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Sample records for extended-release purposes mesquite

  1. Evaluation of new polysaccharides networks for extended-release purposes: mesquite seed gum (MSG, xanthan gum and chitosan Estudo da utilização de polissacarídeos no desenvolvimento de formulações de liberação prolongada: goma de semente de algaroba, goma xantana e quitosano

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    Carlos César dos Santos Nogueira

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to design new hydrophilic matrix (HM systems by cross-linking Mesquite Seed Gum (MSG, a galactomannan that occurs in the endosperm layer of the seeds of a Brazilian tree,Prosopis juliflora DC, with two well-known polysaccharides with the ability of retarding drug release, chitosan and xanthan gum. This had in mind the idea of using these new compounds in the preparation of extended-release dosage oral forms. The first part of this study was dedicated to the evaluation of MSG in terms of its functionality as a hydrophilic matrix (HM system for extended-release purposes. Next, we started the study of water uptake profile of all polymers of interest (MSG, Xanthan Gum and Chitosan, in the following media: water, SGF and SIF. Following, we searched for the best cross-linking agent between Glutharaldehyde (GA and Hexamethylenediisocyanate (HMDI, which turned out to be the GA. Next step we begun to prepare new hydrophilic matrices of MSG_Chitosan and MSG_Xanthan Gum, with different ratios, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1. Finally, after deciding which new HM system presented best results, by using statistics tools, we investigated the mechanism controlling the rate release of the model drug, from tablets made with this new matrix. As a final result we concluded that the best combination of polysaccharides was achieved with MSG and Xanthan Gum, with mass ratio of 1:2, using glutharaldehyde aqueous solution as cross-linking agent. It presented a prevalent zero order kinetics, which is a very important feature when thinking about an extended-release oral dosage.O objetivo deste trabalho foi o desenvolvimento de novos sistemas de matrizes hidrofílicas através da formação de ligações cruzadas (cross-linking entre a Goma da Semente da Algaroba (GSA, uma galactomanana que ocorre no endosperma das sementes de uma árvore nativa do Brasil, a Prosopis juliflora DC, e dois polissacarídeos bem conhecidos pela sua habilidade de retardar a libera

  2. Mesquite: A multi-purpose species in two locations of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose Villanueva-Diaz; Augustin Hernandez-Reyna; J. Armando Ramirez-Garcia

    2000-01-01

    The mesquite woodland distributed in approximately 200,000 ha in Llanos de Angostura, and Pozo del Carmen, San Luis Potosi, represents a main source of firewood, construction material, honey, and forage for the rural people that inhabit part of the lowlands of the hydrological region RH26 and RH37. Firewood collection in this region averages 142 m3 /week. Most of this...

  3. The human allergens of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora

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    Killian Sue

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computerized statistical analysis of allergy skin test results correlating patient reactivities initiated our interest in the cross-reactive allergens of mesquite tree pollen. In-vitro testing with mesquite-sensitized rabbits and a variety of deciduous tree pollens revealed so many cross-reactivities that it became apparent there could be more allergens in mesquite than previously described in the world literature. Our purpose was to examine the allergens of mesquite tree pollen (Prosopis juliflora which elicit an IgE response in allergic humans so that future research could determine if these human allergens cross-react with various tree pollens in the same manner as did the mesquite antiserum from sensitized rabbits. Methods Proteins from commercial mesquite tree pollen were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium-dodecyl-sulphate. These mesquite proteins were subjected to Western blotting using pooled sera from ten mesquite-sensitive patients and goat anti-human IgE. The allergens were detected using an Amplified Opti-4-CN kit, scanned, and then interpreted by Gel-Pro software. Results Thirteen human allergens of mesquite pollen were detected in this study. Conclusion The number of allergens in this study of mesquite exceeded the number identified previously in the literature. With the increased exposure to mesquite through its use in "greening the desert", increased travel to desert areas and exposure to mesquite in cooking smoke, the possible clinical significance of these allergens and their suggested cross-reactivity with other tree pollens merit further study.

  4. The human allergens of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Sue; McMichael, John

    2004-07-05

    BACKGROUND: A computerized statistical analysis of allergy skin test results correlating patient reactivities initiated our interest in the cross-reactive allergens of mesquite tree pollen. In-vitro testing with mesquite-sensitized rabbits and a variety of deciduous tree pollens revealed so many cross-reactivities that it became apparent there could be more allergens in mesquite than previously described in the world literature. Our purpose was to examine the allergens of mesquite tree pollen (Prosopis juliflora) which elicit an IgE response in allergic humans so that future research could determine if these human allergens cross-react with various tree pollens in the same manner as did the mesquite antiserum from sensitized rabbits. METHODS: Proteins from commercial mesquite tree pollen were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium-dodecyl-sulphate. These mesquite proteins were subjected to Western blotting using pooled sera from ten mesquite-sensitive patients and goat anti-human IgE. The allergens were detected using an Amplified Opti-4-CN kit, scanned, and then interpreted by Gel-Pro software. RESULTS: Thirteen human allergens of mesquite pollen were detected in this study. CONCLUSION: The number of allergens in this study of mesquite exceeded the number identified previously in the literature. With the increased exposure to mesquite through its use in "greening the desert", increased travel to desert areas and exposure to mesquite in cooking smoke, the possible clinical significance of these allergens and their suggested cross-reactivity with other tree pollens merit further study.

  5. Ispaghula Husk-Based Extended Release Tablets of Diclofenac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate extended-release tablets of diclofenac sodium based on ispaghula husk. Methods: Tablets with varying proportions of diclofenac sodium and ispaghula husk were formulated by wet granulation technique at a fixed compression force of 10 kN. The formulated tablets were evaluated for ...

  6. Features of the extended-release metformin

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    T O Yalochkina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по материалам статьи Ali S, Fonseca V. Overview of metformin: special focus on metformin extended release. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2012 Aug;13(12:1797-805.

  7. Design and evaluation of nicorandil extended-release tablet

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    Ju-Young Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to design and evaluate extended-release formulations of a model drug, nicorandil, in order to achieve the desired steady-state plasma concentration of drug in vivo. Simulation was employed to estimate optimum dissolution and absorption rate of nicorandil. The dissolution test was employed using pH 1.2, 4.0, 6.8 buffer solution, or water, to measure the in vitro release behaviors of nicorandil formulations. A single dose (15 mg of each formulation was orally administered to four beagle dogs under fasted conditions, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. The in vitro/in vivo relationship of the extended-release formulation was confirmed using in vitro dissolution profiles and plasma concentrations of drug in beagle dogs. Nicorandil was released completely within 30 min from the immediate-release tablets and released for 24 h from the extended-release tablets. The nicorandil plasma concentration could be modified by adjusting the drug release rate from the extended-release formulation. The release rate of nicorandil was the rate-limiting step in the overall absorption of drug from the extended-release formulations. These results highlight the potential of a nicorandil extended-release formulation in the treatment of angina pectoris.

  8. Pramipexole Extended Release: A Novel Treatment Option in Parkinson's Disease

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    Wolfram Eisenreich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pramipexole, the most commonly prescribed dopamine agonist worldwide, meanwhile serves as a reference substance for evaluation of new drugs. Based on numerous clinical data and vast experiences, efficacy and safety profiles of this non-ergoline dopamine agonist are well characterized. Since October 2009, an extended-release formulation of pramipexole has been available for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease. Pramipexole administration can be cut down from three times to once a day due to the newly developed extended-release formulation. This is considerable progress in regard to minimizing pill burden and enhancing compliance. Moreover, the 24 h continuous drug release of the once-daily extended-release formulation results in fewer fluctuations in plasma concentrations over time compared to immediate-release pramipexole, given three times daily. The present study summarizes pharmacokinetics and all essential pharmacological and clinical characteristics of the extended-release formulation. In addition, it provides all study data, available so far, with regard to transition and de-novo administration of extended-release formulation for patients with Parkinson's disease. It further compares efficacy and safety data of immediate-release pramipexole with the extended-release formulation of pramipexole.

  9. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  11. Ispaghula Husk-Based Extended Release Tablets of Diclofenac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Vels College of Pharmacy, Pallavaram, Chennai, India, 2Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University, ... Keywords: Ispaghula husk, Extended release tablet, Diclofenac sodium, Release kinetics. .... release, i.e., Qt vs t, log (Q0-Qt) vs t and Qt vs .... Wallis TE, Textbook of Pharmacognosy, CBS.

  12. Market potential of mesquite as fuel

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    A.T. Wiley; F.G. Manwiller

    1976-01-01

    The heat combustion of mesquite heartwood, aspwood, bark, and a mixture of stems and leaves was tested. The values averaged 8,657, 8,021, 7,836, and 8,123 Btu per OD pound, respectively. If an industrial plant requiring 50,000 pounds of steam per hour were located in an area averaging 25 green tons of mesquite fiber per acre, a harvest radius of about 3 miles would be...

  13. Metoprolol succinate extended release/hydrochlorothiazide combination tablets

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    James W Hainer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available James W Hainer, Jennifer SuggAstraZeneca LP, Wilmington, DE, USAAbstract: Lowering elevated blood pressure (BP with drug therapy reduces the risk for catastrophic fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Given the heterogeneity of hypertension as a disease, the marked variability in an individual patient’s BP response, and low response rates with monotherapy, expert groups such as the Joint National Committee (JNC emphasize the value of combination antihypertensive regimens, noting that combinations, usually of different classes, have additive antihypertensive effects. Metoprolol succinate extended-release tablet is a beta-1 (cardio-selective adrenoceptor-blocking agent formulated to provide controlled and predictable release of metoprolol. Hydrochlorothiazide (HCT is a well-established diuretic and antihypertensive agent, which promotes natruresis by acting on the distal renal tubule. The pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety/tolerability of the antihypertensive combination tablet, metoprolol extended release hydrochlorothiazide, essentially reflect the well-described independent characteristics of each of the component agents. Not only is the combination product more effective than monotherapy with the individual components but the combination product allows a low-dose multidrug regimen as an alternative to high-dose monotherapy, thereby, minimizing the likelihood of dose-related side-effects.Keywords: antihypertensive, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, combination product

  14. Mesquite: a possible source of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiley, A.T.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of utilizing mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) as fuel was studied by means of rough cost analysis. Four possible means of energy conversion were considered: namely, production of commercial electricity, conversion to methane and methanol, and as a boiler fuel for industry. By the harvesting method proposed, which consisted of root plowing all the mesquite within the immediate vicinity of the plant and hauling the trees whole to the plant for shredding, only the use as industrial boiler fuel appeared economically competitive with other fuels, and here, the competitiveness is dependent upon an unknown parameter - the cost of hauling to the plant.

  15. Tramadol extended-release in the management of chronic pain

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    McCarberg, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Chronic, noncancer pain such as that associated with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee is typically managed according to American College of Rheumatology guidelines. Patients unresponsive to first-line treatment with acetaminophen receive nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. However, many patients may have chronic pain that is refractory to these agents, or they may be at risk for the gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular complications associated with their use. Tramadol, a mild opioid agonist and norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is recommended by current guidelines for the treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain in patients who have not responded to previous oral therapy, or in patients who have contraindications to COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective NSAIDs. An extended-release (ER) formulation of tramadol was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2005. In contrast with immediate-release (IR) tramadol, this ER formulation allows once-daily dosing, providing around-the-clock analgesia. In clinical studies, tramadol ER has demonstrated a lower incidence of adverse events than that reported for IR tramadol. Unlike nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors, tramadol ER is not associated with gastrointestinal, renal, or cardiovascular complications. Although tramadol is an opioid agonist, significant abuse has not been demonstrated after long-term therapy. It is concluded that tramadol ER has an efficacy and safety profile that warrants its early use for the management of chronic pain, either alone or in conjunction with nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:18488071

  16. Tapentadol extended release for the management of chronic neck pain

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    Billeci D

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Domenico Billeci,1 Flaminia Coluzzi2 1Division of Neurosurgery, Ca’Foncello Hospital, University of Padova, Treviso, 2Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care Medicine, and Pain Therapy, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Latina, Italy Background: The role of opioids in the management of chronic neck pain is still poorly investigated. No data are available on tapentadol extended release (ER. In this article, we present 54 patients with moderate-to-severe chronic neck pain treated with tapentadol ER. Patients and methods: Patients received tapentadol ER 100 mg/day; dosage was then adjusted according to clinical needs. The following parameters were recorded: pain; Douleur Neuropathique 4 score; Neck Disability Index score; range of motion; pain-associated sleep interference; quality of life (Short Form [36] Health Survey; Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC; Clinician GIC; opioid-related adverse effects; and need for other analgesics. Results: A total of 44 of 54 patients completed the 12-week observation. Tapentadol ER daily doses increased from 100 mg/day to a mean (standard deviation dosage of 204.5 (102.8 mg/day at the final evaluation. Mean pain intensity at movement significantly decreased from baseline (8.1 [1.1] to all time points (P<0.01. At baseline, 70% of patients presented a positive neuropathic component. This percentage dropped to 23% after 12 weeks. Tapentadol improved Neck Disability Index scores from 55.6 (18.6 at baseline to 19.7 (20.9 at the final evaluation (P<0.01. Tapentadol significantly improved neck range of motion in all three planes of motion, particularly in lateral flexion. Quality of life significantly improved in all Short Form (36 Health Survey subscales (P<0.01 and in both physical and mental status (P<0.01. Based on PGIC results, approximately 90% of patients rated their overall condition as much/very much

  17. Differential scanning calorimetry as a screening technique in compatibility studies of acyclovir extended release formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barboza, Fernanda M.; Vecchia, Debora D.; Tagliari, Monika P.; Ferreira, Andrea Granada; Silva, Marcos A.S.; Stulzer, Hellen K.

    2009-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) has been investigated during the past years, mainly due to its antiviral activity. Assessment of possible incompatibility between an active component and different excipients along with the evaluation of thermal stability are crucial parts of a normal study prior to the final formulation setting of a medicine. Thermal analysis studies were used as important and complementary tools during pre-formulation to determine the compatibility of drug excipients with the purpose of developing an acyclovir extended release formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction analyses were also realized. The results showed that ACV only exhibited interaction which could influence the stability of the product in the binary mixtures of ACV/magnesium stearate. (author)

  18. 78 FR 66009 - Determination That INVEGA (Paliperidone) Extended-Release Tablet, 12 Milligrams, Was Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ...] Determination That INVEGA (Paliperidone) Extended-Release Tablet, 12 Milligrams, Was Not Withdrawn From Sale for... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that INVEGA (paliperidone) extended-release tablet...-release tablet, 12 mg, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  19. Formulation and Evaluation of Extended- Release Tablet of Zolpidem Tartrate by Wet Granulation Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Pourhashem; Mohammad Reza Avadi

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to design and evaluate extended - release system of the hypnotic agent, Zolpidem tartrate usefulness for the treatment of insomnia. The half-life of this drug is about 1.9 - 3 hours that indicating it a candidate for the extended release formulation. Our investigation relates to development of extended drug delivery system based on Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMCK4M) as release retardant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP k30) as binder and Magnesium S...

  20. Bilayer tablets of Paliperidone for Extended release osmotic drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdary, K. Sunil; Napoleon, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and optimize the formulation of paliperidone bilayer tablet core and coating which should meet in vitro performance of trilayered Innovator sample Invega. Optimization of core formulations prepared by different ratio of polyox grades and optimization of coating of (i) sub-coating build-up with hydroxy ethyl cellulose (HEC) and (ii).enteric coating build-up with cellulose acetate (CA). Some important influence factors such as different core tablet compositions and different coating solution ingredients involved in the formulation procedure were investigated. The optimization of formulation and process was conducted by comparing different in vitro release behaviours of Paliperidone. In vitro dissolution studies of Innovator sample (Invega) with formulations of different release rate which ever close release pattern during the whole 24 h test is finalized.

  1. Preparation and scale up of extended-release tablets of bromopride

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    Guilherme Neves Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reproducibility of the tablet manufacturing process and control of its pharmaceutics properties depends on the optimization of formulation aspects and process parameters. Computer simulation such as Design of Experiments (DOE can be used to scale up the production of this formulation, in particular for obtaining sustained-release tablets. Bromopride formulations are marketed in the form of extended-release pellets, which makes the product more expensive and difficult to manufacture. The aim of this study was to formulate new bromopride sustained release formulations as tablets, and to develop mathematical models to standardize the scale up of this formulation, controlling weight and hardness of the tablets during manufacture according to the USP 34th edition. DOE studies were conducted using Minitab(tm software. Different excipient combinations were evaluated in order to produce bromopride sustained-release matrix tablets. In the scale-up study, data were collected and variations in tableting machine parameters were measured. Data were processed by Minitab(tm software, generating mathematical equations used for prediction of powder compaction behavior, according to the settings of the tableting machine suitable for scale-up purposes. Bromopride matrix tablets with appropriate characteristics for sustained release were developed. The scale-up of the formulation with the most suitable sustained release profile was established by using mathematical models, indicating that the formulation can be a substitute for the pellets currently marketed.

  2. Once daily, extended release ciprofloxacin for complicated urinary tract infections and acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan, David A; Klimberg, Ira W; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Song, James; Kowalsky, Steven F; Church, Deborah A

    2004-02-01

    We assessed the efficacy and safety of 1,000 mg extended release ciprofloxacin orally once daily vs conventional 500 mg ciprofloxacin orally twice daily, each for 7 to 14 days, in patients with a complicated urinary tract infection (cUTI) or acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis (AUP). In this prospective, randomized, double-blind, North American multicenter clinical trial adults were stratified based on clinical presentation of cUTI or AUP and randomized to extended release ciprofloxacin or ciprofloxacin twice daily. Efficacy valid patients had positive pretherapy urine cultures (105 or greater cFU/ml) and pyuria within 48 hours of study entry. Bacteriological and clinical outcomes were assessed at the test of cure visit (5 to 11 days after therapy) and the late followup visit (28 to 42 days after therapy). The intent to treat population comprised 1,035 patients (extended release ciprofloxacin in 517 and twice daily in 518), of whom 435 were efficacy valid (cUTI in 343 and AUP in 92). For efficacy valid patients (cUTI and AUP combined) bacteriological eradication rates at test of cure were 89% (183 of 206) vs 85% (195 of 229) (95% CI -2.4%, 10.3%) and clinical cure rates were 97% (198 of 205) vs 94% (211 of 225) (95% CI -1.2%, 6.9%) for extended release vs twice daily ciprofloxacin. Late followup outcomes were consistent with test of cure findings. Eradication rates for Escherichia coli, which accounted for 58% of pathogens, were 97% or greater per group. Drug related adverse event rates were similar for extended release and twice daily ciprofloxacin (13% and 14%, respectively). Extended release ciprofloxacin at a dose of 1,000 mg once daily was as safe and effective as conventional treatment with 500 mg ciprofloxacin twice daily, each given orally for 7 to 14 days in adults with cUTI or AUP. It provides a convenient, once daily, empirical treatment option.

  3. Pharmacological and clinical evidence of nevirapine immediate- and extended-release formulations

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    Ena J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Javier Ena, Concepción Amador, Conxa Benito, Francisco PasquauHIV Unit, Hospital Marina Baixa, Villajoyosa, SpainAbstract: We reviewed the current information available on nevirapine immediate- and extended-release formulations and its role in single-dose and combination antiretroviral therapy. Nevirapine was approved in 1996 and was the first non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor available for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Nevirapine has demonstrated good efficacy and a well-characterized safety profile. A major drawback is the low genetic barrier, allowing the emergence of resistance in the presence of single mutations in the reverse-transcriptase gene. This shortcoming is particularly relevant when nevirapine is administered in a single dose to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1 infection, compromising the efficacy of future non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase–inhibitor regimens. Studies published recently have probed the noninferiority of nevirapine compared to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir with both tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine in antiretroviral treatment–naïve patients. In 2011, a new formulation of nevirapine (nevirapine extended release that allowed once-daily dosing was approved by the Food and Drug Administration and by the European Medicines Agency. VERxVe, a study comparing nevirapine extended release with nevirapine immediate release in antiretroviral treatment–naïve patients, and TRANxITION, a study carried out in antiretroviral treatment–experienced patients who switched therapy from nevirapine immediate release to nevirapine extended release, provided data on the noninferiority of the new formulation of nevirapine compared with nevirapine immediate release in terms of efficacy and safety. Nevirapine extended release will further increase the durability and persistence of nevirapine-containing antiretroviral therapy, allowing once-daily dosing regimens.Keywords: nevirapine

  4. Treatment-Continuity of ADHD Compared Using Immediate-Release and Extended-Release MPH

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuity of methylphenidate (MPH therapy for ADHD in young Medicaid beneficiaries (ages 6 to 17 years treated with immediate-release (IR or extended-release (ER MPH formulations was compared in an analysis of statewide California Medicaid claims (2000-2003 conducted at Columbia University, New York; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; and McNeil Pharmaceuticals, Fort Washington, PA.

  5. Simulated Driving Changes in Young Adults with ADHD Receiving Mixed Amphetamine Salts Extended Release and Atomoxetine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Gary G.; Michaels, M. Alex; Pakull, Barton

    2009-01-01

    Background: Psychostimulant treatment may improve simulated driving performance in young adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of simulated driving performance with mixed amphetamine salts--extended release (MAS XR) 50 mg/day (Cohort 1) and…

  6. Aspirin and extended-release dipyridamole versus clopidogrel for recurrent stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sacco, Ralph L; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Yusuf, Salim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recurrent stroke is a frequent, disabling event after ischemic stroke. This study compared the efficacy and safety of two antiplatelet regimens--aspirin plus extended-release dipyridamole (ASA-ERDP) versus clopidogrel. METHODS: In this double-blind, 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly...

  7. Clonidine Extended-Release Tablets for Pediatric Patients with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rakesh; Segal, Scott; Kollins, Scott H.; Khayrallah, Moise

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the efficacy and safety of clonidine hydrochloride extended-release tablets (CLON-XR) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: This 8-week, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose trial, including 3 weeks of dose escalation, of patients 6 to 17 years old with ADHD evaluated the…

  8. A Controlled Trial of Extended-Release Guanfacine and Psychostimulants for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilens, Timothy E.; Bukstein, Oscar; Brams, Matthew; Cutler, Andrew J.; Childress, Ann; Rugino, Thomas; Lyne, Andrew; Grannis, Kara; Youcha, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine efficacy, tolerability, and safety of guanfacine extended release (GXR; less than or equal to 4 mg/d) adjunctive to a long-acting psychostimulant for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents 6 to 17 years of age with suboptimal, but partial, response to psychostimulant…

  9. {sup 13} C-NMR of mesquite gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Cristina T; Garcia, Rosangela B [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas

    1992-12-31

    Mesquite and guar gums are galactomannans extracted from the seeds of Proposis Juliflora and Cyamopsis tetragonolobus, respectively. An experimental sample of mesquite gum and a commercial sample of guar gum were partially depolymerized by ultrasonic radiation and the produce analysed by high resolution {sup 13} C-NMR spectroscopy. The different carbon lines were resolved and their assignments were done as those reported in the literature. The galactose to mannose ratios (G/M) were estimated from the relative peak areas of the C-1 lines as G/M=61 for mesquite and G/M=0.54 for guar gum. The next nearest-neighbour probabilities (diad frequencies) of the D-galactosyl substitution to the D-mannose backbone were evaluated by integrating C-4 mannose splitted peaks. (author) 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Formulation and Evaluation of Extended- Release Tablet of Zolpidem Tartrate by Wet Granulation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Pourhashem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to design and evaluate extended - release system of the hypnotic agent, Zolpidem tartrate usefulness for the treatment of insomnia. The half-life of this drug is about 1.9 - 3 hours that indicating it a candidate for the extended release formulation. Our investigation relates to development of extended drug delivery system based on Hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMCK4M as release retardant, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP k30 as binder and Magnesium Stearate using Factorial design. In vitro release study of matrix tablets was carried out in 0.01N HCl for 2 hours. All prepared matrix tablets were evaluated for physicochemical evaluation and drug content. The formulation that had release profile according to United State Pharmacopoeia selected for stability study according to ICH guidelines.

  11. Rhabdomyolysis following Acute Extended-Release Quetiapine Poisoning: A Case Report

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    Antonios Liolios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During the past few years, there have been a number of case reports concerning rhabdomyolysis following quetiapine poisoning; however, there has been none concerning the medication in its extended-release form. Methods. We present the case report of a 48-year-old man presenting a major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder, who after voluntary intoxication with 12000 mg of quetiapine extended-release developed signs of acute rhabdomyolysis. Results. The rhabdomyolysis was confirmed by the laboratory and the clinical findings, with elevated levels of creatinine, creatine phosphokinase, and CRP. Discussion. We would like to pinpoint the importance of this complication and our concern of prescribing it for psychiatric patients with chronic somatic comorbidities.

  12. Dose comparison and side effect profile of metformin extended release versus metformin immediate release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hameed, M.; Khan, K.; Salman, S.; Mehmood, N.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus type 2 is very common worldwide, with majority of cases in Asia Pacific region. Metformin is the first line therapy, along with lifestyle modification for all type 2 diabetics as recommended by ADA. Metformin is available as conventional Metformin Immediate Release (MIR) and Metformin Extended Release (MXR). Metformin XR has better gastrointestinal tolerability and fewer side effects as compared to Metformin IR, with similar efficacy regarding anti-hyperglycaemic effects. The objective of this study was to determine whether metformin XR is as effective as Metformin IR in maintaining glycaemic control at equivalent doses or even at reduced doses; and to compare the side effect profile of the two preparations. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at Medical and Endocrinology OPD of Jinnah Hospital Lahore A total of 90 type 2 diabetics of both genders were recruited using nonprobability purposive sampling. Patients were randomized into 3 groups; 30 in each group. Group 1 received Metformin IR 1000 mg twice daily; group 2 received metformin XR 1000mg twice daily; and group 3 received metformin XR 500 mg twice daily, for a period of three months. HbA1c was done at baseline and after three months of therapy along with fasting blood sugars and random blood sugars weekly. Results: The mean age of patients was 46+-9 years, with 54% being males and 46% being females. There was a 1% reduction in HbA1c in group 1, 0.7% reduction in group 2 and only 0.4% reduction in group 3. Similarly, all three therapies were equally effective in reducing blood sugar fasting and blood sugar random at three months. Side effects namely diarrhoea, dyspepsia and flatulence were greatest with Metformin IR (40%) but less than half with Metformin XR at equivalent dose and negligible at half the dose. Conclusions: All three Metformin groups were effective in reduction of HbA1C and glycaemic control clinically and there is no statistical difference in HbA1c reduction

  13. Direct and indirect effects of paliperidone extended-release tablets on negative symptoms of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Bossie, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    Ibrahim Turkoz, Cynthia A Bossie, Bryan Dirks, Carla M CanusoOrtho-McNeil Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Titusville, NJ, USAAbstract: Direct and indirect effects of the new psychotropic paliperidone extended-release (paliperidone ER) tablets on negative symptom improvement in schizophrenia were investigated using path analysis. A post hoc analysis of pooled data from three 6-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone ER in patients experiencing acute exacerbation was con...

  14. Long-Term Effectiveness and Safety of Dexmethylphenidate Extended-Release Capsules in Adult ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Lenard A.; Spencer, Thomas; McGough, James J.; Jiang, Hai; Muniz, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates dexmethylphenidate extended release (d-MPH-ER) in adults with ADHD. Method: Following a 5-week, randomized, controlled, fixed-dose study of d-MPH-ER 20 to 40 mg/d, 170 adults entered a 6-month open-label extension (OLE) to assess long-term safety, with flexible dosing of 20 to 40 mg/d. Exploratory effectiveness…

  15. Update on prescription extended-release opioids and appropriate patient selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan MJ

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Brennan The Pain Center of Fairfield, Fairfield, CT, USA Abstract: Chronic pain is largely underdiagnosed, often undertreated, and expected to increase as the American population ages. Many patients with chronic pain require long-term treatment with analgesic medications, and pain management may involve use of prescription opioids for patients whose pain is inadequately controlled through other therapies. Yet because of the potential for abuse and addiction, many clinicians hesitate to treat their patients with pain with potentially beneficial agents. Finding the right opioid for the right patient is the first – often complicated – step. Ensuring that patients continue to properly use the medication while achieving therapeutic analgesic effects is the long-term goal. Combined with careful patient selection and ongoing monitoring, new formulations using extended-release technologies incorporating tamper-resistant features may help combat the growing risk of abuse or misuse, which will hopefully reduce individual suffering and the societal burden of chronic pain. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an update on extended-release opioids and to provide clinicians with a greater understanding of which patients might benefit from these new opioid formulations and how to integrate the recommended monitoring for abuse potential into clinical practice. Keywords: chronic pain, opioid analgesics, extended release, abuse prevention

  16. Critical appraisal of extended-release hydrocodone for chronic pain: patient considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gould HJ III

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Harry J Gould III,1,3–7 Dennis Paul1–8 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 4Department of Anesthesiology, 5Neuroscience Center of Excellence, 6Center of Excellence for Oral and Craniofacial Biology, 7Pain Mastery Center of Louisiana, 8Alcohol and Drug Abuse Center of Excellence, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA, USA Abstract: Opioid analgesics are currently the most effective pharmacologic option for the management of both acute and chronic forms of moderate-to-severe pain. Although the “as-needed” use of immediate-release formulations is considered optimum for treating acute, painful episodes of limited duration, the scheduled dosing of extended-release formulations with immediate-release supplementation for breakthrough pain is regarded to be most effective for managing chronic conditions requiring around-the-clock treatment. The recent introduction of extended-release formulations of the opioid analgesic hydrocodone potentially broadened the possibility of providing pain relief for individuals for whom current formulations are either ineffective or not tolerated. However, reaction to the approval of the new formulations has fueled controversy over the general safety and need for opioid medications, in light of their potential for misuse, abuse, diversion, and addiction. Here, we discuss how the approval of extended-release formulations of hydrocodone and the emotionally charged controversy over their release may affect physician prescribing and the care available to patients in need of chronic opioid therapy for the management of pain. Keywords: opioid analgesics, patient risks, patient benefits, misuse, addiction

  17. Quetiapine extended release versus aripiprazole in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, Anne Katrine; Jeppesen, Pia; Klauber, Dea Gowers

    2017-01-01

    of quetiapine-extended release (quetiapine-ER) versus aripiprazole in children and adolescents with first-episode psychosis, to determine whether differences between the two treatments were sufficient to guide clinicians in their choice of one drug over the other. METHODS: In this multicentre, double-blind...... (47 [92%] vs 39 [71%]), orthostatic dizziness (42 [78%] vs 46 [81%]), depression (43 [80%] vs 44 [77%]), tension/inner unrest (37 [69%] vs 50 [88%]), failing memory (41 [76%] vs 44 [77%]), and weight gain (46 [87%] vs 38 [68%]). INTERPRETATION: This first head-to-head comparison of quetiapine...

  18. Risk based In Vitro Performance Assessment of Extended Release Abuse Deterrent Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Gupta, Abhay; Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Calderon, Silvia N.; Khan, Mansoor A.

    2016-01-01

    High strength extended release opioid products, which are indispensable tools in the management of pain, are associated with serious risks of unintentional and potentially fatal overdose, as well as of misuse and abuse that might lead to addiction. The issue of drug abuse becomes increasingly prominent when the dosage forms can be readily manipulated to release a high amount of opioid or to extract the drug in certain products or solvents. One approach to deter opioid drug abuse is by providing novel abuse deterrent formulations (ADF), with properties that may be viewed as barriers to abuse of the product. However, unlike regular extended release formulations, assessment of ADF technologies are challenging, in part due to the great variety of formulation designs available to achieve deterrence of abuse by oral, parenteral, nasal and respiratory routes. With limited prior history or literature information, and lack of compendial standards, evaluation and regulatory approval of these novel drug products become increasingly difficult. The present article describes a risk-based standardized in-vitro approach that can be utilized in general evaluation of abuse deterrent features for all ADF products. PMID:26784976

  19. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekhit MH

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mary Hanna Bekhit1–51David Geffen School of Medicine, 2Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, 3UCLA Ambulatory Surgery Center, 4UCLA Wasserman Eye Institute, 5UCLA Martin Luther King Community Hospital, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen, are available solely in immediate-release (IR formulations. Keywords: opioid, analgesic, xartemis, acute postsurgical pain, substance abuse, acetaminophen, extended release 

  20. Tapentadol extended-release for treatment of chronic pain: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadivelu N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu1, Alexander Timchenko1, Yili Huang2, Raymond Sinatra11Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; 2Internal Medicine, North Shore-LIJ Plainview Hospital, Plainview, NY, USAAbstract: Tapentadol is a centrally acting analgesic with a dual mechanism of action of mu receptor agonism and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition. Tapentadol immediate-release is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the management of moderate-to-severe acute pain. It was developed to decrease the intolerability issue associated with opioids. Tapentadol extended-release has a 12-hour duration of effect, and has recently been evaluated for pain in patients with chronic osteoarthritis, low back pain, and pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Tapentadol extended-release was found to provide safe and highly effective analgesia for the treatment of chronic pain conditions, including moderate-to-severe chronic osteoarthritis pain and low back pain. Initial trials demonstrating efficacy in neuropathic pain suggest that tapentadol has comparable analgesic effectiveness and better gastrointestinal tolerability than opioid comparators, and demonstrates effectiveness in settings of inflammatory, somatic, and neuropathic pain. Gastrointestinal intolerance and central nervous system effects were the major adverse events noted. Tapentadol will need to be rigorously tested in chronic neuropathic pain, cancer-related pain, and cancer-related neuropathic pain.Keywords: osteoarthritis, neuropathic pain, analgesic, opioids, norepinephrine

  1. Management of obesity and cardiometabolic risk – role of phentermine/extended release topiramate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweeting AN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arianne N Sweeting,1 Eddy Tabet,1 Ian D Caterson,1,2 Tania P Markovic1,2 1Department of Endocrinology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA recently approved lorcaserin and the combination of phentermine and extended release topiramate (phentermine/topiramate ER for the treatment of obesity in conjunction with a lifestyle intervention, expanding the therapeutic options for long-term obesity pharmacotherapy, which was previously limited to orlistat. Combination phentermine/topiramate ER is associated with greater weight loss compared to its constituent monotherapy, with a more favorable adverse effect profile. Phentermine/topiramate ER also appears to have beneficial effects on cardiometabolic risk, although longer-term cardiovascular safety data are required. While there are no head-to-head studies among the currently available obesity pharmacotherapy agents, phentermine/topiramate ER appears to have a superior weight loss profile. This review will discuss the epidemiology, natural history, and cardiometabolic risk associated with obesity, provide an overview on current obesity pharmacotherapy, and summarize the recent clinical efficacy and safety data underpinning the FDA's approval of both phentermine/topiramate ER and lorcaserin as pharmacotherapy for a long-term obesity intervention. Keywords: obesity, phentermine/topiramate extended release, safety and efficacy, review

  2. Topiramate Extended-Release Options: A Focus on Efficacy and Safety in Epilepsy and Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Topiramate (TPM is effective for multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes in children and adults. Topiramate has adverse effects (including cognitive, depression, renal stones, but many of these are low incidence when started at a low dose and slowly titrated to 100 to 200 mg/day. Also, TPM has proven benefit for migraine, obesity, eating disorders, and alcohol use disorders, which can be comorbid in patients with epilepsy and may also be effective in subpopulations within specific psychiatric diagnoses. Recently approved extended-release formulations of TPM (Trokendi and Qudexy in the United States have reliable data supporting their safety and efficacy for patients with epilepsy. They have potential for more rapid titration within 1 month to 200 mg/day and have better patient retention than TPM immediate-release, but there are no robust double-blind randomized controlled trials comparing the different formulations. We expect the once per day extended-release formulations to improve medication adherence compared with the twice per day formulations. This has significant potential to improve outcomes in epilepsy and the other TPM-responsive disorders.

  3. USE OF EXTENDED-RELEASE PRAMIPEXOLE IN EARLY-STAGE PARKINSON’S DISEASE: DESCRIPTION OF A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Fedorova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a clinical case of early-stage mixed Parkinson’s disease (PD with significant affective disorders and restless legs syndrome. Once-daily extended-release pramipexole 3 mg significantly improved a patient’s status and led to regression of movement and affective disorders. The paper gives data on the efficacy of dopamine receptor agonists in treating PD and the benefits of their extended-release formulations.

  4. Update on extended release quetiapine fumarate in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khalili N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nizar El-KhaliliAlpine Clinic, Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine fumarate is available both as an immediate release (IR and as an extended release (XR formulation allowing flexibility of dosing for individual patients. Approved uses of quetiapine XR include the treatment of schizophrenia (including maintenance therapy for prevention of relapse, the treatment of bipolar disorder (manic and depressive episodes, and the prevention of recurrence in patients with bipolar disorder who respond to quetiapine XR. This narrative review provides an update on quetiapine XR in these indications. The pharmacological profile of quetiapine, including a moderate affinity for dopamine D2 receptors and higher affinity for serotonin 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT2A receptors, may explain its broad efficacy and low propensity for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS. The XR formulation has similar bioavailability but prolonged plasma levels compared with the IR formulation, allowing for less frequent (once-daily dosing. Clinical studies have confirmed the efficacy of quetiapine XR in relieving the acute symptoms of schizophrenia during short-term trials, and reducing the risk for relapse in long-term studies. Direct switching from the IR formulation to the same dose of the XR formulation did not reveal any loss of efficacy or tolerability issues, and switching patients to quetiapine XR from conventional or other atypical antipsychotics (for reasons of insufficient efficacy or tolerability also proved to be beneficial and generally well tolerated. In bipolar disorder, quetiapine XR has also proven effective in relieving acute depressive and manic symptoms. Adverse events with quetiapine XR in patients with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are similar to those associated with the IR formulation, the most common being sedation, dry mouth, somnolence, dizziness, and headache. The low propensity for EPS is maintained with the XR formulation

  5. Extended Release of an Anti–Heparan Sulfate Peptide From a Contact Lens Suppresses Corneal Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishankar, Dinesh; Buhrman, Jason S.; Valyi-Nagy, Tibor; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Shukla, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To prolong the release of a heparan sulfate binding peptide, G2-C, using a commercially available contact lens as a delivery vehicle and to demonstrate the ability of the released peptide to block herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of corneal HSV-1 infection. Methods Commercially available contact lenses were immersed in peptide solution for 5 days prior to determining the release of the peptide at various time points. Cytotoxicity of the released samples was determined by MTT and cell cycle analysis, and the functional activity of the released samples were assessed by viral entry, and viral spread assay using human corneal epithelial cells (HCE). The ability to suppress infection in human and pig cornea ex vivo and mouse in vivo models were also assessed. Results Peptide G2-C was released through the contact lens. Following release for 3 days, the peptide showed significant activity by inhibiting HSV-1 viral entry and spread in HCE cells. Significant suppression of infection was also observed in the ex vivo and in vivo experiments involving corneas. Conclusions Extended release of an anti–HS peptide through a commercially available contact lens can generate significant anti–HSV-1 activity and provides a new and effective way to control corneal herpes. PMID:26780322

  6. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: A two-phase randomized controlled trial*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: 1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and 2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Methods Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Results Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. PMID:23755929

  7. Efficacy of extended-release tramadol for treatment of prescription opioid withdrawal: a two-phase randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Babalonis, Shanna; Nuzzo, Paul A; Siegel, Anthony; Campbell, Charles; Walsh, Sharon L

    2013-11-01

    Tramadol is an atypical analgesic with monoamine and modest mu opioid agonist activity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate: (1) the efficacy of extended-release (ER) tramadol in treating prescription opioid withdrawal and (2) whether cessation of ER tramadol produces opioid withdrawal. Prescription opioid users with current opioid dependence and observed withdrawal participated in this inpatient, two-phase double blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. In Phase 1 (days 1-7), participants were randomly assigned to matched oral placebo or ER tramadol (200 or 600 mg daily). In Phase 2 (days 8-13), all participants underwent double blind crossover to placebo. Breakthrough withdrawal medications were available for all subjects. Enrollment continued until 12 completers/group was achieved. Use of breakthrough withdrawal medication differed significantly (popioid withdrawal. Mild opioid withdrawal occurred after cessation of treatment with 600 mg tramadol. These data support the continued investigation of tramadol as a treatment for opioid withdrawal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Functional properties of mesquite bean protein (Prosopis juliflora)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist-Donquis, I; Ruíz de Rey, G

    1997-12-01

    A protein concentrate was prepared from whole mesquite bean (Prosopis juliflora) to evaluate and characterize its functional properties; solubility index, effects of moist heat on its solubility, water sorption, fat absorption, foaming capability and foam stability, emulsifying capacity, viscosity and the effects of NaCl and temperature on some of these properties. These properties were evaluated by procedures used to determine its potential application as a food ingredient and its market potential as a new protein source. The protein isoelectric point ranged between pH 4.00-4.50. Maximum solubility was obtained at a pH 10.00 in a 0.75 M NaCl solution and under heat treatment at 112 degrees C for 5 min. Under the studied conditions the amount of water absorbed and the fat absorption capacity, strongly suggest the mesquite bean protein utilization in foods where both properties are important in order to enhances flavor retention and mouth-feel improvement. Although its foaming capability was larger than that of the egg albumin under similar pH conditions, the protein concentrate did not show a good stability, however, both properties could be improved. Emulsifying capacity as a pH function, showed a positive correlation (r = 0.8435 with a signification level of p = 0.004) with the solubility index but, decreased with NaCl even at low concentrations. For these reasons, the uses of mesquite bean protein for this property will be determined by the pH and ionic strength of the product to be processed.

  9. Paliperidone extended-release: does it have a place in antipsychotic therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Schönfeldt-Lecuona

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Maximilian Gahr1,*, Markus A Kölle1,*, Carlos Schönfeldt-Lecuona1, Peter Lepping2, Roland W Freudenmann11Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany; 2Department of Psychiatry, Glyndwr University, Wales, UK *Both authors contributed equally and their order was determined by coin toss.Abstract: Paliperidone (9-hydroxy-risperidone, the active metabolite of risperidone, was approved for treating schizophrenia worldwide in 2006 as paliperidone extended-release (PER, and became the first second-generation antipsychotic specifically licensed for treating schizoaffective disorder in 2009. However, at the same time, its comparatively high cost gave rise to concerns about the cost-effectiveness of PER as compared with its precursor, risperidone. This paper reviews the existing knowledge of the pharmacology, kinetics, efficacy, tolerability, and fields of application of PER, and compares PER with risperidone in order to determine whether it has a place in antipsychotic therapy. An independent assessment of all relevant publications on PER published until July 2010 was undertaken. PER has a unique pharmacological profile, including single dosing, predominantly renal excretion, low drug–drug interaction risk, and differs from risperidone in terms of mode of action and pharmacokinetics. High-level evidence suggests that PER is efficacious and safe in schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and acute manic episodes. There is a striking lack of published head-to-head comparisons between PER and risperidone, irrespective of indication. Low-level evidence shows a lower risk for hyperprolactinemia and higher patient satisfaction with PER than with risperidone. PER adds to the still limited arsenal of second-generation antipsychotics. In the absence of direct comparisons with risperidone, it remains difficult to come to a final verdict on the potential additional therapeutic benefits of PER which would justify its substantially

  10. Extended-release naltrexone for pre-release prisoners: A randomized trial of medical mobile treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S.; Vocci, Frank J.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.; O'Grady, Kevin E.; O'Brien, Charles P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder but is rarely initiated in US prisons or with criminal justice populations. Mobile treatment for chronic diseases have been implemented in a variety of settings. Mobile treatment may provide an opportunity to expand outreach to parolees to surmount barriers to traditional clinic treatment. Methods Male and female prisoners (240) with pre-incarceration histories of opioid use disorder who are within one month of release from prison will be enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Participants are randomized to one of two study arms: 1) [XR-NTX-OTx] One injection of long-acting naltrexone in prison, followed by 6 monthly injections post-release at a community opioid treatment program; or 2) [XR-NTX+ MMTx] One injection of long-acting naltrexone in prison followed by 6 monthly injections post-release at the patient's place of residence utilizing mobile medical treatment. The primary outcomes are: treatment adherence; opioid use; criminal activity; re-arrest; reincarceration; and HIV risk-behaviors. Results We describe the background and rationale for the study, its aims, hypotheses, and study design. Conclusions The use of long-acting injectable naltrexone may be a promising form of treatment for pre-release prisoners. Finally, as many individuals in the criminal justice system drop out of treatment, this study will assess whether treatment at their place of residence will improve adherence and positively affect treatment outcomes. PMID:28011389

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Paliperidone Extended-Release in Acute and Maintenance Treatment of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Spina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paliperidone, the major active metabolite of risperidone, is a second-generation antipsychotic that has been developed as an extended-release (ER tablet formulation that minimizes peak-trough fluctuations in plasma concentrations, allowing once-daily administration and constant drug delivery. Paliperidone ER has demonstrated efficacy in the reduction of acute schizophrenia symptoms in 6-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials and clinical benefits were maintained in the longer-term according to extension studies of up to 52 weeks in duration. Compared with quetiapine, paliperidone ER was associated with a more rapid symptom improvement. In addition, it was more effective than placebo in the prevention of symptom recurrence. Paliperidone ER is generally well tolerated with a predictable adverse event profile. Like risperidone, it is associated with a dose-dependent risk of extrapyramidal symptoms and prolactin elevation. Short-and longer-term studies have indicated a low liability for paliperidone ER to cause metabolic (ie, weight gain, hyperglycaemia and lipid dysregulation or cardiovascular adverse effects. Available safety data from elderly patients appear to be promising. Due to negligible hepatic biotransformation, paliperidone ER is unlikely to be involved in clinically significant metabolic drug-drug interactions. Additional active comparator trials evaluating efficacy, tolerability and cost-effectiveness are required to better define the role of paliperidone ER in the treatment of schizophrenia in relation to other currently available second-generation antipsychotics, particularly risperidone.

  12. Film Coating of Nifedipine Extended Release Pellets in a Fluid Bed Coater with a Wurster Insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Franquelin Gomes de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the coating process of nifedipine extended release pellets using Opadry and Opadry II, in a fluid bed coater with a Wurster insert. The coating process was studied using a complete experimental design of two factors at two levels for each polymer. The variables studied were the inlet air temperature and the coating suspension flow rate. The agglomerate fraction and coating efficiency were the analyzed response variables. The air temperature was the variable that most influenced the coating efficiency for both polymers. In addition, a study of the dissolution profiles of coated and uncoated pellets using 0.5% sodium lauryl sulfate in simulated gastric fluid without enzymes (pH 1.2 was conducted. The results showed a prolonged release profile for the coated and uncoated pellets that was very similar to the standards established by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. The drug content and the release profiles were not significantly affected by storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity. However, when exposed to direct sunlight and fluorescent light (light from fluorescent bulbs, the coated pellets lost only 5% of the drug content, while the uncoated ones lost more than 35%; furthermore, the dissolution profile of the uncoated pellets was faster.

  13. Granisetron Extended-Release Injection: A Review in Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Emma D

    2016-12-01

    An extended-release (ER) subcutaneously injectable formulation of the first-generation 5-HT 3 receptor antagonist granisetron is now available in the USA (Sustol ® ), where it is indicated for the prevention of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) following moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) or anthracycline and cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy regimens in adults. Granisetron ER is administered as a single subcutaneous injection and uses an erosion-controlled drug-delivery system to allow prolonged granisetron release. Primary endpoint data from phase III studies after an initial cycle of chemotherapy indicate that, when used as part of an antiemetic regimen, granisetron ER injection is more effective than intravenous ondansetron in preventing delayed CINV following highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC); is noninferior to intravenous palonosetron in preventing both acute CINV following MEC or HEC and delayed CINV following MEC; and is similar, but not superior, to palonosetron in preventing delayed CINV following HEC. The benefits of granisetron ER were seen in various patient subgroups, including those receiving anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide-based HEC, and (in an extension of one of the studies) over multiple MEC or HEC cycles. Granisetron ER injection is generally well tolerated, with an adverse event profile similar to that of ondansetron or palonosetron. Thus, granisetron ER injection expands the options for preventing both acute and delayed CINV in adults with cancer receiving MEC or anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide-based HEC.

  14. A flexible-dose dispenser for immediate and extended release 3D printed tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Katarzyna; Isreb, Abdullah; Alhnan, Mohamed A

    2015-10-01

    The advances in personalised medicine increased the demand for a fast, accurate and reliable production method of tablets that can be digitally controlled by healthcare staff. A flexible dose tablet system is presented in this study that proved to be suitable for immediate and extended release tablets with a realistic drug loading and an easy-to-swallow tablet design. The method bridges the affordable and digitally controlled Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) 3D printing with a standard pharmaceutical manufacturing process, Hot Melt Extrusion (HME). The reported method was compatible with three methacrylic polymers (Eudragit RL, RS and E) as well as a cellulose-based one (hydroxypropyl cellulose, HPC SSL). The use of a HME based pharmaceutical filament preserved the linear relationship between the mass and printed volume and was utilized to digitally control the dose via an input from computer software with dose accuracy in the range of 91-95%. Higher resolution printing quality doubled the printing time, but showed a little effect on in vitro release pattern of theophylline and weight accuracy. Physical characterization studies indicated that the majority of the model drug (theophylline) in the 3D printed tablet exists in a crystal form. Owing to the small size, ease of use and the highly adjustable nature of FDM 3D printers, the method holds promise for future individualised treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Tramadol Extended-Release for the Management of Pain due to Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guetti, Cristiana; Paladini, Antonella; Varrassi, Giustino

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge on pathogenesis of osteoarticular pain, as well as the consequent several, especially on the gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular systems, side effects of NSAIDs, makes it difficult to perform an optimal management of this mixed typology of pain. This is especially observable in elderly patients, the most frequently affected by osteoarthritis (OA). Tramadol is an analgesic drug, the action of which has a twofold action. It has a weak affinity to mu opioid receptors and, at the same time, can result in inhibition of the reuptake of noradrenaline and serotonin in nociceptorial descending inhibitory control system. These two mechanisms, “opioidergic” and “nonopioidergic,” are the grounds for contrasting certain types of pain that are generally less responsive to opioids, such as neuropathic pain or mixed OA pain. The extended-release formulation of tramadol has good efficacy and tolerability and acts through a dosing schedule that allows a high level of patients compliance to therapies with a good recovery outcome for the patients' functional status. PMID:27335872

  16. Pharmacokinetic drug evaluation of extended release lorcaserin for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Kathryn M; Dunham, Marissa W

    2017-08-01

    Lorcaserin is a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist that was FDA approved in 2012. Lorcaserin is recently available as an extended-release (ER) formulation for the treatment of obesity as an adjunct to lifestyle modification. Areas covered: The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of lorcaserin ER will be reviewed. Expert opinion: Lorcaserin ER 20mg daily provides drug exposure bioequivalent to lorcaserin immediate release (IR) 10mg twice daily. Lorcaserin IR is associated with 3.3 and 3.0% placebo-subtracted weight loss in patients without and with diabetes, respectively. A1C was reduced by 0.9% in patients with diabetes. Common side effects include headache, dry mouth, constipation, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea. Lorcaserin provides potential advantages over other antiobesity medications in regards to tolerability and simplicity of medication initiation, but may not be as effective as other options. Lorcaserin ER offers improved ease of administration and anticipated adherence compared to the IR formulation. The place in therapy for lorcaserin ER and other antiobesity medications will be further clarified by results of pending clinical trials addressing cardiovascular outcomes as well as the role pharmacogenomics and comorbid disease states may play in choosing patient-specific therapy.

  17. Film Coating of Nifedipine Extended Release Pellets in a Fluid Bed Coater with a Wurster Insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Luciane Franquelin Gomes; Nitz, Marcello; Taranto, Osvaldir Pereira

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the coating process of nifedipine extended release pellets using Opadry and Opadry II, in a fluid bed coater with a Wurster insert. The coating process was studied using a complete experimental design of two factors at two levels for each polymer. The variables studied were the inlet air temperature and the coating suspension flow rate. The agglomerate fraction and coating efficiency were the analyzed response variables. The air temperature was the variable that most influenced the coating efficiency for both polymers. In addition, a study of the dissolution profiles of coated and uncoated pellets using 0.5% sodium lauryl sulfate in simulated gastric fluid without enzymes (pH 1.2) was conducted. The results showed a prolonged release profile for the coated and uncoated pellets that was very similar to the standards established by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. The drug content and the release profiles were not significantly affected by storage at 40°C and 75% relative humidity. However, when exposed to direct sunlight and fluorescent light (light from fluorescent bulbs), the coated pellets lost only 5% of the drug content, while the uncoated ones lost more than 35%; furthermore, the dissolution profile of the uncoated pellets was faster. PMID:24772426

  18. Use of partial AUC to demonstrate bioequivalence of Zolpidem Tartrate Extended Release formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Robert A; Raw, Andre S; Kim, Stephanie H; Zhang, Xinyuan; Yu, Lawrence X

    2012-04-01

    FDA's bioequivalence recommendation for Zolpidem Tartrate Extended Release Tablets is the first to use partial AUC (pAUC) metrics for determining bioequivalence of modified-release dosage forms. Modeling and simulation studies were performed to aid in understanding the need for pAUC measures and also the proper pAUC truncation times. Deconvolution techniques, In Vitro/In Vivo Correlations, and the CAT (Compartmental Absorption and Transit) model were used to predict the PK profiles for zolpidem. Models were validated using in-house data submitted to the FDA. Using dissolution profiles expressed by the Weibull model as input for the CAT model, dissolution spaces were derived for simulated test formulations. The AUC(0-1.5) parameter was indicative of IR characteristics of early exposure and effectively distinguished among formulations that produced different pharmacodynamic effects. The AUC(1.5-t) parameter ensured equivalence with respect to the sustained release phase of Ambien CR. The variability of AUC(0-1.5) is higher than other PK parameters, but is reasonable for use in an equivalence test. In addition to the traditional PK parameters of AUCinf and Cmax, AUC(0-1.5) and AUC(1.5-t) are recommended to provide bioequivalence measures with respect to label indications for Ambien CR: onset of sleep and sleep maintenance.

  19. The management of schizophrenia: focus on extended-release quetiapine fumarate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peuskens J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Peuskens Universitair Psychiatrisch Centrum KU Leuven, Campus St Jozef Kortenberg, Kortenberg, Belgium Abstract: Effective management of schizophrenia remains a significant clinical challenge. While antipsychotic medications have proven efficacy in this disease, there remains an opportunity to further improve symptom control and long-term relapse prevention. Also, a number of factors, including tolerability and complex dosing regimens, can result in nonadherence to medication. Quetiapine is an atypical antipsychotic with proven efficacy and an established tolerability profile in schizophrenia. The once-daily extended-release formulation (quetiapine XR offers a simplified dosing regimen and titration schedule. Short-term clinical studies have shown that quetiapine XR (400–800 mg/d is efficacious in the acute treatment of schizophrenia, while a long-term study has shown that quetiapine XR was significantly more effective than placebo at preventing relapse. Furthermore, an investigation in which stable patients switched from the immediate-release formulation (quetiapine IR to quetiapine XR showed that quetiapine XR is generally well tolerated and has no loss of efficacy compared with quetiapine IR. In patients who experienced insufficient efficacy or poor tolerability on their previous antipsychotic, switching to quetiapine XR significantly improved efficacy compared with the previous treatment. In conclusion, quetiapine XR is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for schizophrenia. Furthermore, once-daily dosing may improve patient adherence, which may impact positively on patient outcomes. Keywords: adherence, atypical antipsychotics, adverse events

  20. Opioid rotation with extended-release opioids: where should we begin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas NalamachuInternational Clinical Research Institute and Pain Management Institute, Overland Park, KS, USAAbstract: Opioid rotation is a common and necessary clinical practice in the management of chronic non-cancer pain to improve therapeutic efficacy with the lowest opioid dose. When dose escalations fail to achieve adequate analgesia or are associated with intolerable side effects, a trial of a new opioid should be considered. Much of the scientific rationale of opioid rotation is based on the wide interindividual variability in sensitivity to opioid analgesics and the novel patient response observed when introducing an opioid-tolerant patient to a new opioid. This article discusses patient indicators for opioid rotation, the conversion process between opioid medications, and additional practical considerations for increasing the effectiveness of opioid therapy during a trial of a new opioid. A Patient vignette that demonstrates a step-wise approach to opioid rotation is also presented.Keywords: extended-release opioids, chronic pain, opioid rotation

  1. Optimization of Melatonin Dissolution from Extended Release Matrices Using Artificial Neural Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martarelli, D; Casettari, L; Shalaby, K S; Soliman, M E; Cespi, M; Bonacucina, G; Fagioli, L; Perinelli, D R; Lam, J K W; Palmieri, G F

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy of melatonin in treating sleep disorders has been demonstrated in numerous studies. Being with short half-life, melatonin needs to be formulated in extended-release tablets to prevent the fast drop of its plasma concentration. However, an attempt to mimic melatonin natural plasma levels during night time is challenging. In this work, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) were used to optimize melatonin release from hydrophilic polymer matrices. Twenty-seven different tablet formulations with different amounts of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, xanthan gum and Carbopol®974P NF were prepared and subjected to drug release studies. Using dissolution test data as inputs for ANN designed by Visual Basic programming language, the ideal number of neurons in the hidden layer was determined trial and error methodology to guarantee the best performance of constructed ANN. Results showed that the ANN with nine neurons in the hidden layer had the best results. ANN was examined to check its predictability and then used to determine the best formula that can mimic the release of melatonin from a marketed brand using similarity fit factor. This work shows the possibility of using ANN to optimize the composition of prolonged-release melatonin tablets having dissolution profile desired.

  2. Potential role of gabapentin and extended- release gabapentin in the management of menopausal hot flashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manisha Yadav, Judith Volkar Center for Specialized Women’s Health, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA Abstract: About 80% of postmenopausal women experience vasomotor symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats – symptoms that are associated with sleep disruption and can lead to fatigue and mood changes. Moreover, hot flashes can be embarrassing for women, causing difficulties at work and in their social lives. Many therapies have been advocated for relief of vasomotor symptoms, but only hormone therapy has been US Food and Drug Administration approved. However, after the Women's Health Initiative Study suggested that there was a correlation between hormone therapy and increased risk for breast cancer and cardiovascular events, many women stopped taking hormone therapy, and many do not want to initiate it. Hormone therapy is also contraindicated in certain women, such as those with a history of hormone-stimulated cancer like breast and uterine cancer. Gabapentin (Neurontin has shown efficacy in relieving vasomotor symptoms and is used as off-label for this indication. A new extended-release formulation of gabapentin has also shown efficacy in treating hot flashes and improving sleep quality with possibly fewer side effects than regular gabapentin. Keywords: Hot flushes, vasomotor symptoms, postmenopausal, hormone-sensitive cancer, non-hormonal therapy, gastric-retentive, Breeze

  3. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of fluvastatin in healthy subjects following a new extended release fluvastatin tablet, Lescol XL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Denise; Prasad, Pratapa; Hubert, Martine; Gumbhir-Shah, Kavita

    2004-03-01

    This was an open-label, randomized, three-period, three-treatment, multiple dose, crossover study in 12 healthy male and female subjects. This study evaluated single dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics of fluvastatin following single and multiple dose administrations of a new extended release fluvastatin 8 h matrix tablet, Lescol XL 80 mg and 160 mg doses once a day. The study also included a twice a day administration of an immediate release (IR) form of fluvastatin capsule, Lescol, for comparative purposes. All doses were administered for 7 days. The safety and tolerability were also assessed. The pharmacokinetics of fluvastatin were evaluated on days 1 and 7 following each treatment. Fluvastatin systemic exposure was 50% less when administered as Lescol XL 80 mg qd compared with Lescol IR 40 mg bid. Conversely, fluvastatin systemic exposure was 22% higher when administered as Lescol XL 160 mg qd compared with Lescol IR 40 mg bid. Single doses of Lescol XL 80 mg and 160 mg were dose proportional but, deviation (30%) from dose proportionality was observed for the Lescol XL 160 mg at steady-state. There appeared to be moderate (20%-40%) accumulation of serum fluvastatin maximal concentrations and exposure after multiple doses of Lescol XL tablets. Both Lescol XL 80 mg and 160 mg showed delayed absorption and longer apparent elimination half-life compared with fluvastatin IR capsule. Single and multiple doses of fluvastatin were generally well tolerated in this healthy volunteer population. Adverse event profiles were consistent with the published safety profile of the marketed formulations. Aside from one incidence of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevation (following Lescol XL 160 mg qd treatment), there were no safety concerns with any of the treatments when administered acutely (7 days). Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Acceptability of Extended-Release Naltrexone by Heroin-Dependent Patients and Addiction Treatment Providers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaaijer, Eline; Goudriaan, Anna E.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Booij, Jan; van den Brink, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Extended-release naltrexone (XRNT) was developed to overcome poor treatment compliance with oral naltrexone in alcohol and opioid-dependent patients. XRNT injections are registered in the United States and Russia, but not in The Netherlands. However, XRNT can be obtained for individual

  5. Guanfacine Extended Release in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Floyd R.; McGough, James; Wigal, Tim; Donahue, Jessica; Lyne, Andrew; Biederman, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    A double-blind, 9-week, randomized trial was done to compare the efficacy of guanfacine extended release (GXR) with a placebo in treating children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders (ADHD). Results find a significant reduction in ADHD from baseline to endpoint for all daily doses of GXR which were measured at 1-, 2-,…

  6. 76 FR 68766 - Draft Blueprint for Prescriber Education for Long-Acting/Extended-Release Opioid Class-Wide Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0771] Draft Blueprint for Prescriber Education for Long-Acting/ Extended-Release Opioid Class-Wide Risk... announcing the availability of a draft document entitled ``Blueprint for Prescriber Education for the Long...

  7. 76 FR 53908 - Determination That OPANA ER (Oxymorphone Hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets, 7.5 Milligrams...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... proceedings that could result in the withdrawal of approval of the ANDAs that refer to the listed drug. OPANA... relief of moderate to severe pain in patients requiring continuous, around-the-clock opioid treatment for... withdrawal of OPANA ER (oxymorphone HCl) extended-release tablets, 7.5 mg and 15 mg, from sale. We have also...

  8. Assessment of efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Yu Vorotnikova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Assessment of efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus Juliana Levy, Roberta A Cobas, Marilia B Gomes. Diabetol Metab Syndr. 2010 Mar 18; 2:16.

  9. A single 2 g oral dose of extended-release azithromycin for treatment of gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Ito, Shin; Kido, Akira; Hamano, Kiminari; Uchijima, Yutaka; Uwatoko, Noriyasu; Kusuyama, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Akiko; Miyamura, Ryuzou; Miyata, Kazutoyo; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We treated gonococcal urethritis in men with a single 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release formulation (azithromycin-SR) to determine its microbiological outcomes and tolerability. We enrolled 189 Japanese men with gonococcal urethritis between April 2009 and December 2013. The patients were given a single 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR. Microbiological efficacy was evaluated by the results of the post-treatment molecular testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. MIC testing was performed only for pretreatment isolates of N. gonorrhoeae collected from the patients. We evaluated 130 patients for microbiological outcomes. Of these patients, 122 (93.8%) were judged to be microbiologically cured on the basis of negative test results. All isolates for which the azithromycin MICs were ≤0.25 mg/L were eradicated, whereas 5 of 12 isolates for which the MICs were 1 mg/L persisted after the treatment. Forty-six adverse events occurred in 41 patients. However, all adverse events were classified as mild. The eradication rate of N. gonorrhoeae was 93.8% in men with gonococcal urethritis treated with a single 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR. The breakpoint MIC of a 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR for gonococcal urethritis associated with clinical treatment failures appeared to be 1 mg/L. With regard to side effects of higher doses of azithromycin, the 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR appeared to improve tolerability. However, the widespread use of a high-dose regimen of azithromycin might lead to the development of further resistance to azithromycin. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Clinical utility of guanfacine extended release in the treatment of ADHD in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello NT

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas T Bello Department of Animal Sciences, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ, USA Abstract: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most common psychiatric illness in children and adolescents. Several stimulant medications, such as methylphenidate and amphetamine derivatives, are available to treat ADHD in pediatric patients. Nonstimulant medications are more preferred by some parents, other caregivers, and patients because they lack the abuse potential of stimulant medications. In the US, one available nonstimulant option is guanfacine extended release (XR. As a selective α2A adrenergic receptor, guanfacine acts on the central noradrenergic pathways and cortical noradrenergic targets to improve working memory and attention. The XR formulation of guanfacine, compared with the immediate-release formulation, is more effective for the long-term management of ADHD and is associated with fewer adverse effects. Available data also indicate that guanfacine XR is superior to atomoxetine and is as effective as the nonselective α2 adrenergic receptor agonist, clonidine XR. The most common adverse effects associated with guanfacine XR are somnolence, fatigue, bradycardia, and hypotension. Somnolence is the most often cited reason for discontinuation. Guanfacine XR is also labeled for use as an adjuvant to stimulant treatment for ADHD. A similar profile of adverse effects as reported with monotherapy is reported when guanfacine XR is “added on” to stimulant therapy with somnolence as the most commonly reported adverse event. This review discusses the clinical efficacy and patient preference of guanfacine XR based on available published data on the safety, relative effectiveness, and tolerance of this medication to treat ADHD. Keywords: Intuniv, norepinephrine, prefrontal cortex, locus coeruleus, impulsivity, inattentive

  11. Levomilnacipran Extended-Release Treatment in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: Improvements in Functional Impairment Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gommoll, Carl P.; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M.; Ruth, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this post hoc analysis, improvement in functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) treated with levomilnacipran extended release (ER) was evaluated by assessing shifts from more severe to less severe functional impairment categories on individual Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) subscales. Method: SDS data were pooled from 5 phase II/III studies conducted between December 2006 and March 2012 of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in adult patients with MDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria). Proportions of patients shifting from moderate-extreme baseline impairment (score ≥ 4) to mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment were assessed for each SDS subscale. Proportions of patients shifting from marked-extreme (score ≥ 7) baseline impairment to moderate-no (score ≤ 6) or mild-no impairment (score ≤ 3) at end of treatment, and shifts in which patients worsened from moderate-no to marked-extreme impairment, were also evaluated. Results: A significantly higher proportion of patients treated with levomilnacipran ER than placebo-treated patients improved from more severe categories of functional impairment at baseline to less severe impairment categories across all SDS subscales: work/school, social life, and family life/home responsibilities (P impairment at baseline improved to mild or no impairment, compared with no more than 40% of placebo patients on any subscale. Almost half (42%–47%) of levomilnacipran ER–treated patients versus only about one-third (29%–34%) of placebo patients improved from marked-extreme to mild or no impairment across functional domains. Conclusions: These results suggest that functional improvement was observed across the SDS functional domains. To our knowledge, this is the first such categorical analysis of functional improvement, as measured by the SDS, for an antidepressant. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00969709, NCT01377194, NCT00969150, and NCT01034462 and Eudra

  12. Role of paliperidone extended-release in treatment of schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuso, Carla M; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong Jing; Bossie, Cynthia A

    2010-10-05

    Schizoaffective disorder is characterized by the presence of symptoms of both schizophrenia and a major mood disorder. The coexistence of these symptoms can be difficult to manage, and these patients are generally treated with antipsychotics as well as mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants. Additionally, no established treatment guidelines exist for this disorder. This review describes the combined results of two international, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies of paliperidone extended-release (ER), an atypical antipsychotic recently approved in the US for the treatment of schizoaffective disorder. Subjects in these six-week trials were aged 18-65 years, had a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder based on the Structural Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition) Disorders, and were experiencing an acute exacerbation. The subjects from these studies had significant symptomatology as evidenced by a mean (standard deviation) baseline Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale total score of 92.8 (13.0). Based on Young Mania Rating Scale and/or a 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of ≥16 at baseline, 79.5% and 66.9% of subjects presented with prominent manic and depressive symptoms, respectively, and 46.4% presented with mixed symptoms. Approximately half (45%) of subjects were taking adjunctive mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants. Paliperidone ER was found to be effective in improving psychotic and mood symptoms in these subjects. Paliperidone ER was also effective as monotherapy or adjunctive to mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants for subjects with prominent manic, depressive, or mixed symptoms at baseline. No new tolerability signals were observed in this population. To the best of our awareness, these pooled data provide the largest data set of patients with schizoaffective disorder, and extend our knowledge of disease characteristics and treatment response.

  13. Extended-release naltrexone for pre-release prisoners: A randomized trial of medical mobile treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Vocci, Frank J; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; O'Brien, Charles P

    2017-02-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder but is rarely initiated in US prisons or with criminal justice populations. Mobile treatment for chronic diseases has been implemented in a variety of settings. Mobile treatment may provide an opportunity to expand outreach to parolees to surmount barriers to traditional clinic treatment. Male and female prisoners (240) with pre-incarceration histories of opioid use disorder who are within one month of release from prison will be enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Participants are randomized to one of two study arms: 1) [XR-NTX-OTx] One injection of long-acting naltrexone in prison, followed by 6 monthly injections post-release at a community opioid treatment program; or 2) [XR-NTX+ MMTx] One injection of long-acting naltrexone in prison followed by 6 monthly injections post-release at the patient's place of residence utilizing mobile medical treatment. The primary outcomes are: treatment adherence; opioid use; criminal activity; re-arrest; reincarceration; and HIV risk-behaviors. We describe the background and rationale for the study, its aims, hypotheses, and study design. The use of long-acting injectable naltrexone may be a promising form of treatment for pre-release prisoners. Finally, as many individuals in the criminal justice system drop out of treatment, this study will assess whether treatment at their place of residence will improve adherence and positively affect treatment outcomes. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02867124. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Production of cattle feed by the growth of bacteria on mesquite wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, D W

    1975-01-01

    The potential for the conversion of mesquite into either a complete animal feed or a protein supplement was evaluated. Species of bacteria which can use the extremely hard mesquite wood as their sole C source were isolated by enrichment culture techniques. Each species was evaluated for its rate of growth, protein production, cellulase activity, amino acid profile of the single-cell protein, and acute toxicity or pathogenicity for weanling mice. The growth products were analyzed for protein, lignin, ash, carbohydrates, and caloric value. The single-cell protein produced from mesquite exceeded or equaled the FAO reference protein in 8 essential amino acids including methionine. No pathogenicity or acute toxicity of the bacteria for weanling mice was found. The results indicate that a high-energy, high-protein, complete cattle feed or an excellent protein supplement can be produced from mesquite wood.

  15. A randomized, double-blind study of hydromorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets versus oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets for cancer pain: efficacy and safety in Japanese cancer patients (EXHEAL: a Phase III study of EXtended-release HydromorphonE for cAncer pain reLief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Satoshi Inoue,1 Yoji Saito,2 Satoru Tsuneto,3 Etsuko Aruga,4 Azusa Ide,1 Yasuyuki Kakurai5 1Clinical Development Department, R&D Division, Daiichi Sankyo, Tokyo,2Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Shimane University, Shimane, 3Human Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 4Department of Palliative Medicine, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Tokyo, 5Biostatistics and Data Management Department, R&D Division, Daiichi Sankyo, Tokyo, Japan Background: In Japan, there are limited options for switching opioid analgesics. Hydromorphone is an opioid analgesic that is routinely used instead of morphine for cancer pain; however, it is not yet available in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone (DS-7113b extended-release tablets in opioid-naïve patients with cancer pain not relieved by non-opioid analgesics.Subjects and methods: This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. A double-dummy method was used for blinding. Each randomized subject received either hydromorphone extended-release tablets plus placebo oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets 4 mg/day (n=88 or placebo hydromorphone extended-release tablets plus oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets 10 mg/day (n=93 orally for 7 days (once-daily dosing for hydromorphone and twice-daily dosing for oxycodone. The doses were adjusted as necessary. Efficacy was evaluated by change in visual analog scale (VAS score from baseline to completion of treatment.Results: The between-group difference in least squares mean changes in VAS score from baseline to completion or discontinuation of treatment was −0.4 mm (95% CI −5.9 to 5 mm by analysis of covariance where the baseline VAS score was used as a covariate. The upper limit of the 95% CI was below 10 mm, which was predefined as the noninferiority limit. This verified the noninferiority of hydromorphone tablets

  16. Impacts of mesquite distribution on seasonal space use of lesser prairie-chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggie, Matthew A.; Strong, Cody R.; Lusk, Daniel; Carleton, Scott A.; Gould, William R.; Howard, Randy L.; Nichols, Clay T.; Falkowski, Michael J.; Hagen, Christian A.

    2017-01-01

    Loss of native grasslands by anthropogenic disturbances has reduced availability and connectivity of habitat for many grassland species. A primary threat to contiguous grasslands is the encroachment of woody vegetation, which is spurred by disturbances that take on many forms from energy development, fire suppression, and grazing. These disturbances are exacerbated by natural- and human-driven cycles of changes in climate punctuated by drought and desertification conditions. Encroachment of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) into the prairies of southeastern New Mexico has potentially limited habitat for numerous grassland species, including lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus). To determine the magnitude of impacts of distribution of mesquite and how lesser prairie-chickens respond to mesquite presence on the landscape in southeastern New Mexico, we evaluated seasonal space use of lesser prairie-chickens in the breeding and nonbreeding seasons. We derived several remotely sensed spatial metrics to characterize the distribution of mesquite. We then used these data to create population-level resource utilization functions and predict intensity of use of lesser prairie-chickens across our study area. Home ranges were smaller in the breeding season compared with the nonbreeding season; however, habitat use was similar across seasons. During both seasons, lesser prairie-chickens used areas closer to leks and largely avoided areas with mesquite. Relative to the breeding season, during the nonbreeding season habitat use suggested a marginal increase in mesquite within areas of low intensity of use, yet aversion to mesquite was strong in areas of medium to high intensity of use. To our knowledge, our study is the first to demonstrate a negative behavioral response by lesser prairie-chickens to woody encroachment in native grasslands. To mitigate one of the possible limiting factors for lesser prairie-chickens, we suggest future conservation

  17. Assessment of fire-damaged mesquite trees 8 years following an illegal burn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald J. Gottfried; Peter F. Ffolliott; Pablo Garcia; Diego Valdez-Zamudio; Akram Al-Khouri

    2003-01-01

    Effects of an illegal burn on the Santa Rita Experimental Range on mesquite (Prosopis velutina) survival in the semidesert grass-shrub ecosystem was initially assessed in terms of firedamage classes 18 months after the fire and again 8 years after the burn. While many of the mesquite trees on the burned site were damaged by the fire, some of the trees appear to have...

  18. Pro j 2 is mesquite profilin: molecular characteristics and specific IgE binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Sadeghi, Hosein; Khodadadi, Ali; Amini, Akram; Assarehzadegan, Mohammad-Ali; Sepahi, Najmeh; Zarinhadideh, Farnoosh

    2015-06-01

    Pollens from mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) are potent allergen responsible in causing immediate hypersensitivity reactions in susceptible people in tropical countries. This study aimed to clone, express and purify the mesquite pollen profilin (Pro j 2) as well as evaluating its nucleotide sequence homology in order to predict allergenic cross-reactivity with profilins of common allergenic plants. Immunoblotting assay and specific ELISA were applied to determine the immunoreactivity of sera from 35 patients who were allergic to mesquite pollen. The mesquite profilin-coding sequence was cloned into PTZ57R/T vector and amplified. The cDNA of mesquite pollen profilin was then expressed in Escherichia coli using pET-21b (+) vector and puri?ed by one-step Ni2+ a?nity chromatography. IgE binding capacity of the recombinant mesquite profiling (rPro j 2) was analyzed by specific ELISA, immunoblotting, and inhibition assays. cDNA nucleotide sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 399bp encoding for 133 amino acids which belongs to the profilin family. Seventeen patients (17/35, 48.57%) had significant specific IgE level for rPro j 2. Immunodetection and inhibition assays indicated that puri?ed rPro j 2 might be similar as that in the crude extract. Pro j 2, as a new allergen from mesquite pollen, was produced in E. coli with an IgE-reactivity similar to that of its natural counterpart. The amino acid sequences homology analysis of mesquite profilin and several profilin molecules from other plants showed high degree of cross-reactivity among plant-derived profilins from unrelated families.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of lurasidone vs quetiapine extended-release (XR) in patients with bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Krithika; Meyer, Kellie; O'Day, Ken; Denno, Melissa; Loebel, Antony

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder imposes a high economic burden on patients and society. Lurasidone and quetiapine extended-release (XR) are atypical antipsychotic agents indicated for monotherapy treatment of bipolar depression. Lurasidone is also indicated as adjunctive therapy with lithium or valproate for depressive episodes associated with bipolar disorder. The objective of this analysis was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of lurasidone and quetiapine XR in patients with bipolar depression. A cost-effectiveness model was developed to compare lurasidone to quetiapine XR. The model was based on a US third-party payer perspective over a 3-month time horizon. The effectiveness measure in the model was the percentage of patients achieving remission (Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score ≤12 by weeks 6-8). The comparison of remission rates was made through an adjusted indirect treatment comparison of lurasidone and quetiapine XR pivotal trials using placebo as the common comparator. Resource utilization for remission vs no remission was estimated from published expert panel data, and resource costs were obtained from a retrospective database study of bipolar I depression patients. Drug costs were estimated using the mean dose from clinical trials and wholesale acquisition costs. Over the 3-month model time period, lurasidone and quetiapine XR patients, respectively, had similar mean numbers of emergency department visits (0.48 vs 0.50), inpatient days (2.1 vs 2.2), and office visits (9.3 vs 9.6). More lurasidone than quetiapine XR patients achieved remission (52.0% vs 43.2%) with slightly higher total costs ($4982 vs $4676), resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $3474 per remission. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed lurasidone had an 86% probability of being cost-effective compared to quetiapine XR at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $10,000 per remission. Lurasidone may be a cost-effective option when compared to

  20. Healthcare utilization in adults with opioid dependence receiving extended release naltrexone compared to treatment as usual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, William E; Wilson, Donna; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, Joshua D; Gordon, Michael; Nunes, Edward V; O'Brien, Charles P; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-02-01

    Opioid use disorders have reached epidemic proportions, with overdose now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Extended release naltrexone (XR-NTX) has emerged as a medication treatment that reduces opioid use and craving. However, the effect of XR-NTX therapy on acute healthcare utilization, including emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalizations, remains uncertain. The objective of the current study is to evaluate hospital-based healthcare resource utilization in adults involved in the criminal justice system with a history of opioid use disorder randomized to XR-NTX therapy compared with treatment as usual (TAU) during a 6-month treatment phase and 12months post-treatment follow up. This retrospective exploratory analysis uses data collected in a published randomized trial. Comparisons of the number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions (for drug detox, psychiatric care and other medical reasons) were performed using chi square tests for any admission and negative binomial models for number of admissions. Of the 308 participants randomized, 96% had utilization data (76% complete 6months, 67% complete follow up). No significant differences were seen in overall healthcare utilization (IRR=0.88, 95%CI 0.63-1.23, p=0.45), or substance use-related drug detox hospitalizations (IRR=0.83, 95%CI 0.32-2.16, p=0.71). Despite having more participants report chronic medical problems at baseline (43% vs. 32%, p=0.05), those receiving XR-NTX generally experienced equivalent or lower rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. The XR-NTX group had significantly lower medical/surgical related hospital admissions (IRR=0.55, 95%CI 0.30-1.00, p=0.05) during the course of the entire study. XR-NTX did not significantly increase rates of healthcare utilization compared to TAU. Provider concerns regarding healthcare utilization should not preclude the consideration of XR-NTX as therapy for opioid use disorders. Copyright © 2018

  1. The effect of extended release tolterodine used for overactive bladder treatment on female sexual function

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    Athanasios Zachariou

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition, especially in middle aged women, requiring long term therapy with anticholinergics to maintain symptoms relief. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of tolterodine extended release (ER used for OAB treatment on the sexual function of women. Materials and Methods Between August 2010 and August 2014, 220 women with confirmed OAB, attended Urogynecology Outpatient Clinic and were prospectively enrolled in this study. 158 women were evaluated, with a comprehensive history, physical examination, urodynamic studies and Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI questionnaire. 73 patients of group A (control group received no treatment and 85 patients of group B received an anticholinergic regimen – tolterodine ER 4mg once daily. Data were evaluated again in accordance with FSFI after three months, using SPSS software. Results A statistically significant increase was noted in group B in domains of desire (pre-treatment 2.5±0.2 to 4.5±0.2 post-treatment, arousal (3.1±0.2 to 3.1±0.2 respectively, lubrication (3.4±0.3 to 4.3±0.3 respectively, orgasm (3.5±0.3 to 4.5±0.3 respectively, satisfaction (2.6±0.2 to 4.2±0.3 respectively and pain (2.4±0.2 to 4.6±0.4 respectively after three months treatment with tolterodine ER. In group A there were no statistically significant changes in pre and post treatment values (p>0.05. Total FSFI score for group B was significantly higher after tolterodine treatment (26.5±1.5 compared to pre-treatment values (17.4±1.4, p0,05 respectively. Conclusions This preliminary study demonstrates that treatment of OAB with tolterodine ER was found to have positive effect on sexual function of patients with OAB.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of nalbuphine hydrochloride extended release tablets in hemodialysis patients with exploratory effect on pruritus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Amale; Alcorn, Harry; Berg, Jolene; Hines, Carey; Hait, Howard; Sciascia, Thomas

    2015-04-08

    Uremic pruritus is a common and deleterious condition among hemodialysis (HD) patients. Central gating of μ/κ opiate circuitry plays an important role in mediating and countering pruritogenic sensation. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the mixed μ-antagonist/κ-agonist nalbuphine, administered orally as nalbuphine HCl extended release (ER) tablets in HD patients, and explore its effect on pruritus. In this open-label multiple escalating dose study, 15 HD patients with pruritus and 9 matched healthy subjects were enrolled. Nalbuphine HCl ER dose was escalated from 30 mg QD to 240 mg BID over 15 days. A full PK profile was obtained under dialysis and non-dialysis conditions as a function of dose. Clearance during dialysis was determined by sampling dialysate and arterial/venous blood during dialysis. Pruritus severity was assessed twice daily using a Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Safety monitoring included extensive monitoring of EKG, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry. In HD patients, nalbuphine concentration peaked within 4-9 hours and attained steady state within 2-3 days, with no significant accumulation. Mean half-life was 14.2 hours, mean Cmax and AUCtau ranged between 13 and 83 ng/mL and 118 and 761 ng∙h/mL, respectively, with exposure increasing in a nearly dose-proportional fashion. Exposure in HD patients was about 2-fold higher than in healthy subjects. There was no meaningful difference between exposure on dialysis and non-dialysis days with 1% or less of the dose removed by dialysis. Nalbuphine suppressed itch in a dose-dependent manner, reducing mean VAS score from 4.0 to 1.2 at 180 mg and 0.4 at 240 mg. Nalbuphine HCl ER tablets can be safely administered to HD patients without dose adjustment up to 240 mg BID and may hold promise in treating uremic pruritus.

  3. Attention benefits after a single dose of metadoxine extended release in adults with predominantly inattentive ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Iris; Rubin, Jonathan; Daniely, Yaron; Adler, Lenard A

    2014-09-01

    To assess the first-dose effectiveness and tolerability of metadoxine extended release (MDX) in adults with predominantly inattentive attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD-PI). In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, adults with ADHD-PI were randomized 1:1:1 to receive a single dose of MDX 1400 mg, MDX 700 mg, and placebo (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01685281). The primary efficacy end point was the mean change in the Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA) ADHD score from baseline to 3 to 5 hours after drug administration. Secondary assessments included TOVA subscores, TOVA response rates (defined as an increase of 0.8 points in the TOVA ADHD score), and the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Test Battery. Safety assessments included adverse events and vital signs. The intention-to-treat population included 36 patients (52.8% men; mean age, 32 years). The efficacy of MDX 1400 mg was demonstrated by a statistically significant difference in the mean (± SD) change in the TOVA ADHD score at baseline to 3 to 5 hours after drug administration compared with placebo (2.0 [4.2]; P = 0.009). The TOVA response time variability subscore was significantly different between MDX 1400 mg and placebo (mean difference, 7.9 [19.2] points; P = 0.022). Significantly more adults responded to single-dose MDX 1400 mg versus placebo (97.1% vs 71.4%, P = 0.006). There were no statistically significant differences between MDX 700 mg and placebo on any measures. Exploratory analyses of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Automated Test Battery did not yield significant findings. Fatigue and headache were the 2 most frequently reported adverse events. There were no clinically significant abnormalities in laboratory values, vital signs measurements, Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale scores, or electrocardiographic parameters. Single-dose MDX 1400 mg significantly improved sustained and selective attention in adults with ADHD-PI as measured by the TOVA

  4. Dalfampridine extended release tablets: 1 year of postmarketing safety experience in the US

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    Jara M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Michele Jara,1 Graham Barker,2 Herbert R Henney 3rd1 1Acorda Therapeutics, Inc, Ardsley, NY, USA; 2Biogen Idec, Inc, Maidenhead, Berkshire, UK Background: Dalfampridine extended release tablets (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-, modified, or sustained-release fampridine in some countries were approved in the US to improve walking in patients with multiple sclerosis, as demonstrated by improvement in walking speed. Postmarketing safety experience is available from exposure of approximately 46,000 patients in the US from product approval through March 2011. Objective: To provide a descriptive analysis of all spontaneously reported postmarketing adverse events (AEs for dalfampridine-ER since product launch. Methods: AE data were extracted from the safety database from product launch through March 31, 2011; AEs were classified using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. Seizure cases were reviewed for patient demographics, time to event from treatment onset, and presence of additional risk factors. Results: The most frequently reported postmarketing AEs were similar to those reported during clinical development: dizziness, insomnia, balance disorder, headache, nausea, urinary tract infection, asthenia, and back pain (all included in US product labeling. New clinically significant findings are related to lack of efficacy and inappropriate dosing. Of the approximately 46,000 patients exposed, 85 seizures were reported (~5.4/1000 patient-years, of which 82 were reported or confirmed by a health care practitioner (~5.2/1000 patient-years. Beyond the intrinsic multiple sclerosis-related seizure risk, more than half of the 85 cases (62% had an additional potential risk factor for seizure including a previous history of convulsions, renal impairment, incorrect dosing, or use of concurrent medications with a labeled seizure risk. Duration of treatment prior to the seizure ranged from one dose to 365 days; 26/85 (31% patients suffered a seizure

  5. Nematode burdens of pastured cattle treated once at turnout with eprinomectin extended-release injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehbein, S; Baggott, D G; Johnson, E G; Kunkle, B N; Yazwinski, T A; Yoon, S; Cramer, L G; Soll, M D

    2013-03-01

    The efficacy of eprinomectin in an extended-release injection (ERI) formulation was evaluated against infections with third-stage larvae or eggs of gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes in cattle under 120-day natural challenge conditions in a series of five studies conducted in the USA (three studies) and in Europe (two studies). For each study, 30 nematode-free (four studies) or 30 cattle harboring naturally acquired nematode infections (one study) were included. The cattle were of various breeds or crosses, weighed 107.5-273 kg prior to treatment and aged approximately 4-11 months. For each study, animals were blocked based on pre-treatment bodyweight and then randomly allocated to treatment: ERI vehicle (control) at 1 mL/50 kg bodyweight or Eprinomectin 5% (w/v) ERI at 1 mL/50 kg bodyweight (1.0 mg eprinomectin/kg) for a total of 15 and 15 animals in each group. Treatments were administered once on Day 0 by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder. In each study, all animals grazed one naturally contaminated pasture for 120 days. At regular intervals during the studies, fecal samples from all cattle were examined for nematode egg and larval counts. In four studies pairs of tracer cattle were used to monitor pasture infectivity at 28-day intervals before and/or during the grazing period. All calves were weighed before turnout onto pasture and at regular intervals until housing on Day 120. For parasite recovery, all study animals were humanely euthanized 27-30 days after removal from pasture. Cattle treated with Eprinomectin ERI had significantly (p92%: Dictyocaulus viviparus (adults and fourth-stage larvae (L4), Bunostomum phlebotomum, Cooperia curticei, Cooperia oncophora, Cooperia punctata, Cooperia surnabada, Cooperia spp. inhibited L4, Haemonchus contortus, Haemonchus placei, Haemonchus spp. inhibited L4, Nematodirus helvetianus, Nematodirus spp. inhibited L4, Oesophagostomum radiatum, Oesophagostomum spp. inhibited L4, Ostertagia leptospicularis

  6. Treatment patterns and health care resource utilization associated with dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy Guo,1 Michael Grabner,2 Swetha Rao Palli,2 Jessica Elder,1 Matthew Sidovar,1 Peter Aupperle,1 Stephen Krieger3 1Acorda Therapeutics Inc., Ardsley, New York, NY, USA; 2HealthCore Inc., Wilmington, DE, USA; 3Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for MS, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of dalfampridine extended release (D-ER tablets in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, there are limited real-world data on D-ER utilization and associated outcomes in patients with MS. Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns, budget impact, and health care resource utilization (HRU associated with D-ER use in a real-world setting. Methods: A retrospective claims database analysis was conducted using the HealthCore Integrated Research DatabaseSM. Adherence (measured by medication possession ratio, or [MPR] and persistence (measured by days between initial D-ER claim and discontinuation or end of follow-up were evaluated over 1-year follow-up. Budget impact was calculated as cost per member per month (PMPM over the available follow-up period. D-ER and control cohorts were propensity-score matched on baseline demographics, comorbidities, and MS-related resource utilization to compare walking-impairment-related HRU over follow-up. Results: Of the 2,138 MS patients identified, 1,200 were not treated with D-ER (control and 938 were treated with D-ER. Patients were aged 51 years on average and 74% female. Approximately 82.6% of D-ER patients were adherent (MPR >80%. The estimated budget impact range of D-ER was $0.014–$0.026 PMPM. Propensity-score-matched D-ER and controls yielded 479 patients in each cohort. Postmatching comparison showed that the D-ER cohort was associated with fewer physician (21.5% vs 62.4%, P<0.0001 and other outpatient visits (22.8% vs 51.4%, P<0.0001 over the 12-month follow-up. Changes in HRU from follow

  7. Niacin extended-release/simvastatin combination therapy produces larger favorable changes in high-density lipoprotein particles than atorvastatin monotherapy

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    Toth PP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Peter P Toth1, Kamlesh M Thakker2, Ping Jiang2, Robert J Padley21University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, and CGH Medical Center, Sterling, 2Abbott, Abbott Park, IL, USABackground: The purpose of this research was to compare the effects of niacin extended-release in combination with simvastatin (NER/S versus atorvastatin monotherapy on high-density lipoprotein (HDL particle number and size in patients with hyperlipidemia or dyslipidemia from the SUPREME study.Methods: This was a post hoc analysis of patients (n = 137 who completed the SUPREME study and who had lipid particle number and size measurements at both baseline and at week 12 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Following ≥4 weeks without lipid-modifying therapy (washout period, the patients received NER/S 1000/40 mg/day for 4 weeks followed by NER/S 2000/40 mg/day for 8 weeks, or atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 12 weeks. Median percent changes in HDL particle number and size from baseline to week 12 were compared between the NER/S and atorvastatin treatment groups using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Distribution of HDL particle subclasses at week 12 was compared between the treatment groups using the Cochran–Mantel–Haenszel test.Results: Treatment with NER/S resulted in a significantly greater percent reduction in small HDL particle number at week 12 compared with atorvastatin monotherapy (-1.8% versus 4.2%, P = 0.014, and a numerically greater percent increase in large HDL particle number (102.4% versus 39.2%, P = 0.078 compared with atorvastatin monotherapy. A significantly greater percent increase in HDL particle size from baseline at week 12 was observed with NER/S compared with atorvastatin (6.0% versus 1.3%, P < 0.001. NER/S treatment also resulted in a significant shift in HDL particle size from small and medium at baseline to large at week 12 (P < 0.0001.Conclusion: Treatment with NER/S resulted in larger favorable changes in number and size of HDL particle

  8. Effects of paliperidone extended release on hostility among Thai patients with schizophrenia

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    Jariyavilas A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Apichat Jariyavilas,1 Nuntika Thavichachart,2 Ronnachai Kongsakon,3 Sunanta Chantakarn,4 Suwanna Arunpongpaisal,5 Vasu Chantarasak,6 Piyadit Jaroensook,7 Khanogwan Kittiwattanagul,8 Osot Nerapusee9 1Srithanya Hospital, Department of Mental Health, Ministry of Public Health, Bangkok, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok, 4Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, 5Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 6Somdetchaopraya Institute of Psychiatry, Bangkok, 7Prasrimahabhodhi Hospital, Ubon Ratchathani, 8Khon Kaen Rajanagarindra Psychiatric Hospital, Khon Kaen, 9Medical Affairs, Janssen-Cilag, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: This open-label prospective study investigated the effects of paliperidone extended release (ER on hostility in Thai patients with schizophrenia. Background: Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia may be hostile or exhibit aggressive behavior, which can occasion their admission to psychiatric hospital. Antipsychotic medications are often used to treat hostility and aggression in such patients. Paliperidone ER is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, there are no data available for paliperidone ER with regard to its efficacy on hostility and aggression among Thai patients. This study was a part of the PERFEcT study, a 6-month, open-label, multicenter, multicountry, prospective trial to explore the safety, efficacy, and functionality of paliperidone ER tablets. The current study included only the data obtained from Thai participants. Materials and methods: Flexible dosing of paliperidone ER in a range of 3–12 mg/day was used, allowing investigators to adjust the dosage of each subject individually. The 199 Thai patients had a stable Clinical Global Impression – severity score before enrollment. Demographic

  9. Efficacy of Tramadol Extended-Release for Opioid Withdrawal: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Tompkins, D Andrew; Bigelow, George E; Strain, Eric C

    2017-09-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a significant public health problem. Supervised withdrawal (ie, detoxification) from opioids using clonidine or buprenorphine hydrochloride is a widely used treatment. To evaluate whether tramadol hydrochloride extended-release (ER), an approved analgesic with opioid and nonopioid mechanisms of action and low abuse potential, is effective for use in supervised withdrawal settings. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a residential research setting with 103 participants with OUD. Participants' treatment was stabilized with morphine, 30 mg, administered subcutaneously 4 times daily. A 7-day taper using clonidine (n = 36), tramadol ER (n = 36), or buprenorphine (n = 31) was then instituted, and patients were crossed-over to double-blind placebo during a post-taper period. The study was conducted from October 25, 2010, to June 23, 2015. Retention, withdrawal symptom management, concomitant medication utilization, and naltrexone induction. Results were analyzed over time and using area under the curve for the intention-to-treat and completer groups. Of the 103 participants, 88 (85.4%) were men and 43 (41.7%) were white; mean (SD) age was 28.9 (10.4) years. Buprenorphine participants (28 [90.3%]) were significantly more likely to be retained at the end of the taper compared with clonidine participants (22 [61.1%]); tramadol ER retention was intermediate and did not differ significantly from that of the other groups (26 [72.2%]; χ2 = 8.5, P = .01). Time-course analyses of withdrawal revealed significant effects of phase (taper, post taper) for the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score (taper mean, 5.19 [SE, .26]; post-taper mean, 3.97 [SE, .23]; F2,170 = 3.6, P = .03) and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) score (taper mean,8.81 [SE, .40]; post-taper mean, 4.14 [SE, .30]; F2,170 = 15.7, P withdrawal severity between the taper and post-taper periods for clonidine (taper mean, 13.1; post

  10. Evaluation of chitosan–anionic polymers based tablets for extended-release of highly water-soluble drugs

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    Yang Shao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to develop chitosan–anionic polymers based extended-release tablets and test the feasibility of using this system for the sustained release of highly water-soluble drugs with high drug loading. Here, the combination of sodium valproate (VPS and valproic acid (VPA were chosen as the model drugs. Anionic polymers studied include xanthan gum (XG, carrageenan (CG, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na and sodium alginate (SA. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. In vitro drug release was carried out under simulated gastrointestinal condition. Drug release mechanism was studied. Compared with single polymers, chitosan–anionic polymers based system caused a further slowdown of drug release rate. Among them, CS–xanthan gum matrix system exhibited the best extended-release behavior and could extend drug release for up to 24 h. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR studies demonstrated that polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs were formed on the tablet surface, which played an important role on retarding erosion and swelling of the matrix in the later stage. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that it is possible to develop highly water-soluble drugs loaded extended-release tablets using chitosan–anionic polymers based system.

  11. A clinically relevant major cross-reactive allergen from mesquite tree pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, A; Singh, B P; Arora, N; Jain, V K; Sridhara, S

    2008-10-01

    Prosopis juliflora (mesquite) is one of the major sources of pollinosis in tropical and semi-arid countries of the world. The present study was undertaken to purify and characterize a major cross-reactive allergen from this tree species. Mesquite pollen extract was purified using reverse-phase chromatography. Allergen characterization was done by electrophoresis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. Clinical relevance of the purified protein was analyzed by in vivo (skin tests) and in vitro experiments such as ELISA, histamine release, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation and cytokine assays. Cross-reactivity of purified protein with allergenic tree species and lima bean (food) was assessed by inhibition assays. A 66-kDa protein was purified from mesquite pollen extract using octadecyl silica resin. Purified protein recognized 90% of mesquite-sensitized patients in skin test and ELISA. It induced significant histamine release in allergic patients' blood and interleukin-4 secretion in the PBMC culture supernatants. Inhibition assays suggested close allergenic relationship of this protein with Ailanthus excelsa, Cassia siamea, Salvadora persica pollen and Phaseolus lunatus (lima bean - an edible legume). A 66-kDa major cross-reactive allergen was isolated from mesquite pollen using single-step purification procedure. The protein seems relevant for clinical applications in allergic disorders.

  12. Growth inhibitory alkaloids from mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Eri; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Yamada, Kosumi; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Hasegawa, Koji

    2004-03-01

    Plant growth inhibitory alkaloids were isolated from the extract of mesquite [Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC.] leaves. Their chemical structures were established by ESI-MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectra analysis. The I50 value (concentration required for 50% inhibition of control) for root growth of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seedlings was 400 microM for 3''''-oxo-juliprosopine, 500 microM for secojuliprosopinal, and 100 microM for a (1:1) mixture of 3-oxo-juliprosine and 3'-oxo-juliprosine, respectively. On the other hand, the minimum concentration exhibiting inhibitory effect on shoot growth of cress seedlings was 10 microM for 3''''-oxo-juliprosopine, 100 microM for secojuliprosopinal, and 1 microM for a (1:1) mixture of 3-oxo-juliprosine and 3'-oxo-juliprosine, respectively. Among these compounds, a (1:1) mixture of 3-oxo-juliprosine and 3'-oxo-juliprosine exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on the growth of cress seedlings.

  13. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) germplasm for biomass production and nitrogen fixation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The nitrogen-fixing trees of the genus Prosopis (mesquite or algaroba) are well adapted to the semi-arid and often saline regions of the world. These trees may produce firewood or pods for livestock food, they may stabilize sand dunes and they may enrich the soil by production of leaf litter supported by nitrogen fixation. A collection of nearly 500 Prosopis accessions representing North and South American and African germplasm has been established. Seventy of these accessions representing 14 taxa are being grown under field conditions where a 30-fold range in biomass productivity among accessions has been estimated. In a greehouse experiment, 13 Prosopis taxa grew on nitrogen-free medium nodulated, and had a 10-fold difference in nitrogen fixation (acetylene reduction). When Prosopis is propagated by seed the resulting trees are extremely variable in growth rate and presence or absence of thorns. Propagation of 6 Prosopis taxa by stem cuttings has been achieved with low success (1 to 10%) in field-grown plants and with higher success (50 to 100%) with young actively growing greenhouse plants.

  14. Assessment of efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Levy Juliana

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims To determine prospectively the efficacy, tolerability and patient satisfaction of an extended release formulation of metformin (metformin XR in hospital based outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus currently treated with standard metformin. Methods Patients on immediate release standard metformin either alone or combined with other oral agents were switched to extended release metformin XR 500 mg tablets and titrated to a maximum dose of 2000 mg/day Measurements to include glucose and lipid control, blood pressure, body weight, waist circumference, C-reactive protein, adverse events and patient satisfaction were recorded at baseline, three and six months. Results Complete data were obtained for 35 of the 61 patients enrolled to the study. At three and six months no changes were reported for any of the cardiovascular risk factors except for lipids where there was a modest rise in plasma triglycerides. These effects were achieved with a reduced dose of metformin XR compared to pre-study dosing with standard metformin (1500 mg +/- 402 vs 1861 +/- 711 p = 0.004. A total of 77% of patients were free of gastrointestinal side effects and 83% of patients stated a preference for metformin XR at the end of the study. Ghost tablets were reported in the faeces by the majority of the patients (54.1%. Conclusions Patients switched to extended release metformin XR derived the same clinical and metabolic benefits as for standard metformin but with reduced dosage, fewer gastrointestinal side effects and a greater sense of well being and satisfaction on medication.

  15. Effects of Vascular and Nonvascular Adverse Events and of Extended-Release Niacin With Laropiprant on Health and Healthcare Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Seamus; Haynes, Richard; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Gray, Alastair; Landray, Martin J; Collins, Rory; Armitage, Jane; Mihaylova, Borislava

    2016-07-01

    Extended-release niacin with laropiprant did not significantly reduce the risk of major vascular events and increased the risk of serious adverse events in Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events (HPS2-THRIVE), but its net effects on health and healthcare costs are unknown. 25 673 participants aged 50 to 80 years with previous cardiovascular disease were randomized to 2 g of extended-release niacin with 40 mg of laropiprant daily versus matching placebo, in addition to effective statin-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering treatment. The net effects of niacin-laropiprant on quality-adjusted life years and hospital care costs (2012 UK £; converted into US $ using purchasing power parity index) during 4 years in HPS2-THRIVE were evaluated using estimates of the impact of serious adverse events on health-related quality of life and hospital care costs. During the study, participants assigned niacin-laropiprant experienced marginally but not statistically significantly lower survival (0.012 fewer years [standard error (SE) 0.007]), fewer quality-adjusted life years (0.023 [SE 0.007] fewer using UK EQ-5D scores; 0.020 [SE 0.006] fewer using US EQ-5D scores) and accrued greater hospital costs (UK £101 [SE £37]; US $145 [SE $53]). Stroke, heart failure, musculoskeletal events, gastrointestinal events, and infections were associated with significant decreases in health-related quality of life in both the year of the event and in subsequent years. All serious vascular and nonvascular events were associated with substantial increases in hospital care costs. In HPS2-THRIVE, the addition of extended-release niacin-laropiprant to statin-based therapy reduced quality of life-adjusted survival and increased hospital costs. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00461630. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The Direct and Indirect Effects of Paliperidone Extended-release on Depressive Symptoms in Schizoaffective Disorder: A Path Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Bossie, Cynthia A; Alphs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    This analysis evaluates improvement in symptoms of depression in patients with schizoaffective disorder administered oral paliperidone extended-release by accounting for the magnitude of direct and indirect (changes in negative and positive symptoms and worsening of extrapyramidal symptoms) treatment effects on depressive symptoms. Data for this post hoc analysis were drawn from two six-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of paliperidone extended-release versus placebo in adult subjects with schizoaffective disorder (N=614; NCT00412373, NCT00397033). Subjects with baseline 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores of 16 or greater were included. Structural equation models (path analyses) were used to separate total effects into direct and indirect effects on depressive symptoms. Change from baseline in 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score at the Week 6 end point was the dependent variable; changes in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale positive and negative factors and Simpson-Angus Scale (to evaluate extrapyramidal symptoms) scores were independent variables. At baseline, 332 of 614 (54.1%) subjects had a 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression score of 16 or greater. Path analysis determined that up to 26.4 percent of the paliperidone extended-release versus placebo effect on depressive symptoms may be attributed to a direct treatment effect, and 45.8 percent and 28.4 percent were mediated indirectly through improvements on positive and negative symptoms, respectively. No effects were identified as mediated through extrapyramidal symptoms changes (-0.7%). RESULTS of this analysis suggest that paliperidone's effect on depressive symptoms in subjects with schizoaffective disorder participating in two six-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies is mediated through indirect effects (e.g., positive and negative symptom changes) and a direct treatment effect.

  17. Clinical Efficacy of a Single Two Gram Dose of Azithromycin Extended Release for Male Patients with Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takahashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the clinical efficacy of a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release for heterosexual male patients with urethritis, and the current antimicrobial sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to azithromycin, a prospective clinical trial was conducted from 2011–2013. In patients with gonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.9% (30 of 33. The susceptibility rates of isolated Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin, cefixime and azithromycin were 100%, 100%, 95.3% (41/43 and 37.2% (16/43, respectively. In the patients with nongonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.0% (45 of 50. The microbiological eradication rates for the pathogens were 90.9% (30/33 for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 91.5% (43/47 for Chlamydia trachomatis, 71.4% (5/7 for Mycoplasma genitalium, and 100% (13/13 for Ureaplasma urealyticum. The main adverse event was diarrhea and its manifestation rate was 35.2% (32 of 120. The symptom of diarrhea was mostly temporary and resolved spontaneously. The conclusion was that the treatment regimen with a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release would be effective for patients with urethritis. However, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium should be carefully monitored because of possible treatment failure.

  18. Clinical Efficacy of a Single Two Gram Dose of Azithromycin Extended Release for Male Patients with Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Ito, Shin; Iwasawa, Akihiko; Hiyama, Yoshiki; Uehara, Teruhisa; Ichihara, Koji; Hashimoto, Jiro; Masumori, Naoya; Sunaoshi, Kenichi; Takeda, Koichi; Suzuki, Nobukazu; Hosobe, Takahide; Goto, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Onodera, Shoichi

    2014-04-02

    To clarify the clinical efficacy of a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release for heterosexual male patients with urethritis, and the current antimicrobial sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to azithromycin, a prospective clinical trial was conducted from 2011-2013. In patients with gonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.9% (30 of 33). The susceptibility rates of isolated Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin, cefixime and azithromycin were 100%, 100%, 95.3% (41/43) and 37.2% (16/43), respectively. In the patients with nongonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.0% (45 of 50). The microbiological eradication rates for the pathogens were 90.9% (30/33) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 91.5% (43/47) for Chlamydia trachomatis, 71.4% (5/7) for Mycoplasma genitalium, and 100% (13/13) for Ureaplasma urealyticum. The main adverse event was diarrhea and its manifestation rate was 35.2% (32 of 120). The symptom of diarrhea was mostly temporary and resolved spontaneously. The conclusion was that the treatment regimen with a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release would be effective for patients with urethritis. However, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium should be carefully monitored because of possible treatment failure.

  19. Mesquite Risk Mapping and Assessment in Tokar Delta-Eastern Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Suliman, Mahgoub; NAWATA, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Buho; Karamalla, Abdelaziz

    2015-01-01

    Tokar Delta is a name given to a small delta of approximately 161,000 hectares situated in the southern area of the Red Sea in Eastern Sudan. Beginning of 1980, mesquite species (Prosopis chilensis & Prosopis juliflora) were introduced to Tokar area to be planted as a shelterbelt for the city Tokar, but after while; it spread out to the delta area and became an invasive plant to the agricultural lands and along Khor Barak banks. Nowadays mesquite covers more than half of the delta area, decre...

  20. Mesquite pod meal in diets for lactating goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiala Cristina de Jesus Pereira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects inclusion of 0%, 33.3%, 66.7% and 100% natural matter (NM of mesquite pod meal (MPM, in substitution of corn, on the intake, digestibility and feeding behavior of lactating Saanen goats. The forage:concentrate ratio in the diet was 40:60, using elephant grass silage as a forage source. Eight adult lactating goats with about 60 days in milk and weighting 50 kg were divided into two 4 × 4 latin squares and four 17-day experimental periods. Dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP and total digestible nutrient (TDN intakes were not influenced by MPM levels. Ether extract (0.51; 0.34; 0.36; 0.20 kg/day and non-fiber carbohydrate (NFC (0.54; 0.53; 0.49; 0.36 kg/day intakes showed a linear effect with increased MPM. Organic matter (OM and NDF intakes presented a quadratic behavior. The maximum OM intake was estimated with the replacement of 40.5%. The maximum estimated intakes for NDF were 0.665 kg/day and 14.8 g/kg body weight, with a replacement close to 60%. Nutrient digestibility coefficients and TDN levels (655.0 g/kg were not affected, except for NFC. The time spent eating, ruminating and idle was not influenced by the addition of MPM. The feeding rate of DM had a linear decrease which reflected the intake restriction. Corn replacement with MPM should not exceed 40.5%, although its total replacement does not interfere with the intake of DM, CP and TDN on the apparent digestibility of nutrients and most ingestive behavior parameters.

  1. APF530 (granisetron injection extended-release) in a three-drug regimen for delayed CINV in highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnadig, Ian D; Agajanian, Richy; Dakhil, Christopher; Gabrail, Nashat Y; Smith, Robert E; Taylor, Charles; Wilks, Sharon T; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Cooper, William; Mosier, Michael C; Payne, J Yvette; Klepper, Michael J; Vacirca, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    APF530, extended-release granisetron, provides sustained release for ≥5 days for acute- and delayed-phase chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). We compared efficacy and safety of APF530 versus ondansetron for delayed CINV after highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC), following a guideline-recommended three-drug regimen. HEC patients received APF530 500 mg subcutaneously or ondansetron 0.15 mg/kg intravenously, with dexamethasone and fosaprepitant. Primary end point was delayed-phase complete response (no emesis or rescue medication). A higher percentage of APF530 versus ondansetron patients had delayed-phase complete response (p = 0.014). APF530 was generally well tolerated; treatment-emergent adverse event incidence was similar across arms, mostly mild-to-moderate injection-site reactions. APF530 versus the standard three-drug regimen provided superior control of delayed-phase CINV following HEC. ClinicalTrials.gov : NCT02106494.

  2. Cuts of dairy-origin cattle fed mesquite pod meal in replacement of corn

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    Marina de Paula Almeida

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in order to assess commercial front and rear cuts of dairy-origin cattle fed mesquite pod meal. Twenty-five non-castrated male bovines (Holstein-Zebu, distributed according to a completely randomized design, with five animals per treatment, were used. The feed contained about 121.2 and 544.98 g kg-1 of crude protein and total digestible nutrients, respectively, and was composed of tifton grass hay, cornmeal, soybean meal, mesquite pod meal and mineral salt. The right half carcass of each animal was separated between the 5th and 6th ribs, in front and rear quarters, from which commercial cuts were obtained. There was no effect (p > 0.05 as to the replacement of corn for mesquite pod meal on the weights and yields of front cuts (shoulder, brisket, chuck, hump and flanks and rear cuts (tenderloin, shank, knuckle, thin flank, flat, eye round, rump tail, top side, cap of rump, rump, cut of rump, striploin, cap of cube roll. Mesquite pod meal can substitute cornmeal in 100% in the concentrate without changes in weight and yield of the commercial front and rear cuts of male bovines of dairy origin.

  3. TECHNICAL ANÁLISIS OF THE MESQUITE TREE (Prosopis laevigata Humb. & Bonpl. ex Willd. IN MEXICO

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    Elvia Nereyda Rodríguez Sauceda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesquite is developed in arid and semiarid regions of Mexico, including northern Sinaloa and it is very important because its wood is used for fuel, the construction of fences, fodder and pods as food for man; it produces resin having use in the manufacture of glues and coatings, while the flowers are important in the production of honey. By the above exposed, the aim of this work was to study and systematize the information found in the scientific literature about the mesquite tree, the methodology used was that one used by Musálem and Sánchez (2003. Mesquite is a biotic resource with a wide geographical and ecological distribution in Mexican arid zones and also a wide distribution and importance in Sudan and Australia. In this specie, a very important ecological role stands out because it is an excellent fixative soil and therefore, controlling erosion; it is nitrogen fixer, which improves soil fertility. On the other hand, under certain conditions are a source of forage for domestic livestock and wildlife. This study concluded that mesquite is a valuable species for communities of northern Sinaloa and Mexico.

  4. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Guanfacine Extended Release in Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilens, Timothy E; Robertson, Brigitte; Sikirica, Vanja; Harper, Linda; Young, Joel L; Bloomfield, Ralph; Lyne, Andrew; Rynkowski, Gail; Cutler, Andrew J

    2015-11-01

    Despite the continuity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) into adolescence, little is known regarding use of nonstimulants to treat ADHD in adolescents. This phase 3 trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of guanfacine extended release (GXR) in adolescents with ADHD. This 13-week, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated once-daily GXR (1-7 mg per day) in adolescents with ADHD aged 13 to 17 years. The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in the ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV) total score; key secondary endpoints included scores from the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness (CGI-S), and Learning and School domain and Family domain scores from the Weiss Functional Impairment Rating Scale-Parent Report (WFIRS-P) at week 13. A total of 314 participants were randomized (GXR, n = 157; placebo, n = 157). The majority of participants received optimal doses of 3, 4, 5, or 6 mg (30 [22.9%], 26 [19.8%], 27 [20.6%], or 24 [18.3%] participants, respectively), with 46.5% of participants receiving an optimal dose above the currently approved maximum dose limit of 4 mg. Participants receiving GXR showed improvement in ADHD-RS-IV total score compared with placebo (least-squares mean score change, -24.55 [GXR] versus -18.53 [placebo]; effect size, 0.52; p ADHD symptoms in adolescents. GXR was well tolerated, with no new safety signals reported. Dose-Optimization in Adolescents Aged 13-17 Diagnosed With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Using Extended-Release Guanfacine HCl; http://ClinicalTrials.gov/; NCT01081132. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Tamarind seed gum-hydrolyzed polymethacrylamide-g-gellan beads for extended release of diclofenac sodium using 32 full factorial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Gouranga; Nandi, Amit Kumar; Khan, Najim Sarif; Pal, Souvik; Dey, Sibasish

    2018-07-15

    Development of tamarind seed gum (TSG)-hydrolyzed polymethacrylamide-g-gellan (h-Pmaa-g-GG) composite beads for extended release of diclofenac sodium using 3 2 full factorial design is the main purpose of this study. The ratio of h-Pmaa-g-GG and TSG and concentration of cross-linker CaCl 2 were taken as independent factors with three different levels of each. Effects of polymer ratio and CaCl 2 on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE), drug release, bead size and swelling were investigated. Responses such as DEE and different drug release parameters were statistically analyzed by 3 2 full factorial design using Design-Expert software and finally the formulation factors were optimized to obtain USP-reference release profile. Drug release rate was found to decrease with decrease in the ratio of h-Pmaa-g-GG:TSG and increase in the concentration of Ca 2+ ions in cross-linking medium. The optimized formulation showed DEE of 93.25% and an extended drug release profile over a period of 10h with f 2 =80.13. Kinetic modeling unveiled case-I-Fickian diffusion based drug release mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipids bearing extruded-spheronized pellets for extended release of poorly soluble antiemetic agent-Meclizine HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Faaiza; Shoaib, Muhammad Harris; Yousuf, Rabia Ismail; Nasiri, Muhammad Iqbal; Ahmed, Kamran; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2017-04-12

    Antiemetic agent Meclizine HCl, widely prescribed in vertigo, is available only in immediate release dosage forms. The approved therapeutic dose and shorter elimination half-life make Meclizine HCl a potential candidate to be formulated in extended release dosage form. This study was aimed to develop extended release Meclizine HCl pellets by extrusion spheronization using natural and synthetic lipids. Influence of lipid type, drug/lipid ratio and combinations of different lipids on drug release and sphericity of pellets were evaluated. Thirty two formulations were prepared with four different lipids, Glyceryl monostearate (Geleol ® ), Glyceryl palmitostearate (Precirol ® ), Glyceryl behenate (Compritol ® ) and Carnauba wax, utilized either alone or in combinations of drug/lipid ratio of 1:0.5-1:3. Dissolution studies were performed at variable pH and release kinetics were analyzed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was conducted and no drug lipid interaction was found. Sphericity indicated by shape factor (e R ) varied with type and concentration of lipids: Geleol ® (e R  = 0.891-0.997), Precirol ® (e R  = 0.611-0.743), Compritol ® (e R  = 0.665-0.729) and Carnauba wax (e R  = 0.499-0.551). Highly spherical pellets were obtained with Geleol ® (Aspect ratio = 1.005-1.052) whereas irregularly shaped pellets were formed using Carnauba wax (Aspect ratio = 1.153-1.309). Drug release was effectively controlled by three different combinations of lipids: (i) Geleol ® and Compritol ® , (ii) Geleol ® and Carnauba wax and (iii) Geleol ® , Compritol ® and Carnauba wax. Scanning electron microscopy of Compritol ® pellets showed smooth surface with pores, whereas, irregular rough surface with hollow depressions was observed in Carnauba wax pellets. Energy dispersive spectroscopy indicated elemental composition of lipid matrix pellets. Kinetics of (i) Geleol ® and Compritol ® pellets, explained by Korsmeyer-Peppas (R 2  = 0.978-0.993) indicated

  7. Profile of guanfacine extended release and its potential in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

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    Martinez-Raga J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Jose Martinez-Raga,1,2 Carlos Knecht,3 Raquel de Alvaro4 1Teaching Unit of Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, University Hospital Doctor Peset, University of Valencia, 2CEU Cardenal Herrera University, 3Área de Salud Mental, Hospital Padre Jofré, Valencia, 4Hospital General, Consorcio Hospitalario Provincial, Castellon, Spain Abstract: The α2-adrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine, in its extended-release formulation (GXR, is the most recent nonstimulant medication approved in several countries for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD as monotherapy and as adjunctive pharmacotherapy to stimulants in children and adolescents. The present paper aims to review comprehensively and critically the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and the published evidence on the efficacy and safety profile of GXR in the treatment of ADHD. A comprehensive search of relevant databases (PubMed, Embase, and PsycInfo was conducted to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals until January 15, 2015. Though the precise mechanism of action of guanfacine in the treatment of ADHD is not fully understood, it is thought to act directly by enhancing noradrenaline functioning via α2A-adrenoceptors in the prefrontal cortex. Weight-adjusted doses should be used, with a dosing regime on a milligram per kilogram basis, starting at doses in the range 0.05–0.08 mg/kg/day, up to 0.12 mg/kg/day. As evidenced in short-term randomized controlled trials and in long-term open-label extension studies, GXR has been shown to be effective as monotherapy in the treatment of ADHD. Furthermore, GXR has also been found to be effective as adjunctive therapy to stimulant medications in patients with suboptimal responses to stimulants. Many of the adverse reactions associated with GXR, particularly sedation-related effects, were dose-related, transient, mild to moderate in severity, and did not interfere with attention or overall

  8. Combination of niacin extended-release and simvastatin results in a less atherogenic lipid profile than atorvastatin monotherapy

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    William Insull Jr

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available William Insull Jr1, Peter P Toth2, H Robert Superko3, Roopal B Thakkar4, Scott Krause4, Ping Jiang4, Rhea A Parreno4, Robert J Padley41Baylor College of Medicine and Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas; 2University of Illinois College of Medicine, Peoria, Illinois; 3Celera, Alameda, California, Mercer University, Atlanta, Georgia; 4Abbott, Abbott Park, Illinois, USAObjective: To compare the effects of combination niacin extended-release + simvastatin (NER/S versus atorvastatin alone on apolipoproteins and lipid fractions in a post hoc analysis from SUPREME, a study which compared the lipid effects of niacin extended-release + simvastatin and atorvastatin in patients with hyperlipidemia or mixed dyslipidemia.Patients and methods: Patients (n = 137 with dyslipidemia (not previously receiving statin therapy or having discontinued any lipid-altering treatment 4–5 weeks prior to the study received NER/S (1000/40 mg/day for four weeks, then 2000/40 mg/day for eight weeks or atorvastatin 40 mg/day for 12 weeks. Median percent changes in apolipoprotein (apo A-1, apo B, and the apo B:A-I ratio, and nuclear magnetic resonance lipoprotein subclasses from baseline to week 12 were compared using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Fisher’s exact test.Results: NER/S treatment produced significantly greater percent changes in apo A-I and apo B:A-I, and, at the final visit, apo B <80 mg/dL was attained by 59% versus 33% of patients, compared with atorvastatin treatment (P = 0.003. NER/S treatment resulted in greater percent reductions in calculated particle numbers for low-density lipoprotein (LDL, 52% versus 43%; P = 0.022, small LDL (55% versus 45%; P = 0.011, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL and total chylomicrons (63% versus 39%; P < 0.001, and greater increases in particle size for LDL (2.7% versus 1.0%; P = 0.007 and VLDL (9.3% versus 0.1%; P < 0.001, compared with atorvastatin.Conclusion: NER/S treatment significantly improved apo A-I levels and the apo

  9. Treatment satisfaction with paliperidone extended-release tablets: open-label study in schizophrenia patients dissatisfied with previous antipsychotic medication

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    Yang FD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fu De Yang,1 Juan Li,1 Yun Long Tan,1 Wei Ye Liang,1 Rongzhen Zhang,1 Ning Wang,1 Wei Feng,1 Shangli Cai,2 Jian Min Zhuo,2 Li Li Zhang2 1Beijing Hui-Long-Guan Hospital, 2Department of Medical Affairs, Xian Janssen Pharmaceutical Ltd, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in treatment satisfaction after switching to paliperidone extended-release (ER in Chinese schizophrenia patients dissatisfied with their previous antipsychotic treatment.Methods: In this 8-week, open-label, single-arm, multicenter, prospective study, 1,693 patients dissatisfied with previous antipsychotic medication were enrolled and switched to paliperidone ER tablets (3–12 mg/d based on clinical judgment. The primary efficacy end point was change in Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ score from baseline to week 8. The secondary end points included percentage of patients with MSQ score ≥4, as well as changes in Clinical Global Improvement-Severity (CGI-S and Personal and Social Performance (PSP scores.Results: MSQ scores increased significantly from baseline (mean [standard deviation {SD}]: 2.48 [0.55] to week 8 (5.47 [0.89], P<0.0001; primary end point, full analysis set. The percentage of patients with MSQ score ≥4 was 95.9% at week 8, indicating that most of the patients were satisfied with their treatment. Significant (P<0.0001 improvements from baseline to week 8 were noted in CGI-S score (2.37 [1.20] and PSP score (25.5 [15.0]. A total of 174 (10.28% patients experienced adverse events (AEs. The most common (>10 patients events were extrapyramidal disorder (n=84, 4.96%, poor quality sleep (n=18, 1.06% and akathisia (n=13, 0.77%. The majority of AEs were mild to moderate in severity. No deaths occurred.Conclusion: Treatment satisfaction improved after switching to paliperidone ER from the previous antipsychotic in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. Keywords: atypical antipsychotics, open label

  10. Extended-Release Guanfacine Does Not Show a Large Effect on Tic Severity in Children with Chronic Tic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Tanya K; Fernandez, Thomas V; Coffey, Barbara J; Rahman, Omar; Gavaletz, Allison; Hanks, Camille E; Tillberg, Caitlin S; Gomez, Laura Ibanez; Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Katsovich, Lily; Scahill, Lawrence

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the tolerability, safety, and preliminary efficacy of extended-release guanfacine in children with chronic tic disorders, including Tourette's disorder (collectively referred to as CTD). This was a multisite, 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary outcome measure was the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) total score. Key secondary outcomes included the Improvement item of Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement (CGI-I) scale and the Tic Symptom Self-report (TSSR). Adverse events were monitored at each visit. Thirty-four subjects (23 boys and 11 girls) of ages 6 to 17 years (mean = 11.1 ± 3.1) with CTD were randomly assigned to extended-release guanfacine (n = 16) or placebo (n = 18). At baseline, the mean YGTSS total score was 26.3 ± 6.6 for the guanfacine group versus 27.7 ± 8.7 for the placebo group. Within the guanfacine group (mean final daily dose of 2.6 ± 1.1 mg, n = 14), the mean YGTSS total score declined to 23.6 ± 6.42 [t(15) = 1.84, p = 0.08; effect size = 0.35]. The results were similar in the placebo group with a score of 24.7 ± 10.54 at week 8 [t(17) = 1.83, p = 0.08; effect size = 0.38]. There was no significant difference in the rate of positive response on the CGI-I between the guanfacine group and placebo (19% [3/16] vs. 22% [4/18], p = 1.0). The most common adverse events were fatigue, drowsiness, dry mouth, headache, and irritability. Two subjects in the guanfacine group discontinued early-one because of an adverse event (depressed mood) and one because of lack of efficacy; two subjects in the placebo group discontinued because of lack of efficacy. This pilot study did not confirm a clinically meaningful effect size within the guanfacine group. These results do not support the launch of a larger efficacy trial for tics in children and adolescents with CTD.

  11. Rates of opioid dispensing and overdose after introduction of abuse-deterrent extended-release oxycodone and withdrawal of propoxyphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larochelle, Marc R; Zhang, Fang; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Wharam, J Frank

    2015-06-01

    In the second half of 2010, abuse-deterrent extended-release oxycodone hydrochloride (OxyContin; Purdue Pharma) was introduced and propoxyphene was withdrawn from the US market. The effect of these pharmaceutical market changes on opioid dispensing and overdose rates is unknown. To evaluate the association between 2 temporally proximate changes in the opioid market and opioid dispensing and overdose rates. Claims from a large national US health insurer were analyzed, using an interrupted time series study design. Participants included an open cohort of 31.3 million commercially insured members aged 18 to 64 years between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2012, with median follow-up of 20 months (last follow-up, December 31, 2012). Introduction of abuse-deterrent OxyContin (resistant to crushing or dissolving) on August 9, 2010, and market withdrawal of propoxyphene on November 19, 2010. Standardized opioid dispensing rates and prescription opioid and heroin overdose rates were the primary outcomes. We used segmented regression to analyze changes in outcomes from 30 quarters before to 8 quarters after the 2 interventions. Two years after the opioid market changes, total opioid dispensing decreased by 19% from the expected rate (absolute change, -32.2 mg morphine-equivalent dose per member per quarter [95% CI, -38.1 to -26.3]). By opioid subtype, the absolute change in dispensing by milligrams of morphine-equivalent dose per member per quarter at 2 years was -11.3 (95% CI, -12.4 to -10.1) for extended-release oxycodone, 3.26 (95% CI, 1.40 to 5.12) for other long-acting opioids, -8.19 (95% CI, -9.30 to -7.08) for propoxyphene, and -16.2 (95% CI, -18.8 to -13.5) for other immediate-release opioids. Two years after the market changes, the estimated overdose rate attributed to prescription opioids decreased by 20% (absolute change, -1.10 per 100,000 members per quarter [95% CI, -1.47 to -0.74]), but heroin overdose increased by 23% (absolute change, 0.26 per 100

  12. Efficacy of extended-release divalproex combined with "condensed" dialectical behavior therapy for individuals with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Richelle; Freitag, Mary; Miller, Michael; Lee, Susanne; Romine, Ann; Song, Sue; Adityanjee, Adit; Schulz, S Charles

    2012-11-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a significant psychiatric illness for which medication treatments are still being explored. The goal of this study was to assess divalproex extended release (ER) vs placebo for patients receiving dialectal behavior therapy (DBT). Patients with BPD received 4 weeks of "condensed DBT." Those with Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90) scores >150 after this treatment were then randomly and blindly assigned to placebo or divalproex ER for 12 weeks. Repeated measures analysis of variance utilizing last observation carried forward was used to assess the results. Seventeen participants completed the full assessment. Two patients had a significant decrease in SCL-90 in the first 4 weeks, leaving 15 patients for the medication phase of the trial. There were no significant differences between the participants assigned to divalproex ER compared with placebo. However, there was a significant improvement in both groups from baseline to endpoint (P = .001). The response of 2 of 17 participants in the first 4 weeks prior to medication may point to a practice strategy in approaching outpatients with BPD. Although the patients had a decrease in symptoms during the study, there was no advantage observed for divalproex ER and DBT over placebo and DBT.

  13. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults.

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    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR methylphenidate (MPH was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations.

  14. Once-Daily Tacrolimus Extended-Release Formulation: 1 Year after Conversion in Stable Pediatric Kidney Transplant Recipients

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    Lars Pape

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is speculated that a once-daily dosage of immunosuppression can increase adherence and thereby graft survival. Until now, there have been no studies on once-daily use of Tacrolimus extended-release formulation (TAC-ER in children following pediatric kidney transplantation. In 11 stable pediatric kidney recipients >10 years, efficacy, safety, and tolerability of a switch to TAC-ER were observed over one year. Adherence was determined by use of the BAASIS-Scale Interview and comparison of individual variability of Tacrolimus trough levels. Over the observation period, two acute rejections were observed in one girl with nonadherence and repeated Tacrolimus trough levels of 0 ng/m. Beside this, there were no acute rejections in this trial. TAC dose was increased in 3/11 patients and decreased in 2/11 patients within the course of the study. Six patients did not require a dose adjustment. All but one patient had a maximum of 1 dose change during therapy. Mean Tacrolimus dose, trough levels, and Glomerular filtration rates were also stable. Adherence, as measured by BAASIS-Scale Interview and coefficient of variation of Tacrolimus trough levels, was good at all times. It is concluded that conversion to Tac-ER is safe in low-risk children following pediatric kidney transplantation.

  15. Human Abuse Potential of an Abuse-Deterrent (AD), Extended-Release (ER) Morphine Product Candidate (Morphine-ADER Injection-Molded Tablets) vs Extended-Release Morphine Administered Intranasally in Nondependent Recreational Opioid Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Lynn R; Smith, Michael D; Lawler, John; Lindhardt, Karsten; Dayno, Jeffrey M

    2017-09-01

    To compare the relative human abuse potential after insufflation of manipulated morphine abuse-deterrent, extended-release injection-molded tablets (morphine-ADER-IMT) with that of marketed morphine ER tablets. A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active- and placebo-controlled five-way crossover study was performed with adult volunteers who were experienced, nondependent, recreational opioid users. After intranasal (IN) administration of manipulated high-volume (HV) morphine-ADER-IMT (60 mg), participants were randomized (1:1:1:1) to receive IN manipulated low-volume (LV) morphine ER (60 mg), IN manipulated LV morphine-ADER-IMT, intact oral morphine-ADER-IMT (60 mg), and placebo in crossover fashion. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic assessments included peak effect of drug liking (E max ; primary endpoint) using drug liking visual analog scale (VAS) score, E max using overall drug liking, and take drug again (TDA) VASs scores, and mean abuse quotient (AQ), a pharmacokinetic parameter associated with drug liking. Forty-six participants completed the study. After insufflation of HV morphine-ADER-IMT and LV morphine-ADER-IMT, drug liking E max was significantly lower ( P  <   0.0001) compared with IN morphine ER. Overall drug liking and TDA E max values were significantly lower ( P  <   0.0001) after insufflation of HV morphine-ADER-IMT and LV morphine-ADER-IMT compared with IN morphine ER. Mean AQ was lower after insufflation of HV (9.2) and LV (2.3) morphine-ADER-IMT or ingestion of oral morphine-ADER-IMT (5.5) compared with insufflation of LV morphine ER (37.2). All drug liking, take drug again, and abuse quotient endpoints support a significantly lower abuse potential with insufflation of manipulated morphine-ADER-IMT compared with manipulated and insufflated non-AD ER morphine. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine.

  16. Biomass accumulation and radiation use efficiency of honey mesquite and eastern red cedar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiniry, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Rangeland models that simulate hydrology, soil erosion and nutrient balance can be used to select management systems which maximize profits for producers while they minimize adverse impacts on water quality. Values are needed for parameters that describe the growth of invading woody species in order to allow simulation of their competition with grasses. Three attributes useful for describing and quantifying plant growth are: the potential leaf area index (LAI) or ratio of leaf area divided by ground area; the light extinction coefficient (k) that is used to calculate the fraction of light intercepted by leaves, applying Beer’s law; and the radiation-use efficiency (RUE) or amount of dry biomass produced per unit of intercepted light. Objectives in this study were to measure LAI, k, and RUE for eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) and honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr. var. glandulosa), without competing plants, as a first step toward simulating their growth. Seedlings were planted in the field at Temple, Texas, USA in early 1992 and kept free of competition from herbaceous plants. During 1993, 1994 and 1995 data were collected on biomass, leaf area and intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for individual trees. Both tree species showed exponential biomass increases. At the end of the 1995 growing season, mean LAI values were 1.16 for cedar and 1.25 for mesquite. Mean k values were 0.34 for mesquite and 0.37 for cedar. Radiation use efficiency for aboveground biomass was 1.60±0.17 (mean±standard deviation) g per MJ of intercepted PAR for cedar and 1.61±0.26 for mesquite. The rapid growth in 1995 was accompanied by greater leaf area and thus greater summed intercepted PAR. These values are critical for quantifying growth of these two species. (author)

  17. Phenol remediation by peroxidase from an invasive mesquite: Turning an environmental wound into wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Savita; Mishra, Ruchi; Sharma, Radhey Shyam; Mishra, Vandana

    2017-07-15

    The present study examines mesquite (Prosopis juliflora), an invasive species, to yield peroxidase that may reduce hazards of phenolics to living organisms. As low as 0.3U of low-purity mesquite peroxidase (MPx) efficiently remove phenol and chlorophenols (90-92%) compared with Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) (40-60%). MPx shows a very high removal efficiency (40-50%) at a wide range of pH (2-9) and temperature (20-80°C), as opposed to HRP (15-20%). At a high-level of the substrate (2.4mM) and without the addition of PEG, MPx maintains a significant phenolic removal (60-≥92%) and residual activity (∼25%). It proves the superiority of MPx over HRP, which showed insignificant removal (10-12%) under similar conditions, and no residual activity even with PEG addition. The root elongation and plant growth bioassays confirm phenolic detoxification by MPx. Readily availability of mesquite across the countries and easy preparation of MPx from leaves make this tree as a sustainable source for a low-technological solution for phenol remediation. This study is the first step towards converting a biological wound of invasive species into wisdom and strength for protecting the environment from phenol pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Divalproex Extended-Release in the Treatment of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karen Dineen; Redden, Laura; Kowatch, Robert A.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Segal, Scott; Chang, Kiki; Wozniak, Patricia; Vigna, Namita V.; Abi-Saab, Walid; Saltarelli, Mario

    2009-01-01

    A double-blind study that involves 150 patients aged 10-17 on the effect of divalproex extended-release in the treatment of bipolar disorder shows that the drug was similar to placebo based on adverse events and that no treatment effect was observed in the drug. The drug is not suitable for treatment of youths with bipolar I disorder, mixed or…

  19. Effect of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Analogue Exenatide Extended Release in Cats with Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riederer, A; Zini, E; Salesov, E; Fracassi, F; Padrutt, I; Macha, K; Stöckle, T M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Exenatide extended release (ER) is a glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue that increases insulin secretion, inhibits glucagon secretion and induces satiation in humans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of exenatide ER is safe and stimulates insulin secretion in healthy cats. The objective of this study is to assess the safety of exenatide ER and its effect on body weight, remission and metabolic control in newly diagnosed diabetic cats receiving insulin and a low-carbohydrate diet. Thirty client-owned cats. Prospective placebo-controlled clinical trial. Cats were treated with exenatide ER or 0.9% saline, administered SC, once weekly. Both groups received insulin glargine and a low-carbohydrate diet. Exenatide ER was administered for 16 weeks, or in cats that achieved remission it was given for 4 weeks after discontinuing insulin treatment. Nonparametric tests were used for statistical analysis. Cats in the exenatide ER and placebo groups had transient adverse signs including decreased appetite (60% vs. 20%, respectively, P = .06) and vomiting (53% vs. 40%, respectively, P = .715). Body weight increased significantly in the placebo group (P = .002), but not in cats receiving exenatide ER. Cats on exenatide ER achieved remission or good metabolic control in 40% or 89%, respectively, whereas in control cats percentages were 20% or 58% (P = .427 and P = .178, respectively). Exenatide ER is safe in diabetic cats and does not result in weight gain. Our pilot study suggests that, should there be an additional clinically relevant beneficial effect of exenatide ER in insulin-treated cats on rate of remission and good metabolic control, it would likely approximate 20% and 30%, respectively. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. Patient preferences and extended-release naltrexone: A new opportunity to treat opioid use disorders in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Ruthanne; Makarenko, Iuliia; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Zelenev, Alexei; Polonsky, Maxim; Madden, Lynn; Filippovych, Sergii; Dvoriak, Sergii; Springer, Sandra A; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-10-01

    Scaling up HIV prevention for people who inject drugs (PWID) using opioid agonist therapies (OAT) in Ukraine has been restricted by individual and structural factors. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), however, provides new opportunities for treating opioid use disorders (OUDs) in this region, where both HIV incidence and mortality continue to increase. Survey results from 1613 randomly selected PWID from 5 regions in Ukraine who were currently, previously or never on OAT were analyzed for their preference of pharmacological therapies for treating OUDs. For those preferring XR-NTX, independent correlates of their willingness to initiate XR-NTX were examined. Among the 1613 PWID, 449 (27.8%) were interested in initiating XR-NTX. Independent correlates associated with interest in XR-NTX included: being from Mykolaiv (AOR=3.7, 95% CI=2.3-6.1) or Dnipro (AOR=1.8, 95% CI=1.1-2.9); never having been on OAT (AOR=3.4, 95% CI=2.1-5.4); shorter-term injectors (AOR=0.9, 95% CI 0.9-0.98); and inversely for both positive (AOR=0.8, CI=0.8-0.9), and negative attitudes toward OAT (AOR=1.3, CI=1.2-1.4), respectively. In the context of Eastern Europe and Central Asia where HIV is concentrated in PWID and where HIV prevention with OAT is under-scaled, new options for treating OUDs are urgently needed. here suggest that XR-NTX could become an option for addiction treatment and HIV prevention especially for PWID who have shorter duration of injection and who harbor negative attitudes to OAT. Decision aids that inform patient preferences with accurate information about the various treatment options are likely to guide patients toward better, patient-centered treatments and improve treatment entry and retention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Are Branded and Generic Extended-Release Ropinirole Formulations Equally Efficacious? A Rater-Blinded, Switch-Over, Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edit Bosnyák

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the branded and a generic extended-release ropinirole formulation in the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease (PD. Of 22 enrolled patients 21 completed the study. A rater blinded to treatment evaluated Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, Fahn-Tolosa-Marin Tremor Rating Scale, Nonmotor Symptoms Assessment Scale, and a structured questionnaire on ropinirole side effects. Besides, the patients self-administered EQ-5D, Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS-2, and Beck Depression Inventories. Branded and generic ropinirole treatment achieved similar scores on all tests measuring severity of motor symptoms (primary endpoint, UPDRS-III: 27.0 versus 28.0 points, P=0.505. Based on patient diaries, the lengths of “good time periods” were comparable (10.5 and 10.0 hours for branded and generic ropinirole, resp., P=0.670. However, generic ropinirole therapy achieved almost 3.0 hours shorter on time without dyskinesia (6.5 versus. 9.5 hours, P<0.05 and 2.5 hours longer on time with slight dyskinesia (3.5 versus. 1.0 hours, P<0.05 than the branded ropinirole did. Except for gastrointestinal problems, nonmotor symptoms were similarly controlled. Patients did not prefer either formulation. Although this study has to be interpreted with limitations, it demonstrated that both generic and branded ropinirole administration can achieve similar control on most symptoms of PD.

  2. Evaluation of Flexible Tacrolimus Drug Concentration Monitoring Approach in Patients Receiving Extended-Release Once-Daily Tacrolimus Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philosophe, Benjamin; Leca, Nicolae; West-Thielke, Patricia M; Horwedel, Timothy; Culkin-Gemmell, Christine; Kistler, Kristin; Stevens, Daniel R

    2018-02-20

    The majority of United States kidney transplant patients are treated with tacrolimus, a drug effective in preventing graft rejection, but with a narrow therapeutic range, necessitating close monitoring to avoid increased risks of transplant rejection or toxicity if the tacrolimus concentration is too low or too high, respectively. The trough drug concentration tests are time sensitive; patients treated on a twice-daily basis have blood draws exactly 12 hours after their previous dose. The schedule's rigidity causes problems for both patients and health care providers. Novel once-daily tacrolimus formulations such as LCPT (an extended-release tablet by Veloxis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Cary, North Carolina) have allowed for blood draws on a once-daily basis; however, even that schedule can be restrictive. Results from tests taken either before or after that 24-hour target time may be discarded, or worse, may lead to inappropriate dose changes. Data from ASTCOFF, a phase 3B pharmacokinetic clinical trial (NCT02339246), demonstrated that the unique pharmacokinetic curve of LCPT may allow for a therapeutic monitoring window that extends for 3 hours before or after the 24-hour monitoring target. Furthermore, important tools to help clinicians interpret these levels, such as formulas to estimate the 24-hour trough level if an alternative monitoring time is used, were constructed from these data. These study results give treating clinicians access to data that allow them to safely use and monitor LCPT in their patients and expand the body of evidence surrounding differentiation and practical application of the novel LCPT tacrolimus formulation. © 2018, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  3. A dose-finding, placebo-controlled study on extended-release felodipine once daily in treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, L M; Ross, J R; Goves, J R; Lees, C T; McCullagh, A; Barnes, P; Timerick, S J; Richardson, P D

    1989-12-01

    Hypertensive patients received a beta-blocker plus placebo once daily for 4 weeks. If their diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was then 95-115 mm Hg, they were randomized to receive, in addition to the beta-blocker, placebo (n = 36), felodipine-extended release (ER) 10 mg (n = 36), or felodipine-ER 20 mg (n = 37) in a 4-week double-blind parallel-group trial. All medication was administered once daily and, when BP was measured 24 h after the last dose, felodipine-ER 10 mg reduced DBP by 14 +/- 9 mm Hg (mean +/- SD) from a mean of 103 mm Hg and felodipine-ER 20 mg reduced DBP by 18 +/- 9 mm Gg from 101 mm Hg. The reductions in DBP with both doses of felodipine were greater than reductions with placebo (5 +/- 8 mm Hg, from 102 mm Hg--both p less than 0.001). At the end of the study, 21% of patients receiving placebo had a DBP less than or equal to 90 mm Hg. In contrast, 69% of patients receiving felodipine-ER 10 mg and 82% receiving 20 mg attained this level. More than 90% of patients receiving 10 mg felodipine-ER once daily had a reduction in DBP greater than 5 mm Hg 24 h postdose. Felodipine-ER was well tolerated. Felodipine-ER once daily is an effective antihypertensive drug for patients who require therapy in addition to a beta-blocker; the tolerability in this study was good, and a starting dose greater than 10 mg once daily is not indicated.

  4. Extended-release niacin/laropiprant significantly improves lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus irrespective of baseline glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bays HE

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Harold E Bays,1 Eliot A Brinton,2 Joseph Triscari,3 Erluo Chen,3 Darbie Maccubbin,3 Alexandra A MacLean,3 Kendra L Gibson,3 Rae Ann Ruck,3 Amy O Johnson-Levonas,3 Edward A O’Neill,3 Yale B Mitchel3 1Louisville Metabolic & Atherosclerosis Research Center (L-MARC, Louisville, KY, USA; 2Utah Foundation for Biomedical Research, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Merck & Co, Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA Background: The degree of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may alter lipid levels and may alter the efficacy of lipid-modifying agents. Objective: Evaluate the lipid-modifying efficacy of extended-release niacin/laropiprant (ERN/LRPT in subgroups of patients with T2DM with better or poorer glycemic control. Methods: Post hoc analysis of clinical trial data from patients with T2DM who were randomized 4:3 to double-blind ERN/LRPT or placebo (n=796, examining the lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT in patients with glycosylated hemoglobin or fasting plasma glucose levels above and below median baseline levels. Results: At Week 12 of treatment, ERN/LRPT significantly improved low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and lipoprotein (a, compared with placebo, with equal efficacy in patients above or below median baseline glycemic control. Compared with placebo, over 36 weeks of treatment more patients treated with ERN/LRPT had worsening of their diabetes and required intensification of antihyperglycemic medication, irrespective of baseline glycemic control. Incidences of other adverse experiences were generally low in all treatment groups. Conclusion: The lipid-modifying effects of ERN/LRPT are independent of the degree of baseline glycemic control in patients with T2DM (NCT00485758. Keywords: lipid-modifying agents, hyperglycemia, LDL, HDL, triglycerides

  5. Review of levetiracetam, with a focus on the extended release formulation, as adjuvant therapy in controlling partial-onset seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol M Ulloa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Carol M Ulloa, Allen Towfigh, Joseph SafdiehDepartment of Neurology and Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED with a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. The extended release formulation of levetiracetam (Keppra XR™; UCB Pharma was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients 16 years of age and older with epilepsy. This approval is based on a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational trial. Levetiracetam XR allows for once-daily dosing, which may increase compliance and, given the relatively constant plasma concentrations, may minimize concentration-related adverse effects. Levetiracetam’s mode of action is not fully elucidated, but it has been found to target high-voltage, N-type calcium channels as well as the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A. Levetiracetam has nearly ideal pharmacokinetics. It is rapidly and almost completely absorbed after oral ingestion, is ‹10% protein-bound, demonstrates linear kinetics, is minimally metabolized through a pathway independent of the cytochrome P450 system, has no significant drug–drug interactions, and has a wide therapeutic index. The most common reported adverse events with levetiracetam XR were somnolence, irritability, dizziness, nausea, influenza, and nasopharyngitis. Levetiracetam XR provides an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures.Keywords: levetiracetam, partial-onset seizures, antiepileptic drugs

  6. Pharmaceutical Product Lead Optimization for Better In vivo Bioequivalence Performance: A case study of Diclofenac Sodium Extended Release Matrix Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahiwala, Aliasgar; Zarar, Aisha

    2018-01-01

    In order to prove the validity of a new formulation, a considerable amount of effort is required to study bioequivalence, which not only increases the burden of carrying out a number of bioequivalence studies but also eventually increases the cost of the optimization process. The aim of the present study was to develop sustained release matrix tablets containing diclofenac sodium using natural polymers and to demonstrate step by step process of product development till the prediction of in vivo marketed product equivalence of the developed product. Different batches of tablets were prepared by direct compression. In vitro drug release studies were performed as per USP. The drug release data were assessed using model-dependent, modelindependent and convolution approaches. Drug release profiles showed that extended release action were in the following order: Gum Tragacanth > Sodium Alginate > Gum Acacia. Amongst the different batches prepared, only F1 and F8 passed the USP criteria of drug release. Developed formulas were found to fit Higuchi kinetics model with Fickian (case I) diffusion-mediated release mechanism. Model- independent kinetics confirmed that total of four batches were passed depending on the similarity factors based on the comparison with the marketed Diclofenac. The results of in vivo predictive convolution model indicated that predicted AUC, Cmax and Tmax values for batch F8 were similar to that of marketed product. This study provides simple yet effective outline of pharmaceutical product development process that will minimize the formulation development trials and maximize the product success in bioequivalence studies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of an oral extended-release formulation of doxycycline hyclate containing acrylic acid and polymethacrylate in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sara Melisa Arciniegas; Olvera, Lilia Gutiérrez; Chacón, Sara del Carmen Caballero; Estrada, Dinorah Vargas

    2015-04-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics of doxycycline hyclate administered orally in the form of experimental formulations with different proportions of acrylic acid-polymethacrylate-based matrices. 30 healthy adult dogs. In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned (in groups of 10) to receive a single oral dose (20 mg/kg) of doxycycline hyclate without excipients (control) or extended-release formulations (ERFs) containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate in the following proportions: 1:0.5:0.0075 (ERF1) or 1:1:0.015 (ERF2). Serum concentrations of doxycycline were determined for pharmacokinetic analysis before and at several intervals after each treatment. Following oral administration to the study dogs, each ERF resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for 48 hours, whereas the control treatment resulted in therapeutic serum doxycycline concentrations for only 24 hours. All pharmacokinetic parameters for ERF1 and ERF2 were significantly different; however, findings for ERF1 did not differ significantly from those for the control treatment. Results indicated that both ERFs containing doxycycline, acrylic acid polymer, and polymethacrylate had an adequate pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for a time-dependent drug and a longer release time than doxycycline alone following oral administration in dogs. Given the minimum effective serum doxycycline concentration of 0.26 μg/mL, a dose interval of 48 hours can be achieved for each tested ERF. This minimum inhibitory concentration has the potential to be effective against several susceptible bacteria involved in important infections in dogs. Treatment of dogs with either ERF may have several benefits over treatment with doxycycline alone.

  8. Population pharmacokinetics of methylphenidate hydrochloride extended-release multiple-layer beads in pediatric subjects with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuscher NS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nathan S Teuscher,1 Akwete Adjei,2 Robert L Findling,3,4 Laurence L Greenhill,5 Robert J Kupper,2 Sharon Wigal6 1PK/PD Associates, Trophy Club, TX, 2Rhodes Pharmaceuticals L.P., Coventry, RI, 3Department of Psychiatric Services and Research, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, 4Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 5Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, 6AVIDA Inc., Newport Beach, CA, USA Abstract: A new multilayer-bead formulation of extended-release methylphenidate hydrochloride (MPH-MLR has been evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies in healthy adults and in Phase III efficacy/safety studies in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Using available data in healthy adults, a two-input, one-compartment, first-order elimination population pharmacokinetic model was developed using nonlinear mixed-effect modeling. The model was then extended to pediatric subjects, and was found to adequately describe plasma concentration–time data for this population. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was also developed using change from baseline in the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS-IV total scores from a pediatric Phase III trial and simulated plasma concentration–time data. During simulations for each MPH-MLR dose level (10–80 mg, increased body weight resulted in decreased maximum concentration. Additionally, as maximum concentration increased, ADHD-RS-IV total score improved (decreased. Knowledge of the relationship between dose, body weight, and clinical response following the administration of MPH-MLR in children and adolescents may be useful for clinicians selecting initial dosing of MPH-MLR. Additional study is needed to confirm these results. Keywords: population pharmacokinetics, Aptensio XR™, MPH-MLR, methylphenidate

  9. Use of Extended-Release Calcifediol to Treat Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Stages 3 and 4 Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Stuart M; Crawford, Paul W; Melnick, Joel Z; Strugnell, Stephen A; Ali, Shaukat; Mangoo-Karim, Roberto; Lee, Sungchun; Petkovich, P Martin; Bishop, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D insufficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are poorly addressed by current treatments. The present clinical studies evaluated extended-release (ER) calcifediol, a novel vitamin D prohormone repletion therapy designed to gradually correct low serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D, improve SHPT control and minimize the induction of CYP24A1 and FGF23. Two identical multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies enrolled subjects from 89 US sites. A total of 429 subjects, balanced between studies, with stage 3 or 4 CKD, SHPT and vitamin D insufficiency were randomized 2:1 to receive oral ER calcifediol (30 or 60 µg) or placebo once daily at bedtime for 26 weeks. Most subjects (354 or 83%) completed dosing, and 298 (69%) entered a subsequent open-label extension study wherein ER calcifediol was administered without interruption for another 26 weeks. ER calcifediol normalized serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations (>30 ng/ml) in >95% of per-protocol subjects and reduced plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) by at least 10% in 72%. The proportion of subjects receiving ER calcifediol who achieved iPTH reductions of ≥30% increased progressively with treatment duration, reaching 22, 40 and 50% at 12, 26 and 52 weeks, respectively. iPTH lowering with ER calcifediol was independent of CKD stage and significantly greater than with placebo. ER calcifediol had inconsequential impact on serum calcium, phosphorus, FGF23 and adverse events. Oral ER calcifediol is safe and effective in treating SHPT and vitamin D insufficiency in CKD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS® hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale ME

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Martin E Hale,1 Srinivas R Nalamachu,2 Arif Khan,3 Michael Kutch4,* 1Gold Coast Research, LLC, Weston, FL, USA; 2International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, USA; 3MedNorthwest Clinical Research Center, Bellevue, WA, USA; Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 4Applied Clinical Intelligence, LLC, Bala Cynwyd, PA, USA *Affiliation at the time this work was completed. Michael Kutch is currently affiliated with Cytel Inc, Chesterbrook, PA, USA Purpose: To describe the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets (OROS hydromorphone ER during dose conversion and titration. Patients and methods: A total of 459 opioid-tolerant adults with chronic moderate to severe low back pain participated in an open-label, 2- to 4-week conversion/titration phase of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial, conducted at 70 centers in the United States. Patients were converted to once-daily OROS hydromorphone ER at 75% of the equianalgesic dose of their prior total daily opioid dose (5:1 conversion ratio, and titrated as frequently as every 3 days to a maximum dose of 64 mg/day. The primary outcome measure was change in pain intensity numeric rating scale; additional assessments included the Patient Global Assessment and the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire scores. Safety assessments were performed at each visit and consisted of recording and monitoring all adverse events (AEs and serious AEs. Results: Mean (standard deviation final daily dose of OROS hydromorphone ER was 37.5 (17.8 mg. Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM] numeric rating scale scores decreased from 6.6 (0.1 at screening to 4.3 (0.1 at the final titration visit (mean [SEM] change, -2.3 [0.1], representing a 34.8% reduction. Mean (SEM change in Patient Global Assessment was -0.6 (0.1, and mean change (SEM in the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire was -2.8 (0.3. Patients achieving a stable dose showed greater improvement

  11. Efficacy of Guanfacine Extended Release in the Treatment of Combined and Inattentive Only Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollins, Scott H.; Wigal, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Extended-release guanfacine (GXR) is approved for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents aged 6–17 years. This post-hoc analysis further examines the effects of GXR on hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattentiveness. Method Data from two large double-blind placebo-controlled pivotal trials of GXR in the treatment of ADHD were analyzed. Using the pooled population to provide sufficient sample size and associated statistical power, the impact of GXR treatment on core ADHD symptoms was examined by comparing ADHD Rating Scale IV (ADHD-RS-IV) total scores in the overall GXR and placebo groups in subjects with each of the three ADHD subtypes. ADHD-RS-IV Hyperactivity-Impulsivity and Inattentiveness subscale scores in the overall study population by randomized dose group (vs. placebo) were also examined. Results The full analysis set included 631 subjects aged 6–17 years (GXR: n=490; placebo: n=141). Among subjects with the predominantly inattentive subtype of ADHD, differences in least squares (LS) mean reductions from baseline in ADHD-RS-IV total scores were significantly greater in GXR-treated subjects (n=127) than in placebo-treated subjects (n=38) at treatment weeks 3 through 5 and end point (p≤0.020). Among subjects with combined type ADHD, differences in LS mean ADHD-RS-IV total score reductions from baseline were significantly greater in the GXR group (n=354) than in the placebo group (n=100) at treatment weeks 1 through 5 and end point (p≤0.011). The dearth of predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type subjects (n=12) precluded analysis of this subgroup. Each randomized GXR dose group in each trial demonstrated significantly greater reductions from baseline in ADHD-RS-IV Hyperactivity-Impulsivity and Inattentiveness subscale scores than did the respective placebo group at end point (p≤0.05 for all). Conclusions The results support the use of GXR in the treatment of core ADHD symptoms

  12. The social functional outcome of being naturalistically treated with paliperidone extended-release in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakagawa R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ryoko Nakagawa,1 Takashi Ohnishi,1 Hisanori Kobayashi,1 Akihide Wakamatsu,2 Ai Tanimura,3 Kazuo Morita,3 Toshio Yamaoka,3 Hideo Usui,3 Yoshimasa Ogawa,3 Akiko Fujino,3 Kazutake Yoshizawa11Evidence Generation Department, Medical Affairs Division, 2Medical Affairs Strategy Department, Medical Affairs Division, 3Drug Safety Surveillance Department, Japan Safety and Surveillance Division, Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K., Tokyo, JapanBackground: Social functioning is an important outcome for patients with schizophrenia. To evaluate the effects of paliperidone extended-release (PAL-ER on social function, symptomatology, and safety in the routine clinical practice, we conducted a 1-year post-marketing surveillance study of PAL-ER. We also explored relationships between symptomatic improvement and socially functional outcome in patients with schizophrenia.Patients and methods: Patients with an established diagnosis of schizophrenia were allowed flexible 3–12 mg/day dosing during the surveillance. Patients were assessed on social functioning using the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS and on symptomatology using the Clinical Global Impression–Schizophrenia scale. All adverse events (AEs were also collected.Results: A total of 1,429 patients were enrolled in the surveillance study, of whom 1,405 were evaluable for safety and 1,142 were evaluable for efficacy. The treatment discontinuation rate for any reason during the observation period was 34.66%. Significant improvements were observed on both Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale and Clinical Global Impression–Schizophrenia scale during the observation period. The percentage of patients with socially functional remission (SOFAS ≥61 also increased significantly. A significant association between early improvements in positive symptoms, sex, severity of negative symptoms at baseline, and socially functional remission was observed. A total of 33.52% of patients

  13. Safety profile of dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: 5-year postmarketing experience in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Michele Jara, Thomas Aquilina, Peter Aupperle, Adrian L Rabinowicz Acorda Therapeutics, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA Background: Dalfampridine extended release tablets (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-, modified, or sustained-release fampridine outside the US, 10 mg twice daily, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in January 2010 to improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis, as determined by an increase in walking speed. Objective: To provide a descriptive analysis of reported adverse events (AEs for commercially available dalfampridine-ER from March 2010 through March 31, 2015. Methods: Five-year postmarketing data for dalfampridine-ER were available from the exposure of approximately 107,000 patients in the US (103,700 patient-years. Commonly reported AEs (≥2% of all reported AEs and serious AEs were determined. The incidence of reported seizures was determined and the events were further investigated. Results: Among the 107,000 patients exposed to dalfampridine-ER (70% female; mean age 52.1, the most common AEs were dizziness (3.7%, insomnia (3.2%, balance disorder (3%, fall (2.4%, headache (2.4%, nausea (2.1%, and urinary tract infection (2%. Other common AEs were drug ineffectiveness (5.8%, gait disturbance (4.6%, and inappropriate dosing (3.1%. Serious AEs included rare anaphylactic reactions (five cases and drug hypersensitivity reactions (eight cases. A total of 657 seizure cases were reported (6.3/1,000 patient-years; of these, 324 were medically confirmed (3.1/1,000 patient-years. Incidence of reported seizures was stable over time. Duration of treatment prior to a seizure ranged from a single dose to >4 years; 12% of the seizures occurred within a week of starting treatment. Conclusion: The 5-year US postmarketing safety data of dalfampridine-ER is consistent with the safety profile observed in clinical trials. Incidence of reported seizures remained stable over time. Since commercial availability in March 2010, a

  14. A review of flavor, aroma and color enhancement in gluten free and conventional pastries, waffles and dairy desserts with mesquite pod mesocarp flour (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquite is a nitrogen fixing tree whose pods were a major food for indigenous desert peoples. The main mesquite flour of commerce is milled from the pod mesocarp (without seeds) and contains 45% sucrose, 25% dietary fiber, 8 % protein, and 2 % fat. The limiting amino acids are methionine and cystei...

  15. Effectiveness and gastrointestinal tolerability during conversion and titration with once-daily OROS® hydromorphone extended release in opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Martin E; Nalamachu, Srinivas R; Khan, Arif; Kutch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets (OROS hydromorphone ER) during dose conversion and titration. Patients and methods A total of 459 opioid-tolerant adults with chronic moderate to severe low back pain participated in an open-label, 2- to 4-week conversion/titration phase of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal trial, conducted at 70 centers in the United States. Patients were converted to once-daily OROS hydromorphone ER at 75% of the equianalgesic dose of their prior total daily opioid dose (5:1 conversion ratio), and titrated as frequently as every 3 days to a maximum dose of 64 mg/day. The primary outcome measure was change in pain intensity numeric rating scale; additional assessments included the Patient Global Assessment and the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire scores. Safety assessments were performed at each visit and consisted of recording and monitoring all adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs. Results Mean (standard deviation) final daily dose of OROS hydromorphone ER was 37.5 (17.8) mg. Mean (standard error of the mean [SEM]) numeric rating scale scores decreased from 6.6 (0.1) at screening to 4.3 (0.1) at the final titration visit (mean [SEM] change, −2.3 [0.1], representing a 34.8% reduction). Mean (SEM) change in Patient Global Assessment was −0.6 (0.1), and mean change (SEM) in the Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire was −2.8 (0.3). Patients achieving a stable dose showed greater improvement than patients who discontinued during titration for each of these measures (P < 0.001). Almost 80% of patients achieving a stable dose (213/268) had a ≥30% reduction in pain. Commonly reported AEs were constipation (15.4%), nausea (11.9%), somnolence (8.7%), headache (7.8%), and vomiting (6.5%); 13.0% discontinued from the study due to AEs. Conclusion The majority of opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain were successfully converted to effective doses of

  16. Effect of food on early drug exposure from extended-release stimulants: results from the Concerta, Adderall XR Food Evaluation (CAFE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auiler, J F; Liu, K; Lynch, J M; Gelotte, C K

    2002-01-01

    Stimulant therapy is the mainstay of treatment for children, adolescents and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Once-daily, extended-release oral formulations offer long acting control of symptoms by modifying drug delivery and absorption. In particular, consistency in early drug exposure is important for symptom control during school or work hours. Because these once-daily formulations are usually taken in the morning, the timing of the doses with breakfast is important. This study compared the effect of a high-fat breakfast on early drug exposure from a morning dose of two extended-release stimulant formulations: the osmotic-controlled OROS tablet of methylphenidate HCI (CONCERTA) and the capsule containing extended-release beads of mixed amphetamine salts (ADDERALL XR). The study had a single-dose, open-label, randomised, four-treatment, crossover design in which healthy subjects received either 36 mg CONCERTA or 20 mg ADDERALL XR in the morning after an overnight fast or a high-fat breakfast. Serial blood samples were collected over 28h to determine plasma concentrations of methylphenidate and amphetamine. The food effect on early drug exposure and the pharmacokinetic profiles up to 8 h after dosing of the two extended-release stimulants were directly compared using partial area (AUC(p4h), AUC(p6h) and AUC(p8h)) fed/fasted ratios. Amphetamine concentrations were markedly lower when the subjects had eaten breakfast, resulting in lower early drug exposures (p food, for patients with ADHD.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of a once-daily extended-release formulation of pramipexole in healthy male volunteers: three studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenner, Peter; Könen-Bergmann, Michael; Schepers, Cornelia; Haertter, Sebastian

    2009-11-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine agonist used in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. The currently available immediate-release (IR) formulation is taken orally 3 times daily. These studies were conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties of a variety of prototypes for a once-daily extended-release (ER) formulation of pramipexole and to further characterize the prototype whose pharmacokinetics best matched those of the IR formulation. Three Phase I studies were conducted, all in healthy adult men aged food effect. In the third study, steady-state pharmacokinetics of the optimal ER formulation were assessed across a range of pramipexole doses (0.375-4.5 mg/d), including investigation of the food effect at steady state for the highest dose. Tolerability was assessed throughout all studies based on physical examinations, laboratory measurements, and adverse events (AEs). The 3 studies included 18, 15, and 39 subjects, respectively. Among the ER prototypes tested at 0.75 mg once daily in study 1, a matrix tablet had the optimal pharmacokinetic resemblance to IR pramipexole 0.25 mg TID, with a geometric mean AUC(0-24h,ss) of 17.4 ng.h/mL (vs 16.0 ng.h/mL for the IR formulation), C(max,ss) of 0.967 ng/mL (vs 1.09 ng/mL), and C(min,ss) of 0.455 ng/mL (vs 0.383 ng/mL). For single-dose ER 0.375 mg administered in the fasted state in study 2, in vivo bioavailability was predictable from in vitro dissolution data, with internal mean absolute percent prediction errors of 3.18% for AUC(0-30h) and 4.87% for C(max), and external mean absolute prediction errors of 6.61% and 3.34%, respectively, satisfying current guidelines for a level A IVIVC. For single-dose ER 0.375 mg administered in the fed state, the upper bound of the 90% CI for fed:fasted values was 119.8 for AUC(0-30h) (within the bioequivalence limits of 80%-125%) and 134.1 for C(max). At steady state in study 3 (subjects' 5th treatment day), dosing at 0.375 to 4.5 mg in the fasted state was associated with a linear

  18. Guanfacine extended release for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: efficacy following prior methylphenidate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huss M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael Huss,1 Vanja Sikirica,2 Amaia Hervas,3,4 Jeffrey H Newcorn,5 Valerie Harpin,6 Brigitte Robertson71Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz, Germany; 2Global Health Economics, Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Wayne, PA, USA; 3Child and Adolescent Mental Health Unit, University Hospital Mútua de Terressa, Barcelona, Spain; 4Developmental Disorders Unit (UETD, Hospital San Juan de Dios, Barcelona, Spain; 5Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 6Ryegate Children’s Centre, Sheffield Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, UK; 7Global Clinical Development, Shire, Wayne, PA, USAAbstract: Guanfacine extended release (GXR and atomoxetine (ATX are nonstimulant treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. As nonstimulant treatments are often used after stimulants in ADHD, GXR was assessed relative to prior stimulant treatment in a randomized controlled trial (RCT, in which ATX was included as a reference arm, and in the open-label phase of a randomized-withdrawal study (RWS. Participants were 6–17 years old with ADHD Rating Scale version IV (ADHD-RS-IV scores ≥32 and Clinical Global Impressions – Severity scores ≥4. RCT participants received dose-optimized GXR (1–7 mg/day, ATX (10–100 mg/day, or placebo for 10–13 weeks. RWS participants received dose-optimized GXR (1–7 mg/day for 13 weeks. Participants’ last stimulant medication prior to enrolment, and reasons for stopping this medication, were collected at baseline. Change from baseline ADHD-RS-IV score and the proportion of responders were assessed by prior stimulant exposure. Of 163 RCT and 296 RWS participants who had previously received stimulant treatment, 142 and 224, respectively, had received methylphenidate (MPH; due to the low number of participants and the heterogeneity of non-MPH treatments, we only report data for prior MPH treatment. The most

  19. Two-way pharmacokinetic interaction studies between saxagliptin and cytochrome P450 substrates or inhibitors: simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Chirag G Patel, Li Li, Suzette Girgis, David M Kornhauser, Ernest U Frevert, David W BoultonBristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USABackground: Many medicines, including several cholesterol-lowering agents (eg, lovastatin, simvastatin, antihypertensives (eg, diltiazem, nifedipine, verapamil, and antifungals (eg, ketoconazole are metabolized by and/or inhibit the cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A4 metabolic pathway. These types of medicines are commonly coprescribed to treat comorbidities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and the potential for drug-drug interactions of these medicines with new medicines for T2DM must be carefully evaluated.Objective: To investigate the effects of CYP3A4 substrates or inhibitors, simvastatin (substrate, diltiazem (moderate inhibitor, and ketoconazole (strong inhibitor on the pharmacokinetics and safety of saxagliptin, a CYP3A4/5 substrate; and the effects of saxagliptin on these agents in three separate studies.Methods: Healthy subjects were administered saxagliptin 10 mg or 100 mg. Simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, and ketoconazole doses of 40 mg once daily, 360 mg once daily, and 200 mg twice daily, respectively, were used to determine two-way pharmacokinetic interactions.Results: Coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole increased mean area under the concentration-time curve values (AUC of saxagliptin by 12%, 109%, and 145%, respectively, versus saxagliptin alone. Mean exposure (AUC of the CYP3A4-generated active metabolite of saxagliptin, 5-hydroxy saxagliptin, decreased with coadministration of simvastatin, diltiazem, and ketoconazole by 2%, 34%, and 88%, respectively. All adverse events were considered mild or moderate in all three studies; there were no serious adverse events or deaths.Conclusion: Saxagliptin, when coadministered with simvastatin, diltiazem extended-release, or ketoconazole, was safe and generally well tolerated in healthy subjects. Clinically

  20. A comparison of the extended-release and standard-release formulations of tacrolimus in de novo kidney transplant recipients: a 12-month outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Helen; Zheng, Rebecca; Campbell, Carolyn; Huang, Michael; Nash, Michelle M; Rapi, Lindita; Zaltzman, Jeffrey S; Prasad, G V Ramesh

    2013-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited comparative data are available on the outcomes between extended-release and standard-release tacrolimus when used de novo in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). METHODS: We identified KTRs transplanted at our institution during 2009-10 routinely prescribed extended-release tacrolimus and compared them with those transplanted during 2008-09 prescribed standard-release tacrolimus. Graft function (eGFR by MDRD-7 equation) at 12 months post-transplant (primary outcome); new-onset diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors, BK viremia incidence, acute rejection, and graft survival to 12 months (secondary outcomes) were compared by intent-to-treat analysis. Time-to-steady-state concentration and number of dose adjustments required to attain steady state were recorded. RESULTS: There were no important demographic differences between the extended-release (N = 106) and standard-release (N = 95) cohorts. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 12 months was similar (58.8 ± 17 versus 59.2 ± 18 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.307). There was no difference in new-onset diabetes (17 versus 20%, P = 0.581), BK viremia (10 versus 7%, P = 0.450), acute rejection (7 versus 16%, P = 0.067) or graft survival (97 versus 95%, P = 0.301). Time-to-steady state was similar (9.2 ± 1.1 versus 8.1 ± 4.7 days, P = 0.490) although extended-release patients required fewer adjustments to attain steady state (1.2 ± 1.7 [0-8] versus 1.7 ± 1.5 [0-7], P = 0.030) but a similar dose (7.2 ± 2.4 [2-17] versus 7 ± 2.7 [2-16] mg/day, P = 0.697). CONCLUSION: De novo KTRs prescribed extended-release or standard-release tacrolimus demonstrate similar 12-month outcomes.

  1. History of mesquite introduction in Rio Grande do Norte State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Silva dos Santos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw DC was established as a successful action of xerophilous introduction in Brazilian Northeast dry region. Its fruits are used in animal feed and the wood may be used as piles, firewood and charcoal. The species was introduced in 1942, spreading in "low areas" in Rio Grande do Norte, Paraiba, Pernambuco, Bahia and Piauí States. This article aims to elucidate how mesquite was introduced in Rio Grande do Norte State and to understand how it was spread. It was first introduced in Rio Grande do Norte State by the introduction experiments installed at São Miguel farm in the municipality of Angicos. The enthusiasm of technicians and researchers promoted the distribution of pods and seedlings on farms and cities in the state. In addition, there were government incentives to production, distribution and planting the species. This work aims to establish considerations to be used as historical basis on studies about this species and to consider aspects regarding current situation of this culture in Brazilian Northeast.

  2. Mesquite pod meal in sheep diet: intake, apparent digestibility of nutrients and nitrogen balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edileusa de Jesus do Santos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Eight Santa Ines sheep were assigned to two 4 x 4 Latin squares, to evaluate the effects of replacing elephant grass silage with different levels of mesquite pod meal (MDM (15, 30 and 45% DM on intake, apparent digestibility of dry matter (DM, organic matter (OM, crude protein (CP, ether extract (EE, acid detergent fiber (ADF, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, total carbohydrates (TC and non-fiber carbohydrates (NFC and the nitrogen balance. There was a linear increase (p < 0.05 in the intake of DM, OM, CP, ADF, NDF, NFC and TC according to the addition of MPM to the diet. The digestibility of DM, OM and CP increased (p < 0.05 with the addition of MDM. We observed a positive linear effect (p < 0.05 for the nitrogen intake. The addition of mesquite pod meal up to 45% increased the intake of DM, NDF, ADF, CP, OM, NFC and TC but reduced the digestibility of EE and NDF. MPM at 30 and 45% propitiated a positive nitrogen balance.

  3. Identifying barriers to effective management of widespread invasive alien trees: Prosopis species (mesquite) in South Africa as a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shackleton, RT

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available and in some cases improve the benefits that some invasive species can provide. This study assesses the barriers that hinder the effective management of widespread tree invasions, drawing insights from a case study of invasions of Prosopis species (mesquite...

  4. Mesquite seed density in fecal samples of Raramuri Criollo vs. Angus x Hereford cows grazing Chihuahuan Desert Rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was part of a larger project investigating breed-related differences in feeding habits of Raramuri Criollo (RC) versus Angus x Hereford (AH) cows. Seed densities in fecal samples collected in July and August 2015 were analyzed to compare presumed mesquite bean consumption of RC and AH cow...

  5. The Effect of a Novel form of Extended-Release Gabapentin on Pain and Sleep in Fibromyalgia Subjects: An Open-Label Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, James M; Hong, Kyung-Soo J; Rauck, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    We assessed the efficacy and safety of extended-release gabapentin in a 15-week, open-label, single-arm, single-center study in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Subjects with documented diagnosis of FM were allowed to participate in the study. We opened enrollment to those who have tried and failed gabapentinoids such as gabapentin or pregabalin due to side effects. Subjects with autoimmune conditions, and or taking opioids for management of their FM pain, were excluded from the study. Subjects were given an extended-release gabapentin starter pack and treated for total of 12 weeks. The primary study endpoint of pain relief was measured using Numeric Pain Rating System (NPRS) scores, and secondary study endpoints were measured with Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Patient's Global Impression of Change (PGIC), and Medical Outcome Sleep questionnaires (MOS). A total of 34 subjects were enrolled and 29 subjects completed the starter pack (85%). Patients reported significant pain relief on NPRS by end of 4 weeks (P life by end of 4 weeks on FIQ (P quality. Improvements in primary and secondary measurements were reflected in PGIC, with significant improvement in patient's impression of FM by week 8. Small sample size, geographical bias, relatively short duration of treatment, and single-arm study without control group. Extended-release gabapentin relieved FM pain symptoms and improved quality-of-life for the FM subjects studied. Subjects reported improvements in both quantity and quality of sleep. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  6. Review of extended-release formulations of Tramadol for the management of chronic non-cancer pain: focus on marketed formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilbash, Arshi; Ngô-Minh, Cường

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic non-malignant pain report impairments of physical, social, and psychological well-being. The goal of pain management should include reducing pain and improving quality of life. Patients with chronic pain require medications that are able to provide adequate pain relief, have minimum dosing intervals to maintain efficacy, and avoid breakthrough pain. Tramadol has proven efficacy and a favourable safety profile. The positive efficacy and safety profile has been demonstrated historically in numerous published clinical studies as well as from post-marketing experience. It is a World Health Organization “Step 2” opioid analgesic that has been shown to be effective, well-tolerated, and valuable, where treatment with strong opioids is not required. A number of extended release formulations of Tramadol are available in Canada and the United States. An optimal extended release Tramadol formulation would be expected to provide consistent pain control with once daily dosing, few sleep interruptions, flexible dosing schedules, and no limitation on taking with meals. Appropriate treatment options should be based on the above proposed attributes. A comparative review of available extended release Tramadol formulations shows that these medications are not equivalent in their pharmacokinetic profile and this may have implications for selecting the optimal therapy for patients with pain syndromes where Tramadol is an appropriate analgesic agent. Differences in pharmacokinetics amongst the formulations may also translate into varied clinical responses in patients. Selection of the appropriate formulation by the health care provider should therefore be based on the patient’s chronic pain condition, needs, and lifestyle. PMID:24711710

  7. Comparative steady-state pharmacokinetic study of an extended-release formulation of itopride and its immediate-release reference formulation in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Seonghae; Lee, Howard; Kim, Tae-Eun; Lee, SeungHwan; Chee, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Seonghae Yoon,1,* Howard Lee,2,* Tae-Eun Kim,1 SeungHwan Lee,1 Dong-Hyun Chee,3 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu,1 In-Jin Jang1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 2Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 3AbbVie Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study was conducted to compare the oral bioavailability of an itopride extended-release (ER...

  8. In vitro solubility, dissolution and permeability studies combined with semi-mechanistic modeling to investigate the intestinal absorption of desvenlafaxine from an immediate- and extended release formulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, F; Jarlfors, A; Larsen, F.

    2015-01-01

    Desvenlafaxine is a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class 1 (high solubility, high permeability) and biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system (BDDCS) class 3, (high solubility, poor metabolism; implying low permeability) compound. Thus the rate-limiting step...... not imply low intestinal permeability, as indicated by the BDDCS, merely low duodenal/jejunal permeability....... for desvenlafaxine absorption (i.e. intestinal dissolution or permeation) is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissolution and/or intestinal permeability rate-limit desvenlafaxine absorption from an immediate-release formulation (IRF) and Pristiq®, an extended release formulation...

  9. Mapping the spatial and temporal dynamics of the velvet mesquite with MODIS and AVIRIS: Case study at the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurivi, Jorry Zebby Ujama

    The general objective of this research is to develop a methodology that will allow mapping and quantifying shrub encroachment with remote sensing. The multitemporal properties of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) -250m, 16-day vegetation index products were combined with the hyperspectral and high spatial resolution (3.6m) computation of the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) to detect the dynamics of mesquite and grass/soil matrix at two sites of high (19.5%) and low (5.7%) mesquite cover in the Santa Rita Experimental Range (SRER). MODIS results showed separability between grassland and mesquite based on phenology. Mesquite landscapes had longer green peak starting in April through February, while the grassland only peaked during the monsoon season (July through October). AVIRIS revealed spectral separability, but high variation in the data implicated high heterogeneity in the landscape. Nonetheless, the methodology for larger data was developed in this study and combines ground, air and satellite data.

  10. The changing landscape of opioid prescribing: long-acting and extended-release opioid class-wide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudin JA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey A GudinEnglewood Hospital and Medical Center, Englewood, NJ, USAAbstract: Prescriptions for opioid analgesics to manage moderate-to-severe chronic noncancer pain have increased markedly over the last decade, as have postmarketing reports of adverse events associated with opioids. As an unintentional consequence of greater prescription opioid utilization, there has been the parallel increase in misuse, abuse, and overdose, which are serious risks associated with all opioid analgesics. In response to these concerns, the Food and Drug Administration announced the requirement for a class-wide Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS for long-acting and extended-release (ER opioid analgesics in April 2011. An understanding of the details of this REMS will be of particular importance to primary care providers. The class-wide REMS is focused on educating health care providers and patients on appropriate prescribing and safe use of ER opioids. Support from primary care will be necessary for the success of this REMS, as these clinicians are the predominant providers of care and the main prescribers of opioid analgesics for patients with chronic pain. Although currently voluntary, future policy will likely dictate that providers undergo mandatory training to continue prescribing medications within this class. This article outlines the elements of the class-wide REMS for ER opioids and clarifies the impact on primary care providers with regard to training, patient education, and clinical practice.Keywords: long-acting opioid, extended-release opioid, risk, REMS, FDA, primary care

  11. [Therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release for patients with depressive and anxiety disorders in the German outpatient setting - results of 2 observational studies including 8500 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, I-G; Dierkes, W; Volz, H-P; Loeschmann, P-A; Schmitt, A B

    2009-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of venlafaxine extended release have been investigated by two prospective observational studies including 8506 patients in the outpatient setting of office based general practitioners and specialists. The efficacy has been documented by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale and by the Hamilton depression (HAMD-21) scale. The tolerability has been assessed by the documentation of adverse events. About (2/3) of the patients were treated because of depression and about (1/3) mainly because of anxiety disorder. The patients of specialists did receive higher dosages and were more severely affected. The response rate on the CGI scale was 87.4 for the patients of general practitioners and 74.2 % for the patients of specialists. The results of the HAMD-21 scale, which has been used by specialists, showed a response rate of 71.8 and a remission rate of 56.3 %. These positive effects could be demonstrated even for the more severely and chronically affected patients. The incidence of adverse events was low in both studies and comparable to the tolerability profile of randomized studies. Importantly, the good tolerability profile was similar even for patients with concomitant cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, these results confirm the efficacy and good tolerability of venlafaxine extended release in the outpatient setting in Germany. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  12. CoMET: A Mesquite package for comparing models of continuous character evolution on phylogenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunghau Lee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuously varying traits such as body size or gene expression level evolve during the history of species or gene lineages. To test hypotheses about the evolution of such traits, the maximum likelihood (ML method is often used. Here we introduce CoMET (Continuous-character Model Evaluation and Testing, which is module for Mesquite that automates likelihood computations for nine different models of trait evolution. Due to its few restrictions on input data, CoMET is applicable to testing a wide range of character evolution hypotheses. The CoMET homepage, which links to freely available software and more detailed usage instructions, is located at http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/eemb/labs/oakley/software/comet.htm.

  13. Exploring the Potential of Mesquite Gum-Nopal Mucilage Mixtures: Physicochemical and Functional Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Camargo, Stefani; Gallardo-Rivera, Raquel; Barragán-Huerta, Blanca E; Dublán-García, Octavio; Román-Guerrero, Angélica; Pérez-Alonso, César

    2018-01-01

    In this work the physicochemical and functional properties of mesquite gum (MG) and nopal mucilage (NM) mixtures (75-25, 50-50, 25-75) were evaluated and compared with those of the individual biopolymers. MG-NM mixtures exhibited more negative zeta potential (ZP) values than those displayed by MG and NM, with 75-25 MG-NM showing the most negative value (-14.92 mV at pH = 7.0), indicative that this biopolymer mixture had the highest electrostatic stability in aqueous dispersions. Viscosity curves and strain amplitude sweep of aqueous dispersions (30% w/w) of the individual gums and their mixtures revealed that all exhibited shear thinning behavior, with NM having higher viscosity than MG, and all displaying fluid-like viscoelastic behavior where the loss modulus predominated over the storage modulus (G″>G'). Differential Scanning Calorimetry revealed that MG, NM, and MG-NM mixtures were thermally stable with decomposition peaks in a range from 303.1 to 319.6 °C. From the functional properties viewpoint, MG (98.4 ± 0.7%) had better emulsifying capacity than NM (51.9 ± 2.0%), while NM (43.0 ± 1.4%) had better foaming capacity than MG. MG-NM mixtures acquired additional functional properties (emulsifying and foaming) regarding the individual biopolymers. Therefore, MG-NM mixtures represent interesting alternatives for their application as emulsifying and foaming agents in food formulations. Mesquite gum (MG) and nopal mucilage (NM) are promising raw materials with excellent functional properties whose use has been largely neglected by the food industry. This work demonstrates MG-NM mixtures acquired additional functional properties regarding the individual biopolymers, making these mixtures multifunctional ingredients for the food industry. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Mesquite pod meal in elephant grass silages - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v35i3.12506

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Rodrigues Machado Neto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD of elephant grass silages at different growth stages (70, 90 and 110 days, with the addition (0, 5, 10 and 15%, on a fresh matter basis of mesquite pod meal. A completely randomized design (CRD was used in a factorial arrangement with four replications. PVC pipes 100 mm in diameter were used as experimental silos. After 30 days of ensilage, samples were taken from the open silos to determine chemical composition and IVDMD. The inclusion of mesquite pod meal (MPM increased (p 0.01 was detected between MPM concentrations and elephant grass cutting age for DM, CP and NDF contents in the silages. A decrease (p  

  15. A long-term, open-label safety study of single-entity hydrocodone bitartrate extended release for the treatment of moderate to severe chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Srinivas Nalamachu,1,2 Richard L Rauck,3 Martin E Hale,4 Orlando G Florete Jr,5 Cynthia Y Robinson,6 Stephen J Farr,6 1International Clinical Research Institute, Overland Park, KS, USA; 2Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA; 3Carolinas Pain Institute, Center for Clinical Research, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; 4Gold Coast Research, LLC, Weston, FL, USA; 5Institute of Pain Management, Jacksonville, FL, USA; 6Zogenix, Inc., Emeryville, CA, USA Objective: To evaluate the long-term safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of single-entity extended-release hydrocodone in opioid-experienced subjects with moderate to severe chronic pain not receiving adequate pain relief or experiencing intolerable side effects from their current opioid. Methods: This multicenter, open-label study started with a conversion/titration phase (≤6 weeks where subjects (n=638 were converted to individualized doses (range 20–300 mg of extended-release hydrocodone dosed every 12 hours, followed by a 48-week maintenance phase (n=424. The primary objective (safety and tolerability and the secondary objective (long-term efficacy as measured by change in average pain score; 0= no pain, 10= worst imaginable pain were monitored throughout the study. Results: Subjects were treated for a range of chronic pain etiologies, including osteoarthritis, low back pain, and neuropathic and musculoskeletal conditions. The mean hydrocodone equivalent dose at screening was 68.9±62.2 mg/day and increased to 139.5±81.7 mg/day at the start of the maintenance phase. Unlimited dose adjustments were permitted at the investigator's discretion during the maintenance phase, reflecting typical clinical practice. No unexpected safety issues were reported. Common adverse events during the conversion/titration and maintenance phases, respectively, were constipation (11.3% and 12.5%, nausea (10.7% and 9.9%, vomiting (4.1% and 9.7%, and somnolence (7

  16. The cost effectiveness of long-acting/extended-release antipsychotics for the treatment of schizophrenia: a systematic review of economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilla, Evanthia; McCrone, Paul

    2013-04-01

    Antipsychotic medication is the mainstay of treatment in schizophrenia. Long-acting medication has potential advantages over daily medication in improving compliance and thus reducing hospitalization and relapse rates. The high acquisition and administration costs of such formulations raise the need for pharmacoeconomic evaluation. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the available evidence on the cost effectiveness of long-acting/extended-release antipsychotic medication and critically appraise the strength of evidence reported in the studies from a methodological viewpoint. Relevant studies were identified by searching five electronic databases: PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the NHS Economic Evaluation Database and the Health Technology Assessment database (HTA). Search terms included, but were not limited to, 'long-acting injection', 'economic evaluation', 'cost-effectiveness' and 'cost-utility'. No limits were applied for publication dates and language. Full economic evaluations on long-acting/extended-release antipsychotics were eligible for inclusion. Observational studies and clinical trials were also checked for cost-effectiveness information. Conference abstracts and poster presentations on the cost effectiveness of long-acting antipsychotics were excluded. Thirty-two percent of identified studies met the selection criteria. Pertinent abstracts were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Relevant studies underwent data extraction by one reviewer and were checked by a second, with any discrepancies being clarified during consensus meetings. Eligible studies were assessed for methodological quality using the quality checklist for economic studies recommended by the NICE guideline on interventions in the treatment and management of schizophrenia. After applying the selection criteria, the final sample consisted of 28 studies. The majority of studies demonstrated that risperidone long-acting injection, relative to oral or other long

  17. Lithium carbonate as a treatment for paliperidone extended-release-induced leukopenia and neutropenia in a patient with schizoaffective disorder; a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Hiroki; Kimoto, Sohei; Harada, Izumi; Naemura, Satoshi; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2016-05-26

    Antipsychotic drug treatment can potentially lead to adverse events such as leukopenia and neutropenia. Although these events are rare, they represent serious and life-threatening hematological side effects. We present a case study of a patient with schizoaffective disorder in a 50-year-old woman. We report a case of paliperidone extended-release (ER)-induced leukopenia and neutropenia in a female patient with schizoaffective disorder. Initiating lithium carbonate treatment and decreasing the dose of valproic acid improved the observed leukopenia and neutropenia. This treatment did not influence psychotic symptoms. The combination of paliperidone ER and valproic acid induces increased paliperidone ER plasma levels. Lithium carbonate was successfully used to treat paliperidone ER-induced leukopenia and neutropenia.

  18. A Randomized Double-blind, Placebo Controlled Trial of Venlafaxine-Extended Release for Co-occurring Cannabis Dependence and Depressive Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Frances R.; Mariani, John; Brooks, Daniel J.; Pavlicova, Martina; Nunes, Edward V.; Agosti, Vito; Bisaga, Adam; Sullivan, Maria A.; Carpenter, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To evaluate whether venlafaxine-extended release (VEN-XR) is an effective treatment for cannabis dependence with concurrent depressive disorders. Design This was a randomized, 12 week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of outpatients (n = 103) with DSM-IV cannabis dependence and major depressive disorder or dysthymia. Participants received up to 375 mg VEN-XR on a fixed-flexible schedule or placebo. All patients received weekly individual cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy that primarily targeted marijuana use. Settings The trial was conducted at two university research centers in the United States. Participants One hundred and three cannabis dependent adults participated in the trial. Measurements The primary outcome measures were 1) abstinence from marijuana defined as at least two consecutive urine-confirmed abstinent weeks and 2) improvement in depressive symptoms based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Findings The proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant mood improvement [50% decrease in Hamilton Depression score from baseline] was high and did not differ between groups receiving VEN-XR (63%) and placebo (69%) (X12=0.48, p-value= 0.49). The proportion of patients achieving abstinence was low overall, but was significantly worse on VEN-XR (11.8%) compared to placebo (36.5%) (X12=7.46, p-valuemarijuana use in the placebo group (F1,179=30.49, p-valuedepressed, cannabis-dependent patients, venlafaxine-extended release does not appear to be effective at reducing depression and may lead to an increase in cannabis use. PMID:23297841

  19. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of venlafaxine-extended release for co-occurring cannabis dependence and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Frances R; Mariani, John; Brooks, Daniel J; Pavlicova, Martina; Nunes, Edward V; Agosti, Vito; Bisaga, Adam; Sullivan, Maria A; Carpenter, Kenneth M

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate whether venlafaxine-extended release (VEN-XR) is an effective treatment for cannabis dependence with concurrent depressive disorders. This was a randomized, 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of out-patients (n = 103) with DSM-IV cannabis dependence and major depressive disorder or dysthymia. Participants received up to 375 mg VEN-XR on a fixed-flexible schedule or placebo. All patients received weekly individual cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy that primarily targeted marijuana use. The trial was conducted at two university research centers in the United States. One hundred and three cannabis-dependent adults participated in the trial. The primary outcome measures were (i) abstinence from marijuana defined as at least two consecutive urine-confirmed abstinent weeks and (ii) improvement in depressive symptoms based on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The proportion of patients achieving a clinically significant mood improvement (50% decrease in Hamilton Depression score from baseline) was high and did not differ between groups receiving VEN-XR (63%) and placebo (69%) (χ1 (2)  = 0.48, P = 0.49). The proportion of patients achieving abstinence was low overall, but was significantly worse on VEN-XR (11.8%) compared to placebo (36.5%) (χ1 (2)  = 7.46, P marijuana use in the placebo group (F1,179  = 30.49, P depressed, cannabis-dependent patients, venlafaxine-extended release does not appear to be effective at reducing depression and may lead to an increase in cannabis use. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. A Simple and Improved HPLC-PDA Method for Simultaneous Estimation of Fexofenadine and Pseudoephedrine in Extended Release Tablets by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Kayesh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple RP-HPLC method has been developed for simultaneous estimation of fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine in their extended release tablet. The method was developed based on statistical design of experiments (DoE and Response Surface Methodology. Separation was achieved on double end-capped C18 column (250 mm × 4 mm, 5 μm. In this experiment, two components of mobile phase, namely, acetonitrile (% v/v and methanol (% v/v, were the factors whereas retention and resolution of the chromatographic peaks were the responses. The effects of different composition of factors on the corresponding responses were investigated. The optimum chromatographic condition for the current case was found as an isocratic mobile phase consisting of 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.8 and acetonitrile and methanol in a ratio of 50 : 36 : 14 (% v/v at a flow rate of 1 mL/min for 7 minutes. The retention of pseudoephedrine and fexofenadine was found to be 2.6 min and 4.7 min, respectively. The method was validated according to the ICH and FDA guidelines and various validation parameters were determined. Also, forced degradation studies in acid, base, oxidation, and reduction media and in thermal condition were performed to establish specificity and stability-indicating property of this method. Practical applicability of this method was checked in extended release tablets available in Bangladeshi market.

  1. Randomized, double-blind trial of guanfacine extended release in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: morning or evening administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcorn, Jeffrey H; Stein, Mark A; Childress, Ann C; Youcha, Sharon; White, Carla; Enright, Gail; Rubin, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    To examine the efficacy and tolerability of guanfacine extended release (GXR) administered in the morning or evening in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-optimization study, children 6 to 12 years of age with ADHD were randomized to receive GXR (1-4 mg/d) in the morning and placebo in the evening (GXR am), placebo in the morning and GXR in the evening (GXR pm), or twice-daily placebo. The primary efficacy measure was the ADHD Rating Scale-IV (ADHD-RS-IV). A total of 333 child participants received study drug in the following cohorts: GXR am (n = 107), GXR pm (n = 114), or placebo (n = 112). Mean (standard deviation) changes from baseline to week 8 (visit 10 or last observation carried forward) in ADHD-RS-IV total scores were significant for both GXR treatment groups combined (GXR all-active: -20.0 [12.97]) and separately (GXR am: -19.8 [12.95]; GXR pm: -20.1 [13.04]) compared with placebo (-11.0 [12.93]; p ADHD symptoms. The levels of response and tolerability observed with GXR were similar regardless of time of dosing (morning versus evening), indicating that once-daily GXR monotherapy is effective whether administered in the morning or evening. Clinical trial registration information-Tolerability and Efficacy of AM and PM Once Daily Dosing With Extended-release Guanfacine Hydrochloride in Children 6-12 With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (The ADHD Tempo Study. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of ethanol from mesquite [Prosopis juliflora (SW) D.C.] pods mash by Zymomonas mobilis in submerged fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Celiane Gomes Maia da [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Domesticas; Andrade, Samara Alvachian Cardoso; Schuler, Alexandre Ricardo Pereira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Souza, Evandro Leite de [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Nutricao; Stamford, Tania Lucia Montenegro [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Nutricao], E-mail: tlmstamford@yahoo.com.br

    2011-01-15

    Mesquite [Prosopis juliflora (SW) D.C.], a perennial tropical plant commonly found in Brazilian semi-arid region, is a viable raw material for fermentative processes because of its low cost and production of pods with high content of hydrolyzable sugars which generate many compounds, including ethanol. This study aimed to evaluate the use of mesquite pods as substrate for ethanol production by Z. mobilis UFPEDA- 205 in a submerged fermentation. The fermentation was assessed for rate of substrate yield to ethanol, rate of ethanol production and efficiency of fermentation. The very close theoretical (170 g L{sup -1}) and experimental (165 g L{sup -1}) maximum ethanol yields were achieved at 36 h of fermentation. The highest counts of Z. mobilis UFEPEDA-205 (both close to 6 Log cfu mL{sup -1}) were also noted at 36 h. Highest rates of substrate yield to ethanol (0.44 g ethanol g glucose{sup -1}), of ethanol production (4.69 g L{sup -1} h{sup -1}) and of efficiency of fermentation (86.81%) were found after 30 h. These findings suggest mesquite pods as an interesting substrate for ethanol production using submerged fermentation by Z. mobilis. (author)

  3. Aeolian responses to climate variability during the past century on Mesquite Lake Playa, Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, John W.; Breit, George N.; Buckingham, S.E.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Bogle, Rian C.; Luo, Lifeng; Goldstein, Harland L.; Vogel, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The erosion and deposition of sediments by wind from 1901 to 2013 have created large changes in surface features of Mesquite Lake playa in the Mojave Desert. The decadal scale recurrence of sand-sheet development, migration, and merging with older dunes appears related to decadal climatic changes of drought and wetness as recorded in the precipitation history of the Mojave Desert, complemented by modeled soil-moisture index values. Historical aerial photographs, repeat land photographs, and satellite images document the presence and northward migration of a mid-20th century sand sheet that formed during a severe regional drought that coincided with a multi-decadal cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The sand sheet slowly eroded during the wetter conditions of the subsequent PDO warm phase (1977–1998) due to a lack of added sediment. Sand cohesion gradually increased in the sand sheet by seasonal additions of salt and clay and by re-precipitation of gypsum, which resulted in the wind-carving of yardangs in the receding sand sheet. Smaller yardangs were aerodynamically shaped from coppice dunes with salt-clay crusts, and larger yardangs were carved along the walls and floor of trough blowouts. Evidence of a 19th century cycle of sand-sheet formation and erosion is indicated by remnants of yardangs, photographed in 1901 and 1916, that were found buried in the mid-20th century sand sheet. Three years of erosion measurements on the playa, yardangs, and sand sheets document relatively rapid wind erosion. The playa has lowered 20 to 40 cm since the mid-20th century and a shallow deflation basin has developed since 1999. Annually, 5–10 cm of surface sediment was removed from yardang flanks by a combination of wind abrasion, deflation, and mass movement. The most effective erosional processes are wind stripping of thin crusts that form on the yardang surfaces after rain events and the slumping of sediment blocks from yardang flanks. These wind

  4. Cost-effectiveness of extended release naltrexone to prevent relapse among criminal justice-involved individuals with a history of opioid use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean M; Polsky, Daniel; Lee, Joshua D; Friedmann, Peter D; Kinlock, Timothy W; Nunes, Edward V; Bonnie, Richard J; Gordon, Michael; Chen, Donna T; Boney, Tamara Y; O'Brien, Charles P

    2017-08-01

    Criminal justice-involved individuals are highly susceptible to opioid relapse and overdose-related deaths. In a recent randomized trial, we demonstrated the effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX; Vivitrol ® ) in preventing opioid relapse among criminal justice-involved US adults with a history of opioid use disorder. The cost of XR-NTX may be a significant barrier to adoption. Thus, it is important to account for improved quality of life and downstream cost-offsets. Our aims were to (1) estimate the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for XR-NTX versus treatment as usual (TAU) and evaluate it relative to generally accepted value thresholds; and (2) estimate the incremental cost per additional year of opioid abstinence. Economic evaluation of the aforementioned trial from the taxpayer perspective. Participants were randomized to 25 weeks of XR-NTX injections or TAU; follow-up occurred at 52 and 78 weeks. Five study sites in the US Northeast corridor. A total of 308 participants were randomized to XR-NTX (n = 153) or TAU (n = 155). Incremental costs relative to incremental economic and clinical effectiveness measures, QALYs and abstinent years, respectively. The 25-week cost per QALY and abstinent-year figures were $162 150 and $46 329, respectively. The 78-week figures were $76 400/QALY and $16 371/abstinent year. At 25 weeks, we can be 10% certain that XR-NTX is cost-effective at a value threshold of $100 000/QALY and 62% certain at $200 000/QALY. At 78 weeks, the cost-effectiveness probabilities are 59% at $100 000/QALY and 76% at $200 000/QALY. We can be 95% confident that the intervention would be considered 'good value' at $90 000/abstinent year at 25 weeks and $500/abstinent year at 78 weeks. While extended-release naltrexone appears to be effective in increasing both quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and abstinence, it does not appear to be cost-effective using generally accepted value

  5. Comparative steady-state pharmacokinetic study of an extended-release formulation of itopride and its immediate-release reference formulation in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seonghae Yoon,1,* Howard Lee,2,* Tae-Eun Kim,1 SeungHwan Lee,1 Dong-Hyun Chee,3 Joo-Youn Cho,1 Kyung-Sang Yu,1 In-Jin Jang1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Hospital, 2Clinical Trials Center, Seoul National University Hospital, 3AbbVie Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: This study was conducted to compare the oral bioavailability of an itopride extended-release (ER formulation with that of the reference immediate-release (IR formulation in the fasting state. The effect of food on the bioavailability of itopride ER was also assessed. Methods: A single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-sequence, crossover study was performed in 24 healthy male subjects, aged 22–48 years, who randomly received one of the following treatments for 4 days in each period: itopride 150 mg ER once daily under fasting or fed conditions, or itopride 50 mg IR three times daily in the fasting state. Steady-state pharmacokinetic parameters of itopride, including peak plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve over 24 hours after dosing (AUC0–24h, were determined by noncompartmental analysis. The geometric mean ratio of the pharmacokinetic parameters was derived using an analysis of variance model. Results: A total of 24 healthy Korean subjects participated, 23 of whom completed the study. The geometric mean ratio and its 90% confidence interval of once-daily ER itopride versus IR itopride three times a day for AUC0–24h were contained within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80–1.25 (0.94 [0.88–1.01], although Cmax was reached more slowly and was lower for itopride ER than for the IR formulation. Food delayed the time taken to reach Cmax for itopride ER, but AUC0–24h was not affected. There were no serious adverse events and both formulations were

  6. US Food and Drug Administration's Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy for extended-release and long-acting opioids: pros and cons, and a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Craig, David; Giarratano, Antonello

    2012-12-24

    Prescriptions for opioid analgesics to manage moderate-to-severe chronic non-cancer pain have increased markedly over the last decade. An unintentional consequence of greater prescription opioid utilization has been the parallel increase in misuse, abuse and overdose, which are serious risks associated with all opioid analgesics. In response to disturbing rises in prescription opioid abuse, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed the implementation of aggressive Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). While REMS could dramatically change the development, release, marketing and prescription of extended-release opioids, questions remain on how these programmes may influence prescribing practices, patient safety and ultimately patient access to these agents. The extent of the availability and misuse of prescription opioids in Europe is difficult to assess from the data currently available, due in large part to the considerable differences in prescribing patterns and regulations between countries. Balancing the availability of prescription opioids for those patients who have pain, while discouraging illicit use, is a complex challenge and requires effective efforts on many levels, particularly in Europe where policies are quite different between countries.

  7. Changes in misuse and abuse of prescription opioids following implementation of Extended-Release and Long-Acting Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher Bartelson, Becki; Le Lait, M Claire; Green, Jody L; Cepeda, M Soledad; Coplan, Paul M; Maziere, Jean-Yves; Wedin, Gregory P; Dart, Richard C

    2017-09-01

    An unintended consequence of extended-release (ER) and long-acting (LA) prescription opioids is that these formulations can be more attractive to abusers than immediate-release (IR) formulations. The US Food and Drug Administration recognized these risks and approved the ER/LA Opioid Analgesic Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (ER/LA REMS), which has a goal of reducing opioid misuse and abuse and their associated consequences. The primary objective of this analysis is to determine whether ER/LA REMS implementation was associated with decreased reports of misuse and abuse. Data from the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS(R)) System Poison Center Program were utilized. Poison center cases are assigned a reason for exposure, a medical outcome, and a level of health care received. Rates adjusted for population and drug utilization were analyzed over time. RADARS System Poison Center Program data indicate a notable decrease in ER/LA opioid rates of intentional abuse and misuse as well as major medical outcomes or hospitalizations following implementation of the ER/LA REMS. While similar decreases were observed for the IR prescription opioid group, the decreasing rate for the ER/LA opioids exceeded the decreasing rates for the IR prescription opioids and was distinctly different than that for the prescription stimulants, indicating that the ER/LA REMS program may have had an additional effect on decreases in opioid abuse and intentional misuse beyond secular trends. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study with alprazolam and extended-release alprazolam in the treatment of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecknold, J; Luthe, L; Munjack, D; Alexander, P

    1994-10-01

    This is a double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose, multicenter, 6-week study comparing regular alprazolam (compressed tablet, CT), given four times per day, and extended release alprazolam (XR), given once in the morning. The aim of the XR preparation is to offer less frequent dosing and to reduce interdose anxiety. Of the intent-to-treat group of 209 patients, 184 completed 3 weeks of medication and were evaluated according to protocol. There was a completer rate for the 6 weeks of 94% (CT), 97% (XR), and 87% (placebo). On global measures, Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety, phobia rating, and work disability measures, both active treatment groups were equally effective and significantly more efficacious than the placebo cell on endpoint MANOVA analysis. On analysis of the panic factor with endpoint data, both active treatment groups were equally effective throughout the 6-week trial and significantly more efficacious than the placebo group. Drowsiness occurred more frequently with CT alprazolam (86% of patients) than with the XR preparation (79%) or placebo (49%).

  9. Metformin extended release treatment of adolescent obesity: a 48-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 48-week follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Darrell M; Abrams, Stephanie H; Aye, Tandy; Lee, Phillip D K; Lenders, Carine; Lustig, Robert H; Osganian, Stavroula V; Feldman, Henry A

    2010-02-01

    Metformin has been proffered as a therapy for adolescent obesity, although long-term controlled studies have not been reported. To test the hypothesis that 48 weeks of daily metformin hydrochloride extended release (XR) therapy will reduce body mass index (BMI) in obese adolescents, as compared with placebo. Multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. The 6 centers of the Glaser Pediatric Research Network from October 2003 to August 2007. Obese (BMI > or = 95th percentile) adolescents (aged 13-18 years) were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 39) or placebo groups. Intervention Following a 1-month run-in period, subjects following a lifestyle intervention program were randomized 1:1 to 48 weeks' treatment with metformin hydrochloride XR, 2000 mg once daily, or an identical placebo. Subjects were monitored for an additional 48 weeks. Main Outcome Measure Change in BMI, adjusted for site, sex, race, ethnicity, and age and metformin vs placebo. After 48 weeks, mean (SE) adjusted BMI increased 0.2 (0.5) in the placebo group and decreased 0.9 (0.5) in the metformin XR group (P = .03). This difference persisted for 12 to 24 weeks after cessation of treatment. No significant effects of metformin on body composition, abdominal fat, or insulin indices were observed. Metformin XR caused a small but statistically significant decrease in BMI when added to a lifestyle intervention program. clinicaltrials.gov Identifiers: NCT00209482 and NCT00120146.

  10. Long-term tolerability of tolterodine extended release in children 5-11 years of age: results from a 12-month, open-label study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijman, Rien J M; Borgstein, Niels G; Ellsworth, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term tolerability of tolterodine extended release (ER) in children (aged 5-11 yr) with urgency urinary incontinence (UUI). METHODS: This was a multicenter, open-label extension of a 12-wk, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of tolterodine ER. Patients had UUI...... suggestive of detrusor overactivity (>/=1 diurnal incontinence episode per 24h for >/=5 of 7 d) and >/=6 voids per 24h at baseline and had completed the 12-wk double-blind study. Patients received tolterodine ER (2mg once daily) for 12 mo. The primary end points were the incidence and severity of adverse......-blind tolterodine ER, n=221; placebo, n=97). The majority of patients were white (90%), mean+/-SD age was 7.6+/-1.5 yr, and 54% were boys. Forty-nine percent of patients reported >/=1 AE during the study, similar to that observed in the preceding 12-wk study (42%). The most frequent AEs were urinary tract infection...

  11. Development and validation of an in vitro–in vivo correlation (IVIVC model for propranolol hydrochloride extended-release matrix formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinhwa Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro–in vivo correlation (IVIVC model for hydrophilic matrix extended-release (ER propranolol dosage formulations. The in vitro release characteristics of the drug were determined using USP apparatus I at 100 rpm, in a medium of varying pH (from pH 1.2 to pH 6.8. In vivo plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in male beagle dogs were obtained after administering oral, ER formulations and immediate-release (IR commercial products. The similarity factor f2 was used to compare the dissolution data. The IVIVC model was developed using pooled fraction dissolved and fraction absorbed of propranolol ER formulations, ER-F and ER-S, with different release rates. An additional formulation ER-V, with a different release rate of propranolol, was prepared for evaluating the external predictability. The results showed that the percentage prediction error (%PE values of Cmax and AUC0–∞ were 0.86% and 5.95%, respectively, for the external validation study. The observed low prediction errors for Cmax and AUC0–∞ demonstrated that the propranolol IVIVC model was valid.

  12. Evaluation of the Relative Abuse of an OROS® Extended-release Hydromorphone HCI Product: Results from three Post-market Surveillance Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen F; McNaughton, Emily C; Black, Ryan A; Cassidy, Theresa A

    2018-01-02

    Formulating prescription opioids to limit abuse remains a priority. OROS® extended-release (ER) hydromorphone HCl (EXALGO®) may have low abuse potential. Three post-marketing studies of the relative abuse liability of OROS hydromorphone ER were conducted. Estimates of abuse, unadjusted and adjusted for prescription volume, were generated for OROS hydromorphone ER and comparators from Q2 2010 through Q2 2014 for a high-risk, substance abuse treatment population and the general population using poison control center data. Comparators were selected for compound, market penetration, and route of administration (ROA) profile. ROA comparisons were made among the substance abuse treatment population. Internet discussion was examined to determine abusers' interest in and desire for the OROS formulation. Examination of abuse prevalence among adults within substance abuse treatment, intentional poison exposures and Internet discussion levels generally support the hypothesis that OROS hydromorphone ER may have lower abuse potential than many other opioid products. OROS hydromorphone ER also appears to be abused less often by alternate ROAs (e.g., snorting and injection). Lower levels of online discussion were observed along with relatively low endorsement for abuse. Abuse of OROS hydromorphone ER was observed in high-risk substance abuse and general population samples but at a very low relative prevalence. Evidence suggests it may be less often abused by alternate ROAs than some comparators. Online data did not find evidence of high levels of desire for OROS hydromorphone ER by recreational abusers. Continued monitoring of this product's abuse liability is warranted.

  13. Low-threshold extended-release naltrexone for high utilizers of public services with severe alcohol use disorder: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bernardin, Shannon; Rowe, Chris; Behar, Emily; Geier, Michelle; Washington, Stuart; Santos, Glenn-Milo; Euren, Jason; Martin, Judith; Gleghorn, Alice; Coffin, Phillip O

    2018-02-01

    Extended-release naltrexone (XRNTX) is an effective treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD). We sought to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of XRNTX delivered as a stand-alone service to persons with severe AUD who are high utilizers of multiple urgent and emergency medical services (HUMS). Of 15 HUMS persons with severe AUD selected based on chart review, 11 agreed to participate. Participants received a mean of 4.5 injections (range 2-7). Modest benefits from XRNTX were observed in terms of patients' Urge-to-Drink Score and the costs of emergency medical services utilized. Though limited by a small sample size, costs including client utilization and study related expenses during the post-enrollment period were less than client utilization costs in the pre-enrollment period. We also observed non-significant improvements in the number of drinking days, but no change in quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D. Eighty-eight percent of participants perceived XRNTX as helping with their drinking. Findings need to be replicated in a larger study, however if replicated, the cost savings could be substantial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Add-on-Statin Extended Release Nicotinic Acid/Laropiprant but Not the Switch to High-Dose Rosuvastatin Lowers Blood Pressure: An Open-Label Randomized Study

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    Anastazia Kei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nicotinic acid (NA and statins have been associated with reductions in blood pressure (BP. Patients and Methods. We recruited 68 normotensive and hypertensive dyslipidemic patients who were treated with a conventional statin dose and had not achieved lipid targets. Patients were randomized to switch to high-dose rosuvastatin (40 mg/day or to add-on current statin treatment with extended release (ER NA/laropiprant (1000/20 mg/day for the first 4 weeks followed by 2000/40 mg/day for the next 8 weeks for 3 months. Results. Switching to rosuvastatin 40 mg/day was not associated with significant BP alterations. In contrast, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to current statin treatment resulted in a 7% reduction of systolic BP (from 134±12 to 125±10 mmHg, <.001 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group and a 5% reduction of diastolic BP (from 81±9 to 77±6 mmHg, =.009 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group. These reductions were significant only in the subgroup of hypertensives and were independent of the hypolipidemic effects of ER-NA/laropiprant. Conclusions. Contrary to the switch to high-dose rosuvastatin, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to statin treatment was associated with significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic BP.

  15. Analgesic Efficacy of a New Immediate-Release/Extended-Release Formulation of Ibuprofen: Results From Single- and Multiple-Dose Postsurgical Dental Pain Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Steven; Paluch, Ed; Jayawardena, Shyamalie; Daniels, Stephen; Meeves, Suzanne

    2017-05-01

    Analgesic effects of ibuprofen immediate-release/extended-release (IR/ER) 600-mg tablets were evaluated in 2 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dental pain studies. Patients 16-40 years old with moderate-severe pain following third-molar extraction received single-dose ibuprofen 600 mg IR/ER (formulation A or B), naproxen sodium 220 mg, or placebo (2:2:2:1; study 1) or 4 doses of ibuprofen 600 mg IR/ER (formulation A) or placebo (1:1; study 2). In study 1 (n = 196), mean (standard deviation [SD]) time-weighted sum of pain intensity difference scores for placebo, ibuprofen IR/ER A, ibuprofen IR/ER B, and naproxen, respectively, were 0.05 (9.2), 16.87 (9.4), 17.34 (10.5), and 12.66 (10.0) over 0-12 hours and -0.03 (4.1), 6.57 (4.4), 7.14 (5.2), and 5.14 (5.0) over 8-12 hours (all P ibuprofen IR/ER, respectively (P ibuprofen. Gastrointestinal adverse events predominated with placebo both after study medication administration and after rescue medication use, if applicable. Ibuprofen 600 mg IR/ER provided safe and effective analgesia after single and multiple doses. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Costs, benefits and management options for an invasive alien tree species: the case of mesquite in the Northern Cape, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wise, RM

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available and management options for an invasive alien tree species: The case of mesquite in the Northern Cape, South Africa R.M. Wise1?, B.W. van Wilgen2 and D.C. Le Maitre2 1 CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, GPO Box 284, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia . 2 Centre for Invasion... determined the net economic impact of mesquite in arid parts of South Africa today and for a range of plausible future scenarios, and identified the pivotal factors driving these outcomes. Our assessment was based on a thorough review of the beneficial...

  17. Green leaf volatiles and oxygenated metabolite emission bursts from mesquite branches following light-dark transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, K; Barron-Gafford, G A; Norman, J P; Abrell, L; Monson, R K; Meyers, K T; Pavao-Zuckerman, M; Dontsova, K; Kleist, E; Werner, C; Huxman, T E

    2012-09-01

    Green leaf volatiles (GLVs) are a diverse group of fatty acid-derived compounds emitted by all plants and are involved in a wide variety of developmental and stress-related biological functions. Recently, GLV emission bursts from leaves were reported following light-dark transitions and hypothesized to be related to the stress response while acetaldehyde bursts were hypothesized to be due to the 'pyruvate overflow' mechanism. In this study, branch emissions of GLVs and a group of oxygenated metabolites (acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetic acid, and acetone) derived from the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) bypass pathway were quantified from mesquite plants following light-dark transitions using a coupled GC-MS, PTR-MS, and photosynthesis system. Within the first minute after darkening following a light period, large emission bursts of both C(5) and C(6) GLVs dominated by (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate together with the PDH bypass metabolites are reported for the first time. We found that branches exposed to CO(2)-free air lacked significant GLV and PDH bypass bursts while O(2)-free atmospheres eliminated the GLV burst but stimulated the PDH bypass burst. A positive relationship was observed between photosynthetic activity prior to darkening and the magnitude of the GLV and PDH bursts. Photosynthesis under (13)CO(2) resulted in bursts with extensive labeling of acetaldehyde, ethanol, and the acetate but not the C(6)-alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate. Our observations are consistent with (1) the "pyruvate overflow" mechanism with a fast turnover time (3 h) responsible for the C(6) alcohol moiety of (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl acetate via the 13-lipoxygenase pathway. We conclude that our non-invasive method may provide a new valuable in vivo tool for studies of acetyl-CoA and fatty acid metabolism in plants at a variety of spatial scales.

  18. Effects of alkaloid extracts of mesquite pod on the products of in vitro rumen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Pereira, Taiala Cristina; Pereira, Mara Lúcia Albuquerque; Moreira, Jeruzia Vitória; Azevêdo, José Augusto Gomes; Batista, Ronan; de Paula, Vanderlúcia Fonseca; Oliveira, Brena Santos; de Jesus Dos Santos, Edileusa

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of alkaloid extracts of Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) D.C. pods obtained by two extraction methods as compared with sodium monensin on the gas production kinetic, mitigation of methane, and rumen fermentation products using wheat bran or Tifton 85 hay as substrates, by the semi-automatic in vitro gas production technique. A completely randomized design was adopted, and two natural additives were tested made from mesquite pod (alkaloid extract I and alkaloid extract II) at three levels (3.9, 7.9, and 12 μg), sodium monensin 5 μM (positive control), and no inclusion of additives (negative control). The volume of gases produced by the degradation of the fibrous fraction of wheat bran was influenced by the concentration of the extract I added to the medium, and the amounts of 7.9 and 12 μg were equal to monensin at the lowest value. The degradation rate of the fibrous carbohydrates with additive extract I at 12 μg was lower in relation to monensin. When Tifton 85 hay was utilized, alkaloid extract I provided a shorter colonization time as compared with monensin at the added amounts of 7.9 and 12 μg and higher production of gases from the fibrous fraction but without interfering with the total volume of gases produced during 96 h of fermentation of carbohydrates. In the periods of 12 and 24 h of incubation, utilizing alkaloid extract I, the mean values of methane production with wheat bran and Tifton 85 hay were lower than monensin (p < 0.05) when the respective amounts of 7.9 and 12 μg were added. Alkaloid extract I has similar potential to sodium in reducing production of total gases, methane, and the acetate/propionate ratio.

  19. Evaluation of the Microbiological Efficacy of a Single 2-Gram Dose of Extended-Release Azithromycin by Population Pharmacokinetics and Simulation in Japanese Patients with Gonococcal Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Midori; Ito, Shin; Matsumaru, Naoki; Nakamura, Sakiko; Nagase, Izumi; Takahashi, Hikari; Ohno, Yuta; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Miho; Tsukamoto, Katsura; Itoh, Yoshinori; Deguchi, Takashi; Kitaichi, Kiyoyuki

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between the pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters of a single 2-g dose of extended-release formulation of azithromycin (AZM-SR) and its microbiological efficacy against gonococcal urethritis. Fifty male patients with gonococcal urethritis were enrolled in this study. In 36 patients, the plasma AZM concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, the AZM MIC values for the Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates were determined, and the microbiological outcomes were assessed. AZM-SR monotherapy eradicated N. gonorrhoeae in 30 (83%) of the 36 patients. AZM MICs ranged from 0.03 to 2 mg/liter. The mean value of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC), estimated by population PK analysis using a two-compartment model, was 20.8 mg · h/liter. Logistic regression analysis showed that the PK/PD target value required to predict an N. gonorrhoeae eradication rate of ≥95% was a calculated AUC/MIC of ≥59.5. The AUC/MIC value was significantly higher in patients who achieved microbiological cure than in patients who achieved microbiological failure. Monte Carlo simulation using this MIC distribution revealed that the probability that AZM-SR monotherapy would produce an AUC/MIC exceeding the AUC/MIC target of 59.5 was 47%. Furthermore, the MIC distribution for strains isolated in this study was mostly consistent with that for strains currently circulating in Japan. In conclusion, in Japan, AZM-SR monotherapy may not be effective against gonococcal urethritis. Therefore, use of a single 2-g dose of AZM-SR either with or without other antibiotics could be an option to treat gonococcal urethritis if patients are allergic to ceftriaxone and spectinomycin or are diagnosed to be infected with an AZM-sensitive strain. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Managing severe pain and abuse potential: the potential impact of a new abuse-deterrent formulation oxycodone/naltrexone extended-release product

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    Pergolizzi, J

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph V Pergolizzi, Jr,1 Robert Taylor Jr,1 Jo Ann LeQuang,1 Robert B Raffa2,3 On behalf of the NEMA Research Group 1NEMA Research Inc., Naples, FL, USA; 2University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ, USA; 3Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Proper management of severe pain represents one of the most challenging clinical dilemmas. Two equally important goals must be attained: the humanitarian/medical goal to relieve suffering and the societal/legal goal to not contribute to the drug abuse problem. This is an age-old problem, and the prevailing emphasis placed on one or the other goal has resulted in pendulum swings that have resulted in either undertreatment of pain or the current epidemic of misuse and abuse. In an effort to provide efficacious strong pain relievers (opioids that are more difficult to abuse by the most dangerous routes of administration, pharmaceutical companies are developing products in which the opioid is manufactured in a formulation that is designed to be tamper resistant. Such a product is known as an abuse-deterrent formulation (ADF. ADF opioid products are designed to deter or resist abuse by making it difficult to tamper with the product and extracting the opioid for inhalation or injection. To date, less than a dozen opioid formulations have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to carry specific ADF labeling, but this number will likely increase in the coming years. Most of these products are extended-release formulations. Keywords: oxycodone/naltrexone, abuse-deterrent formulation, abuse-deterrent opioid, oxycodone, abuse liability

  1. Switch from Immediate-release Pramipexole to Extended-release Pramipexole: The Safety and Efficacy Characteristics of Sixty-eight Patients

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    Müge Kuzu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of switching from immediate-release pramipexole (pex to extended-release pramipexole (pex-ER. Materials and Methods: Pex-ER became available in Turkey about a year ago, since then we documented satisfactory information on patients (26 women; 38% who were switched from pex to pex-ER. We recorded pre- and post-switch pex and levodopa, equivalent doses of other anti-parkinsonian medication, and analyzed the frequency and nature of reported adverse effects. Results: The mean age of the patients was 63.3 years (range, 44-88 years, and the mean disease duration was 7.1 years (range, 1-27 years. The other drugs were levodopa (57 patients, 82.6%, entacapone (24 patients, 34.58%, rasagiline (20 patients, 29%, amantadine (18 patients, 26.1%, and apomorphine (six patients, 8.7%. Switch from pex to pex-ER was uneventful in 62 (91.2% patients. Adverse events were reported in six (8.8% patients: ankle swelling (two patients, nausea (one patient, dyskinesia (one patient, hypersexuality (one patient, and psychosis (one patient. Problems resolved with further medication change in two patients. Four patients preferred to return to pex. Conclusion: The great majority of patients (91.2% switched from three times daily pex to once daily pex-ER uneventfully. A slight increase in pex daily dose, which was tailored according to patients’ symptomatic needs, resulted in an increase in post-switch levodopa equivalent doses. Our experience is compatible with previously reported studies.

  2. Effect of Concomitant Medications on the Safety and Efficacy of Extended-Release Carbidopa-Levodopa (IPX066) in Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease: A Post Hoc Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWitt, Peter A; Verhagen Metman, Leo; Rubens, Robert; Khanna, Sarita; Kell, Sherron; Gupta, Suneel

    Extended-release (ER) carbidopa-levodopa (CD-LD) (IPX066/RYTARY/NUMIENT) produces improvements in "off" time, "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia, and Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale scores compared with immediate-release (IR) CD-LD or IR CD-LD plus entacapone (CLE). Post hoc analyses of 2 ER CD-LD phase 3 trials evaluated whether the efficacy and safety of ER CD-LD relative to the respective active comparators were altered by concomitant medications (dopaminergic agonists, monoamine oxidase B [MAO-B] inhibitors, or amantadine). ADVANCE-PD (n = 393) assessed safety and efficacy of ER CD-LD versus IR CD-LD. ASCEND-PD (n = 91) evaluated ER CD-LD versus CLE. In both studies, IR- and CLE-experienced patients underwent a 6-week, open-label dose-conversion period to ER CD-LD prior to randomization. For analysis, the randomized population was divided into 3 subgroups: dopaminergic agonists, rasagiline or selegiline, and amantadine. For each subgroup, changes from baseline in PD diary measures ("off" time and "on" time with and without troublesome dyskinesia), Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale Parts II + III scores, and adverse events were analyzed, comparing ER CD-LD with the active comparator. Concomitant dopaminergic agonist or MAO-B inhibitor use did not diminish the efficacy (improvement in "off" time and "on" time without troublesome dyskinesia) of ER CD-LD compared with IR CD-LD or CLE, whereas the improvement with concomitant amantadine failed to reach significance. Safety and tolerability were similar among the subgroups, and ER CD-LD did not increase troublesome dyskinesia. For patients on oral LD regimens and taking a dopaminergic agonist, and/or a MAO-B inhibitor, changing from an IR to an ER CD-LD formulation provides approximately an additional hour of "good" on time.

  3. Costs and effects of paliperidone extended release compared with alternative oral antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia in Greece: a cost effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geitona, Maria; Kousoulakou, Hara; Ollandezos, Markos; Athanasakis, Kostas; Papanicolaou, Sotiria; Kyriopoulos, Ioannis

    2008-08-28

    To compare the costs and effects of paliperidone extended release (ER), a new pharmaceutical treatment for the management of schizophrenia, with the most frequently prescribed oral treatments in Greece (namely risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and ziprasidone) over a 1-year time period. A decision tree was developed and tailored to the specific circumstances of the Greek healthcare system. Therapeutic effectiveness was defined as the annual number of stable days and the clinical data was collected from international clinical trials and published sources. The study population was patients who suffer from schizophrenia with acute exacerbation. During a consensus panel of 10 psychiatrists and 6 health economists, data were collected on the clinical practice and medical resource utilisation. Unit costs were derived from public sources and official reimbursement tariffs. For the comparators official retail prices were used. Since a price had not yet been granted for paliperidone ER at the time of the study, the conservative assumption of including the average of the highest targeted European prices was used, overestimating the price of paliperidone ER in Greece. The study was conducted from the perspective of the National Healthcare System. The data indicate that paliperidone ER might offer an increased number of stable days (272.5 compared to 272.2 for olanzapine, 265.5 f risperidone, 260.7 for quetiapine, 260.5 for ziprasidone and 258.6 for aripiprazole) with a lower cost compared to the other therapies examined (euro 7,030 compared to euro 7,034 for olanzapine, euro 7,082 for risperidone, euro 8,321 for quetiapine, euro 7,713 for ziprasidone and euro 7,807 for aripiprazole). During the sensitivity analysis, a +/- 10% change in the duration and frequency of relapses and the economic parameters did not lead to significant changes in the results. Treatment with paliperidone ER can lead to lower total cost and higher number of stable days in most of the

  4. Evaluation of sleep profile in schizophrenia patients treated with extended-release paliperidone: an open-label prospective study in Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongsakon R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ronnachai Kongsakon,1 Nuntika Thavichachart,2 Ka Fai Chung,3 Leslie Lim,4 Beverly Azucena,5 Elizabeth Rondain,6 Benson Go,7 Fe Costales,8 Osot Nerapusee9 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Medicine, Division of Psychiatry, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Psychiatry, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore; 5National Center for Mental Health, Mandaluyong, Philippines; 6Makati Medical Center, Makati, Philippines; 7Northern Mindanao Medical Center, Cagayan De Oro, Misamis Oriental, Philippines; 8Perpetual Succour Hospital, Cebu, Philippines; 9Medical Affairs, Janssen‑Cilag, Bangkok, Thailand Objective: To evaluate the effect of 6 months of treatment with paliperidone extended-release (ER tablets on the sleep profile of patients with schizophrenia.Methods: A total of 984 patients meeting the The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia who switched their antipsychotic to paliperidone ER were recruited from 61 sites in five countries in Southeast Asia. We recorded patient demographics and assessed sleep quality and daytime drowsiness using visual analog scales.Results: Approximately 70% of patients completed the 6-month study. After the use of paliperidone ER, patients reported significantly better sleep quality (76.44 vs 65.48; p<0.001 and less daytime drowsiness compared with their baseline value (23.18 vs 34.22; p<0.001. Factors predicting sleep profile improvement were completion of the study and higher baseline Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores.Conclusion: Paliperidone ER can help schizophrenia patients to improve sleep quality and reduce daytime drowsiness; this was seen especially in the patients who completed the 6-month

  5. Post-marketing experience with nevirapine extended release (XR) tablets: effectiveness and tolerability in a population-based cohort in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepik, Katherine J; Yip, Benita; McGovern, Rachel A; Ding, Erin; Nohpal, Adriana; Watson, Birgit E; Toy, Junine; Akagi, Linda; Harrigan, P Richard; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio S G; Barrios, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Nevirapine 400 mg extended release tablets (nevirapine-XR) are a once-daily alternative to nevirapine 200 mg immediate release tablets (nevirapine-IR). Study objectives were to describe the effectiveness and tolerability of nevirapine-XR in clinical practice and, for patients who switched from once daily 2×200 mg nevirapine-IR to nevirapine-XR, compare virological suppression and plasma nevirapine concentrations during each treatment period. HIV-1-infected adults entered the study cohort if they initiated nevirapine-XR in British Columbia (BC) Canada between 1 April 2012 and 30 September 2012 and were followed until 30 September 2013. Demographic and clinical variables were abstracted from the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS databases. Patients who switched from once daily nevirapine-IR to nevirapine-XR were monitored for 6 months pre- and post-switch with comparison of virological suppression (McNeamer's test) and median random plasma nevirapine concentrations (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test) in each period. The 536 nevirapine-XR-treated patients were 96% male, median (IQR) age 49.9 (44.0-56.9) years. Median follow-up was 15.6 (14.7-16.5) months, with 474/536 (88%) maintaining virological suppression. Emergent drug resistance developed in 5/536 (1%), adverse drug reactions in 17/536 (3%) and, although 31/536 (6%) reported 'whole' tablets in their stools, this was not associated with adverse outcomes. Among the 305 patients who switched from nevirapine-IR to nevirapine-XR, median (IQR) random plasma nevirapine concentration was higher during nevirapine-IR 5,000 (3,690-6,090) ng/ml than nevirapine-XR 3,930 (3,050-5,150) ng/ml (Pmarketing study affirms the effectiveness and tolerability of nevirapine-XR as an alternative to nevirapine-IR in adults.

  6. Conversion From Twice-Daily Tacrolimus Capsules to Once-Daily Extended-Release Tacrolimus (LCPT): A Phase 2 Trial of Stable Renal Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, A. Osama; Alloway, Rita R.; Bodziak, Kenneth; Kaplan, Bruce; Bunnapradist, Suphamai

    2013-01-01

    Background LCP-Tacro is an extended-release formulation of tacrolimus designed for once-daily dosing. Phase 1 studies demonstrated greater bioavailability to twice-daily tacrolimus capsules and no new safety concerns. Methods In this phase 2 study, adult stable kidney transplant patients on tacrolimus capsules (Prograf) twice-daily were converted to tacrolimus tablets (LCP-Tacro) once-daily; patients continued on LCP-Tacro once-daily for days 8 to 21; trough levels were to be maintained between 5 and 15 ng/mL; 24-hr pharmacokinetic assessments were done on days 7 (baseline pre-switch), 14, and 21. Results Forty-seven patients completed LCP-Tacro dosing per protocol. The mean conversion ratio was 0.71. Pharmacokinetic data demonstrated consistent exposure (AUC) at the lower conversion dose. Cmax (P=0.0001), Cmax/Cmin ratio (P<0.001), percent fluctuation (P<0.0001), and swing (P=0.0004) were significantly lower and Tmax significantly (P<0.001) longer for LCP-Tacro versus Prograf. AUC24 and Cmin correlation coefficients after 7 and 14 days of therapy were 0.86 or more, demonstrating a robust correlation between LCP-Tacro tacrolimus exposure and trough levels. There were three serious adverse events; none were related to study drug and all were resolved. Conclusions Stable kidney transplant patients can be safely converted from Prograf twice-daily to LCP-Tacro. The greater bioavailability of LCP-Tacro allows for once-daily dosing and similar (AUC) exposure at a dose approximately 30% less than the total daily dose of Prograf. LCP-Tacro displays flatter kinetics characterized by significantly lower peak-trough fluctuations. PMID:23715050

  7. Comparative steady-state pharmacokinetic study of an extended-release formulation of itopride and its immediate-release reference formulation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seonghae; Lee, Howard; Kim, Tae-Eun; Lee, SeungHwan; Chee, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Joo-Youn; Yu, Kyung-Sang; Jang, In-Jin

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the oral bioavailability of an itopride extended-release (ER) formulation with that of the reference immediate-release (IR) formulation in the fasting state. The effect of food on the bioavailability of itopride ER was also assessed. A single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, three-treatment, three-sequence, crossover study was performed in 24 healthy male subjects, aged 22-48 years, who randomly received one of the following treatments for 4 days in each period: itopride 150 mg ER once daily under fasting or fed conditions, or itopride 50 mg IR three times daily in the fasting state. Steady-state pharmacokinetic parameters of itopride, including peak plasma concentration (Cmax) and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve over 24 hours after dosing (AUC(0-24h)), were determined by noncompartmental analysis. The geometric mean ratio of the pharmacokinetic parameters was derived using an analysis of variance model. A total of 24 healthy Korean subjects participated, 23 of whom completed the study. The geometric mean ratio and its 90% confidence interval of once-daily ER itopride versus IR itopride three times a day for AUC(0-24h) were contained within the conventional bioequivalence range of 0.80-1.25 (0.94 [0.88-1.01]), although Cmax was reached more slowly and was lower for itopride ER than for the IR formulation. Food delayed the time taken to reach Cmax for itopride ER, but AUC(0-24h) was not affected. There were no serious adverse events and both formulations were generally well tolerated. At steady state, once-daily itopride ER at 150 mg has a bioavailability comparable with that of itopride IR at 50 mg given three times a day under fasting conditions. Food delayed the absorption of itopride ER, with no marked change in its oral bioavailability.

  8. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to an FDA approved extended release formulation of naltrexone in opioid-dependent adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone provides excellent opioid blockade, but its clinical utility is limited because opioid-dependent patients typically refuse it. An injectable suspension of naltrexone for extended release (XR-NTX) was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of opioid dependence. XR-NTX treatment may require concurrent behavioral intervention to maximize adherence and effectiveness, thus we sought to evaluate employment-based reinforcement as a method of improving adherence to XR-NTX in opiate dependent adults. Opioid-dependent adults (n=38) were detoxified and inducted onto oral naltrexone, then randomly assigned to contingency or prescription conditions. Participants received up to six doses of XR-NTX at four-week intervals. All participants could earn vouchers for attendance and performance at a therapeutic workplace. Contingency participants were required to accept XR-NTX injections to access the workplace and earn vouchers. Prescription participants could earn vouchers independent of their acceptance of XR-NTX injections. Contingency participants accepted significantly more naltrexone injections than prescription participants (87% versus 52%, p=.002), and were more likely to accept all injections (74% versus 26%, p=.004). Participants in the two conditions provided similar percentages of samples negative for opiates (72% versus 65%) and for cocaine (58% versus 54%). Opiate positivity was significantly more likely when samples were also cocaine positive, independent of naltrexone blockade (p=.002). Long-term adherence to XR-NTX in unemployed opiate dependent adults is low under usual care conditions. Employment-based reinforcement can maintain adherence to XR-NTX. Ongoing cocaine use appears to interfere with the clinical effectiveness of XR-NTX on opiate use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety and tolerability of extended-release niacin-laropiprant: Pooled analyses for 11,310 patients in 12 controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, James; Bays, Harold; Gleim, Gilbert; Mitchel, Yale; Kuznetsova, Olga; Sapre, Aditi; Sirah, Waheeda; Maccubbin, Darbie

    2015-01-01

    The Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events (HPS2-THRIVE) showed that adding extended-release niacin-laropiprant (ERN-LRPT) to statin provided no incremental cardiovascular benefit vs placebo (PBO). ERN-LRPT was also associated with an excess of serious adverse experiences (AEs), some of which were unexpected (infections and bleeding). These findings led to the withdrawal of ERN-LRPT from all markets. We examined the safety profile of ERN-LRPT vs the comparators ERN alone and statins in the ERN-LRPT development program to assess whether similar safety signals were observed to those seen in HPS-THRIVE and whether these might be attributed to ERN or LRPT. Postrandomization safety data from 12 clinical studies, 12 to 52 weeks in duration and involving 11,310 patients, were analyzed across 3 treatments: (1) ERN-LRPT; (2) ERN-NSP (ERN, Merck & Co, Inc or Niaspan [NSP], Abbott Laboratories); and (3) statin-PBO (statin or PBO). The safety profiles of ERN-LRPT and ERN-NSP were similar, except for less flushing with ERN-LRPT. Nonflushing AEs reported more frequently with ERN-LRPT or ERN-NSP than with statin-PBO were mostly nonserious and typical of niacin (nausea, diarrhea, and increased blood glucose). There was no evidence for an increased risk of serious AEs related to diabetes, muscle, infection, or bleeding. Pooled data from 11,310 patients revealed that, except for reduced flushing, the safety profile of ERN-LRPT was similar to that of ERN-NSP; LRPT did not appear to adversely affect the side-effect profile of ERN. The inability to replicate the unexpected AE findings in HPS2-THRIVE could be because of the smaller sample size and substantially shorter duration of these studies. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extended-Release Once-Daily Formulation of Tofacitinib: Evaluation of Pharmacokinetics Compared With Immediate-Release Tofacitinib and Impact of Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Manisha; Wang, Rong; Fletcher, Tracey; Alvey, Christine; Kushner, Joseph; Stock, Thomas C

    2016-11-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. An extended-release (XR) formulation has been designed to provide a once-daily (QD) dosing option to patients to achieve comparable pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters to the twice-daily immediate-release (IR) formulation. We conducted 2 randomized, open-label, phase 1 studies in healthy volunteers. Study A characterized single-dose and steady-state PK of tofacitinib XR 11 mg QD and intended to demonstrate equivalence of exposure under single-dose and steady-state conditions to tofacitinib IR 5 mg twice daily. Study B assessed the effect of a high-fat meal on the bioavailability of tofacitinib from the XR formulation. Safety and tolerability were monitored in both studies. In study A (N = 24), the XR and IR formulations achieved time to maximum plasma concentration at 4 hours and 0.5 hours postdose, respectively; terminal half-life was 5.9 hours and 3.2 hours, respectively. Area under plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (C max ) after single- and multiple-dose administration were equivalent between the XR and IR formulations. In study B (N = 24), no difference in AUC was observed for fed vs fasted conditions. C max increased by 27% under the fed state. On repeat administration, negligible accumulation (Tofacitinib administration as an XR or IR formulation was generally well tolerated in these studies. © 2016, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Long-acting injectable paliperidone palmitate versus oral paliperidone extended release: a comparative analysis from two placebo-controlled relapse prevention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Michael; Fu, Dong-Jing; Levitan, Bennett; Gopal, Srihari; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Alphs, Larry

    2013-07-11

    Increasing availability and use of long-acting injectable antipsychotics have generated a need to compare these formulations with their oral equivalents; however, a paucity of relevant data is available. This post hoc comparison of the long-term efficacy, safety and tolerability of maintenance treatment with paliperidone palmitate (PP) versus oral paliperidone extended release (ER) used data from two similarly designed, randomised, double-blind (DB), placebo-controlled schizophrenia relapse prevention trials. Assessments included measures of time to relapse, symptom changes/functioning and treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Time to relapse between treatment groups was evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards model. Between-group differences for continuous variables for change scores during the DB phase were assessed using analysis of co-variance models. Categorical variables were evaluated using Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. No adjustment was made for multiplicity. Approximately 45% of enrolled subjects in both trials were stabilised and randomised to the DB relapse prevention phase. Risk of relapse was higher in subjects treated with paliperidone ER than in those treated with PP [paliperidone ER/PP hazard ratio (HR), 2.52; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.46-4.35; p 70, both approximately 58.5%; p = 1.000] compared with a 10.9% decrease for paliperidone ER (58.5% vs 47.6%, respectively; p = 0.048). The least squares mean change for Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score at DB end point in these previously stabilised subjects was 3.5 points in favour of PP (6.0 vs 2.5; p = 0.025). The rates of TEAEs and AEs of interest appeared similar. This analysis supports maintenance of effect with the injectable compared with the oral formulation of paliperidone in patients with schizophrenia. The safety profile of PP was similar to that of paliperidone ER. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  12. Rapid onset of treatment effects on psychosis, depression, and mania in patients with acute exacerbation of schizoaffective disorder following treatment with oral extended-release paliperidone.

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    Fu, Dong-Jing; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Bossie, Cynthia A; Patel, Hiren; Alphs, Larry

    2016-03-15

    Patients with schizoaffective disorder (SCA) experience complicated interplays of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms. Paliperidone extended-release (pali ER) tablets have been shown to be efficacious in these patients, but treatment response has not been studied relative to the onset of effects for these symptom domains. In a pooled analysis of data from two 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies, the onset of treatment effects with oral pali ER was evaluated by symptom domain (psychosis, depression, mania) in patients with an acute SCA exacerbation. Subjects were categorized as having prominent psychotic (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score >70), depressive (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-21 score ≥16), or manic (Young Mania Rating Scale score ≥16) symptoms at baseline. Of the 614 patients in these analyses, 597 (97.2%), 411 (66.9%), and 488 (79.5%) had prominent psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms at baseline, respectively. Pali ER treatment was associated with rapid and significant improvement of all three symptom domains versus placebo within 1 week of initiation, regardless of whether treatment was given as monotherapy or in combination with mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants. Adverse events were similar to those reported in the original published studies. This post hoc analysis of two phase 3 trials requires confirmation in prospective studies. This pooled analysis suggests that treatment with pali ER is associated with rapid control of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms in patients with SCA. Its findings support the benefit of pali ER as a primary treatment for the management of SCA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute opioid withdrawal precipitated by ingestion of crushed embeda (morphine extended release with sequestered naltrexone): case report and the focused review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiulu; Chen, Tao; Gudin, Jeff; Couch, John Patrick; Chiravuri, Srinivas

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of newly formulated extended release (ER) morphine with sequestered naltrexone (Embeda) has provided another treatment option for moderate to severe persistent pain. Embeda was designed to be an abuse-deterrent opioid formulation. Naltrexone is a centrally acting opioid receptor antagonist that blocks the action of opioid. When taken as directed, insignificant amount of sequestered naltrexone would reach systemic circulation, but upon tampering, the released naltrexone may blunt the euphoria of opioids, and possibly precipitate opioid withdrawal in opioid-dependent patient. To describe a case report ofa 50-year-old opioid-dependent male who developed acute opioid withdrawal after taking crushed Embeda. A 50-year-old male with severe, chronic low back pain due to degenerative disc disease was referred to our clinic for pain management. He was taking ER oxycodone 80 mg tid and Roxicodone 30 mg qid prn, with inadequate pain relief A trial of ER oxymorphone was decided, at 40 mg 1-2 doses bid. The patient returned to the clinic 1 week early, out of his ER oxymorphone. At this time, the decision to switch him to Embeda was made, at 80 mg/3.2 mg, 1-2 doses bid. The patient and his family members were counseled about risk involved with tampering with Embeda. A few hours later, our clinic was informed that the patient was brought to emergency room by ambulance, in severe opioid withdrawal. He was treated with IV fluid, antiemetics, clonidine, and IV hydromorphone. His condition improved and he was discharged home the next morning. Later on, the patient admitted that he took two prescribed Embeda within half an hour, the 1st one whole and the 2nd one crushed. He further admitted that he did so against our medical advice. CONCLUSION. Taking tampered Embeda may precipitate opioid withdrawal in opioid-tolerant patient. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of induced opioid withdrawal following consumption of crushed Embeda.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of extended-release methylphenidate in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder sub-optimally treated with immediate release methylphenidate.

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    Jurjen van der Schans

    Full Text Available Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a common psychiatric disorder in children and adolescents. Immediate-release methylphenidate (IR-MPH is the medical treatment of first choice. The necessity to use several IR-MPH tablets per day and associated potential social stigma at school often leads to reduced compliance, sub-optimal treatment, and therefore economic loss. Replacement of IR-MPH with a single-dose extended release (ER-MPH formulation may improve drug response and economic efficiency.To evaluate the cost-effectiveness from a societal perspective of a switch from IR-MPH to ER-MPH in patients who are sub-optimally treated.A daily Markov-cycle model covering a time-span of 10 years was developed including four different health states: (1 optimal response, (2 sub-optimal response, (3 discontinued treatment, and (4 natural remission. ER-MPH options included methylphenidate osmotic release oral system (MPH-OROS and Equasym XL/Medikinet CR. Both direct costs and indirect costs were included in the analysis, and effects were expressed as quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Univariate, multivariate as well as probabilistic sensitivity analysis were conducted and the main outcomes were incremental cost-effectiveness ratios.Switching sub-optimally treated patients from IR-MPH to MPH-OROS or Equasym XL/Medikinet CR led to per-patient cost-savings of €4200 and €5400, respectively, over a 10-year treatment span. Sensitivity analysis with plausible variations of input parameters resulted in cost-savings in the vast majority of estimations.This study lends economic support to switching patients with ADHD with suboptimal response to short-acting IR-MPH to long-acting ER-MPH regimens.

  15. Effect of Food Intake on the Pharmacokinetics of a Novel Methylphenidate Extended-Release Oral Suspension for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

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    Sallee, Floyd R; Palumbo, Donna R; Abbas, Richat; Berry, Sally A; Puthli, Shivanand P; Kathala, Kalyan K

    2017-09-01

    We conducted an open-label, single-dose, randomized, crossover study in healthy adults to assess the impact of food on the bioavailability of 60 mg methylphenidate extended-release oral suspension (MEROS; Quillivant XR™)-a long-acting stimulant for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder-by comparing the pharmacokinetic parameters under fed and fasting conditions. When MEROS 60 mg was administered under fed conditions compared with fasting conditions, the exposure of methylphenidate (d enantiomer) was higher, with a mean area under the plasma concentration-vs-time curve (AUC) 0-t of 160.2 ng·h/mL vs 140.4 ng·h/mL, and a mean AUC 0-inf of 163.2 ng·h/mL vs 143.7 ng·h/mL, respectively. The ratios of the ln-transformed geometric means for methylphenidate for AUC 0-t and AUC 0-inf were 119.5% (90%CI, 115.7% to 123.5%) and 119.0% (90%CI, 115.2% to 122.8%), respectively, within the standard 80% to 125% bioequivalence acceptance range indicating no food effect on the overall exposure (rate and extent). There was a small increase in the peak plasma concentration (127.6% [90%CI, 119.9% to 135.8%]). However, this effect was small and not likely to be clinically significant. Overall, MEROS 60 mg was safe in both the fed and fasting condition when administered to healthy volunteers in this study. © 2017 The Authors. Clinical Pharmacology in Drug Development Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  16. Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated cross-reactivity between mesquite pollen proteins and lima bean, an edible legume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, A; Arora, N; Jain, V K; Sridhara, S; Singh, B P

    2007-09-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated food allergy often develops as a consequence of allergic sensitization to pollen proteins. Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) tree pollen is reported to be cross-reactive with other pollen species, but little has been reported on its cross-reactivity with plant-derived foods belonging to the same/different families. The present study investigates the in vitro cross-reactivity of mesquite pollen and lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), an edible seed belonging to the Leguminosae family. Of 110 patients (asthma, rhinitis or both) tested intradermally, 20 showed marked positive reactions with Prosopis pollen extract. Of these, 12 patients showed elevated specific IgE to Prosopis pollen extract alone and four to both Phaseolus and pollen extract. In vitro cross-reactivity was investigated using inhibition assays [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) inhibition, immunoblot inhibition], histamine release and lymphoproliferation. P. lunatus extract could inhibit IgE binding to P. juliflora in a dose-dependent manner, requiring 400 ng of protein for 50% inhibition in ELISA assay. Immunoblot and immunoblot inhibition demonstrated the presence of 20, 26, 35, 66 and 72 kDa as shared IgE binding components between the two extracts. Histamine release, peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation and interleukin (IL)-4 levels also suggested allergenic cross-reactivity. In conclusion, there is humoral and cellular cross-reactivity between Prosopis pollen and Phaseolus seed allergens.

  17. Magnetic field effect on growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity on mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S.; Elizalde Galindo, José T.; Castillo-Michelle, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetic field is closely related to the cell metabolism of plants [N. A. Belyavskaya, Adv. Space Res. 34, 1566 (2004)]. In order to see the effect of magnetic field on the plant growth, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina) seeds, ten sets of 80 seeds were selected to be oriented with the long axis parallel or randomly oriented to an external magnetic field. The external magnetic field magnitude was 1 T, and the exposition time t = 30 min. Then, the seeds were stored for three days in a plastic bag and then sown on paper towels in a modified Hoagland's nutrient solution. After three days of germination in the dark and three days in light, seedlings were grown hydroponically in modified Hoagland's nutrient solution (high PO42-) containing 0, 10, or 20 ppm of arsenic as As (III) and (V). The results show that the germination ratios, growth, elongation, arsenic uptake, and total amylolytic activity of the long axis oriented mesquite seeds were much higher than those of the randomly oriented seeds. Also, these two sets of seeds showed higher properties than the ones that were not exposed to external magnetic field.

  18. Costs and effects of paliperidone extended release compared with alternative oral antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia in Greece: A cost effectiveness study

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    Papanicolaou Sotiria

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the costs and effects of paliperidone extended release (ER, a new pharmaceutical treatment for the management of schizophrenia, with the most frequently prescribed oral treatments in Greece (namely risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, aripiprazole and ziprasidone over a 1-year time period. Methods A decision tree was developed and tailored to the specific circumstances of the Greek healthcare system. Therapeutic effectiveness was defined as the annual number of stable days and the clinical data was collected from international clinical trials and published sources. The study population was patients who suffer from schizophrenia with acute exacerbation. During a consensus panel of 10 psychiatrists and 6 health economists, data were collected on the clinical practice and medical resource utilisation. Unit costs were derived from public sources and official reimbursement tariffs. For the comparators official retail prices were used. Since a price had not yet been granted for paliperidone ER at the time of the study, the conservative assumption of including the average of the highest targeted European prices was used, overestimating the price of paliperidone ER in Greece. The study was conducted from the perspective of the National Healthcare System. Results The data indicate that paliperidone ER might offer an increased number of stable days (272.5 compared to 272.2 for olanzapine, 265.5 f risperidone, 260.7 for quetiapine, 260.5 for ziprasidone and 258.6 for aripiprazole with a lower cost compared to the other therapies examined (€7,030 compared to €7,034 for olanzapine, €7,082 for risperidone, €8,321 for quetiapine, €7,713 for ziprasidone and €7,807 for aripiprazole. During the sensitivity analysis, a ± 10% change in the duration and frequency of relapses and the economic parameters did not lead to significant changes in the results. Conclusion Treatment with paliperidone ER can lead to lower total cost

  19. Efficacy and safety of extended-release oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR™) as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, JA; Baroldi, P; Brittain, ST; Johnson, JK

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of once-daily 1200 mg and 2400 mg SPN-804 (Oxtellar XR™, Supernus Pharmaceuticals), an extended-release tablet formulation of oxcarbazepine (OXC), added to 1-3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Methods The Prospective, Randomized Study of OXC XR in Subjects with Partial Epilepsy Refractory (PROSPER) study was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study. The primary efficacy endpoint was median percent reduction from baseline in monthly (28-day) seizure frequency for the 16-week double-blind treatment period in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population with analyzable seizure data. Other efficacy analyses included proportion of patients with ≥ 50% seizure reduction, proportion of patients seizure free, and the relationship between clinical response and plasma concentration. Results Median percent reduction was -28.7% for placebo, −38.2% (P = 0.08 vs placebo) for once-daily SPN-804 1200 mg, and −42.9% (P = 0.003) for SPN-804 2400 mg. Responder rates were 28.1%, 36.1% (P = 0.08), and 40.7% (P = 0.02); 16-week seizure-free rates in a pragmatic ITT analysis were 3.3%, 4.9% (P = 0.59), and 11.4% (P = 0.008), respectively. When data were analyzed separately for study site clusters, a post hoc analysis demonstrated that both SPN-804 dosages were significantly superior to placebo in median percent seizure reduction (placebo: −13.3%; 1200 mg: −34.5%, P = 0.02; 2400 mg: −52.7%, P = 0.006) in the North American study site cluster. A concentration–response analysis also supported a clinically meaningful effect for 1200 mg. Adverse event types reflected the drug's established profile. Adverse event frequency was consistent with a pharmacokinetic profile in which SPN-804 produces lower peak plasma concentrations vs immediate-release OXC. Once-daily dosing was not

  20. An open-label, flexible-dose study of paliperidone extended-release in Chinese patients with first-onset psychosis

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    Si TM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TianMei Si,1 QingRong Tan,2 KeRang Zhang,3 Yang Wang,4 Qing Rui4 1Peking University Institute of Mental health, Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University, Beijing, 2Fourth Military Medical University, First Hospital, Xi’an, 3Shanxi Medical University, First Hospital, Shanxi, 4Janssen Research and Development, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Antipsychotic medications facilitate the improvement of psychotic symptoms in patients with first-episode psychosis. Paliperidone extended-release (pali-ER, an atypical anti­psychotic, was assessed for efficacy and safety in Chinese patients with first-episode psychosis. Methods: In this 8-week, open-label, single-arm, multicenter study, patients with first-episode psychosis (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria and a Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS total score ≥70 were treated with flexible-dose pali-ER tablets (3–12 mg/day. The primary efficacy endpoint was the percentage of patients with an increase of ≥8 points in Personal and Social Performance (PSP score from baseline to day 56 (8 weeks. Secondary endpoints included reduction in PANSS total score, improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Severity score, PSP score, Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptics Scale score, and relationship between duration of untreated psychosis and PANSS or PSP. Incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events were used to evaluate safety.Results: Overall, 283 of 294 patients (96% achieved a ≥8-point increase in PSP (primary endpoint, analysis set. For the secondary efficacy endpoints, 284/306 patients (93% had a ≥30% reduction in PANSS total score; 266/306 patients (87% achieved a ≤3 Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale score, and 218/294 patients (74% had a PSP score ≥71. The Subjective Well-being under Neuroleptics Scale score was improved from a baseline mean of 72.7 to 94.7 at endpoint. There was a

  1. A randomized, double-blind study of the efficacy and tolerability of extended-release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR monotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gang Wang,1 Alexander McIntyre,2 Willie R Earley,3 Shane R Raines,3 Hans Eriksson4 1Beijing Anding Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Psychiatry, Penticton Regional Hospital, Penticton, BC, Canada; 3AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, DE, USA; 4AstraZeneca R&D, Södertälje, Sweden Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of once-daily extended release quetiapine fumarate (quetiapine XR monotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD. Patients and methods: This was a 10-week (8-week active treatment/2-week post-treatment randomized, double-blind, placebo- and active-controlled study (D1448C00004. Patients received quetiapine XR 150 mg/day, escitalopram 10 mg/day, or placebo; patients with an inadequate response (<20% improvement in Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale [MADRS] total score at week two received double-dose treatment. The primary end point was week eight change from randomization in MADRS total score. Secondary end points included MADRS response (≥50% improvement and remission (score ≤8; Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total and item 1; Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety total, psychic, and somatic; Clinical Global Impressions – Severity of Illness total; Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI global; and Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire – Short Form percentage maximum total scores. Tolerability was assessed throughout. Results: A total of 471 patients was randomized. No significant improvements in MADRS total score were observed at week eight (last observation carried forward with either active treatment (quetiapine XR, -17.21 [P=0.174]; escitalopram, -16.73 [P=0.346] versus placebo (-15.61. There were no significant differences in secondary end points versus placebo, with the exception of week-eight change in PSQI global score (quetiapine XR, -4.96 [P<0.01] versus placebo, -3.37. Mixed-model repeated

  2. In vitro solubility, dissolution and permeability studies combined with semi-mechanistic modeling to investigate the intestinal absorption of desvenlafaxine from an immediate- and extended release formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, F; Jarlfors, A; Larsen, F; Holm, P; Steffansen, B

    2015-09-18

    Desvenlafaxine is a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class 1 (high solubility, high permeability) and biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system (BDDCS) class 3, (high solubility, poor metabolism; implying low permeability) compound. Thus the rate-limiting step for desvenlafaxine absorption (i.e. intestinal dissolution or permeation) is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissolution and/or intestinal permeability rate-limit desvenlafaxine absorption from an immediate-release formulation (IRF) and Pristiq(®), an extended release formulation (ERF). Semi-mechanistic models of desvenlafaxine were built (using SimCyp(®)) by combining in vitro data on dissolution and permeation (mechanistic part of model) with clinical data (obtained from literature) on distribution and clearance (non-mechanistic part of model). The model predictions of desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics after IRF and ERF administration were compared with published clinical data from 14 trials. Desvenlafaxine in vivo dissolution from the IRF and ERF was predicted from in vitro solubility studies and biorelevant dissolution studies (using the USP3 dissolution apparatus), respectively. Desvenlafaxine apparent permeability (Papp) at varying apical pH was investigated using the Caco-2 cell line and extrapolated to effective intestinal permeability (Peff) in human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. Desvenlafaxine pKa-values and octanol-water partition coefficients (Do:w) were determined experimentally. Due to predicted rapid dissolution after IRF administration, desvenlafaxine was predicted to be available for permeation in the duodenum. Desvenlafaxine Do:w and Papp increased approximately 13-fold when increasing apical pH from 5.5 to 7.4. Desvenlafaxine Peff thus increased with pH down the small intestine. Consequently, desvenlafaxine absorption from an IRF appears rate-limited by low Peff in the upper small intestine, which "delays" the predicted

  3. [Development of a high content protein beverage from Chilean mesquite, lupine and quinoa for the diet of pre-schoolers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezal Mezquita, P; Acosta Barrientos, E; Rojas Valdivia, G; Romero Palacios, N; Arcos Zavala, R

    2012-01-01

    This research was aimed at developing a high content protein beverage from the mixture of liquid extracts of a pseudocereal, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) and two legumes: mesquite (Prosopis chilensis (Mol.) Stunz) and lupine (Lupinus albus L.), native from the Andean highlands of the Chilean northern macro-zone, flavored with raspberry pulp, to help in the feeding of children between 2 and 5 years of lower socioeconomic status with nutritional deficiencies. The formulation was defined by linear programming, its composition was determined by proximate analysis and physical, microbiological and sensory acceptance tests were performed. After 90 days of storage time, the beverage got a protein content of 1.36%, being tryptophan the limiting amino acid; for its part, the chromaticity coordinates of CIEL*a*b* color space showed no statistical significant differences (p < 0.05) maintaining the "dark pink" tonality, the viscosity and the sensory evaluation were acceptable for drinking.

  4. Effects of mesquite gum-candelilla wax based edible coatings on the quality of guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, S. A.; Bosquez-Molina, E.; Stolik, S.; Sánchez, F.

    2005-06-01

    The ability of composite edible coatings to preserve the quality of guava fruit (Psidium guajava L.) at 20ºC was studied for a period of 15 days. The edible coatings were formulated with candelilla wax blended with white mineral oil as the lipid phase and mesquite gum as the structural material. The use of edible coatings prolonged the shelf life of treated fruits by retarding ethylene emission and enhancing texture as compared to control samples. At the sixth day, the ethylene produced by the control samples was fivefold higher than the ethylene produced by the coated samples. In addition, the physiological weight loss of coated fruits was nearly 30% lower than the control samples.

  5. Mesquite Gum as a Novel Reducing and Stabilizing Agent for Modified Tollens Synthesis of Highly Concentrated Ag Nanoparticles

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    Maira Berenice Moreno‐Trejo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis that is described in this study is for the preparation of silver nanoparticles of sizes ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm with a defined shape (globular, confirmed by UV-vis, SEM, STEM and DLS analysis. This simple and favorable one-step modified Tollens reaction does not require any special equipment or other stabilizing or reducing agent except for a solution of purified mesquite gum, and it produces aqueous colloidal dispersions of silver nanoparticles with a stability thatexceeds three months, a relatively narrow size distribution, a low tendency to aggregate and a yield of at least 95% for all cases. Reaction times are between 15 min and 60 min to obtain silver nanoparticles in concentrations ranging from 0.1 g to 3 g of Ag per 100 g of reaction mixture. The proposed synthetic method presents a high potential for scale-up, since its production capacity is rather high and the methodology is simple.The synthesis that is described in this study is for the preparation of silver nanoparticles of sizes ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm with a defined shape (globular, confirmed by UV-vis, SEM, STEM and DLS analysis. This simple and favorable one-step modified Tollens reaction does not require any special equipment or other stabilizing or reducing agent except for a solution of purified mesquite gum, and it produces aqueous colloidal dispersions of silver nanoparticles with a stability thatexceeds three months, a relatively narrow size distribution, a low tendency to aggregate and a yield of at least 95% for all cases. Reaction times are between 15 min and 60 min to obtain silver nanoparticles in concentrations ranging from 0.1 g to 3 g of Ag per 100 g of reaction mixture. The proposed synthetic method presents a high potential for scale-up, since its production capacity is rather high and the methodology is simple.

  6. Mesquite pod meal in diets for Santa Inês sheep: ingestive behavior - doi: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v35i2.16221

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    Alana Batista dos Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the ingestive behavior of sheep fed increasing levels of mesquite pod meal (0, 15, 30 and 45% in total dry matter diet, replacing grass silage elephant. Eight non-castrated Santa Inês sheep with average weight of 32 kg were divided into two 4 x 4 Latin squares, each lasting 15 days. The sheep were submitted to visual observation every ten minutes, for 24 hours, in the 13th day of each experimental period. There was no significant regression (p > 0.05 relative to the time spent on feeding, rumination and resting, depending on the levels of substitution of mesquite pod meal. The average time spent on feeding, rumination and resting was 5.64, 10.88 and 8.8h day-1, respectively. There was a positive linear effect (p

  7. Total replacement of corn by mesquite pod meal considering nutritional value, performance, feeding behavior, nitrogen balance, and microbial protein synthesis of Holstein-Zebu crossbred dairy steers.

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    de Oliveira Moraes, Gláucia Sabrine; de Souza, Evaristo Jorge Oliveira; Véras, Antonia Sherlânea Chaves; de Paula Almeida, Marina; da Cunha, Márcio Vieira; Torres, Thaysa Rodrigues; da Silva, Camila Sousa; Pereira, Gerfesson Felipe Cavalcanti

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the present study to assess the effects of mesquite pod addition replacing corn (0, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 g/kg in the dry matter basis) on nutrient intake, animal performance, feeding behavior, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance, and microbial protein synthesis. Twenty-five Holstein-Zebu crossbred dairy steers at 219 ± 22 kg initial body weight and 18 months of age were used. The experiment lasted 84 days, divided into three periods of 28 days. A completely randomized design was used, and data were submitted to analysis using PROC GLM for analysis of variance and PROC REG for regression analysis using the software Statistical Analysis Systems version 9.1. Experimental diets were composed of Tifton 85 hay, soybean meal, ground corn, mesquite pod meal, and mineral salt. Samples of food offered were collected during the last 3 days of each period, and the leftovers were collected daily, with samples bulked per week. At the end of each 28-day period, the remaining animals were weighed to determine total weight gain and average daily gain. The assessment of behavioral patterns was performed through instantaneous scans in 5-min intervals for three consecutive 12-h days. A single urine sample from each animal was collected on the last day of each collection period at about 4 h after the first feeding. The replacement of corn by mesquite pod meal did not significantly influence treatments regarding nutrients intake, animal performance, and feeding behavior. Retained and consumed nitrogen ratio did not statistically differ between replacement levels. Likewise, there were no statistical differences regarding microbial protein synthesis and efficiency between replacement levels. Mesquite pod meal can be used in Holstein-Zebu crossbred dairy steers' diet with total corn replacement.

  8. Spectroscopic verification of zinc absorption and distribution in the desert plant Prosopis juliflora-velutina (velvet mesquite) treated with ZnO nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Viezcas, J A; Castillo-Michel, H; Servin, A D; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2011-06-01

    The impact of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on biological systems, especially plants, is still not well understood. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs in velvet mesquite (Prosopis juliflora-velutina). Mesquite seedlings were grown for 15 days in hydroponics with ZnO NPs (10 nm) at concentrations varying from 500 to 4000 mg L(-1). Zinc concentrations in roots, stems and leaves were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). Plant stress was examined by the specific activity of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX); while the biotransformation of ZnO NPs and Zn distribution in tissues was determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF), respectively. ICP-OES results showed that Zn concentrations in tissues (2102 ± 87, 1135 ± 56, and 628 ± 130 mg kg(-1) d wt in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively) were found at 2000 mg ZnO NPs L(-1). Stress tests showed that ZnO NPs increased CAT in roots, stems, and leaves, while APOX increased only in stems and leaves. XANES spectra demonstrated that ZnO NPs were not present in mesquite tissues, while Zn was found as Zn(II), resembling the spectra of Zn(NO(3))(2). The μXRF analysis confirmed the presence of Zn in the vascular system of roots and leaves in ZnO NP treated plants.

  9. Substantial production of drosophilin A methyl ether (tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) by the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius in the heartwood of mesquite ( Prosopis juliflora) trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Wilkens, Barry; Groy, Thomas L.; Glaeser, Jessie A.

    2015-04-01

    Toxic organohalogen pollutants produced as by-products of industrial processes, such as chloroform and polychlorinated dibenzo- p-dioxins, also have significant natural sources. A substantial terrestrial source of halogenated organics originates from fungal decay of wood and leaf litter. Here we show that the lignicolous basidiomycete Phellinus badius deposits up to 30,000 mg of the halogenated metabolite drosophilin A methyl ether (DAME, tetrachloro-1,4-dimethoxybenzene) per kilogram of decayed heartwood in the mesquite Prosopis juliflora. DAME occurs as clusters of glassy crystals up to 1 mm long within the decayed heartwood. In addition, the Phellinus badius basidiocarps contain an average of 24,000 mg DAME/kg dried fruiting body, testifying to the significant translocation and accumulation of Cl accompanied by DAME biosynthesis. The high DAME concentrations attest to the substantial Cl content of the heartwood, which averages near 5,000 ppm, with Cl/K near 1:1, consistent with an inorganic chloride precursor. Phellinus badius has a circumglobal distribution in the tropics and subtropics, where it is widely distributed on hardwoods and commonly associated with decay of mesquite. There is the potential for extensive DAME formation within decayed heartwood worldwide given the extensive range of Phellinus badius and its propensity to form DAME within mesquites. Further, DAME production is not limited to Phellinus badius but occurs in a range of lignicolous basidiomycetes, suggesting a significant natural reservoir for this chloroaromatic with potential environmental implications.

  10. Biomass production of Prosopis species (mesquite), leucaena, and other leguminous trees grown under heat/drought stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.; Nash, P.

    1983-01-01

    Leguminous trees were examined for use on hot/arid lands in field trials in the Califronia Imperial Valley where July daily maximum temperatures are 42/sup 0/C (108/sup 0/F). Two field trials were carried out to rank 55 accessions in biomass per tree and to evaluate biomass production per unit area with four of the more productive accessions identified in earlier trials. The trial with 55 accessions compared Prosopis (mesquite) to widely recommended species for arid lands such as Leucaena leucocephala (K-8), Parkinsonia aculeata, and Prosopis tamarugo and to other drought adapted tree legume species of California/Arizona deserts such as Cercidium fluoridium and Olneya tesota. Prosopis selections were identified that had greater productivity than either Leucaena leucocephala (K-8) or Parkinsonia aculeata. The mean ovendry biomass per accession ranged from 0.2 kg/tree for Prosopis tamarugo to 29 kg/tree for P. alba (0166) when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. Clones were obtained from trees in this trial which had 45-56 kg/tree (ovendry) in two seasons. The plots designed to measure biomass production per unit area were on a 1.5 m spacing and had productivities of 7, 11.2, 14.3, and 14.5 ovendry T ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/ for P. glandulosa var torreyana (0001), P. alba (0163), P. chilensis (0009), and P. alba (0039), respectively, when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse.

  11. Biomass production of Prosopis species (mesquite), Leucaena, and other leguminous trees grown under heat/drought stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.; Nash, P.

    1983-09-01

    Leguminous trees were examined for use of hot/arid lands in field trials in the California Imperial Valley where July daily maximum temperatures are 42 degrees C (108 degrees F). Two field trials were carried out to rank 55 accessions in biomass per tree and to evaluate biomass production per unit area with four of the more productive accessions identified in earlier trials. The trial with 55 accessions compared Prosopis (mesquite) to widely recommended species for arid lands such as Leucaena leucocephala (K-8), Parkinsonia aculeata, and Prosopis tamarugo and to other drought adapted tree legume species of California/Arizona deserts such as Cercidium floridium and Olneya tesota. Prosopis selections were identified that had greater productivity than either Leucaena leucocephala (K-8) or Parkinsonia aculeata. The mean oven-dry biomass per accession ranged from 0.2 kg/tree for Prosospis tamarugo to 29 kg/tree for P. alba (0166) when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. Clones were obtained from trees in this trial which had 45-56 kg/tree (oven-dry) in two seasons. The plots designed to measure biomass production per unit area were on a 1.5 m spacing and had productivities of 7, 11.2, 14.3, and 14.5 oven-dry T ha-1 yr-1 for P. glandulosa var torreyana (0001), P. alba (0163), P. chilensis (0009), and P. alba(0039), respectively, when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. 30 references

  12. Analysis of IgE binding proteins of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora) pollen and cross-reactivity with predominant tree pollens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhyani, Anamika; Arora, Naveen; Gaur, Shailendra N; Jain, Vikram K; Sridhara, Susheela; Singh, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    Pollen from the mesquite tree, Prosopis juliflora, is an important source of respiratory allergy in tropical countries. Our aim was to partially characterize the IgE binding proteins of P. juliflora pollen extract and study cross-reactivity with prevalent tree pollen allergens. Intradermal tests with P. juliflora and five other tree pollen extracts were performed on respiratory allergy patients from Bikaner (arid) and Delhi (semi arid). Prosopis extract elicited positive skin reactions in 71/220 of the patients. Sera were collected from 38 of these 71 patients and all demonstrated elevated specific IgE to P. juliflora. Immunoblotting with pooled patients' sera demonstrated 16 IgE binding components, with components of 24, 26, 29, 31, 35, 52, 58, 66 and 95 kDa recognized by more than 80% of individual patients' sera. P. juliflora extract is allergenically potent requiring 73 ng of self-protein for 50% inhibition of IgE binding in ELISA inhibition. Cross-inhibition assays showed close relationship among P. juliflora, Ailanthus excelsa, Cassia siamea and Salvadora persica. IgE binding components of 14, 41, 52 and 66 kDa were shared allergens whereas 26 and 29 kDa were specific to P. juliflora. The findings suggest that purification of cross-reactive allergens will be helpful for diagnosis and immunotherapy of tree pollen allergic patients.

  13. A Single-Dose, Single-Period Pharmacokinetic Assessment of an Extended-Release Orally Disintegrating Tablet of Methylphenidate in Children and Adolescents with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Ann; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Stark, Jeffrey G; McMahen, Russ; Tengler, Mark; Sikes, Carolyn

    2016-08-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of a proprietary formulation of methylphenidate (MPH) in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a phase 1 study. Methylphenidate extended-release orally disintegrating tablets (MPH XR-ODTs) combine two technologies in a single-tablet formulation-an extended-release profile that was designed for once-daily dosing in an ODT that does not require water or chewing for ingestion. This was a single-dose, open-label, single-period, single-treatment study, in which 32 children with ADHD who were receiving MPH in doses of 40 or 60 mg before beginning the study each received a 60-mg dose (2 × 30 mg) of MPH XR-ODT. The following plasma PK parameters of MPH were determined for participants grouped by age (6-7, 8-9, 10-12, and 13-17 years old): maximum concentration (Cmax), time to maximum concentration (Tmax), elimination half-life (T½), area under the curve from 0 hours to infinity (AUCinf), oral clearance (CL/F), and volume of distribution in the terminal phase (Vz/F). Safety and tolerability were also assessed. A total of 32 participants received the study drug. For all participants, plasma concentration-time profiles of MPH exhibited a broad peak after administration of MPH XR-ODT through ∼8 hours, indicating extended release from the formulation, followed by an apparent first-order elimination phase. As age increased, MPH exposure decreased and mean estimates of CL/F increased; however, weight-normalized CL/F values were comparable across age groups. Similarly, mean estimates of Vz/F increased with age, but weight-normalization decreased differences across age groups, with the exception of the youngest age group, which had higher values. All adverse events (AEs) were mild. This XR-ODT formulation of MPH demonstrated weight-normalized clearance rates that were consistent across all age groups, a PK profile consistent with once-daily dosing, and an AE profile consistent with

  14. δ13C values of soil organic matter in semiarid grassland with mesquite (Prosopis) encroachment in southeastern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Thomas H.; Quade, Jay; Webb, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past century, C3 woody plants and trees have increased in abundance in many semiarid ecosystems, displacing native C4 grasses. Livestock grazing, climatic fluctuations, and fire suppression are several reasons proposed for this shift. Soil carbon isotopic signatures are an ideal technique to evaluate carbon turnover rates in such ecosystems. On the gunnery ranges of Fort Huachuca in southeastern Arizona, study sites were established on homogeneous granitic alluvium to investigate the effects of fire frequency on δ13C values in surface soil organic matter (SOM). These ranges have had no livestock grazing for 50 years and a well-documented history of fires. Prosopis velutina Woot. (mesquite) trees have altered SOM δ13C pools by the concentration of plant nutrients and the addition of isotopically light litter. These soil carbon changes do not extend beyond canopy margins. Elevated total organic carbon (TOC), plant nutrient (N and P) concentrations, and depleted SOM δ13C values are associated with C3Prosopis on an unburned plot, which enables recognition of former Prosopis-occupied sites on plots with recent fire histories. Elevated nutrient concentrations associated with former Prosopis are retained in SOM for many decades. Surface SOM δ13C values indicate the estimated minimum turnover time of C4-derived carbon beneath large mature Prosopis is about 100–300 years. In contrast, complete turnover of original C3 carbon to C4 carbon under grasslands is estimated to take a minimum of 150–500 years. Our study confirms that C4 grass cover has declined over the past 100 years, although isolated C3 trees or shrubs were not uncommon on the historic C4-dominated grasslands. We find evidence in surface soil layers for a modern C3 plant expansion reflected in the substantial shift of SOM δ13C values from C4 grasses to C3 shrublands.

  15. Aspirin and Extended-Release Dipyridamole

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), rofecoxib (Vioxx) (no longer available in the ... Mobic), nabumetone (Relafen), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), and tolmetin (Tolectin); phenytoin (Dilantin); ...

  16. Extended release formulations for local anaesthetic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, C F; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Ickowicz, D

    2012-08-01

    Systemic toxicity through overdose of local anaesthetic agents is a real concern. By encapsulating local anaesthetics in biodegradable carriers to produce a system for prolonged release, their duration of action can be extended. This encapsulation should also improve the safety profile of the local anaesthetic as it is released at a slower rate. Work with naturally occurring local anaestheticss has also shown promise in the area of reducing systemic and neurotoxicity. Extended duration local anaesthetic formulations in current development or clinical use include liposomes, hydrophobic based polymer particles such as Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, pasty injectable and solid polymers like Poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) P(SA:RA) and their combination with synthetic and natural local anaesthetic. Their duration of action, rationale and limitations are reviewed. Direct comparison of the different agents is limited by their chemical properties, the drug doses encapsulated and the details of in vivo models described. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. COMPARATIVE EFFICАCY AND TOLERABILITY OF MONOTHERAPY WITH DEPAKINE CHRONOSPHERE, DRUGS OF CARBAMAZEPINE GROUP WITH EXTENDED RELEASE AND OXCARBAZEPINE IN SYMPTOMATIC AND CRYPTOGENIC FOCAL EPILEPSY (SVT. LUKA’S INSTITUTE OF CHILD NEUROLOGY AND EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on comparative efficаcy and tolerability of monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere, drugs of Carbamazepine group with extended release and oxcarbazepine in symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy has been conducted at Svt. Luka’s Institute of Child Neurology and Epilepsy (ICNE (Moscow. This retrospective study covers a random sample of patients treated in ICNE in the period from December 1, 2013 to September 1, 2014.  The study included 131 patients aged 1 to 18 years with symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy receiving treatment with one of the study drugs in monotherapy: group 1 – monotherapy with Depakine chronosphere (n = 56; group 2 – monotherapy with drugs of carbamazepine group with extended release (n = 55; group 3 – monotherapy with oxcarbazepine (trileptal (n = 20. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the effectiveness of Depakin chronosphere, carbamazepine with extended release and oxcarbazepine in monotherapy of symptomatic and cryptogenic focal epilepsy was comparable (statistically significant differences in efficacy were not found. However, carbamazepine was awarded the highest frequency of seizures aggravation. Drugs showed approximately same tolerability (statistically significant differences in tolerability were not found. However, withdrawal of the drug due to side effects was the rarest in Depakine (3.5 %, and withdrawal due to intolerance was higher in carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine (5 and 10 % respectively. Depakinum and oxcarbazepine had the best results in the blocking of pathological activity on the electroencephalogram, whereas carbamazepine was clearly inferior to them. In this regard, complete clinical-electroencephalographic remission (lasting 12 months or more was achieved under treatment of Depakine chromosphere in 21.5 % of cases, oxcarbazepi on therapy for 12 months was similar in all study drugs. Considering that the objective of epilepsy treatment is to achieve complete

  18. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the extended-release tramadol hydrochloride/acetaminophen fixed-dose combination tablet for the treatment of chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Chong-Suh

    2013-11-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common condition that is often difficult to treat. The combination of tramadol hydrochloride and acetaminophen in an extended-release formulation has been shown to provide rapid and long-lasting analgesic effects resulting from the synergistic activity of these 2 active ingredients. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of extended-release tramadol hydrochloride 75-mg/acetaminophen 650-mg fixed-dose combination tablets (TA-ER) for the treatment of chronic low back pain. This Phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study enrolled 245 patients with moderate to severe (≥4 cm on a 10-cm visual analog scale) chronic (≥3 months') low back pain insufficiently controlled by previous NSAIDs or cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors and randomly assigned them to receive 4 weeks of either TA-ER or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the percentage of patients with a pain intensity change rate ≥30% from baseline to final evaluation. Secondary end points included quality of life (Korean Short Form-36), functionality (Korean Oswestry Disability Index), and adverse events. The percentage of patients with a pain intensity change rate ≥30% was significantly higher (P Pain relief success rate from baseline was significantly higher with TA-ER versus placebo at days 8 and 15 but not at the final visit. Patients in the TA-ER group had significant improvements versus placebo in role-physical, general health, and reported health transition domains of the Korean Short Form-36 and significantly higher functional improvements in the personal care section of the Korean Oswestry Disability Index. Patient assessment of overall pain control as "very good" was also significantly higher with TA-ER than with placebo. Adverse events were reported more frequently with TA-ER than with placebo; the most common adverse events reported were nausea, dizziness, constipation, and vomiting. TA-ER was significantly more

  19. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) species for biofuel production on semi-arid lands. Final report, April 1, 1978-March 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P; Cannell, G H; Clark, P R; Osborn, J F; Nash, P

    1985-01-01

    Arid adapted nitrogen fixing trees and shrubs of the genus Prosopis (mesquite) have been examined for woody biomass production on semi-arid lands of southwestern United States. A germ-plasm collection of 900 accessions from North and South America and Africa was assembled. Field studies screening for biomass production, frost tolerance, response to irrigation, pod production and heat/drought tolerance involved a total of 80 accessions. Selections made from survivors of coal/frost screening trial had more frost tolerance and biomass productivity than prostrate selections from the ranges of Arizona, New Mexico and west Texas. Thirteen Prosopis species were found to nodulate, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and grow on a nitrogen free media in greenhouse experiments. The salinity tolerance of six Prosopis species was examined on a nitrogen free media in greenhouse experiments. No reduction in growth occurred for any species tested at a salinity of 6000 mg NaC1/L which is considered too saline for normal agricultural crops. Individual trees have grown 5 to 7 cm in basal diameter, and 2.0 to 3.7 meters in height per year and have achieved 50 kg oven dry weight per tree in 2 years with 600 mm water application per year. Vegetative propagation techniques have been developed and clones of these highly productive trees have been made. Small pilots on 1.5 x 1.5 m spacing in the California Imperial Valley had a first and second season dry matter production of 11.7 and 16.9 T/ha for P. chilensis (0009), 7.1 and 6.9 T/ha for P. glandulosa var. torreyana (0001), 9.8 and 19.2 T/ha for P. alba (0039) and 7.9 and 14.5 T/ha for progency of a California ornamental (0163). The projected harvested costs of $25.00 per oven dry ton or $1.50 per million Btu's compare favorable with coal and other alternative fuel sources in South Texas.

  20. [Use of mesquite cotyledon (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Shuntz) in the manufacturing of cereal bars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, A M; Escobar, B; Ugarte, V

    2000-06-01

    Cereal bars with peanut and walnut has shown to be snack foods of good organoleptic characteristics and high caloric value, due to their content of protein, lipids and carbohydrates. Cotyledons of mezquite seeds have a high protein content which biological quality improves with thermal processing like toasting, microwave or moist heat under pressure. The purposes of this research were to study the use of mezquite cotyledon (Prosopis chilensis (Mol) Stuntz) in cereal bars with two different levels of peanut or walnut; and to determine the effect of two thermal treatment applied on the cotyledon upon the bar characteristics. Twelve different kind of bars were developed through the combination of two levels of peanut or walnut (15% and 18%); the use of mezquite cotyledon (0% and 6%); and the application of two thermal processing to the cotyledon (microwave and toasting). Cereal bars were analysed for chemical, physical and sensory characteristics: moisture, water activity, proximate chemical composition, sensory quality and acceptability. Moisture content of bars with peanut ranged between 10.4% and 10.9%; and for those with walnut, between 10.5% and 12.3%. Protein content was higher in the bars with mezquite cotiledon, being higher those with peanut. Thermal processing did not have any effect on the chemical composition. Bars with mezquite cotyledon treated by microwave showed a higher acceptability.

  1. QUALITY OF LIFE AND COMPLIANCE TO THERAPY IN PATIENTS FOLLOWING SUCCESSFULTRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY, WHO WERE PRESCRIBED FLUVASTATIN EXTENDED RELEASE ADDED TO STANDARD THERAPY. PROTOCOL OF THE OPEN-LABEL OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Susekov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate quality of life changes and compliance to therapy in patients following successful transluminal angioplasty, who have indications for fluvastatin extended release in addition to standard treatment.Material and methods. This is a national observational multicenter study. An inclusion of 60 investigator centers is planned (out-patient medical centers, the total number of patients to be included is 600. Patients (men and women with coronary heart disease following successful transluminal coronary angioplasty, who were prescribed fluvastatinextended release (Lescol Forte, Novartis 80 mg once daily will be included in the observation. The following efficacy and safety parameters will be evaluated: quality of life assessed with SF-36 scale before and during treatment; compliance to therapy; adverse events and serious adverse events. Observation period is planned for 6 months. During this period patient is expected to make 4 visits to treating physician. According to the physician’s decision, observation period can be extended to 12 months.Present study status. The study is completed. 524 patients completed the observation, including 116 patients who were followed up for 12 months. There are 414 men (79% and 110 women (21% among patients enrolled into the study.

  2. Extended-Release Guaifenesin/Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride for Symptom Relief in Support of a Wait-and-See Approach for the Treatment of Acute Upper Respiratory Tract Infections: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septimus, Edward J; Albrecht, Helmut H; Solomon, Gail; Shea, Tim; Guenin, Eric P

    2017-01-01

    Despite the well-known fact that antibiotics (AB) are not effective against viruses, many patients ask for - and all too often doctors provide - AB for treating URTIs. Over-prescribing of AB is one of the key causes for the development of bacterial resistance, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls "one of the world's most pressing public health problems". In addition to the CDC initiated "Get Smart About Antibiotics" campaign, focused on educating doctors the public about the importance of appropriate AB use, other programs tackling this problem include the development of new treatment paradigms. Data published at the Oregon Health & Science University demonstrated that a 'wait-and-see' approach, without an AB prescription for the treatment of acute childhood ear infections, was as quick, safe, and effective in resolving the infections as an AB prescription (Spiro DM, Tay KY, Arnold DH, Dziura JD, Baker MD, Shapiro ED. Wait-and-See Prescription for the Treatment of Acute Otitis Media. JAMA 2006; 296:1235-1241). To try and reduce inappropriate prescribing practices, a wait and see or delayed approach requires patients to return for a prescription if their symptoms persist or worsen. The aim of this study was to determine whether treatment with Mucinex D (Reckitt Benckiser LLC, Parsippany, New Jersey) lowers the use of antibiotics in the treatment of URTIs when compared with placebo. Patients aged 18 to 75 years with symptoms of acute URTIs were randomized to 1200 mg guaifenesin/120 mg pseudoephedrine hydrochloride extended-release, bilayer tablets or matching placebo for 7 consecutive days. Eligible patients met physician's criteria for antibiotic therapy but were considered suitable for a wait and see approach (withholding antibiotics for ≥48 hours). Patients recorded symptom ratings via an interactive voice response system. One thousand one hundred eighty-nine patients enrolled; data are presented for the modified intent

  3. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of biphasic immediate-release/extended-release hydrocodone bitartrate/acetaminophen (MNK-155 compared with immediate-release hydrocodone bitartrate/ibuprofen and immediate-release tramadol HCl/acetaminophen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devarakonda K

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Krishna Devarakonda,1 Kenneth Kostenbader,2 Michael J Giuliani,3 Jim L Young41Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, 2Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, 3Research and Development, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, 4Department of Clinical Affairs and Program Management, Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Hazelwood, MO, USAObjective: To characterize the single-dose and steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK of biphasic immediate-release/extended-release hydrocodone bitartrate/acetaminophen (IR/ER HB/APAP, IR HB/ibuprofen, and IR tramadol HCl/APAP.Methods: In this single-center, open-label, randomized, four-period crossover study, healthy participants received four treatments under fasted conditions: 1 a single dose of two IR/ER HB/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets (15/650 mg total dose on day 1, followed by two tablets every 12 hours (q12h beginning on day 3; 2 a single dose of IR HB/ibuprofen 15/400 mg (divided as one 7.5/200 mg tablet at hour 0 and 6, followed by one tablet every 6 hours (q6h beginning on day 3; 3 a single dose of IR tramadol HCl/APAP 75/650 mg (divided as one 37.5/325 mg tablet at hour 0 and 6, followed by one tablet q6h beginning on day 3; and 4 a single dose of three IR/ER HB/APAP 7.5/325 mg tablets (22.5/975 mg total dose on day 1, a three-tablet initial dose at 48 hours followed by two-tablet doses q12h beginning on day 3. Hydrocodone and APAP single-dose and steady-state PK were assessed. Adverse events were monitored.Results: The PK analysis was carried out on 29 of 48 enrolled participants who completed all treatment periods. Single-dose hydrocodone exposure was similar for IR/ER HB/APAP 22.5/975 mg and IR HB/ibuprofen 15/400 mg; time to maximum observed plasma concentration was shorter and half-life was longer for IR/ER HB/APAP (22.5/975 mg and 15/650 mg vs IR HB/ibuprofen. Single-dose APAP exposure was similar for IR/ER HB/APAP 15/650 mg and IR tramadol HCl/APAP 75/650 mg. Steady-state hydrocodone and APAP exposures

  4. A randomized, rater-blinded, crossover study of the effects of oxymorphone extended release, fed versus fasting, on cognitive performance as tested with CANTAB in opioid-tolerant subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierings, Egilius L H; Volkerts, Edmund R; Heitland, Ivo; Thomson, Heather

    2014-02-01

    The maximum plasma concentration (Cmax ) of oxymorphone extended release (ER) 20 mg and 40 mg is approximately 50% higher in fed than in fasted subjects, with most of the difference in area-under-the-curve (AUC) occurring in the first 4 hours post-dose. Hence, the US FDA recommends in the approved labeling that oxymorphone ER is taken at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after eating. In order to determine the potential impact on cognitive performance of the increased absorption of oxymorphone ER, fed versus fasting, we conducted a randomized, rater-blinded, crossover study in 30 opioid-tolerant subjects, using tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). The subjects randomly received 40 mg oxymorphone ER after a high-fat meal of approximately 1,010 kCal or after fasting for 8-12 hours, and were tested 1 hour and 3 hours post-dose. The CANTAB tests, Spatial Recognition Memory (SRM) and Spatial Working Memory (SWM), showed no statistically significant differences between the fed and fasting conditions. However, sustained attention, as measured by the Rapid Visual Information Processing (RVP) CANTAB test, showed a statistically significant interaction of fed versus fasting and post-dose time of testing (F[1,28] = 6.88, P = 0.01), suggesting that 40 mg oxymorphone ER after a high-fat meal versus fasting mitigates the learning effect in this particular cognition domain from 1 hour to 3 hours post-dose. Oxymorphone 40 mg ER affected cognitive performance similarly within 3 hours post-dose, whether given on an empty stomach or after a high-fat meal, suggesting that the effect of food on plasma concentration may not be relevant in the medication's impact on cognition. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Comparison of extended-release epidural morphine with femoral nerve block to patient-controlled epidural analgesia for postoperative pain control of total knee arthroplasty: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, Scott L; Hutson, Larry R; Shannon, Patrick; Thomas, Leslie C; Nossaman, Bobby D

    2011-01-01

    Because newer anticoagulation strategies for total knee replacement present potentially increased risk of neuraxial analgesia, there is movement away from using patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) for pain control. This concern opens the door for other regional modalities in postoperative analgesia, including the use of extended-release epidural morphine (EREM) combined with a femoral nerve block (FNB). This study was a prospective observational chart review with the use of recent historical controls in patients undergoing unilateral total knee replacement. Outcomes of interest were 0-, 24-, and 48-hour postoperative pain scores using the visual analog scale (VAS); incidence of side effects; and time spent in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Postoperative pain scores at 24 and 48 hours in the EREM and FNB group (n  =  14; 2.6 ± 0.6 and 5.0 ± 0.9, respectively) were comparable to the PCEA group (n  =  14; 3.8 ± 0.6 and 4.2 ± 0.9). The PACU time was shorter in the EREM and FNB group (2.4 ± 0.3 hours) compared with PCEA (3.6 ± 0.3 hours, P  =  .02). No statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of side effects between the 2 groups. The VAS scores at 24 and 48 hours indicate that EREM and FNB provide comparable analgesia to PCEA. The trend toward shorter PACU times represents an opportunity for cost-identification analysis. The study data are limited by their observational nature and the small number of patients involved; nevertheless, this study demonstrates a therapeutic equivalence to PCEA that may be more cost effective.

  6. The impact of extended release exenatide as adjuvant therapy on hemoglobin A1C, weight, and total daily dose of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using U-500 insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farwig, Phillip A; Zielinski, Angela J; Accursi, Mallory L; Burant, Christopher J

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjuvant exenatide extended release (ER) therapy in patients treated with regular U-500 insulin. In this retrospective chart review at an ambulatory care center in the Midwest, 18 patients with type 2 diabetes being treated with regular U-500 insulin and adjuvant exenatide ER were identified. These patients were evaluated for outcomes following the addition of exenatide ER. The primary outcome was change in HbA 1C from baseline to 3, 6, and 12months. Secondary outcomes included change in weight, total daily dose (TDD) of insulin, and hypoglycemia. Repeated measures ANOVA was performed to assess the differences in mean scores over four time periods. A total of 18 of 50 patients met inclusion criteria with sufficient data to be included in analysis. HbA 1C showed non-significant findings from baseline to 12months (8.08% vs. 8.23%; p=0.75). A non-significant, modest weight loss occurred (146.4kgvs. 144.2kg; -2.2kg; p=0.31). A significant decrease in TDD of insulin was observed (378 units vs. 326 units; p1). There was a trend towards hypoglycemia from baseline to month 3 post addition of exenatide ER (0.33 events vs. 1.33 events; p=0.055). In patients treated with regular U-500 insulin, adjuvant exenatide ER therapy showed no significant improvement in HbA 1C , but did show modest weight loss as well as decreased insulin requirements to achieve a HbA 1C that was comparable to baseline. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Cost-utility analysis of memantine extended release added to cholinesterase inhibitors compared to cholinesterase inhibitor monotherapy for the treatment of moderate-to-severe dementia of the Alzheimer's type in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Laurent Thibault, Catherine; Özer Stillman, Ipek; Chen, Stephanie; Getsios, Denis; Proskorovsky, Irina; Hernandez, Luis; Dixit, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the cost-effectiveness of memantine extended release (ER) as an add-on therapy to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) [combination therapy] for treatment of patients with moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) from both a healthcare payer and a societal perspective over 3 years when compared to AChEI monotherapy in the US. A phase III trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of memantine ER for treatment of AD patients taking an AChEI. The analysis assessed the long-term costs and health outcomes using an individual patient simulation in which AD progression is modeled in terms of cognition, behavior, and functioning changes. Input parameters are based on patient-level trial data, published literature, and publicly available data sources. Changes in anti-psychotic medication use are incorporated based on a published retrospective cohort study. Costs include drug acquisition and monitoring, total AD-related medical care, and informal care associated with caregiver time. Incremental cost-utility ratio (ICUR), life years, care time for caregiver, time in community and institution, time on anti-psychotics, time by disease severity, and time without severe symptoms are reported. Costs and health outcomes are discounted at 3% per annum. Considering a societal perspective over 3 years, this analysis shows that memantine ER combined with an AChEI provides better clinical outcomes and lower costs than AChEI monotherapy. Discounted average savings were estimated at $18,355 and $20,947 per patient and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) increased by an average of 0.12 and 0.13 from a societal and healthcare payer perspective, respectively. Patients on combination therapy spent an average of 4 months longer living at home and spend less time in moderate-severe and severe stages of the disease. Combination therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe AD is a cost-effective treatment compared to AChEI monotherapy in the US.

  8. Synovial and systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of triamcinolone acetonide (TA) following intra-articular (IA) injection of an extended-release microsphere-based formulation (FX006) or standard crystalline suspension in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, V B; Conaghan, P G; Aazami, H A; Mehra, P; Kivitz, A J; Lufkin, J; Hauben, J; Johnson, J R; Bodick, N

    2018-01-01

    Intra-articular (IA) corticosteroids relieve osteoarthritis (OA) pain, but rapid absorption into systemic circulation may limit efficacy and produce untoward effects. We compared the pharmacokinetics (PK) of IA triamcinolone acetonide (TA) delivered as an extended-release, microsphere-based formulation (FX006) vs a crystalline suspension (TAcs) in knee OA patients. This Phase 2 open-label study sequentially enrolled 81 patients who received a single IA injection of FX006 (5 mL, 32 mg delivered dose, N = 63) or TAcs (1 mL, 40 mg, N = 18). Synovial fluid (SF) aspiration was attempted in each patient at baseline and one post-IA-injection visit (FX006: Week 1, Week 6, Week 12, Week 16 or Week 20; TAcs: Week 6). Blood was collected at baseline and multiple post-injection times. TA concentrations (validated LC-MS/MS, geometric means (GMs)), PK (non-compartmental analysis models), and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. SF TA concentrations following FX006 were quantifiable through Week 12 (pg/mL: 231,328.9 at Week 1; 3590.0 at Week 6; 290.6 at Week 12); post-TAcs, only two of eight patients had quantifiable SF TA at Week 6 (7.7 pg/mL). Following FX006, plasma TA gradually increased to peak (836.4 pg/mL) over 24 h and slowly declined to IA injection prolonged SF joint residency, diminished peak plasma levels, and thus reduced systemic TA exposure relative to TAcs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Short-term therapy with combination dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin/metformin extended release (XR) is superior to saxagliptin or metformin XR monotherapy in prediabetic women with polycystic ovary syndrome: a single-blind, randomized, pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind-Hirsch, Karen E; Paterson, Martha S; Seidemann, Ericka L; Gutowski, Hanh C

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy with the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor saxagliptin (SAXA), metformin extended release (MET), and combination (SAXA-MET) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and impaired glucose regulation. Prospective, randomized, single-blind drug study. Outpatient clinic. Patients (n = 38) with PCOS (aged 18-42 years) and prediabetic hyperglycemia determined by a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test. Patients were randomized to SAXA-MET (5 mg/2,000 mg), SAXA (5 mg), or MET (2,000 mg) for 16 weeks. Fasting and mean blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and insulin secretion-sensitivity index (IS-SI) by oral glucose tolerance tests. Free androgen index and lipid levels, average menstrual interval, and anthropometric measurements (body mass index, waist circumference, and waist/height ratio). The study was completed by 34 patients. Nineteen patients had normal glucose tolerance: 3 of 12 (25%) on MET; 6 of 11 (55%) on SAXA; and 10 of 11 (91%) on SAXA-MET (SAXA-MET statistically superior to MET) at study completion. Body mass index, waist circumference, waist/height ratio, free androgen index, insulin sensitivity, IS-SI, and menses improved in all groups; however, IS-SI and menstrual regularity were significantly better with SAXA-MET vs. MET treatment. Triglyceride, triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and mean blood glucose significantly declined in the SAXA-MET and SAXA groups only. This pilot work provides the first evidence regarding the effects of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor alone and in combination with MET in this patient population. Treatment with SAXA-MET was superior to either drug alone in terms of clinical and metabolic benefits in prediabetic patients with PCOS. NCT02022007. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of Quality of Life, Functioning, Disability, and Work/School Productivity Following Treatment with an Extended-Release Hydrocodone Tablet Formulated with Abuse-Deterrence Technology: A 12-month Open-label Study in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Martin E; Zimmerman, Thomas R; Ma, Yuju; Malamut, Richard

    2017-02-01

    This phase 3 study evaluated quality of life, functioning, and productivity after treatment with extended-release (ER) hydrocodone formulated with CIMA ® Abuse-Deterrence Technology platform. Patients with chronic pain were rolled over from a 12-week placebo-controlled hydrocodone ER study or were newly enrolled. Hydrocodone ER doses were titrated (15 to 90 mg every 12 hours) to an analgesic dose, and patients received up to 52 weeks of open-label treatment. Assessments included Clinician Assessment of Patient Function (CAPF), Patient Assessment of Function (PAF), Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and World Health Organization Health and Work Performance Questionnaire-Short Form (HPQ-SF). Of 330 enrolled patients, 291 composed the full analysis population. By week 4, ≥ 50% of patients showed improvement from baseline in all 5 CAPF domains (general activities, walking, work/daily living, relationships, and enjoyment of life) and 6 of 7 PAF domains (work attendance, work performance, walking, exercise, socializing, and enjoying life). Mean decreases from baseline of 2 to 3 points were noted for BPI-SF pain interference questions from week 4 through endpoint. Mean improvements from baseline to endpoint in SF-36 subscales ranged from 3.3 to 22.3, and SDS scores improved from moderate (4.8 to 5.1) to mild (2.5 to 2.8) disruptions in work/school, social life, and family life. At endpoint, mean HPQ-SF absolute absenteeism scores decreased from 13.6 to 10.0 hours lost/month and absolute presenteeism scores improved from 67.0 to 77.1. Patients receiving hydrocodone ER showed early numeric improvements in functioning that continued throughout this 12-month study. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  11. A pragmatic, phase III, multisite, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm, dose increment randomised trial of regular, low-dose extended-release morphine for chronic breathlessness: Breathlessness, Exertion And Morphine Sulfate (BEAMS) study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currow, David; Watts, Gareth John; Johnson, Miriam; McDonald, Christine F; Miners, John O; Somogyi, Andrew A; Denehy, Linda; McCaffrey, Nicola; Eckert, Danny J; McCloud, Philip; Louw, Sandra; Lam, Lawrence; Greene, Aine; Fazekas, Belinda; Clark, Katherine C; Fong, Kwun; Agar, Meera R; Joshi, Rohit; Kilbreath, Sharon; Ferreira, Diana; Ekström, Magnus

    2017-07-17

    Chronic breathlessness is highly prevalent and distressing to patients and families. No medication is registered for its symptomatic reduction. The strongest evidence is for regular, low-dose, extended- release (ER) oral morphine. A recent large phase III study suggests the subgroup most likely to benefit have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and modified Medical Research Council breathlessness scores of 3 or 4. This protocol is for an adequately powered, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, multisite, factorial, block-randomised study evaluating regular ER morphine for chronic breathlessness in people with COPD. The primary question is what effect regular ER morphine has on worst breathlessness, measured daily on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. Uniquely, the coprimary outcome will use a FitBit to measure habitual physical activity. Secondary questions include safety and, whether upward titration after initial benefit delivers greater net symptom reduction. Substudies include longitudinal driving simulation, sleep, caregiver, health economic and pharmacogenetic studies. Seventeen centres will recruit 171 participants from respiratory and palliative care. The study has five phases including three randomisation phases to increasing doses of ER morphine. All participants will receive placebo or active laxatives as appropriate. Appropriate statistical analysis of primary and secondary outcomes will be used. Ethics approval has been obtained. Results of the study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals, findings presented at relevant conferences and potentially used to inform registration of ER morphine for chronic breathlessness. NCT02720822; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy and safety study of ALO-02 (extended-release oxycodone surrounding sequestered naltrexone) for moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Richard L; Hale, Martin E; Bass, Almasa; Bramson, Candace; Pixton, Glenn; Wilson, Jacquelyn G; Setnik, Beatrice; Meisner, Paul; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Malhotra, Bimal K; Wolfram, Gernot

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized withdrawal study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ALO-02, an abuse-deterrent formulation containing pellets of extended-release oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) surrounding sequestered naltrexone HCl, compared with placebo in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic low back pain. An open-label titration period in which all patients received ALO-02 was followed by a double-blind treatment period where patients meeting treatment response criteria were randomized to either a fixed dose of ALO-02 or placebo. Daily average low back pain was assessed using an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS)-Pain. Of the 663 patients screened, 410 received ALO-02 during the open-label conversion and titration period and 281 patients were randomized to the double-blind treatment period (n = 134, placebo; n = 147, ALO-02). Change in the mean NRS-Pain score from randomization baseline to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period was significantly different favoring ALO-02 compared with placebo (P = 0.0114). Forty-four percent of patients treated with placebo and 57.5% of patients treated with ALO-02 reported ≥30% improvement in weekly average NRS-Pain scores from screening to the final 2 weeks of the treatment period (P = 0.0248). In the double-blind treatment period, 56.8% of patients in the ALO-02 group and 56.0% of patients in the placebo group experienced a treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE). The most common treatment-related TEAEs for ALO-02 during the treatment period were nausea, vomiting, and constipation, consistent with opioid therapy. ALO-02 has been demonstrated to provide significant reduction of pain in patients with chronic low back pain and has a safety profile similar to other opioids.

  13. In Vitro-In Vivo Predictive Dissolution-Permeation-Absorption Dynamics of Highly Permeable Drug Extended-Release Tablets via Drug Dissolution/Absorption Simulating System and pH Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Qiang; Tian, Shuang; Gu, Hui; Wu, Zeng-Guang; Nyagblordzro, Makafui; Feng, Guo; He, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Each of dissolution and permeation may be a rate-limiting factor in the absorption of oral drug delivery. But the current dissolution test rarely took into consideration of the permeation property. Drug dissolution/absorption simulating system (DDASS) valuably gave an insight into the combination of drug dissolution and permeation processes happening in human gastrointestinal tract. The simulated gastric/intestinal fluid of DDASS was improved in this study to realize the influence of dynamic pH change on the complete oral dosage form. To assess the effectiveness of DDASS, six high-permeability drugs were chosen as model drugs, including theophylline (pK a1  = 3.50, pK a2  = 8.60), diclofenac (pK a  = 4.15), isosorbide 5-mononitrate (pK a  = 7.00), sinomenine (pK a  = 7.98), alfuzosin (pK a  = 8.13), and metoprolol (pK a  = 9.70). A general elution and permeation relationship of their commercially available extended-release tablets was assessed as well as the relationship between the cumulative permeation and the apparent permeability. The correlations between DDASS elution and USP apparatus 2 (USP2) dissolution and also between DDASS permeation and beagle dog absorption were developed to estimate the predictability of DDASS. As a result, the common elution-dissolution relationship was established regardless of some variance in the characteristic behavior between DDASS and USP2 for drugs dependent on the pH for dissolution. Level A in vitro-in vivo correlation between DDASS permeation and dog absorption was developed for drugs with different pKa. The improved DDASS will be a promising tool to provide a screening method on the predictive dissolution-permeation-absorption dynamics of solid drug dosage forms in the early-phase formulation development.

  14. A clinical trial to determine if corelease of morphine and naltrexone from crushed extended-release capsules induces withdrawal in opioid-dependent patients: a descriptive analysis of six patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Goli, Veeraindar; Sommerville, Kenneth; Webster, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether intact or crushed doses of an extended-release formulation of morphine sulfate surrounding an inner core of sequestered naltrexone (MSN) induces signs and symptoms of withdrawal in opioid-dependent patients. Randomized, double-blind, two-way crossover study. Single center. Fourteen patients with chronic moderate-to-severe noncancer pain receiving opioids were enrolled into the study; six completed the maintenance and treatment phases prior to early study discontinuation for issues with manufacturing; eight discontinued: adverse effects (4), noncompliance (1), patient decision (1), study termination (2). Patients were titrated to a stable dose of MSN (ranging from 30/1.2 to 100/4.0 mg of morphine/naltrexone) that was used in the single-dose crossover evaluation of crushed and intact MSN. Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS). Clinically significant withdrawal (COWS ≥ 13) was observed with rapid onset (≤0.8 hours postdose) in three patients (50 percent) following treatment with crushed MSN at the highest doses administered of ≥60/2.4 mg. Although naltrexone exposure was negligible following exposure to intact MSN, increasing plasma levels of naltrexone and 6-β-naltrexol were associated with COWS score ≥13 in patients who received crushed MSN. COWS ≥ 13 was observed in one patient receiving intact MSN without quantifiable naltrexone concentrations. Crushing the MSN capsule may precipitate moderate-to-severe signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal in opioid-dependent individuals. The negligible exposure to naltrexone following exposure to intact MSN supports that intact capsules may be taken safely without precipitating withdrawal in opioid-dependent individuals.

  15. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Plant Biomass and the Rhizosphere Microbial Community Structure of Mesquite Grown in Acidic Lead/Zinc Mine Tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A.; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M.

    2011-01-01

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by AMF, or a combination of both mechanisms. PMID:21211826

  16. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass and the rhizosphere microbial community structure of mesquite grown in acidic lead/zinc mine tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Domínguez, Fernando A; Valentín-Vargas, Alexis; Chorover, Jon; Maier, Raina M

    2011-02-15

    Mine tailings in arid and semi-arid environments are barren of vegetation and subject to eolian dispersion and water erosion. Revegetation is a cost-effective strategy to reduce erosion processes and has wide public acceptance. A major cost of revegetation is the addition of amendments, such as compost, to allow plant establishment. In this paper we explore whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help support plant growth in tailings at a reduced compost concentration. A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the effects of three AMF inocula on biomass, shoot accumulation of heavy metals, and changes in the rhizosphere microbial community structure of the native plant Prosopis juliflora (mesquite). Plants were grown in an acidic lead/zinc mine tailings amended with 10% (w/w) compost amendment, which is slightly sub-optimal for plant growth in these tailings. After two months, AMF-inoculated plants showed increased dry biomass and root length (p<0.05) and effective AMF colonization compared to controls grown in uninoculated compost-amended tailings. Mesquite shoot tissue lead and zinc concentrations did not exceed domestic animal toxicity limits regardless of whether AMF inoculation was used. The rhizosphere microbial community structure was assessed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles of the small subunit RNA gene for bacteria and fungi. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of DGGE profiles showed that the rhizosphere fungal community structure at the end of the experiment was significantly different from the community structure in the tailings, compost, and AMF inocula prior to planting. Further, CCA showed that AMF inoculation significantly influenced the development of both the fungal and bacterial rhizosphere community structures after two months. The changes observed in the rhizosphere microbial community structure may be either a direct effect of the AMF inocula, caused by changes in plant physiology induced by

  17. (MESQUITE THORN) PODS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'n basale dieet van gemaalde lusern- en hawerhooi ontvang (kontrole) wat trapsgewys verplaas is met gemaalde hosopis juliflora pcule tot 1009e verplasing.Ad lib. innames van suiwer Prosopis-peule het nie betekenisvol van die kontroledieet verskil nie, maar verteerbaarheid. veral van ruvesel, is ver- laag namate die vlak ...

  18. Joint purpose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Starting from Crenshaw´s point that antiracism often fails to interrogate patriarchy and that feminism often reproduces racist practices (1991: 1252), this paper asks: What are the theoretical reasons for believing that feminism and anti-racism can be regarded as fighting for the joint purpose...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of hydrocodone extended-release tablets formulated with different levels of coating to achieve abuse deterrence compared with a hydrocodone immediate-release/acetaminophen tablet in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Bond, Mary; Tracewell, William; Robertson, Philmore; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-01-01

    A hydrocodone extended-release (ER) formulation employing the CIMA(®) Abuse-Deterrence Technology platform was developed to provide resistance against rapid release of hydrocodone when tablets are comminuted or taken with alcohol. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics of three hydrocodone ER tablet prototypes with varying levels of polymer coating to identify the prototype expected to have the greatest abuse deterrence potential based on pharmacokinetic characteristics that maintain systemic exposure to hydrocodone comparable to that of a commercially available hydrocodone immediate-release (IR) product. In this four-period crossover study, healthy subjects aged 18-45 years were randomized to receive a single intact, oral 45-mg tablet of one of three hydrocodone ER prototypes (low-, intermediate-, or high-level coating) or an intact, oral tablet of hydrocodone IR/acetaminophen (APAP) 10/325 mg every 6 h until four tablets were administered, with each of the four treatments administered once over the four study periods. Dosing periods were separated by a minimum 5-day washout. Naltrexone 50 mg was administered to block opioid receptors. Blood samples for pharmacokinetic assessments were collected predose and through 72 h postdose. Parameters assessed included maximum observed plasma hydrocodone concentration (C(max)), time to C(max) (t(max)), and area under the concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0-∞)). Mean C(max) values were 49.2, 32.6, and 28.4 ng/mL for the low-, intermediate-, and high-level coating hydrocodone ER tablet prototypes, respectively, and 37.3 ng/mL for the hydrocodone IR/APAP tablet; respective median t(max) values were 5.9, 8.0, 8.0, and 1.0 h. Total systemic exposure to hydrocodone (AUC(0-∞)) was comparable between hydrocodone ER tablet prototypes (640, 600, and 578 ng·h/mL, respectively) and hydrocodone IR/APAP (581 ng·h/mL). No serious adverse events or deaths were reported. The most common adverse events included

  20. The safety and effectiveness of open-label extended-release carbamazepine in the treatment of children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder suffering from a manic or mixed episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findling RL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robert L Findling,1,2 Lawrence D Ginsberg31Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 2Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Red Oak Psychiatry Associates, PA, Houston, TX, USAObjective: To assess the safety and effectiveness of open-label treatment with extended-release carbamazepine (ERC in pediatric subjects suffering from bipolar I disorder.Method: Medically healthy youths aged 10–17 years suffering from an acute manic or mixed episode were eligible. After screening for study eligibility, the youths began a 5-week titration period in which doses of ERC were adjusted in order to optimize benefit whilst minimizing adverse events, at doses between 200–1,200 mg/day. Thereafter, subjects could continue to receive treatment during a subsequent 21-week period. Safety measures included spontaneously reported adverse events (AEs and laboratory assessments. The primary efficacy measure was the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS.Results: A total of 60 children (ages 10–12 and 97 adolescents (ages 13–17, with an overall average age of 13.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.0 years received ERC. The mean duration of study participation was 109.6 days (SD 70.2 days, with 66 (42% completing the entire study. At end of study participation (end point, the most prevalent dose of ERC was 1,200 mg: 31.7% of children and 24.7% of adolescents reached the 1,200 mg dose. The YMRS decreased from a mean of 28.6 (SD 6.2 at baseline to a mean of 13.8 (SD 9.4 (P<0.0001 at end point. A total of 26 subjects discontinued study participation because of AEs, the most common of which were rash (n=6, white blood cell count decreased (n=5, nausea (n=3, and vomiting (n=3. No deaths were reported. The most commonly reported AEs were headache (n=41, somnolence (n=30, nausea (n=22, dizziness (n=21, and fatigue (n=19.Conclusions: Open-label administration of ERC might be a safe

  1. Is adjunctive pharmacotherapy in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder cost-effective in Canada: a cost-effectiveness assessment of guanfacine extended-release as an adjunctive therapy to a long-acting stimulant for the treatment of ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaine, Jean; Sikirica, Vanja; Mathurin, Karine

    2016-01-16

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common psychiatric disorder in children, with worldwide prevalence of ADHD varying from 5.9 to 7.1 %, depending on the reporter. In case of inadequate response to stimulants, combination therapy of stimulants and an adjunctive medication may improve the control of ADHD symptoms, reduce the dose-limiting adverse events, and help control comorbidities. To date, the only medication to be used for adjunctive therapy to psychostimulants is guanfacine extended release (GXR). The aim of this study was to assess the economic impact of GXR as an adjunct therapy with long-acting stimulants (GXR + stimulant) compared to long-acting stimulant monotherapy (stimulant alone) in the treatment of children and adolescents with ADHD in Canada. A Markov model was developed using health states defined based on the clinician-reported Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) score (normal, mild, moderate, severe). Transition probabilities were calculated based on patient-level data from a published study. Long-acting stimulants available in Canada were considered in the base-case model: amphetamine mixed salts, methylphenidate HCl formulations, and lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. Analyses were conducted from a Canadian Ministry of Health (MoH; Ontario) and a societal perspective over a 1-year time horizon with weekly cycles. Over a 1-year time horizon, GXR + stimulant was associated with 0.655 quality-adjusted life year (QALY), compared to 0.627 QALY with stimulant alone, for a gain of 0.028 QALY. From a MoH perspective, GXR+ stimulant and stimulant alone were associated with total costs of $CA1,617 and $CA949, respectively (difference of $CA668), which resulted in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $CA23,720/QALY. From a societal perspective, GXR + stimulant and stimulant alone were associated with total costs of $CA3,915 and $CA3,582, respectively (difference of $CA334), which resulted in an ICER of $CA11

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of a hydrocodone extended-release tablet formulated with abuse-deterrence technology for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain in patients with osteoarthritis or low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale ME

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Martin E Hale,1 Charles Laudadio,2 Ronghua Yang,2 Arvind Narayana,2 Richard Malamut2 1Gold Coast Research, LLC, Plantation, FL, 2Teva Branded Pharmaceutical Products R & D, Inc., Frazer, PA, USA Abstract: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the efficacy and safety of hydrocodone extended release (ER developed with abuse-deterrence technology to provide sustained pain relief and limit effects of alcohol and tablet manipulation on drug release. Eligible patients with chronic moderate-to-severe low back or osteoarthritis pain were titrated to an analgesic dose of hydrocodone ER (15–90 mg and randomized to placebo or hydrocodone ER every 12 hours. The primary efficacy measure was change from baseline to week 12 in weekly average pain intensity (API; 0=no pain, 10=worst pain imaginable. Secondary measures included percentage of patients with >33% and >50% increases from baseline in weekly API, change from baseline in weekly worst pain intensity, supplemental opioid usage, aberrant drug-use behaviors, and adverse events. Overall, 294 patients were randomized and received ≥1 dose of placebo (n=148 or hydrocodone ER (n=146. Weekly API did not differ significantly between hydrocodone ER and placebo at week 12 (P=0.134; although, in post hoc analyses, the change in weekly API was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER when excluding the lowest dose (15 mg; least squares mean, –0.20 vs 0.40; P=0.032. Significantly more patients had .33% and .50% increase in weekly API with placebo (P<0.05, and mean weekly worst pain intensity was significantly lower with hydrocodone ER at week 12 (P=0.026. Supplemental medication usage was higher with placebo (86% than hydrocodone ER (79%. Incidence of aberrant drug-use behaviors was low, and adverse events were similar between groups. This study did not meet the primary endpoint, although results support the effectiveness of this hydrocodone ER formulation in managing chronic low back or

  3. The cost-effectiveness of solifenacin vs fesoterodine, oxybutynin immediate-release, propiverine, tolterodine extended-release and tolterodine immediate-release in the treatment of patients with overactive bladder in the UK National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardozo, Linda; Thorpe, Andrew; Warner, Juliet; Sidhu, Manpreet

    2010-08-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of solifenacin vs other antimuscarinic strategies commonly used in UK clinical practice, based on the results of a recent published review. Overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome is characterized by symptoms of urgency, frequency, incontinence and nocturia. Pharmacological treatment comprises oral antimuscarinic agents, which are divided into older-generation treatments, including oxybutynin, and new-generation treatments, comprising solifenacin, tolterodine, darifenacin and fesoterodine. The latter have reduced central nervous system penetration and have better selectivity for the M3 subclass of acetylcholine receptors, resulting in improved tolerability. A recent systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of antimuscarinics provided an opportunity for an economic evaluation of these agents using a rigorous assessment of efficacy. A cost-utility analysis was undertaken using a 1-year decision-tree model. Treatment success was defined separately for urgency, frequency and incontinence, with efficacy data taken from the recent review. Treatment persistence rates were taken from the Information Management System database. Utility values for the calculation of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were taken from published sources. The analysis included costs directly associated with treatment for OAB, i.e. antimuscarinic therapy, consultations with general practitioners, and outpatient contacts. Resource use was based on expert opinion. Costs were reported at 2007/2008 prices. Extensive deterministic and probabilistic analyses were conducted to test the robustness of the base-case results. Solifenacin was associated with the highest QALY gains (per 1000 patients) for all three outcomes of interest, i.e. urgency (712.3), frequency (723.1) and incontinence (695.0). Solifenacin was dominant relative to fesoterodine, tolterodine extended-release (ER) and tolterodine immediate-release (IR), and cost-effective relative to

  4. Quality measure attainment with dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release as initial combination therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: a post hoc pooled analysis of two clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell KF

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kelly F Bell, Arie Katz, John J Sheehan AstraZeneca, Wilmington, DE, USA Background: The use of quality measures attempts to improve safety and health outcomes and to reduce costs. In two Phase III trials in treatment-naive patients with type 2 diabetes, dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d as initial combination therapy with metformin extended-release (XR significantly reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C from baseline to 24 weeks and allowed higher proportions of patients to achieve A1C <7% vs dapagliflozin or metformin monotherapy. Objective: A pooled analysis of data from these two studies assessed the effect of dapagliflozin 5 or 10 mg/d plus metformin XR (combination therapy compared with placebo plus metformin XR (metformin monotherapy on diabetes quality measures. Quality measures include laboratory measures of A1C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C as well as vital status measures of blood pressure (BP and body mass index (BMI. The proportion of patients achieving A1C, BP, and LDL-C individual and composite measures was assessed, as was the proportion with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 who lost ≥4.5 kg. Subgroup analyses by baseline BMI were also performed. Results: A total of 194 and 211 patients were treated with dapagliflozin 5- or 10-mg/d combination therapy, respectively, and 409 with metformin monotherapy. Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved A1C ≤6.5%, <7%, or <8% with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy (P<0.02. Significantly higher proportions of patients achieved BP <140/90 mmHg (P<0.02 for each dapagliflozin dose and BP <130/80 mmHg (P<0.02 with dapagliflozin 5 mg/d only with combination therapy vs metformin monotherapy. Similar proportions (29%–33% of patients had LDL-C <100 mg/dL across treatment groups. A higher proportion of patients with baseline BMI ≥25 kg/m2 lost ≥4.5 kg with combination therapy. Combination therapy had a more robust effect on patients with higher baseline BMI. Conclusion

  5. Does switching from oral extended-release methylphenidate to the methylphenidate transdermal system affect health-related quality-of-life and medication satisfaction for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landgraf Jeanne M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQL and medication satisfaction after switching from a stable dose of oral extended-release methylphenidate (ER-MPH to methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS via a dose-transition schedule in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Methods In a 4-week, multisite, open-label study, 171 children (164 in the intent-to-treat [ITT] population aged 6-12 years diagnosed with ADHD abruptly switched from a stable dose of oral ER-MPH to MTS nominal dosages of 10, 15, 20, and 30 mg using a predefined dose-transition schedule. Subjects remained on the scheduled dose for the first week, after which the dose was then titrated to an optimal effect. The ADHD Impact Module-Children (AIM-C, a disease-specific validated HRQL survey instrument measuring child and family impact, was used to assess the impact of ADHD symptoms on the lives of children and their families at baseline and study endpoint. Satisfaction with MTS use was assessed via a Medication Satisfaction Survey (MSS at study endpoint. Both the AIM-C and MSS were completed by a caregiver (parent/legally authorized representative. Tolerability was monitored by spontaneous adverse event (AE reporting. Results AIM-C child and family HRQL mean scores were above the median possible score at baseline and were further improved at endpoint across all MTS doses. Similar improvements were noted for behavior, missed doses, worry, and economic impact AIM-C item scores. Overall, 93.8% of caregivers indicated a high level of satisfaction with their child's use of the study medication. The majority of treatment-emergent AEs (> 98% were mild to moderate in intensity, and the most commonly reported AEs included headache, decreased appetite, insomnia, and abdominal pain. Seven subjects discontinued the study due to intolerable AEs (n = 3 and application site reactions (n = 4. Conclusion This study demonstrates that MTS, when carefully

  6. Long-term safety and effectiveness of once-daily, single-entity, extended-release hydrocodone over 76 weeks of an open-label study in patients with chronic noncancer and nonneuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Louise; Lynch, Shau Yu; He, Ellie; Ripa, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate long-term use of Hysingla(®) ER (HYD), a single-entity, extended-release, once-daily hydrocodone bitartrate tablet with abuse-deterrent properties in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic noncancer and nonneuropathic pain. This open-label study consisted of a dose-titration period (up to 45 days), a 52-week maintenance period and a 24-week extension period. Opioid-naïve or opioid-experienced patients with controlled or uncontrolled chronic pain conditions were treated with HYD 20-120 mg daily. Supplemental nonopioid and short-acting opioid analgesics were permitted. This paper presents the results of 106 patients who continued HYD treatment for up to 76 weeks. Primary safety measures included the incidence of adverse events, as well as audiologic, clinical laboratory and electrocardiogram measurements. Effectiveness was measured by the change between baseline and the overall 76-week treatment period in "average pain over the last 24 h" (0 = no pain, 10 = pain as bad as you can imagine), Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form survey, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale-Revised and concomitant nonstudy opioid analgesic use. Among 410 patients who completed the maintenance period, 106 continued into the extension. Of these, 83 (78%) completed the entire 76-week treatment period. Treatment-emergent adverse events were typical of those observed with μ-opioid agonists. No study drug abuse or diversion was reported. Clinically important analgesia and functional improvement were achieved during the dose-titration period and were maintained in most patients throughout 76 weeks without the need for continued HYD dose increases or changes in concomitant nonstudy opioid analgesics. The mean pain score was 6.1 at baseline, 3.8 at the end of the dose titration period and 3.8 through 76 weeks. HYD was generally well tolerated. No unexpected safety concerns emerged. Pain control was sustained throughout 76 weeks of

  7. A randomized study to compare the efficacy and safety of extended-release and immediate-release tramadol HCl/acetaminophen in patients with acute pain following total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Beom; Ha, Chul-Won; Cho, Sung-Do; Lee, Myung-Chul; Lee, Ju-Hong; Seo, Seung-Suk; Kang, Seung-Baik; Kyung, Hee-Soo; Choi, Choong-Hyeok; Chang, NaYoon; Rhim, Hyou Young Helen; Bin, Seong-Il

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the relative efficacy and safety of extended-release tramadol HCl 75 mg/acetaminophen 650 mg (TA-ER) and immediate-release tramadol HCl 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg (TA-IR) for the treatment of moderate to severe acute pain following total knee replacement. This phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study randomized 320 patients with moderate to severe pain (≥4 intensity on an 11 point numeric rating scale) following total knee replacement arthroplasty to receive oral TA-ER (every 12 hours) or TA-IR (every 6 hours) over a period of 48 hours. In the primary analysis, TA-ER was evaluated for efficacy non-inferior to that of TA-IR based on the sum of pain intensity difference (SPID) at 48 hours after the first dose of study drug (SPID48). Secondary endpoints included SPID at additional time points, total pain relief at all on-therapy time points (TOTPAR), sum of SPID and TOTPAR at all on-therapy time points (SPID + TOTPAR), use of rescue medication, subjective pain assessment (PGIC, Patient Global Impression of Change), and adverse events (AEs). Analysis of the primary efficacy endpoint (SPID48) could not establish the non-inferiority of TA-ER to TA-IR. However, a post hoc analysis with a re-defined non-inferiority margin did demonstrate the non-inferiority of TA-ER to TA-IR. No statistically significant difference in SPID at 6, 12, or 24 hours was observed between the TA-ER and TA-IR groups. Similarly, analysis of TOTPAR showed that there were no significant differences between groups at any on-therapy time point, and SPID + TOTPAR at 6 and 48 hours were similar among groups. There was no difference in the mean frequency or dosage of rescue medication required by both groups, and the majority of patients in both the TA-ER and TA-IR groups rated their pain improvement as 'much' or 'somewhat better'. The overall incidence of ≥1 AEs was similar among the TA-ER (88.8%) and TA-IR (89.5%) groups. The most commonly

  8. Evaluation of Patient Migration Patterns and Related Health Care Costs Within a National Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug Plan After Implementation of an Oxycodone HCl Extended-Release Access Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Chang; De, Ajita P; Sweet, Brian; Wade, Rolin L

    2017-08-01

    Health plans use formulary restrictions (e.g., prior authorization, step therapy, tier change, nonformulary status) in an effort to control cost and promote quality, safety, and appropriate prescription utilization. Some Medicare payers perceive that the inclusion of certain agents, such as branded oxycodone HCl extended-release tablets (OERs), on their formularies is associated with attracting high-cost members to the plan. To evaluate disenrollment rates, patient migration, and subsequent health care costs among OER users who disenrolled from a national Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug plan (study-MAPD) in the plan year following OER nonformulary restriction. A retrospective, longitudinal cohort study using IMS pharmacy and medical claims data between July 1, 2011, and December 31, 2014, was conducted. In the study-MAPD, adults aged ≥ 18 years who were chronic OER users with ≥ 2 OER claims 6 months before the nonformulary restriction date on January 1, 2013 (index date) and with continuous activity in pharmacy and medical claims for 6 months pre- and post-index were included in the study. Comparison years of 2012 and 2014 prerestriction/postrestriction were selected. All groups were followed for 6 months postindex. Year-to-year disenrollment rates of OER patients and the overall plan, as well as patient characteristics and costs of those who disenrolled from and those who remained with the plan, were measured. Costs were compared using a difference-in-differences approach. This study identified 2,935 eligible OER users from the study-MAPD population after imposing nonformulary restrictions on OERs on January 1, 2013. Mean age was 62.1 years, and 59.8% were female. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 1.83 for those 1,001 patients with medical claims data. For comparison years 2012 (prerestriction) and 2014 (postrestriction), 2,248 and 2,222 OER patients were identified, respectively. Patient characteristics were similar across patient cohorts in

  9. Microencapsulation by spray drying of lemon essential oil: Evaluation of mixtures of mesquite gum-nopal mucilage as new wall materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Camargo, Stefani; Cruz-Olivares, Julian; Barragán-Huerta, Blanca E; Dublán-García, Octavio; Román-Guerrero, Angélica; Pérez-Alonso, César

    2017-06-01

    Mesquite gum (MG) and nopal mucilage (NM) mixtures were used for microencapsulation of lemon essential oil (LEO) by spray drying. Emulsions of MG, NM and MG-NM mixtures (25-75, 50-50, 75-25) were evaluated according to the droplet size (1.49-9.16 μm), viscosity and zeta potential (-16.07 to -20.13 mV), and microcapsules were characterised in particle size (11.9-44.4 μm), morphology, volatile oil retention (VOR) (45.9-74.4%), encapsulation efficiency (EE) (70.9-90.6%), oxidative stability and thermal analysis. The higher concentration of MG led to smaller droplet sizes and lower viscosity in the emulsions, and smaller particle sizes with the highest VOR in microcapsules. The higher concentration of NM induced to higher viscosity in the emulsions, and larger particle sizes with the highest values of EE and oxidative stability in microcapsules. This work shows evidence that MG-NM mixtures can have synergic effect in desirable characteristics such as retention and shelf life extension of LEO in microcapsules.

  10. Jojoba - a promising plant for the semi-arid regions. [North America, plants, seeds, oils, waxes, growth, cultivation, lubricants, guayule, mesquite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yermanos, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the world-wide concern for conservation of resources and for the development of new renewable resources a great deal of attention has been directed towards the development of jojoba as a potential new crop for semi-arid regions. Jojoba grows wild in the Southwestern U.S. and N. Mexico, in areas where the annual precipitation is 4''-15''. Under cultivation it appears to grow satisfactorily in areas of marginal soil fertility, high salinity and high atmospheric temperatures. It appears to have no major natural enemies and to be tolerant to chemical treatments, if they were to become necessary. It is perennial with an assumed life span in excess of 150 years. Jojoba seed has an average weight of about 0.5 grams per seed, and it contains a unique liquid wax which is a superior lubricant and a potential replacement of whale oil, obtained from the sperm whale, and endangered species. Thus, jojoba has a double appeal, first as a potential crop of semi-arid regions requiring low cultural and energy inputs and second as a source of a valuable commodity. It should be pointed out that a cheap and abundant source of lubricants will disappear when our stock of fossil fuels are exhausted and that none of our new sources of energy have lubricants as by-products. Finally, jojoba could be grown with other companion crops such as guayule or mesquite for more diversified farming.

  11. Control of Rice Weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L., in Stored Wheat Grains with Mesquite Plant, Prosopis juliflora (SW, D.C. Seed Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. AI-Moajel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of mesquite plant, Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C. (Family: Mimosaceae, seed extracts against rice weevil. Sitophilus oryzae (L, reared on wheat grains was investigated in the laboratory. The tested plant extracts of P. juliflora in petroleum ether, chloroform, and acetone, effectively controlled adults and their toxicity based on LC95 and LC5O values respectively was in order: acetone (12.0, 5.8ml/kg < pet ether (8.0, 4.1ml/kg chloroform (6.3, 2.2ml/kg. A highly significant oviposition deterency effect (P< 0.05 was found for all extracts at LC50 levels, while at LC95 levels, oviposition was nearly completely inhibited. Thus, progeny emergence was completely suppressed at Legs levels, also at LCSC, of acetone extract. Chlorofonn extract indicated a slow rate of degradation alter one month of storage (90% mortality. All tested plant extracts reduced weight loss in wheat grains after 45 days of storage, but chloroform extract was the most effective. Most treatments did not significantly affect water absorption but viability was significantly reduced. Petroleum ether and chloroform extracts caused a significant inhibition effect on acetyl choline esterase (AchE in adults while acetone extract caused a significant activation effect. All three different extracts, caused a significant activation effect on phosphases (AcP and AlkP, except for chloroform and acetone extract treatments which caused significant inhibition of AcP in adults. All extracts caused a significant decrease in protein and carbohydrate contents of adults, except the carbohydrate content of adults treated with acetone extract. There was a significant increase in lipid content in adults treated with all three extracts and significant increase of carbohydrate content only in adults treated with acetone extract.

  12. Toxicity of arsenic (III) and (V) on plant growth, element uptake, and total amylolytic activity of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgalaka-Matlala, Ntebogeng S; Flores-Tavizón, Edith; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2008-01-01

    The effects of arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)] on the growth of roots, stems, and leaves and the uptake of arsenic (As), micro- and macronutrients, and total amylolytic activity were investigated to elucidate the phytotoxicity of As to the mesquite plant (Prosopis juliflora x P. velutina). The plant growth was evaluated by measuring the root and shoot length, and the element uptake was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The root and leaf elongation decreased significantly with increasing As(III) and As(V) concentrations; whereas, stem elongation remained unchanged. The As uptake increased with increasing As(III) or As(V) concentrations in the medium. Plants treated with 50 mg/L As(III) accumulated up to 920 mg/kg dry weight (d wt) in roots and 522 mg/kg d wt in leaves, while plants exposed to 50 mg/L As(V) accumulated 1980 and 210 mg/kg d wt in roots and leaves, respectively. Increasing the As(V) concentration up to 20 mg/L resulted in a decrease in the total amylolytic activity. On the contrary, total amylolytic activity in As(III)-treated plants increased with increasing As concentration up to 20 mg/L. The macro- and micronutrient concentrations changed in As-treated plants. In shoots, Mo and K were reduced but Ca was increased, while in roots Fe and Ca were increased but K was reduced. These changes reduced the size of the plants, mainly in the As(III)-treated plants; however, there were no visible sign of As toxicity.

  13. Degradação ruminal de silagem de capim-elefante com adição de vagem de algaroba triturada Ruminal degradation of elephant grass silage with mesquite pods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Coutinho do Rêgo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa foi realizada visando-se avaliar a degradação ruminal da matéria seca (MS, proteína bruta (PB e fibra em detergente neutro (FDN de silagens de capim-elefante colhido aos 70; 90 e 110 dias após rebrota, com inclusão de 0; 5; 10 e 15% de vagem de algaroba triturada, com base na matéria natural, em delineamento inteiramente casualizado arranjado em parcelas subdivididas. Amostras de cada silagem foram incubadas no rúmen de duas vacas Jersey por 3; 6; 12; 24; 48; 72 e 96 h, sendo os saquinhos referentes ao tempo zero apenas lavados em água para determinação da fração solúvel. Não houve interação (P > 0,05 tempo de incubação x inclusão de vagem de algaroba x idade de corte para degradabilidade da MS, embora tenha ocorrido interação destes fatores para degradabilidade da PB e FDN. A maior degradabilidade efetiva (DE da MS (42,54% foi observada para 15% de inclusão de vagem de algaroba. A DE da PB foi maior (69,04% para silagem de capim-elefante com 70 dias de idade com 15% de vagem de algaroba. A inclusão de vagem de algaroba triturada à silagem de capim-elefante melhora a degradabilidade da MS, PB e FDN, enquanto o avanço da idade após rebrota resulta em redução destes parâmetros.This research was carried out to evaluate the ruminal degradation of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP and neutral detergent fiber (NDF of silages of elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum cutting in 70; 90 and 110 days after regrowth with inclusion of 0; 5; 10 and 15% of mesquite (Prosopis juliflora meal, based on natural matter in a completely randomized design, in split plot arrangement. Samples of silages were incubated in the rumen of two Jersey cows for 3; 6; 12; 24; 48; 72 and 96 h, and the bags at time "zero" were only washed with water to determine the soluble fraction. There was not interaction (P > 0.05 incubation time × inclusion of mesquite pods × cutting age of the grass for DM degradability, there was only

  14. Single Layer Extended Release Two-in-One Guaifenesin Matrix Tablet: Formulation Method, Optimization, Release Kinetics Evaluation and Its Comparison with Mucinex® Using Box-Behnken Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morovati, Amirhosein; Ghaffari, Alireza; Erfani Jabarian, Lale; Mehramizi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Guaifenesin, a highly water-soluble active (50 mg/mL), classified as a BCS class I drug. Owing to its poor flowability and compressibility, formulating tablets especially high-dose one, may be a challenge. Direct compression may not be feasible. Bilayer tablet technology applied to Mucinex®, endures challenges to deliver a robust formulation. To overcome challenges involved in bilayer-tablet manufacturing and powder compressibility, an optimized single layer tablet prepared by a binary mixture (Two-in-one), mimicking the dual drug release character of Mucinex ® was purposed. A 3-factor, 3-level Box-Behnken design was applied to optimize seven considered dependent variables (Release "%" in 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h) regarding different levels of independent one (X 1 : Cetyl alcohol, X 2 : Starch 1500 ® , X 3 : HPMC K100M amounts). Two granule portions were prepared using melt and wet granulations, blended together prior to compression. An optimum formulation was obtained (X 1 : 37.10, X 2 : 2, X 3 : 42.49 mg). Desirability function was 0.616. F2 and f1 between release profiles of Mucinex® and the optimum formulation were 74 and 3, respectively. An n-value of about 0.5 for both optimum and Mucinex® formulations showed diffusion (Fickian) control mechanism. However, HPMC K100M rise in 70 mg accompanied cetyl alcohol rise in 60 mg led to first order kinetic (n = 0.6962). The K values of 1.56 represented an identical burst drug releases. Cetyl alcohol and starch 1500 ® modulated guaifenesin release from HPMC K100M matrices, while due to their binding properties, improved its poor flowability and compressibility, too.

  15. Formulation of Extended-Release Metformin Hydrochloride Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    ... of diclofenac sodium by non-solvent addition technique. Trop J Pharm. Res 2010; 9(2): 187-195. 17. Hadjiioannou TP, Christian GD, Koupparis MA,. Macheras PE. Quantitative Calculations in. Pharmaceutical Practice and Research, VCH. Publishers Inc, New York: 1993; p 345-348. 18. Bourne DWA. Pharmacokinetics.

  16. Extended-release hydrocodone – gift or curse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krashin D

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Krashin,1 Natalia Murinova,2 Andrea M Trescot31Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, 2Department of Neurology University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA 3Algone Pain Center, Wasilla, AK, USAAbstract: Hydrocodone is a semisynthetic opioid, which has been used for decades as a short-acting analgesic combined with acetaminophen (or less commonly ibuprofen. Several long-acting, non-acetaminophen-containing hydrocodone formulations are undergoing trials in the US under the auspices of the US Food and Drug Administration, and may be available shortly. This article reviews some of the advantages (including drug familiarity and lack of acetaminophen toxicity and potential disadvantages (including altered use patterns and high morphine equivalent dosing of such a medication formulation. We also discuss the abuse potential of long-acting versus short-acting opioids in general and hydrocodone specifically, as well as the metabolism of hydrocodone.Keywords: hydrocodone, long-acting opioids, opioid abuse, acetaminophen toxicity, tamper-resistant opioids

  17. Locomotor therapy with extended-release crystalline glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasilyevich Badokin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical glucocorticoid (GC therapy for locomotor diseases is an extremely important component of a comprehensive program to treat inflammatory and, to a lesser extent, degenerative diseases. It reduces the time of hospitalization by 5—10 days in this category of patients, has a prompt and potent anti-inflammatory effect, and shows predictable efficiency. This therapy shows good tolerability and high safety and prevents serious adverse reactions to GC treatment.

  18. Development of extended-release formulation of domperidone using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Raphia hookeri (Family: Palmae) is the largest palm in ... previous work of Majekodunmi and Makper [7]. All other ... individually using an analytical balance (Mettler, .... Also, the retention of all the ... assessed to ensure acceptable mechanical.

  19. Formulation of Extended-Release Metformin Hydrochloride Matrix ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Various metformin hydrochloride formulations containing a hydrophobic carrier (stearic acid) and a hydrophilic polymer (polyethylene oxide) were prepared using a 32 factorial design. ... The release data were subjected to various release kinetic models and also compared with those of a commercial brand.

  20. Caracterização físico-química e microbiológica da farinha de algaroba (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. DC Physicochemical and microbiological characterization of mesquite flour (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiane Gomes Maia da Silva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Algaroba (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. é uma leguminosa arbórea tropical comum no semi-árido brasileiro e desenvolve-se em lugares secos, onde dificilmente outras plantas poderiam sobreviver. Suas vagens produzem uma farinha que pode ser usada na alimentação humana, além de vários outros produtos como o mel, licor e um produto similar ao café. Este trabalho teve por objetivo caracterizar quanto à composição físico-química e microbiológica a farinha de algaroba potencialmente passível de introdução como matéria-prima de interesse comercial. A farinha de algaroba foi analisada quanto ao teor de umidade, cinzas, proteína, lipídios, açúcares totais, açúcares redutores, fibra alimentar total e tanino. Os minerais analisados foram cálcio, fósforo, magnésio, ferro, zinco, sódio, potássio, manganês, silício, alumínio e cobre. As análises microbiológicas foram: coliformes a 45 °C.g -1, Bacillus cereus.g -1, Salmonella sp..25 g -1, e bolores e leveduras.g -1. Verificou-se que a farinha de algaroba apresenta elevados níveis de açúcares (56,5 g.100 g -1, razoável teor de proteínas (9,0 g.100 g -1 e baixo teor em lipídios (2,1 g.100 g -1. Quanto aos minerais observou-se a predominância do fósforo (749 mg.100 g -1 e do cálcio (390 mg.100 g -1. As análises microbiológicas apresentaram resultados inferiores ao limite estabelecido pela legislação, sendo considerada apropriada quanto à qualidade higiênico-sanitária. Portanto, conclui-se que esta possui uma elevada concentração de açúcares além de outros nutrientes, como minerais, importantes para o desenvolvimento humano e animal.Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. is a tropical tree legume fairly common in the semi-arid region of Brazil, which thrives in dry environments where other plants would hardly survive. Its seedpods can be made into flour, which is used in human food and other products such as honey, liqueur and a product similar to coffee. The

  1. Farelo da vagem de algaroba em dietas para cabras lactantes: parâmetros ruminais e síntese de proteína microbiana Mesquite pod meal in diets of lactating goats: ruminal parameters and microbial efficiency synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizziane da Silva Argôlo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar os efeitos da adição de farelo da vagem de algaroba (0; 33,3; 66,7 e 100% em substituição ao fubá de milho sobre a excreção de derivados de purina, estimada com coleta total de urina, e sobre os parâmetros ruminais (pH, amônia e ácidos graxos voláteis de cabras em lactação. Utilizaram-se oito cabras adultas lactantes distribuídas em dois quadrados latinos 4 × 4 e alimentadas com dietas isoproteicas, compostas de 40% de silagem de capim-elefante e 60% de concentrado. Não houve efeito significativo da adição de farelo da vagem de algaroba sobre os parâmetros ruminais. O pH manteve-se em faixa adequada, entre 6,85 e 7,03, e a concentração média de nitrogênio amoniacal ruminal foi de 6,97 mg de N/100 mL de fluido ruminal. As concentrações de acetato e propionato variaram de 9,47 a 10,54 e de 4,79 a 6,58 mM, respectivamente. As excreções (mmol/dia de alantoína, ácido úrico, xantinahipoxantina, a quantidade (mmol/dia de purinas absorvidas, o fluxo intestinal (g/dia de nitrogênio microbiano e a eficiência de síntese microbiana (PM/kg NDT apresentaram resposta linear negativa à substituição do fubá de milho pelo farelo da vagem de algaroba. A estimativa da síntese de proteína microbiana em cabras deve ser calculada pela excreção de derivados de purinas a partir de equações obtidas com caprinos.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding mesquite pod meal (0, 33.3, 66.7 and 100% to substitute corn meal on purin derivative the excretion, estimated by total urine collection, and on the ruminal parameters (pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids. Eight lactating goats were used and distributed in a 4 × 4 Latin square and fed iso-protein diets consisting of 40% elephant grass silage and 60% concentrate. There was no significant effect from adding mesquite pod meal on the ruminal parameters. The pH ranged from 6.85 to 7.03 and the ruminal ammonia concentration averaged 6.97 mg

  2. Combining Purpose With Profits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julian Birkinshaw, Julian; Foss, Nicolai Juul; Lindenberg, Siegwart

    2014-01-01

    A sense of purpose that transcends making money can motivate employees. But to sustain both a sense of purpose and a solid level of profitability over time, companies need to pay attention to several fundamental organizing principles....

  3. Purpose and Professional Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyler, Nancy Roundy

    1989-01-01

    Describes a protocol study of 10 professional writers which examined the meaning and influence of purpose on writers in the workplace. Explores the interactions of various purpose considerations derived from situation, reader, and text. Suggests that professional writers have a range of meanings in mind when they think about purpose. (MM)

  4. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN.

  5. Relative oral bioavailability of morphine and naltrexone derived from crushed morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules versus intact product and versus naltrexone solution: a single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, three-way crossover trial in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Franklin K; Stark, Jeffrey G; Bieberdorf, Frederick A; Stauffer, Joe

    2010-06-01

    Morphine sulfate/sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (HCl) (MS-sNT) extended-release fixed-dose combination capsules, approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2009 for chronic moderate to severe pain, contain extended-release morphine pellets with a sequestered core of the opioid antagonist naltrexone. MS-sNT was designed so that if the product is tampered with by crushing, the naltrexone becomes bioavailable to mitigate morphine-induced subjective effects, rendering the product less attractive for tampering. The primary aim of this study was to compare the oral bioavailability of naltrexone and its metabolite 6-beta-naltrexol, derived from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules, to naltrexone solution. This study also assessed the relative bioavailability of morphine from crushed pellets from MS-sNT capsules and that from the whole, intact product. This single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, 3-period, 3-treatment crossover trial was conducted in healthy volunteers. Adults admitted to the study center underwent a 10-hour overnight fast before study drug administration. Each subject received all 3 of the following treatments, 1 per session, separated by a 14-day washout: tampered pellets (crushed for >or=2 minutes with a mortar and pestle) from a 60-mg MS-sNT capsule (60 mg morphine/2.4 mg naltrexone); 60-mg whole, intact MS-sNT capsule; and oral naltrexone HCl (2.4 mg) solution. Plasma concentrations of naltrexone and 6-beta-naltrexol were measured 0 to 168 hours after administration. Morphine pharmaco-kinetics of crushed and whole pellets were determined 0 to 72 hours after administration. The analysis of relative bioavailability was based on conventional FDA criteria for assuming bioequivalence; that is, 90% CIs for ratios of geometric means (natural logarithm [In]-transformed C(max) and AUC) fell within the range of 80% to 125%. Subjects underwent physical examinations, clinical laboratory tests, and ECG at screening and study

  6. The Special Purpose Vehicle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate whether the situation where two companies appear as originators or sponsors behind a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) can be described as a merger, although on micro scale. Are the underlying grounds behind the creation of an SPV much different than those...

  7. The purpose of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andy

    2017-10-06

    A central feature of Darwin's theory of natural selection is that it explains the purpose of biological adaptation. Here, I: emphasize the scientific importance of understanding what adaptations are for, in terms of facilitating the derivation of empirically testable predictions; discuss the population genetical basis for Darwin's theory of the purpose of adaptation, with reference to Fisher's 'fundamental theorem of natural selection'; and show that a deeper understanding of the purpose of adaptation is achieved in the context of social evolution, with reference to inclusive fitness and superorganisms.

  8. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setnik B

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Setnik,1 Carl L Roland,1 Kenneth W Sommerville,1,2 Glenn C Pixton,1 Robert Berke,3,4 Anne Calkins,5 Veeraindar Goli1,2 1Pfizer Inc, 2Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 3Family Health Medical Services PLLC, Mayville, 4Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, 5New York Spine & Wellness Center, Syracuse, NY, USA Objective: To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN using a standardized conversion guide. Methods: This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results: Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%. The mean (standard deviation number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94, and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37. The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion: Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of

  9. Intoxicação espontânea por vagens de Prosopis juliflora (Leg. Mimosoideae em bovinos no Estado de Pernambuco Spontaneous poisoning in cattle by mesquite beans, Prosopis juliflora (Leg. Mimosoideae in Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos L. Câmara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Descrevem-se três surtos de intoxicação por vagens de Prosopis juliflora no Sertão e Agreste de Pernambuco, na região semi-árida, em animais pastejando áreas invadidas pela planta ou que ingeriram as vagens como alimento concentrado. Em duas fazendas nas que a doença ocorria esporadicamente foram observados casos individuais. Em outra, o surto afetou um rebanho de 1206 bovinos, dos quais adoeceram 112 (9,28% e morreram 84 (6,96%, enquanto os demais 28 (2,32% recuperaram-se e ganharam peso após a retirada das vagens da alimentação. Clinicamente observou-se, principalmente, perda de peso progressiva, atrofia da musculatura da face e masseter, mandíbula pendulosa, protrusão de língua, dificuldade de apreensão e mastigação dos alimentos, torção da cabeça para mastigar ou ruminar, salivação excessiva, disfagia e hipotonia lingual. Nos exames laboratoriais constatou-se anemia e hipoproteinemia. Na necropsia havia caquexia e diminuição de volume e coloração acinzentada dos músculos masseteres. Na histologia observou-se degeneração de neurônios do núcleo motor do trigêmeo, degeneração Walleriana do nervo trigêmeo e atrofia muscular por denervação do músculo masseter com substituição por tecido fibroso. Recomendam-se medidas para a profilaxia da intoxicação e discute-se a necessidade de desenvolver pesquisas para determinar a viabilidade econômica e sustentabilidade da utilização da algaroba como alimento animal ou humano e para produção de carvão, lenha ou madeira.Three outbreaks of poisoning by Prosopis juliflora pods are reported in the semiarid region of the state of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil, in cattle grazing in fields invaded by the plant or ingesting mesquite beans as a concentrate food. In two farms the disease occurred sporadically. In another, 112 (9.28% cattle out of 1206 were affected, 84 (6.96% died due to emaciation, and 28 (2.32% gained weight after the pods had been withdrawn from the

  10. Combining purpose with profits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkinshaw, J.; Foss, N.J.; Lindenberg, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Is it possible for a company to strive for a higher purpose while also delivering solid profits? Some have argued that pursuing goals other than making money means, by definition, spending on things that aren't profit-maximizing. Others have countered that by investing in worthwhile causes the

  11. JENDL special purpose file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsuneo

    1995-01-01

    In JENDL-3,2, the data on all the reactions having significant cross section over the neutron energy from 0.01 meV to 20 MeV are given for 340 nuclides. The object range of application extends widely, such as the neutron engineering, shield and others of fast reactors, thermal neutron reactors and nuclear fusion reactors. This is a general purpose data file. On the contrary to this, the file in which only the data required for a specific application field are collected is called special purpose file. The file for dosimetry is a typical special purpose file. The Nuclear Data Center, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, is making ten kinds of JENDL special purpose files. The files, of which the working groups of Sigma Committee are in charge, are listed. As to the format of the files, ENDF format is used similarly to JENDL-3,2. Dosimetry file, activation cross section file, (α, n) reaction data file, fusion file, actinoid file, high energy data file, photonuclear data file, PKA/KERMA file, gas production cross section file and decay data file are described on their contents, the course of development and their verification. Dosimetry file and gas production cross section file have been completed already. As for the others, the expected time of completion is shown. When these files are completed, they are opened to the public. (K.I.)

  12. Meaningful and Purposeful Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a graphic, designed by Clementi and Terrill, the authors of "Keys to Planning for Learning" (2013), visually representing the components that contribute to meaningful and purposeful practice in learning a world language, practice that leads to greater proficiency. The entire graphic is centered around the letter…

  13. Fit-for-Purpose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2013-01-01

    ; completeness to cover the total jurisdiction; and credibility in terms of reliable data being trusted by the users. Accuracy can then be incrementally improved over time when relevant and justified by serving the needs of citizen, business and society in general. Such a fit-for-purpose approach is fundamental...... systems act within adopted land policies that define the legal regulatory pattern for dealing with land issues. Land administration systems - whether highly advanced or very basic – require a spatial framework to operate. This framework provides the fundamental information for dealing with land issues...... concepts may well be seen as the end target but not as the point of entry. When assessing the technology and investment choices the focus should be on building a fit-for-purpose framework that will meet the needs of society today and that can be incrementally improved over time....

  14. Purposeful engineering economics

    CERN Document Server

    Chadderton, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    This textbook/course supplement stands as a unique and highly original complement to the traditional engineering economics curriculum. Its primarily narrative approach conveys the essence of an “Austrian" economic perspective on cash flow analysis and decision making in engineering, without extensive tables and graphs, and requires very little mathematics. The book’s objective is to add a new perspective to the usual study of cash flow analysis and solely econometric engineering decision making. The author draws on the methodology of the Austrian Economists—a school of economic thought that bases its study of economic phenomena on the interpretation and analysis of the purposeful actions of individuals. The book includes an array of illustrative case studies examined in detail by the author and emphasizes the importance of market processes and price signals to coordinate engineering plans. Purposeful Engineering Economics is an ideal resource for students, teaching faculty, and practicing professional ...

  15. Vitalism, purpose and superstition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Saher, Marieke

    2007-02-01

    Developmental studies have shown that children assign purpose to objects more liberally than adults, and that they explain biological processes in terms of vitalistic causality. This study tested the hypothesis that similar misconceptions can be found among superstitious adults. The results from 116 superstitious and 123 sceptical individuals showed that more than sceptics, superstitious individuals attributed purpose to objects, and explained biological processes in terms of organ intentionality and energy transmission. In addition, they thought of energy as a vital force, attributing life and mental properties to it. These conceptual confusions were positively associated to all types of superstitions as well as belief in alternative medicine. The results support the argument that category mistakes and ontological confusions underlie superstitious and vitalistic thinking.

  16. The purpose of astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Davoust, Emmanuel

    1995-01-01

    This is a presentation of the purpose of astronomy in the context of modern society. After exposing two misconceptions about astronomy, I detail its role in five domains, certified knowledge, incorporated abilities, innovations, collective goods, and popular science; with each domain is associated an institution, an incentive, and a method of evaluation. Finally, I point out the role of astronomy as a source of inspiration in other fields than science.

  17. Multi purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, Samiran; Singh, Tej

    2006-01-01

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor

  18. Purpose of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.

    1998-01-01

    The main purpose of the Workshop is to share the experience on emergency data management and to review various conceptual, technical, organisational and operational aspects and problems. The problems posed by hardware and software, the interplay of software developers and users/operators and the positive and negative experiences both from development and operation of data management systems are discussed. Emergency data management systems and their demonstrations are divided into four classes of possible applications: video games, training and simulation systems, 'history writing' = post-event analysis and documentation systems, real-time operational systems. (author)

  19. Uso da Farinha Integral da Vagem de Algaroba (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. na Alimentação de Codornas Japonesas Use of Integral Mesquite (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. Pods Meal in the Japanese Quails Feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Vilar da Silva

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Um experimento foi realizado para testar a inclusão da farinha integral de vagem de algaroba (FVA nos níveis de 0; 5; 10; 15; 20 e 25% na alimentação de codornas japonesas. Foram utilizadas 216 codornas com 160 dias de idade e peso vivo de 189 g, distribuídas num delineamento inteiramente ao acaso. As variáveis estudadas foram obtidas em três períodos de 21 dias. O consumo e a massa de ovos do tratamento controle foram superiores aos do tratamento com 25% de FVA. Excluindo-se o controle, o consumo de ração, produção de ovos, massa de ovos e conversão por massa de ovos foram afetadas de forma quadrática pelos níveis de inclusão de FVA. Recomenda-se a inclusão de FVA em até 15% ou 150 g/kg em rações isoenergéticas e isoprotéicas sem afetar, adversamente, o desempenho de codornas.An experiment was conducted to evaluate the inclusion levels of integral mesquite pods meal (MPM (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% in diet on laying quail performance. Two hundred and sixteen layer quails with 160 days of age and live weight of 189 g were allotted to an experimental design completely randomized. The studied variables were obtained in three periods of 21 days. The 25% of MPM level reduced feed intake and egg mass when compared to control. Except for the control, feed intake, egg production, egg mass production and egg feed mass ratio were quadratically affected. Based on the results of this work, the MPM can be included up to 15% or 150 g/kg in partial corn replacement of isonitrogen and isoenergy diets, without an adverse effect on laying hens quail performance.

  20. The punishment's purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe DIACONU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The repressive reaction involves, as any human action, a certain finality. As the punishment's essence is the suffering, then, in the course of time it has been arisen the question regarding the goal for which the society utilizes the suffering and for what the society punishes. According to the classic penal doctrine that bases on the idea of retribution, the repressive reaction was limited to a simple revenge and it didn't existed any concern in order to influence the doer's future behaviour. In the positivist conception, the punishment's purpose was to shelter the society against the offender's new attacks. Going up to an extreme point with this idea, the positivists equated the punishment with the curative treatment at which the patients in the hospitals were submitted and which it was adequate to each category of offender. For the positivists, the penal sanction, it was meant to combat the organic or the psychological anomalies or the dysfunctions of the social environment that have influenced the offender and that determined him to commit antisocial deeds. In the modern vision, the punishment cannot have a goal on its own and that is to answer to bad with bad because it doesn't come from an abstract desire for revenge, but from a concrete necessity of hindering the repetition of the antisocial deeds and of defending the fundamental social values.

  1. Drilling for scientific purpose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Shoichi

    1987-09-01

    Drilling for scientific purpose is a process of conducting geophysical exploration at deep underground and drilling for collecting crust samples directly. This is because earth science has advanced to get a good understanding about the top of the crust and has shifted its main interest to the lower layer of the crust in land regions. The on-land drilling plan in Japan has just started, and the planned drilling spots are areas around the Minami River, Hidaka Mts., kinds of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic granite in outside zone, the extension of Japan Sea, Ogasawara Is., Minami-Tori Is., and active volcanos. The paper also outlines the present situation of on-land drilling in the world, focusing on the SG-3rd super-deep well SG-3 on the Kola Peninsula, USSR, Satori SG-1st well SG-1 in Azerbaidzhan S.S.R, V.S.S.R, Sweden's wells, Cyprus' wells, Bayearn well Plan in West Germany, and Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program in the U.S. At its end, the paper explains the present situation and the future theme of the Japanese drilling technique and points out the necessity of developing equipment, and techniques. (14 figs, 5 tabs, 26 refs)

  2. Uso do farelo de vagem de algaroba (Prosopis juliflora (Swartz D.C. em dietas para eqüinos Effects of feeding mesquite pod meal (Prosopis juliflora (Swartz D.C. for horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Barros da Silva Stein

    2005-08-01

    the effects of replacing corn cob meal (CCM with mesquite pod meal (MPM on nutrient intake. In the digestion trial, the total feces collection method was used and the coefficients of apparent digestibility of dry matter (CDDM, organic matter (CDOM, crude protein (CDCP, acid detergent fiber (CDADF, neutral detergent fiber (CDNDF, hemicellulose (CDHCEL and gross energy (CDGE were estimated. Diets were formulated to be isonitrogenous and isoenergetic, all containing coastcross hay and concentrate (60:40 ratio. The treatments consisted of increasing replacement levels of CCM with MPM, as follows: 0, 33, 66 and 100%. No effects of mare age on the variables were detected. No significant effect of increasing MPM levels on dry matter intake, with mean values of 1.8% body weight (BW, 7.02 kg DM/day, 79.84 g DM/kg BW0.75, was observed. CDDM, CDOM, CDCP and CDHCEL did not differ among diets and showed the respective mean values of 49.15, 50.18, 56.89, and 35.43%. Linear decreasing effect on CDNDF and quadratic effect on CDADF and CDGE were observed as the dietary levels of MPM increased. According to the regression equations, maximum point of CDADF could be obtained by replacing 22.3% MPM and maximum values of CDNDF and CDGE in the diets without MPM. It was concluded that, despite of decrease on dietary fiber digestibility, mesquite pod meal can be used in horses diets.

  3. Absorção e distribuição de chumbo em plantas devetiver, jureminha e algaroba Absorption and distribution of lead in vetiver, mimosa and mesquite plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jailson do Carmo Alves

    2008-06-01

    , and studies concerning heavy metal tolerance, absorption and distribution in plants are essential for the success of such programs. This study was carried out to evaluate the tolerance, absorption and distribution of lead (Pb in vetiver grass [Vetiveria zizanioides (L. Nash], mimosa [Desmanthus virgatus (L. Willd] and mesquite trees [Prosopis juliflora (SW DC] subjected to increasing lead doses in solution. The experiment was conducted under a screenhouse, at the DSER/CCA/UFPB, Areia-PB, Brazil. The species were grown in nutrient solution containing increasing Pb levels (0, 50, 100 and 200 mg L-1 during a 45-day exposure period. An entirely randomized split-plot design was used with three replicates. The main plot was represented by the plant species and the subplot by Pb levels. The increased Pb levels caused significant reductions of dry mass of the root, shoot and whole plant (root + shoot in the three species under study. Based on critical toxicity levels, the tolerance of vetiver to Pb contamination was higher than in the other species. In vetiver and mesquite plants, the roots were the component most sensitive to Pb contamination, whereas a similar response to Pb by all plant components was observed for mimosa. Total Pb concentrations and content in plant compartments were significantly affected by the increasing Pb levels in solution, and a higher accumulation of this element was observed in the roots of the three species under study. The highest Pb concentration and content were found in all compartments of vetiver, which suggests a high potential of this grass for phytoremediation of Pb-contaminated areas.

  4. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MW t h, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co 60 ) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200 Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N 16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  5. Mesquite bean and cassava leaf in diets for Nile tilapia in growth=Farelos da vagem da algaroba e da folha da mandioca em rações para tilápia do Nilo em crescimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Batista Costa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the inclusion of mesquite bean bran (Prosopis juliflora and cassava leaf bran (Manihot esculenta in diets for Nile tilapia (85.22 ± 3.13 g. Three hundred and thirty-six fish were distributed in 28 fiberglass tanks (120 L in a 2 × 4 factorial scheme for two sources of oil and four levels of bran (0, 5, 10 and 20% (n = 4. After 60 days, growth performance (feed intake, weight gain, apparent feed conversion and survival rate and fish body composition were evaluated. Heights and density of villi were measured for morphometric analysis of the intestinal mucosa. Animal performance, body composition and villi density were not affected (p > 0.05 by the source and level of inclusion of bran. There was a significant effect of the level of inclusion of bran on villi height, with a linear trend, indicating that the higher the inclusion levels of bran, the lower the height of the villi. The bran studied can be used in diets for Nile tilapia up to 20% without compromising growth performance and body composition change, but the presence of these by-products can result in a deleterious effect on fish villi.Avaliou-se a inclusão dos farelos da vagem da algaroba (Prosopis juliflora e folha da mandioca (Manihot esculenta em rações para tilápia do Nilo (85,22 ± 3,13 g. Foram utilizados 336 peixes, distribuídos em 28 tanques (120 L, em esquema fatorial 2 x 4, duas fontes de óleo e quatro níveis de farelo (0, 5, 10 e 20% (n = 4. Ao final de 60 dias, foram avaliados o desempenho zootécnico (consumo de ração, ganho de peso, conversão alimentar aparente e taxa de sobrevivência e a composição da carcaça dos peixes. Para análise da histologia intestinal, foram mensuradas a altura e a densidade das vilosidades. O desempenho zootécnico, a composição da carcaça e a densidade das vilosidades intestinais não foram afetados (p > 0,05 pela fonte e nível de inclusão de farelo. Houve efeito significativo do nível de inclusão dos

  6. Screening Prosopis (mesquite) for cold tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P. (Texas AandI Univ., Kingsville); Clark, P.R.; Nash, P.; Osborn, J.F.; Cannell, G.H.

    1982-09-01

    Cold tolerance and biomass estimation of Prosopis species were examined under field conditions. Prosopis africana and P. pallida tolerated several minus 1.5/sup 0/C freezes but none survived a minus 5/sup 0/C freeze. P. alba, P. articulata, P. chilensis, P. nigra, and P. tamarugo tolerated several minus 5/sup 0/C freezes but not a 12-hour below 0/sup 0/C freeze. Most North American native species P. glandulosa var. glandulosa, P. glandulosa var. torreyana, and P. velutina tolerated the 12 hour freeze with only moderate damage. In general trees with greater productivity belonged to the most cold sensitive accessions but sufficient variability exists to substantially improve Prosopis biomass production on the coldest areas where it now naturally occurs.

  7. Teaching English for Specific Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Netikšienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching English for Specific Purposes and General English is analysed in the article. The scientific approach of a scientist M. Rosenberg is presented. The experience of teaching English for Specific Purposesat VGTU is alsopresented. The ideas and teaching methods from the classes of general English can be transferred to the classes of English for Specific Purposes.

  8. Communicative Purpose as Genre Determinant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askehave, Inger

    1999-01-01

    Through the years researchers and LSP teachers alike have used various parameters for classifying texts. This article sets out to discuss the notion of "communicative purpose" as a means for classifying text. It points to some of the difficulties associated with the functional approaches to genre...... classification in general and the notion of "communicative purpose" in particular.......Through the years researchers and LSP teachers alike have used various parameters for classifying texts. This article sets out to discuss the notion of "communicative purpose" as a means for classifying text. It points to some of the difficulties associated with the functional approaches to genre...

  9. Production of ethanol from mesquite [Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C.] pods mash by Zymomonas mobilis in submerged fermentation Produção de etanol a partir do mosto de vagens de algaroba [Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C.] por Zymomonas mobilis em fermentação submersa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiane Gomes Maia da Silva

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesquite [Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C.], a perennial tropical plant commonly found in Brazilian semi-arid region, is a viable raw material for fermentative processes because of its low cost and production of pods with high content of hydrolysable sugars which generate many compounds, including ethanol. This study aimed to evaluate the use of mesquite pods as substrate for ethanol production by Z. mobilis UFPEDA205 in a submerged fermentation. The fermentation was assessed for rate of substrate yield to ethanol, rate of ethanol production and efficiency of fermentation. The very close theoretical (170 g L-1 and experimental (165 g L-1 maximum ethanol yields were achieved at 36 h of fermentation. The highest counts of Z. mobilis UFEPEDA-205 (both close to 6 Log cfu mL-1 were also noted at 36 h. Highest rates of substrate yield to ethanol (0.44 g ethanol g glucose-1, of ethanol production (4.69 g L-1 h-1 and of efficiency of fermentation (86.81% were found after 30 h. These findings suggest mesquite pods as an interesting substrate for ethanol production using submerged fermentation by Z. mobilis.A algaroba [Prosopis juliflora (SW D.C.] é uma planta tropical perene comumente encontrada no semi-árido brasileiro e apresenta-se como matéria-prima viável para o processo fermentativo por possuir baixo custo e para produzir vagens que contém um elevado teor de açúcares hidrolisáveis, os quais podem gerar diversos compostos, incluindo etanol. Avaliou-se o uso de vagens de algaroba como substrato para produção de etanol por Z. mobilis UFPEDA-205 por meio de fermentação submersa. O processo fermentativo foi avaliado por meio da mensuração da taxa de conversão de substrato em etanol, taxa de produção de etanol e eficiência de fermentação. Os valores muito próximos encontrados para o fornecimento máximo teórico (170 g L-1 e experimental (165 g L-1 de etanol foram alcançados após 36 h de fermentação. O valor de contagem experimental

  10. Multi-Purpose Test Stand

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Multi-Purpose Test Stand is used for a wide variety of tests. The Stand is designed to be rotated through a range of fixed yaw positions to allow engines to be...

  11. General Purpose (office) Network reorganisation

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    On Saturday 27 August, the IT Department’s Communication Systems group will perform a major reorganisation of CERN’s General Purpose Network.   This reorganisation will cause network interruptions on Saturday 27 August (and possibly Sunday 28 August) and will be followed by a change to the IP addresses of connected systems that will come into effect on Monday 3 October. For further details and information about the actions you may need to take, please see: https://information-technology.web.cern.ch/news/general-purpose-office-network-reorganisation.

  12. Analytical purpose electron backscattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desdin, L.; Padron, I.; Laria, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this work an analytical purposes electron backscattering system improved at the Center of Applied Studies for Nuclear Development is described. This system can be applied for fast, exact and nondestructive testing of binary and AL/Cu, AL/Ni in alloys and for other applications

  13. Machine Translation for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Grace Hui-chin; Chien, Paul Shih Chieh

    2009-01-01

    Due to the globalization trend and knowledge boost in the second millennium, multi-lingual translation has become a noteworthy issue. For the purposes of learning knowledge in academic fields, Machine Translation (MT) should be noticed not only academically but also practically. MT should be informed to the translating learners because it is a…

  14. supplementary foods for weaning purposes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Nigeria. ABSTRACT. The paper focuses on complementary and supplementary foods for weaning purposes. While ... decision, which guides when to introduce semi-solid foods to infants. It considers the .... readiness of many healthy infants. ... foods. However, caution should be exercised .... Attitudes and practices of infants.

  15. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  16. Purposes and Effects of Lying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hample, Dale

    Three exploratory studies were aimed at describing the purposes of lies and the consequences of lying. Data were collected through a partly open-ended questionnaire, a content analysis of several tape-recorded interviews, and a large-scale survey. The results showed that two of every three lies were told for selfish reasons, while three of every…

  17. General purpose programmable accelerator board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Witzke, Edward L.

    2001-01-01

    A general purpose accelerator board and acceleration method comprising use of: one or more programmable logic devices; a plurality of memory blocks; bus interface for communicating data between the memory blocks and devices external to the board; and dynamic programming capabilities for providing logic to the programmable logic device to be executed on data in the memory blocks.

  18. Educational Purpose Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGHICIU Nicolae

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the development of computers and other sciences we can use in our personal projects complex structures built with microcontrollers. They miniaturise and simplify the final project, instead they depend/rely on the computer, through the programming of the microcontroller/s/them. This project presents the application of electronics in order to achieve a resuscitation mannequin for didactic purpose, using Arduino Prototyping Platform.

  19. Extended Release Liposomal Bupivacaine Injection (Exparel) for Early Postoperative Pain Control Following Palatoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Kristopher M; Nair, Narayanan M; Sargent, Larry A

    2018-05-14

    Liposomal bupivacaine (LB) is a long-acting local anesthetic reported to decrease postoperative pain in adults. The authors demonstrate the safe use of LB in pediatric patients with improved pain control following palatoplasty. Retrospective patient series of all single-surgeon palatoplasty patients treated at a tertiary craniofacial center from August 2014 to December 2015 were included. All patients received 1.3% LB intraoperatively as greater palatal nerve and surgical field blocks in 2-flap V-Y pushback palatoplasty. Postoperative oral intake, opioids administered, duration of hospitalization, and FLACC (face, legs, activity, cry, consolability) pain scores were measured. Twenty-seven patients (16 males and 11 females, average age of 10.8 months, weight 8.8 kg) received 2.9 ± 0.9 mL (2.6 ± 1.9 mg/kg) 1.3% LB. Average FLACC scores were 2.4 ± 2.2/10 in the postanesthesia care unit and 3.8 ± 1.8/10 while inpatients. Oral intake was first tolerated 10.3 ± 11.5 hours postoperatively and tolerated 496.4 ± 354.2 mL orally in the first 24 hours postoperatively. Patients received 8.5 ± 8.4 mg hydrocodone equivalents (0.46 ± 0.45 mg/kg per d hydrocodone equivalents) and were discharged 2.1 ± 1.3 days postoperatively. Opioid-related adverse events included emesis in 7.4% and pruritis in 3.7% of patients. The LB may be used safely in pediatric patients. Intraoperative injection of LB during palatoplasty can yield low postoperative opioid use and an early and adequate volume of oral intake over an average hospital stay. Further cost-efficacy studies of LB are needed to assess its value in pediatric plastic surgery.

  20. Extended release of hyaluronic acid from hydrogel contact lenses for dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvi, Furqan A; Soni, Tejal G; Shah, Dinesh O

    2015-01-01

    Current dry eye treatment includes delivering comfort enhancing agents to the eye via eye drops, but low residence time of eye drops leads to low bioavailability. Frequent administration leads to incompliance in patients, so there is a great need for medical device such as contact lenses to treat dry eye. Studies in the past have demonstrated the efficacy of hyaluronic acid (HA) in the treatment of dry eyes using eye drops. In this paper, we present two methods to load HA in hydrogel contact lenses, soaking method and direct entrapment. The contact lenses were characterized by studying their optical and physical properties to determine their suitability as extended wear contact lenses. HA-laden hydrogel contact lenses prepared by soaking method showed release up to 48 h with acceptable physical and optical properties. Hydrogel contact lenses prepared by direct entrapment method showed significant sustained release in comparison to soaking method. HA entrapped in hydrogels resulted in reduction in % transmittance, sodium ion permeability and surface contact angle, while increase in % swelling. The impact on each of these properties was proportional to HA loading. The batch with 200-μg HA loading showed all acceptable values (parameters) for contact lens use. Results of cytotoxicity study indicated the safety of hydrogel contact lenses. In vivo pharmacokinetics studies in rabbit tear fluid showed dramatic increase in HA mean residence time and area under the curve with lenses in comparison to eye drop treatment. The study demonstrates the promising potential of delivering HA through contact lenses for the treatment of dry eye syndrome.

  1. Clinical use of extended-release oral treprostinil in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugliese SC

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Steven C Pugliese,1 Todd M Bull1,2 1Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, 2UCD Pulmonary Vascular Disease Center, Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine and Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The development of parenteral prostacyclin therapy marked a dramatic breakthrough in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Intravenous (IV epoprostenol was the first PAH specific therapy and to date, remains the only treatment to demonstrate a mortality benefit. Because of the inherent complexities and risks of treating patients with continuous infusion IV therapy, there is great interest in the development of an oral prostacyclin analog that could mimic the benefits of IV therapy. Herein, we highlight the development of oral prostacyclin therapy, focusing on oral treprostinil, the only US Food and Drug Administration approved oral prostacyclin. Recent Phase III clinical trials have shown the drug to improve exercise tolerance in treatment-naïve PAH patients, but not patients on background oral therapy. Oral treprostinil appears to be most efficacious at higher doses, but its side effect profile and complexities with dosing complicate its use. While oral treprostinil’s current therapeutic role in PAH remains unclear, ongoing studies of this class of medication should help clarify their role in the treatment of PAH. Keywords: oral treprostinil, pulmonary arterial hypertension, selexipag

  2. Effects of extended-release niacin with laropiprant in high-risk patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landray, Martin J; Haynes, Richard; Hopewell, Jemma C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with evidence of vascular disease are at increased risk for subsequent vascular events despite effective use of statins to lower the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level. Niacin lowers the LDL cholesterol level and raises the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) choleste......-release niacin-laropiprant to statin-based LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of major vascular events but did increase the risk of serious adverse events. (Funded by Merck and others; HPS2-THRIVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00461630.)....

  3. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan K Al Jurdi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patients prescribed atypicals. Over the last decade all atypical drugs except for clozapine have received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA bipolar indication. In October 2008, the FDA approved quetiapine XR monotherapy for the treatment of acute depressive episodes of bipolar disorder and acute manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder based on two placebo-control trials. Quetiapine was also approved as adjunct therapy with lithium and divalproex for the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes as well as maintenance of bipolar I disorder. In contrast to immediate release quetiapine which may require a twice-daily regimen, the XR formulation is intended for once-daily administration. This drug profile of quetiapine XR will address chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability and clinical trials in bipolar disorder.Keywords: quetiapine XR, bipolar disorder

  4. 78 FR 40484 - Determination That METADATE ER (Methylphenidate Hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablet, 10...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... marketing for reasons other than safety or effectiveness. ANDAs that refer to METADATE ER (methylphenidate... Withdrawn From Sale for Reasons of Safety or Effectiveness AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... safety or effectiveness. This determination will allow FDA to approve abbreviated new drug applications...

  5. Developments in managing severe chronic pain: role of oxycodone–naloxone extended release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelli G

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Guido Fanelli,1 Andrea Fanelli2 1Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, University of Parma, Parma, 2Anesthesia and Intensive Care Unit, Policlinico S Orsola-Malpighi, Bologna, Italy Abstract: Chronic pain is a highly disabling condition, which can significantly reduce patients’ quality of life. Prevalence of moderate and severe chronic pain is high in the general population, and it increases significantly in patients with advanced cancer and older than 65 years. Guidelines for the management of chronic pain recommend opioids for the treatment of moderate-to-severe pain in patients whose pain is not responsive to initial therapies with paracetamol and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Despite their analgesic efficacy being well recognized, adverse events can affect daily functioning and patient quality of life. Opioid-induced constipation (OIC occurs in 40% of opioid-treated patients. Laxatives are the most common drugs used to prevent and treat OIC. Laxatives do not address the underlying mechanisms of OIC; for this reason, they are not really effective in OIC treatment. Naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist with low systemic bioavailability. When administered orally, naloxone antagonizes the opioid receptors in the gut wall, while its extensive first-pass hepatic metabolism ensures the lack of antagonist influence on the central-mediated analgesic effect of the opioids. A prolonged-release formulation consisting of oxycodone and naloxone in a 2:1 ratio was developed trying to reduce the incidence of OIC maintaining the analgesic effect compared with use of the sole oxycodone. This review includes evidence related to use of oxycodone and naloxone in the long-term management of chronic non-cancer pain and OIC. Keywords: chronic pain, opioid-induced constipation, opioids, oxycodone–naloxone

  6. Extended release local anesthetic agents in a postoperative arthritic pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickowicz, Diana E; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Haze, Amir; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2014-01-01

    Local anesthetics play an important role in postoperative pain management in orthopedic joint procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an intraoperative extra-articular injection of poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil 3:7), p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 15% bupivacaine, for postoperative analgesia following knee arthroplasty. Prolonged release local anesthetic formulation was synthesized by mixing p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 with bupivacaine base. Under anesthesia, the knee joint of Sprague-Dawley rats was exposed, a hole drilled in the femoral trochlea. 0.2 mL of either 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation or plain bupivacaine (control) was injected locally and compared with a nonsurgery control group. Mechanical hyperalgesia was determined by counting the vocalizations and leg withdrawal after joint squeezing. Behavioral assessments over a day postoperative period revealed a reduction in rearing and ambulation in an open-field apparatus in animals of both experimental groups compared with the nonsurgery control. The vocalizations during the hyperalgesia test increased compared with the control at 24 h. At 48 h, 3.667 ± 0.5138, p = 0.0076 vocalizations were recorded for the plain bupivacaine group versus 1.417 ± 0.5138, p < 0.0001 in the 15% polymer-bupivacaine formulation. Bupivacaine encapsulated in p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 extended the duration of the analgesia compared with plain drug in rats and could represent effective postoperative analgesic in orthopedic joint procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  7. Health expenditure comparison of extended-release metoprolol succinate and immediate-release metoprolol tartarate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidya V

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Varun Vaidya, Pranav PatelCollege of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USABackground: Metoprolol, a selective beta-1 blocker, is available in two different salt forms in the market – metoprolol succinate (MS and metoprolol tartarate (MT. Both the formulations are Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of hypertension. Several studies have shown similar efficacies between the two salts; however, they differ in their pharmacokinetic properties and are therefore priced differently. The primary objective of this study was to compare the overall health care expenditures of hypertensive patients on MT and MS to see if the price difference in the two preparations is offset by savings in overall expenditure.Methods: Two cohorts of patients using MT and MS were selected from the 2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Propensity score matching technique was used to balance the cohorts on various parameters such as demographic information, insurance status, and comorbidity score. Patients using MT were matched to patients using MS on the logit of propensity score using calipers of width equal to 0.2 of the standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine the association between health expenditure and type of metoprolol salt, adjusting for other covariates.Results: A total of 742 patients were found to use metoprolol (MT-388, MS-354. After propensity score matching, a total of 582 patients were left in the sample for final analysis (291 patients in each cohort. The average annual health care expenditure was slightly higher in the MT cohort; however, after adjusting for covariates in a multivariate analysis, the difference was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.23.Conclusion: Both the products of metoprolol were found to have similar average annual total health care expenditure; however, MS once a day has higher out-of-pocket cost.Keywords: hypertension, cost, propensity score

  8. Prevention of organ rejection in renal and liver transplantation with extended release tacrolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reschen ME

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Reschen, Christopher A O’Callaghan Henry Wellcome Building, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom Abstract: Tacrolimus is the key immunosuppressant used to prevent allograft rejection in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Despite the efficacy of tacrolimus and adjunctive immunosuppressants, a substantial number of patients experience episodes of acute rejection and late graft loss. Nonadherence is an etiological factor in both acute rejection and graft loss. In 2007, a prolonged release version of tacrolimus became available that allows once daily administration, thus halving the pill burden compared to the standard twice-daily tacrolimus. An increasing number of studies in de novo transplantation and in treatment conversion have evaluated the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and safety of prolonged-release tacrolimus. We have reviewed the literature on the use of prolonged-release tacrolimus and hope that this will be of value in the design of protocols for transplant immunosuppression.Keywords: immunosuppression, kidney, hepatic, allograft, adherence

  9. Safety and Clinical Efficiency of Using Combined Preparation of Metformin Extended-Release and Glimepiride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Pankiv

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions. Administration of a combined anti-diabetic therapy with Duglimax for 24 weeks results in a significant reduction in HbA1c and the achievement of the targets of carbohydrate metabolism in patients with DM type 2. On the background of normalization of carbohydrate metabolism using combination therapy helps moderate decrease in body weight and WC value, to reduce serum LDL. Good tolerability and high degree of safety of Duglimax throughout the observation period were noted.

  10. Design of cellulose ether-based macromolecular prodrugs of ciprofloxacin for extended release and enhanced bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad; Abbas, Nazia Shahana; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Sher, Muhammad; Edgar, Kevin J

    2018-07-01

    The present study reveals the syntheses of hydroxypropylcellulose‑(HPC) and hydroxyethylcellulose‑(HEC) based macromolecular prodrugs (MPDs) of ciprofloxacin (CIP) using homogeneous reaction methodology. Covalently loaded drug content (DC) of each prodrug was quantified using UV-Vis spectrophotometry to determine degree of substitution (DS). HPC-ciprofloxacin (HPC-CIP) conjugates showed DS of CIP in the range 0.87-1.15 whereas HEC-ciprofloxacin (HEC-CIP) conjugates showed DS range 0.51-0.75. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 self-assembled into nanoparticles of 150-300 and 180-250nm, respectively. Size exclusion chromatography revealed HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 as monodisperse systems. In vitro drug release studies indicated 15 and 43% CIP release from HPC-CIP conjugate 2 after 6h in simulated gastric and simulated intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), respectively. HEC-CIP conjugate 6 showed 16% and 46% release after 6h in SGF and SIF, respectively. HPC-CIP conjugate 2 and HEC-CIP conjugate 6 exhibited half-lives of 10.87 and 11.71h, respectively with area under the curve values of 164 and 175hμgmL -1 , respectively, indicating enhanced bioavailability and improved pharmacokinetic profiles in animal model. Equal antibacterial activities to that of unmodified CIP confirmed their competitive efficacies. Cytotoxicity studies supported their non-toxic nature and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Nebivolol versus Metoprolol Succinate Extended Release on Asymmetric Dimethylarginine in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandavar, Ramprasad; Higashi, Yusuke; Chen, Wei; Blackstock, Christopher; Vaughn, Charlotte; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Sander, Gary E.; Roffidal, Louise E.; Delafontaine, Patrice; Giles, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to determine if metoprolol succinate ER (MET), and nebivolol (NEB), a β1-AR with increased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), would have differing effects on plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentration in hypertensives. Background It was hypothesized that NEB, a β1-AR antagonist and β3-AR agonist with NO- releasing properties and MET, only a β1-AR antagonist, would have different effects on plasma ADMA concentration. Methods Forty-one hypertensive subjects randomly received either 50 mg of MET (n = 19) or 5 mg of NEB (n = 22) for 4 weeks followed by 100 mg MET and 10 mg NEB for 4 weeks. ADMA and IGF-1 were measured by ELISA kit; endothelial progenitor cells were estimated using fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody to KDR and CD133 receptors; arterial augmentation index was measured by radial tonometry. Results Baseline systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 155.1 ± 18.7/85.3 ± 12.5 mm Hg for MET subjects and 157.6 ± 20.7/87.1 ± 14.0 mm Hg for NEB subjects. Baseline ADMA was 0.32 ± 0.123 μmol/L in the MET group and 0.4035 ± 0.1378 in the NEB group. ADMA increased 44.78% and 72% in the MET group at weeks 4 and 8 (p < 0.05 for both), respectively, without increase in the NEB group. At week 8 augmentation index was increased in the MET group (p<0.05). IGF-1 and EPC were unchanged by treatment. Conclusions Plasma ADMA and augmentation index are increased in a dose-dependent fashion by MET but not with NEB. PMID:21251896

  12. Solar stills for agricultural purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K.; Tran, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concepts of using desalinated water for agricultural purposes are outlined. A mathematical model describing heat and mass transfer in a system combining a solar still with a greenhouse, its solution, and test results of a small-scale unit built at the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, are discussed. The unit was employed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the system. Further development and modifications are necessary for larger-scale operations. The basis of an optimization study which is underway at the Brace Research Institute of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, aimed at finding the best combination of design and operation parameters is also presented.

  13. General Purpose Heat Source Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, Bill

    2008-01-01

    The General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) simulator project is designed to replicate through the use of electrical heaters, the form, fit, and function of actual GPHS modules which generate heat through the radioactive decay of Pu238. The use of electrically heated modules rather than modules containing Pu238 facilitates the testing of spacecraft subsystems and systems without sacrificing the quantity and quality of the test data gathered. Previous GPHS activities are centered around developing robust heater designs with sizes and weights that closely matched those of actual Pu238 fueled GPHS blocks. These efforts were successful, although their maximum temperature capabilities were limited to around 850 C. New designs are being pursued which also replicate the sizes and weights of actual Pu238 fueled GPHS blocks but will allow operation up to 1100 C.

  14. Iris Cryptography for Security Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajith, Srighakollapu; Balaji Ganesh Kumar, M.; Latha, S.; Samiappan, Dhanalakshmi; Muthu, P.

    2018-04-01

    In today's world, the security became the major issue to every human being. A major issue is hacking as hackers are everywhere, as the technology was developed still there are many issues where the technology fails to meet the security. Engineers, scientists were discovering the new products for security purpose as biometrics sensors like face recognition, pattern recognition, gesture recognition, voice authentication etcetera. But these devices fail to reach the expected results. In this work, we are going to present an approach to generate a unique secure key using the iris template. Here the iris templates are processed using the well-defined processing techniques. Using the encryption and decryption process they are stored, traversed and utilized. As of the work, we can conclude that the iris cryptography gives us the expected results for securing the data from eavesdroppers.

  15. Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is an important body fluid for diagnostic purposes. Glycoproteins, glucose, steroids, DNA, and other molecules of diagnostic value are found in saliva. It is easier to collect as compared to blood or urine. Unfortunately, saliva also contains large numbers of bacteria that can release enzymes, which can degrade proteins and nucleic acids. These degradative enzymes destroy or reduce saliva s diagnostic value. This innovation describes the formulation of a chemical preservative that prevents microbial growth and inactivates the degradative enzymes. This extends the time that saliva can be stored or transported without losing its diagnostic value. Multiple samples of saliva can be collected if needed without causing discomfort to the subject and it does not require any special facilities to handle after it is collected.

  16. 12 CFR 41.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FAIR CREDIT REPORTING General Provisions § 41.1 Purpose. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this part is to establish standards for national banks regarding consumer report information. In addition, the purpose of this part is to specify the extent to which...

  17. 32 CFR 74.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DOCTORS OF OSTEOPATHY AS MEDICAL OFFICERS § 74.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to implement the provisions of Pub. L. 763, 84th Congress (70 Stat. 608), relating to the appointment of doctors of osteopathy...

  18. 49 CFR 541.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD § 541.2 Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to reduce the incidence of motor vehicle thefts by facilitating the tracing and recovery of parts from stolen vehicles. ...

  19. 24 CFR 51.200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Conventional Fuels or Chemicals of an Explosive or Flammable Nature § 51.200 Purpose. The purpose of this... store, handle, or process hazardous substances; (b) Alert those responsible for the siting of HUD...

  20. 14 CFR 1201.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INFORMATION Introduction § 1201.101 Purpose. It is the purpose of the National Aeronautics and Space... activities peculiar to or primarily associated with the development of weapons systems, military operations...

  1. 5 CFR 582.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the United States Postal Service, the Postal Rate Commission, and the General Accounting Office. ... FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' PAY Purpose, Definitions, and Exclusions § 582.101 Purpose. Section 5520a of title 5 of...

  2. 15 CFR 990.40 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Preassessment Phase § 990.40 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to provide a...

  3. 15 CFR 990.60 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Implementation Phase § 990.60 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to...

  4. Mesquite bean and cassava leaf bran in diets for juvenile Nile tilapia kept in water with salinity Farelos da vagem da algaroba e da folha da mandioca em rações para juvenis de tilápia do Nilo mantidos em água salobra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Sérgio Oliveira Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It was evaluated the inclusion of the mesquite bean (Prosopis juliflora and cassava leaf bran (Manihot esculenta in diets for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus (2.89±0.43g. 225 fish were used, distributed in 15 tanks (120L in a completely randomized design in a 2x2 factorial design, two sources and three levels of bran (10 and 20%, and a control treatment free of by-products (n=3. After 60 days, it was evaluated the growth performance (daily feed intake, daily weight gain, feed conversion and survival rate and corporal composition of fish. The performance and corporal composition, except the crude protein content, were not affected by the source or level of bran inclusion. The brans evaluated may be applicable in diets of Nile tilapia including up to 20% without decreasing performance.Avaliou-se a inclusão dos farelos da vagem da algaroba (Prosopis juliflora e folha da mandioca (Manihot esculenta em rações para tilápia do Nilo (Oreochromis niloticus (2,89±0,43g. Foram utilizados 225 peixes, distribuídos em 15 tanques (120L, em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, em esquema fatorial 2x2, duas fontes e dois níveis de farelo (10 e 20%, além de um tratamento controle isento dos coprodutos (n=3. Ao final de 60 dias, foram avaliados o desempenho zootécnico (consumo de ração, ganho de peso, conversão alimentar aparente e taxa de sobrevivência e a composição corporal dos peixes. O desempenho zootécnico e a composição corporal, exceto quanto ao teor de proteína bruta, não foram afetados pela fonte ou nível de inclusão do farelo. Os farelos estudados podem ser utilizados em rações de tilápias do Nilo até 20% de inclusão, sem comprometer o desempenho zootécnico.

  5. 33 CFR 151.1000 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 151.1000 Section 151.1000 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION... Transportation of Municipal and Commercial Waste § 151.1000 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to implement...

  6. 45 CFR 99.24 - Evidentiary purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evidentiary purpose. 99.24 Section 99.24 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Hearing Procedures § 99.24 Evidentiary purpose. The purpose of the...

  7. 28 CFR 23.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 23.1 Section 23.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL INTELLIGENCE SYSTEMS OPERATING POLICIES § 23.1 Purpose. The purpose...-647), are utilized in conformance with the privacy and constitutional rights of individuals. ...

  8. 10 CFR 205.350 - General purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General purpose. 205.350 Section 205.350 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Electric Power System Permits and Reports....350 General purpose. The purpose of this rule is to establish a procedure for the Office of...

  9. 12 CFR 1703.31 - General purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General purposes. 1703.31 Section 1703.31 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN... Legal Proceedings in Which OFHEO Is Not a Named Party § 1703.31 General purposes. The purposes of this...

  10. 5 CFR 211.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 211.101 Section 211.101 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS VETERAN PREFERENCE § 211.101 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to define veterans' preference and the administration of preference...

  11. 23 CFR 710.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 710.101 Section 710.101 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY AND REAL ESTATE General § 710.101 Purpose. The primary purpose of the requirements in this part is to ensure the...

  12. 23 CFR 710.701 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 710.701 Section 710.701 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY AND REAL ESTATE Concession Agreements § 710.701 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe the standards...

  13. 12 CFR 408.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 408.2 Section 408.2 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES PROCEDURES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT General § 408.2 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to establish procedures which supplement the...

  14. 45 CFR 2400.1 - Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purposes. 2400.1 Section 2400.1 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) JAMES MADISON MEMORIAL FELLOWSHIP FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS General § 2400.1 Purposes. (a) The purposes of the James Madison Memorial Fellowship...

  15. 7 CFR 1980.310 - Loan purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Loan purposes. 1980.310 Section 1980.310 Agriculture... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Rural Housing Loans § 1980.310 Loan purposes. The purpose of a loan guaranteed... applicant as a primary residence. The loan may be to purchase a new dwelling or an existing dwelling. The...

  16. 7 CFR 762.121 - Loan purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan purposes. 762.121 Section 762.121 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS GUARANTEED FARM LOANS § 762.121 Loan purposes. (a) Operating Loan purposes. (1) Loan... the need to refinance; (viii) Payment of loan closing costs; (ix) Payment of costs associated with...

  17. 24 CFR 963.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by this part is based on the established procurement procedures set forth in 24 CFR 85.36, with... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 963.1 Section 963.1... HOUSING-CONTRACTING WITH RESIDENT-OWNED BUSINESSES General § 963.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to...

  18. 29 CFR 215.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 215.1 Section 215.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GUIDELINES, SECTION 5333(b), FEDERAL TRANSIT LAW § 215.1 Purpose. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide information concerning the...

  19. 34 CFR 104.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 104.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to effectuate section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 104.1 Section 104.1 Education Regulations of...

  20. 45 CFR 605.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 605.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to effectuate section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 605.1 Section 605.1 Public Welfare...

  1. 45 CFR 1232.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... NONDISCRIMINATION ON BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 1232.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to effectuate section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 1232.1 Section 1232.1 Public Welfare...

  2. 29 CFR 32.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 32.1 Purpose. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits... purpose of this part is to implement section 504 with respect to receiving Federal financial assistance... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose. 32.1 Section 32.1 Labor Office of the Secretary of...

  3. 7 CFR 15b.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 15b.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to implement... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 15b.1 Section 15b.1 Agriculture Office of the... receiving Federal financial assistance. ...

  4. 12 CFR 1806.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1806.100 Section 1806.100 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM General Provisions § 1806.100 Purpose. The purpose of the Bank Enterprise Award Program is...

  5. 33 CFR 135.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OFFSHORE OIL POLLUTION COMPENSATION FUND Levy of Fees § 135.101 Purpose. (a) The purpose of this subpart is to state the general requirements concerning the levy of fees. ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 135.101 Section 135.101...

  6. 49 CFR 22.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 22.1 Section 22.1 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) General § 22.1 Purpose. The purpose of the DOT OSDBU STLP is to provide financial assistance in the form of short-term loans from...

  7. 28 CFR 42.501 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 General Provisions § 42.501 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 42.501 Section 42.501 Judicial... basis of handicap in any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. ...

  8. 12 CFR 1805.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1805.100 Section 1805.100 Banks and Banking COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM General Provisions § 1805.100 Purpose. The purpose of the Community...

  9. 41 CFR 101-6.202 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FEDERAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 6-MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS 6.2-Nondiscrimination in Programs Receiving Federal Financial Assistance § 101-6.202 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose. 101-6.202...

  10. 49 CFR 604.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE General provisions. § 604.1 Purpose. (a) The purpose of this part is to implement... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 604.1 Section 604.1 Transportation Other... recipients of Federal financial assistance under the Federal Transit Laws. (b) This subpart specifies which...

  11. 22 CFR 142.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 142.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 142.1 Section 142.1 Foreign Relations... the basis of handicap in any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. ...

  12. 45 CFR 1170.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ACTIVITIES General Provisions § 1170.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to implement section 504 of the... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 1170.1 Section 1170.1 Public Welfare... or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. ...

  13. 22 CFR 217.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 217.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 217.1 Section 217.1 Foreign Relations... the basis of handicap in any program or activity within the United States receiving Federal financial...

  14. 49 CFR 27.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 27.1 Section 27.1 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General § 27.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to...

  15. 49 CFR 28.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 28.101 Section 28.101 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION § 28.101 Purpose. The purpose of this...

  16. Development of a General Purpose Gamification Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Vea, Eivind

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the design and implementation of a general purpose gamification framework developed in JavaScript on the Metor platform. Gamification is described as the use of game elements in none-game contexts. The purpose is to encourage and change user behaviour. Examples of existing gamification use cases and frameworks are described. A demo game shows how a general purpose framework can be used.

  17. Purpose and Meaning, Ethnic Identity, and

    OpenAIRE

    Kiang, Lisa; Fuligni, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose and meaning are primary facets of eudaimonic well-being, yet are understudied in adolescent development. Using data from 579 adolescents from Latin American, Asian, and European backgrounds, demographic differences in purpose and meaning, links with psychological and academic adjustment, links with ethnic identity, and the mediating role of purpose and meaning in associations between ethnic identity and adjustment were examined. Although no generational or gender differences in purpos...

  18. 24 CFR 92.600 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.600 Purpose. This subpart describes the requirements for the HOME Program American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI). Through the...

  19. 5 CFR 2472.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AGENCY DETERMINATIONS NOT TO ESTABLISH OR TO TERMINATE FLEXIBLE OR COMPRESSED WORK SCHEDULES Purpose and... determinations not to establish or to terminate flexible and compressed work schedules. ...

  20. 12 CFR 4.61 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 4.61 Section 4.61 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS, AVAILABILITY AND RELEASE...; Contracting for Goods and Services § 4.61 Purpose. Pursuant to the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery...

  1. 28 CFR 93.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 93.1 Section 93.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROVISIONS IMPLEMENTING THE VIOLENT CRIME CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 Drug Courts § 93.1 Purpose. This part sets forth requirements and procedures to ensure...

  2. 36 CFR 219.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... System Land and Resource Management Planning Purpose and Principles § 219.1 Purpose. (a) Land and... management of these lands. (3) Sustainability, composed of interdependent ecological, social, and economic elements, embodies the principles of multiple-use and sustained-yield without impairment to the...

  3. 16 CFR 1115.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SUBSTANTIAL PRODUCT HAZARD REPORTS General Interpretation § 1115.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part 1115 is to set forth the Consumer Product Safety Commission's (Commission's) interpretation of the reporting requirements imposed on...

  4. 7 CFR 3052.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 3052.100 Section 3052.100 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS General § 3052.100 Purpose. This...

  5. 28 CFR 49.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 49.1 Section 49.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) ANTITRUST CIVIL PROCESS ACT § 49.1 Purpose. The regulations in... the Antitrust Civil Process Act, as amended (15 U.S.C. 1313(c)). The terms used in this part shall be...

  6. 23 CFR 1313.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INCENTIVE GRANT CRITERIA FOR ALCOHOL-IMPAIRED DRIVING PREVENTION PROGRAMS § 1313.2 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to encourage States to adopt and implement effective programs to reduce traffic safety problems resulting from individuals driving motor...

  7. 28 CFR 31.500 - Program purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... prosecutors to address drug, gang, and youth violence more effectively; (f) Program purpose no. 6: Providing... sharing programs that enable the juvenile and criminal justice system, schools, and social services... treatment of juveniles who repeatedly commit serious delinquent or criminal acts; (k) Program purpose no. 11...

  8. 29 CFR 99.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose. 99.100 Section 99.100 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS General § 99.100 Purpose. This part sets forth standards for obtaining consistency and uniformity among Federal agencies for the...

  9. 47 CFR 400.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 400.1 Section 400.1 Telecommunication NATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E-911 GRANT PROGRAM § 400.1 Purpose. This part...

  10. 28 CFR 570.20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., halfway house, restitution center, mental health facility, alcohol or drug rehabilitation center, or other... Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS AND RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Pre-Release Community Confinement § 570.20 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to provide the procedures...

  11. 18 CFR 284.261 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Emergency Natural Gas Sale, Transportation, and Exchange Transactions § 284.261 Purpose. This subpart... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 284.261 Section 284.261 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  12. 6 CFR 25.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 25.1 Section 25.1 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY REGULATIONS TO SUPPORT ANTI-TERRORISM BY FOSTERING EFFECTIVE TECHNOLOGIES § 25.1 Purpose. This part implements the Support Anti-terrorism by Fostering...

  13. 7 CFR 3430.201 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Specialty Crop Research Initiative § 3430.201 Purpose. (a) Focus areas. The purpose of this program is to address the critical needs of the specialty crop industry by developing and disseminating science-based tools to address needs of specific crops and their regions...

  14. 22 CFR 226.70 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 226.70 Section 226.70 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS After-the-Award Requirements § 226.70 Purpose. Sections 226.71 through 226.73 contain closeout...

  15. 22 CFR 226.10 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 226.10 Section 226.10 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-award Requirements § 226.10 Purpose. Sections 226.11 through 226.17 prescribe forms and...

  16. Youth Purpose Worldwide: A Tapestry of Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Seana

    2017-01-01

    Interest in youth purpose is growing among scholars around the world. With globalization, better understanding of life purposes in different countries becomes more important as this generation's youth are influenced by ideas and events anywhere. This special issue contributes to this inclusive, worldwide frame of mind by showcasing work done…

  17. 32 CFR 644.429 - Wildlife purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Wildlife purposes. 644.429 Section 644.429... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.429 Wildlife... for wildlife conservation purposes by the agency of the state exercising administration over the...

  18. 19 CFR 212.01 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 212.01 Section 212.01 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT General Provisions § 212.01 Purpose. (a) The Equal Access to...

  19. 7 CFR 254.1 - General purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General purpose. 254.1 Section 254.1 Agriculture... GENERAL REGULATIONS AND POLICIES-FOOD DISTRIBUTION ADMINISTRATION OF THE FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM FOR INDIAN HOUSEHOLDS IN OKLAHOMA § 254.1 General purpose. This part sets the requirement under which...

  20. 22 CFR 309.1 - General purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true General purpose. 309.1 Section 309.1 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.1 General purpose. This part prescribes the procedures to be used by the United States Peace Corps (Peace Corps) in the collection and/or disposal of non...

  1. 24 CFR 960.701 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF..., AND OCCUPANCY OF, PUBLIC HOUSING Pet Ownership in Public Housing § 960.701 Purpose. The purpose of.... 1437z-3), to permit pet ownership by residents of public housing, subject to compliance with reasonable...

  2. A new multi-purpose NIM module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Binjiang; Wang Congrong; Du Chunxiang.

    1992-01-01

    The authors briefly state the function, character and main technique performance of a new multi-purpose NIM interposition (NI01) developed recently. This interposition uses 8031 single-chip microprocessors as the kernel and is multi-purpose, reliable and convenient. Especially, it is suitable for training teaching and scientific researching

  3. 22 CFR 1203.735-101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONDUCT General Provisions § 1203.735-101 Purpose. The maintenance of the highest standards of honesty... reporting employment and financial interests. Note: These regulations are codified in State 3 FAM 620, AID... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Purpose. 1203.735-101 Section 1203.735-101...

  4. 33 CFR 155.1010 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR VESSELS Tank Vessel Response Plans for Oil § 155.1010 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to establish requirements for oil spill response plans for certain vessels. The planning criteria in this subpart are intended for use in response...

  5. 44 CFR 206.31 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 206.31 Section 206.31 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... purpose of this subpart is to describe the process leading to a Presidential declaration of a major...

  6. 12 CFR 1730.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND SOUNDNESS DISCLOSURE OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION § 1730.1 Purpose. (a) The purpose of this part is to require the Enterprises to prepare and submit financial and other disclosures as specified... soundness mandate to regulate the Enterprises, including conducting examinations, requiring reports and...

  7. 44 CFR 17.600 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 17.600 Section 17.600 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) § 17.600 Purpose. (a) The...

  8. 2 CFR 215.10 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-110) Pre-Award Requirements § 215.10 Purpose. Sections 215.11 through 215.17... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 215.10 Section 215.10 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...

  9. 32 CFR 67.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR APPOINTMENT OF RESERVE COMPONENT OFFICERS TO A GRADE ABOVE FIRST LIEUTENANT OR LIEUTENANT (JUNIOR GRADE) § 67.1 Purpose. This part provides guidance for implementing policy, assigns... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 67.1 Section 67.1 National Defense...

  10. 2 CFR 215.70 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-110) After-the-Award Requirements § 215.70 Purpose. Sections 215.71 through 215.73... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 215.70 Section 215.70 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE...

  11. 7 CFR 1775.66 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1775.66 Section 1775.66 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS Solid Waste Management Grants § 1775.66 Purpose. Grants may be made...) Provide technical assistance and/or training to reduce the solid waste stream through reduction, recycling...

  12. 49 CFR 543.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION EXEMPTION FROM VEHICLE THEFT PREVENTION STANDARD § 543.2 Purpose. The purpose of... passenger motor vehicles to obtain an exemption from the parts-marking requirements of the vehicle theft... motor vehicle theft as compliance with the parts-marking requirements. This part also provides the...

  13. 49 CFR 591.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) IMPORTATION OF VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT SUBJECT TO FEDERAL SAFETY, BUMPER AND THEFT PREVENTION STANDARDS § 591.2 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to ensure that motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment permanently imported into the United States conform with theft...

  14. 12 CFR 410.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 410.101 Section 410.101 Banks and Banking EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES ENFORCEMENT OF NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED BY EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES § 410.101 Purpose...

  15. 7 CFR 1703.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RURAL DEVELOPMENT Distance Learning and Telemedicine Loan and Grant Program-General § 1703.100 Purpose. The purpose of the Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) Loan and Grant Program is to encourage and... telecommunications, computer networks, and related advanced technologies by students, teachers, medical professionals...

  16. 7 CFR 771.5 - Loan purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan purposes. 771.5 Section 771.5 Agriculture... SPECIAL PROGRAMS BOLL WEEVIL ERADICATION LOAN PROGRAM § 771.5 Loan purposes. (a) Loan funds may be used..., travel and office operations; (3) Salaries and benefits. (b) Loan funds may not be used to pay expenses...

  17. 32 CFR 634.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose. 634.1 Section 634.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS MOTOR VEHICLE TRAFFIC SUPERVISION Introduction § 634.1 Purpose. (a) This subpart establishes policy, responsibilities, and procedures for...

  18. 7 CFR 1780.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) WATER AND WASTE LOANS AND GRANTS General Policies and Requirements § 1780.2 Purpose. Provide loan and grant funds for water and waste projects serving the most financially needy communities. Financial... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1780.2 Section 1780.2 Agriculture...

  19. 10 CFR 140.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 140.1 Section 140.1 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 140.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are issued to provide appropriate procedures and requirements for...

  20. 7 CFR 550.19 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY FOR NON-ASSISTANCE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS Management of Agreements Financial Management § 550.19 Purpose. Sections 550.20 through 550.25 of this subpart prescribe standards for financial... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 550.19 Section 550.19 Agriculture Regulations...

  1. 45 CFR 84.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 84.1 Section 84.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 84.1 Purpose. The...

  2. 15 CFR 8b.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of handicap in any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. The purpose of this... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 8b.1 Section 8b.1 Commerce... HANDICAPPED IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS OPERATED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE General Provisions § 8b.1...

  3. 14 CFR 1251.100 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... General Provisions § 1251.100 Purpose. This part effectuates section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 1251.100 Section 1251.100... receiving Federal financial assistance. ...

  4. 48 CFR 9904.402-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.402-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.402-20 Purpose. The purpose of this standard is to require that...

  5. 48 CFR 9904.403-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.403-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.403-20 Purpose. (a) The purpose of this Cost Accounting Standard is...

  6. 48 CFR 9904.410-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.410-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.410-20 Purpose. The purpose of this Cost Accounting Standard is to...

  7. 48 CFR 9904.408-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.408-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.408-20 Purpose. The purpose of this Standard is to improve, and...

  8. 48 CFR 9904.404.20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.404.20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.404.20 Purpose. This Standard requires that, for purposes of cost...

  9. 48 CFR 9904.406-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.406-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.406-20 Purpose. The purpose of this Cost Accounting Standard is to...

  10. 48 CFR 9904.405-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.405-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.405-20 Purpose. (a) The purpose of this Cost Accounting Standard is...

  11. 48 CFR 9904.409-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.409-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.409-20 Purpose. The purpose of this Standard is to provide criteria...

  12. 48 CFR 9904.401-20 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 9904.401-20 Federal Acquisition Regulations System COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD, OFFICE OF FEDERAL PROCUREMENT POLICY, OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET PROCUREMENT PRACTICES AND COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 9904.401-20 Purpose. The purpose of this Cost Accounting Standard is to...

  13. 15 CFR 806.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ANALYSIS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to... concerning direct investment as required by, or provided for in, the International Investment Survey Act of... investment, including direct investment, and to do so with a minimum of burden on respondents and with no...

  14. 12 CFR 998.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... institutions who raise funds in the global debt markets. ... EQUITY SECURITIES § 998.1 Purpose. The purposes of this part are to enhance the quality of the financial... disclosures from Bank to Bank, to provide a greater degree of transparency regarding the financial condition...

  15. 15 CFR 990.50 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.50 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to provide... that information to determine the need for and scale of restoration actions (restoration selection). ...

  16. 23 CFR 972.200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal land management agency, to the extent appropriate, to develop by rule safety, bridge, pavement, and congestion management systems for roads funded under the FLHP. ... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Fish and Wildlife Service Management Systems § 972.200 Purpose. The purpose of this...

  17. 23 CFR 973.200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appropriate, to develop by rule safety, bridge, pavement, and congestion management systems for roads funded... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS PERTAINING... Management Systems § 973.200 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to implement 23 U.S.C. 204 which...

  18. 23 CFR 971.200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... management agency, to the extent appropriate, to develop by rule safety, bridge, pavement, and congestion... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL LANDS HIGHWAYS FOREST SERVICE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Forest Highway Program Management Systems § 971.200 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to...

  19. 23 CFR 970.200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Federal land management agency, to the extent appropriate, to develop by rule safety, bridge, pavement, and congestion management systems for roads funded under the FLHP. These management systems serve to... MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS National Park Service Management Systems § 970.200 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is...

  20. 23 CFR 500.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Management Systems § 500.101 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to implement... highway pavement of Federal-aid highways (PMS), bridges on and off Federal-aid highways (BMS), highway...

  1. 10 CFR 712.31 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 712.31 Section 712.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HUMAN RELIABILITY PROGRAM Medical Standards § 712.31 Purpose. The standards and procedures set forth in... impairment in reliability; (b) Facilitate the early diagnosis and treatment of disease or impairment and...

  2. The Influence of Chinese College Teachers' Competence for Purpose Support on Students' Purpose Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei; Lin, Shan; Mariano, Jenni Menon

    2016-01-01

    Research studies agree on the role formal education can play in facilitating students building a sense of life purpose. This paper examined the influence of Chinese college students' perceived competence of their teachers for supporting purpose on these same college students' purpose status. Portions of the Revised Youth Purpose Survey were…

  3. Current Trends in Korean Adolescents’ Social Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Jongho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the research presented we investigated the features of Korean adolescents’ social purpose as compared with other life goals in terms of different aspects of psychological well-being (study 1. We also examine the perceptions of high achieving Korean adolescents on social purpose and factors affecting it (study 2.The results of study 1 showed that the pursuit of social purpose significantly predicted psychological well-being compared to the other two life goals. Results of study 2 showed Korean adolescents value and pursue social purpose as a life goal. They explicitly accepted their social responsibility to serve their country in line with idyllic Confucianism values and Collectivistic roles. However, further analysis revealed that they had implicitly pursued individualistic desires of materialistic wealth and fame in parallel with their explicit social purpose. Implications of the results are discussed from the socio-cultural perspective on social purpose in regards to how to understand the features of social purpose that Korean adolescents have and how to foster its development.

  4. Valores energéticos e efeitos da inclusão da farinha integral da vagem de algaroba (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. em rações de poedeiras comerciais Energy values and effects of integral mesquite pods (Prosopis juliflora (Sw. D.C. meal inclusion in commercial laying hens diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Humberto Vilar da Silva

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Um ensaio de metabolismo foi realizado para determinar os valores de EMV e EMVn da farinha integral de vagem de algaroba (FVA com galos cecectomizados, utilizando o método Sibbald. Um experimento de desempenho foi realizado para avaliar os efeitos da inclusão da FVA em níveis de 0; 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; e 30% em rações peletizada e farelada para poedeiras comerciais. No experimento 1, foram obtidos valores de EMV e EMVn de 2819 e 2806 kcal, respectivamente, enquanto a FVA apresentou cinco vezes mais celulose e quatro vezes mais lignina em comparação com o milho. No experimento 2, verificou-se que a peletização aumentou o peso vivo, peso dos ovos e da clara e a porcentagem de clara e reduziu a porcentagem de gema. O nível de 30% da FVA reduziu o peso e a massa de ovos e piorou a conversão alimentar, em comparação ao tratamento controle. Houve efeito quadrático do nível da FVA (como efeito principal sobre o consumo de ração, a produção de ovos, massa de ovos, conversão alimentar por massa e porcentagens de casca, clara e gema. O consumo da FVA cresceu linearmente nas rações peletizada e farelada em resposta ao seu aumento na ração. A inclusão da FVA até 13,6%, em substituição ao milho, em rações isoprotéicas e isoenergéticas não afetou adversamente o desempenho de poedeiras comerciais.An experiment was carried out to determine TME and TMEn values of integral mesquite pods meal (MPM in cecectomized cockerels by Sibbald method. A second experiment was conducted to examine the effects of MPM inclusion (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% in pelleted and mashed diets on laying hens performance. In the experiment 1, values of TME and TMEn in raw MPM were 2819 and 2806 kcal/kg, respectively, while cellulose and lignin contents were five- and four-fold higher than in corn. Results of experiment 2 showed that pelleting increased live weight, egg and albumen weight and percentage of albumen, and reduced yolk percentage. The 30% MPM

  5. Farelo da vagem de algaroba associado a níveis de ureia na alimentação de ovinos: balanço de nitrogênio, N-ureico no plasma e parâmetros ruminais=Mesquite pod meal associated with levels of urea on feeding sheep: nitrogen balance, plasma urea-N and ruminal parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gonsalves Neto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar os efeitos da inclusão de ureia em dietas contendo farelo da vagem de algaroba sobre o balanço de nitrogênio, N-ureico no plasma e parâmetros ruminais em ovinos. Foram utilizados oito animais, machos castrados, com peso médio de 33,5 kg, distribuídos em dois quadrados latinos 4 x 4. Os tratamentos constituíram da inclusão de níveis de ureia na dieta, sendo: 0; 0,5; 1,0 e 1,5% da MS total. A dieta foi fornecida como dieta total na relação volumoso:concentrado de 40:60 com base na MS total da dieta. Foi realizada a coleta total de urina e fezes e determinada a excreção de nitrogênio. Foi coletado sangue, seguido com a extração do plasma e determinação do N-ureico. Para avaliação do pH e N-amoniacal no líquido ruminal foram utilizados quatro animais fistulados no rúmen. A ingestão de N (31,68 g dia-1 e perdas vias fecal (7,94 g dia-1 e urinária (9,95 g dia-1 não sofreram alterações. As concentrações de N-amoniacal e N-ureico no plasma aumentaram de forma linear. O pH ruminal foi semelhante entre os tratamentos. A inclusão de ureia não influencia o balanço de nitrogênio, porém eleva as concentrações de N-amoniacal no rúmen e N-ureico no plasma podendo influenciar o gasto de energia no organismo.The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of including urea in diets containing mesquite pod meal on nitrogen balance, plasma urea-N and ruminal parameters. Eight gelded males, with mean weight of 33.5 kg, were divided into two 4 x 4 Latin squares. Treatments consisted of following urea levels in diet: 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of total dry matter. The diet was provided as total diet a 40:60 forage: concentrate ratio based on total diet DM. Total urine and feces were collected and nitrogen excretion was determined. Blood was collected, followed by plasma extraction and quantification of urea nitrogen. To evaluate pH and ammonia-N in rumen fluid, four rumen fistulated animals were

  6. 32 CFR 845.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EXPENSES IN FOREIGN TRIBUNALS § 845.1 Purpose. This part establishes criteria and assigns responsibility... the Armed Forces, civilian personnel and dependents. Payment of fines is not authorized hereunder. ...

  7. 32 CFR 734.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CIVILIAN PERSONNEL FOR COLLECTION OF CHILD SUPPORT AND ALIMONY § 734.1 Purpose. This part prescribes responsibilities and procedures applicable in the Department of the Navy when processsing and honoring legal...

  8. 23 CFR 650.401 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS BRIDGES, STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Highway Bridge Replacement and Rehabilitation Program § 650.401 Purpose. The... Bridge Replacement and Rehabilitation Program in accordance with 23 U.S.C. 144. ...

  9. 40 CFR 1500.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... act according to the letter and spirit of the Act. The regulations that follow implement section 102(2). Their purpose is to tell federal agencies what they must do to comply with the procedures and achieve...

  10. 23 CFR 230.201 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS EXTERNAL PROGRAMS Supportive Services for Minority, Disadvantaged, and Women Business Enterprises § 230.201 Purpose. To prescribe the... programs for minority, disadvantaged, and women business enterprises. ...

  11. 49 CFR 9.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... litigants; (4) Avoid spending the time and money of the United States for private purposes; and (5) To... exception may be granted only when the deviation will not interfere with matters of operational or military...

  12. 42 CFR 456.500 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.500 Purpose. For hospitals and mental hospitals, this subpart— (a...

  13. Course evaluation for the purpose of development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine; Kreiner, Svend

    2017-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate whether it would be useful for development purposes to include a survey of learning styles among student and teachers as part of the evaluation of a graduate course in statistics in a Public Health Programme, and to compare the learning styles of students and lectur......The purpose was to investigate whether it would be useful for development purposes to include a survey of learning styles among student and teachers as part of the evaluation of a graduate course in statistics in a Public Health Programme, and to compare the learning styles of students...... different styles. Results showed differences between the learning styles of teachers and students, and identified two areas for course development: the design of exercises with regard to the level of abstraction and concreteness; the incompatibility of the relatively complex ways of thinking embedded...

  14. 38 CFR 61.0 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROVIDERS GRANT AND PER DIEM PROGRAM § 61.0 Purpose. This part implements the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program which consists of the following components: capital grants, per diem, special...

  15. Selected Special-Purpose Telecommunications Circuits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimble, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    We are providing this memorandum report for your information and use. This report is the first of three reports resulting from the review of requirements for special-purpose voice circuits as part of Project...

  16. Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2015-01-01

    The term “Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration” indicates that the approach used for building land administration systems in less developed countries should be flexible and focused on serving the purpose of the systems (such as providing security of tenure and control of land use) rather than...... focusing on top-end technical solutions and high accuracy surveys. Of course, such flexibility allows for land administration systems to be incrementally improved over time. This paper unfolds the Fit-For-Purpose concept by analyzing the three core components: The spatial framework (large scale land parcel...... mapping) should be provided using affordable modern technologies such aerial imageries rather than field surveys. The legal framework must support both legal and social tenure, and the regulations must be designed along administrative rather than judicial lines. The fit-for-purpose approach must...

  17. 32 CFR 352a.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE (DFAS) § 352a.1 Purpose. Pursuant to the authority vested in the... Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) as an Agency of the Department of Defense with responsibilities...

  18. 45 CFR 1643.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., EUTHANASIA, AND MERCY KILLING § 1643.1 Purpose. This part is intended to ensure that recipients do not use any LSC funds for any assisted suicide, euthanasia or mercy killing activities prohibited by this part. ...

  19. 22 CFR 139.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Act of 1998 (the “IPPCTPA”), Public Law 105-319, 112 Stat. 3013. The purpose of the IPPCTPA is to... governmental authorities in the Republic of Ireland and in Northern Ireland to further the goals of the IPPCTPA...

  20. 22 CFR 62.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended, 8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(J). (b) The Secretary of State of the... assistance of third parties. The purpose of the Program is to provide foreign nationals with opportunities to...

  1. 32 CFR 651.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Major Automated Information Systems). (e) This part applies to actions of the Active Army and Army... ANALYSIS OF ARMY ACTIONS (AR 200-2) Introduction § 651.1 Purpose. (a) This part implements the National...

  2. 33 CFR 133.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; STATE ACCESS § 133.1 Purpose. This... trust Fund (the Fund) for oil pollution removal costs under section 1012(d)(1) of the Oil Pollution Act...

  3. 40 CFR 97.301 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 97.301 Section 97.301 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL NOX... and nitrogen oxides. ...

  4. 12 CFR 1710.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... minimum standards with respect to the corporate governance practices and procedures of the Enterprises. ... AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE General § 1710.1 Purpose. OFHEO is responsible under the Federal...

  5. 48 CFR 904.7200 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Affairs 904.7200 Purpose. It is the policy of the Department of Energy to provide to the public... information with the cognizant contracting officer and appropriate DOE Public Affairs personnel. ...

  6. General purpose code for Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcke, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    A general-purpose computer called MONTHY has been written to perform Monte Carlo simulations of physical systems. To achieve a high degree of flexibility the code is organized like a general purpose computer, operating on a vector describing the time dependent state of the system under simulation. The instruction set of the computer is defined by the user and is therefore adaptable to the particular problem studied. The organization of MONTHY allows iterative and conditional execution of operations

  7. Designing a Science Curriculum Fit for Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The science curriculum to age 16 should be judged on how well it meets the needs of students who progress to A-level science courses and those (a larger number) who do not. To address the diversity of students' interests and aspirations, we need a clear view of the purposes of science education rooted in a view of the purposes of education itself.…

  8. Impact of Prosopis (mesquite) invasion and clearing on vegetation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of Prosopis invasion and clearing on vegetation species composition and diversity (alien and indigenous species richness and cover) in Nama-Karoo rangeland on two sheep farms in the Beaufort ... Keywords: invasive plants – exotic, Nama-Karoo, plant community ecology, rehabilitation, semi-arid ...

  9. Teaching writing in English for medical purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckles, Nancy María

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes teaching-learning process shortcomings in the English for Medical Purposes, a subject of fourth-year medical student’s curriculum at the medical university of Camagüey. Its main objective is aimed at the elaboration of a Methodological Alternative distinguished by the use of the Project Method approach to favour the development of writing skills in English. This Methodological Alternative is characterized by being flexible, pertinent and able to develop and integrate knowledge of the English language and medicine. It has two main stages: Socio-affective dynamics for the production of written texts in English for medical purposes and the dynamics for the construction of written texts in English for medical purposes. The results of considering expertise’s’ opinion revealed the feasibility of the proposal as a fostering tool for teaching writing in medical sciences.

  10. Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; McLaren, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This paper looks at implementing Fit-For-Purpose land administration solutions at county level. This will require a country specific strategy drawing from the recent GLTN publication on “Fit-For-Purpose Land Administration – Guiding Principles for Country Implementation”. The Fit...... administration; 4) Designing the country specific FFP spatial / legal / institutional frameworks; 5) Capacity development; 6) Country specific instruction manuals; and 7) Economic benefits analysis. Finally, the paper presents some experiences and reflections from a case study on implementing the FFP approach...

  11. General-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Noritaka

    1982-01-01

    A new series of diagnostic tables, Model DT-KEL, was developed for general-purpose radiographic and fluoroscopic systems. Through several investigations, the table was so constructed that the basic techniques be general radiography and GI examination, and other techniques be optionally added. The diagnostic tables involve the full series of the type for various purposes and are systematized with the surrounding equipment. A retractable mechanism of grids was adopted first for general use. The fine grids with a density of 57 lines per cm, which was adopted in KEL-2, reduced the X-ray doses by 16 percent. (author)

  12. General purpose computers in real time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biel, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    I see three main trends in the use of general purpose computers in real time. The first is more processing power. The second is the use of higher speed interconnects between computers (allowing more data to be delivered to the processors). The third is the use of larger programs running in the computers. Although there is still work that needs to be done, I believe that all indications are that the online need for general purpose computers should be available for the SCC and LHC machines. 2 figs

  13. Transport and Purpose in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-12-01

    A challenge to a geological, or any scientific, explanation of transport and other fundamental processes of the anthroposphere is the presence of purpose. The proximate force driving the flux of economic goods in a society is clearly physical (e.g., diesel engines), but a higher-level cause or force is human purpose—people want stuff. Large-scale expression of human purpose in the anthroposphere is nonetheless subject to some of the same physical restrictions as apply to physical forcing. Long-distance transport (Haff, 2010) of economic goods in response to human demand, for example, requires a diffusion-to-advection hand-off from producer to transport mode which resembles heat transfer from a thermal boundary layer to a convective roll in a Rayleigh-Benard cell (Haff, 2012) or to the earth's atmosphere. The (inverse) thickness of the boundary layer plays a role analogous to price. However, detailing anthropic mass and energy fluxes even with consideration of human purpose addresses only half the problem of describing transport dynamics in the anthroposphere; this is meant in the same sense that studies of river flow under the influence of gravity address only part of the problem of water transport in the hydrologic cycle. From the point of view of the hydrosphere the purpose of a river is to help maintain hydrospheric function, and from the point of view of the anthroposphere, the purpose of economic flows is not to fulfill human wants but to help maintain anthropospheric function. The role of purpose in the anthroposphere becomes clearer under the (mental) operation of coarse-graining a system, i.e., of spatially decomposing a system according to scale. Self-consistency, or equivalently system longevity, implies the existence of a set of mutual responsibilities and constraints between system and parts. These relationships illustrate the role of purpose as an attribute of complex, steady, dynamical systems, including the anthroposphere. Purpose arises

  14. 21 CFR 814.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 814.2 Section 814.2 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PREMARKET..., Apr. 1, 2010, § 814.2 was revised, effective Aug. 16, 2010. For the convenience of the user, the...

  15. 10 CFR 455.80 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS State Administrative Expenses § 455.80 Purpose. This subpart describes what constitutes a State administrative expense that may receive financial assistance under this...

  16. 13 CFR 400.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 400.1 Section 400.1 Business Credit and Assistance EMERGENCY STEEL GUARANTEE LOAN BOARD EMERGENCY STEEL GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM..., Chapter 1 of Public Law 106-51, 113 Stat. 252, as amended by section 734 of Public Law 106-102, 113 Stat...

  17. 47 CFR 214.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 214.1 Section 214.1 Telecommunication OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL PROCEDURES FOR THE USE AND... provide guidance for the use of the radio spectrum in a period of war, or a threat of war, or a state of...

  18. 32 CFR 552.84 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Purpose. 552.84 Section 552.84 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES... training areas. Uninterrupted military use is vital to maintain and improve the combat readiness of the US...

  19. 28 CFR 522.10 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.10 Purpose. (a) This subpart describes the procedures for federal civil contempt of court commitments (civil contempt commitments) referred to the... to implement civil contempt commitments by making our facilities and resources available. When we...

  20. 32 CFR 112.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN INDEBTEDNESS OF MILITARY PERSONNEL § 112.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Updates DoD policies and assigns responsibilities... U.S.C. 5520a(k). (b) Establishes responsibility for procedures implementing 5 U.S.C. 5520a(k), 15 U...

  1. 32 CFR 247.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE NEWSPAPERS, MAGAZINES AND CIVILIAN ENTERPRISE PUBLICATIONS § 247.1 Purpose. This part implements DoD Directive 5122.10 1 and implements policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures concerning authorized DoD Appropriated Funded (APF) newspapers and magazines, and Civilian Enterprise (CE...

  2. 32 CFR 107.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 107.1 Section 107.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERSONAL SERVICES.... 1091, “Contracts For Direct Health Care Providers,” and assigns responsibility for implementing the...

  3. 32 CFR 104.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL, MILITARY AND CIVILIAN CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT... UNIFORMED SERVICES § 104.1 Purpose. This part: (a) Updates implementation policy, assigns responsibilities... chapter 43 and individuals who apply for uniformed service, of their civilian employment and reemployment...

  4. 32 CFR 155.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 155.1 Section 155.1 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEFENSE INDUSTRIAL PERSONNEL SECURITY... Industrial Personnel Security Clearance Review Program implementing E.O. 10865, as amended. [57 FR 5383, Feb...

  5. 7 CFR 3430.901 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 3430.901 Section 3430.901 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMPETITIVE AND NONCOMPETITIVE NON-FORMULA FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS...

  6. 15 CFR 290.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Technology, as well as criteria for the evaluation of the Centers, throughout the lifecycle of financial... AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NIST EXTRAMURAL PROGRAMS REGIONAL CENTERS FOR THE TRANSFER OF MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY § 290.1 Purpose. This rule provides policy for a program to establish Regional Centers...

  7. 48 CFR 3.701 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Voiding and Rescinding Contracts 3.701 Purpose. This subpart... final conviction for bribery, conflict of interest, disclosure or receipt of contractor bid or proposal information or source selection information in exchange for a thing of value or to give anyone a competitive...

  8. 28 CFR 524.10 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 524.10 Section 524.10 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER... subpart is to explain the Bureau of Prisons (Bureau) process for classifying newly committed inmates and...

  9. 46 CFR 169.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS General Provisions § 169.101 Purpose. The regulations in this part set forth uniform requirements which are suited to the particular characteristics and specialized operations of sailing school vessels as defined in Title 46...

  10. 24 CFR 1007.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or as a result of a lack of access to private financial markets. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 1007.1 Section 1007.1 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF...

  11. 15 CFR 911.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.1 Purpose. These regulations set forth the procedural, informational and technical requirements for use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems (DCS). In... agreement to operate data collection platforms pursuant to these regulations does not affect related...

  12. 36 CFR 62.1 - Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Landmarks Program focuses attention on areas of exceptional natural value to the nation as a whole rather... United States, enhances the scientific and educational values of preserved areas, strengthens public... LANDMARKS PROGRAM § 62.1 Purpose The procedures in this part set forth the processes and criteria for the...

  13. 15 CFR 705.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS EFFECT OF IMPORTED ARTICLES ON THE NATIONAL SECURITY § 705.2 Purpose. These regulations set forth the procedures by which the Department shall commence and conduct an investigation to determine the effect on the national security of...

  14. 29 CFR 34.1 - Purpose; application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Assistance Act of 1974, as amended (38 U.S.C. 4212), the Equal Pay Act of 1963, as amended (29 U.S.C. 206d... Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY REQUIREMENTS OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT OF 1982, AS AMENDED (JTPA) General Provisions § 34.1 Purpose; application. (a...

  15. 29 CFR 1621.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES-THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1621.1 Purpose. The regulations set forth in this part contain the procedures established by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for issuing opinion letters under the Equal Pay Act. ...

  16. 15 CFR 303.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 303.1 Section 303.1 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS WATCHES, WATCH MOVEMENTS AND JEWELRY PROGRAM...

  17. 15 CFR 303.15 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 303.15 Section 303.15 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MISCELLANEOUS REGULATIONS WATCHES, WATCH MOVEMENTS AND...

  18. 50 CFR 453.01 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS ENDANGERED SPECIES EXEMPTION PROCESS ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE § 453.01 Purpose. This part prescribes the procedures to be used by the Endangered Species Committee when examining applications for exemption from section 7(a)(2) of the Endangered Species Act of...

  19. 44 CFR 360.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... intergovernmental endeavor which combines financial and human resources to fill the unique training needs of local... PREPAREDNESS STATE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS FOR TRAINING AND EDUCATION IN COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT § 360.1 Purpose. The Emergency Management Training Program is designed to enhance the States' emergency management...

  20. 7 CFR 1955.101 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Community and Business Programs (C&BP) and Multi-Family Housing (MFH) which will be handled in accordance... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Disposal of Inventory Property § 1955.101 Purpose. This subpart...

  1. 40 CFR 58.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... QUALITY SURVEILLANCE General Provisions § 58.2 Purpose. (a) This part contains requirements for measuring ambient air quality and for reporting ambient air quality data and related information. The monitoring... instruments or instrument probes. (5) Minimum ambient air quality monitoring network requirements used to...

  2. 44 CFR 327.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 327.1 Section 327.1 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS POLICY ON USE OF GOVERNMENT-OWNED INDUSTRIAL PLANT EQUIPMENT BY PRIVATE INDUSTRY (DMO-10A) § 327.1...

  3. 32 CFR 57.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Individualized Educational Programs (IEP). (4) Monitoring of DoD programs providing EIS, special education, and... INTERVENTION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE DOD DEPENDENTS § 57.1 Purpose. This part: (a... with disabilities (birth through 2 years, inclusive) and their families, and special education and...

  4. Doing Mathematics with Purpose: Mathematical Text Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostal, Hannah M.; Robinson, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Mathematical literacy includes learning to read and write different types of mathematical texts as part of purposeful mathematical meaning making. Thus in this article, we describe how learning to read and write mathematical texts (proof text, algorithmic text, algebraic/symbolic text, and visual text) supports the development of students'…

  5. 36 CFR 73.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purpose. 73.1 Section 73.1 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR WORLD HERITAGE... Convention is to enhance worldwide understanding and appreciation of heritage conservation, and to recognize...

  6. 22 CFR 1104.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Purpose. 1104.1 Section 1104.1 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION PROTECTION OF..., located on public lands through permits authorizing excavation and/or removal of archaeological resources...

  7. 22 CFR 1102.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Purpose. 1102.1 Section 1102.1 Foreign Relations INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO, UNITED STATES SECTION FREEDOM OF... implement the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552, as amended on November 21, 1974, by Public...

  8. 22 CFR 61.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 61.1 Section 61.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES WORLD-WIDE FREE FLOW OF AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS § 61.1... formally known as the Agreement for Facilitating the International Circulation of Visual and Auditory...

  9. 22 CFR 231.01 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 231.01 Section 231.01 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT LOAN GUARANTEES ISSUED UNDER THE EMERGENCY WARTIME SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 2003, PUBLIC LAW 108-11-STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS...

  10. 22 CFR 203.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 203.1 Section 203.1 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT REGISTRATION OF PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS (PVOs) § 203.1... enable registered PVOs to make any representation to the public concerning the meaning of being...

  11. 17 CFR 200.550 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 200.550 Section 200.550 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Regulations Pertaining to the Protection of the Environment § 200...

  12. 15 CFR 960.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the foreign policies and international obligations of the United States; (3) Advance and protect U.S... necessary to meet national security, foreign policy and international obligations are made by the... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 960.1 Section 960.1 Commerce...

  13. 7 CFR 1767.11 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., business and affairs of the borrower in accordance with the methods and principles of accounting of this... (CONTINUED) ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS FOR RUS ELECTRIC BORROWERS Uniform System of Accounts § 1767.11 Purpose...A for electric borrowers and by providing accounting methodologies and procedures which are...

  14. 21 CFR 516.2 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... designation of minor use or minor species new animal drugs and associated exclusive marketing rights. ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS NEW ANIMAL DRUGS FOR MINOR USE AND MINOR SPECIES General Provisions § 516.2 Purpose. This...

  15. 5 CFR 9701.401 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., managers, and employees in the implementation and operation of the performance management system; (6) Periodic performance feedback and dialogue among supervisors, managers, and employees throughout the... MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Performance Management § 9701.401 Purpose. (a) This subpart provides for the establishment...

  16. 45 CFR 1620.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PRIORITIES IN USE OF RESOURCES § 1620.1 Purpose. This part is designed to provide guidance to recipients for setting priorities and to ensure that a recipient's governing body adopts written priorities for the types of cases and matters...

  17. 28 CFR 81.11 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CHILD ABUSE AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY REPORTING DESIGNATIONS AND PROCEDURES Child Pornography Reporting Designations and Procedures § 81.11 Purpose. The regulations in this... pornography that are forwarded from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children under the...

  18. 28 CFR 804.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hospitality to support offender and defendant programs, and of equipment and vocational training services to... Administration COURT SERVICES AND OFFENDER SUPERVISION AGENCY FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA ACCEPTANCE OF GIFTS § 804.1 Purpose. By statute, the Director of the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA...

  19. 32 CFR 249.1 - Purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF DoD-RELATED SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL PAPERS AT MEETINGS § 249.1 Purpose. This part amplifies... scientific and technical papers; provides guidance for reviewing and presenting papers containing export... scientific and technical papers; and provides criteria for identifying fundamental research activities...

  20. Evolution of work utilization - multiple purpose works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meclot, B.; Masson, J.; Eon, J.

    1992-01-01

    EDF exploitation of hydraulic resource is mainly for electric purposes, but also for electricity, irrigation, tourism and sport activities (for example: DURANCE and VERDON), electricity and navigation (for example: RHIN), and for providing collectivity needs (new reserves creation, existing barrages improvement, present management adaptation