rotator cuff repair model in rats. Rotator cuff injury was created in 68 left shoulders of rats. PRP was obtained from the blood of an additional 15 rats. The 68 rats were divided into 4 groups with 17 rats in each group; PRP group (Week 2), control group (Week 2), PRP group (Week 4), and control group (Week 4). Platelet-rich plasma or saline was injected to the repair area intraoperatively. Rats were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after the surgery. Histological analysis using a semiquantitative scoring was performed on 7 rats per group. Tendon integrity and increases in vascularity and inflammatory cells and the degree of new bone formation were evaluated and compared between the groups. The remaining tendons (n=10) were mechanically tested. Degree of inflammation and vascularity were less in the study group at both time intervals (protator cuff tendon-to-bone healing and enhance initial tendon-to-bone healing remodeling. This may represent a clinically important improvement in rotator cuff repair.

  12. Co-effect of silk and amniotic membrane for tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young-Kwon; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Eo, Su-Rak

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the feasibility and biocompatibility of a silk scaffold and a composite silk scaffold in terms of new tendon generation using a rabbit Achilles tendon model. The silk scaffold was constructed using a weaving machine, then soaked in a 1% collagen-hyaluronan (HA) solution and air-dried, whereas the composite silk scaffold was composed of a silk scaffold containing a lyophilized collagen-HA substrate. Tenocytes were cultured in vitro to compare cell populations in the two groups. The cellular densities on composite silk scaffolds were 40% higher on average than those on silk scaffolds in 30-day tenocyte cultures. The tendon scaffolds had implanted into Achilles tendon defects in 16 white New Zealand rabbits. Rabbits were randomly divided into the following three groups: group I, silk scaffold alone; group II, composite silk scaffold; and group III, composite silk scaffold wrapped by an amniotic membrane. Implants were harvested 2, 8, and 12 weeks post-implantation. Histological examinations were conducted using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Masson's trichrome, and by performing immunohistochemical staining for CD34. After 12 weeks, the three groups were distinguishable based on gross examination. The histological examination revealed more organized collagen fibrils in groups III, which showed a dense, parallel, linear organization of collagen bundles. CD34 staining revealed neoangiogenesis in groups III. The results of this research showed that collagen-HA substrates with amniotic membrane accelerate cellular migration and angiogenesis in neotendons.

  13. Cerebral consequences of dynamic immobilisation after primary digital flexor tendon repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenekes, M W; Coert, J H; Nicolai, J-P A; Mulder, Th; Geertzen, J H B; Paans, A M; de Jong, BM

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment protocols for flexor tendon injuries of the hand generally result in an acceptable function, which can be quantified by objective parameters such as range of motion. The latter does not always match the patients' subjective experiences of persisting dysfunction. This raises the

  14. Effect of shoulder abduction angle on biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons with 3 types of double-row technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihata, Teruhisa; Fukuhara, Tetsutaro; Jun, Bong Jae; Watanabe, Chisato; Kinoshita, Mitsuo

    2011-03-01

    After rotator cuff repair, the shoulder is immobilized in various abduction positions. However, there is no consensus on the proper abduction angle. To assess the effect of shoulder abduction angle on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendons among 3 types of double-row techniques. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-two fresh-frozen porcine shoulders were used. A simulated rotator cuff tear was repaired by 1 of 3 double-row techniques: conventional double-row repair, transosseous-equivalent repair, and a combination of conventional double-row and bridging sutures (compression double-row repair). Each specimen underwent cyclic testing followed by tensile testing to failure at a simulated shoulder abduction angle of 0° or 40° on a material testing machine. Gap formation and failure loads were measured. Gap formation in conventional double-row repair at 0° (1.2 ± 0.5 mm) was significantly greater than that at 40° (0.5 ± 0.3mm, P = .01). The yield and ultimate failure loads for conventional double-row repair at 40° were significantly larger than those at 0° (P row repair (P row repair was the greatest among the 3 double-row techniques at both 0° and 40° of abduction. Bridging sutures have a greater effect on the biomechanical properties of the repaired rotator cuff tendon at a low abduction angle, and the conventional double-row technique has a greater effect at a high abduction angle. Proper abduction position after rotator cuff repair differs between conventional double-row repair and transosseous-equivalent repair. The authors recommend the use of the combined technique of conventional double-row and bridging sutures to obtain better biomechanical properties at both low and high abduction angles.

  15. A biomechanical comparison of tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading between single-row, triple-loaded cuff repairs and double-row, suture-tape cuff repairs using biocomposite anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Drew, Otis R

    2012-09-01

    To compare tendon-bone interface motion and cyclic loading in a single-row, triple-loaded anchor repair with a suture-tape, rip-stop, double-row rotator cuff repair. Using 18 human shoulders from 9 matched cadaveric pairs, we created 2 groups of rotator cuff repairs. Group 1 was a double-row, rip-stop, suture-tape construct. Group 2 was a single-row, triple-loaded construct. Before mechanical testing, the supraspinatus footprint was measured with calipers. A superiorly positioned digital camera optically measured the tendon footprint motion during 60° of humeral internal and external rotation. Specimens were secured at a fixed angle not exceeding 45° in reference to the load. After preloading, each sample was cycled between 10 N and 100 N for 200 cycles at 1 Hz, followed by destructive testing at 33 mm/s. A digital camera with tracking software measured the repair displacement at 100 and 200 cycles. Ultimate load and failure mode for each sample were recorded. The exposed anterior footprint border (6.5% ± 6%) and posterior footprint border (0.9% ± 1.7%) in group 1 were statistically less than the exposed anterior footprint border (30.3% ± 17%) and posterior footprint border (29.8% ± 14%) in group 2 (P = .003 and P row rotator cuff repair had greater footprint coverage, less rotational footprint displacement, and a greater mean ultimate failure load than the triple-loaded, single-row repair on mechanical testing. No double-row or single-row constructs showed 5 mm of displacement after the first 100 cycles. The most common failure mode for both constructs was suture tearing through the tendon. Differences in cuff fixation influence rotational tendon movement and may influence postoperative healing. Stronger repair constructs still fail at the suture-tendon interface. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acute flexor tendon injury following midshaft radius and ulna fractures in a paediatric patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Williams

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Delayed rupture of the extensor and flexor tendons are recognised complications of distal radius fractures. However, acute flexor tendon rupture in the context of forearm fractures is rare. A twelve-year-old female sustained midshaft fractures of the radius and ulna. Intra-operatively the flexor pollicis longus (FPL was found to be stripped from its musculotendinous junction at the level of the fracture fragment. The ruptured tendon was repaired using a modified Krackow technique at the time of fracture fixation. The repair was protected in plaster of Paris prior to referral to the paediatric hand clinic. The patient made a full recovery. Flexor tendon injury is a rare but potentially devastating consequence of acute forearm fractures. High energy trauma, significant volar angulation of the fracture fragment and clinical signs of flexor tendon injury should raise suspicion of this injury. A high index of suspicion in conjunction with repeat clinical examination of flexor tendon function should be performed before opting for closed management or intramedullary nailing in paediatric patients. Keywords: Acute, Flexor, Tendon, Fracture, Radius, Paediatric

  17. Application of the Goutallier/Fuchs Rotator Cuff Classification to the Evaluation of Hip Abductor Tendon Tears and the Clinical Correlation With Outcome After Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Lee, Simon X; Haro, Marc S; Frank, Jonathon M; Mather, Richard C; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Nho, Shane J

    2015-11-01

    To assess the reliability and reproducibility of the Goutallier/Fuchs classification for the evaluation of abductor tendon tears of the hip, as well as to identify the relation between preoperative tear size, abductor muscle quality, and the success of endoscopic tendon repair. This is a retrospective review of 30 consecutive endoscopic abductor tendon repairs performed by a single surgeon over a 2-year period. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed, and the muscle was assigned a grade according to the Goutallier/Fuchs classification. Patient-rated outcome scores--visual analog scale score, Hip Outcome Score (HOS), and modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS)--were collected preoperatively and at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability for muscle grading was calculated. Postoperative outcome measures were compared with preoperative tear size, muscle grade, and repair type to assess for correlations. Of the 30 hips included in the study, over 75% were classified as grade 1 (n = 15) or grade 2 (n = 8). The intraobserver reliability and interobserver reliability of the classification system averaged 0.872 and 0.916, respectively. Two patients (grades 3 and 4) had repair failure and underwent muscle transfer. In the remaining 28 hips, improvement was seen in the visual analog scale score (6.0 v 1.7, P size, or repair type (double v single row) did not affect postoperative outcomes. The Goutallier/Fuchs classification system can be reliably and reproducibly applied to the evaluation of abductor tendon tears of the hip and appears to correlate with patient-rated outcomes after repair. Increasing preoperative muscle fatty atrophy correlates with increased patient pain and decreased patient satisfaction and functional outcomes after repair. Level IV, prognostic case series. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Enveloping bioabsorbable polyglycolide membrane and immobilization in Achilles tendon repair: A comparative experimental study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlajamäki, Harri; Tynninen, Olli; Karjalainen, Pertti; Rokkanen, Pentti

    2008-02-01

    Using qualitative and histoquantitative methods, we investigated the effect of immobilization versus nonimmobilization on the biodegradation process, implant-tissue interaction, and scar formation after enveloping a rejoined rabbit Achilles tendon with a self-reinforced polyglycolide (SR-PGA) membrane. The soleus and gastrocnemius tendons of the right hind legs of 40 rabbits were transected. After suturing the ends, the seam was enveloped with the bioabsorbable membrane. Twenty ankles were immobilized with cast, 20 remained nonimmobilized. All nonoperated left ankles served as intact controls. During the follow-up of 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks, scar formation, tissue response, and membrane biodegradation were studied histologically and histomorphometrically. The amount of scar tissue, highest at 3 weeks, gradually approached intact controls. SR-PGA degradation in both cast and noncast specimens was near complete by 24 weeks. Signs of an inflammatory process were most prominent at 3 weeks and diminished gradually by 24 weeks. No significant difference between cast and noncast specimens was noted at any time point regarding the amount of scar tissue, degradation process of PGA, or intensity of inflammatory reaction. In the present experimental setting, cast immobilization influenced neither scar formation nor speed of degradation during reunion of transected Achilles tendon ends as compared with nonimmobilization. No differences in the reunion process of the tendon ends were seen between the immobilized and nonimmobilized groups. Moreover, inflammatory cells were similar in both groups and reflected a transient tissue reaction to the membrane. Within the follow-up, the seam area (cross-sectional) approached that of intact controls. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Does footprint preparation influence tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair in an animal model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklscherer, Andreas; Loitsch, Thomas; Serr, Michaela; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F; Niethammer, Thomas R; Müller, Hans-Helge; Milz, Stefan; Pietschmann, Matthias F; Müller, Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of footprint spongialization and radiofrequency ablation on rotator cuff repair outcomes compared with an untreated group in a rat model. We randomly assigned 189 Sprague-Dawley rats to either a spongialization, radiofrequency ablation, or untreated group. After separation of the supraspinatus tendon from the greater tubercle, the footprint was prepared by removing the cortical bone with a burr (spongialization), was prepared by ablating soft tissue with a radiofrequency ablation device, or was left unaltered (untreated). Biomechanical testing (after 7 weeks, n = 165) and histologic analysis after 1 and 7 weeks (n = 24) followed reinsertion. The mean load to failure was 17.51 ± 4.46 N/mm(2) in the spongialization group, 15.56 ± 4.85 N/mm(2) in the radiofrequency ablation group, and 19.21 ± 5.19 N/mm(2) in the untreated group. A significant difference was found between the spongialization and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0409), as well as between the untreated and radiofrequency ablation groups (P = .0014). There was no significant difference between the spongialization and untreated groups (P = .2456). The mean area of fibrocartilage transition, characterized by the presence of type II collagen, was larger after 1 and 7 weeks in the spongialization group (0.57 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.58 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) and untreated group (0.51 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.51 ± 0.2 mm(2), respectively) than in the radiofrequency ablation group (0.11 ± 0.1 mm(2) and 0.4 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively) with P rotator cuff repair may influence tendon-to-bone healing. Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair.

  1. Inhibition of 5-LOX, COX-1, and COX-2 increases tendon healing and reduces muscle fibrosis and lipid accumulation after rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Nikhil R; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Saripalli, Anjali L; Davis, Max E; Harning, Julie A; Lynch, Evan B; Roche, Stuart M; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    The repair and restoration of function after chronic rotator cuff tears are often complicated by muscle atrophy, fibrosis, and fatty degeneration of the diseased muscle. The inflammatory response has been implicated in the development of fatty degeneration after cuff injuries. Licofelone is a novel anti-inflammatory drug that inhibits 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 enzymes, which play important roles in inducing inflammation after injuries. While previous studies have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and selective inhibitors of COX-2 (coxibs) may prevent the proper healing of muscles and tendons, studies about bone and cartilage have demonstrated that drugs that inhibit 5-LOX concurrently with COX-1 and COX-2 may enhance tissue regeneration. After the repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in rats, licofelone would increase the load to failure of repaired tendons and increase the force production of muscle fibers. Controlled laboratory study. Rats underwent supraspinatus release followed by repair 28 days later. After repair, rats began a treatment regimen of either licofelone or a vehicle for 14 days, at which time animals were euthanized. Supraspinatus muscles and tendons were then subjected to contractile, mechanical, histological, and biochemical analyses. Compared with controls, licofelone-treated rats had a grossly apparent decrease in inflammation and increased fibrocartilage formation at the enthesis, along with a 62% increase in the maximum load to failure and a 51% increase in peak stress to failure. Licofelone resulted in a marked reduction in fibrosis and lipid content in supraspinatus muscles as well as reduced expression of several genes involved in fatty infiltration. Despite the decline in fibrosis and fat accumulation, muscle fiber specific force production was reduced by 23%. The postoperative treatment of cuff repair with licofelone may reduce fatty degeneration and enhance the development

  2. Does autologous leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma improve tendon healing in arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charousset, Christophe; Zaoui, Amine; Bellaïche, Laurence; Piterman, Michel

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with the use of leukocyte-platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP) in patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears. A comparative cohort of patients with large or massive rotator cuff tears undergoing arthroscopic repair was studied. Two consecutive groups of patients were included: rotator cuff repairs with L-PRP injection (group 1, n = 35) and rotator cuff repairs without L-PRP injection (group 2, n = 35). A double-row cross-suture cuff repair was performed by a single surgeon with the same rehabilitation protocol. Patients were clinically evaluated with the Constant score; Simple Shoulder Test score; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) score; and strength measurements by use of a handheld dynamometer. Rotator cuff healing was evaluated by postoperative MRI using the Sugaya classification (type 1 to type 5). We prospectively evaluated the 2 groups at a minimum 2-year follow-up. The results did not show differences in cuff healing between the 2 groups (P = .16). The size of recurrent tears (type 4 v type 5), however, was significantly smaller in group 1 (P = .008). There was no statistically significant difference in the recurrent tear rate (types 4 and 5) between the 2 groups (P = .65). There was no significant difference between group 1 and group 2 in terms of University of California, Los Angeles score (29.1 and 30.3, respectively; P = .90); Simple Shoulder Test score (9.9 and 10.2, respectively; P = .94); Constant score (77.3 and 78.1, respectively; P = .82); and strength (7.5 and 7.0, respectively; P = .51). In our study the use of autologous L-PRP did not improve the quality of tendon healing in patients undergoing arthroscopic repair of large or massive rotator cuff tears based on postoperative MRI evaluation. The only significant advantage was that the L-PRP patients had smaller iterative tears. However, the functional outcome was similar in

  3. Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff: prospective study of tendon healing after 70 years of age in 145 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurin, P-H; Hardy, P; Abadie, P; Boileau, P; Collin, P; Deranlot, J; Desmoineaux, P; Duport, M; Essig, J; Godenèche, A; Joudet, T; Kany, J; Sommaire, C; Thelu, C-E; Valenti, P

    2013-12-01

    The level of activity of patients older than 70 years is tending to increase, as are their expectations in terms of joint function recuperation. It has not been proven that rotator cuff repair healing is satisfactory in the elderly. The main hypothesis of this study was: repair of supraspinous lesions in patients older than 70 years is reliable in terms of both clinical results and healing. The secondary hypothesis was: tendon healing is significantly correlated with the Constant, ASES, and SST scores as well as with age, tendon retraction, and fatty infiltration. Multicenter prospective study on 145 patients older than 70 years, with 135 patients reviewed at 1 year (93%). The mean age was 73.9 years. Full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus extended at most to the upper third of the infraspinatus and retraction limited to Patte stages 1 and 2 were included. Clinical assessment was carried out in accordance with the Constant, ASES, and SST scores. Healing was evaluated with ultrasound. A significant improvement was noted in the Constant (44/76)+31.5 (P0.0001) scores at 1 year of follow-up. The healing rate was 89% with 15 re-tears, nine of which were stage 1 and six stage 2. The clinical result was not correlated with patient age (Constant, P=0.24; ASES, P=0.38; SST, P=0.83) nor with the retraction stage (Constant, P=0.71; ASES, P=0.35; SST, P=0.69) or the stage of fatty infiltration (P>0.7). Healing was correlated with the quality of the clinical result (Constant, P=0.02; ASES, P=0.03) and age (P=0.01) but was not correlated with retraction or the fatty infiltration stage (P>0.3). Arthroscopic repair significantly improves the clinical results, even in patients older than 70 years. The clinical results are not correlated with age (but deterioration of the result was not noted after 75 years) or frontal retraction (but the study only included retractions limited to stages 1 and 2). The healing rate is satisfactory, but this study is limited to small ruptures of

  4. Extracorporeal shockwave enhanced regeneration of fibrocartilage in a delayed tendon-bone insertion repair model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dick Ho Kiu; Suen, Pui Kit; Huang, Le; Cheung, Wing-Hoi; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Ng, Chun; Shi, San Qiang; Wong, Margaret Wan Nar; Qin, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Fibrous tissue is often formed in delayed healing of tendon bone insertion (TBI) instead of fibrocartilage. Extracorporeal shockwave (ESW) provides mechanical cues and upregulates expression of fibrocartilage-related makers and cytokines. We hypothesized that ESW would accelerate fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. Partial patellectomy with shielding at the TBI interface was performed on 32 female New Zealand White Rabbits for establishing this delayed TBI healing model. The rabbits were separated into the control and ESW group for evaluations at postoperative week 8 and 12. Shielding was removed at week 4 and a single ESW treatment was applied at week 6. Fibrocartilage regeneration was evaluated histomorphologically and immunohistochemically. Vickers hardness of the TBI matrix was measured by micro-indentation. ESW group showed higher fibrocartilage area, thickness, and proteoglycan deposition than the control in week 8 and 12. ESW increased expression of SOX9 and collagen II significantly in week 8 and 12, respectively. ESW group showed a gradual transition of hardness from bone to fibrocartilage to tendon, and had a higher Vickers hardness than the control group at week 12. In conclusion, ESW enhanced fibrocartilage regeneration at the healing interface in a delayed TBI healing model. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. TOB1 Deficiency Enhances the Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Tendon-Bone Healing in a Rat Rotator Cuff Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study investigated the effect of silencing TOB1 (Transducer of ERBB2, 1 expression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs on MSC-facilitated tendon-bone healing in a rat supraspinatus repair model. Methods: Rat MSCs were transduced with a recombinant lentivirus encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA against TOB1. MSC cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. The effect of MSCs with TOB1 deficiency on tendon-bone healing in a rat rotator cuff repair model was evaluated by biomechanical testing, histological analysis and collagen type I and II gene expression. An upstream regulator (miR-218 of TOB1 was determined in MSCs. Results: We found that knockdown of TOB1 significantly increased the proliferative activity of rat MSCs in vitro. When MSCs with TOB1 deficiency were injected into injured rat supraspinatus tendon-bone junctions, the effect on tendon-bone healing was enhanced compared to treatment with control MSCs with normal TOB1 expression, as evidenced by elevated levels of ultimate load to failure and stiffness, increased amount of fibrocartilage and augmented expression of collagen type I and type II genes. In addition, we found that the TOB1 3′ untranslated region is a direct target of miR-218. Similar to the effect of TOB1 deficiency, overexpression of miR-218 effectively promoted tendon-bone healing in rat. Conclusion: These results suggest that TOB1 may play a negative role in the effect of MSCs on tendon-bone healing, and imply that expression of TOB1 may be regulated by miR-218.

  6. Cellular response of healing tissue to DegraPol tube implantation in rabbit Achilles tendon rupture repair: an in vivo histomorphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Meier-Bürgisser, Gabriella; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Neuenschwander, Peter; Milleret, Vincent; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2013-05-01

    In tendon rupture repair, improvements such as higher primary repair strength, anti-adhesion and accelerated healing are needed. We developed a potential carrier system of an electrospun DegraPol tube, which was tightly implanted around a transected and conventionally sutured rabbit Achilles tendon. Histomorphometric analysis of the tendon tissue 12 weeks postoperation showed that the tenocyte density, tenocyte morphology and number of inflammation zones were statistically equivalent, whether or not DegraPol tube was implanted; only the collagen fibres were slightly less parallelly orientated in the tube-treated case. Comparison of rabbits that were operated on both hind legs with ones that were operated on only one hind leg showed that there were significantly more inflammation zones in the two-leg cases compared to the one-leg cases, while the implantation of a DegraPol tube had no such adverse effects. These findings are a prerequisite for using DegraPol tube as a carrier system for growth factors, cytokines or stem cells in order to accelerate the healing process of tendon tissue. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D.; Goodwin, C.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.)

  8. Magnetic resonance evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament repair using the patellar tendon double bone block technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autz, G.; Singson, R.D. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goodwin, C. (St. Luke' s Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics)

    1991-11-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was determined in 20 clinically stable and 2 clinically unstable knees for a total of 22 examinations. All patients studied had undergone knee reconstruction using the patellar tendon as graft material. The reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament varies in appearance. It appeared as a thick, well-defined, low signal band on T1- and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images in 14 of 22 examinations. The remaining 8 knees showed a graft having one or more thin and attenuated, low signal intensity bands in the sagittal and/or coronal plane. Arthroscopy confirmed an intact but lax graft in the clinically unstable knees. (orig.).

  9. Arthroscopic repair of partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears: tendon quality as a prognostic factor for repair integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Jae Yoon; Yoon, Jong Pil; Lyu, Seong Hwa; Rhee, Sung Min; Oh, Se Bong

    2015-03-01

    The healing failure rate is high for partial-thickness or small full-thickness rotator cuff tears. To retrospectively evaluate and compare outcomes after arthroscopic repair of high-grade partial-thickness and small full-thickness rotator cuff tears and factors affecting rotator cuff healing. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Included in the study were 55 consecutive patients (mean age, 57.9 ± 7.2 years) who underwent arthroscopic repair for high-grade partial-thickness (n = 34) and small full-thickness (n = 21) rotator cuff tears. The study patients also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and computed tomography arthrography (CTA) at least 6 months postoperatively, and their functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up (>24 months). All partial-thickness tears were repaired after being converted to full-thickness tears; thus, the repair process was almost the same as for small full-thickness tears. The tendinosis of the torn tendon was graded from the MRI images using a 4-point scale, and the reliabilities were assessed. The outcomes between high-grade partial-thickness tears that were converted to small full-thickness tears and initially small full-thickness tears were compared, and factors affecting outcomes were evaluated. The inter- and intraobserver reliabilities of the tendinosis grade were good (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.706 and 0.777, respectively). Failure to heal as determined by CTA was observed in 12 patients with a high-grade partial-thickness tear (35.3%; complete failure in 4 and partial failure in 8) and in 3 patients with a small full-thickness tear (14.3%; complete failure in 1 and partial failure in 2). The patients with high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears showed a higher tendinosis grade than did those with small full-thickness tears (P = .014), and the severity of the tendinosis was related to the failure to heal (P = .037). Tears with a higher tendinosis grade

  10. Small hook thread (Quill) and soft felt internal splint to increase the primary repair strength of lacerated rabbit Achilles tendons: biomechanical analysis and considerations for hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Feldman, Kirill; Tervoort, Theo A; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2011-07-01

    For the prevention of re-rupture during early healing phase, the primary repair strength of repaired lacerated tendons in hand surgery should be maximal and the reconstructed diameter minimal. Two new repair methods (small hook thread and internal splint) were assessed for strength and reconstructed diameter characteristics. Achilles tendons of 43 female New Zealand White rabbits were sectioned 2 cm above the calcaneus. Specimens were divided into 7 groups and repaired as follows: Kirchmayr method 2-strand with 4.0 polypropylene thread; Becker method 4-strand; 6-strand; internal splint; Kirchmayr method small hook 2-strand; Becker method small hook 4-strand, non-modified tendon. Load until failure, load until gap formation, gap length, cross-sectional area and failure stress were determined. The small hook 2-strand suture had 1.3 fold higher loads until failure compared to a conventional 2-strand suture, P<0.05. The internal splint had a similar load until failure (22 N (SD 6)) as the conventional 2-strand suture (23 N (SD 4)); around half the load until failure of the conventional 4-strand suture (38 N (SD 9)). Load until gap formation correlated positively with load until failure (y=0.65+3.6; r(2)=0.72). The running suture increased the cross-sectional area at the repair site by a factor of 1.3. Using a small hook thread instead of a 4.0 polypropylene thread significantly increases the primary repair strength with the same number of strands. Internal splints may be an alternative to conventional 2-strand sutures for bridging large gaps. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of single- and double-row rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone interface: preliminary results using an in vivo sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, M H; Schminke, B; Posmyk, A; Miosge, N; Klinger, H-M; Lakemeier, S

    2015-01-01

    The clinical superiority of the double-row technique is still a subject of controversial debate in rotator cuff repair. We hypothesised that the expression of different collagen types will differ between double-row and single-row rotator cuff repair indicating a faster healing response by the double-row technique. Twenty-four mature female sheep were randomly assembled to two different groups in which a surgically created acute infraspinatus tendon tear was fixed using either a modified single- or double-row repair technique. Shoulder joints from female sheep cadavers of identical age, bone maturity, and weight served as untreated control cluster. Expression of type I, II, and III collagen was observed in the tendon-to-bone junction along with recovering changes in the fibrocartilage zone after immunohistological tissue staining at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 26 weeks postoperatively. Expression of type III collagen remained positive until 6 weeks after surgery in the double-row group, whereas it was detectable for 12 weeks in the single-row group. In both groups, type I collagen expression increased after 12 weeks. Type II collagen expression was increased after 12 weeks in the double-row versus single-row group. Clusters of chondrocytes were only visible between week 6 and 12 in the double-row group. The study demonstrates differences regarding the expression of type I and type III collagen in the tendon-to-bone junction following double-row rotator cuff repair compared to single-row repair. The healing response in this acute repair model is faster in the double-row group during the investigated healing period.

  12. BIOMECHANICS AND HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS IN RABBIT FLEXOR TENDONS REPAIRED USING THREE SUTURE TECHNIQUES (FOUR AND SIX STRANDS) WITH EARLY ACTIVE MOBILIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Arenhart, Rodrigo; Silveira, Daniela; Ávila, Aluísio Otávio Vargas; Berral, Francisco José; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo César Faiad; Lech, Osvandré Luís Canfield; Fukushima, Walter Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps) and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands) which the end knot (core) is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands) and Tsai (6-strands) with sutures technique which the end knot (core) is inner of the tendon, associated with early active mobilization. Methods: The right calcaneal tendons (plantar flexor of the hind paw) of 36 rabbits of the New Zealand breed (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used in the analysis. This sample presents similar size to human flexor tendon that has approximately 4.5 mm (varying from 2mm). The selected sample showed the same mass (2.5 to 3kg) and were male or female adults (from 8 ½ months). For the flexor tendons of the hind paws, sterile and driven techniques were used in accordance to the Committee on Animal Research and Ethics (CETEA) of the University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), municipality of Lages, in Brazil (protocol # 1.33.09). Results: In the biomechanical analysis (deformity) carried out between tendinous stumps, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01). There was no statistical difference in relation to surgical time in all three suture techniques with a mean of 6.0 minutes for Tsai (6- strands), 5.7 minutes for Indiana (4-strands) and 5.6 minutes for Brazil (4-strands) (p>0.01). With the early active mobility, there was qualitative and quantitative evidence of thickening of collagen in 38.9% on the 15th day and in 66.7% on the 30th day, making the biological tissue stronger and more resistant (p=0.095). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that there was no histological difference between the results achieved with an inside or outside end knot with respect to the repaired tendon and the number of strands did not affect healing, vascularization or sliding of the tendon in the osteofibrous tunnel, which are associated with early active mobility, with the repair techniques

  13. BIOMECHANICS AND HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS IN RABBIT FLEXOR TENDONS REPAIRED USING THREE SUTURE TECHNIQUES (FOUR AND SIX STRANDS) WITH EARLY ACTIVE MOBILIZATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, Antônio Lourenço; Arenhart, Rodrigo; Silveira, Daniela; Ávila, Aluísio Otávio Vargas; Berral, Francisco José; Lemos, Marcelo Barreto; Piluski, Paulo César Faiad; Lech, Osvandré Luís Canfield; Fukushima, Walter Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    Analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps) and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands) which the end knot (core) is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands) and Tsai (6-strands) with sutures technique which the end knot (core) is inner of the tendon, associated with early active mobilization. The right calcaneal tendons (plantar flexor of the hind paw) of 36 rabbits of the New Zealand breed (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were used in the analysis. This sample presents similar size to human flexor tendon that has approximately 4.5 mm (varying from 2mm). The selected sample showed the same mass (2.5 to 3kg) and were male or female adults (from 8 ½ months). For the flexor tendons of the hind paws, sterile and driven techniques were used in accordance to the Committee on Animal Research and Ethics (CETEA) of the University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), municipality of Lages, in Brazil (protocol # 1.33.09). In the biomechanical analysis (deformity) carried out between tendinous stumps, there was no statistically significant difference (p>0.01). There was no statistical difference in relation to surgical time in all three suture techniques with a mean of 6.0 minutes for Tsai (6- strands), 5.7 minutes for Indiana (4-strands) and 5.6 minutes for Brazil (4-strands) (p>0.01). With the early active mobility, there was qualitative and quantitative evidence of thickening of collagen in 38.9% on the 15(th) day and in 66.7% on the 30(th) day, making the biological tissue stronger and more resistant (p=0.095). This study demonstrated that there was no histological difference between the results achieved with an inside or outside end knot with respect to the repaired tendon and the number of strands did not affect healing, vascularization or sliding of the tendon in the osteofibrous tunnel, which are associated with early active mobility, with the repair techniques applied.

  14. Preservation of bursal-sided tendon in partial-thickness articular-sided rotator cuff tears: a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Yoon Sang; Kim, Rag Gyu

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair technique that spares the intact bursal-sided tendon in articular-sided partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCT) and to present shoulder functional outcomes in patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT that involves more than 50 % of its thickness after arthroscopic repair using a novel technique. Eighteen patients with symptomatic articular-sided PCRCT involving more than 50 % of the tendon's thickness underwent arthroscopic repair using a devised technique. The devised technique restores only the torn articular portion of the rotator cuff at the anatomical footprint using a suture anchor, and preserves the integrity of the corresponding bursal-sided tendon by tying knots at the most lateral bursal side on the subacromial space. Clinical and functional outcome using ASES and Constant scores were evaluated. The structural integrity of the rotator cuff was evaluated by MRI at 6 months postoperatively. Pain relief and shoulder functional outcomes were encouraging during the recovery phase after operation. ASES (preoperative 54.0 ± 10.3 to postoperative 92.6 ± 8.0), Constant score (61.2 ± 8.5-88.0 ± 5.3), VAS for pain (4.9 ± 2.6-0.6 ± 0.7) improved significantly after arthroscopic transtendon anatomic repair (p rotator cuff retears on 6-month MRI. No complications related to surgical procedures had occurred. The devised technique of arthroscopic transtendon repair provided satisfactory functional outcomes without postoperative discomforts. This technique minimizes over-tightening of the articular layer and reduces tension mismatches between the articular and bursal layers, which are considered as important factors for improvement of postoperative shoulder motion.

  15. Repair of full-thickness tendon injury using connective tissue progenitors efficiently derived from human embryonic stem cells and fetal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shahar; Leshansky, Lucy; Zussman, Eyal; Burman, Michael; Srouji, Samer; Livne, Erella; Abramov, Natalie; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-10-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue engineering (TE) encourages scientists to design new platforms in the field of regenerative and reconstructive medicine. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have been proposed to be an important cell source for cell-based TE applications as well as an exciting tool for investigating the fundamentals of human development. Here, we describe the efficient derivation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from hESC lines and fetal tissues. The CTPs were significantly expanded and induced to generate tendon tissues in vitro, with ultrastructural characteristics and biomechanical properties typical of mature tendons. We describe a simple method for engineering tendon grafts that can successfully repair injured Achilles tendons and restore the ankle joint extension movement in mice. We also show the CTP's ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and fat both in vitro and in vivo. This study offers evidence for the possibility of using stem cell-derived engineered grafts to replace missing tissues, and sets a basic platform for future cell-based TE applications in the fields of orthopedics and reconstructive surgery.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and histomorphometric analysis of cellular response to a new elastic DegraPol® polymer for rabbit Achilles tendon rupture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Neuenschwander, Peter; Milleret, Vincent; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Tendon rupture repair is a surgical field where improvements are still required due to problems such as repeat ruptures, adhesion formation and joint stiffness. In the current study, a reversibly expandable and contractible electrospun tube based on a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer was implanted around a transected and conventionally sutured rabbit Achilles tendon. The material used was DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane. To make DP softer, more elastic and surgeon-friendly, the synthesis protocol was slightly modified. Material properties of conventional and new DP film electrospun meshes are presented. At 12 weeks post-surgery, tenocyte and tenoblast density, nuclei and width, collagen fibre structure and inflammation levels were analyzed histomorphometrically. Additionally, a comprehensive histological scoring system by Stoll et al. (2011) was used to compare healing outcomes. Results showed that there were no adverse reactions of the tendon tissue following the implant. No differences were found whether the DP tube was applied or not for both traditional and new DP materials. As a result, the new DP material was shown to be an excellent carrier for delivery of growth factors, stem cells and other agents responsible for tendon healing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Histomorphological analyse of accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbits by low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baoliang; Lü, Hongbin; Hu, Jianzhong; Xu, Daqi; Zhou, Jingyong; Wang, Ye

    2013-08-01

    To analyse the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on accelerating the fibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction. A total of 60 mature female New Zealand white rabbits undergoing standard partial patellectomy were divided into 2 groups randomly. The control group was given comfort treatment and the treatment group was given LIPUS treatment starting from day 3 to the end of week 6 postoperatively. The scheduled time points of animal euthanization would be at week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively. The patella-patellar tendon (PPT) complex would be harvested and cut into sections after decalcification for H&E staining, Safranine o/fast green staining. The thickness and gray value of fibrocartilage layer were analyzed by SANO Microscope Partner image analyzer. At week 6, week 12 and week 18 postoperatively, the fibrocartilage layer in the treatment group was significantly thicker than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer was significantly smaller than that in the control group (Pfibrocartilage layer repair of patella-patellar tendon junction in rabbit models.

  18. Clinical Significance of Presence of Extensor Indicis Brevis Manus – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Esakkiammal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Anatomical variations of additional muscles and tendons are commonly encountered in extensor aspect of forearm and hand during surgeries and dissections. There are reports on different kinds of variations like, extra tendons, additional bellies, and abnormal attachments of the muscle. Surgeons should have the knowledge about these variations for muscle or tendon grafting and also to plan surgeries. While dissecting the extensor compartment forearm and dorsum of hand of an elderly female cadaver, an anomalous muscle belly was noticed on dorsum of hand bilaterally alongwith the main tendon of extensor indicis muscle. This additional belly of extensor indicis muscle was called Extensor Indicis Brevis Manus (EIBM. This muscle originated from the dorsal carpal ligament and joined the main tendon of extensor indicis muscle in both the hands. Awareness of existence of this kind of variation is important for clinicians and surgeons for a correct diagnosis and eventual surgery in patients presenting with a cyst on the dorsum of hand, to avoid accidental mishaps.

  19. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parellada, Antoni J.; Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B.; Sweet, Stephanie; Leinberry, Charles F.; Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark

    2007-01-01

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons, as well as

  20. Distal intersection tenosynovitis of the wrist: a lesser-known extensor tendinopathy with characteristic MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parellada, Antoni J. [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frankford Hospitals - Torresdale Campus, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gopez, Angela G.; Morrison, William B. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sweet, Stephanie [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia Hand Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Leinberry, Charles F. [Thomas Jefferson University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery - Hand Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Reiter, Sean B.; Kohn, Mark [DII - Diagnostic Imaging, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2007-03-15

    To present the MRI imaging findings of extensor tenosynovitis at the distal intersection or crossover between the second (extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) and brevis (ECRB)) and third (extensor pollicis longus (EPL)) extensor compartment tendons, and the anatomical details that may play a role in the pathogenesis of this condition. The imaging studies and clinical records of five patients (three females and two males, with ages ranging between 22 and 78 years; mean age, 49 years) presenting with pain on the dorsal and radial aspect of the wrist were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. Three cases were identified serendipitously during routine clinical reading sessions; a follow-up computerized database search for additional cases reported in the prior two years yielded two additional cases. The overall number of cases screened was 1,031. The diagnosis of tendinopathy affecting the second and third compartment extensor tendons was made on the basis of MRI findings and clinical follow-up, or synovectomy. All patients showed signs of tenosynovitis: in four patients both the tendons of the second and third extensor compartments were affected; the fifth patient showed signs of tenosynovitis of the EPL tendon, and tendinosis of the extensor carpi radialis tendons. Three patients showed tenosynovitis proximal and distal to the point of intersection; and in two of them, a discrete point of constriction was appreciated at the crossover site in relation to the extensor retinaculum. Two patients showed tenosynovitis limited to the segment distal to the point of decussation. Tendinosis tended to follow the presence of tenosynovitis. In one of the patients, subtendinous reactive marrow edema in Lister's tubercle was noted. Distal intersection tenosynovitis may be related to the biomechanical pulley effect exerted by Lister's tubercle on the EPL tendon as it leaves the third compartment and crosses over the extensor carpi radialis tendons

  1. Corticospinal excitability changes following prolonged muscle tendon vibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyvers, M.; Levin, O.; Baelen, M.G.M. van; Swinnen, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    The present experiment addressed the time course of corticospinal excitability changes following interventional muscle tendon vibration. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials of the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle were recorded for a period

  2. Initial experience with visualizing hand and foot tendons by dual-energy computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Kai; Sun, Cong; Liu, Cheng; Ma, Rui

    2009-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of visualizing hand and foot tendons by dual-energy computed tomography (CT). Twenty patients who suffered from hand or feet pains were scanned on dual-source CT (Definition, Forchheim, Germany) with dual-energy mode at tube voltages of 140 and 80 kV and a corresponding ratio of 1:4 between tube currents. The reconstructed images were postprocessed by volume rendering techniques (VRT) and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). All of the suspected lesions were confirmed by surgery or follow-up studies. Twelve patients (total of 24 hands and feet, respectively) were found to be normal and the other eight patients (total of nine hands and feet, respectively) were found abnormal. Dual-energy techniques are very useful in visualizing tendons of the hands and feet, such as flexor pollicis longus tendon, flexor digitorum superficialis/profundus tendon, Achilles tendon, extensor hallucis longus tendon, and extensor digitorum longus tendon, etc. It can depict the whole shape of the tendons and their fixation points clearly. Peroneus longus tendon in the sole of the foot was not displayed very well. The distal ends of metacarpophalangeal joints with extensor digitoium tendon and extensor pollicis longus tendon were poorly shown. The lesions of tendons such as the circuitry, thickening, and adherence were also shown clearly. Dual-energy CT offers a new method to visualize tendons of the hand and foot. It could clearly display both anatomical structures and pathologic changes of hand and foot tendons.

  3. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2016.

  4. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  5. Treatment of peroneal tendon dislocation and coexisting medial and lateral ligamentous laxity in the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, Pejman; Sabeti-Aschraf, Manuel; Fehske, Kai; Dlaska, Constantin E; Funovics, Philipp; Wenzel, Florian; Graf, Alexandra; Buchhorn, Tomas

    2011-06-01

    Acute dislocation of the peroneal tendon is caused by massive combined flexion-torsion trauma supported by preexisting ligamentous laxity of the ankle joint. This study aimed to investigate the clinical outcome of combined treatment of peroneal tendon dislocation and lateral and medial ligamentous laxity. Between 2005 and 2007, forty-two patients with peroneal tendon dislocation and coexisting ligamentous laxity were treated. The superior extensor retinaculum was reconstructed using anchor technique and periosteal flap repair, whereas the preexisting ligamentous laxity with regard to the extensor inferior retinaculum was addressed using anchor reconstruction. All patients underwent arthroscopy prior to surgery. Thirty-eight of a total of 42 patients (aged 17-31) completed the 24-month follow-up. Clinical and arthroscopic examination was accomplished consistently by always the same two surgeons. Postoperative follow-up comprised clinical evaluation after 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Clinical results showed a significant (Pankle joint following arthroscopy results in good clinical outcome and high patient satisfaction. Case series, Level IV.

  6. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture ?

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, Jos? Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a s...

  7. Metal artefacts severely hamper magnetic resonance imaging of the rotator cuff tendons after rotator cuff repair with titanium suture anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Femke F; Huis In't Veld, Rianne; den Otter, Lydia A; van Raak, Sjoerd M; Ten Haken, Bennie; Vochteloo, Anne J H

    2018-04-01

    The rate of retear after rotator cuff surgery is 17%. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are used for confirmative diagnosis of retear. However, because of the presence of titanium suture anchors, metal artefacts on the MRI are common. The present study evaluated the diagnostic value of MRI after rotator cuff tendon surgery with respect to assessing the integrity as well as the degeneration and atrophy of the rotator cuff tendons when titanium anchors are in place. Twenty patients who underwent revision surgery of the rotator cuff as a result of a clinically suspected retear between 2013 and 2015 were included. The MRI scans of these patients were retrospectively analyzed by four specialized shoulder surgeons and compared with intra-operative findings (gold standard). Sensitivity and interobserver agreement among the surgeons in assessing retears as well as the Goutallier and Warner classification were examined. In 36% (range 15% to 50%) of the pre-operative MRI scans, the observers could not review the rotator cuff tendons. When the rotator cuff tendons were assessable, a diagnostic accuracy with a mean sensitivity of 0.84 (0.70 to 1.0) across the surgeons was found, with poor interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.12). Metal artefacts prevented accurate diagnosis from MRI scans of rotator cuff retear in 36% of the patients studied.

  8. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria | Mohammed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 46-year-old man with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture due to ochronosis. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in Sudan literature. The tendon of the reported patient healed well after debridement and primary repairs.

  9. Not all sagittal band tears come with extensor instability. A case report with radiological and operative correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shuo; Jacob, Jubin; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Marrinan, Greg B.; Brooks, Jeffrey J.

    2018-01-01

    The sagittal bands are a component of the extensor hood. They serve an important role in stabilizing the extensor tendon by forming a ''check-rein'' to radial-ulnar translation of the tendon over the metacarpal head, and extending the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint by virtue of attaching the extensor tendon to the palmar plate. Injury to the sagittal band is thought to cause extensor instability and subluxation to the contralateral side by disruption of this ''check-rein'' function, although recent evidence from cadaver studies suggests that ulnar sagittal band tear may be spared of extensor instability. As a case in point, we encountered a patient with surgically proven ulnar sagittal band tear, who did not have any extensor tendon subluxation or any limitation in motion. Intraoperative findings demonstrated a chronic-appearing ulnar sagittal band tear, indicating that chronic injury with fibrosis may stabilize the central band. Therefore, in patients with metacarpophalangeal pain without central tendon subluxation or limitation of motion, it remains important to raise the concern of sagittal band tear for appropriate treatment. We present the clinical course of this case, with radiological and operative findings, followed by a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  10. Not all sagittal band tears come with extensor instability. A case report with radiological and operative correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuo; Jacob, Jubin; Ghasemiesfe, Ahmadreza; Marrinan, Greg B. [Yale New Haven Health Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, CT (United States); Brooks, Jeffrey J. [Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Center, New Canaan, CT (United States)

    2018-04-15

    The sagittal bands are a component of the extensor hood. They serve an important role in stabilizing the extensor tendon by forming a ''check-rein'' to radial-ulnar translation of the tendon over the metacarpal head, and extending the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint by virtue of attaching the extensor tendon to the palmar plate. Injury to the sagittal band is thought to cause extensor instability and subluxation to the contralateral side by disruption of this ''check-rein'' function, although recent evidence from cadaver studies suggests that ulnar sagittal band tear may be spared of extensor instability. As a case in point, we encountered a patient with surgically proven ulnar sagittal band tear, who did not have any extensor tendon subluxation or any limitation in motion. Intraoperative findings demonstrated a chronic-appearing ulnar sagittal band tear, indicating that chronic injury with fibrosis may stabilize the central band. Therefore, in patients with metacarpophalangeal pain without central tendon subluxation or limitation of motion, it remains important to raise the concern of sagittal band tear for appropriate treatment. We present the clinical course of this case, with radiological and operative findings, followed by a review of the relevant literature. (orig.)

  11. Quadriceps tendon rupture: a biomechanical comparison of transosseous equivalent double-row suture anchor versus transosseous tunnel repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Nathan D; Wallace, Matthew K; Scovell, J Field; Krupp, Ryan J; Cook, Chad; Wyland, Douglas J

    2012-09-01

    Quadriceps rupture off the patella is traditionally repaired by a transosseous tunnel technique, although a single-row suture anchor repair has recently been described. This study biomechanically tested a new transosseous equivalent (TE) double-row suture anchor technique compared with the transosseous repair for quadriceps repair. After simulated quadriceps-patella avulsion in 10 matched cadaveric knees, repairs were completed by either a three tunnel transosseous (TT = 5) or a TE suture anchor (TE = 5) technique. Double-row repairs were done using two 5.5 Bio-Corkscrew FT (fully threaded) (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) and two 3.5 Bio-PushLock anchors (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL, USA) with all 10 repairs done with #2 FiberWire suture (Arthrex, Inc., Naples, FL). Cyclic testing from 50 to 250 N for 250 cycles and pull to failure load (1 mm/s) were undertaken. Gap formation and ultimate tensile load (N) were recorded and stiffness data (N/mm) were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using a Mann-Whitney U test and survival characteristics examined with Kaplan-Meier test. No significant difference was found between the TE and TT groups in stiffness (TE = 134 +/- 15 N/mm, TT = 132 +/- 26 N/mm, p = 0.28). The TE group had significantly less ultimate tensile load (N) compared with the TT group (TE = 447 +/- 86 N, TT = 591 +/- 84 N, p = 0.04), with all failures occurring at the suture eyelets. Although both quadriceps repairs were sufficiently strong, the transosseous repairs were stronger than the TE suture anchor repairs. The repair stiffness and gap formation were similar between the groups.

  12. Investigation Of Wrist Flexor/Extensor Muscle Strength Following Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment Of Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Onur SERBEST

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Lateral epicondylitis is a common disease of elbow joint. Repetitive wrist activities and activities that requires strength are risk factors. Wrist extensor muscle strength are decreased in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with a diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis enrolled to study. Wrist flexor and extensor muscle strength of patients who were completed one year after surgery were measured by isokinetic dynamometer. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the flexor and extensor muscle strength of the patients (p>0.05. Conclusion: In this study, arthroscopic extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon release in lateral epicondylitis has shown no negative effect on flexor and extensor wrist muscle stregth.

  13. Local Application of Gelatin Hydrogel Sheets Impregnated With Platelet-Derived Growth Factor BB Promotes Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Rotator Cuff Repair in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takuya; Ide, Junji; Arimura, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Uehara, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether the local application of platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) in hydrogel sheets would promote healing and improve histologic characteristics and biomechanical strength after rotator cuff (RC) repair in rats. To assess the effect of PDGF-BB on tendon-to-bone healing we divided 36 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with bilateral surgery to repair the supraspinatus tendon at its insertion site into 3 groups: group 1 = suture-only group; group 2 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS); and group 3 = suture and gelatin hydrogel sheets impregnated with PDGF-BB (0.5 μg). Semiquantitative histologic evaluation was carried out 2, 6, and 12 weeks later; cell proliferation was assessed 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively by immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and biomechanical testing, including ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate stress to failure, was performed 12 weeks after the operation. At 2 weeks, the average percentage of PCNA-positive cells at the insertion site was significantly higher in group 3 (40.5% ± 2.4%) than in group 1 (32.1% ± 6.9%; P = .03) and group 2 (31.9% ± 3.7%; P = .02). At 2 and 6 weeks, the histologic scores were similar among the 3 groups. At 12 weeks, the histologic score was significantly higher in group 3 (10.3 ± 0.8) than in group 1 (8.5 ± 0.5; P = .002) or group 2 (8.8 ± 0.8; P = .009), whereas ultimate load to failure, stiffness, and ultimate load to stress (normal control population, 44.73 ± 9.75 N, 27.59 ± 4.32 N/mm, and 21.33 ± 4.65 N/mm(2), respectively) were significantly higher in group 3 (28.28 ± 6.28 N, 11.05 ± 2.37 N/mm, and 7.99 ± 2.13 N/mm(2), respectively) than in group 1 (10.44 ± 1.98 N, 4.74 ± 1.31 N/mm, and 3.28 ± 1.27 N/mm(2), respectively; all P repair in humans. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Icariin Promotes Tendon-Bone Healing during Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears: A Biomechanical and Histological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chenyi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Shengdong; Jiang, Shuai; Yu, Yuanbin; Chen, Erman; Xue, Deting; Chen, Jianzhong; He, Rongxin

    2016-10-25

    To investigate whether the systematic administration of icariin (ICA) promotes tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff reconstruction in vivo, a total of 64 male Sprague Dawley rats were used in a rotator cuff injury model and underwent rotator cuff reconstruction (bone tunnel suture fixation). Rats from the ICA group ( n = 32) were gavage-fed daily with ICA at 0.125 mg/g, while rats in the control group ( n = 32) received saline only. Micro-computed tomography, biomechanical tests, serum ELISA (calcium; Ca, alkaline phosphatase; AP, osteocalcin; OCN) and histological examinations (Safranin O and Fast Green staining, type I, II and III collagen (Col1, Col2, and Col3), CD31, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)) were analyzed two and four weeks after surgery. In the ICA group, the serum levels of AP and OCN were higher than in the control group. More Col1-, Col2-, CD31-, and VEGF-positive cells, together with a greater degree of osteogenesis, were detected in the ICA group compared with the control group. During mechanical testing, the ICA group showed a significantly higher ultimate failure load than the control group at both two and four weeks. Our results indicate that the systematic administration of ICA could promote angiogenesis and tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff reconstruction, with superior mechanical strength compared with the controls. Treatment for rotator cuff injury using systematically-administered ICA could be a promising strategy.

  15. Achilles Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... almost impossible. Achilles tendonitis is a very common running injury. But it can also affect basketball players, dancers, ... Proximal Biceps Tendonitis Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: Running Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise Safety Dealing With Sports Injuries ...

  16. Four cases of variations in the forearm extensor musculature in a study of hundred limbs and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Mohandas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available All surgeons must bear in mind the existence of muscular variations when performing common tendon transfers. Presence of additional bellies and tendons of existing muscles or presence of additional muscles in unusual locations might misguide a surgeon, during surgery and also during diagnosis. In the present paper we are reporting four cases of variations encountered during the study of extensor muscles of the forearm in 100 limbs. In Case 1, additional bellies of extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis and multiple tendons of insertion of abductor pollicis longus were observed in a single limb. In Case 2, an additional belly of the abductor pollicis longus was observed. In Case 3, a short muscle on the dorsum of the hand going to the index finger [extensor indicis brevis (EIB] was found in addition to the normal extensor indicis (EI. It was also observed that some of the most superficial fleshy fibers of EIB were getting inserted into the tendon of EI. In Case 4, a rare incidence of extensor digiti medii proprius was observed. Further, the related literature is reviewed and the clinical and surgical importance of these muscular variations in diagnosis and proper planning of treatment is discussed.

  17. Anomalous bilateral contribution of extensor pollicis longus and muscle fusion of the first compartment of the wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo César Rosa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the anatomical variations of the muscles of the first dorsal compartments of the wrist is clinically relevant to De Quervain's tenosynovitis and to reconstructive surgeries. In the literature, there are many reports of the presence of multiple insertion tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist, but few reports describe occurrences of fusion and muscle contributions. This case report describes an anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus. This anomalous contribution was found through a slender auxiliary tendon that crossed laterally under the extensor retinaculum, entered the first dorsal compartment of the wrist and merged with the tendon of the extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In the same cadaver in which this contribution was present, there was atypical muscle fusion of the abductor pollicis longus muscle and extensor pollicis brevis muscle. In conclusion, anomalous bilateral contribution of the extensor pollicis longus muscle and atypical muscle fusion, concomitant with a variant insertion pattern, are the highlight of this case report. Furthermore, it is concluded that additional tendons may be effectively used in reconstructive surgeries, but that there is a need for knowledge of the possible numerical and positional variations of these tendons, with a view to making more effective surgical plans.

  18. Slap Lesions in Middle-aged Patients: Biceps Repair or Tenodesis? What Should We Perform for Long Biceps Tendon?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Sastre

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Biceps tenodesis is a feasible therapeutic alternative to anatomical repair for the treatment of SLAP lesions in middle-aged patients; the reinsertion failure rates for this type of lesion are rather discouraging due to the high percentage of revision surgeries that must be carried out after the primary intervention.

  19. Surgical and anatomical studies on De Quervain's tenosynovitis syndrome: Variations in the first extensor compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Randal Pires J and uacute;nior

    2016-08-01

    Clinical relevance: As septation of the first extensor compartment and multiple APL tendons appears to represent risk factors for the development of DQT, prior knowledge of the frequency of such anomalies may assist surgeons in pre-operative evaluation and perioperative procedures. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 50-55

  20. Customizing Extensor Reconstruction in Vascularized Toe Joint Transfers to Finger Proximal Interphalangeal Joints: A Strategic Approach for Correcting Extensor Lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Charles Yuen Yung; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Hung; Chen, Shih-Heng; Lien, Shwu-Huei; Lin, Chih-Hung; Wei, Fu-Chan; Lin, Yu-Te

    2017-04-01

    Vascularized toe proximal interphalangeal joint transfer allows the restoration of damaged joints. However, extensor lag and poor arc of motion have been reported. The authors present their outcomes of treatment according to a novel reconstructive algorithm that addresses extensor lag and allows for consistent results postoperatively. Vascularized toe joint transfers were performed in a consecutive series of 26 digits in 25 patients. The average age was 30.5 years, with 14 right and 12 left hands. Reconstructed digits included eight index, 10 middle, and eight ring fingers. Simultaneous extensor reconstructions were performed and eight were centralization of lateral bands, five were direct extensor digitorum longus-to-extensor digitorum communis repairs, and 13 were central slip reconstructions. The average length of follow-up was 16.7 months. The average extension lag was 17.9 degrees. The arc of motion was 57.7 degrees (81.7 percent functional use of pretransfer toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion). There was no significant difference in the reconstructed proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion for the handedness (p = 0.23), recipient digits (p = 0.37), or surgical experience in vascularized toe joint transfer (p = 0.25). The outcomes of different techniques of extensor mechanism reconstruction were similar in terms of extensor lag, arc of motion, and reconstructed finger arc of motion compared with the pretransfer toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion. With this treatment algorithm, consistent outcomes can be produced with minimal extensor lag and maximum use of potential toe proximal interphalangeal joint arc of motion. Therapeutic, IV.

  1. Variations of anatomy on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist and association with DeQuervain tenosynovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Kheterpal, Arvin B.; Terneria Vicentini, Joao Rafael; Huang, Ambrose J. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    To study anatomical variations on MRI of the first extensor compartment of the wrist in DeQuervain tenosynovitis (DQT). A retrospective search for DQT patients yielded 47 subjects (51 ± 15 years, 36 female, 11 male). The age-matched control group (normal first extensor compartment) was 49 ± 15 years (29 female, 18 male). Two independent readers reviewed: the number of abductor pollicis longus (APL) tendon slips, tendon sheath septations (compartmentalization), and APL and EPB cross-sectional area (CSA) at the radial styloid. A tendon slip was defined as a discrete structure for ≥5 contiguous slices with its own insertion. The distribution of APL tendon slips was different for the DQT and control groups (Reader 1/Reader 2: P = 0.0001 and 0.001). The most common arrangement for both groups was two APL tendon slips. One tendon slip was less common (P = 0.03 and 0.1) and compartmentalization was more common (P = 0.003; < 0.0001) for the DQT group than the control group. There was no difference in tendon slip insertions on one or multiple bones (P = 0.1; 0.7). APL and EPB compartment CSAs were also higher for the DQT group (combined first extensor compartment area: 21.3 ± 7.6 mm{sup 2}; 21.0 ± 7.1) than the control group (17.2 ± 3.8; 17.1 ± 3.9) (P = 0.002; 0.002). We found a statistically significantly increased proportion of supernumerary tendon slips and compartmentalization of the first extensor compartment in patients with DQT and greater CSA of the first extensor compartment at the radial styloid, consistent with previous anatomical, surgical, and ultrasound studies. (orig.)

  2. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  3. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Lino Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  4. Knee extension and flexion muscle power after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon graft or hamstring tendons graft: a cross-sectional comparison 3 years post surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageberg, Eva; Roos, Harald; Silbernagel, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Hamstring muscles play a major role in knee-joint stabilization after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Weakness of the knee extensors after ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon (PT) graft, and in the knee flexors after reconstruction with hamstring tendons (HT) graft has been observed ...

  5. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries.

  6. Reparo artroscópico das lesões completas isoladas do subescapular Arthroscopic repair of complete, isolated lesions of the subscapularis tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niso Eduardo Balsini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o resultado retrospectivo de 12 pacientes submetidos ao reparo artroscópico de lesões completas isoladas do tendão do subescapular com seguimento mínimo de um ano. MÉTODOS: De 11 de abril de 2002 a 24 de setembro de 2004, realizou-se o reparo artroscópico de lesões completas do manguito rotador em 95 pacientes no Instituto Balsini. Pacientes com subescapular lesado somavam 31; 12 lesões isoladas compunham o grupo de estudo. Foram reavaliados com seguimento mínimo de um ano da cirurgia, considerando grau de elevação anterior ativa, escala da UCLA e satisfação do paciente. RESULTADOS: A elevação anterior ativa pré-operatória atingiu a média de 102º, o grau de elevação anterior ativa pós-operatória obteve a média de 175º. O ganho médio na elevação anterior ativa foi de 73º (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the retrospective result of 12 patients submitted to arthroscopic repair of complete, isolated lesions of the subscapularis tendon with minimum follow-up of one year. METHODS: From April 11, 2002 to September 24, 2004, the authors performed the arthroscopic repair of complete rotator cuff lesions in 95 patients at the Balsini Institute. Patients with lesioned subscapularis amounted to 31, and 12 isolated lesions were included in the study group. They were re-analyzed with a minimum follow-up of one year after surgery to evaluate the degree of active anterior elevation, according to the UCLA scale and to patient satisfaction. RESULTS: Pre-operative active anterior elevation had a mean of 102º, and the degree of active anterior elevation after surgery presented a mean of 175º. The mean gain in active anterior elevation was 73º (p < 0.0001. Preoperative UCLA had a mean of 15.25 score points, and after surgery, a mean of 31.66 score points. The mean UCLA index was 16 score points (p < 0.0001; 10 excellent results, one good, and one poor. Satisfactory results: 10, unsatisfactory: 1. CONCLUSION: 1 The

  7. Effect of Preoperative Fatty Degeneration of the Rotator Cuff Muscles on the Clinical Outcome of Patients With Intact Tendons After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair of Large/Massive Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzono, Hiroki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Honda, Hirokazu; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Okawa, Takahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-11-01

    Fatty degeneration of the rotator cuff muscles is associated not only with postoperative retear but also with postoperative muscle weakness; therefore, fatty changes in the muscles may affect the clinical outcome even in patients with these tears who have intact tendons after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). To evaluate the effect of fatty infiltration on the clinical outcome in patients with intact tendons after arthroscopic repair of large/massive cuff tears. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. One hundred fifty-five consecutive patients with large/massive rotator cuff tears underwent ARCR. Of these, 55 patients (mean ± SD age, 64.4 ± 9.1 years) in whom intact tendons after surgery were confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging at final follow-up (mean ± SD, 2.5 ± 1.4 years) were included in this study. Depending on their University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) score at the final follow-up, they were assigned to either the unsatisfactory group (score ≤27; n = 12) or the satisfactory group (score >27; n = 43). Various clinical parameters affecting the clinical outcome were examined through univariate and multivariate analyses. The UCLA score of all patients significantly improved from 18.1 ± 4.4 points preoperatively to 29.8 ± 4.5 points postoperatively ( P muscles, with area under the curve values of 0.79 (sensitivity 91% and specificity 51%) and 0.84 (sensitivity 100% and specificity 54%) in the infraspinatus and subscapularis, respectively. Preoperative fatty degeneration of the infraspinatus and/or subscapularis with Goutallier stage 2 or higher was significantly associated with worse outcome in patients with large/massive tears who had intact tendons after ARCR.

  8. Imaging the infrapatellar tendon in the elite athlete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peace, K.A.L.; Lee, J.C.; Healy, J.

    2006-01-01

    Extensor mechanism injuries constitute a major cause of anterior knee pain in the elite athlete. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the imaging methods of choice when assessing the infrapatellar tendon. A comprehensive imaging review of infrapatellar tendon normal anatomy, tendinopathy, and partial/full-thickness tendon tears is provided. The value of imaging the infrapatellar tendon in clinical practice, including whether sonography can predict symptoms in asymptomatic athletes, is discussed. Acute avulsion fractures, including periosteal sleeve avulsion, and chronic avulsion injuries, including Sinding-Larsen-Johansson and Osgood-Schlatter syndromes, are shown. Mimics of infrapatellar tendon pathology, including infrapatellar plica injury, patellar tendon-lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome, and Hoffa's syndrome, are illustrated

  9. Step Cut Lengthening: A Technique for Treatment of Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chew-Wei; Chen, Shih-Heng

    2018-04-01

    Reconstruction of a tendon defect is a challenging task in hand surgery. Delayed repair of a ruptured flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon is often associated with tendon defect. Primary repair of the tendon is often not possible, particularly after debridement of the unhealthy segment of the tendon. As such, various surgical treatments have been described in the literature, including single-stage tendon grafting, 2-stage tendon grafting, flexor digitorum superficialis tendon transfer from ring finger, and interphalangeal joint arthrodesis. We describe step cut lengthening of FPL tendon for the reconstruction of FPL rupture. This is a single-stage reconstruction without the need for tendon grafting or tendon transfer. To our knowledge, no such technique has been previously described.

  10. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khurana, Shruti; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Amirlak, Bardia

    2017-01-01

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  11. MRI in flexor tendon rupture after collagenase injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurana, Shruti [Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi (India); Wadhwa, Vibhor [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Amirlak, Bardia [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Flexor tendon rupture is an unusual complication following collagenase injection to relieve contractures. These patients require a close follow-up and in the event of tendon rupture, a decision has to be made whether to repair the tendon or manage the complication conservatively. The authors report the utility of MRI in the prognostication and management of a patient with Dupuytren's contracture, who underwent collagenase injection and subsequently developed flexor digitorum profundus tendon rupture. (orig.)

  12. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze; Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2015-01-01

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  13. The extensor carpi ulnaris pseudolesion: evaluation with microCT, histology, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Sayed; Cunningham, Ryan; Mohamed, Feroze [Temple University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Amin, Mamta; Popoff, Steven N.; Barbe, Mary F. [Temple University School of Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To determine if magic angle plays a role in apparent central increased signal intensity of the distal extensor carpi ulnaris tendon (ECU) on MRI, to see if histologic findings of tendon degeneration are associated with increased T1 or T2 tendon signal on MR imaging, and to determine the prevalence of the ECU ''pseudolesion''. A standard 3 Tesla protocol was utilized to scan ten cadaveric wrists. A 40 mm length of 10 ECU and four extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendons were immersion fixed before microCT scanning. Staining with Alcian blue, Masson's trichrome and Safranin O was performed before light microscopy. Fifty clinical wrist MRIs were also reviewed for the presence of increased T1 and/or T2 signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal was observed in 9 of 10 cadaveric ECU tendons, but not in ECRB tendons. MicroCT and histology showed inter-tendinous matrix between the two distal heads of the ECU. Increased mucoid degeneration correlated with increased MRI signal intensity. The tendon fibers were at a maximum of 8.39 to the longitudinal axis on microCT. Clinical MRIs showed increased T1 signal in 6 %, increased T2 signal in 8 %, increased T1 and T2 signal in 80 %, and 6 % showing no increased signal. Central increased T1 and/or T2 signal in the ECU tendon indicates the presence of normal inter-tendinous ground substance, with increased proteoglycan content (mucoid degeneration) responsible for increased signal intensity. None of the fibers were shown on microCT to approach the magic angle. (orig.)

  14. 2D motion analysis of rabbits after Achilles tendon rupture repair and histological analysis of extracted tendons: can the number of animals be reduced by operating both hind legs simultaneously?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Nicholls, Flora; Achermann, Rita; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Baumgartner, Walter; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2013-10-01

    Considering the 3Rs principle in animal experiments, there is a demand to perform research experiments with the fewest number of animals possible while warranting the welfare of the animals. Orthopaedic experimental studies involving operations on the hind legs of rabbits are either performed on one hind leg with the second hind leg serving as control or on both hind legs simultaneously (control: rabbits with no operations at all). The Achilles tendon of rabbits was transected and sutured, and the two-dimensional motion pattern of animals having only one leg operated was compared to rabbits having both hind legs operated (control: non-treated animals). Step length, maximum ankle angle, minimum ankle angle and the resulting range of motion of both hind legs were determined weekly over a time span from 3 weeks to 12 weeks post-operation. The results were fitted by a linear mixed effects model including time dependency. Moreover, all tendon specimen were analysed histologically. Tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, inflammation level and collagen fibre alignment were determined. Statistically significant differences in the motion pattern were found when one-leg treated and two-leg treated animals were compared. However, the absolute differences were on average less than 20%. Histologically, 1-leg treated animals had tendon tissue with higher cell density, but lower inflammation and less ondulated collagen fibres compared to 2-leg treated animals; the nuclei width was the same for both groups. With regard to welfare, all animals were fine during the experiments. While comparative studies should be performed with one-leg treated animals due to interaction effects, for proof-of-principle studies, operating two legs per animal may be justified as the welfare of the animals is warranted. This is a great benefit in the sense of the 3Rs because up to 50% of animals can be spared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tendon Interposition and Ligament Reconstruction with ECRL Tendon in the Late Stages of Kienböck’s Disease: A Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Karalezli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal surgical treatment for Kienböck’s disease with stages IIIB and IV remains controversial. A cadaver study was carried out to evaluate the use of coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon for tendon interposition and a strip obtained from the same tendon for ligament reconstruction in the late stages of Kienböck’s disease. Methods. Coiled extensor carpi radialis longus tendon was used to fill the cavity of the excised lunate, and a strip obtained from this tendon was sutured onto itself after passing through the scaphoid and the triquetrum acting as a ligament to preserve proximal row integrity. Biomechanical tests were carried out in order to evaluate this new ligamentous reconstruction. Results. It was biomechanically confirmed that the procedure was effective against axial compression and distributed the upcoming mechanical stress to the distal row. Conclusion. Extensor carpi radialis longus tendon has not been used for tendon interposition and ligament reconstruction in the treatment of this disease before. In view of the biomechanical data, the procedure seems to be effective for the stabilization of scaphoid and carpal bones.

  16. The effects of implant composition on extensor tenosynovitis in a canine distal radius fracture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicropi, Stefano M; Su, Brian W; Raia, Frank J; Parisien, May; Strauch, Robert J; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2005-03-01

    Dorsal plating of distal radius fractures with titanium plates has resulted in clinically observed tenosynovitis and tendon rupture. The goal of this study was to investigate whether titanium-based implants result in more extensor tendon inflammation than matched stainless-steel implants in a canine fracture model. An osteotomy was created in the distal radius of 18 beagles and fixed with 2.7-mm 4-hole plates composed of commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-Al6-V4), or 316L stainless steel. Animals were killed at an average of 4 months. Tendon gliding was assessed by applying a force at the extensor musculotendinous junction and noting gliding. Histologic grading (mild, moderate, severe) was based on cellular hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and leukocytic infiltration. Tendons glided freely in 100% stainless-steel specimens, 75% of titanium alloy, and 43% of commercially pure titanium groups. A severe inflammatory reaction was identified in 60% of the titanium alloy (Ti-A16-V4) group, 57% of the pure titanium group, and 0% of the stainless-steel group. Dorsal plating of the canine radius with commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy implants produced a greater inflammatory peritendinous response than matched stainless-steel implants.

  17. In vitro biomechanical comparison of three different types of single- and double-row arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs: analysis of continuous bone-tendon contact pressure and surface during different simulated joint positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimberg, Jean; Diop, Amadou; Kalra, Kunal; Charousset, Christophe; Duranthon, Louis-Denis; Maurel, Nathalie

    2010-03-01

    We assessed bone-tendon contact surface and pressure with a continuous and reversible measurement system comparing 3 different double- and single-row techniques of cuff repair with simulation of different joint positions. We reproduced a medium supraspinatus tear in 24 human cadaveric shoulders. For the 12 right shoulders, single-row suture (SRS) and then double-row bridge suture (DRBS) were used. For the 12 left shoulders, DRBS and then double-row cross suture (DRCS) were used. Measurements were performed before, during, and after knot tying and then with different joint positions. There was a significant increase in contact surface with the DRBS technique compared with the SRS technique and with the DRCS technique compared with the SRS or DRBS technique. There was a significant increase in contact pressure with the DRBS technique and DRCS technique compared with the SRS technique but no difference between the DRBS technique and DRCS technique. The DRCS technique seems to be superior to the DRBS and SRS techniques in terms of bone-tendon contact surface and pressure. Copyright 2010 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the clinical-functional results from repairing extensive rotator cuff injury with inclusion of the tendon of the long head of the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the outcomes of the arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon. METHODS: From October 2003 to December 2007, 20 patients with massive rotator cuff tear which include the rotator interval were treated with arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to biceps tendon. Sixteen patients were female and four were male. The mean age was 58.95 years old. The dominant side was affected in 16 cases (80%. The outcomes were analysed according to the UCLA Score with a minimum follow-up period of two years. RESULTS: The UCLA score improved, on average, 14 points (p < 0.001. Six patients had excellent results; nine good; three fair and two poor results. The mean improvement of forward flexion was 33º (p < 0.001, 3º of external rotation (p < 0.396 and two vertebral levels for internal rotation (p < 0.025. CONCLUSION: The arthroscopic margin convergence of the posterior cuff to the biceps tendon leads to satisfactory results.

  19. Ultrasonographic findings of healing of torn tendon in the patients with lateral epicondylitis after prolotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beom; Lee, Hea Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Yang, Sung Joon; Seo, Kyung Muk; Kim, Don Gyu

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the sonographic findings of healing in torn common extensor tendon of elbow after prolotherapy and to evaluate the value of US in the course of management of lateral epicondylitis. 12 common extensor tendons in eleven patients were examined by sonography before and after prolotherapy. On initial US examination, 11 tendons showed a partial tear and one tendon showed a full thickness but incomplete width tear. All patients were managed with prolotherapy several times(2 to 6 times). The time interval between the initial US and follow up US examination after treatment was from 4.5 to 6.5 months(mean ; 5.8 months). The findings of healing were evaluated with respect to the change of echogenicity(anechoic focus, hypoechoic focus), presence or absence of fibrillar pattern in the tendon on gray scale US, and focus of hypervascularity on color Doppler image. We used the visual analogue scale(VAS) of pain to assess the response to the treatment. All patients showed symptom improvement as the points drop on VAS in a range between 1.5 and 6.5(mean ; 4.5). In one tendon, a few echogenic lines were seen within the initially anechoic lesion(pattern I). In three tendons, most of the anechoic lesion(tear) was filled with fibrillar echogenicity except for a small focus of anechogenicity(pattern II). In two tendons, initial anechoic lesion in common extensor tendon was changed to same sized hypoechoic lesion with diffuse fibrillar pattern within the initial anechoic lesion (pattern III). In 6 tendons, initial anechoic lesion became smaller with diffuse fibrillar pattern were seen(pattern IV). Color Doppler examination was performed in 11 tendons after therapy and six of 11 tendons showed hypervascularity. Most important finding of healing in torn tendon is reappearance of fibrillar pattern in initial anechoic lesion(tear). The follow up sonography of the common extensor tendon in the course of treatment can be useful to evaluate the effects

  20. Ultrasonographic findings of healing of torn tendon in the patients with lateral epicondylitis after prolotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hyung; Song, In Sup; Lee, Jong Beom; Lee, Hea Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Yang, Sung Joon; Seo, Kyung Muk; Kim, Don Gyu [Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the sonographic findings of healing in torn common extensor tendon of elbow after prolotherapy and to evaluate the value of US in the course of management of lateral epicondylitis. 12 common extensor tendons in eleven patients were examined by sonography before and after prolotherapy. On initial US examination, 11 tendons showed a partial tear and one tendon showed a full thickness but incomplete width tear. All patients were managed with prolotherapy several times(2 to 6 times). The time interval between the initial US and follow up US examination after treatment was from 4.5 to 6.5 months(mean ; 5.8 months). The findings of healing were evaluated with respect to the change of echogenicity(anechoic focus, hypoechoic focus), presence or absence of fibrillar pattern in the tendon on gray scale US, and focus of hypervascularity on color Doppler image. We used the visual analogue scale(VAS) of pain to assess the response to the treatment. All patients showed symptom improvement as the points drop on VAS in a range between 1.5 and 6.5(mean ; 4.5). In one tendon, a few echogenic lines were seen within the initially anechoic lesion(pattern I). In three tendons, most of the anechoic lesion(tear) was filled with fibrillar echogenicity except for a small focus of anechogenicity(pattern II). In two tendons, initial anechoic lesion in common extensor tendon was changed to same sized hypoechoic lesion with diffuse fibrillar pattern within the initial anechoic lesion (pattern III). In 6 tendons, initial anechoic lesion became smaller with diffuse fibrillar pattern were seen(pattern IV). Color Doppler examination was performed in 11 tendons after therapy and six of 11 tendons showed hypervascularity. Most important finding of healing in torn tendon is reappearance of fibrillar pattern in initial anechoic lesion(tear). The follow up sonography of the common extensor tendon in the course of treatment can be useful to evaluate the effects

  1. Linear atrophy and vascular fragility following ultrasoundguided triamcinolone injection for DeQuervain tendonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Willardson, Hal B; Buck, Shannon; Neiner, James

    2017-01-01

    A 64 year-old woman presented with a one-yearhistory of purpuric, atrophic, linear patches alongthe left lateral forearm. The patient had receivedtwo ultrasound-guided triamcinolone injectionsone year earlier into her left extensor pollicis brevisand abductor pollicis longus tendon sheathsfor DeQuervain tendonitis. In the seven monthsfollowing the second injection, the patient developedatrophy, purpura, and telangiectasias starting at thesite of injection and extending proximally, followingth...

  2. Iliopsoas Tendon Reformation after Psoas Tendon Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal snapping hip syndrome, or psoas tendonitis, is a recognised cause of nonarthritic hip pain. The majority of patients are treated conservatively; however, occasionally patients require surgical intervention. The two surgical options for iliopsoas tendinopathy are step lengthening of the iliopsoas tendon or releasing the tendon at the lesser trochanter. Although unusual, refractory snapping usually occurs soon after tenotomy. We report a case of a 47-year-old active female with internal snapping and pain following an open psoas tenotomy. Postoperatively she was symptom free for 13 years. An MRI arthrogram revealed reformation of a pseudo iliopsoas tendon reinserting into the lesser trochanter. The pain and snapping resolved after repeat iliopsoas tendon release. Reformation of tendons is an uncommon sequela of tenotomies. However the lack of long-term studies makes it difficult to calculate prevalence rates. Tendon reformation should be included in the differential diagnosis of failed tenotomy procedures after a period of symptom relief.

  3. In vivo Evaluation of Patellar Tendon Stiffness in Individuals with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to utilise an ultrasonic technique to assess the effect of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS on the mechanical properties of the patellar tendon. Seven subjects with PFPS and seven matched control subjects volunteered to participate in this study. Subjects were asked to perform isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors while their knee extension torque was monitored and the displacement of the patellar tendon was recorded with an ultrasonic system. Our results showed significantly lower tendon stiffness (by ∼30% in the PFPS subjects. Although tendon secant modulus was lower by 34% in the PFPS subjects, the difference was not statistically significant. Therefore, we conclude that the ultrasonic technique was able to detect a decrease in the structural stiffness of the patellar tendon associated with PFPS. The decrease in tendon stiffness was moderately correlated with the length of symptoms in these individuals.

  4. Spring or string: does tendon elastic action influence wing muscle mechanics in bat flight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konow, Nicolai; Cheney, Jorn A; Roberts, Thomas J; Waldman, J Rhea S; Swartz, Sharon M

    2015-10-07

    Tendon springs influence locomotor movements in many terrestrial animals, but their roles in locomotion through fluids as well as in small-bodied mammals are less clear. We measured muscle, tendon and joint mechanics in an elbow extensor of a small fruit bat during ascending flight. At the end of downstroke, the tendon was stretched by elbow flexion as the wing was folded. At the end of upstroke, elastic energy was recovered via tendon recoil and extended the elbow, contributing to unfurling the wing for downstroke. Compared with a hypothetical 'string-like' system lacking series elastic compliance, the tendon spring conferred a 22.5% decrease in muscle fascicle strain magnitude. Our findings demonstrate tendon elastic action in a small flying mammal and expand our understanding of the occurrence and action of series elastic actuator mechanisms in fluid-based locomotion. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods: Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η 2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  6. Gouty involvement of the patella and extensor mechanism of the knee mimicking aggressive neoplasm. A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Christopher; Wallace, Matthew T; Jelinek, James; Aboulafia, Albert

    2018-06-01

    Gout is a common inflammatory crystal deposition disease that occurs in many joints throughout the body. Active gout is most often associated with painful synovitis causing searing joint pains, but gout can also produce large masses of space-occupying deposits called tophi. Tophi are most frequently seen in juxta-articular locations with or without bony erosion and are often misdiagnosed as degenerative joint disease. Soft tissue deposits and tendon involvement are also known manifestations of gout, but can present with indeterminate and alarming findings on imaging. We present three cases of tophaceous gout mimicking aggressive neoplasms in the extensor mechanism of the knee. All cases presented as extensor tendon masses eroding into the patella, with imaging findings initially concerning for primary musculoskeletal malignancy.

  7. Endoscopic Treatment of Intrasheath Peroneal Tendon Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Michels

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrasheath subluxation of the peroneal tendons within the peroneal groove is an uncommon problem. Open exploration combined with a peroneal groove-deepening procedure and retinacular reefing is the recommended treatment. This extensive lateral approach needs incision of the intact superior peroneal retinaculum and repair afterwards. We treated three patients with a painful intrasheath subluxation using an endoscopic approach. During this tendoscopy both tendons were inspected. The distal muscle fibers of the peroneus brevis tendon were resected in two patients. A partial tear was debrided in the third patient. All patients had a good result. No wound-healing problems or other complications occurred. Early return to work and sports was possible. An endoscopic approach was successful in treatment of an intrasheath subluxation of the peroneal tendons.

  8. Tendon shift in hallux valgus: observations at MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eustace, S. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Williamson, D. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wilson, M. [Department of Orthopedics, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); O`Byrne, J. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Bussolari, L. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Stephens, M. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Stack, J. [Department of Radiology, Boston University Medical Center Hospital, 88 East Newton Street, Atrium - 2, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Weissman, B. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a shift in tendon alignment at the first metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux valgus by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Design. Ten normal feet and 20 feet with the hallux valgus deformity conforming to conventional clinical and radiographic criteria were prospectively studied using magnetic resonance imaging. Correlation was made between tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the severity of the hallux valgus deformity. Results. There is a significant shift in tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint of patients with hallux valgus. The insertion of the abductor hallucis tendon is markedly plantarward and the flexor and extensor tendons bowstring at the first metatarsophalangeal joint compared with patients without the deformity. The severity of the tendon shift correlates with the hallux valgus angle and clinical severity of the hallux valgus deformity in each case. Conclusion. Patients with hallux valgus have a significant tendon shift at the first metatarsophalangeal joint which appears to contribute to development of the deformity. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Tendon shift in hallux valgus: observations at MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eustace, S.; Williamson, D.; Wilson, M.; O'Byrne, J.; Bussolari, L.; Thomas, M.; Stephens, M.; Stack, J.; Weissman, B.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to demonstrate a shift in tendon alignment at the first metatarsophalangeal joint in patients with hallux valgus by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Design. Ten normal feet and 20 feet with the hallux valgus deformity conforming to conventional clinical and radiographic criteria were prospectively studied using magnetic resonance imaging. Correlation was made between tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint and the severity of the hallux valgus deformity. Results. There is a significant shift in tendon position at the first metatarsophalangeal joint of patients with hallux valgus. The insertion of the abductor hallucis tendon is markedly plantarward and the flexor and extensor tendons bowstring at the first metatarsophalangeal joint compared with patients without the deformity. The severity of the tendon shift correlates with the hallux valgus angle and clinical severity of the hallux valgus deformity in each case. Conclusion. Patients with hallux valgus have a significant tendon shift at the first metatarsophalangeal joint which appears to contribute to development of the deformity. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  11. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  12. Analysis of Achilles tendon vascularity with second generation Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS)

    OpenAIRE

    Genovese , Eugenio; Ronga , Mario; Recaldini , Chiara; Fontana , Federico; Callegari , Leonardo; Fugazzola , Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To compare morphological and power Doppler features of the Achilles tendon and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) behaviour between asymptomatic athletes and athletes who had undergone surgery for repair of an Achilles tendon rupture. Materials and Methods: 24 athletes were divided in two groups (A and B). Group A included 14 patients with a median age of 32 years (range 27 to 47 years) who had undergone surgical repair for unilateral Achilles tendon ...

  13. Biomechanical and histologic comparison of Achilles tendon ruptures reinforced with intratendinous and peritendinous plantaris tendon grafts in rabbits: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhami, Kuru; Gokhan, Maralcan; Ulukan, Inan; Eray, Bozan M; Levent, Altinel; Ciğdem, Tokyol

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesized that the closer the reinforcing graft was to the repair zone, the more strength the healed tendon would achieved. Therefore, we compared the ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons reinforced with intratendinous and peritendinous plantaris grafts. The experimental study was performed on Achilles tendons of 20 rabbits. First, they were divided into two groups: group I (n=10) underwent intratendinous graft and end-to-end tenorraphy, and group P (n=10) were repaired end-to-end and then reinforced with a peritendinous plantaris graft. An above-knee cast was applied during 6 weeks postoperatively. The two groups were compared to each other biomechanically and histologically. Seven randomly selected rabbits from each group were used for biomechanical evaluation. The remaining six rabbits (three from each group) were used for histologic comparison. Non-operated sides (n=20) served as the control group. The mean maximum load at rupture of the repaired and control groups was 159.9+/-31 N, 83+/-7.5 N, and 207.5+/-35 N for group I, group P, and the control group, respectively. Values between groups were significantly different considering maximum load and absorbed energy to rupture. There was no significant difference between groups I and P in respect to strain. Control group tendons (groups I-C and P-C) had significantly more lengthening capability than operated tendons. Macroscopically, group I tendons were thicker and stiffer than group P tendons. Histologically, differences between the group I and group P specimens revealed that the healing process was faster in tendons augmented intratendinously. In reinforcing Achilles tendon repair, the site of the tendon graft affected the result. When the graft was used intratendinously, the healed tendon was more similar biomechanically to normal tendon and had more graft-tendon orientation histologically than the tendon augmented peritendinously.

  14. Suture holding capacity of the Achilles tendon during the healing period: an in vivo experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yakup; Kara, Hasan; Cabukoglu, Cengiz; Esemenli, Tanil

    2006-02-01

    Early motion and weightbearing is known to promote the healing of Achilles tendon repair. It is important to be informed about the repair strength for a secure rehabilitation. There are reports about the initial repair strength of Achilles tendons; however, they are mainly in vitro studies that represent the time zero strength of the repair. Softening of the tendon observed during the biological process of the tendon healing, which may effect the suture holding capacity and in turn the repair strength of the tendon has not been evaluated before. In the current study, the suture holding capacity of rabbit Achilles tendon was observed at various times during the healing period. The suture holding capacity of the tendon at the end of the first and third weeks after surgery was found to be similar within 30% of the control tendon. However, at the end of the fourth week it was doubled reaching 65% of the control tendon. Intrinsic tendon insufficiency which causes a decrease in the suture holding capacity of the tendon may lead to pull-out of the suture material during the postoperative third week. This period is precarious for early motion and weightbearing since the suture holding capacity of the tendon doubled relative to the previous three weeks.

  15. Deep and shallow forms of the sulcus for extensor carpi ulnaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, T; Hojo, T; Furukawa, H

    1993-01-01

    Anatomical variations in the sulcus for the tendon of extensor carpi ulnaris were studied in 240 upper limbs. The sulcus lies between the head and the styloid process on the dorsal surface of the distal end of the ulna. This groove has deep and shallow forms and, rarely, a flat form. The sulcus was classified into 4 grades according to its depth. Grade I, a deep sulcus, was found in 51.3%. Grades II and III are shallow, but the styloid process in grade II is more prominent than in grade III. ...

  16. Utility of sonographic measurement of the common tensor tendon in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hee; Cha, Jang Gyu; Jin, Wook; Kim, Byung Sung; Park, Jai Soung; Lee, Hae Kyung; Hong, Hyun Sook

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate prospectively the utility of sonographic measurements of the common extensor tendon for diagnosing lateral epicondylitis. Forty-eight patients with documented lateral epicondylitis and 63 healthy volunteers were enrolled and underwent ultrasound of the elbow joint. The common extensor tendon overlying the bony landmark was scanned transversely, and the cross-section area and the maximum thickness were measured. Clinical examination was used as the reference standard in the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis. Data from the patient and control groups were compared with established optimal diagnostic criteria for lateral epicondylitis using receiver operating characteristic curves. Qualitative evaluation with grayscale ultrasound was also performed on patients and healthy volunteers. The common extensor tendon was significantly thicker in patients with lateral epicondylitis than in control subjects (p lateral epicondylitis. For qualitative evaluation with gray-scale ultrasound, overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values in the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis were 76.5%, 76.2%, and 76.3%, respectively. The quantitative sonographic measurements had an excellent diagnostic performance for lateral epicondylitis, as well as good or excellent interreader agreement. A common extensor tendon cross-section area greater than or equal to 32 mm(2) and a thickness of 4.2 mm correlated well with the presence of lateral epicondylitis. However, further prospective study is necessary to determine whether quantitative ultrasound with these cutoff values can improve the accuracy of the diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis.

  17. Floating fat in the wrist joint and in the tendon sheaths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Zink, Jean-Vincent; Champsaur, Pierre [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Radiology Department, Marseille (France); Parratte, Sebastien; Argenson, Jean-Noel [Hopital Sainte-Marguerite, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Marseille (France)

    2010-09-15

    A traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath is an unreported entity. We report on the clinical and imaging features, including radiography and computed tomography (CT), of a fat-density effusion in the wrist joint and tendon sheaths of the extensor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis longus, and extensor carpi radialis brevis in a 28-year-old patient after a roller-skating accident. Radiographs showed a fracture of the distal radius and a wrist joint effusion. Preoperative CT examination exhibited two distinct layers resulting in a fat-fluid level pathognomonic of lipohemarthrosis in the radiocarpal joint. In addition, a fat-density effusion was noted in the sheaths of the second and third compartment extensor tendons. The lipohemarthrosis depicted on imaging classically results from the extrusion of fat from bone marrow into the joint space after an intraarticular fracture. Similarly, a traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath presents characteristic imaging features that may help to diagnose a potentially overlooked fracture. (orig.)

  18. Floating fat in the wrist joint and in the tendon sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Corroller, Thomas; Zink, Jean-Vincent; Champsaur, Pierre; Parratte, Sebastien; Argenson, Jean-Noel

    2010-01-01

    A traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath is an unreported entity. We report on the clinical and imaging features, including radiography and computed tomography (CT), of a fat-density effusion in the wrist joint and tendon sheaths of the extensor pollicis longus, extensor carpi radialis longus, and extensor carpi radialis brevis in a 28-year-old patient after a roller-skating accident. Radiographs showed a fracture of the distal radius and a wrist joint effusion. Preoperative CT examination exhibited two distinct layers resulting in a fat-fluid level pathognomonic of lipohemarthrosis in the radiocarpal joint. In addition, a fat-density effusion was noted in the sheaths of the second and third compartment extensor tendons. The lipohemarthrosis depicted on imaging classically results from the extrusion of fat from bone marrow into the joint space after an intraarticular fracture. Similarly, a traumatic fat effusion in a tendon sheath presents characteristic imaging features that may help to diagnose a potentially overlooked fracture. (orig.)

  19. Trauma versus no trauma: an analysis of the effect of tear mechanism on tendon healing in 1300 consecutive patients after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Martin; Lam, Patrick H; Le, Brian T N; Murrell, George A C

    2016-01-01

    Patients with rotator cuff tears often recall a specific initiating event (traumatic), whereas many cannot (nontraumatic). It is unclear how important a history of trauma is to the outcomes of rotator cuff repair. This question was addressed in a study cohort of 1300 consecutive patients who completed a preoperative questionnaire regarding their shoulder injury and had a systematic evaluation of shoulder range of motion and strength, a primary arthroscopic rotator cuff repair performed by a single surgeon, an ultrasound scan, and the same subjective and objective measurements made of their shoulder 6 months after surgery. Post hoc, this cohort was separated into 2 groups: those who reported no history of trauma on presentation (n = 489) and those with a history of traumatic injury (n = 811). The retear rate in the group with no history of trauma was 12%, whereas that of the group with a history of trauma was 14% (P = .36). Those patients with a history of shoulder trauma who waited longer than 24 months had higher retear rates (20%) than those who had their surgery earlier (13%) (P = .040). Recollection of a traumatic initiating event had little effect on the outcome of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Duration of symptoms was important in predicting retears if patients recalled a specific initiating event but not in patients who did not recall any specific initiating event. Patients with a history of trauma should be encouraged to have their rotator cuff tear repaired within 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quadriceps tendon autograft for arthroscopic knee ligament reconstruction: use it now, use it often.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheean, Andrew J; Musahl, Volker; Slone, Harris S; Xerogeanes, John W; Milinkovic, Danko; Fink, Christian; Hoser, Christian

    2018-04-28

    Traditional bone-patellar tendon-bone and hamstring tendon ACL grafts are not without limitations. A growing body of anatomic, biomechanical and clinical data has demonstrated the utility of quadriceps tendon autograft in arthroscopic knee ligament reconstruction. The quadriceps tendon autograft provides a robust volume of tissue that can be reliably harvested, mitigating the likelihood of variably sized grafts and obviating the necessity of allograft augmentation. Modern, minimally invasive harvest techniques offer the advantages of low rates of donor site morbidity and residual extensor mechanism strength deficits. New data suggest that quadriceps tendon autograft may possess superior biomechanical characteristics when compared with bone-patella tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft. However, there have been very few direct, prospective comparisons between the clinical outcomes associated with quadriceps tendon autograft and other autograft options (eg, hamstring tendon and bone-patellar tendon-bone). Nevertheless, quadriceps tendon autograft should be one of the primary options in any knee surgeon's armamentarium. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Patellar Sleeve Fracture With Ossification of the Patellar Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrow, Derek S; Van Valin, Scott E

    2017-03-01

    Patellar sleeve fractures make up greater than 50% of all patellar fractures. They are essentially only seen in the pediatric population because of the thick periosteum and the distal patellar pole apophysis in this group. These fractures can lead to complications if not treated appropriately and in a timely fashion. Complications of missed or untreated patellar sleeve fractures include patella alta, anterior knee pain, and quadriceps atrophy. These can all result in severe limitations in activity. The authors describe a case of a 16-year-old boy who sustained a patellar sleeve fracture 3 years prior to presentation. On presentation, he had patella alta, diminished strength, 5° of extensor lag, and radiographs that revealed bone formation along the patellar tendon. Despite this, he was able to maintain a high level of activity. This case report explores how the patient could have maintained a high level of activity despite having a patellar sleeve fracture. Also, because of the delayed presentation, the patella was ossified and the quadriceps was retracted, which led to a novel approach to reconstructing his distal extensor mechanism. This approach included a V-Y advancement of the quadriceps tendon and patellar tendon reconstruction using the patient's hamstring tendon (semitendinosus). This technique, combined with physical therapy postoperatively, resulted in his return to varsity high school soccer. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this technique has not been reported for this rare condition. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e357-e359.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Calcaneal tendon: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montandon, Cristiano; Fonseca, Cristiano Rezio; Montandon Junior, Marcelo Eustaquio; Lobo, Leonardo Valadares; Ribeiro, Flavia Aparecida de Souza; Teixeira, Kim-Ir-Sen Santos

    2003-01-01

    We reviewed the radiological and clinical features of 23 patients with calcaneal tendon diseases, who were submitted to ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging. The objective of this study was to characterize the lesions for a precise diagnosis of calcaneal tendon injuries. A wide range of calcaneal tendon diseases include degenerative lesions, inflammation of the peritendinous tissue such as peritendinitis and bursitis, and rupture. Imaging methods are essential in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of calcaneal tendon diseases. (author)

  3. Tendon Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... DESCRIPTION The tendon is the strong cord at either end of a muscle that is attached to bone. Tendons , combined with ...

  4. Morpho-functional changes in human tendon tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Galliani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insertion tissue biopsies of right arm common extensor tendons from 11 patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis were processed for light and electron microscopy. The subjects were aged between 38 and 54 years (only one was 25. The specimens showed a variety of structural changes such as biochemical and spatial alteration of collagen, hyaline degeneration, loss of tenocytes, fibrocartilage metaplasia, calcifying processes, neovascularization and vessel wall modifications. Tissue alterations were evident in limited zones of the tendon fibrocartilage in which the surgical resection was generally visible. The areas where the degenerative processes were localized, were restricted and in spatial contiguity with morphologically normal ones. The observed cases presented histological and electron microscopic findings that characterize lateral epicondylitis as a degenerative phenomenon involving all tendon components.

  5. Treatment of peroneal nerve injuries with simultaneous tendon transfer and nerve exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Bryant; Khan, Zubair; Switaj, Paul J; Ochenjele, George; Fuchs, Daniel; Dahl, William; Cederna, Paul; Kung, Theodore A; Kadakia, Anish R

    2014-08-06

    Common peroneal nerve palsy leading to foot drop is difficult to manage and has historically been treated with extended bracing with expectant waiting for return of nerve function. Peroneal nerve exploration has traditionally been avoided except in cases of known traumatic or iatrogenic injury, with tendon transfers being performed in a delayed fashion after exhausting conservative treatment. We present a new strategy for management of foot drop with nerve exploration and concomitant tendon transfer. We retrospectively reviewed a series of 12 patients with peroneal nerve palsies that were treated with tendon transfer from 2005 to 2011. Of these patients, seven were treated with simultaneous peroneal nerve exploration and repair at the time of tendon transfer. Patients with both nerve repair and tendon transfer had superior functional results with active dorsiflexion in all patients, compared to dorsiflexion in 40% of patients treated with tendon transfers alone. Additionally, 57% of patients treated with nerve repair and tendon transfer were able to achieve enough function to return to running, compared to 20% in patients with tendon transfer alone. No patient had full return of native motor function resulting in excessive dorsiflexion strength. The results of our limited case series for this rare condition indicate that simultaneous nerve repair and tendon transfer showed no detrimental results and may provide improved function over tendon transfer alone.

  6. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart R Young

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology.

  7. Tendon surveillance requirements - average tendon force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed Rev. 3 to USNRC Reg. Guide 1.35 discusses the need for comparing, for individual tendons, the measured and predicted lift-off forces. Such a comparison is intended to detect any abnormal tendon force loss which might occur. Recognizing that there are uncertainties in the prediction of tendon losses, proposed Guide 1.35.1 has allowed specific tolerances on the fundamental losses. Thus, the lift-off force acceptance criteria for individual tendons appearing in Reg. Guide 1.35, Proposed Rev. 3, is stated relative to a lower bound predicted tendon force, which is obtained using the 'plus' tolerances on the fundamental losses. There is an additional acceptance criterion for the lift-off forces which is not specifically addressed in these two Reg. Guides; however, it is included in a proposed Subsection IWX to ASME Code Section XI. This criterion is based on the overriding requirement that the magnitude of prestress in the containment structure be sufficeint to meet the minimum prestress design requirements. This design requirement can be expressed as an average tendon force for each group of vertical hoop, or dome tendons. For the purpose of comparing the actual tendon forces with the required average tendon force, the lift-off forces measured for a sample of tendons within each group can be averaged to construct the average force for the entire group. However, the individual lift-off forces must be 'corrected' (normalized) prior to obtaining the sample average. This paper derives the correction factor to be used for this purpose. (orig./RW)

  8. [The history of flexor tendon surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamay, A

    1997-01-01

    Flexor tendon injuries were already treated in antiquity by Hippocrates, Galien and Avicenne. Since the Renaissance, other surgeons have attempted to repair flexor tendon injuries, but without success due to problems related to unsuitable materials and ignorance of the basic rules of asepsis and the absence of antiseptics until the second half of the 19th century. The first successful flexor tendon grafts in man were performed by K. Biesalski in 1910, E. Lexer in 1912 and L. Mayer in 1916. These three authors published their series of grafts and described in detail the anatomical, physiological and technical principles to be respected. St. Bunnell, in 1918, developed various pull-out direct suture procedures, but faced with the problems of adhesions, he abandoned this technique and proposed not to repair flexors in the digital tunnels but to graft them. He defined the famous zone which he called No man's land, which subsequently became Claude Verdan's zone II, in 1959. In 1960, C. Verdan published his first series of sutures maintained by 2 pins in zone II with comparable results to those obtained after grafting. In 1967, H. Kleinert, with his mobile suture, became the leader of direct tendon repair in zone II. 2-stage grafts were introduced in 1965 under the impetus of J. Hunter, who revised and popularized the studies conducted by A. Bassett and R.E. Caroll in 1950.

  9. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Young

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use.

  11. Tissue-Engineered Tendon for Enthesis Regeneration in a Rat Rotator Cuff Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Smietana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Healing of rotator cuff (RC injuries with current suture or augmented scaffold techniques fails to regenerate the enthesis and instead forms a weaker fibrovascular scar that is prone to subsequent failure. Regeneration of the enthesis is the key to improving clinical outcomes for RC injuries. We hypothesized that the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon to repair either an acute or a chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tear would regenerate a functional enthesis and return the biomechanics of the tendon back to that found in native tissue. Engineered tendons were fabricated from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells utilizing our well-described fabrication technology. Forty-three rats underwent unilateral detachment of the supraspinatus tendon followed by acute (immediate or chronic (4 weeks retracted repair by using either our engineered tendon or a trans-osseous suture technique. Animals were sacrificed at 8 weeks. Biomechanical and histological analyses of the regenerated enthesis and tendon were performed. Statistical analysis was performed by using a one-way analysis of variance with significance set at p < 0.05. Acute repairs using engineered tendon had improved enthesis structure and lower biomechanical failures compared with suture repairs. Chronic repairs with engineered tendon had a more native-like enthesis with increased fibrocartilage formation, reduced scar formation, and lower biomechanical failure compared with suture repair. Thus, the utilization of our tissue-engineered tendon showed improve enthesis regeneration and improved function in chronic RC repairs compared with suture repair. Clinical Significance: Our engineered tendon construct shows promise as a clinically relevant method for repair of RC injuries.

  12. FIBRILLINS IN TENDON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibres made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1-2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of elastic fibres in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of elastic fibres in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of elastic fibres in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively.

  13. MOLECULAR PATHOBIOLOGICAL AND SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC CHANGES IN HORSE TENDON CELLS TREA TED WITH ENROFLOXACIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khan1 and J. Halper

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluoroquinolone (FQNL antibiotics have been used widely in horses because of their broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and relative safety, however, their use is not without risk. Tendonitis and spontaneous tendon rupture have been reported in people during or following therapy with FQNLs. To evaluate the potential damage of enrofloxacin (ENRO on the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SOFT, an equine cell culture system as an in vitro model of equine tendon injury and repair was developed. The effects of ENRO on tendon cell cultures established from equine SOFT were studied. The data thus collected demonstrated that ENRO inhibited cell proliferation, induced morphological changes and altered proteoglycan synthesis in equine tendon cell cultures. Interestingly, these effects were more pronounced in juvenile tendon cells as compared to adult horses, It. is hypothesized that morphological changes and inhibition of cell proliferation is a result of impaired production of proteoglycans and other glycoproteins in the extracellular matrix of ENRO-treated tendon cells.

  14. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells influence early tendon-healing in a rabbit achilles tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alphonsus K S; Ang, Abel D; Goh, James C H; Hui, James H P; Lim, Aymeric Y T; Lee, Eng Hin; Lim, Beng Hai

    2007-01-01

    A repaired tendon needs to be protected for weeks until it has accrued enough strength to handle physiological loads. Tissue-engineering techniques have shown promise in the treatment of tendon and ligament defects. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can accelerate tendon-healing after primary repair of a tendon injury in a rabbit model. Fifty-seven New Zealand White rabbits were used as the experimental animals, and seven others were used as the source of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The injury model was a sharp complete transection through the midsubstance of the Achilles tendon. The transected tendon was immediately repaired with use of a modified Kessler suture and a running epitendinous suture. Both limbs were used, and each side was randomized to receive either bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a fibrin carrier or fibrin carrier alone (control). Postoperatively, the rabbits were not immobilized. Specimens were harvested at one, three, six, and twelve weeks for analysis, which included evaluation of gross morphology (sixty-two specimens), cell tracing (twelve specimens), histological assessment (forty specimens), immunohistochemistry studies (thirty specimens), morphometric analysis (forty specimens), and mechanical testing (sixty-two specimens). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to the gross morphology of the tendons. The fibrin had degraded by three weeks. Cell tracing showed that labeled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and present in the intratendinous region for at least six weeks, becoming more diffuse at later time-periods. At three weeks, collagen fibers appeared more organized and there were better morphometric nuclear parameters in the treatment group (p tendon repair can improve histological and biomechanical parameters in the early stages of tendon-healing.

  15. Reconstrucción y restauración de la rotura aguda del tendón rotuliano con aumento del tendon semitendinoso preservando su inserción distal. Reporte de un caso.[Reconstruction and repair of acute patellar tendon ruptures with semitendinosus autograft].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Andres Ciccarello

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de ruptura aguda de tendon rotuliano con mala calidad de tejido remanente , en la que se realiza una tecnica de restauración y aumentación con injerto del tendon semitendinoso ipsilateral , preservando su inseríón distal.

  16. Fixation of the Achilles tendon insertion using suture button technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanter, Nathan J; Davis, Edward W; Baker, Champ L

    2012-09-01

    In the operative treatment of Achilles insertional tendinopathy, no guidelines exist concerning which form of fixation of the Achilles tendon insertion is superior. Transcalcaneal drill pin passage does not place any major plantar structures at risk, and the addition of a Krackow stitch and suture button to the fixation technique provides a significant increase in ultimate load to failure in Achilles tendon insertional repairs. Controlled laboratory study. The Achilles tendon insertions in 6 fresh-frozen cadaveric ankles were detached, and transcalcaneal drill pins were passed. Plantar dissection took place to evaluate the drill pin relationship to the plantar fascia, lateral plantar nerve and artery, flexor digitorum longus tendon, and master knot of Henry. The Achilles tendons were then repaired with a double-row suture anchor construct alone or with a suture button and Krackow stitch added to the double-row suture anchor construct. The repairs were then tested to maximum load to failure at 20 mm/min. The mode of failure was recorded, and the mean maximum load to failure was assessed using the Student t test for distributions with equal variance. Transcalcaneal drill pin passage did not place any selected anatomic structures at risk. The mean maximum load to failure for the suture bridge group was 239.2 N; it was 391.4 N for the group with the suture button (P = .014). The lateral plantar artery was the structure placed at greatest risk from drill pin placement, with a mean distance of 22.7 mm (range, 16.5-29.2 mm) between the pin and artery. In this laboratory study, transcalcaneal drill pin passage appeared to be anatomically safe, and the use of suture button technology with a Krackow stitch for Achilles tendon insertional repair significantly increased repair strength. Achilles tendon insertional repair with suture button fixation and a Krackow stitch may facilitate the earlier institution of postoperative rehabilitation and improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Triple Achilles Tendon Rupture: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Hofer, Deann

    We present a case report with 1-year follow-up data of a 57-year-old male soccer referee who had sustained an acute triple Achilles tendon rupture injury during a game. His triple Achilles tendon rupture consisted of a rupture of the proximal watershed region, a rupture of the main body (mid-watershed area), and an avulsion-type rupture of insertional calcific tendinosis. The patient was treated surgically with primary repair of the tendon, including tenodesis with anchors. Postoperative treatment included non-weightbearing for 4 weeks and protected weightbearing until 10 weeks postoperative, followed by formal physical therapy, which incorporated an "antigravity" treadmill. The patient was able to return to full activity after 26 weeks, including running and refereeing, without limitations. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic extensor brace for lateral epicondylitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faes, M.C.; Akker, B. van den; Lint, J.A. de; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is a common, often disabling ailment. Based on the failure of current therapies, a new dynamic extensor brace has been developed. In this study, the effects of application of this brace for 3 months on the most important and disabling symptoms of patients with

  19. Augmentation of tendon healing with butyric acid-impregnated sutures: biomechanical evaluation in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, Bryan T; Tasto, James P; Tibor, Lisa M; Healey, Robert M; Freemont, Anthony; Linn, Michael S; Chase, Derek E; Amiel, David

    2012-08-01

    Butyric acid (BA) has been shown to be angiogenic and to enhance transcriptional activity in tissue. These properties of BA have the potential to augment biological healing of a repaired tendon. To evaluate this possibility both biomechanically and histologically in an animal tendon repair model. Controlled laboratory study. A rabbit Achilles tendon healing model was used to evaluate the biomechanical strength and histological properties at 6 and 12 weeks after repair. Unilateral tendon defects were created in the middle bundle of the Achilles tendon of each rabbit, which were repaired equivalently with either Ultrabraid BA-impregnated sutures or control Ultrabraid sutures. After 6 weeks, BA-impregnated suture repairs had a significantly increased (P Tendons repaired with BA-impregnated sutures demonstrated improved biomechanical properties at 6 weeks relative to control sutures, suggesting a neoangiogenic mechanism of enhanced healing through an increased myofibroblast presence. These findings demonstrate that a relatively simple alteration of suture material may augment early tendon healing to create a stronger repair construct during this time.

  20. Surgical treatment of partial biceps tendon ruptures at the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellaero, David T; Mallon, William J

    2006-01-01

    We present the treatment and results of a consecutive series of 7 patients (mean age, 42.7 years) with partial ruptures of the distal biceps tendon. All injuries occurred as the result of either heavy labor or weightlifting. Diagnosis in all cases was made with magnetic resonance imaging. After failure of conservative therapy, the patients were treated with repair of the distal biceps tendon. Mean follow-up was 30.6 months (range, 25-39 months). Results were uniformly good, with all patients satisfied with the outcome. All patients maintained their preoperative range of motion, with none reporting significant postoperative pain. The only complication was transient neurapraxias of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve in 2 cases. We conclude that patients presenting with chronic pain in the cubital fossa should be evaluated for possible partial biceps tendon tear. If the diagnosis of partial tendon tear is made, surgical repair is a safe and effective method of treatment.

  1. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  2. Silicone infusion tubing instead of Hunter rods for two-stage zone 2 flexor tendon reconstruction in a resource-limited surgical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibadi, K; Moutet, F

    2017-10-01

    The authors describe their experience using silicone infusion tubing in place of Hunter rods for two-stage zone 2 flexor tendon reconstruction in a resource-limited surgical environment. This case report features a 47-year-old, right-handed man who had no active PIP and DIP joint flexion in four fingers of the right hand 5 months after an injury. During the first repair stage, the A2 and A4 pulleys were reconstructed using an extensor retinaculum graft. An infusion tube was inserted instead of Hunter rods. During the second stage, formation of a digital neo-canal around the infusion tubing was observed. The infusion tubing was removed and replaced with a palmaris longus tendon graft according to the conventional technique. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation followed surgery. At 6 months, very significant progress had been made with complete recovery of PIP and DIP flexion in the four fingers. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of botulinum toxin A injection on healing and tensile strength of ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzuner, Serdar; Özkan, Özlenen; Erin, Nuray; Özkaynak, Sibel; Cinpolat, An; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-04-01

    Tendon lacerations are most commonly managed with surgical repair. Postoperative complications such as adhesions and ruptures often occur with immobilization. Early postoperative mobilization is therefore advised to minimize complications and time required to return to daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) can be used to enhance healing and prevent rupture in mobilized animals with Achilles tenotomy. Twenty-seven rabbits were divided into 3 groups, namely, I, II, and III, after surgical 1-sided Achilles tenotomy and end-to-end repair. The control group for biomechanical comparisons consisted of randomly selected contralateral (unoperated) healthy Achilles tendons. Group I received BoNT-A (4 U/kg) injection into the calf muscles. One week later, electromyographical confirmation was performed to establish the effects of injection. Surgery was then performed. Animals in the second group (n = 9, group II) were immobilized with a cast postoperatively. The third group (n = 9, group III) was mobilized immediately with no cast or BoNT-A. Tendons were harvested and gap formation or ruptures as well as strength of the repaired tendon were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Achilles tendons healed in all animals injected with BoNT-A, whereas all were ruptured in group III. All Achilles tendons of animals in groups I and II healed. However, group I repaired tendons were biomechanically equivalent to healthy tendons, whereas group II repaired tendons demonstrated significantly decreased tensile strength (P = 0.009). The present study suggests that local injection of BoNT-A can be used for treatment of tendon rupture and may replace the use of cast for immobilization. However, further studies are needed to determine whether BoNT-A injection can have a beneficial effect on the healing of tendon repairs in humans.

  4. Achilles tendon and sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F.; Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.

    2002-01-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [de

  5. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Qianqian [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Yang, Jun [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, 421 Hospital of PLA, Guangzhou 510318 (China); Dong, Weiqiang [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital to Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: 1780468505@qq.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Subei People’s Hospital of Jiangsu Province (Clinical Medical College of Yangzhou University), Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province 225001 (China); Yu, Bin, E-mail: carryzhang1985@live.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  6. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation

  7. Atelocollagen Enhances the Healing of Rotator Cuff Tendon in Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong-Sam; Lee, Jun-Keun; Yoo, Ji-Chul; Woo, Sang-Hun; Kim, Ga-Ram; Kim, Ju-Won; Choi, Nam-Yong; Kim, Yongdeok; Song, Hyun-Seok

    2017-07-01

    Failure of rotator cuff healing is a common complication despite the rapid development of surgical repair techniques for the torn rotator cuff. To verify the effect of atelocollagen on tendon-to-bone healing in the rabbit supraspinatus tendon compared with conventional cuff repair. Controlled laboratory study. A tear of the supraspinatus tendon was created and repaired in 46 New Zealand White rabbits. They were then randomly allocated into 2 groups (23 rabbits per group; 15 for histological and 8 for biomechanical test). In the experimental group, patch-type atelocollagen was implanted between bone and tendon during repair; in the control group, the torn tendon was repaired without atelocollagen. Each opposite shoulder served as a sham (tendon was exposed only). Histological evaluation was performed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Biomechanical tensile strength was tested 12 weeks after surgery. Histological evaluation scores of the experimental group (4.0 ± 1.0) were significantly superior to those of the control group (7.7 ± 2.7) at 12 weeks ( P = .005). The load to failure was significantly higher in the experimental group (51.4 ± 3.9 N) than in the control group (36.4 ± 5.9 N) ( P = .001). Histological and biomechanical studies demonstrated better results in the experimental group using atelocollagen in a rabbit model of the supraspinatus tendon tear. Atelocollagen patch could be used in the cuff repair site to enhance healing.

  8. Lateral luxation of the superficial digital flexor tendon from the calcaneal tuber in two horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meagher, D.M.; Aldrete, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    Lateral luxation of the superficial digital flexor tendon from the calcaneal tuber occurs in horses as a result of tearing or rupture of the medial retinaculum of the tendon. This report describes the repair of this condition in 2 Thoroughbred race horses, using a surgical technique in which 2 cancellous bone screws were placed in the calcaneus lateral to the tendon, along with suturing the medial retinaculum

  9. Containment structure tendon investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, J.F.; Murray, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes an investigation into the possible causes of lower-than-predicted tendon forces which were measured during past tendon surveillances for a concrete containment. The containment is post tensioned by vertical tendons which are anchored into a rock foundation. The tendons were originally stressed in 1969, and lift-off tests were performed on six occasions subsequent to this date over a period of 11 years. The tendon forces measured in these tests were generally lower than predicted, and by 1979 the prestress level in the containment was only marginally above the design requirement. The tendons were retensioned in 1980, and by this time an investigation into the possible causes was underway. Potential causes investigated include the rock anchors and surrounding rock, elastomeric pad creep, wire stresses, thermal effects, stressing equipment and lift-off procedures, and wire stress relaxation. The investigation activities included stress relaxation testing of wires pulled from actual tendons. The stress relaxation test program included wire specimens at several different temperature and initial stress levels and the effect of a varying temperature history on the stress relaxation property of the wires. For purpose of future force predictions of the retensioned tendons, the test program included tests to determine the effect on stress relaxation due to restressing the wires after they had relaxed for 1000 hours and 10,000 hours. (orig./GL)

  10. Extensor and flexor digit synovial sheath, sac and synovial capsule in the distal part of the limbs in buffalos and camels and its relation of surgical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. AL-sadi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty one samples of the distal parts of limbs were obtained from different ages of buffalo and camels of both sex to study the synovial structures to determine the suitable sites for injection of surgical interference. The result showed that extensor digit synovial sheath was extend between middle or distal part of metacarpal (metatarsal to the extensor processes and this formed with synovial capsule dorsal pouches which serve in surgical interference. The flexor digit synovial sheath extended to palmar (planter between distal extremity of metacarpal (metatarsal to the middle of second phalanx in buffalo while in camel it extended to the proximal extremity of second phalanx, that sheath was formed with suspensory ligament and sessamoid bone palmar or planter pouches which were serve the surgical interference. Fourth synovial bursa observed situated dorsally between the extensor digit laterals tendon and capsule of fetlock joint, forms site of injection during surgical interference, while the other two synovial bursa were located to palmer (planter between deep flexor tendon and distal sessamoid bone in buffalo while in camel these bursa were located between deep flexor tendon and cartilage of the second phalanx, these bursa were served for surgical interference. The synovial capsule which serve the surgical interference through digit cushion these were shown extended from the claw capsule. The result show that surgical interference was form six pouches in buffalo and eight pouches in camel, which formed by synovial structures and the tissue associated with them.

  11. Sex Hormones and Tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood....... The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet...... has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens....

  12. Tendon allograft sterilized by peracetic acid/ethanol combined with gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Naili; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Youchen; Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Xusheng; Li, Baoming; Li, Baoxing

    2014-07-01

    Research and clinical applications have demonstrated that the effects of tendon allografts are comparable to those of autografts when reconstructing injured tendons or ligaments, but allograft safety remains problematic. Sterilisation could eliminate or decrease the possibility of disease transmission, but current methods seldom achieve satisfactory sterilisation without affecting the mechanical properties of the tendon. Peracetic acid-ethanol in combination with low-dose gamma irradiation (PE-R) would inactivate potential deleterious microorganisms without affecting mechanical and biocompatible properties of tendon allograft. Controlled laboratory design. HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV inactivation was evaluated. After verifying viral inactivation, the treated tendon allografts were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, and the cytocompatibility was assessed with an MTT assay and by subcutaneous implantation. Effective and efficient inactivation of HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV was observed. Histological structure and ultrastructure were unchanged in the treated tendon allograft, which also exhibited comparable biomechanical properties and good biocompatibility. The preliminary results confirmed our hypothesis and demonstrated that the PE-R tendon allograft has significant potential as an alternative to ligament/tendon reconstruction. Tendon allografts have been extensively used in ligament reconstruction and tendon repair. However, current sterilisation methods have various shortcomings, so PE-R has been proposed. This study suggests that PE-R tendon allograft has great potential as an alternative for ligament/tendon reconstruction. Sterilisation has been a great concern for tendon allografts. However, most sterilisation methods cannot inactivate viruses and bacteria without impairing the mechanical properties of the tendon allograft. Peracetic acid/ethanol with gamma irradiation can effectively inactivate viruses and bacteria

  13. Mineral distributions at the developing tendon enthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrea G; Pasteris, Jill D; Genin, Guy M; Daulton, Tyrone L; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Tendon attaches to bone across a functionally graded interface, "the enthesis". A gradient of mineral content is believed to play an important role for dissipation of stress concentrations at mature fibrocartilaginous interfaces. Surgical repair of injured tendon to bone often fails, suggesting that the enthesis does not regenerate in a healing setting. Understanding the development and the micro/nano-meter structure of this unique interface may provide novel insights for the improvement of repair strategies. This study monitored the development of transitional tissue at the murine supraspinatus tendon enthesis, which begins postnatally and is completed by postnatal day 28. The micrometer-scale distribution of mineral across the developing enthesis was studied by X-ray micro-computed tomography and Raman microprobe spectroscopy. Analyzed regions were identified and further studied by histomorphometry. The nanometer-scale distribution of mineral and collagen fibrils at the developing interface was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A zone (∼20 µm) exhibiting a gradient in mineral relative to collagen was detected at the leading edge of the hard-soft tissue interface as early as postnatal day 7. Nanocharacterization by TEM suggested that this mineral gradient arose from intrinsic surface roughness on the scale of tens of nanometers at the mineralized front. Microcomputed tomography measurements indicated increases in bone mineral density with time. Raman spectroscopy measurements revealed that the mineral-to-collagen ratio on the mineralized side of the interface was constant throughout postnatal development. An increase in the carbonate concentration of the apatite mineral phase over time suggested possible matrix remodeling during postnatal development. Comparison of Raman-based observations of localized mineral content with histomorphological features indicated that development of the graded mineralized interface is linked to endochondral

  14. Effects of implant material and plate design on tendon function and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mark S; Turner, Thomas M; Urban, Robert M

    2006-04-01

    Titanium implants are an alternative to stainless steel implants for internal fixation after fracture. The advantages of titanium include decreased implant stiffness, increased bio-compatibility, and diminished stress shielding. However, titanium has been implicated in tendon irritation and adhesions when used in the hand and wrist. We evaluated the relationship between extensor tendon morphology and dorsal plating of the distal radius in a canine model using distal radius pi plates made of stainless steel, titanium, and titanium alloy with a modified ramped edge design. We found marked histologic changes in the tendons and surrounding soft tissues including tendon deformation and degeneration (fibrillation, cartilage metaplasia, hypocellularity and hyalinization of blood vessels), peritendonous adhesions and neovascularity in the parenchyma. Only a minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate was identified and was limited to the tenosynovium and/or paratenon. No differences were identified between titanium and stainless steel implants and those with a ramped design. Although all animals lost wrist motion with time, no differences were observed between groups. Our results suggest that pi plate placement on the dorsal surface of the distal radius may lead to extensor tendon irritation and dysfunction. There is no evidence to suggest that this is specifically related to titanium or plate edge design.

  15. Slab fractures of the third tarsal bone: Minimally invasive repair using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw placed in lag fashion in 17 Thoroughbred racehorses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, W H J; Wright, I M

    2017-03-01

    A technique for minimally invasive repair of slab fractures of the third tarsal bone has not previously been reported. Results of third tarsal bone slab fracture repair in Thoroughbred racehorses are lacking. To report the outcomes of repair of uniplanar frontal slab factures of the third tarsal bone using a single 3.5 mm cortex screw in lag fashion. Retrospective case series. Case records of horses that had undergone this procedure were reviewed. Seventeen horses underwent surgery. Eighteen percent of cases had wedge shaped third tarsal bones. A point midway between the long and lateral digital extensor tendons and centrodistal and tarsometatarsal joints created a suitable entry site for implants. The fracture location, configuration and curvature of the third tarsal bone and associated joints requires a dorsolateral proximal-plantaromedial distal trajectory for the screw, which was determined by preplaced needles. There were no complications and fractures healed in all cases at 4-6 months post surgery. Seventy-nine percent of horses returned to racing and, at the time of reporting, 3 are in post operative rehabilitation programmes. The technique reported provides a safe, appropriate and repeatable means of repairing slab fractures of the third tarsal bone. Surgical repair is a viable alternative to conservative management. © 2016 EVJ Ltd.

  16. Achilles tendon healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, E.H.; Pope, C.F.; Barber, V.; Jokl, P.; Lynch, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on symptomatic Achilles tendon abnormalities (rupture, tendinitis) evaluated with MR imaging during the healing phase after either surgical or conservative treatment. A total of 21 patients were studied. Fifteen of 21 underwent surgery (13 tendon ruptures) and six were managed conservatively (one rupture). MR studies were obtained before treatment in 11, at 3 months in eight, at 6 months in seven, and at 12 months in 12. The 1.5-T spin-echo and gradient-echo images were correlated with clinical results, planter reflex response times, and calf force measurements. Sequential T2 times were obtained from representative levels in the tendons

  17. Strength and power of knee extensor muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Olivera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the studies of human neuromuscular function, the function of leg muscles has been most often measured, particularly the function of the knee extensors. Therefore, this review will be focused on knee extensors, methods for assessment of its function, the interdependence of strength and power, relations that describe these two abilities and the influence of various factors on their production (resistance training, stretching, movement tasks, age, etc.. Given that it consists of four separate muscles, the variability of their anatomical characteristics affects their participation in strength and power production, depending on the type of movement and motion that is performed. Since KE is active in a variety of activities it must be able to generate great strength in a large and diverse range of muscle lengths and high shortening velocities, in respect to different patterns of strength production, and thus different generation capacities within the muscle (Blazevich et al., 2006. It has been speculated that KE exerts its Pmax at workloads close to subject's own body weight or lower (Rahmani et al., 2001, which is very close to the maximum dynamic output hypothesis (MDI of Jaric and Markovic (2009. Changes under the influence of resistance training or biological age are variously manifested in muscle's morphological, physiological and neural characteristics, and thus in strength and power. Understanding the issues related to strength and power as abilities of great importance for daily activities, is also important for sports and rehabilitation. Performances improvement in sports in which leg muscles strength and power are crucial, as well as recovery after the injuries, are largely dependent on the research results regarding KE function. Also, the appropriate strength balance between knee flexors and extensors is important for the knee joint stability, so that the presence of imbalance between these two muscle groups might be a risk factor for

  18. Engaging Stem Cells for Customized Tendon Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Thaker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for a consistent therapeutic approach to tendon injury repair is long overdue. Patients with tendon microtears or full ruptures are eligible for a wide range of invasive and non invasive interventions, often subjectively decided by the physician. Surgery produces the best outcomes, and while studies have been conducted to optimize graft constructs and to track outcomes, the data from these studies have been inconclusive on the whole. What has been established is a clear understanding of healthy tendon architecture and the inherent process of healing. With this knowledge, tissue regeneration efforts have achieved immense progress in scaffold design, cell line selection, and, more recently, the appropriate use of cytokines and growth factors. This paper evaluates the plasticity of bone-marrow-derived stem cells and the elasticity of recently developed biomaterials towards tendon regeneration efforts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and poly(1,8-octanediol co-citrate scaffolds (POC are discussed in the context of established grafting strategies. With POC scaffolds to cradle the growth of MSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells, developing a fibroelastic network guided by cytokines and growth factors may contribute towards consistent graft constructs, enhanced functionality, and better patient outcomes.

  19. A dynamic traction splint for the management of extrinsic tendon tightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovelle, S; Heeter, P K; Phillips, P D

    1987-02-01

    The dynamic traction splint designed by therapists at Walter Reed Army Medical Center is used for the management of extrinsic extensor tendon tightness commonly seen in brachial plexus injuries and traumatic soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. The two components of the splint allow for simultaneous maximum flexion of the MCP and IP joints. This simple and economical splint provides an additional modality to any occupational therapy service involved in the management of upper extremity disorders.

  20. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a strong fibrous cord that connects the muscles in the back of your calf to your heel bone. If you overstretch your Achilles tendon, it can tear (rupture) completely or just partially. If your Achilles ...

  1. Resorbable electrospun polydioxanone fibres modify the behaviour of cells from both healthy and diseased human tendons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kendal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tendinopathy in an active and ageing population represents an increasing burden to healthcare systems. Rotator cuff tendinopathy alone accounts for approximately 70 % of all shoulder pain. Tendinopathic tissue has a disorganised extracellular matrix, altered vasculature, and infiltration of fibroblasts and inflammatory cells. This altered biology may contribute to the limited success of surgical repair strategies. Electrospun resorbable scaffolds can potentially enhance endogenous repair mechanisms by influencing the tissue microenvironment. Polydioxanone (PDO has an established safety profile in patients. We compared the response of healthy and diseased human tendon cells to electrospun PDO fibres using live cell imaging, proliferation, flow cytometry, and gene expression studies. Within 4 h of initial contact with electrospun PDO, healthy tendon cells underwent a marked transformation; elongating along the fibres in a fibre density dependent manner. Diseased tendon cells initially responded at a slower rate, but ultimately underwent a similar morphological change. Electrospun fibres increased the proliferation rate of diseased tendon cells and increased the ratio of type I:IIIcollagenmRNA expression. Flow cytometry revealed decreased expression of CD106, a marker of mesenchymal stem cells, and increased expression of CD10 on healthy versus diseased tendon cells. PDO electrospun scaffolds further promoted CD106negCD10pos expression of healthy tendon cells. Despite their behavioural differences, both healthy and diseased human tendon cells responded to electrospun PDO fibres. This encourages further work establishing their efficacy in augmenting surgical repair of diseased tendons.

  2. Avulsion of subscapularis muscle tendon leading to recurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dislocation was found to be due to a complete tear of the subscapularis tendon (12 patients) and partial tears in three patients, without fracture of the lesser tuberosity in any of the patients. The repair consisted of mobilisation of the subscapularis muscle and its reinsertion into an osseous trough created in the humerus.

  3. [Isokinetic assessment with two years follow-up of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring tendons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condouret, J; Cohn, J; Ferret, J-M; Lemonsu, A; Vasconcelos, W; Dejour, D; Potel, J-F

    2008-12-01

    This retrospective multicentric study was designed to assess the outcome of quadriceps and hamstrings muscles two years after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction and compare muscles recovery depending on the type of graft and individual variables like age, gender, level of sport, but also in terms of discomfort, pain and functional score. The results focused on the subjective and objective IKDC scores, SF36, the existence or not of subjective disorders and their location. The review included isokinetic muscle tests concentric and eccentric extensors/flexors but also internal rotators/external rotators with analysis of mean work and mean power. One hundred and twenty-seven patients were included with an average age 29 years (+/-10). They all had an ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon or hamstring tendon with single or double bundles. In the serie, the average muscles deficit at two years was 10% for the flexors and extensors but with a significant dispersion. Significant differences were not noted in the mean values of all parameters in term of sex or age (over 30 years or not), neither the type of sport, nor of clinical assessment (Class A and B of objective IKDC score), nor the existence of anterior knee pain. There was a relationship between the level of extensor or flexor recovery and the quality of functional results with minimal muscle deficits close to 5% if the IKDC score was over 90 and deficits falling to 15% in the group with IKDC score less than 90. The type of reconstruction (patellar tendon versus hamstrings) had an influence on the muscle deficit. For extensors, the recovery was the same in the two groups, more than 90% at two years and the distribution of these two populations by level of deficit was quite the same. For flexors, residual deficits were significantly higher in the hamstrings group on the three studied parameters whatever the speed and the type of contraction (concentric or eccentric) with an average deficit of 14 to 18

  4. In vivo engineering of a functional tendon sheath in a hen model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Cao, Dejun; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin

    2010-05-01

    Repair of injured tendon sheath remains a major challenge and this study explored the possibility of in vivo reconstruction of a tendon sheath with tendon sheath derived cells and polyglycolic acid (PGA) fibers in a Leghorn hen model. Total 55 Leghorn hens with a 1cm tendon sheath defect created in the left middle toe of each animal were randomly assigned into: (1) experimental group (n=19) that received a cell-PGA construct; (2) scaffold control group (n=18) that received a cell-free PGA scaffold; (3) blank control group (n=18) with the defect untreated. Tendon sheath cells were isolated, in vitro expanded, and seeded onto PGA scaffolds. After in vitro culture for 7 days, the constructs were in vivo implanted to repair the sheath defects. Alcian blue staining confirmed the ability of cultured cells to produce specific matrices containing acidic carboxyl mucopolysaccharide (mainly hyaluronic acid). In addition, the engineered sheath formed a relatively mature structure at 12 weeks post-surgery, which was similar to that of native counterpart, including a smooth inner surface, a well-developed sheath histological structure with a clear space between the tendon and the engineered sheath. More importantly, Work of Flexion assay revealed that the tendons needed less power consumption to glide inside the engineered sheath when compared to the tendons which were surrounded by scar-repaired tissues, indicating that the engineered sheaths had gained the function to a certain extent of preventing tendon adhesion. Taken together, these results suggest that tendon sheaths that are functionally and structurally similar to native sheaths are possible to be engineered in vivo using tendon sheath cells and PGA scaffolds. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of platelet lysate patches on the activity of tendon-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Franco, Albina R; Pesqueira, Tamagno; Oliveira, Mariana B; Babo, Pedro S; Leonor, Isabel B; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Gomes, Manuela E

    2018-03-01

    Platelet-derived biomaterials are widely explored as cost-effective sources of therapeutic factors, holding a strong potential for endogenous regenerative medicine. Particularly for tendon repair, treatment approaches that shift the injury environment are explored to accelerate tendon regeneration. Herein, genipin-crosslinked platelet lysate (PL) patches are proposed for the delivery of human-derived therapeutic factors in patch augmentation strategies aiming at tendon repair. Developed PL patches exhibited a controlled release profile of PL proteins, including bFGF and PDGF-BB. Additionally, PL patches exhibited an antibacterial effect by preventing the adhesion, proliferation and biofilm formation by S. aureus, a common pathogen in orthopaedic surgical site infections. Furthermore, these patches supported the activity of human tendon-derived cells (hTDCs). Cells were able to proliferate over time and an up-regulation of tenogenic genes (SCX, COL1A1 and TNC) was observed, suggesting that PL patches may modify the behavior of hTDCs. Accordingly, hTDCs deposited tendon-related extracellular matrix proteins, namely collagen type I and tenascin C. In summary, PL patches can act as a reservoir of biomolecules derived from PL and support the activity of native tendon cells, being proposed as bioinstructive patches for tendon regeneration. Platelet-derived biomaterials hold great interest for the delivery of therapeutic factors for applications in endogenous regenerative medicine. In the particular case of tendon repair, patch augmentation strategies aiming at shifting the injury environment are explored to improve tendon regeneration. In this study, PL patches were developed with remarkable features, including the controlled release of growth factors and antibacterial efficacy. Remarkably, PL patches supported the activity of native tendon cells by up-regulating tenogenic genes and enabling the deposition of ECM proteins. This patch holds great potential towards

  6. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques.

  7. TGIF1 Gene Silencing in Tendon-Derived Stem Cells Improves the Tendon-to-Bone Insertion Site Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyang Chen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The slow healing process of tendon-to-bone junctions can be accelerated via implanted tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs with silenced transforming growth interacting factor 1 (TGIF1 gene. Tendon-to-bone insertion site is the special form of connective tissues derivatives of common connective progenitors, where TGF-β plays bidirectional effects (chondrogenic or fibrogenic through different signaling pathways at different stages. A recent study revealed that TGF-β directly induces the chondrogenic gene Sox9. However, TGIF1 represses the expression of the cartilage master Sox9 gene and changes its expression rate against the fibrogenesis gene Scleraxis (Scx. Methods: TGIF1 siRNA was transduced or TGIF1 was over-expressed in tendon-derived stem cells. Following suprapinatus tendon repair, rats were either treated with transduced TDSCs or nontransduced TDSCs. Histologic examination and Western blot were performed in both groups. Results: In this study, the silencing of TGIF1 significantly upregulated the chondrogenic genes and markers. Similarly, TGIF1 inhibited TDSC differentiation into cartilage via interactions with TGF-β-activated Smad2 and suppressed the phosphorylation of Smad2. The area of fibrocartilage at the tendon-bone interface was significantly increased in the TGIF1 (- group compared with the control and TGIF1-overexpressing groups in the early stages of the animal model. The interface between the tendon and bone showed a increase of new bone and fibrocartilage in the TGIF1 (- group at 4 weeks. Fibrovascular scar tissue was observed in the TGIF1-overexpressing group and the fibrin glue only group. Low levels of fibrocartilage and fibrovascular scar tissue were found in the TDSCs group. Conclusion: Collectively, this study shows that the tendon-derived stem cell modified with TGIF1 gene silencing has promising effects on tendon-to-bone healing which can be further explored as a therapeutic tool in regenerative medicine.

  8. Mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon: a histomorphological study in pigs with clinical significance for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Daneva, Eleni; Givissis, Panagiotis; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    Tendons contain neurosensory elements called mechanoreceptors which contribute to the neuromuscular system as sources of reflex signals. The literature is lacking in histological assessment of mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon in piglets and our aim was to indicate their types, location and quantity. The study was performed using histological tissue samples from the Achilles tendon of ten healthy pigs, five left, five right, six males, four females. The samples were taken up to 12 hours after death. Immediately after removal, the tendons were placed in the laboratory where sections were taken and examined microscopically. The tendons were stained with the gold chloride method. The results showed that Golgi tendon organs, free nerve endings and Pacinian-like corpuscles were found in the Achilles tendon of pigs. Most structures were near the osteotendinous and myotendinous junctions, away from the middle portion of the tendon. As shown in other studies and similarly in ours, mechanoreceptors tend to be close to the distant thirds and not in the middle third of the tendon. This study could have clinical application on human Achilles tendon and its repair after damage. IV.

  9. The interaction between the vastus medialis and vastus intermedius and its influence on the extensor apparatus of the knee joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Karl; Manestar, Mirjana; Filgueira, Luis; Kuster, Markus S; Gilbey, Helen; Ackland, Timothy

    2018-03-01

    Although the vastus medialis (VM) is closely associated with the vastus intermedius (VI), there is a lack of data regarding their functional relationship. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomical interaction between the VM and VI with regard to their origins, insertions, innervation and function within the extensor apparatus of the knee joint. Eighteen human cadaveric lower limbs were investigated using macro-dissection techniques. Six limbs were cut transversely in the middle third of the thigh. The mode of origin, insertion and nerve supply of the extensor apparatus of the knee joint were studied. The architecture of the VM and VI was examined in detail, as was their anatomical interaction and connective tissue linkage to the adjacent anatomical structures. The VM originated medially from a broad hammock-like structure. The attachment site of the VM always spanned over a long distance between: (1) patella, (2) rectus femoris tendon and (3) aponeurosis of the VI, with the insertion into the VI being the largest. VM units were inserted twice-once on the anterior and once on the posterior side of the VI. The VI consists of a complex multi-layered structure. The layers of the medial VI aponeurosis fused with the aponeuroses of the tensor vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis. Together, they form the two-layered intermediate layer of the quadriceps tendon. The VM and medial parts of the VI were innervated by the same medial division of the femoral nerve. The VM consists of multiple muscle units inserting into the entire VI. Together, they build a potential functional muscular complex. Therefore, the VM acts as an indirect extensor of the knee joint regulating and adjusting the length of the extensor apparatus throughout the entire range of motion. It is of clinical importance that, besides the VM, substantial parts of the VI directly contribute to the medial pull on the patella and help to maintain medial tracking of the patella during knee

  10. Imaging of postoperative knee extensor mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motamedi, Kambiz [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-59, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Seeger, Leanne L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Musculoskeletal Imaging-Department of Radiology, 200 Medical Plaza, Suite 165-57, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hame, Sharon L. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Box 956902, 76-143 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2005-05-01

    Disorders of the anterior knee are common and include patellofemoral syndrome, patella instability, patella fracture, and patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures. Depending on the operative procedure performed, the post-operative imaging appearance of these knees may be confusing. It is crucial for the radiologist to be familiar with the procedures performed in order to recognize the postoperative findings. Radiologists must be able to interpret hardware (anchors, screw and wires) and disruptions in soft tissue planes that may persist with these types of procedures.

  11. Ruptura de Tendones Extensores de Dedos por Cubito Plus Idiopático Bilateral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Alberto Breglia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyaline cartilage has only a very restricted capability of regeneration in the adult. The incidence of chondral lesions at the knee is high, especially those of Grade II/III (Outerbridge. Therapies combining cells and biological scaffolds are promising biological approaches for the treatment of cartilage defects. The aim of this study is to analyze the characteristics of in vitro culture of human chondrocytes on decellularized amniochorionic membrane (ACM. Methods: Between December 2010 and December 2011, 16 samples of cartilage from a living donor were processed, but only 7 of them were analyzed. Chondrocytes were grown and amplified on plastic and on ACM. The following analyses were carried out with those cells: interactions between cells and ACM; ACM capacity as a matrix for cells; and behavior of cells cultured on ACM. Results: In vitro chondrocytes exhibited phenotypic changes in the presence of ACM. The cells were able to adhere and remain on the spongy region of the membrane. Electron microscopy of cultured ACM showed cells, well preserved organelles, endoplasmic reticulum and desmosomes junctions. Conclusions: The feasibility of culturing chondrocytes on ACM was shown in this work. The cells were able to adhere, remain and differentiate on this membrane during the study period.

  12. A group of patients with Marfan's syndrome, who have finger and toe contractures, displays tendons' alterations upon an ultrasound examination: are these features common among classical Marfan patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Pratelli, Elisa; Torricelli, Elena; Sofi, Francesco; Abbate, Rosanna; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Gensini, GianFranco; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of the musculoskeletal system with other mild pleiotropic manifestations represents a clinical criterion, called "systemic features," to d iagnose Marfan's syndrome. We aimed to investigate the features of the hands and feet redressable contractures present in a group of Marfan patients. In 13 patients with previously diagnosed Marfan's syndrome, an accurate clinical examination was performed. In particular the characterization of the musculoskeletal system by visual analogic scale to measure muscle pain (VAS) and muscle strength (MRC system) was carried out; the Beighton scale score was used to evaluate the articular hypermobility. Ultrasound examination (US) was performed to detect deep-superficial flexor tendons and extensor tendons of both hands, and the short and long flexor and extensor tendons of the fingers and toes in static and dynamic positions. The ImageJ program was adopted to measure a profile of tendon echo-intensity. A reduction of the thickness of all tendons was detected by US in our patients; the VAS and Beighton scale scores were in normal ranges. The profile of tendon echo-intensity showed different textural details in all Marfan patients. This study provides evidence for other contractures' localization, and for altered findings of the tendons in patients with Marfan syndrome and finger/toe contractures. These changes may be associated with structural modifications in connective tissue.

  13. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanujan Thangarajah

    Full Text Available Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds.In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5, or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5 were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery.Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047, 9 (P = 0.028, and 12 weeks (P = 0.009. In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015, and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039. No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group.Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft.

  14. Clinical aspects of tendon healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.H.M. van der Meulen (Jacques)

    1974-01-01

    textabstractWe know that healing of a tendon wound takes place by an invasion of fibreblasts from the surrounding tissues; the tendon itself has no intrinsic healing capacity. lt was Potenza (1962) who proved that a traumatic suture of the tendons within their sheath is followed by disintegration of

  15. Nickel-titanium wire as a flexor tendon suture material: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karjalainen, T; Göransson, H; Viinikainen, A; Jämsä, T; Ryhänen, J

    2010-07-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloy (NiTi) is a new suture material that is easy to handle, is strong, and biocompatible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the material properties and biomechanical behaviour of 150 microm and 200 microm NiTi wires in flexor tendon repair. Braided polyester (4-0 Ethibond) was used as control. Fifty fresh-frozen porcine flexor tendons were repaired using the Pennington modification of the Kessler repair or a double Kessler technique. NiTi wires were stiffer and reached higher tensile strength compared to braided polyester suture. Repairs with 200 microm NiTi wire had a higher yield force, ultimate force and better resistance to gapping than 4-0 braided polyester repairs. Repairs made with 200 microm NiTi wire achieved higher stiffness and ultimate force than repairs made with 150 microm NiTi wire.

  16. Equine induced pluripotent stem cells have a reduced tendon differentiation capacity compared to embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Patricia Bavin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon injuries occur commonly in horses and their repair through scar tissue formation predisposes horses to a high rate of re-injury. Pluripotent stem cells may provide a cell replacement therapy to improve tendon tissue regeneration and lower the frequency of re-injury. We have previously demonstrated that equine embryonic stem cells (ESCs differentiate into the tendon cell lineage upon injection into the damaged horse tendon and can differentiate into functional tendon cells in vitro to generate artificial tendons. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have now been derived from horses but, to date, there are no reports on their ability to differentiate into tendon cells. As iPSCs can be produced from adult cell types, they provide a more accessible source of cells than ESCs, which require the use of horse embryos. The aim of this study was to compare tendon differentiation by ESCs and iPSCs produced through two independent methods. In 2-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs expressed tendon associated genes and proteins, which were enhanced by the presence of transforming growth factor-β3. However, in 3-dimensional differentiation assays the iPSCs failed to differentiate into functional tendon cells and generate artificial tendons. These results demonstrate the utility of the 3-dimensional in vitro tendon assay for measuring tendon differentiation and the need for more detailed studies to be performed on equine iPSCs to identify and understand their epigenetic differences from pluripotent ESCs prior to their clinical application.

  17. Immediate effects of whole body vibration on patellar tendon properties and knee extension torque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, F; Wiesinger, H-P; Kösters, A; Müller, E; Seynnes, O R

    2016-03-01

    Reports about the immediate effects of whole body vibration (WBV) exposure upon torque production capacity are inconsistent. However, the changes in the torque-angle relationship observed by some authors after WBV may hinder the measurement of torque changes at a given angle. Acute changes in tendon mechanical properties do occur after certain types of exercise but this hypothesis has never been tested after a bout of WBV. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether tendon compliance is altered immediately after WBV, effectively shifting the optimal angle of peak torque towards longer muscle length. Twenty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to either a WBV (n = 14) or a squatting control group (n = 14). Patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus and knee extension torque-angle relationship were measured using ultrasonography and dynamometry 1 day before and directly after the intervention. Tendon CSA was additionally measured 24 h after the intervention to check for possible delayed onset of swelling. The vibration intervention had no effects on patellar tendon CSA, stiffness and Young's modulus or the torque-angle relationship. Peak torque was produced at ~70° knee angle in both groups at pre- and post-test. Additionally, the knee extension torque globally remained unaffected with the exception of a small (-6%) reduction in isometric torque at a joint angle of 60°. The present results indicate that a single bout of vibration exposure does not substantially alter patellar tendon properties or the torque-angle relationship of knee extensors.

  18. [Application of silk-based tissue engineering scaffold for tendon / ligament regeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yejun; Le, Huihui; Jin, Zhangchu; Chen, Xiao; Yin, Zi; Shen, Weiliang; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Tendon/ligament injury is one of the most common impairments in sports medicine. The traditional treatments of damaged tissue repair are unsatisfactory, especially for athletes, due to lack of donor and immune rejection. The strategy of tissue engineering may break through these limitations, and bring new hopes to tendon/ligament repair, even regeneration. Silk is a kind of natural biomaterials, which has good biocompatibility, wide range of mechanical properties and tunable physical structures; so it could be applied as tendon/ligament tissue engineering scaffolds. The silk-based scaffold has robust mechanical properties; combined with other biological ingredients, it could increase the surface area, promote more cell adhesion and improve the biocompatibility. The potential clinical application of silk-based scaffold has been confirmed by in vivo studies on tendon/ligament repairing, such as anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, achilles tendon and rotator cuff. To develop novel biomechanically stable and host integrated tissue engineered tendon/ligament needs more further micro and macro studies, combined with product development and clinical application, which will give new hope to patients with tendon/ligament injury.

  19. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplas, Monica C.; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-01-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  20. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koplas, Monica C. [University of Mississippi Medical Center, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Radiology, Jackson, MS (United States); Schneider, Erika [Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed. (orig.)

  1. Prevalence of triceps tendon tears on MRI of the elbow and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplas, Monica C; Schneider, Erika; Sundaram, Murali

    2011-05-01

    Triceps tendon injuries are reported to be very rare. To our knowledge, there have been no studies describing its prevalence or injury patterns on MR imaging. The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence and patterns of triceps injuries based on a large series of consecutive MR examinations. Clinical correlation was obtained. From 801 consecutive elbow MR examinations over a 15-year period, 28 patients with 30 triceps tendon injuries were identified and graded as partial tendon tear and complete tendon tear. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine age, gender, cause of tears, and management. The prevalence of triceps tendon injuries was 3.8%. There were 5 women and 23 men with partial or complete tears (mean age: 46.6 years; range: 2.7 to 75.1 years). The most common injury was partial tear, found in 18 patients. There were 10 patients with 12 complete tears (2 had re-torn following surgical repair). A tear was suspected in 12 out 28 (43%) patients prior to the MRI. The most common presenting symptom was pain. The most common cause was athletic injury (8 patients [29%], including weightlifting [2 patients]). Tendon tear was found to be a complication of infection in 6 patients, and in 3 patients the tears were a complication of steroid use. Thirteen tendon tears were surgically repaired (8 of these were complete tears). Triceps tendon injury is not as rare as commonly reported and may often be clinically underdiagnosed.

  2. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  3. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lädermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described.

  4. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  5. Tendon patch grafting using the long head of the biceps for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hirotaka; Itoi, Eiji; Mineta, Mitsuyoshi; Kita, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Surgical treatment of massive rotator cuff tears is challenging for shoulder surgeons. The purpose of this study was to investigate both clinical outcomes and cuff integrity after tendon patch grafting using the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon for irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. A short deltoid splitting approach was used to expose the torn cuff tendon stump. After tenodesis of the LHB tendon, its intraarticular portion was resected. If the size of the harvested tendon was smaller than that of the cuff defect, it was split into two layers. Then, the LHB tendon was sutured to the remnant cuff tendons and fixed to the footprint using the transosseous suture technique. A total of 14 patients (12 men, 2 women; average age 64 years) underwent this procedure. The average postoperative follow-up period was 28 months (range 12-51 months). Active elevation angle of the shoulder as well as the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score were assessed before surgery and at the time of follow-up. Postoperative cuff integrity was assessed using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All cuff defects were successfully closed with this technique. Average active elevation angle improved from 69deg to 149deg. Total JOA score also improved from 54.7 points to 83.1 points. Thirteen shoulders showed no re-tearing on T2-weighted MRI; a minor discontinuity of the repaired cuff tendon was observed in the other shoulder. The LHB tendon is available in case tenodesis or tenotomy is needed. The resected tendon may be used as a graft for rotator cuff repair without any additional skin incision, which could reduce both the surgical invasion and the risk of infection. The LHB tendon patch grafting may be one of the useful options for surgical treatment of irreparable massive rotator cuff tears. (author)

  6. Flexor Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy ... fields From * To * DESCRIPTION The muscles that bend (flex) the fingers are called flexor ...

  7. triceps tendon avulsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... trauma. Systemic causes such as chronic renal failure, steriod use, diabetes mellitus, hyperparathyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, osteogensis imperfecta and local causes like local steriod injection, olecranon bursitis and attritional changes due to degenerative arthritis are associated with tendon weakening.

  8. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-02-01

    As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures.

  9. Central Tendon Injuries of Hamstring Muscles: Case Series of Operative Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempainen, Lasse; Kosola, Jussi; Pruna, Ricard; Puigdellivol, Jordi; Sarimo, Janne; Niemi, Pekka; Orava, Sakari

    2018-01-01

    Background: As compared with injuries involving muscle only, those involving the central hamstring tendon have a worse prognosis. Limited information is available regarding the surgical treatment of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings. Purpose: To describe the operative treatment and outcomes of central tendon injuries of the hamstrings among athletes. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Eight athletes (6 top level, 2 recreational) with central hamstring tendon injuries underwent magnetic resonance imaging and surgical treatment. The indication for surgery was recurrent (n = 6) or acute (n = 2) central hamstring tendon injury. All patients followed the same postoperative rehabilitation protocol, and return to play was monitored. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging found a central tendon injury in all 3 hamstring muscles (long head of the biceps femoris, semimembranosus, and semitendinosus) with disrupted tendon ends. In acute and recurrent central tendon injuries, full return to play was achieved at 2.5 to 4 months. There were no adverse events during follow-up. Conclusion: Central tendon injuries of the hamstrings can be successfully repaired surgically after acute and recurrent ruptures. PMID:29479545

  10. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Qian; Chen Denglong; Yang Zhiming; Li Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  11. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qian [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Chen Denglong [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Yang Zhiming [Division of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li Min, E-mail: mli@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China)

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  12. Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Repair With Soft Tissue Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, Tanujan; Pendegrass, Catherine J.; Shahbazi, Shirin; Lambert, Simon; Alexander, Susan; Blunn, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tears of the rotator cuff are one of the most common tendon disorders. Treatment often includes surgical repair, but the rate of failure to gain or maintain healing has been reported to be as high as 94%. This has been substantially attributed to the inadequate capacity of tendon to heal once damaged, particularly to bone at the enthesis. A number of strategies have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing, tendon-tendon healing, and tendon regeneration. Scaffolds have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects but may not possess situation-specific or durable mechanical and biological characteristics. Purpose To provide an overview of the biology of tendon-bone healing and the current scaffolds used to augment rotator cuff repairs. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A preliminary literature search of MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed using the terms rotator cuff scaffolds, rotator cuff augmentation, allografts for rotator cuff repair, xenografts for rotator cuff repair, and synthetic grafts for rotator cuff repair. Results The search identified 438 unique articles. Of these, 214 articles were irrelevant to the topic and were therefore excluded. This left a total of 224 studies that were suitable for analysis. Conclusion A number of novel biomaterials have been developed into biologically and mechanically favorable scaffolds. Few clinical trials have examined their effect on tendon-bone healing in well-designed, long-term follow-up studies with appropriate control groups. While there is still considerable work to be done before scaffolds are introduced into routine clinical practice, there does appear to be a clear indication for their use as an interpositional graft for large and massive retracted rotator cuff tears and when repairing a poor-quality degenerative tendon. PMID:26665095

  13. Comparison of Clinical and Structural Outcomes by Subscapularis Tendon Status in Massive Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Nam, Dae Jin; Kim, Se Jin; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2017-09-01

    The subscapularis tendon is essential in maintaining normal glenohumeral biomechanics. However, few studies have addressed the outcomes of tears extending to the subscapularis tendon in massive rotator cuff tears. To assess the clinical and structural outcomes of arthroscopic repair of massive rotator cuff tears involving the subscapularis. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Between January 2010 and January 2014, 122 consecutive patients with massive rotator cuff tear underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Overall, 122 patients were enrolled (mean age, 66 years; mean follow-up period, 39.5 months). Patients were categorized into 3 groups based on subscapularis tendon status: intact subscapularis tendon (I group; n = 45), tear involving less than the superior one-third (P group; n = 35), and tear involving more than one-third of the subscapularis tendon (C group; n = 42). All rotator cuff tears were repaired; however, subscapularis tendon tears involving less than the superior one-third in P group were only debrided. Pain visual analog scale, Constant, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores and passive range of motion were measured preoperatively and at the final follow-up. Rotator cuff integrity, global fatty degeneration index, and occupation ratio were determined via magnetic resonance imaging preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. We identified 37 retears (31.1%) based on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Retear rate in patients in the C group (47.6%) was higher than that in the I group (22.9%) or P group (20.0%) ( P = .011). Retear subclassification based on the involved tendons showed that subsequent subscapularis tendon retears were noted in only the C group. The improvement in clinical scores after repair was statistically significant in all groups but not different among the groups. Between-group comparison showed significant differences in preoperative external rotation ( P = .021). However, no statistically

  14. Surgical treatment of distal biceps tendon rupture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina N. Cozma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Distal biceps tendon rupture affects the functional upperextremity movement, impairing supination and flexion strength. According to age, profession and additional risks treatment might be nonoperative or surgical. Methods. We describe the case of a 43 years old male patient who sustained an injury to his right distal biceps and was diagnosed with acute right distal biceps rupture. Surgical treatment was decided and biceps tendon was reinserted to the radius tuberosity using a combination of a cortical button fixation associated with an interference screw. Results. Postoperative functional result was favorable with no complications and with no movement limitation after one month. Conclusions. When possible, distal biceps tendon repair should be realized surgically because this permits restoring of the muscle strength to near normal levels with no loss of motion. Nerve complications are common; therefore the surgery should be realized by experienced upper extremity surgeons.

  15. HGF Mediates the Anti-inflammatory Effects of PRP on Injured Tendons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Middleton, Kellie K.; Fu, Freddie H.; Im, Hee-Jeong; Wang, James H-C.

    2013-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2. PMID:23840657

  16. HGF mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of PRP on injured tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianying Zhang

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF and other growth factors are widely used in orthopaedic/sports medicine to repair injured tendons. While PRP treatment is reported to decrease pain in patients with tendon injury, the mechanism of this effect is not clear. Tendon pain is often associated with tendon inflammation, and HGF is known to protect tissues from inflammatory damages. Therefore, we hypothesized that HGF in PRP causes the anti-inflammatory effects. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro experiments on rabbit tendon cells and in vivo experiments on a mouse Achilles tendon injury model. We found that addition of PRP or HGF decreased gene expression of COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1, induced by the treatment of tendon cells in vitro with IL-1β. Further, the treatment of tendon cell cultures with HGF antibodies reduced the suppressive effects of PRP or HGF on IL-1β-induced COX-1, COX-2, and mPGES-1 gene expressions. Treatment with PRP or HGF almost completely blocked the cellular production of PGE2 and the expression of COX proteins. Finally, injection of PRP or HGF into wounded mouse Achilles tendons in vivo decreased PGE2 production in the tendinous tissues. Injection of platelet-poor plasma (PPP however, did not reduce PGE2 levels in the wounded tendons, but the injection of HGF antibody inhibited the effects of PRP and HGF. Further, injection of PRP or HGF also decreased COX-1 and COX-2 proteins. These results indicate that PRP exerts anti-inflammatory effects on injured tendons through HGF. This study provides basic scientific evidence to support the use of PRP to treat injured tendons because PRP can reduce inflammation and thereby reduce the associated pain caused by high levels of PGE2.

  17. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  18. Improved Achilles tendon healing by early mechanical loading in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihong; Jiang, Dianming; Wen, Shuzheng; Jing, Shangfei; Fan, Dongsheng; Hao, Zengtao; Han, Chaoqian

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structure and the attachment strength of a healing tendon-bone interface and the role of mechanical loading in tendon healing. Sixty rabbits underwent unilateral detachment and repair of the Achilles tendon. Thirty animals were immobilized (Group A), and the others wereallowed loadingimmediately postoperatively (Group B). Animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks and evaluated for histological and biomechanical testing. Statistical analysis was performed with an independent t test with significance set at P = 0.05. The ultimate stress was greater in group B (4.598 ± 1.321 N/mm(2)) compared with the control group (3.388 ± 0.994 N/mm(2)) (P tendon-to-bone interface with a larger area of chondrocytes was found in group B (P tendon-to-bone interface.

  19. Miscellaneous conditions of tendons, tendon sheaths, and ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, S J; Dik, K J

    1995-08-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasonography has greatly enhances our ability to diagnose injuries of tendons and tendon sheaths that were previously either unrecognized or poorly understood. For may of these injuries, there is currently only a small amount of follow-up data. This article considers injuries of the deep digital flexor tendon and its accessory ligament, the carpal tunnel syndrome soft tissue swellings on the dorsal aspect of the carpus, intertubercular (bicipital) bursitis and bicipital tendinitis, injuries of the gastrocnemius tendon, common calcaneal tendinitis, rupture of peroneus (fibularis tertius) and ligaments injuries of the back.

  20. Novel methods for tendon investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Michael; Langberg, Henning; Bojsen-Møller, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. Tendon structures have been studied for decades, but over the last decade, methodological development and renewed interest for metabolic, circulatory and tissue protein turnover in tendon tissue has resulted in a rising amount of investigations. Method. This paper will detail the various...... modern investigative techniques available to study tendons. Results. There are a variety of investigative methods available to study the correlations between mechanics and biology in tendons. Conclusion. The available methodologies not only allow for potential insight into physiological...... and pathophysiological mechanisms in tendon tissue, but also, to some extent, allow for more elaborate studies of the intact human tendon. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.1080/09638280701785403...

  1. [Achilles tendon ruptures: 25 year's experience in sport-orthopedic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, M; Widmer, K H; Steinbrück, K

    2002-12-01

    From 1972 - 1996 570 Achilles tendon ruptures in 565 patients were treated in the Sportklinik Stuttgart. The 499 men and 66 women had an average age of 38 years. For the diagnosis of a Achilles tendon rupture Ultrasound and MRI are important procedures, but clinical history and examination are still the best methods to find an Achilles tendon rupture (100%). However,the Actiology of the Achilles tendon rupture is still controversial and cannot be answered by these methods. Opposed to the degenerative theory, biomechanical experiments show that any Achilles tendon can tear when the calf muscle is tensed before the tendon is quickly stretched. We found that 69.8% of the patients with Achilles tendon rupture had a real trauma. Regardless of that, the treatment of the ruptured Achilles tendon has considerably changed over the last ten years. Responsible for this development are the positive experiences at the field of sports medicine with minimally invasive methods and the early functional treatment after knee surgery. Since we use an early functional rehabilitation concept instead of plaster immobilisation, all methods to treat a ruptured Achilles tendon have been improved. 43.5% of the patients after plaster immobilisation and 28.8% of the patients after early functional rehabilitation had a subjectively felt force reduction. Other important selecting criteria are the risk factors related to treatment method. Minimal invasive percutaneous Achilles tendon repair is considerably better than conservative therapy with a high rate of re-rupture (9.8%) and better than the open surgical repair, which carries a higher risk of infection (2.2%)

  2. Intermuscular interaction via myofascial force transmission: Effects of tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus length on force transmission from rat extensor digitorum longus muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2001-01-01

    Force transmission in rat anterior crural compartment, containing tibialis anterior (TA), extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, was investigated. These muscles together with the muscles of the peroneal compartment were excited maximally. Force was measured at

  3. Presence of Bacteria in Spontaneous Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, Christer G; Fu, Sai-Chuen; Hopkins, Chelsea; Luan, Ju; Ip, Margaret; Yung, Shu-Hang; Friman, Göran; Qin, Ling; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2017-07-01

    The structural pathology of Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures resembles tendinopathy, but the causes remain unknown. Recently, a number of diseases were found to be attributed to bacterial infections, resulting in low-grade inflammation and progressive matrix disturbance. The authors speculate that spontaneous AT ruptures may also be influenced by the presence of bacteria. Bacteria are present in ruptured ATs but not in healthy tendons. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with spontaneous AT ruptures and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction were recruited for this study. During AT surgical repair, excised tendinopathic tissue was collected, and healthy tendon samples were obtained as controls from hamstring tendon grafts used in ACL reconstruction. Half of every sample was reserved for DNA extraction and the other half for histology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using 16S rRNA gene universal primers, and the PCR products were sequenced for the identification of bacterial species. A histological examination was performed to compare tendinopathic changes in the case and control samples. Five of 20 AT rupture samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA, while none of the 23 hamstring tendon samples were positive. Sterile operating and experimental conditions and tests on samples, controlling for harvesting and processing procedures, ruled out the chance of postoperative bacterial contamination. The species identified predominantly belonged to the Staphylococcus genus. AT rupture samples exhibited histopathological features characteristic of tendinopathy, and most healthy hamstring tendon samples displayed normal tendon features. There were no apparent differences in histopathology between the bacterial DNA-positive and bacterial DNA-negative AT rupture samples. The authors have demonstrated the presence of bacterial DNA in ruptured AT samples. It may suggest the potential involvement of bacteria

  4. Partial isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon in a professional soccer player: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariani Pier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complete isolated rupture of the popliteus tendon has been described as a rare injury and this report describes the case of a 31-year-old soccer player who sustained a partial rupture of the popliteus tendon during a game. The injury was suspected clinically and at MRI but confirmed only by the arthroscopic examination. The treatment consisted in open debridment with no tendon repair or augmentation. Seven weeks post-operation the patient was symptom-free and returned to competitive professional soccer at the same preinjury level. The clinical and arthroscopic findings of the case reported suggest a possible overuse disease with degenerative expression.

  5. Healing parameters in a rabbit partial tendon defect following tenocyte/biomaterial implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Christiane; John, Thilo; Conrad, Claudia; Lohan, Anke; Hondke, Sylvia; Ertel, Wolfgang; Kaps, Christian; Endres, Michaela; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2011-07-01

    Although rabbits are commonly used as tendon repair model, interpretative tools are divergent and comprehensive scoring systems are lacking. Hence, the aim was to develop a multifaceted scoring system to characterize healing in a partial Achilles tendon defect model. A 3 mm diameter defect was created in the midsubstance of the medial M. gastrocnemius tendon, which remained untreated or was filled with a polyglycolic-acid (PGA) scaffold + fibrin and either left cell-free or seeded with Achilles tenocytes. After 6 and 12 weeks, tendon repair was assessed macroscopically and histologically using self-constructed scores. Macroscopical scoring revealed superior results in the tenocyte seeded PGA + fibrin group compared with the controls at both time points. Histology of all operated tendons after 6 weeks proved extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, hypercellularity and occurrence of irregular running elastic fibres with no significance between the groups. Some inflammation was associated with PGA implantation and increased sulphated proteoglycan deposition predominantly with the empty defects. After 12 weeks defect areas became hard to recognize and differences between groups, except for the increased sulphated proteoglycans content in the empty defects, were almost nullified. We describe a partial Achilles tendon defect model and versatile scoring tools applicable for characterizing biomaterial-supported tendon healing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sensitivity of physical examination versus arthroscopy in diagnosing subscapularis tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruqui, Sami; Wijdicks, Coen; Foad, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of physical examination in the detection of subscapularis tendon tears and compare it with the gold standard of arthroscopy to determine whether clinical examination can reliably predict the presence of subscapularis tendon tears. This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients (52 shoulders) who underwent arthroscopic subscapularis tendon repairs between September 2008 and April 2012. Positive findings on any combination of the belly press, lift-off, and bear hug tests constituted a positive physical examination result. There was a positive finding on physical examination in 42 of 52 patients. The sensitivity of the physical examination as a whole was 81%. The literature has shown that the belly press, bear hug, and lift-off tests are specific to the subscapularis tendon. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the sensitivity of these 3 separate clinical tests as a composite. Knowledge regarding the sensitivity of the subscapularis-specific physical examination as a composite can lead practitioners to implement all 3 components, even when 1 test has a negative finding, thus promoting a more thorough physical examination. Because unrepaired subscapularis tendon tears can result in poor outcomes in the repair of other rotator cuff tendons, a complete physical examination would be beneficial to patients with shoulder pathology. The authors conclude that physical examination, when performed consistently by an experienced practitioner, can reliably predict the presence of subscapularis tendon tears.

  7. Analysis of achilles tendon vascularity with second-generation contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Eugenio; Ronga, Mario; Recaldini, Chiara; Fontana, Federico; Callegari, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    To compare morphological, power Doppler, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) features of the Achilles tendon between asymptomatic athletes and athletes who had undergone surgical repair of a previous rupture. Twenty-four athletes were divided in two groups (A and B). Group A included 14 patients with a median age of 32 years (range 27 to 47 years) who had undergone surgical repair for unilateral Achilles tendon rupture. Group B (control group) included 10 subjects with a median age of 34 years (range 27 to 40 years) with no previous or present history of tendinopathy. All patients were evaluated with ultrasound, power Doppler, and CEUS with second-generation contrast agent. We studied the uninjured Achilles tendon in athletes of group A and either the left or the right Achilles tendon of the athletes in group B. CEUS showed a significantly greater ability to detect a greater number of vascular spots within the uninjured tendon of group A compared to group B (power Doppler ultrasound in the uninjured contralateral Achilles tendon. CEUS is useful to evaluate vascularity not detected by other imaging techniques. Vascularity in the uninjured tendon seems to be increased in patients who had a previous rupture. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Análise biomecânica e histológica de tendões flexores reparados em coelhos usando três técnicas de sutura (quatro e seis passadas com mobilização ativa precoce Biomechanics and histological analysis in rabbit flexor tendons repaired using three suture techniques (four and six strands with early active mobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Lourenço Severo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar o tempo das suturas, a biomecânica (deformidade entre os cotos tendíneos e a histologia dos três grupos de reparo cirúrgico tendíneo: Brasil-2 (quatro passadas, com técnica de sutura central em que o nó final se encontra fora do tendão; Indiana (quatro passadas; e Tsai (seis passadas, com técnicas de sutura central em que o nó final se encontra no interior do tendão reparado, associados de mobilização ativa precoce. MÉTODOS: O tendão calcâneo direito de 36 coelhos da raça New Zealand foi escolhido para a análise. Este apresenta calibre semelhante ao tendão flexor humano, o qual tem aproximadamente 4,5mm (variando 2mm para mais ou menos. A amostra selecionada apresentava a mesma massa (2,5 a 3kg e eram adultos machos ou fêmeas (a partir de 8½ meses de idade. RESULTADOS: Na análise biomecânica, não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa (p > 0,01. Não houve diferença estatística com relação ao tempo cirúrgico na realização das três técnicas de suturas (p > 0,01. Evidenciou-se, qualitativamente e quantitativamente, com a mobilidade ativa precoce, um espessamento da fibra de colágeno em 38,9% dentro do 15º dia e de 66,7% dentro do período do 30º dia (p = 0,095. CONCLUSÃO: Esta investigação serviu para demonstrar que não houve diferença histológica do nó final da sutura central dentro ou fora do tendão reparado, bem como o número de passadas, no que diz respeito à cicatrização, vascularização ou deformidade do tendão no túnel osteofibroso com as técnicas de reparo aplicadas, associados de mobilização ativa precoce.OBJECTIVE: analyzing suture time, biomechanics (deformity between the stumps and the histology of three groups of tendinous surgical repair: Brazil-2 (4-strands which the end knot (core is located outside the tendon, Indiana (4-strands and Tsai (6-strands with sutures technique which the end knot (core is inner of the tendon, associated with early active

  9. Comparação do ultrassom pulsado e contínuo no reparo tendíneo de ratos Comparison of pulsed and continuous ultrasound on tendon repair in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladson Ricardo Flor Bertolini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available No tratamento de lesões tendíneas, o uso do ultrassom surge como possibilidade terapêutica, apesar de lacunas sobre seus efeitos clínicos. O objetivo foi avaliar dois protocolos de ultrassom terapêutico sobre dor e edema após trauma tendíneo. Vinte e um ratos Wistar foram submetidos a trauma no tendão calcâneo e divididos em três grupos: sham (GS; ultrassom contínuo (GUC; e ultrassom pulsado (GUP. O trauma ocorreu sobre a face lateral do tendão calcâneo direito, com energia de 0,40 J. A dor foi avaliada pelo teste de incapacidade funcional e o edema, pelo diâmetro laterolateral. Foram realizadas avaliações previamente à lesão; após 1 hora da indução da lesão; após o 1º tratamento; 2, 8 e 24 horas após lesão; e após o 5º dia. O tratamento ocorreu em 5 dias, com transdutor de 1 MHz, durante 3 minutos, sobre o local do trauma, com dose de 0,4 W/cm² SATA. Os resultados da incapacidade funcional para GS mostraram aumento da nocicepção. Para GUC houve aumento ao comparar a avaliação 1 (AV1 com as avaliações 2 (AV2, 3 (AV3 e 4 (AV4; ao comparar AV2 com as avaliações 5 (AV5 e 6 (AV6 houve diminuição de valores. Para GUP houve aumento ao comparar AV1 com AV2 e AV3, mas ao comparar AV2 com as seguintes, houve diminuição significativa a partir de AV4. Para o edema, os grupos tratados produziram aumento inicial, com redução nas últimas avaliações. O ultrassom terapêutico produziu diminuição de dor e edema, mais precocemente para a forma pulsada.In tendon injuries treatment, the use of ultrasound appears as a therapeutic option, despite the lack of their clinical effects. The aim was to evaluate two therapeutic ultrasound protocols, continuous or pulsed, on the pain and swelling after tendinous trauma. Twenty-one Wistar rats were subjected to traumatic injury in the tendon and divided in three groups: sham (GS, continuous ultrasound (GUC, and pulsed ultrasound (GUP. The injury occurred on right Achilles tendon

  10. Management of tendon haemangiosarcoma in a Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Kvapil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year old intact female Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus was suffering from lameness due to a mass on the right dorsal metacarpal region that caused acute swelling and local skin necrosis. Histology examination and immunohistochemistry of the biopsy material of a mass revealed haemangiosarcoma of the extensor tendons. Three weeks after the biopsy, the tumour was enlarged to 6 cm in diameter and the animal became disabled. The tumour with its associated tendon were resected and the tendon’s edges were bridged with a synthetic polytape graft. The camel was fully weight-bearing after the surgery. Two weeks later, the graft was removed due to widespread necrosis. Since the wound was positive for Corynebacterium sp., Acinetobacter iwoffii, Micrococcus sp., Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus sp., the post-operative antibiotic treatment was prolonged for 28 days. Four months later, the wound healed using daily irrigation and bandaging and the camel walked normally. Nine months after diagnosis, the camel suddenly died without any clinical signs. Metastases of the haemangiosarcoma were found in the liver, lungs, kidneys, brain, meninges, and mediastinum. Exsanguination due to rupture of a liver metastasis was determined as the cause of the death. Haemangiosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm that arises from endothelial cells of blood vessels and tends to be very aggressive. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first case report of a metastasizing haemangiosarcoma arising from the lateral extensor tendon in a Bactrian camel.

  11. Can a Biodegradable Implanted Bilayered Drug Delivery System Loaded with BMP-2/BMP-12 Take an Effective Role in the Biological Repair Process of Bone–Tendon Injuries? A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Komur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Use of biodegradable and biocompatible materials in the orthopedic surgery is gaining popularity. In this research, the rate of controlled release of a bilayered prototype biomaterial designed to promote osteoblastic and tenoblastic activity was calculated using pharmacochemical methods. Methods. The first part of the design, composed of a sodium tetraborate, polyvinyl alcohol, and starch based hydrogel, was loaded with bone morphogenic protein-2. The second part which was composed of a sodium tetraborate, polyvinyl alcohol, and chitosan based hydrogel was loaded with bone morphogenic protein-12. Osteochondral and tendon tissue specimens were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of gonarthrosis and primary bone cells and tendon cells cultures were prepared following treatment with collagenase enzyme. Cell samples were collected from the groups by means of an invert light microscope and environmental scanning electron microscope underwent at the 1st and 21st days. The level of osteogenic differentiation was measured by the activity of alkaline phosphatase. For the statistical evaluation of the obtained data, groups were compared with post hoc Tukey test following analysis of variance. Level of significance was accepted to be <0,01. Results. Both osteogenic and tenogenic stimulation were observed in the cultured specimens. In comparison to the control groups, the rate of proliferation of healthy cells was found to be higher in the groups to which the design was added (p<0.01. Conclusions. Our research is a preliminary report that describes a study conducted in an in vitro experimental setting. We believe that such prototype systems may be pioneers in targeted drug therapies after reconstructional surgeries.

  12. Chronic Degeneration Leads to Poor Healing of Repaired Massive Rotator Cuff Tears in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Megan L; Cavinatto, Leonardo M; Ward, Samuel R; Havlioglu, Necat; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Galatz, Leesa M

    2015-10-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tears present a clinical challenge, often with poor outcomes after surgical repair. Degenerative changes to the muscle, tendon, and bone are thought to hinder healing after surgical repair; additionally, the ability to overcome degenerative changes after surgical repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate healing outcomes of muscle, tendon, and bone after tendon repair in a model of chronic rotator cuff disease and to compare these outcomes to those of acute rotator cuff injuries and repair. The hypothesis was that degenerative rotator cuff changes associated with chronic multitendon tears and muscle unloading would lead to poor structural and mechanical outcomes after repair compared with acute injuries and repair. Controlled laboratory study. Chronic rotator cuff injuries, induced via detachment of the supraspinatus (SS) and infraspinatus (IS) tendons and injection of botulinum toxin A into the SS and IS muscle bellies, were created in the shoulders of rats. After 8 weeks of injury, tendons were surgically reattached to the humeral head, and an acute, dual-tendon injury and repair was performed on the contralateral side. After 8 weeks of healing, muscles were examined histologically, and tendon-to-bone samples were examined microscopically, histologically, and biomechanically and via micro-computed tomography. All repairs were intact at the time of dissection, with no evidence of gapping or ruptures. Tendon-to-bone healing after repair in our chronic injury model led to reduced bone quality and morphological disorganization at the repair site compared with acute injuries and repair. SS and IS muscles were atrophic at 8 weeks after repair of chronic injuries, indicating incomplete recovery after repair, whereas SS and IS muscles exhibited less atrophy and degeneration in the acute injury group at 8 weeks after repair. After chronic injuries and repair, humeral heads had decreased total mineral density and an altered

  13. Measurement of fatigue in knee flexor and extensor muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Y; Senda, M; Oka, T; Yagata, Y; Takahara, Y; Nagashima, H; Inoue, H

    2000-04-01

    In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.

  14. Dickkopf1 Up-Regulation Induced by a High Concentration of Dexamethasone Promotes Rat Tendon Stem Cells to Differentiate Into Adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Chen; Hong Tang; Xiangzhou Liu; Mei Zhou; Jiqiang Zhang; Kanglai Tang

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Dexamethasone (Dex)-induced spontaneous tendon rupture and decreased self-repair capability is very common in clinical practice. The metaplasia of adipose tissue in the ruptured tendon indicates that Dex may induce tendon stem cells (TSCs) to differentiate into adipocytes, but the mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we used in vitro methods to investigate the effects of Dex on rat TSC differentiation and the molecular mechanisms underlying this process. Methods: ...

  15. Application of a novel Kalman filter based block matching method to ultrasound images for hand tendon displacement estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ting-Yu; Chen, Hsiao-I; Shih, Cho-Chiang; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Hsu, Hsiu-Yun; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Information about tendon displacement is important for allowing clinicians to not only quantify preoperative tendon injuries but also to identify any adhesive scaring between tendon and adjacent tissue. The Fisher-Tippett (FT) similarity measure has recently been shown to be more accurate than the Laplacian sum of absolute differences (SAD) and Gaussian sum of squared differences (SSD) similarity measures for tracking tendon displacement in ultrasound B-mode images. However, all of these similarity measures can easily be influenced by the quality of the ultrasound image, particularly its signal-to-noise ratio. Ultrasound images of injured hands are unfortunately often of poor quality due to the presence of adhesive scars. The present study investigated a novel Kalman-filter scheme for overcoming this problem. Three state-of-the-art tracking methods (FT, SAD, and SSD) were used to track the displacements of phantom and cadaver tendons, while FT was used to track human tendons. These three tracking methods were combined individually with the proposed Kalman-filter (K1) scheme and another Kalman-filter scheme used in a previous study to optimize the displacement trajectories of the phantom and cadaver tendons. The motion of the human extensor digitorum communis tendon was measured in the present study using the FT-K1 scheme. The experimental results indicated that SSD exhibited better accuracy in the phantom experiments, whereas FT exhibited better performance for tracking real tendon motion in the cadaver experiments. All three tracking methods were influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. On the other hand, the K1 scheme was able to optimize the tracking trajectory of displacement in all experiments, even from a location with a poor image quality. The human experimental data indicated that the normal tendons were displaced more than the injured tendons, and that the motion ability of the injured tendon was restored after appropriate rehabilitation

  16. Biomaterials based strategies for rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Su, Wei; Shah, Vishva; Hobson, Divia; Yildirimer, Lara; Yeung, Kelvin W K; Zhao, Jinzhong; Cui, Wenguo; Zhao, Xin

    2017-09-01

    Tearing of the rotator cuff commonly occurs as among one of the most frequently experienced tendon disorders. While treatment typically involves surgical repair, failure rates to achieve or sustain healing range from 20 to 90%. The insufficient capacity to recover damaged tendon to heal to the bone, especially at the enthesis, is primarily responsible for the failure rates reported. Various types of biomaterials with special structures have been developed to improve tendon-bone healing and tendon regeneration, and have received considerable attention for replacement, reconstruction, or reinforcement of tendon defects. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of the anatomy of the rotator cuff and then discuss various design strategies to augment rotator cuff repair. Furthermore, we highlight current biomaterials used for repair and their clinical applications as well as the limitations in the literature. We conclude this article with challenges and future directions in designing more advanced biomaterials for augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization and Surgical Management of Achilles Tendon Sleeve Avulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jeannie; Easley, Mark E; Nunley, James A

    2016-06-01

    An Achilles sleeve avulsion occurs when the tendon ruptures distally from its calcaneal insertion as a continuous "sleeve." This relatively rare injury pattern may not be appreciated until the time of surgery and can be challenging to treat because, unlike a midsubstance rupture, insufficient tendon remains on the calcaneus to allow for end-to-end repair, and unlike a tuberosity avulsion fracture, any bony element avulsed with the tendon is inadequate for internal fixation. This study aimed to highlight the characteristics of Achilles sleeve avulsions and present the outcomes of operative repair using suture anchor fixation. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 11 consecutive Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions (10 males, 1 female; mean age 44 years) that underwent operative repair between 2008 and 2014. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and operative details were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes were collected at a mean follow-up of 38.4 (range, 12-83.5) months, including the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, plantarflexion strength, patient satisfaction, and complications. Eight patients (72.7%) had preexisting symptoms of insertional Achilles disease. Ten of 11 (90.9%) injuries were sustained during recreational athletic activity. An Achilles sleeve avulsion was recognized preoperatively in 7 of 11 (64%) cases, where lateral ankle radiographs demonstrated a small radiodensity several centimeters proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Intraoperatively, 90.9% of sleeve avulsions had a concomitant Haglund deformity and macroscopic evidence of insertional tendinopathy. All patients healed after suture anchor repair. The average AOFAS score was 92.8 and VAS score was 0.9. Ten patients (90.9%) were completely satisfied. One complication occurred, consisting of delayed wound healing. Achilles tendon sleeve avulsions predominantly occurred in middle-aged men with preexisting insertional

  18. Transfer of extensor digiti minimi and extensor carpi ulnaris nerve branches to the intrinsic motor nerve branches: A histological study on cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, H; Haji Vandi, S

    2017-06-01

    In cases of high ulnar and median nerve palsy, result of nerve repair in term of intrinsic muscle recovery is unsatisfactory. Distal nerve transfer can alleviate the regeneration time and improve the results. Transfer of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) nerve branches to the deep branch of ulnar nerve (DBUN)/recurrent branch of median nerve (RMN) at wrist had been used to restore intrinsic hand function but, incomplete recovery occurred. The axon count at the donor nerve has a strong influence on the final results. This cadaveric study aims to analyses the histology of this nerve transfer to evaluate whether these donor nerves are suitable for this transfer or another donor nerve may be considered. Ten cadaveric upper limbs dissected to identify the location of the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN. Surface area, fascicle count, and axon number was determined by histological methods. The mean of axon number in the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN branches was 5931, 7355, 30960 and 35426, respectively. In this study, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 37% (13281/35426) of that in the DBUN. Also, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 42% (13281/30960) of that in the RMN. The axon count data showed an unfavorable match between the EDM, ECU and DBUN/RMN. Therefore, it is suggested that another donor nerve with higher axon number to be considered. Cadaver study (histological study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven; Miller, Theodore T.; Hofman, Josh

    2007-01-01

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  20. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Manhasset, NY (United States); Miller, Theodore T. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Hofman, Josh [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  1. The range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V: a comparison of active vs passive flexion mobilisation regimes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Panchal, J

    1997-10-01

    A number of early postoperative mobilisation regimes have been developed in an attempt to increase tendon excursion and gliding and thereby reduce formation of adhesions following repair of flexor tendons. Early active flexion mobilisation regimes are becoming more popular, and have replaced early passive flexion regimes in many centres. The aim of the present study was: (a) to determine the range of excursion of flexor tendons in Zone V, and (b) to compare the excursion ranges between active (Belfast) and passive (modified Duran) flexion mobilisation regimes postoperatively. This was done (a) in two cadavers, and (b) in two patients intraoperatively, and postoperatively at 10 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks. With passive flexion, the mean tendon excursion in Zone V in cadavers was 1 mm for flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendons respectively. With simulated active flexion, the mean tendon excursion was 14 mm, 10 mm and 11 mm respectively. The mean tendon excursion in clinical cases intraoperatively following passive flexion was 2 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively; following simulated active flexion it was 10 mm, 11 mm and 11 mm for FDS, FDP and FPL respectively. On the tenth day following repair, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL were 1 mm, 4 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 3 mm, 10 mm and 12 mm on active flexion respectively. Three weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 1 mm, 2 mm and 1 mm on passive flexion as compared to 5 mm, 15 mm on active flexion respectively. Six weeks postoperatively, the mean excursions of FDS, FDP and FPL tendons were 9 mm, 7 mm and 4 mm on passive flexion as compared to 12 mm, 33 mm and 20 mm on active flexion respectively. These results demonstrate an increased excursion of repaired flexor tendons in Zone V following an active flexion mobilisation regime as compared to a passive flexion mobilisation regime.

  2. Anabolic Steroids Reduce Muscle Degeneration Associated With Rotator Cuff Tendon Release in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C; Flück, Martin; Benn, Mario C; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Wieser, Karl

    2015-10-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tendon tearing is associated with irreversible atrophy, fatty infiltration, and interstitial fibrosis of the corresponding muscle. Anabolic steroids can prevent musculotendinous degeneration during retraction and/or can reverse these changes after operative repair of the retracted musculotendinous unit in sheep. Controlled laboratory study. The infraspinatus tendon was released in 18 alpine sheep. All sheep underwent repair of the retracted musculotendinous unit after 16 weeks and were sacrificed after 22 weeks; 6 sheep served as controls, 6 sheep were treated with weekly intramuscular injection of 150 mg of nandrolone decanoate after infraspinatus (ISP) repair (group N6W), and 6 sheep were treated with 150 mg of nandrolone decanoate immediately after tendon release (group N22W). Muscle biopsy specimens were taken before tendon release and after 16 and 22 weeks. Muscle volume and fatty infiltration (on MRI), myotendinous retraction, and muscle density (on computed tomography) were measured immediately after ISP release, after 6 weeks, and before ISP repair and sacrifice. Muscle volume on MRI decreased to a mean (±SD) of 80% ± 8% of the original volume after 6 weeks, remained stable at 78% ± 11% after 16 weeks, and decreased further to 69% ± 9% after 22 weeks in the control group. These findings were no different from those in group N22W (72% ± 9% at 6 weeks, 73% ± 6% at 16 weeks, and 67% ± 5% at 22 weeks). Conversely, the N6W group did not show a decrease in ISP volume after repair; this finding differed significantly from the response in the control and N22W groups. Fatty infiltration (on MRI) continuously increased in the control group (12% ± 4% at tendon release, 17% ± 4% after 6 weeks, 50% ± 9% after 16 weeks, and 60% ± 8% after 22 weeks) and the N6W group. However, application of anabolic steroids at the time of tendon release (N22W group) significantly reduced fatty infiltration after 16 (16% ± 5%; P anabolic steroids starting

  3. Articular Cartilage Increases Transition Zone Regeneration in Bone-tendon Junction Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ling; Lee, Kwong Man; Leung, Kwok Sui

    2008-01-01

    The fibrocartilage transition zone in the direct bone-tendon junction reduces stress concentration and protects the junction from failure. Unfortunately, bone-tendon junctions often heal without fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. We hypothesized articular cartilage grafts could increase fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration. Using a goat partial patellectomy repair model, autologous articular cartilage was harvested from the excised distal third patella and interposed between the residual proximal two-thirds bone fragment and tendon during repair in 36 knees. We evaluated fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration, bone formation, and mechanical strength after repair at 6, 12, and 24 weeks and compared them with direct repair. Autologous articular cartilage interposition resulted in more fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration (69.10% ± 14.11% [mean ± standard deviation] versus 8.67% ± 7.01% at 24 weeks) than direct repair at all times. There was no difference in the amount of bone formation and mechanical strength achieved. Autologous articular cartilage interposition increases fibrocartilage transition zone regeneration in bone-tendon junction healing, but additional research is required to ascertain the mechanism of stimulation and to establish the clinical applicability. PMID:18987921

  4. Healing of rotator cuff tendons using botulinum toxin A and immobilization in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Shorofsky, Michael J; Stein, Jason A; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-15

    We evaluated effects of botulinum toxin A (Botox) and cast immobilization on tendon healing in a rat model. Injection of Botox into rat supraspinatus was hypothesized to reduce muscle active force and improved healing. Eighty-four supraspinatus tendons were surgically transected and repaired in 42 Sprague-Dawley rats (transosseous technique). After repair, supraspinatus muscle was injected with saline or Botox (3 or 6 U/kg). Half the shoulders were cast-immobilized for the entire postoperative period; half were allowed free cage activity. Histology was examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. A healing zone cross-sectional area was measured, and biomechanical testing of repair strength and tendon viscoelastic properties was conducted at 4 and 12 weeks. Botox alone and cast immobilization alone exhibited increased ultimate load compared with controls (saline injection, no immobilization) at 4 weeks. No difference in ultimate load occurred between Botox-only and cast-only groups. At 12 weeks, the Botox (6 U/kg) plus cast immobilization group was significantly weakest (p < 0.05). A trend was shown toward decreased healing zone cross-sectional areas in casted groups. Supraspinatus Botox injection after rotator cuff repair might help protect the repair. However, cast immobilization plus Botox administration is harmful to rotator cuff healing in a rat tendon model.

  5. Histological study of the influence of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) on the healing of divided Achilles tendons in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sarmiento, J Andrés; Domínguez, Juan M; Granados, María M; Morgaz, Juan; Navarrete, Rocío; Carrillo, José M; Gómez-Villamandos, Rafael J; Muñoz-Rascón, Pilar; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana; Millán, Yolanda; García-Balletbó, Montserrat; Cugat, Ramón

    2013-02-06

    The use of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) has been proposed to improve the healing of Achilles tendon injuries, but there is debate about the effectiveness of this therapy. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the histological effects of PRGF, which is a type of leukocyte-poor platelet-rich plasma, on tendon healing. The Achilles tendons of twenty-eight sheep were divided surgically. The animals were randomly divided into four groups of seven animals each. The repaired tendons in two groups received an infiltration of PRGF intraoperatively and every week for the following three weeks under ultrasound guidance. The tendons in the other two groups received injections with saline solution. The animals in one PRGF group and one saline solution group were killed at four weeks, and the animals in the remaining two groups were killed at eight weeks. The Achilles tendons were examined histologically, and the morphometry of fibroblast nuclei was calculated. The fibroblast nuclei of the PRGF-treated tendons were more elongated and more parallel to the tendon axis than the fibroblast nuclei of the tendons in the saline solution group at eight weeks. PRGF-treated tendons showed more packed and better oriented collagen bundles at both four and eight weeks. In addition to increased maturation of the collagen structure, fibroblast density was significantly lower in PRGF-infiltrated tendons. PRGF-treated tendons exhibited faster vascular regression than tendons in the control groups, as demonstrated by a lower vascular density at eight weeks. PRGF was associated with histological changes consistent with an accelerated early healing process in repaired Achilles tendons in sheep after experimental surgical disruption. PRGF-treated tendons showed improvements in the morphometric features of fibroblast nuclei, suggesting a more advanced stage of healing. At eight weeks, histological examination revealed more mature organization of collagen bundles, lower vascular

  6. Richly innervated soft tissues covering the superficial aspect of the extensor origin in patients with chronic painful tennis elbow – Implication for treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C.; Alfredson, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tennis elbow is difficult to treat. The results of surgical treatments are not convincing. Treatment studies on Achilles and patellar tendinopathy targeting the richly innervated and vascularized soft tissues outside the tendon have shown promising outcomes. The innervation patterns in the fibrous/fatty tissues superficially to the elbow extensor origin have not been clarified. Methods: Nine tissue specimens from the fibrous/fatty tissue covering the extensor origin was taken from seven patients (mean age: 45 years) undergoing surgical treatment for chronic painful tennis elbow. The specimens were stained for morphology (haematoxylin & eosin, H&E) and immunohistochemically for general nerve marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and markers for sympathetic (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH) and sensory nerve fibres (calcitonin gene-related peptide, CGRP). Results: All specimens contained multiple blood vessels and nerve structures indicated by morphology and immunoreactions. There was a frequent occurrence of TH reactions, especially peri-vascularly, but also in nerve fascicles. Immunoreactions for CGRP were seen in nerve fascicles and isolated nerve fibres. Conclusion: The results provide new information on the innervation patterns of the superficial tissues of the extensor origin and their potential as source of tennis elbow pain. Level of Evidence: IV. PMID:28574416

  7. Richly innervated soft tissues covering the superficial aspect of the extensor origin in patients with chronic painful tennis elbow - Implication for treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C; Alfredson, H

    2017-06-01

    Tennis elbow is difficult to treat. The results of surgical treatments are not convincing. Treatment studies on Achilles and patellar tendinopathy targeting the richly innervated and vascularized soft tissues outside the tendon have shown promising outcomes. The innervation patterns in the fibrous/fatty tissues superficially to the elbow extensor origin have not been clarified. Nine tissue specimens from the fibrous/fatty tissue covering the extensor origin was taken from seven patients (mean age: 45 years) undergoing surgical treatment for chronic painful tennis elbow. The specimens were stained for morphology (haematoxylin and eosin, H and E) and immunohistochemically for general nerve marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and markers for sympathetic (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH) and sensory nerve fibres (calcitonin gene-related peptide, CGRP). All specimens contained multiple blood vessels and nerve structures indicated by morphology and immunoreactions. There was a frequent occurrence of TH reactions, especially peri-vascularly, but also in nerve fascicles. Immunoreactions for CGRP were seen in nerve fascicles and isolated nerve fibres. The results provide new information on the innervation patterns of the superficial tissues of the extensor origin and their potential as source of tennis elbow pain. IV.

  8. Characterization of differential properties of rabbit tendon stem cells and tenocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang James

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tendons are traditionally thought to consist of tenocytes only, the resident cells of tendons; however, a recent study has demonstrated that human and mouse tendons also contain stem cells, referred to as tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs. However, the differential properties of TSCs and tenocytes remain largely undefined. This study aims to characterize the properties of these tendon cells derived from rabbits. Methods TSCs and tenocytes were isolated from patellar and Achilles tendons of rabbits. The differentiation potential and cell marker expression of the two types of cells were examined using histochemical, immunohistochemical, and qRT-PCR analysis as well as in vivo implantation. In addition, morphology, colony formation, and proliferation of TSCs and tenocytes were also compared. Results It was found that TSCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes in vitro, and form tendon-like, cartilage-like, and bone-like tissues in vivo. In contrast, tenocytes had little such differentiation potential. Moreover, TSCs expressed the stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA-4, and nucleostemin, whereas tenocytes expressed none of these markers. Morphologically, TSCs possessed smaller cell bodies and larger nuclei than ordinary tenocytes and had cobblestone-like morphology in confluent culture whereas tenocytes were highly elongated. TSCs also proliferated more quickly than tenocytes in culture. Additionally, TSCs from patellar tendons formed more numerous and larger colonies and proliferated more rapidly than TSCs from Achilles tendons. Conclusions TSCs exhibit distinct properties compared to tenocytes, including differences in cell marker expression, proliferative and differentiation potential, and cell morphology in culture. Future research should investigate the mechanobiology of TSCs and explore the possibility of using TSCs to more effectively repair or regenerate injured tendons.

  9. Tissue-engineering strategies for the tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lester; Xia, Younan; Galatz, Leesa M; Genin, Guy M; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Injuries to connective tissues are painful and disabling and result in costly medical expenses. These injuries often require reattachment of an unmineralized connective tissue to bone. The uninjured tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion (enthesis) is a functionally graded material that exhibits a gradual transition from soft tissue (i.e., tendon or ligament) to hard tissue (i.e., mineralized bone) through a fibrocartilaginous transition region. This transition is believed to facilitate force transmission between the two dissimilar tissues by ameliorating potentially damaging interfacial stress concentrations. The transition region is impaired or lost upon tendon/ligament injury and is not regenerated following surgical repair or natural healing, exposing the tissue to risk of reinjury. The need to regenerate a robust tendon-to-bone insertion has led a number of tissue engineering repair strategies. This review treats the tendon-to-bone insertion site as a tissue structure whose primary role is mechanical and discusses current and emerging strategies for engineering the tendon/ligament-to-bone insertion in this context. The focus lies on strategies for producing mechanical structures that can guide and subsequently sustain a graded tissue structure and the associated cell populations.

  10. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W.; Lloyd, David G.; Zheng, Ming H.

    2012-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a s...

  11. Elbow flexor and extensor muscle weakness in lateral epicondylalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Brooke K; Bisset, Leanne; Vicenzino, Bill

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate whether deficits of elbow flexor and extensor muscle strength exist in lateral epicondylalgia (LE) in comparison with a healthy control population. Cross-sectional study. 150 participants with unilateral LE were compared with 54 healthy control participants. Maximal isometric elbow flexion and extension strength were measured bilaterally using a purpose-built standing frame such that gripping was avoided. The authors found significant side differences in elbow extensor (-6.54 N, 95% CI -11.43 to -1.65, p=0.008, standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.45) and flexor muscle strength (-11.26 N, 95% CI -19.59 to -2.94, p=0.009, SMD -0.46) between LE and control groups. Within the LE group, only elbow extensor muscle strength deficits between sides was significant (affected-unaffected: -2.94 N, 95% CI -5.44 to -0.44). Small significant deficits of elbow extensor and flexor muscle strength exist in the affected arm of unilateral LE in comparison with healthy controls. Notably, comparing elbow strength between the affected and unaffected sides in unilateral epicondylalgia is likely to underestimate these deficits. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12609000051246.

  12. A histologic analysis of the effects of stainless steel and titanium implants adjacent to tendons: an experimental rabbit study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, Adam; Lozano-Calderón, Santiago; Jupiter, Jesse B; Rosenzweig, Jaime S; Randolph, Mark A; Lee, Sang Gil P

    2006-09-01

    The current trend is to treat distal radius fractures with open reduction and internal fixation with either titanium or stainless steel plates. Both provide stable fixation; however, there is minimal evidence concerning the soft-tissue response to these materials. Our objective was to evaluate the response of adjacent extensor tendons to titanium and stainless steel in a rabbit in vivo model and to evaluate the influence of time. Forty rabbits were divided into 5 groups of 8 rabbits each. Groups I and II had unilateral osteotomy of the distal radius followed by dorsal fixation with titanium and stainless steel plates, respectively. Groups III and IV had fixation with titanium and stainless steel, respectively, but without osteotomy. Group V had surgical dissection without osteotomy or plates. Two animals per group were killed at 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks. The specimens (distal radius, plate, overlying soft tissue, and extensor tendon) were harvested en bloc for histologic analysis. For interface preservation between implant and tissues the specimens were embedded in methylmethacrylate, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Histologic analysis showed a fibrous tissue layer formed over both implants between the plate and the overlying extensor tendons in the groups treated with plating independently of the material and the presence or absence of osteotomy. This fibrous layer contained the majority of debris. Metallic particles were not observed in the tendon or muscle substance of any animals; however, they were visualized in the tenosynovium. Hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of groups I through IV showed proliferative fibroblasts and metallic particles; however, this layer was not observed in group V. Statistical analysis did not show differences between the groups regarding the number of cells or metallic particles. Our results indicate that both implants generated adjacent reactive inflammatory tissue and particulate debris. There was no difference in cell

  13. 4-corner arthrodesis and proximal row carpectomy: a biomechanical comparison of wrist motion and tendon forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debottis, Daniel P; Werner, Frederick W; Sutton, Levi G; Harley, Brian J

    2013-05-01

    Controversy exists as to whether a proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a better procedure than scaphoid excision with 4-corner arthrodesis for preserving motion in the painful posttraumatic arthritic wrist. The purpose of this study was to determine how the kinematics and tendon forces of the wrist are altered after PRC and 4-corner arthrodesis. We tested 6 fresh cadaver forearms for the extremes of wrist motion and then used a wrist simulator to move them through 4 cyclic dynamic wrist motions, during which time we continuously recorded the tendon forces. We repeated the extremes of wrist motion measurements and the dynamic motions after scaphoid excision with 4-corner arthrodesis, and then again after PRC. We analyzed extremes of wrist motion and the peak tendon forces required for each dynamic motion using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Wrist extremes of motion significantly decreased after both the PRC and 4-corner arthrodesis compared with the intact wrist. Wrist flexion decreased on average 13° after 4-corner arthrodesis and 12° after PRC. Extension decreased 20° after 4-corner arthrodesis and 12° after PRC. Four-corner arthrodesis significantly decreased wrist ulnar deviation from the intact wrist. Four-corner arthrodesis allowed more radial deviation but less ulnar deviation than the PRC. The average peak tendon force was significantly greater after 4-corner arthrodesis than after PRC for the extensor carpi ulnaris during wrist flexion-extension, circumduction, and dart throw motions. The peak forces were significantly greater after 4-corner arthrodesis than in the intact wrist for the extensor carpi ulnaris during the dart throw motion and for the flexor carpi ulnaris during the circumduction motion. The peak extensor carpi radialis brevis force after PRC was significantly less than in the intact wrist. The measured wrist extremes of motion decreased after both 4-corner arthrodesis and PRC. Larger peak tendon forces were required to achieve

  14. * Fabrication and Characterization of Biphasic Silk Fibroin Scaffolds for Tendon/Ligament-to-Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Font Tellado, Sònia; Bonani, Walter; Balmayor, Elizabeth R; Foehr, Peter; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; van Griensven, Martijn

    2017-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an attractive strategy for tendon/ligament-to-bone interface repair. The structure and extracellular matrix composition of the interface are complex and allow for a gradual mechanical stress transfer between tendons/ligaments and bone. Thus, scaffolds mimicking the structural features of the native interface may be able to better support functional tissue regeneration. In this study, we fabricated biphasic silk fibroin scaffolds designed to mimic the gradient in collagen molecule alignment present at the interface. The scaffolds had two different pore alignments: anisotropic at the tendon/ligament side and isotropic at the bone side. Total porosity ranged from 50% to 80% and the majority of pores (80-90%) were ligament, enthesis, and cartilage markers significantly changed depending on pore alignment in each region of the scaffolds. In conclusion, the biphasic scaffolds fabricated in this study show promising features for tendon/ligament-to-bone tissue engineering.

  15. Rupture of the Distal Biceps Tendon Combined with a Supinator Muscle Tear in a 51-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Nayyar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal biceps tendon rupture is a relatively uncommon occurrence in the general female population, and to our knowledge, has not been reported in association with a supinator muscle tear. We report a case of 51-year-old woman who experienced sharp pain in her forearm and elbow after lifting a heavy object. History and physical examination raised suspicion for a distal biceps tendon rupture. MRI imaging determined a combined distal biceps tendon tear with a supinator muscle tear with subsequent confirmation at surgery. Surgical repair was performed for the distal biceps tendon only through a single incision approach using the Endobutton technique.

  16. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. MR anatomy study of the elbow, with emphasis in ligaments and tendons structure - methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilela, Sonia de Aguiar; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa; Barbieri, Antonio; Turrini, Elisabete; Juliano, Yara

    1999-01-01

    Seventeen MR exams of the elbow joints of fifteen healthy volunteers were obtained on T1 spin-echo sequences in the transversal, coronal and sagital planes. Eight anatomic structures were selected and evaluated by three independent blind readers. The aim of this study was to establish the frequency of visibility as well to determine the best plane to characterize these anatomic structures and also to analyze the interobserver variability. The readers analyzed the exams using the same criteria: degree 0 (structure not visible); degree 1 (structure visible and partially delineated); degree 2 (structure well visible and well delineated). The structure visibility showed variability close related to the degree (1 or 2) chosen by the readers to define the structure visualization and mainly in the transverse plane. The coronal plane was showed to be the ideal to evaluate the collateral ligaments, the common extensor tendon and the com,mon flexor tendon, otherwise the sagital plane was useful to define triceps and braquial tendons. The biceps tendon and annular ligament were well defined in the transverse plane. The usefulness of this study is to establish the ideal planes to evaluate these anatomic structures, and develop faster protocols. (author)

  18. Tendon overuse syndrome: imaging diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.; Muellner, T.; Kainberger, F.; Ulreich, N.; Bernhard, C.; Imhof, H.

    2001-01-01

    Injuries of muscles and tendons occur commonly during various sporting activities and in most cases the athletes feel such an accident to be sudden and unavoidable. The rupture of a tendon, however, has to be considered in many cases as the final stage of a long-standing progressive degeneration of collagen fibers. This process con be described as 'tendon overuse syndrome (TOS)'. Diagnostic imaging modalities, especially sonography and MRI, are suitable to detect and analyse the different stages of this syndrome and the degree of morphological abnormalities. The first stage is painful functional derangement, followed by tendovaginitis, peritendinitis, or bursitis. The third stage is tendinosis resulting from biomechanical or ischaemic injury of tendon fibers which may eventually be followed by partial or complete rupture. Regional or individual specifications of these four stages may occur at anatomically predisposing sites, so-called critical zones, or during periods of specific proneness, the vulnerable phases. (author)

  19. Arthrography of the biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahovuo, J.; Linden, H.; Hovi, I.; Paavolainen, P.; Bjoerkenheim, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the factors having an influence on the arthrographic imaging of the biceps tendon. The study comprised 174 patients suffering from chronic shoulder pain. They underwent conventional shoulder arthrography with sodium meglumine metrizoate or metrizamide as a contrast medium. In the patients with a full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff, the biceps tendon sheath failed to fill with contrast medium more often than in those with an intact tendinous cuff. Metrizamide filled the biceps tendon sheath more readily than sodium meglumine metrizoate in patients with a full-thickness tear of the ortator cuff. The volume of the contrast medium injected had no influence on the imaging of the biceps tendon. (orig.)

  20. Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Achilles Tendon Healing in Rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafbeygi, Arash; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Lebaschi, Amir Hussein; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Husseini, Seyed Abouzar; Niazi, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and it takes a long time for an injured tendon to heal. Adverse phenomena such as adhesion and rupture are associated with these injuries. Finding a method to reduce the time required for healing which improves the final outcome, will lead to decreased frequency and intensity of adverse consequences. This study was designed to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits. In 10 New Zealand white rabbits, Achilles tendon was cut at the intersection of the distal and middle thirds on both hind legs. One microgram of recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was injected in the proximal and distal stumps of the cut tendon on the right side (study group). Normal saline of equal volume was injected on the left side in the same way (control group). Then the tendons were repaired with 5/0 nylon using modified Kessler technique. A cast was made to immobilize each leg. On day 42, rabbits were euthanized and both hind legs were amputated. Tensometry and histopathologic examination were done on specimens. In tensometric studies, more force was required to rupture the repair site in study group. In histopathologic examination, collagen fibers had significantly better orientation and organization in the study group. No difference was noted regarding number of fibroblast and fibrocytes, and degree of angiogenesis in the two groups. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor at tendon repair site improves the healing process through improvement of collagen fiber orientation and increase in biomechanical resistance.

  1. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Reparação artroscópica de lesões pequenas e médias do tendão do músculo supraespinal: avaliação dos resultados clínico-funcionais após dois anos de seguimento Arthroscopic repair of the small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon: evaluation of the clinical and functional outcomes after two years of follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yukio Ikemoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados clínico-funcionais das reparações artroscópicas de lesões pequenas e médias do tendão do músculo supraespinal. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados, retrospectivamente, 129 casos de lesões isoladas pequenas ou médias do tendão do músculo supraespinal. O tempo médio de dor foi de 29 meses. A amplitude articular média era de 136º de elevação ativa, 48º de rotação lateral, rotação medial no nível T12 e a escala funcional pré-operatória da UCLA foi, em média, de 17 pontos. Em todos os casos foi possível o reparo completo da lesão. RESULTADOS: A pontuação pela escala funcional da UCLA no período pós-operatório foi, em média, de 32 pontos. O tempo médio de seguimento foi de 39 meses. Setenta e cinco casos (58% tiveram resultados excelentes e 42 (32%, bons. A elevação ativa final teve a média de 156º, com ganho médio de 20º, e a rotação lateral final foi, em média, de 57º, com ganho médio de 9º, ambos estatisticamente significativos (P OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. METHODS: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136º, lateral rotation of 58º and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. RESULTS: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58% had excellent results and 42 (32% had good results. The average final active elevation was 156º with an average gain of 20º, and the average final lateral rotation was 57º with an average gain of 9º. Both of these were

  3. Peroneal perforator-based peroneus longus tendon and sural neurofasciocutaneous composite flap transfer for a large soft-tissue defect of the forearm: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kenji; Saijo, Hiroto; Fujioka, Masaki

    2018-01-01

    We describe the use of a composite flap composed of a sural neurofasciocutaneous flap and a vascularized peroneus longus tendon for the reconstruction of severe composite forearm tissue defects in a patient. A 43-year-old man had his left arm caught in a conveyor belt resulting in a large soft-tissue defect of 18 × 11 cm over the dorsum forearm. The extensor carpi radialis, superficial radial nerve, and radial artery were severely damaged. A free neurofasciocutaneous composite flap measuring 16 × 11 cm was outlined on the patient's left lower leg to allow simultaneous skin, tendon, nerve, and artery reconstruction. The flap, which included the peroneus longus tendon, was elevated on the subfascial plane. After the flap was transferred to the recipient site, the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the radial artery in a flow-through manner. The vascularized tendon graft with 15 cm in length was used to reconstruct the extensor carpi radialis longus tendon defect using an interlacing suture technique. As the skin paddle of the sural neurofasciocutaneous flap and the vascularized peroneus longus tendon graft were linked by the perforator and minimal fascial tissue, the skin paddle was able to rotate and slide with comparative ease. The flap survived completely without any complications. The length of follow-up was 12 months and was uneventful. Range of motion of his left wrist joint was slightly limited to 75 degrees. This novel composite flap may be useful for reconstructing long tendon defects associated with extensive forearm soft tissue defects. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Tendon transfers in radial nerve palsy with fractures of the humerus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regarding nerve repair or tendon transfers. b). Stabilisation of the fracture by internal fixation protects the radial nerve from further damage. c). Early exploration is technically easier and safer. Khan and Birch in their study of iatropathic injuries of peripheral nerves 26 out of 48 (56%) developed lesion following open reduction ...

  5. The value of clinical tests in acute full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Klaus; Sørensen, Anne Kathrine Belling; Jørgensen, Uffe Viegh

    2010-01-01

    Early repair of rotator cuff tears leads to superior results. To detect symptomatic full-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon at an early stage, we conducted a prospective study to evaluate the value of clinical examination with and without subacromial lidocaine within the first weeks after...

  6. Characterization of in vivo Achilles tendon forces in rabbits during treadmill locomotion at varying speeds and inclinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John R; Juncosa, Natalia; Galloway, Marc T; Boivin, Gregory P; Butler, David L

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing the speed and inclination of the treadmill increases the peak Achilles tendon forces and their rates of rise and fall in force. Implantable force transducers (IFT) were inserted in the confluence of the medial and lateral heads of the left gastrocnemius tendon in 11 rabbits. IFT voltages were successfully recorded in 8 animals as the animals hopped on a treadmill at each of two speeds (0.1 and 0.3 mph) and inclinations (0 degrees and 12 degrees). Instrumented tendons were isolated shortly after sacrifice and calibrated. Contralateral unoperated tendons were failed in uniaxial tension to determine maximum or failure force, from which safety factor (ratio of maximum force to peak in vivo force) was calculated for each activity. Peak force and the rates of rise and fall in force significantly increased with increasing treadmill inclination (prabbit Achilles tendon and other tendon repairs. Force patterns can also serve as input data for mechanical stimulation of tissue-engineered constructs in culture. Such approaches are expected to help accelerate tendon repair after injury.

  7. Do cells contribute to tendon and ligament biomechanics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Acellular scaffolds are increasingly used for the surgical repair of tendon injury and ligament tears. Despite this increased use, very little data exist directly comparing acellular scaffolds and their native counterparts. Such a comparison would help establish the effectiveness of the acellularization procedure of human tissues. Furthermore, such a comparison would help estimate the influence of cells in ligament and tendon stability and give insight into the effects of acellularization on collagen.Eighteen human iliotibial tract samples were obtained from nine body donors. Nine samples were acellularized with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, while nine counterparts from the same donors remained in the native condition. The ends of all samples were plastinated to minimize material slippage. Their water content was adjusted to 69%, using the osmotic stress technique to exclude water content-related alterations of the mechanical properties. Uniaxial tensile testing was performed to obtain the elastic modulus, ultimate stress and maximum strain. The effectiveness of the acellularization procedure was histologically verified by means of a DNA assay.The histology samples showed a complete removal of the cells, an extensive, yet incomplete removal of the DNA content and alterations to the extracellular collagen. Tensile properties of the tract samples such as elastic modulus and ultimate stress were unaffected by acellularization with the exception of maximum strain.The data indicate that cells influence the mechanical properties of ligaments and tendons in vitro to a negligible extent. Moreover, acellularization with SDS alters material properties to a minor extent, indicating that this method provides a biomechanical match in ligament and tendon reconstruction. However, the given protocol insufficiently removes DNA. This may increase the potential for transplant rejection when acellular tract scaffolds are used in soft tissue repair. Further research

  8. Bilateral movements increase sustained extensor force in the paretic arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2018-04-01

    Muscle weakness in the extensors poststroke is a common motor impairment. Unfortunately, research is unclear on whether bilateral movements increase extensor force production in the paretic arm. This study investigated sustained force production while stroke individuals maximally extended their wrist and fingers on their paretic arm. Specifically, we determined isometric force production in three conditions: (a) unilateral paretic arm, (b) unilateral nonparetic arm, and (c) bilateral (both arms executing the same movement simultaneously). Seventeen chronic stroke patients produced isometric sustained force by executing wrist and fingers extension in unilateral and bilateral contraction conditions. Mean force, force variability (coefficient of variation), and signal-to-noise ratio were calculated for each contraction condition. Analysis of two-way (Arm × Type of Condition: 2 × 2; Paretic or Nonparetic Arm × Unilateral or Bilateral Conditions) within-subjects ANOVAs revealed that the bilateral condition increased sustained force in the paretic arm, but reduced sustained force in the nonparetic arm. Further, although the paretic arm exhibited more force variability and less signal-to-noise ratio than the nonparetic arm during a unilateral condition, there were no differences when participants simultaneously executed isometric contractions with both arms. Our unique findings indicate that bilateral contractions transiently increased extensor force in the paretic arm. Implications for Rehabilitation Bilateral movements increased isometric wrsit extensor force in paretic arms and redcued force in nonparetic arms versus unilateral movements. Both paretic and nonparetic arms produced similar force variability and signal-to-noise ratio during bilateral movements. Increased sustained force in the paretic arm during the bilateral condition indicates that rehabilitation protocols based on bilateral movements may be beneficial for functional recovery.

  9. Evaluation of Repair Tension in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Does It Really Matter to the Integrity of the Rotator Cuff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Hoon; Jang, Young Hoon; Choi, Young Eun; Lee, Hwa-Ryeong; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Repair tension of a torn rotator cuff can affect healing after repair. However, a measurement of the actual tension during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is not feasible. The relationship between repair tension and healing of a rotator cuff repair remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of repair tension on healing at the repair site. The hypothesis was that repair tension would be a major factor in determining the anatomic outcome of rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs (132 patients) for full-thickness rotator cuff tears were analyzed. An intraoperative model was designed for the estimation of repair tension using a tensiometer. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed approximately 1 year (mean [±SD], 12.7 ± 3.2 months) postoperatively for the evaluation of healing at the repair site. Multivariable analysis was performed for tear size, amount of retraction, and fatty degeneration (FD) of rotator cuff muscles. The mean repair tension measured during the arthroscopic procedure was 28.5 ± 23.1 N. There was a statistically significant correlation between tension and tear size (Pearson correlation coefficient [PCC], 0.529; P repair tension also showed a significant inverse correlation with healing at the repair site (SCC, 0.195; P = .025). However, when sex, age, tear size, amount of retraction, tendon quality, and FD of rotator cuff muscles were included for multivariable logistic regression analysis, only FD of the infraspinatus showed an association with the anatomic outcome of repair (Exp(B) = 0.596; P = .010). Our intraoperative model for the estimation of rotator cuff repair tension showed an inverse correlation of repair tension with healing at the repair site, suggesting that complete healing is less likely with high-tension repairs. A significant association was observed on MRI between a high level of FD of the infraspinatus and repaired tendon integrity. © 2016

  10. Enhanced Tendon-to-Bone Healing of Chronic Rotator Cuff Tears by Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Ning; Yang, Cheol-Jung; Kim, Ji Eui; Du, Zhen Wu; Ren, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Hong Yu; Kim, Kyung Ok

    2018-01-01

    Background To evaluate the influence of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) on tendon-to-bone healing in a rabbit rotator cuff model and to characterize the composition of growth factors in BMAC. Methods In this in vivo study, 40 rabbits were allocated into five groups: control (C), repair + saline (RS), repair + platelet-rich plasma (PRP; RP), repair + BMAC (RB) and repair + PRP + BMAC (RPB). A tear model was created by supraspinatus tendon transection at the footprint. Six weeks after transection, the torn tendon was repaired along with BMAC or PRP administration. Six weeks after repair, shoulder samples were harvested for biomechanical and histological testing. Ten rabbits were used for processing PRP and BMAC, followed by analysis of blood cell composition and the levels of growth factors in vitro. Results The ultimate load-to-failure was significantly higher in RPB group compared to RS group (p = 0.025). BMAC-treated groups showed higher values of biomechanical properties than RS group. The histology of BMAC-treated samples showed better collagen fiber continuity and orientation than RS group. BMAC contained significantly higher levels of the several growth factors than PRP. Conclusions Locally administered BMAC enhanced tendon-to-bone healing and has potential for clinical applications. PMID:29564054

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals age-related changes in tendon matrix composition, with age- and injury-specific matrix fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peffers, Mandy J; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Collins, John A; Eong, Robin; Wei, Timothy K J; Screen, Hazel R C; Clegg, Peter D

    2014-09-12

    Energy storing tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), are highly prone to injury, the incidence of which increases with aging. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that result in increased injury in aged tendons are not well established but are thought to result in altered matrix turnover. However, little attempt has been made to fully characterize the tendon proteome nor determine how the abundance of specific tendon proteins changes with aging and/or injury. The aim of this study was, therefore, to assess the protein profile of normal SDFTs from young and old horses using label-free relative quantification to identify differentially abundant proteins and peptide fragments between age groups. The protein profile of injured SDFTs from young and old horses was also assessed. The results demonstrate distinct proteomic profiles in young and old tendon, with alterations in the levels of proteins involved in matrix organization and regulation of cell tension. Furthermore, we identified several new peptide fragments (neopeptides) present in aged tendons, suggesting that there are age-specific cleavage patterns within the SDFT. Proteomic profile also differed between young and old injured tendon, with a greater number of neopeptides identified in young injured tendon. This study has increased the knowledge of molecular events associated with tendon aging and injury, suggesting that maintenance and repair of tendon tissue may be reduced in aged individuals and may help to explain why the risk of injury increases with aging. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. MRI of tibialis anterior tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Robert A.; DeMeo, Patrick J.; Kolman, Brett H.; Daffner, Richard H.; Sciulli, Robert L.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2004-01-01

    Ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are rare. We present the clinical histories and MRI findings of three recent male patients with tibialis anterior tendon rupture aged 58-67 years, all of whom presented with pain over the dorsum of the ankle. Two of the three patients presented with complete rupture showing discontinuity of the tendon, thickening of the retracted portion of the tendon, and excess fluid in the tendon sheath. One patient demonstrated a partial tear showing an attenuated tendon with increased surrounding fluid. Although rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is a rarely reported entity, MRI is a useful modality in the definitive detection and characterization of tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. (orig.)

  13. Achilles Tendon's Tear

    OpenAIRE

    F. Shahandeh

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The achilles and plantaris tendons to-gether makeup the posterior grouptendons of ankle. Their seldom confusion in interpreting MR images of the achilles tendon. The achilles tendon should ap-pear informally straight and black on sagital T1 weighted images and on fluid sensitive images."nCase Presentation: After a heavy sport, a 55 year-old woman cannot walk with right foot."nDiscussion: The classic achilles tendon rupture occurs with forced dorsiflexion of planted foo...

  14. Correspondence of high-frequency ultrasound and histomorphometry of healing rabbit Achilles tendon tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Puippe, Gilbert; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-04-01

    Static and dynamic high-frequency ultrasound of healing rabbit Achilles tendons were set in relationship to histomorphometric analyses at three and six weeks post-surgery. Twelve New Zealand White rabbits received a clean-cut Achilles tendon laceration (the medial and lateral Musculus gastrocnemius) and were repaired with a four-strand Becker suture. Six rabbits got additionally a tight polyester urethane tube at the repair site in order to vary the adhesion extent. Tendons were analysed by static and dynamic ultrasound (control: healthy contralateral legs). The ultrasound outcome was corresponded to the tendon shape, tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, collagen fibre orientation and adhesion extent. The spindle-like morphology of healing tendons (ultrasound) was confirmed by the swollen epitenon (histology). Prediction of adhesion formation by dynamic ultrasound assessment was confirmed by histology (contact region to surrounding tissue). Hyperechogenic areas corresponded to acellular zones with aligned fibres and hypoechogenic zones to not yet oriented fibres and to cell-rich areas. These findings add new in-depth structural knowledge to the established non-invasive analytical tool, ultrasound.

  15. Intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts for functional limb salvage surgery of soft tissue sarcomas of the wrist and hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Shinsuke; Hamada, Kenichiro; Outani, Hidetatsu; Oshima, Kazuya; Joyama, Susumu; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Naka, Norifumi; Araki, Nobuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-05-12

    In patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand, limb salvage operation is extremely challenging for surgeons in attempting a complete tumor resection with negative surgical margins. In this study, we report four patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand treated by limb salvage operation with intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts. The patients were all male, and the mean age at the time of surgery was 45 years. Histological diagnoses included clear cell sarcoma in two patients, synovial sarcoma in one, and angiosarcoma in one. All four patients had high grade tumors, wherein three had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III disease and one with AJCC stage IV disease. The tumors were resected en bloc with involved tendons. The tendons were isolated from the resected tissues, irradiated ex vivo, and re-implanted into the host tendons. In one patient, the bone was resected additionally because of tumor invasion to the bone. Hand function was evaluated using Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) rating system. Of the four patients, three died of distant metastatic disease. The remaining patient lives and remains disease-free. The mean follow-up period was 33 months. One patient had local recurrence outside the irradiated graft at 20 months after surgery. The functional rating was 22. Lower scores were seen in patients with reconstruction of flexor tendons than extensor tendons. Limb salvage operation with intraoperative extracorporeal autogenous irradiated tendon grafts is an acceptable method in selected patients with soft tissue sarcoma of the wrist and hand.

  16. Atualização da anatomia do mecanismo extensor do joelho com uso de técnica de visualização tridimensional Updating of the anatomy of the extensor mechanism of the knee using a three-dimensional viewing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Costa Astur

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O mecanismo extensor do joelho é uma estrutura complexa formada pelo músculo e tendão quadricipital, a patela, o tendão patelar e os ligamentos que os circundam e auxiliam na estabilização do joelho. Através do uso de técnica de visualização tridimensional de imagens do aparelho extensor do joelho pretendemos mostrar de forma didática as estruturas que compõem este complexo ósteo-músculo-ligamentar. Dissecção anatômica do joelho com ênfase nas estruturas do seu mecanismo extensor foi realizada seguida de fotografias com câmera e lentes adequadas para simulação da visão humana através de técnica de construção de imagem tridimensional. Em seguida, com a ajuda de software apropriado, as duas imagens da mesma estrutura de diferentes ângulos simulando a visão humana são sobrepostas com adição de camada polarizante, concluindo a construção da imagem anaglífica. As principais estruturas do mecanismo extensor do joelho podem ser observadas com efeito tridimensional. Dentre os principais benefícios relacionados a esta técnica, destacamos, além do ensino e estudo da anatomia musculoesquelética, o potencial uso em treinamento de procedimentos cirúrgicos e a realização de imagens em exames diagnósticos.The knee extensor mechanism is a complex structure formed by the quadriceps muscle and tendon, the patella, the patellar tendon and the ligaments that surround and help stabilize the knee. Through using a three-dimensional viewing technique on images of the knee extensor apparatus, we aimed to didactically show the structures that compose this bone-muscle-ligament complex. Anatomical dissection of the knee with emphasis on the structures of its extensor mechanism was performed, followed by taking photographs using a camera and lenses suitable for simulating human vision, through a technique for constructing three-dimensional images. Then, with the aid of appropriate software, pairs of images of the same structure from

  17. Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannus, P.; Paavola, M.; Paakkala, T.; Parkkari, J.; Jaervinen, T.; Jaervinen, M.

    2002-01-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports.The etiology as well as the pathophysilogical mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance.At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage.The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment.Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information. (orig.) [de

  18. Effects of flunixin meglumine on experimental tendon wound healing: A histopathological and mechanical study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendons are frequently targets of injury in sports and work. Whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have beneficial effects on tendon healing is still a matter of debate. This study was conducted to evaluate effects of flunixin meglumine (FM on tendon healing after experimentally induced acute trauma. Twenty eight adult male New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to complete transection of deep digital flexor tendons followed by suture placement. Treatment group received intramuscular injection of FM for three days, and controls received placebo. Subsequently, cast immobilization was continued for two weeks. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after surgery and tissue samples were taken. The histological evaluations revealed improved structural characteristics of neotendon formation including fibrillar linearity, fibrillar continuity and neovascularization in treatment group compared to those of controls (p 0.05. Mechanical evaluation revealed significant increase in load-related material properties including ultimate load, yield load, energy absorption and ultimate stress in treatment group compared to those of control group (p 0.05. The present study showed that intramuscular injection of FM resulted in improved structural and mechanical properties of tendon repairs and it could be an effective treatment for acute tendon injuries like severance and laceration.

  19. Ultrasonographic assessment of tendon thickness, Doppler activity and bony spurs of the elbow in patients with lateral epicondylitis and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, T P; Fredberg, U; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tennis elbow, also known as lateral epicondylitis (LE), is a common disorder often assessed by ultrasound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic outcomes and methods used in LE research and clinical practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was designed as an intra......- and interobserver reliability and agreement study. Ultrasonographic examination of the common extensor tendon of the elbow was performed. The intraobserver study examined tendon thickness twice in 20 right elbows from 20 healthy individuals at an interval of 7 to 12 days. The interobserver study examined tendon...... thickness, color Doppler activity, and bony spurs in 18 right elbows in 9 healthy individuals and 9 patients with LE. Two trained rheumatologists performed the interobserver examinations with the same scanner on the same day. The main outcomes were intra- and interclass correlation (ICC) and agreement...

  20. Kinesthetic perception based on integration of motor imagery and afferent inputs from antagonistic muscles with tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, E; Kaneko, F

    2013-04-29

    The perceptual integration of afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles, or the perceptual integration of afferent input and motor imagery are related to the generation of a kinesthetic sensation. However, it has not been clarified how, or indeed whether, a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery if afferent inputs from two antagonistic muscles were simultaneously induced by tendon vibration. The purpose of this study was to investigate how a kinesthetic perception would be generated by motor imagery during co-vibration of the two antagonistic muscles at the same frequency. Healthy subjects participated in this experiment. Illusory movement was evoked by tendon vibration. Next, the subjects imaged wrist flexion movement simultaneously with tendon vibration. Wrist flexor and extensor muscles were vibrated according to 4 patterns such that the difference between the two vibration frequencies was zero. After each trial, the perceived movement sensations were quantified on the basis of the velocity and direction of the ipsilateral hand-tracking movements. When the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and the extensor was 0Hz, no subjects perceived movements without motor imagery. However, during motor imagery, the flexion velocity of the perceived movement was higher than the flexion velocity without motor imagery. This study clarified that the afferent inputs from the muscle spindle interact with motor imagery, to evoke a kinesthetic perception, even when the difference in frequency applied to the wrist flexor and extensor was 0Hz. Furthermore, the kinesthetic perception resulting from integrations of vibration and motor imagery increased depending on the vibration frequency to the two antagonistic muscles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Engineered stem cell niche matrices for rotator cuff tendon regenerative engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sean Peach

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff (RC tears represent a large proportion of musculoskeletal injuries attended to at the clinic and thereby make RC repair surgeries one of the most widely performed musculoskeletal procedures. Despite the high incidence rate of RC tears, operative treatments have provided minimal functional gains and suffer from high re-tear rates. The hypocellular nature of tendon tissue poses a limited capacity for regeneration. In recent years, great strides have been made in the area of tendonogenesis and differentiation towards tendon cells due to a greater understanding of the tendon stem cell niche, development of advanced materials, improved scaffold fabrication techniques, and delineation of the phenotype development process. Though in vitro models for tendonogenesis have shown promising results, in vivo models have been less successful. The present work investigates structured matrices mimicking the tendon microenvironment as cell delivery vehicles in a rat RC tear model. RC injuries augmented with a matrix delivering rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs showed enhanced regeneration over suture repair alone or repair with augmentation, at 6 and 12-weeks post-surgery. The local delivery of rMSCs led to increased mechanical properties and improved tissue morphology. We hypothesize that the mesenchymal stem cells function to modulate the local immune and bioactivity environment through autocrine/paracrine and/or cell homing mechanisms. This study provides evidence for improved tendon healing with biomimetic matrices and delivered MSCs with the potential for translation to larger, clinical animal models. The enhanced regenerative healing response with stem cell delivering biomimetic matrices may represent a new treatment paradigm for massive RC tendon tears.

  2. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN+/+) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTNΔ/Δ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTNΔ/Δ rats demonstrated 20–33% increases in mass, 35–45% increases in fibre number, 20–57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTNΔ/Δ muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTNΔ/Δ rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differences in mass, peak stress or stiffness. The general morphology and gene expression patterns were similar between tendons of both genotypes. This large rodent model of myostatin deficiency did not have the negative consequences to muscle fibres and extracellular matrix observed in mouse models, and suggests that the greatest impact of myostatin in the regulation of muscle mass may not be to induce atrophy directly, but rather to block hypertrophy signalling. PMID:25640143

  3. Proximity of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex to Key Surrounding Structures and Safety Assessment of an Arthroscopic Repair Technique: A Cadaveric Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuremsky, Marshall A; Habet, Nahir; Peindl, Richard D; Gaston, R Glenn

    2016-12-01

    To quantify the distance of the dorsal ulnar sensory branch, floor of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) subsheath, and ulnar neurovascular bundles from the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and secondarily to assess the safety of an all-inside arthroscopic repair of the TFCC with a commonly used meniscal repair device with respect to the aforementioned structures. A custom K-wire with 1-mm gradation was used to determine the distance of at-risk structures from the periphery of the TFCC in 13 above-elbow human cadaver specimens. An all-inside repair of the TFCC at the location of a Palmer 1B tear was then performed using a commonly employed meniscal repair device. The distance from the deployed devices to the structure in closest proximity was then measured using digital calipers. The mean distance from the deployed device to the nearest structure of concern for iatrogenic injury was 9.4 mm (range, 5-15 mm). The closest structure to iatrogenic injury was usually, but not always, the dorsal ulnar sensory nerve in 9 of 13 wrists (69.2%) at 9.3 mm (range, 5-15 mm); on 3 occasions it was instead the ulnar nerve (23.1%) at 9.5 mm (range, 9-10 mm), and on 1 occasion 6 mm from the flexor digitorum profundus to the little finger (7.7%). Forearm rotation had no significant effect on measured distances (ulnar nerve: P = .98; dorsal sensory: P = .89; ECU: P = .90). The largest influence of forearm rotation was a 0.4-mm difference between pronation and supination with respect to the distance of the TFCC periphery on the ECU subsheath. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly used meniscal repair device appears safe with respect to nearby neurovascular structures and tendons under typical arthroscopic conditions. An all-inside arthroscopic TFCC repair using a commonly employed meniscal repair device appears safe in terms of proximity to important structures although further clinical investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy

  4. Can PRP effectively treat injured tendons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James H-C

    2014-01-01

    PRP is widely used to treat tendon and other tissue injuries in orthopaedics and sports medicine; however, the efficacy of PRP treatment on injured tendons is highly controversial. In this commentary, I reason that there are many PRP- and patient-related factors that influence the outcomes of PRP treatment on injured tendons. Therefore, more basic science studies are needed to understand the mechanism of PRP on injured tendons. Finally, I suggest that better understanding of the PRP action mechanism will lead to better use of PRP for the effective treatment of tendon injuries in clinics.

  5. Mobilidade articular dos dedos não lesados pós-reparo em lesão dos tendões flexores da mão Joint range of motion of uninjured fingers after repairs to flexor tendon injuries of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB Rabelo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a amplitude de movimento (ADM em mãos que sofreram reparo tendinoso dos músculos flexores superficial e profundo dos dedos, comparando os dados de cada dedo na mão lesada e entre mãos lesadas e não lesadas. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada a goniometria ativa em 15 pacientes e 120 dedos, 60 dedos de mãos lesadas e 60 de mãos controle não lesadas. Os sujeitos foram avaliados no momento da retirada da tala gessada, tendo sido realizada a movimentação precoce pelo método de Duran modificado. A partir dos dados goniométricos, foram registrados os valores do índice TAM (Total Active Motion dos dedos nas mãos lesadas e controle. Para análise dos dados, foi acessada a fórmula de índices funcionais proposta pela American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH e para cálculo estatístico, foi escolhido o Modelo de Efeitos Mistos. RESULTADOS: A fórmula da ASSH para os dedos lesados mostrou que 18,33% tiveram a classificação do movimento "bom", 18,33%, "regular" e 63,34%, "pobre". Foram comparadas as médias das medidas em graus de todos os dedos entre si dentro de cada grupo, controle ou lesado, e as médias das medidas entre os grupos, encontrando-se um p-valor significante apenas entre os grupos controle e lesado. Não houve diferença estatística entre o TAM de cada dedo na mão lesada. CONCLUSÃO: Independente de quantos dedos tenham sofrido lesão tendinosa em uma mão, os dedos não lesados também terão suas ADMs ativas diminuídas no período logo após a retirada da imobilização.OBJECTIVE: To assess the range of motion (ROM in hands that underwent tendon repair in the flexor digitorum superficialis and flexor digitorum profundus muscles of the fingers, comparing the data between the fingers on the injured hand, and between the injured and uninjured hands. METHOD: Active goniometry was performed on 15 patients, making a total of 120 fingers (60 on injured hands and 60 on noninjured control hands. The patients

  6. Bioreactor design for tendon/ligament engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake; Smith, David W; Lloyd, David G; Zheng, Ming H

    2013-04-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments.

  7. Tendoscopy of the peroneal tendons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Kort, N.

    1998-01-01

    An anatomic cadaver study was performed. Subsequently, in a prospective study, diagnostic and therapeutic tendoscopy (tendon sheath endoscopy) was performed in nine consecutive patients with a history of persistent posterolateral ankle pain for at least 6 months. All patients had pain on palpation

  8. Smart Tendon Actuated Flexible Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Masum Billah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the kinematic feasibility of a tendon-based flexible parallel platform actuator. Much of the research on tendon-driven Stewart platforms is devoted either to the completely restrained positioning mechanism (CRPM or to one particular type of the incompletely restrained positioning mechanism (IRPM where the external force is provided by the gravitational pull on the platform such as in cable-suspended Stewart platforms. An IRPM-based platform is proposed which uses the external force provided by a compliant member. The compliant central column allows the configuration to achieve n DOFs with n tendons. In particular, this investigation focuses on the angular deflection of the upper platform with respect to the lower platform. The application here is aimed at developing a linkable module that can be connected to one another so as to form a “snake robot” of sorts. Since locomotion takes precedence over positioning in this application, a 3-DOF Stewart platform is adopted. For an arbitrary angular displace of the end-effector, the corresponding length of each tendon can be determined through inverse kinematics. Mathematical singularities are investigated using the traditional analytical method of defining the Jacobian.

  9. Neck extensor muscle weakness (Dropped head syndrome) following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, S.; Miller, R.C.; Lachance, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Dropped head syndrome is an unusual condition in which the head cannot be held upright in its normal anatomic position secondary to pronounced, isolated, neck extensor muscle weakness. Case report. A case of dropped head syndrome in a female with a history of radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma and a clinical history consistent with multiple sclerosis is presented, and potential etiologies are discussed. Conclusions. Muscular atrophy and lower motor neuron injury secondary to isolated anterior horn cell injury from radiotherapy emerge as the most likely etiology. (author)

  10. MR imaging findings in flexed abducted supinated (FABS) position and clinical presentation following refixation of distal biceps tendon rupture using bioabsorbable suture anchors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnitz, T.; Steffen, I.G.; Denecke, T.; Elgeti, F.A.; Spiegel, D.; Hug, K.; Hueper, M.; Gerhardt, C; Greiner, S.; Scheibel, M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate MRI findings after suture anchor repair of distal biceps tendons with symptoms. Materials and Methods: 24 men with 25 distal biceps tendon ruptures (one bilateral) treated with suture anchor repair were retrospectively included. Follow-up after a mean of 31 months (range, 12 - 74) included clinical examination and MRI. The pain level and flexion strength compared to the uninvolved arm were recorded. MRI was performed at 1.5 T obtaining FABS position images (both elbows in 7 patients) and evaluated for artifacts, signal abnormalities, and rerupture by two experienced readers in consensus and blinded to symptoms. Pain and loss of flexion strength > 20 % were tested against MRI findings as dichotomous data using Fisher's exact chi-square tests (p 0.05). There was a 2.7-fold mean increase of the tendon cross-sectional area on the repaired side compared to the uninvolved contralateral tendon (p = 0.02). Conclusion: We found good MRI visualization of postoperative tendons, but no correlation between symptoms and MRI signal abnormalities or rerupture. The increase in caliber of the repaired tendon might promote an impingement in pronation. (orig.)

  11. Proteomic differences between native and tissue‐engineered tendon and ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Simon R.; Peffers, Mandy; Canty‐Laird, Elizabeth G.; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age‐related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the proteomic profile between native T/Ls and tissue engineered (TE) T/L constructs. The canine long digital extensor tendon and anterior cruciate ligament were analyzed along with 3D TE fibrin‐based constructs created from their cells. Native tendon and ligament differed in their content of key structural proteins, with the ligament being more abundant in fibrocartilaginous proteins. 3D T/L TE constructs contained less extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and had a greater proportion of cellular‐associated proteins than native tissue, corresponding to their low collagen and high DNA content. Constructs were able to recapitulate native T/L tissue characteristics particularly with regard to ECM proteins. However, 3D T/L TE constructs had similar ECM and cellular protein compositions indicating that cell source may not be an important factor for T/L tissue engineering. PMID:27080496

  12. Proteomic differences between native and tissue-engineered tendon and ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharaz, Yalda A; Tew, Simon R; Peffers, Mandy; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G; Comerford, Eithne

    2016-05-01

    Tendons and ligaments (T/Ls) play key roles in the musculoskeletal system, but they are susceptible to traumatic or age-related rupture, leading to severe morbidity as well as increased susceptibility to degenerative joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. Tissue engineering represents an attractive therapeutic approach to treating T/L injury but it is hampered by our poor understanding of the defining characteristics of the two tissues. The present study aimed to determine differences in the proteomic profile between native T/Ls and tissue engineered (TE) T/L constructs. The canine long digital extensor tendon and anterior cruciate ligament were analyzed along with 3D TE fibrin-based constructs created from their cells. Native tendon and ligament differed in their content of key structural proteins, with the ligament being more abundant in fibrocartilaginous proteins. 3D T/L TE constructs contained less extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and had a greater proportion of cellular-associated proteins than native tissue, corresponding to their low collagen and high DNA content. Constructs were able to recapitulate native T/L tissue characteristics particularly with regard to ECM proteins. However, 3D T/L TE constructs had similar ECM and cellular protein compositions indicating that cell source may not be an important factor for T/L tissue engineering. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hyperuricemic PRP in Tendon Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Andia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is injected within tendons to stimulate healing. Metabolic alterations such as the metabolic syndrome, diabetes, or hyperuricemia could hinder the therapeutic effect of PRP. We hypothesise that tendon cells sense high levels of uric acid and this could modify their response to PRP. Tendon cells were treated with allogeneic PRPs for 96 hours. Hyperuricemic PRP did not hinder the proliferative actions of PRP. The gene expression pattern of inflammatory molecules in response to PRP showed absence of IL-1b and COX1 and modest expression of IL6, IL8, COX2, and TGF-b1. IL8 and IL6 proteins were secreted by tendon cells treated with PRP. The synthesis of IL6 and IL8 proteins induced by PRP is decreased significantly in the presence of hyperuricemia (P = 0.017 and P = 0.012, resp.. Concerning extracellular matrix, PRP-treated tendon cells displayed high type-1 collagen, moderate type-3 collagen, decorin, and hyaluronan synthase-2 expression and modest expression of scleraxis. Hyperuricemia modified the expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins, upregulating COL1 (P = 0.036 and COMP (P = 0.012 and downregulating HAS2 (P = 0.012. Positive correlations between TGF-b1 and type-1 collagen (R = 0.905, P = 0.002 and aggrecan (R = 0.833, P = 0.010 and negative correlations between TGF-b1 and IL6 synthesis (R = −0.857, P = 0.007 and COX2 (R = −0.810, P = 0.015 were found.

  14. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  15. Implantation of a novel biologic and hybridized tissue engineered bioimplant in large tendon defect: an in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali; Parizi, Abdolhamid Meimandi; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Surgical reconstruction of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. There is no standard method, and tissue engineering may be a valuable option. We investigated the effects of 3D collagen and collagen-polydioxanone sheath (PDS) implants on a large tendon defect model in rabbits. Ninety rabbits were divided into three groups: control, collagen, and collagen-PDS. In all groups, 2 cm of the left Achilles tendon were excised and discarded. A modified Kessler suture was applied to all injured tendons to retain the gap length. The control group received no graft, the treated groups were repaired using the collagen only or the collagen-PDS prostheses. The bioelectrical characteristics of the injured areas were measured at weekly intervals. The animals were euthanized at 60 days after the procedure. Gross, histopathological and ultrastructural morphology and biophysical characteristics of the injured and intact tendons were investigated. Another 90 pilot animals were also used to investigate the inflammatory response and mechanism of graft incorporation during tendon healing. The control tendons showed severe hyperemia and peritendinous adhesion, and the gastrocnemius muscle of the control animals showed severe atrophy and fibrosis, with a loose areolar connective tissue filling the injured area. The tendons receiving either collagen or collagen-PDS implants showed lower amounts of peritendinous adhesion, hyperemia and muscle atrophy, and a dense tendon filled the defect area. Compared to the control tendons, application of collagen and collagen-PDS implants significantly improved water uptake, water delivery, direct transitional electrical current and tissue resistance to direct transitional electrical current. Compared to the control tendons, both prostheses showed significantly increased diameter, density and alignment of the collagen fibrils and maturity of the tenoblasts at ultrastructure level. Both prostheses influenced favorably tendon healing

  16. Surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures: the comparison of open and percutaneous methods in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Güney; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Atay, Ahmet Özgür; Kaya, Defne

    2014-09-01

    This study was intended to investigate the healing properties of open and percutaneous techniques in a rabbit model and compare histological, electron microscopical, and biomechanical findings of the healed tendon between the groups. Twenty-six rabbits were randomly assigned to two groups of thirteen rabbits each. Percutaneous tenotomy of the Achilles tendon (AT) was applied through a stab incision on the right side 1.5 cm above the calcaneal insertion in all animals. Using the same Bunnell suture, the first group was repaired with the open and the second group was repaired with the percutaneous method. ATs were harvested at the end of eight weeks for biomechanical and histological evaluation. When the sections were evaluated for fibrillar density under electron microscopy, it was noted that fibrils were more abundant in the percutaneous repair group. The tendon scores in the percutaneous group were less than the open group indicating closer histological morphology to normal. The difference was not significant (p=0.065). The mean force to rupture the tendon was 143.7± 9.5 N in percutaneous group and 139.2±8.2 N in the open group. The difference was not significant (p=0.33). Percutaneous techniques provide as good clinical results as the open techniques do. The healing tendon shows better findings in histological and electron microscopical level with percutaneous technique.

  17. Common extensor origin release in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis - role justified?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukundan Cibu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of our study was to analyse the efficacy of operative management in recalcitrant lateral epicondylitis of elbow. Forty patients included in this study were referred by general practitioners with a diagnosis of tennis elbow to the orthopaedic department at a district general hospital over a five year period. All had two or more steroid injections at the tender spot, without permanent relief of pain. All subsequently underwent simple fasciotomy of the extensor origin. Of forty patients thirty five had improvement in pain and function, two had persistent symptoms and three did not perceive any improvement. Twenty five had excellent, ten had well, two had fair and three had poor outcomes (recurrent problem; pain at rest and night. Two patients underwent revision surgery. Majority of the patients had improvement in pain and function following operative treatment. In this study, an extensor fasciotomy was demonstrated to be an effective treatment for refractory chronic lateral epicondylitis; however, further studies are warranted.

  18. The Elbow-EpiTrainer: a method of delivering graded resistance to the extensor carpi radialis brevis. Effectiveness of a prototype device in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navsaria, Rishi; Ryder, Dionne M; Lewis, Jeremy S; Alexander, Caroline M

    2015-03-01

    Tennis elbow or lateral epicondylopathy (LE) is experienced as the lateral elbow has a reported prevalence of 1.3%, with symptoms lasting up to 18 months. LE is most commonly attributed to tendinopathy involving the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) tendon. The aim of tendinopathy management is to alleviate symptoms and restore function that initially involves relative rest followed by progressive therapeutic exercise. To assess the effectiveness of two prototype exercises using commonly available clinical equipment to progressively increase resistance and activity of the ECRB. Eighteen healthy participants undertook two exercise progressions. Surface electromyography was used to record ECRB activity during the two progressions, involving eccentric exercises of the wrist extensors and elbow pronation exercises using a prototype device. The two progressions were assessed for their linearity of progression using repeated ANOVA and linear regression analysis. Five participants repeated the study to assess reliability. The exercise progressions led to an increase in ECRB electromyographic (EMG) activity (p0.7) between the first and second tests for five participants. Manipulation of resistance and leverage with the prototype exercises was effective in creating significant increases of ECRB normalised EMG activity in a linear manner that may, with future research, become useful to clinicians treating LE. In addition, between trial reliability for the device to generate a consistent load was acceptable. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Campbell, Sean; Scott, Jonathan; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel surgical technique for simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft and to compare its biomechanical characteristics to those of a coracoid cerclage reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. Six matched pairs of human acromioclavicular joints with an average age of 54.8 ± 7.8 years were used. One shoulder from each pair received the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction; the contralateral shoulder received the coracoid cerclage reconstruction. Bovine extensor tendon was used for both techniques. The single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction technique provided anatomic restoration of the two coracoclavicular ligaments and the superior and inferior acromioclavicular ligaments simultaneously using one coracoid hole, one acromion hole, and two clavicular holes with interference screws. Anterior-posterior and superior-inferior translations were quantified for all specimens before and after reconstruction, followed by load to failure testing. Following coracoid cerclage reconstruction, total anterior-posterior translation was significantly greater than intact (10.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.008). Following single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction, there was no significant difference in anterior-posterior translation compared to intact (-1.6 ± 2.2 mm; n.s.). The coracoid cerclage technique demonstrated significantly greater anterior-posterior translation than the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular technique (p = 0.007). Both techniques restored superior-inferior translation to the intact condition (n.s.). Ultimate load, deformation at ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load were significantly greater after acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction than after coracoid cerclage reconstruction (p

  20. Micropatterning of nanocomposite polymer scaffolds using sacrificial phosphate glass fibers for tendon tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshomer, Feras; Chaves, Camilo; Serra, Tiziano; Ahmed, Ifty; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2017-04-01

    This study presents a simple and reproducible method of micropatterning the novel nanocomposite polymer (POSS-PCU) using a sacrificial phosphate glass fiber template for tendon tissue engineering applications. The diameters of the patterned scaffolds produced were dependent on the diameter of the glass fibers (15 μm) used. Scaffolds were tested for their physical properties and reproducibility using various microscopy techniques. For the first time, we show that POSS-PCU supports growth of human tenocytes cells. Furthermore, we show that cellular alignment, their biological function and expression of various tendon related proteins such as scleraxis, collagen I and III, tenascin-C are significantly elevated on the micropatterned polymer surfaces compared to flat samples. This study demonstrated a simple, reproducible method of micropatterning POSS-PCU nanocomposite polymer for novel tendon repair applications, which when provided with physical cues could help mimic the microenvironment of tenocytes cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnetotherapy: The quest for tendon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesqueira, Tamagno; Costa-Almeida, Raquel; Gomes, Manuela E

    2018-05-09

    Tendons are mechanosensitive tissues that connect and transmit the forces generated by muscles to bones by allowing the conversion of mechanical input into biochemical signals. These physical forces perform the fundamental work of preserving tendon homeostasis assuring body movements. However, overloading causes tissue injuries, which leads us to the field of tendon regeneration. Recently published reviews have broadly shown the use of biomaterials and different strategies to attain tendon regeneration. In this review, our focus is the use of magnetic fields as an alternative therapy, which has demonstrated clinical relevance in tendon medicine because of their ability to modulate cell fate. Yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms still need to be elucidated. While providing a brief outlook about specific signalling pathways and intracellular messengers as framework in play by tendon cells, application of magnetic fields as a subcategory of physical forces is explored, opening up a compelling avenue to enhance tendon regeneration. We outline here useful insights on the effects of magnetic fields both at in vitro and in vivo levels, particularly on the expression of tendon genes and inflammatory cytokines, ultimately involved in tendon regeneration. Subsequently, the potential of using magnetically responsive biomaterials in tendon tissue engineering is highlighted and future directions in magnetotherapy are discussed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gougoulias Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques have been developed for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in chronic tears. In presence of a large gap (greater than 6 centimetres, tendon augmentation is required. Methods We present our method of minimally invasive semitendinosus reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using one para-midline and one midline incision. Results The first incision is a 5 cm longitudinal incision, made 2 cm proximal and just medial to the palpable end of the residual tendon. The second incision is 3 cm long and is also longitudinal but is 2 cm distal and in the midline to the distal end of the tendon rupture. The distal and proximal Achilles tendon stumps are mobilised. After trying to reduce the gap of the ruptured Achilles tendon, if the gap produced is greater than 6 cm despite maximal plantar flexion of the ankle and traction on the Achilles tendon stumps, the ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon is harvested. The semitendinosus tendon is passed through small incisions in the substance of the proximal stump of the Achilles tendon, and it is sutured to the Achilles tendon. It is then passed beneath the intact skin bridge into the distal incision, and passed from medial to lateral through a transverse tenotomy in the distal stump. With the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, the semitendinosus tendon is sutured to the Achilles tendon at each entry and exit point Conclusion This minimally invasive technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using the tendon of semitendinosus preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of large gap (greater than 6 centimetres.

  3. Effects of exercise on tenocyte cellularity and tenocyte nuclear morphology in immature and mature equine digital tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, R L; Goodship, A E; Edwards, B; Firth, E C; Patterson-Kane, J C

    2008-03-01

    The injury-prone, energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) of the mature performance horse has a limited ability to respond to exercise in contrast with the noninjury-prone, anatomically opposing common digital extensor tendon (CDET). Previous studies have indicated low levels of cellular activity in the mature SDFT, but in foal tendons the tenocytes may still have the ability to adapt positively to increased exercise. To measure tenocyte densities and types in histological sections from the SDFT and CDET of horses from controlled long-term, short-term and foal exercise studies. Specimens were collected from mid-metacarpal segments of the CDET and SDFT for each horse and processed for histology; central and peripheral regions of the SDFT cross-section were analysed separately (SDFTc, SDFTp). Tenocyte nuclei were counted in a total area of 1.59 mm(2) for each tendon region in each horse. Each nucleus was classified as type 1 (elongate and thin), type 2 (ovoid and plump) or type 3 (chondrocyte-like); type 1 cells are proposed to be less synthetically active than type 2 cells. No significant differences were noted between exercise and control groups in any of the studies, with the exception of an exercise-related reduction in the proportion of type 1 tenocytes for all tendons combined in the long-term study. There were tendon- and site-specific differences in tenocyte densities and proportions of type 1 and 2 cells in all 3 studies. There was no indication that exercise increased tenocyte density or proportions of the (theoretically) more active type 2 cells in immature horses (short-term and foal studies), perhaps because the training regimens did not achieve certain threshold strain levels. In the foal study these findings can still be interpreted positively as evidence that the training regimen did not induce subclinical damage.

  4. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures: An Experimental Study on Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Baran; Güler, Serkan; Çeçen, Berivan; Kumtepe, Erdem; Bağrıyanık, Alper; Özkal, Sermin; Ali Özcan, M; Özsan, Hayri; Şanlı, Namık; Tatari, M Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are characterized by a long recovery period, high re-rupture rate and late return to work. To overcome these difficulties and augment tendon repair, many agents have been used. To determine the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures in rabbits. Animal experimentation. The study included 14 New Zealand albino rabbits that were divided randomly into 2 groups, A and B, each containing seven rabbits. On day zero, all 28 Achilles tendons were tenotomized and repaired. In group A, the tendons were injected with PRP post-surgery, whereas those in group B were left untreated. On day 28, the right tendons in both groups were examined histopathologically via both light and electron microscopy, and the left tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing. The histological and biomechanical findings in both light and electron microscopy in group A were better than those in group B, but the difference was not significant. According to Tang's scale, the mean value in Group A was 3.57, while it was 3.0 in Group B. The mean value of Group A for the length of collagen bands was 48.09 nm while the mean value of Group B was 46.58 nm (p=0.406). In biomechanical tests, although stiffness values were higher in group A, the difference between groups was not significant. In addition, maximum load values did not differ between groups A and B. PRP had no effect on the healing process 28 days post-Achilles tendon rupture.

  5. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  6. Effect of estrogen on tendon collagen synthesis, tendon structural characteristics, and biomechanical properties in postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette; Kongsgaard, Mads; Holm, Lars

    2009-01-01

    and fibril characteristics were determined by MRI and transmission electron microscopy, whereas tendon biomechanical properties were measured during isometric maximal voluntary contraction by ultrasound recording. Tendon FSR was markedly higher in ERT-users (P

  7. Biomechanical characteristics of the horizontal mattress stitch: implication for double-row and suture-bridge rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamboli, Mallika; Mihata, Teruhisa; Hwang, James; McGarry, Michelle H; Kang, Yangmi; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the effects of bite-size horizontal mattress stitch (distance between the limbs passed through the tendon) on the biomechanical properties of the repaired tendon. We anchored 20 bovine Achilles tendons to bone using no. 2 high-strength suture and 5-mm titanium suture anchors in a mattress-suture technique. Tendons were allocated randomly into two groups of ten each to receive stitches with a 4- or 10-mm bite. Specimens underwent cyclic loading from 5 to 30 N at 1 mm/s for 30 cycles, followed by tensile testing to failure. Gap formation, tendon strain, hysteresis, stiffness, yield load, ultimate load, energy to yield load, and energy to ultimate load were compared between groups using unpaired t tests. The 4-mm group had less (p row repair, small mattress stitches provide a tighter repair, whereas large stitches are beneficial to prevent sutures from pulling through the tendon after surgery. For suture-bridge rotator cuff repair, large stitches are beneficial because the repaired tendon has a higher strength, and the slightly mobile medial knot can be tightened by lateral fixation.

  8. Tendon Force Transmission at the Nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René

    2013-01-01

    of connective tissue function that are poorly understood. One such aspect is the microscopic mechanisms of force transmission through tendons over macroscopic distances. Force transmission is at the heart of tendon function, but the large range of scales in the hierarchical structure of tendons has made...... it difficult to tackle. The tendon hierarchy ranges from molecules (2 nm) over fibrils (200 nm), fibers (2 μm) and fascicles (200 μm) to tendons (10 mm), and to derive the mechanisms of force transmission it is necessary to know the mechanical behavior at each hierarchical level. The aim of the present work...... was to elucidate the mechanisms of force transmission in tendons primarily by investigating the mechanical behavior at the hierarchical level of collagen fibrils. To do so we have developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) method for tensile testing of native collagen fibrils. The thesis contains five papers...

  9. The effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on achilles tendon healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Fuat; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Zeybek, N Dilara; Kaymaz, F Figen; Güneş, Tamer

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on transversely transected and sutured achilles tendon healing in an experimental rabbit model. Adult New Zealand rabbits (n=22) weighting 3,000-3,500 g were used in this experimental study. Rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. Achilles tendon was transversely incised and repaired in all animals. In the experiment group subcutaneous injection of Nicotine tartrate 3 mg/kg/day was done. In the control group Serum physiologic injection was done at the same dosage. The injections were made three times a day in equal dosages. Nicotine and SF injections were made until the end of the 8-week, and then all animals were euthanized. Both light microscopic and electron microscopic evaluations were made on 14 animals. In N group light microscopic evaluation showed a visible gap in repair site. The total tendon score represented in N group was less than in SF group. The statistical analysis of the groups was significantly different for total tendon scores (P=0.002). Beside this electron microscopic examination showed inactive and degenerated fibroblasts and irregular collagen fibrils around them as well as collagen synthesis interruption in N group. Biomechanical evaluation was made on eight animals. The average tensile strength values in Group N (139.47+/-44.55 N) were significantly lower than those in Group SF (265.9+/-39.01 N) (z=2.309, P=0.029). Nicotine is the major chemical component common to all cigarettes and previously has been shown to affect wound and fracture healing adversely. The results of this study show that nicotine impairs achilles tendon healing after a surgical repair.

  10. Achilles tendon rupture in badminton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaalund, S; Lass, P; Høgsaa, B; Nøhr, M

    1989-01-01

    The typical badminton player with an Achilles tendon rupture is 36 years old and, despite limbering up, is injured at the rear line in a sudden forward movement. He resumes work within three months and has a slight lack of dorsiflexion in the ankle as the main complication. Most patients resume badminton within one year, but some finish their sports career, mainly due to fear of a new injury. The investigation discusses predisposing factors and prophylactic measures. PMID:2605439

  11. ''Dropped-head'' syndrome due to isolated myositis of neck extensor muscles: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mazziotti, Silvio; Blandino, Alfredo; Toscano, Antonio; Rodolico, Carmelo; Mazzeo, Anna

    2006-01-01

    MRI findings of a patient with dropped-head syndrome due to focal myositis of the neck extensor muscles are presented. MRI showed oedematous changes and marked enhancement of the neck extensor muscles. After therapy MRI demonstrated disappearance of the abnormal findings. (orig.)

  12. Severity of upper-limb panga injuries and infection rates associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The injuries sustained included 32 flexor tendon injuries, 14 extensor tendon injuries, 9 fractures and 21 peripheral nerve injuries. Results. Of the patients, 17 underwent early primary repair (within 24 h), 19 delayed primary repair, and 13 delayed repair following primary washout. Wounds were assessed postoperatively ...

  13. Kartogenin with PRP promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone in the tendon-bone interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yiqin; Zhang, Jianying; Yang, Jinsong; Narava, Manoj; Zhao, Guangyi; Yuan, Ting; Wu, Haishan; Zheng, Nigel; Hogan, MaCalus V; Wang, James H-C

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of tendon-bone junction injuries is a challenge because tendon-bone interface often heals poorly and the fibrocartilage zone, which reduces stress concentration, at the interface is not formed. In this study, we used a compound called kartogenin (KGN) with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to induce the formation of fibrocartilage zone in a rat tendon graft-bone tunnel model. The experimental rats received KGN-PRP or PRP injections in the tendon graft-bone tunnel interface. The control group received saline. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, Safranin O staining of the tendon graft-bone tunnels revealed abundant proteoglycans in the KGN-PRP group indicating the formation of cartilage-like transition zone. Immunohistochemical and immuno-fluorescence staining revealed collagen types I (Col-I) and II (Col-II) in the newly formed fibrocartilage zone. Both fibrocartilage zone formation and maturation were healing time dependent. In contrast, the PRP and saline control groups had no cartilage-like tissues and minimal Col-I and Col-II staining. Some gaps were also present in the saline control group. Finally, pull-out strength in the KGN-PRP-treated group at 8 weeks was 1.4-fold higher than the PRP-treated group and 1.6-fold higher than the saline control group. These findings indicate that KGN, with PRP as a carrier, promotes the formation of fibrocartilage zone between the tendon graft and bone interface. Thus, KGN-PRP may be used as a convenient cell-free therapy in clinics to promote fibrocartilage zone formation in rotator calf repair and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, thereby enhancing the mechanical strength of the tendon-bone interface and hence the clinical outcome of these procedures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

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    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong [Shilla General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture.

  15. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture

  16. Ultrasound determination of rotator cuff tear repairability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Andrew K; Lam, Patrick H; Walton, Judie R; Hackett, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff repair aims to reattach the torn tendon to the greater tuberosity footprint with suture anchors. The present study aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability and to assess which sonographic and pre-operative features are strongest in predicting repairability. Methods The study was a retrospective analysis of measurements made prospectively in a cohort of 373 patients who had ultrasounds of their shoulder and underwent rotator cuff repair. Measurements of rotator cuff tear size and muscle atrophy were made pre-operatively by ultrasound to enable prediction of rotator cuff repairability. Tears were classified following ultrasound as repairable or irreparable, and were correlated with intra-operative repairability. Results Ultrasound assessment of rotator cuff tear repairability has a sensitivity of 86% (p tear size (p tear size ≥4 cm2 or anteroposterior tear length ≥25 mm indicated an irreparable rotator cuff tear. Conclusions Ultrasound assessment is accurate in predicting rotator cuff tear repairability. Tear size or anteroposterior tear length and age were the best predictors of repairability. PMID:27582996

  17. Sources of adult mesenchymal stem cells for ligament and tendon tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhinsa, Baljinder S; Mahapatra, Anant N; Khan, Wasim S

    2015-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common, and repair slowly with reduced biomechanical properties. With increasing financial demands on the health service and patients to recover from tendon and ligament injuries faster, and with less morbidity, health professionals are exploring new treatment options. Tissue engineering may provide the answer, with its unlimited source of natural cells that in the correct environment may improve repair and regeneration of tendon and ligament tissue. Mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated the ability to self renew and have multilineage differentiation potential. The use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells has been reported, however significant in vitro culture expansion is required due to the low yield of cells, which has financial implications. Harvesting of bone marrow cells also has associated morbidity. Several studies have looked at alternative sources for mesenchymal stem cells. Reports in literature from animal studies have been encouraging, however further work is required. This review assesses the potential sources of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering in tendons and ligaments.

  18. [Arthroscopic double-row reconstruction of high-grade subscapularis tendon tears].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachel, F; Pauly, S; Moroder, P; Scheibel, M

    2018-04-01

    Reconstruction of tendon integrity to maintain glenohumeral joint centration and hence to restore shoulder functional range of motion and to reduce pain. Isolated or combined full-thickness subscapularis tendon tears (≥upper two-thirds of the tendon) without both substantial soft tissue degeneration and cranialization of the humeral head. Chronic tears of the subscapularis tendon with higher grade muscle atrophy, fatty infiltration, and static decentration of the humeral head. After arthroscopic three-sided subscapularis tendon release, two double-loaded suture anchors are placed medially to the humeral footprint. Next to the suture passage, the suture limbs are tied and secured laterally with up to two knotless anchors creating a transosseous-equivalent repair. The affected arm is placed in a shoulder brace with 20° of abduction and slight internal rotation for 6 weeks postoperatively. Rehabilitation protocol including progressive physical therapy from a maximum protection phase to a minimum protection phase is required. Overhead activities are permitted after 6 months. While previous studies have demonstrated superior biomechanical properties and clinical results after double-row compared to single-row and transosseous fixation techniques, further mid- to long-term clinical investigations are needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture with the panda rope bridge technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liangjun; Wu, Yahong; Ren, Changsong; Wang, Yizhong; Fu, Ting; Cheng, Xiangjun; Li, Ruidong; Nie, Mao; Mu, Yuan

    2018-03-01

    Although nonsurgical methods and many surgical techniques have been developed for repairing a ruptured Achilles tendon, there is no consensus on its best treatment. In this article, a novel minimally invasive technique called the Panda Rope Bridge Technique (PRBT) is described. Patient with acute Achilles tendon rupture was operated on in the prone position. The PRBT begin with making the proximal bridge anchor (Krackow sutures in the myotendinous junction), the distal bridge anchor (two suture anchors in the calcaneus bone) and the ropes (threads of the suture anchors) stretched between the anchor sites. Then a small incision was made to debride and reattach the stumps of ruptured tendon. After the surgery, no cast or splint fixation was applied. All patients performed enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), which included immediate ankle mobilisation from day 1, full weight-bearing walking from day 5 to 7, and gradually take part in athletic exercises from 8 weeks postoperatively. PBRT was performed in 11patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture between June 2012 and June 2015. No wound infection, fistula, skin necrosis, sural nerve damage, deep venous thrombosis or tendon re-rupture was found. One year after the surgery, all patients reported 100 AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score points and the mean ATRS was 96.6. The PRBT is a simple, effective and minimally invasive technique, with no need for immobilisation of the ankle, making possible immediate and aggressive postoperative rehabilitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Three-dimensional parallel collagen scaffold promotes tendon extracellular matrix formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zefeng; Shen, Weiliang; Le, Huihui; Dai, Xuesong; Ouyang, Hongwei; Chen, Weishan

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effects of three-dimensional parallel collagen scaffold on the cell shape, arrangement and extracellular matrix formation of tendon stem cells. Parallel collagen scaffold was fabricated by unidirectional freezing technique, while random collagen scaffold was fabricated by freeze-drying technique. The effects of two scaffolds on cell shape and extracellular matrix formation were investigated in vitro by seeding tendon stem/progenitor cells and in vivo by ectopic implantation. Parallel and random collagen scaffolds were produced successfully. Parallel collagen scaffold was more akin to tendon than random collagen scaffold. Tendon stem/progenitor cells were spindle-shaped and unified orientated in parallel collagen scaffold, while cells on random collagen scaffold had disorder orientation. Two weeks after ectopic implantation, cells had nearly the same orientation with the collagen substance. In parallel collagen scaffold, cells had parallel arrangement, and more spindly cells were observed. By contrast, cells in random collagen scaffold were disorder. Parallel collagen scaffold can induce cells to be in spindly and parallel arrangement, and promote parallel extracellular matrix formation; while random collagen scaffold can induce cells in random arrangement. The results indicate that parallel collagen scaffold is an ideal structure to promote tendon repairing.

  1. Tendon sheath fibroma in the thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Vincent M; Ashana, Adedayo O; de la Cruz, Michael; Lackman, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    Tendon sheath fibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumors that are predominantly found in the fingers, hands, and wrists of young adult men. This article describes a tendon sheath fibroma that developed in the thigh of a 70-year-old man, the only known tendon sheath fibroma to form in this location. Similar to tendon sheath fibromas that develop elsewhere, our patient's lesion presented as a painless, slow-growing soft tissue nodule. Physical examination revealed a firm, nontender mass with no other associated signs or symptoms. Although the imaging appearance of tendon sheath fibromas varies, our patient's lesion appeared dark on T1- and bright on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It was well marginated and enhanced with contrast.Histologically, tendon sheath fibromas are composed of dense fibrocollagenous stromas with scattered spindle-shaped fibroblasts and narrow slit-like vascular spaces. Most tendon sheath fibromas can be successfully removed by marginal excision, although 24% of lesions recur. No lesions have metastasized. Our patient's tendon sheath fibroma was removed by marginal excision, and the patient remained disease free 35 months postoperatively. Despite its rarity, tendon sheath fibroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a thigh mass on physical examination or imaging, especially if it is painless, nontender, benign appearing, and present in men. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naziri Qais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18 embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001. The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25. Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft.

  3. EFFECT OF UNIPOLAR ACU-STIM ON MUSCLE RE-EDUCATION FOLLOWING TENDON TRANSFER - A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Srikanth R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tendon transfer surgery is usually done to improve function, following damage to either major nerve trunks or peripheral nerves. Re-education of the muscle is of utmost importance to gain functional activity.To achieve this, along with re-education exercises, faradic stimulation is usually used. Unipolar Acu-Stim (UAS, is an innovative technique where an acupuncture needle is used to stimulate the transferred tendon with Surged Faradic Currents (SFC. The objective of the study is to identify if the application of SFC using UAS method, is effective to re-educate a transferred muscle. Case Description: The subject was a 24 year old male who had a loss of finger and thumb extension following Posterior Interosseous Nerve (PIN palsy, for which Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR was transferred to Extensor Digitorum Communis (EDC and Palmaris Longus (PL was transferred to Extensor Pollicis Longus (EPL. Following removal of the POP, UAS with surged faradic current was applied for 4 weeks along with re-education exercises. Prognosis of finger extension was assessed by goniometry and video recordings. Outcome: At the end of 8th week, as observed on goniometry and video recordings, complete finger extension was achieved. Discussion: UAS with SFC, is useful in re-education of a transferred muscle, as desired movement can be achieved with low intensity.

  4. [Homeostasis and Disorder of Musculoskeletal System.Enthesis formation and repair:Current understanding and perspectives for the future regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Takuya; Arimura, Hitoshi; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    Tendons and ligaments are dense fibrous connective tissues mainly composed of type I collagen, aligned in highly ordered arrays along the axis of the tendon and ligament. The enthesis is defined as the attachment site of a tendon, ligament, joint capsule, or fascia to bone. During morphogenesis, the cell population co-expressing Scleraxis(Scx)and the SRY-box containing gene 9(Sox9)contributes to the formation of fibrocartilaginous entheses. Scx regulates tendon and ligament maturation, while Sox9 is a key regulatory factor for cartilage formation. The considerable mechanical forces transmitted through the enthesis and avascular properties of the tissue make it more prone to injuries and degenerative changes. Thus, integration of tendons or ligaments with bone following surgical repair remains a clinical challenge. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the formation, maintenance, damage, and repair of fibrocartilaginous entheses, focusing on the rotator cuff tendon-to-bone attachment sites.

  5. Optimizing pressurized contact area in rotator cuff repair: the diamondback repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Stephen S; Denard, Patrick J; Obopilwe, Elifho; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare tendon-bone footprint contact area over time under physiologic loads for 4 different rotator cuff repair techniques: single row (SR), triangle double row (DR), chain-link double row (CL), and diamondback double row (DBK). A supraspinatus tear was created in 28 human cadavers. Tears were fixed with 1 of 4 constructs: SR, DR, CL, or DBK. Immediate post-repair measurements of pressurized contact area were taken in neutral rotation and 0° of abduction. After a static tensile load, pressurized contact area was observed over a 160-minute period after repair. Cyclic loading was then performed. The DBK repair had the highest pressurized contact area initially, as well as the highest pressurized contact area and lowest percentage decrease in pressurized contact area after 160 minutes of testing. The DBK repair had significantly larger initial pressurized contact than CL (P = .003) and SR (P = .004) but not DR (P = .06). The DBK technique was the only technique that produced a pressurized contact area that exceeded the native footprint both at initial